WorldWideScience

Sample records for density measurements obtained

  1. A laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for obtaining neutral hydrogen densities in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, X.Z.; Yang, T.F.; Chang-Diaz, F.R. [Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The resonance fluorescence of neutral hydrogen illuminated by {ital H}{sub {alpha}} radiation has been used as a technique for the spatially and temporally resolved density measurements of neutral hydrogen in high temperature plasmas, such as in the tokamak and magnetic mirror plasma fusion devices. The fluorescence signal, usually very weak and buried in the background of stray laser light and {ital H}{sub {alpha}} emission, is very difficult to extract and its measurements are inaccurate. This paper discusses the improvement of the signal extraction using two optical path laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) methods. One optical path carries the fluorescence signal and the background (the stray laser light and {ital H}{sub {alpha}} emission), whereas the other path carries only the background signal. By combining these two signals, a clean fluorescence signal can be isolated by subtracting out the background using a differential amplifier. The measurement is obtained instantaneously from these two signals which are taken simultaneously in one pulse rather than being extracted from two separate spectra taken in two sequential pulses (double pulses). This method, therefore, makes a significant improvement on the double pulse technique in terms of the accuracy of the measurement and the time resolution. Using this LIF technique the measurement of the neutral density profile in the exhaust of a tandem mirror plasma propulsion device is obtained and presented. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  2. Mechanical properties of low density polymeric foams obtained from full-field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierron F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory paper presents some preliminary results on the use of fullfield deformation measurements on low density polymeric foams to identify the evolution of Poisson’s ratio with compressive strain. Two types of foams were tested: a standard low density polyurethane foam and an auxetic foam manufactured from a similar precursor. 2D digital image correlation was used to measure the strain field at the specimens surfaces. Then, Poisson’s ratios were identified using a dedicated inverse method called the Virtual Fields Method (VFM and the results compared with the standard approaches. The results illustrate the advantages of the VFM compared to the standard procedure. It was also found that for the standard foam, very strong localization effects resulted in biased Poisson’s ratio evaluation. It was shown that this could be corrected by taking into account these localization effects thanks to the full-field information.

  3. Comparison of high latitude electron density profiles obtained with the GPS radio occultation technique and EISCAT measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stolle

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a comprehensive view on high latitude processes by applying different observation techniques, the SIRCUS campaign was initiated in 2001/2002. This paper compares electron density profiles derived from CHAMP radio occultation data and those measured with the EISCAT facility. Since ionospheric profiling with the help of space-based received GPS is a relatively new technique, validations with established independent instruments are of crucial need. We present 28 profiling events for quasi-statistical analyses, which occurred during the SIRCUS campaigns and describe some of them in more detail. We found out that the majority of profile comparisons in electron density peak value and height, as well as in TEC, lie within the error ranges of the two methods. Differences in the ionospheric quantities do not necessarily occur when the locations of the occultation and of the radar site show considerable distances. Differences are more pronounced when the ionosphere is remarkably structured.

  4. MEASUREMENT OF WHEAT DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯跟胜; 党金春; 等

    1995-01-01

    A method used for on line determining the change of wheat density with a automatic watering machine in a lqarge flour mill has been studied.The results show that the higher distinguishing ability is obtained when using 241Am as a γ-ray source for measuring the wheat density than using 137Cs.

  5. Density measures and additive property

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisada, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    We deal with finitely additive measures defined on all subsets of natural numbers which extend the asymptotic density (density measures). We consider a class of density measures which are constructed from free ultrafilters on natural numbers and study a certain additivity property of such density measures.

  6. Density measures and additive property

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisada, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    We deal with finitely additive measures defined on all subsets of natural numbers which extend the asymptotic density (density measures). We consider a class of density measures which are constructed from free ultrafilters on natural numbers and study a certain additivity property of such density measures.

  7. Density Functional Approach Based on Numerically Obtained Bridge Functional

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUShi-Qi

    2002-01-01

    The ornstein-zenike equation is solved with the Rogers-Young approximation for bulk hard sphere fluid and Lennard-Jones fluid for several state points.Then the resulted bulk fluid radial distribution function combined with the test particle method is employed to determine numerically the function relationship of bridge functional as a function of indirect correlation function.It is found that all of the calculated points from different phase space state points for a same type of fluid collapse onto a same smooth curve.Then the numerically obtained curve is used to substitute the analytic expression of the bridge functional as a function of indirect correlation function required in the methodology [J.Chem.Phys,112(2000)8079] to determine the density distribution of non-uniform hard sphere fluid and Lennard-Jones fluid.The good agreement of theoretical predictions with the computer simulation data is obtained.The present numerical procedure incroporates the knowledge of bulk fluid radial distribution function into the constructing of the density functional approximation and makes the original methodology more accurate and more filexible for various interaction potential fluid.

  8. Density Functional Approach Based on Numerically Obtained Bridge Functional

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shi-Qi

    2002-01-01

    The Ornstein Zernike equation is solved with the Rogers Young approximation for bulk hard sphere fluidand Lennard-Jones fluid for several state points. Then the resulted bulk fluid radial distribution function combinedwith the test particle method is employed to determine numerically the function relationship of bridge functional as afunction of indirect correlation function. It is found that all of the calculated points from different phase space statepoints for a same type of fluid collapse onto a same smooth curve. Then the numerically obtained curve is used tosubstitute the analytic expression of the bridge functional as a function of indirect correlation function required in themethodology [J. Chem. Phys. 112 (2000) 8079] to deterrnine the density distribution of non-uniform hard spherefluid and Lennard Jones fluid. The good agreement of theoretical predictions with the computer simulation data isobtained. The present numerical procedure incorporates the knowledge of bulk fluid radial distribution function intothe constructing of the density functional approximation and makes the original methodology more accurate and moreflexible for various interaction potential fluid.

  9. Spacetime Average Density (SAD) Cosmological Measures

    CERN Document Server

    Page, Don N

    2014-01-01

    The measure problem of cosmology is how to obtain normalized probabilities of observations from the quantum state of the universe. This is particularly a problem when eternal inflation leads to a universe of unbounded size so that there are apparently infinitely many realizations or occurrences of observations of each of many different kinds or types, making the ratios ambiguous. There is also the danger of domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here two new Spacetime Average Density (SAD) measures are proposed, Maximal Average Density (MAD) and Biased Average Density (BAD), for getting a finite number of observation occurrences by using properties of the Spacetime Average Density (SAD) of observation occurrences to restrict to finite regions of spacetimes that have a preferred beginning or bounce hypersurface. These measures avoid Boltzmann brain domination and appear to give results consistent with other observations that are problematic for other widely used measures, such as the observation of a positive cosmolo...

  10. Improving the accuracy of S02 column densities and emission rates obtained from upward-looking UV-spectroscopic measurements of volcanic plumes by taking realistic radiative transfer into account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Deutschmann, Tim; Werner, Cynthia; Sutton, A. Jeff; Elias, Tamar; Kelly, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is monitored using ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy at numerous volcanoes around the world due to its importance as a measure of volcanic activity and a tracer for other gaseous species. Recent studies have shown that failure to take realistic radiative transfer into account during the spectral retrieval of the collected data often leads to large errors in the calculated emission rates. Here, the framework for a new evaluation method which couples a radiative transfer model to the spectral retrieval is described. In it, absorption spectra are simulated, and atmospheric parameters are iteratively updated in the model until a best match to the measurement data is achieved. The evaluation algorithm is applied to two example Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements conducted at Kilauea volcano (Hawaii). The resulting emission rates were 20 and 90% higher than those obtained with a conventional DOAS retrieval performed between 305 and 315 nm, respectively, depending on the different SO2 and aerosol loads present in the volcanic plume. The internal consistency of the method was validated by measuring and modeling SO2 absorption features in a separate wavelength region around 375 nm and comparing the results. Although additional information about the measurement geometry and atmospheric conditions is needed in addition to the acquired spectral data, this method for the first time provides a means of taking realistic three-dimensional radiative transfer into account when analyzing UV-spectral absorption measurements of volcanic SO2 plumes.

  11. Comparing measurements of breast density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Highnam, R [Highnam Associates Limited, Wellington (New Zealand); Jeffreys, M [Massey University, Wellington (New Zealand); McCormack, V [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Warren, R [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Smith, G Davey [Department of Clinical Epidemiology, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Brady, M [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    Breast density measurements can be made from mammograms using either area-based methods, such as the six category classification (SCC), or volumetric based methods, such as the standard mammogram form (SMF). Previously, we have shown how both types of methods generate breast density estimates which are generally close. In this paper, we switch our attention to the question of why, for certain cases, they provide widely differing estimates. First, we show how the underlying physical models of the breast employed in the methods need to be consistent, and how area-based methods are susceptible to projection effects. We then analyse a set of patients whose mammograms show large differences between their SCC and SMF assessments. More precisely, 12% of 657 patients were found to fall into this category. Of these, 2.7% were attributable to errors either in the SMF segmentation algorithms, human error in SCC categorization or poor image exposure. More importantly, 9.3% of the cases appear to be due to fundamental differences between the area- and volume-based techniques. We conclude by suggesting how we might remove half of those discrepancies by introducing a new categorization of the SMF estimates based on the breast thickness. We note however, that this still leaves 6% of patients with large differences between SMF and SCC estimates. We discuss why it might not be appropriate to assume SMF (or any volume measure) has a similar breast cancer risk prediction capability to SCC.

  12. X-ray structure refinement using aspherical atomic density functions obtained from quantum-mechanical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilaka, Dylan; Dittrich, Birger

    2008-05-01

    An approach is outlined for X-ray structure refinement using atomic density fragments obtained by Hirshfeld partitioning of quantum-mechanical density fragments. Results are presented for crystal structure refinements of urea and benzene using these 'Hirshfeld atoms'. Using this procedure, the quantum-mechanical non-spherical electron density is taken into account in the structural model based on the conformation found in the crystal. Contrary to current consensus in structure refinement, the anisotropic displacement parameters of H atoms can be reproduced from neutron diffraction measurements simply from a least-squares fit using the Hirshfeld atoms derived from the BLYP level of theory and including a simple point-charge model to treat the crystal environment.

  13. Optimally focused cold atom systems obtained using density-density correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, Andika; Campbell, Daniel L; Price, Ryan M; De, Subhadeep; Spielman, I B

    2014-01-01

    Resonant absorption imaging is a common technique for detecting the two-dimensional column density of ultracold atom systems. In many cases, the system's thickness along the imaging direction greatly exceeds the imaging system's depth of field, making the identification of the optimally focused configuration difficult. Here we describe a systematic technique for bringing Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) and other cold-atom systems into an optimal focus even when the ratio of the thickness to the depth of field is large: a factor of 8 in this demonstration with a BEC. This technique relies on defocus-induced artifacts in the Fourier-transformed density-density correlation function (the power spectral density, PSD). The spatial frequency at which these artifacts first appear in the PSD is maximized on focus; the focusing process therefore both identifies and maximizes the range of spatial frequencies over which the PSD is uncontaminated by finite-thickness effects.

  14. Obtaining the Probability Vector Current Density in Canonical Quantum Mechanics by Linear Superposition

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffmann, Steven Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The quantum mechanics status of the probability vector current density has long seemed to be marginal. On one hand no systematic prescription for its construction is provided, and the special examples of it that are obtained for particular types of Hamiltonian operator could conceivably be attributed to happenstance. On the other hand this concept's key physical interpretation as local average particle flux, which flows from the equation of continuity that it is supposed to satisfy in conjunction with the probability scalar density, has been claimed to breach the uncertainty principle. Given the dispiriting impact of that claim, we straightaway point out that the subtle directional nature of the uncertainty principle makes it consistent with the measurement of local average particle flux. We next focus on the fact that the unique closed-form linear-superposition quantization of any classical Hamiltonian function yields in tandem the corresponding unique linear-superposition closed-form divergence of the proba...

  15. Low density ionogels obtained by rapid gellification of tetraethyl orthosilane assisted by ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abhishek Kumar; Singh, Manish Pratap; Singh, Rajendra Kumar; Chandra, Suresh

    2012-05-28

    A non-hydrolytic one pot sol-gel method has been used to synthesize mesoporous silica ionogels with the confined ionic liquid (IL) 1-ethyl 3-methyl imidazolium tetra fluoro-borate [EMIM][BF(4)]. The precursor for obtaining the SiO(2) matrix was tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and formic acid was used as a catalyst. These ionogels have been characterized by density measurements, TEM, BET, DSC, TGA and FTIR. The incorporation of the ionic liquid [EMIM][BF(4)] enhances the gellification rate which results in the ionogels having very low density (~0.3 g cm(-3)). The low density has been explained on the basis of the creation of 'blind embedded pores' in the matrix (apart from open pores) due to very rapid gellification (~1 min). Morphological studies provide experimental evidence for the presence of blind pores/voids inside the ionogel ingots. We have also shown that the IL entrapped in nanopores (~7-8 nm pore size) of the SiO(2) matrix has different physical properties than the bulk IL viz. (a) the phase transition temperatures (T(g), T(c) and T(m)) of the IL change upon confinement, (b) the thermal stability reduces upon confinement, and (c) the pore wall interaction with the IL results in changes in the C-H vibrations of the imidazolium ring and alkyl chain (the former increasing) which is also indicated in our DFT-calculation.

  16. Effect of intraband variability on stable isotope and density time series obtained from banded corals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chakraborty; R Ramesh; J M Lough

    2000-03-01

    Density, 18O and 13C were measured along two tracks, one close to the central growth axis and the other, ∼20° off the axis, in a coral (Porites lutea) collected from the Stanley Reef, Central Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The 18O variations in the coral are well correlated with sea surface temperature changes. The common variances between the two tracks were about 60% in the 18O, 13C and the skeletal density variations. Part of the noise (40%) could be due to the difficulty of sampling exactly time contemporaneous parts of each band along the two tracks and part of it could be due to genuine intraband variability. In spite of the intraband variability, the time series obtained from the two tracks are similar, indicating that the dominant causative factor for the isotopic variations is external, i.e., the environmental conditions that prevail during the growth of the coral; density band formation does not appear to be directly controlled by the sea surface temperature.

  17. Density Measurement of Liquid Metals Using Dilatometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianwen WANG; Qingsong MEI

    2006-01-01

    The dilatometer method for density measurement of liquid metals was improved to give a high measurement accuracy with simple operation. The density of liquid tin was measured and the results are in agreement with values in literature. The melting point density of liquid Sn was measured to be 6.966×103 Kg·m-3 and the temperature (T) dependence of the density (ρ) for liquid Sn can be well described by a polynomial equation ρ(T)=7.406 - 9.94 × 10-4T + 2.12 × 10-7T2.

  18. Density measurements using coherence imaging spectroscopy based on Stark broadeninga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischtschenko, O.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G.; Howard, J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; König, R.

    2010-10-01

    A coherence imaging camera has been set up at Pilot-PSI. The system is to be used for imaging the plasma density through the Stark effect broadening of the Hγ line. Local density values are then obtained by the Abel inversion of the measured interferometric fringe contrast. This report will present the instrument setup and proof-of-principle demonstration. The inverted spatial electron density profiles obtained near the cascaded arc source of Pilot-PSI in discharges with axial magnetic field of B=0.4 T are compared with an independent measurement of electron density by Thomson scattering and good agreement is found.

  19. Density measurements using coherence imaging spectroscopy based on Stark broadening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lischtschenko, O.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G. [Association EURATOM-FOM, FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Howard, J. [Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Jaspers, R. J. E. [Fusion Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Postbus 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Koenig, R. [EURATOM Association, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, TI Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr.1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    A coherence imaging camera has been set up at Pilot-PSI. The system is to be used for imaging the plasma density through the Stark effect broadening of the H{sub {gamma}} line. Local density values are then obtained by the Abel inversion of the measured interferometric fringe contrast. This report will present the instrument setup and proof-of-principle demonstration. The inverted spatial electron density profiles obtained near the cascaded arc source of Pilot-PSI in discharges with axial magnetic field of B=0.4 T are compared with an independent measurement of electron density by Thomson scattering and good agreement is found.

  20. Mammographic density estimation with automated volumetric breast density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Su Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung

    2014-01-01

    To compare automated volumetric breast density measurement (VBDM) with radiologists' evaluations based on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to identify the factors associated with technical failure of VBDM. In this study, 1129 women aged 19-82 years who underwent mammography from December 2011 to January 2012 were included. Breast density evaluations by radiologists based on BI-RADS and by VBDM (Volpara Version 1.5.1) were compared. The agreement in interpreting breast density between radiologists and VBDM was determined based on four density grades (D1, D2, D3, and D4) and a binary classification of fatty (D1-2) vs. dense (D3-4) breast using kappa statistics. The association between technical failure of VBDM and patient age, total breast volume, fibroglandular tissue volume, history of partial mastectomy, the frequency of mass > 3 cm, and breast density was analyzed. The agreement between breast density evaluations by radiologists and VBDM was fair (k value = 0.26) when the four density grades (D1/D2/D3/D4) were used and moderate (k value = 0.47) for the binary classification (D1-2/D3-4). Twenty-seven women (2.4%) showed failure of VBDM. Small total breast volume, history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density were significantly associated with technical failure of VBDM (p = 0.001 to 0.015). There is fair or moderate agreement in breast density evaluation between radiologists and VBDM. Technical failure of VBDM may be related to small total breast volume, a history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density.

  1. Mammography density estimation with automated volumetic breast density measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Su Yeon; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To compare automated volumetric breast density measurement (VBDM) with radiologists' evaluations based on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to identify the factors associated with technical failure of VBDM. In this study, 1129 women aged 19-82 years who underwent mammography from December 2011 to January 2012 were included. Breast density evaluations by radiologists based on BI-RADS and by VBDM (Volpara Version 1.5.1) were compared. The agreement in interpreting breast density between radiologists and VBDM was determined based on four density grades (D1, D2, D3, and D4) and a binary classification of fatty (D1-2) vs. dense (D3-4) breast using kappa statistics. The association between technical failure of VBDM and patient age, total breast volume, fibroglandular tissue volume, history of partial mastectomy, the frequency of mass > 3 cm, and breast density was analyzed. The agreement between breast density evaluations by radiologists and VBDM was fair (k value = 0.26) when the four density grades (D1/D2/D3/D4) were used and moderate (k value = 0.47) for the binary classification (D1-2/D3-4). Twenty-seven women (2.4%) showed failure of VBDM. Small total breast volume, history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density were significantly associated with technical failure of VBDM (p 0.001 to 0.015). There is fair or moderate agreement in breast density evaluation between radiologists and VBDM. Technical failure of VBDM may be related to small total breast volume, a history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density.

  2. An Empirical Measure for Labor Market Density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Gautier (Pieter); C.N. Teulings (Coen)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we derive a structural measure for labor market density based on the Ellison and Glasear (1997) index for industry concentration''. This labor market density measure serves as a proxy for the number of workers that can reach a certain work area within a reasonal amount of t

  3. Critical current density: Measurements vs. reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, A. V.; Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Fedoseev, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Different experimental techniques are employed to evaluate the critical current density (Jc), namely transport current measurements and two different magnetisation measurements forming quasi-equilibrium and dynamic critical states. Our technique-dependent results for superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) film and MgB2 bulk samples show an extremely high sensitivity of Jc and associated interpretations, such as irreversibility fields and Kramer plots, which lose meaning without a universal approach. We propose such approach for YBCO films based on their unique pinning features. This approach allows us to accurately recalculate the magnetic-field-dependent Jc obtained by any technique into the Jc behaviour, which would have been measured by any other method without performing the corresponding experiments. We also discovered low-frequency-dependent phenomena, governing flux dynamics, but contradicting the considered ones in the literature. The understanding of these phenomena, relevant to applications with moving superconductors, can clarify their dramatic impact on the electric-field criterion through flux diffusivity and corresponding measurements.

  4. Absolute density measurements in the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    Full Text Available In the last ten years a total of 25 sounding rockets employing ionization gauges have been launched at high latitudes ( ~ 70° N to measure total atmospheric density and its small scale fluctuations in an altitude range between 70 and 110 km. While the determination of small scale fluctuations is unambiguous, the total density analysis has been complicated in the past by aerodynamical disturbances leading to densities inside the sensor which are enhanced compared to atmospheric values. Here, we present the results of both Monte Carlo simulations and wind tunnel measurements to quantify this aerodynamical effect. The comparison of the resulting ‘ram-factor’ profiles with empirically determined density ratios of ionization gauge measurements and falling sphere measurements provides excellent agreement. This demonstrates both the need, but also the possibility, to correct aerodynamical influences on measurements from sounding rockets. We have determined a total of 20 density profiles of the mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT region. Grouping these profiles according to season, a listing of mean density profiles is included in the paper. A comparison with density profiles taken from the reference atmospheres CIRA86 and MSIS90 results in differences of up to 40%. This reflects that current reference atmospheres are a significant potential error source for the determination of mixing ratios of, for example, trace gas constituents in the MLT region.

    Key words. Middle atmosphere (composition and chemistry; pressure, density, and temperature; instruments and techniques

  5. Is it possible to obtain cosmic accelerated expansion through energy transfer between different energy densities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Recai

    2017-03-01

    The equation of state of an energy density may be significantly modified by coupling it to another energy density. In the light of this observation we check the possibility of producing cosmic accelerated expansion in this way. In particular we consider the case where matter is converted to radiation (or vice versa by particle physics processes). We find that cosmic accelerated expansion can be obtained in this way only if an intermediate state with negative equation of state forms during the conversion.

  6. Assessment studies on the inversion of satellite to satellite electron content to obtain electron density profiles in the ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Hochegger, G P

    2000-01-01

    The electron content data, obtained by satellite-to-satellite occultations of radio signals can lead to height profiles of electron density by discrete inversion. Since there is no possibility to verify such profiles by means of other measurements (practically never measurements at the same time and same location) it was necessary to simulate occultation scenarios by means of an ionosphere model to obtain a large number of comparisons sufficient for investigations on a statistical basis. The obtained electron contents were inverted and compared with electron density height profiles, obtained with the same ionospheric model for the occultation point. The differences between these profiles were investigated (difference between the F2-peak maxima, the height of the maxima, the shape of the topside and bottom side ionosphere). Since simulations were done for chosen locations (250 randomly spread on the globe) for every month and every second hour and for two solar activity levels (HSA and LSA), a whole year was '...

  7. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibrationa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappatou, A.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Delabie, E.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Jakobs, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  8. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marchuk, O.; Biel, W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Julich (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  9. Quantitatively measuring the orbital angular momentum density of light : Presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although many techniques are efficient at measuring optical orbital angular momentum (OAM), they do not allow one to obtain a quantitative measurement for the OAM density across an optical field and instead only measure its global OAM. Numerous...

  10. Measuring liquid density using Archimedes' principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2006-09-01

    A simple technique is described for measuring absolute and relative liquid density based on Archimedes' principle. The technique involves placing a container of the liquid under test on an electronic balance and suspending a probe (e.g. a glass marble) attached to a length of line beneath the surface of the liquid. If the volume of the probe is known, the density of liquid is given by the difference between the balance reading before and after immersion of the probe divided by the volume of the probe. A test showed that the density of water at room temperature could be measured to an accuracy and precision of 0.01 ± 0.1%. The probe technique was also used to measure the relative density of milk, Coca-Cola, fruit juice, olive oil and vinegar.

  11. Georadar Measurements for the Snow Cover Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Godio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground Probing Radar (GPR devices is adopted for the analysis of thickness and the mechanical properties (density of the snow cover in some test site in Alps, in Northern Italy. The performances of standard radar systems for the snow cover characterisation are analysed, the main aim is to assess the reliability of the method to estimate the snow density, the snowpack thickness and the depth resolution in terms of capability to detect thin layers. The main relationships between the electrical permittivity and the density of the dry-snow are applied to estimate the density vertical profiles inferred by the GPR investigation. The data were calibrated and compared with the results coming from direct measurements of the density and thickness.

  12. Thermospheric mass density measurement from precise orbit ephemeris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric drag, which can be inferred from orbit information of low-Earth orbiting (LEO satellites, provides a direct means of measuring mass density. The temporal resolution of derived mass density could be in the range from minutes to days, depending on the precision of the satellite orbit data. This paper presents two methods potentially being able to estimate thermosphere mass density from precise obit ephemeris with high temporal resolution. One method is based on the drag perturbation equation of the semi-major axis and the temporal resolution of retrieved density could be 150 s for CHAMP satellite. Another method generates corrections to densities computed from a baseline density model through a Kalman filter orbit drag coefficient determination (KFOD process and the temporal resolution of derived density could be as high as 30 s for CHAMP satellite. The densities estimated from these two methods are compared with densities obtained from accelerometer data of CHAMP satellite. When the accelerometer data based densities are used as reference values, the mean relative accuracy of the densities derived from precision orbit data using the two methods is within approximately 10%. An application of the derived densities shows that the derived densities can reduce orbit predication errors.

  13. Thermospheric mass density measurement from precise orbit ephemeris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junyu Chen; Jizhang Sang

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric drag,which can be inferred from orbit information of low-Earth orbiting (LEO)satellites,provides a direct means of measuring mass density.The temporal resolution of derived mass density could be in the range from minutes to days,depending on the precision of the satellite orbit data.This paper presents two methods potentially being able to estimate thermosphere mass density from precise obit ephemeris with high temporal resolution.One method is based on the drag perturbation equation of the semi-major axis and the temporal resolution of retrieved density could be 150 s for CHAMP satellite.Another method generates corrections to densities computed from a baseline density model through a Kalman filter orbit drag coefficient determination (KFOD) process and the temporal resolution of derived density could be as high as 30 s for CHAMP satellite.The densities estimated from these two methods are compared with densities obtained from accelerometer data of CHAMP satellite.When the accelerometer data based densities are used as reference values,the mean relative accuracy of the densities derived from precision orbit data using the two methods is within approximately 10%.An application of the derived densities shows that the derived densities can reduce orbit predication errors.

  14. Smart density: a more accurate method of measuring rural residential density for health-related research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson Lucinda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies involving the built environment have typically relied on US Census data to measure residential density. However, census geographic units are often unsuited to health-related research, especially in rural areas where development is clustered and discontinuous. Objective We evaluated the accuracy of both standard census methods and alternative GIS-based methods to measure rural density. Methods We compared residential density (units/acre in 335 Vermont school neighborhoods using conventional census geographic units (tract, block group and block with two GIS buffer measures: a 1-kilometer (km circle around the school and a 1-km circle intersected with a 100-meter (m road-network buffer. The accuracy of each method was validated against the actual residential density for each neighborhood based on the Vermont e911 database, which provides an exact geo-location for all residential structures in the state. Results Standard census measures underestimate residential density in rural areas. In addition, the degree of error is inconsistent so even the relative rank of neighborhood densities varies across census measures. Census measures explain only 61% to 66% of the variation in actual residential density. In contrast, GIS buffer measures explain approximately 90% of the variation. Combining a 1-km circle with a road-network buffer provides the closest approximation of actual residential density. Conclusion Residential density based on census units can mask clusters of development in rural areas and distort associations between residential density and health-related behaviors and outcomes. GIS-defined buffers, including a 1-km circle and a road-network buffer, can be used in conjunction with census data to obtain a more accurate measure of residential density.

  15. Comparing turbulent parameters obtained from LITOS and radiosonde measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, A.; Gerding, M.; Lübken, F.-J.

    2015-02-01

    Stratospheric turbulence is important for the mixing of trace species and the energy balance, but direct measurements are sparse due to the required resolution and accuracy. Recently, turbulence parameters such as the energy dissipation rate ɛ were inferred from standard radiosonde data by means of a Thorpe analysis. To this end, layers with vertically decreasing potential temperature are analysed, which is expected to indicate turbulence. Such an application assumes a proportionality between the Thorpe length LT and the Ozmidov scale LO. While this relation is accepted for the ocean, experimental evidence for such proportionality in the stratosphere is sparse. We have developed a high-resolution (8 kHz) turbulence measurement system called LITOS (Leibniz Institute Turbulence Observations in the Stratosphere), which for the first time resolves the inner scale of turbulence in the stratosphere. Therewith the energy dissipation rate ɛ can be determined by spectral analysis. This independent value for ɛ enables us to check the relation LO ∝ LT. In our measurements no such proportionality can be seen, although the mean of the ratio LO/LT is close to what is assumed in radiosonde analyses. Dissipation rates for individual layers obtained from radiosondes deviate up to a factor of ~3000 from those obtained by spectral analysis. Some turbulent layers measured by LITOS are not observed by the radiosonde at all, and vice versa. However, statements about the statistical mean seem to be possible by Thorpe analysis.

  16. Measurement of Density Inhomogeneity for Glass Pendulum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lin-Xia; LIU Qi; SHAO Cheng-Gang; ZHANG Ya-Ting; LUO Jun; Vadim Milyukov

    2008-01-01

    @@ The density inhomogeneity of a glass pendulum is determined by an optical interference method.The relative variations of the densities over a volume with sizes of 5 × 5 × 5mm3 are (0.64±0.97) × 10-5 and (0.99 ± 0.92) ×10-5 for the K9 glass and silica glass pendulum, respectively.These variations of densities contributing to the relative uncertainties of the Newtonian gravitational constant G are 0.20 ppm and 0.21 ppm in our experiment on measurement of G.

  17. Precision measurements of Linear Scattering Density using Muon Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Åström, E; Calliari, I; Calvini, P; Checchia, P; Donzella, A; Faraci, E; Forsberg, F; Gonella, F; Hu, X; Klinger, J; Ödqvist, L S; Pagano, D; Rigoni, A; Ramous, E; Urbani, M; Vanini, S; Zenoni, A; Zumerle, G

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that muon tomography can be used to precisely measure the properties of various materials. The materials which have been considered have been extracted from an experimental blast furnace, including carbon (coke) and iron oxides, for which measurements of the linear scattering density relative to the mass density have been performed with an absolute precision of 10%. We report the procedures that are used in order to obtain such precision, and a discussion is presented to address the expected performance of the technique when applied to heavier materials. The results we obtain do not depend on the specific type of material considered and therefore they can be extended to any application.

  18. Precision measurements of linear scattering density using muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åström, E.; Bonomi, G.; Calliari, I.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Donzella, A.; Faraci, E.; Forsberg, F.; Gonella, F.; Hu, X.; Klinger, J.; Sundqvist Ökvist, L.; Pagano, D.; Rigoni, A.; Ramous, E.; Urbani, M.; Vanini, S.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that muon tomography can be used to precisely measure the properties of various materials. The materials which have been considered have been extracted from an experimental blast furnace, including carbon (coke) and iron oxides, for which measurements of the linear scattering density relative to the mass density have been performed with an absolute precision of 10%. We report the procedures that are used in order to obtain such precision, and a discussion is presented to address the expected performance of the technique when applied to heavier materials. The results we obtain do not depend on the specific type of material considered and therefore they can be extended to any application.

  19. Flow rate of particles through apertures obtained from self-similar density and velocity profiles

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    ‘‘Beverloo’s law’’ is considered as the standard expression to estimate the flow rate of particles through apertures. This relation was obtained by simple dimensional analysis and includes empirical parameters whose physical meaning is poorly justified. In this Letter, we study the density and velocity profiles in the flow of particles through an aperture. We find that, for the whole range of apertures studied, both profiles are self-similar. Hence, by means of the functionality obtained for the...

  20. Mammographic density measurements are not affected by mammography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damases, Christine N; Brennan, Patrick C; McEntee, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a significant risk factor for breast cancer and has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of mammography screening. Knowledge of a woman's density can be used to predict her risk of developing breast cancer and personalize her imaging pathway. However, measurement of breast density has proven to be troublesome with wide variations in density recorded using radiologists' visual Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). Several automated methods for assessing breast density have been proposed, each with their own source of measurement error. The use of differing mammographic imaging systems further complicates MD measurement, especially for the same women imaged over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer's equipment affects a woman's MD measurement. Raw mammographic images were acquired on two mammography imaging systems (General Electric and Hologic) one year apart and processed using VolparaDensity™ to obtain the Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average volumetric breast density percentage (AvBD%). Visual BIRADS scores were also obtained from 20 expert readers. BIRADS scores for both systems showed strong positive correlation ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]), while the VDG ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) and AvBD% ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) showed stronger positive correlations. Substantial agreement was shown between the systems for BIRADS ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]), however, the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]).

  1. Effect of electrolysis parameters on the morphologies of copper powder obtained at high current densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Gökhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of copper ion concentrations and electrolyte temperature on the morphologies and on the apparent densities of electrolytic copper powders at high current densities under galvanostatic regime were examined. These parameters were evaluated by the current efficiency of hydrogen evolution. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was used for analyzing the morphology of the copper powders. It was found that the morphology was dependent over the copper ion concentration and electrolyte temperature under same current density (CD conditions. At 150 mA cm-2 and the potential of 1000±20 mV (vs. SCE, porous and disperse copper powders were obtained at low concentrations of Cu ions (0.120 M Cu2+ in 0.50 M H2SO4. Under this condition, high rate of hydrogen evolution reaction took place parallel to copper electrodeposition. The morphology was changed from porous, disperse and cauliflower-like to coral-like, shrub-like and stalk-stock like morphology with the increasing of Cu ion concentrations towards 0.120 M, 0.155 M, 0.315 M, 0.475 M and 0.630 M Cu2+ in 0.5 M H2SO4 respectively at the same CD. Similarly, as the temperature was increased, powder morphology and apparent density were observed to be changed. The apparent density values of copper powders were found to be suitable for many of the powder metallurgy applications.

  2. Coronal temperature profiles obtained from kinetic models and from coronal brightness measurements obtained during solar eclipses

    CERN Document Server

    Pierrard, V; Lemaire, J F

    2012-01-01

    Coronal density, temperature and heat flux distributions for the equatorial and polar corona have been deduced by Lemaire [2012] from Saito's model of averaged coronal white light (WL) brightness and polarization observations. They are compared with those determined from a kinetic collisionless/exospheric model of the solar corona. This comparison indicates rather similar distributions at large radial distances (> 7 Rs) in the collisionless region. However, rather important differences are found close to the Sun in the acceleration region of the solar wind. The exospheric heat flux is directed away from the Sun, while that inferred from all WL coronal observations is in the opposite direction, i.e., conducting heat from the inner corona toward the chromosphere. This could indicate that the source of coronal heating rate extends up into the inner corona where it maximizes at r > 1.5 Rs well above the transition region.

  3. Obtaining raised density connections by thermosonic microwelding in 3D integrated microcircuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanin V. L.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the processes of obtaining raised density microwelded connections in 3D-integrated microcircuits by the thermosonic microwelding. The processes include the use of the raised frequencies of ultrasound, application of the microinstrument with a thinning of the working end and precision devices for ball formation, which provide reproducibility of connections quality. At a small step of contact pads, the use of a wire of small diameter (not more than 25 µm is necessary for devices with a multilevel arrangement of leads and chess arrangement of contact pads on the chip, providing the maximum length of the formed crosspieces does not exceed 4—5 mm.

  4. Comparison between measurements obtained with three different perineometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Brentegani Barbosa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the results obtained in the evaluation of intra-vaginal pressure using three different brands of perineometers in nulliparous volunteers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty nulliparous women with no anatomical alterations and/or dysfunction of the pelvic floor were enrolled in our study. All the women had the ability to voluntarily contract their PFM (Pelvic Floor Muscles, as assessed by digital palpation. The intra-vaginal pressure was assessed using three different brands of perineometer (Neurodyn EvolutionTM, SensuPowerTM and PeritronTM. Each volunteer was evaluated on three alternate days by a single examiner using a single brand of perineometer on each day. In the assessment, the volunteers were required to pull (contract their PFM in and up as strongly as possible 3 times and to sustain the contraction for 5 seconds, with an interval of 30 seconds between each pull. For the statistical analysis, a concordance correlation coefficient was used to compare the values that were obtained with each brand of perineometer. RESULTS: A moderate concordance (0.51 was found between the results from the PeritronTM and NeurodynTM perineometers, a fair concordance (0.21 between the PeritronTM and SensuPowerTM brands and a poor concordance (0.19 between the NeurodynTM and SensuPowerTM brands. CONCLUSION: The concordance of the measurements of the intra-vaginal pressure ranged from poor to moderate, suggesting that perineometers of different brands generate different results.

  5. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, David, E-mail: davidwa@earth.ox.ac.uk [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Hansen, Lars N. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Ben Britton, T. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Royal School of Mines, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (<0.01°) than conventional EBSD (~0.5°), allowing very low dislocation densities to be analysed. We develop the application of HR-EBSD to olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation. - Highlights: • Lattice orientation gradients in olivine were measured using HR-EBSD. • The limited number of olivine slip systems enable simple least squares inversion for GND

  6. Flow Rate of Particles through Apertures Obtained from Self-Similar Density and Velocity Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Alvaro; Zuriguel, Iker; Maza, Diego

    2012-06-01

    “Beverloo’s law” is considered as the standard expression to estimate the flow rate of particles through apertures. This relation was obtained by simple dimensional analysis and includes empirical parameters whose physical meaning is poorly justified. In this Letter, we study the density and velocity profiles in the flow of particles through an aperture. We find that, for the whole range of apertures studied, both profiles are self-similar. Hence, by means of the functionality obtained for them the mass flow rate is calculated. The comparison of this expression with the Beverloo’s one reveals some differences which are crucial to understanding the mechanism that governs the flow of particles through orifices.

  7. Measurement and analyses of molten Ni-Co alloy density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; K. MUKAI; FANG Liang; FU Ya; YANG Ren-hui

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of powerful mathematical modeling techniques for material phenomena, there is renewed interest in reliable data for the density of the Ni-based superalloys. Up to now, there has been few report on the density of molten Ni-Co alloy.In order to obtain more accurate density data for molten Ni-Co alloy, the density of molten Ni-Co alloy was measured with a modified sessile drop method, and the accommodation of different atoms in molten Ni-Co alloy was analyzed. The density of alloy is found to decrease with increasing temperature and Co concentration in the alloy. The molar volume of molten Ni-Co alloy increases with increasing Co concentration. The molar volume of Ni-Co alloy determined shows a positive deviation from the linear molar volume, and the deviation of molar volume from ideal mixing increases with increasing Co concentration over the experimental concentration range.

  8. Comparison of the Volume Charge Density of Nanofiltration Membranes Obtained from Retention and Conductivity Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, J.; Silva, V.; Pradanos, P.

    2010-01-01

    A version of the Donnan steric-partitioning pore model with dielectrical exclusion (DSPM-DE) has been used to get information on the pore size and charge density of a commercial membrane, NF45 from FilmTec, from its retention of KCl solutions. The conductivity inside the pores has been measured...... of the membrane. These two methods give results in fair accordance which probes that the sometimes controversial method of DSPM-DE can give accurate results for the charge as well as for the mean pore size of a nanofiltration membrane. Sonic clues to improve the way this model can be used are given as well....

  9. Electrostatic density measurements in green-state PM parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, Georg H. W.

    The goal of this research is to show the feasibility of detecting density variations in greenstate powder metallurgy (P/M) compacts from surface voltage measurements. By monitoring a steady electric current flow through the sample and recording the voltages over the surface, valuable information is gathered leading to the prediction of the structural health of the compacts. Unlike prior research that concentrated on the detection of surface-breaking and subsurface defects, the results presented in this thesis target the density prediction throughout the volume of the sample. The detection of density variations is achieved by establishing a correlation between the conductivity and their respective density. The data obtained from the surface measurements is used as part of an inversion algorithm, calculating the conductivity distribution, and subsequently the density within the compact. In a first step, the relationship between conductivity and density of green-state P/M compacts was investigated. Tests were conducted for a number of parts of various powder mixtures. In all cases a clear correlation between conductivity and density could be established, indicating that measurements of electric conductivity could indeed be exploited in an effort to render valid information about the density of the sample under test. We found a linear correlation for nonlubricated parts and a non-linear behavior for lubricated samples. Specifically, it was found that the conductivity increases with increasing density only up to a maximum value obtained at approximately 6.9g/cm 3. Interestingly, any additional density increase leads to a reduction of the conductivity. This behavior was confirmed to be inherent in all powder mixtures with lubricants. The thesis research is able to provide a physical model and a mathematical formulation describing this counter-intuitive phenomenon. A finite element solver in conjunction with an inversion algorithm was then implemented to study arbitrarily

  10. Measuring Air Density in the Introductory Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzà, G.; Gratton, L. M.; López-Arias, T.; Oss, S.

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the mass, or the density, of air can easily be done with very simple materials and offers many interesting phenomena for discussion—buoyancy and its effects being the most obvious but not the only one. Many interesting considerations can be done regarding the behavior of gases, the effect of the external conditions in the measurement, and the reason for the choice of the procedure, among others. One of the most widespread approaches makes use of rubber balloons. Such an approach can be misleading if attention is not paid to the effect of the buoyant force on the balloon, exerted by the surrounding air. Air is weightless in an environment full of it. While this fact can usually be neglected in daily, nontechnical weight measurements, it is not the case when we are interested in the weight of air itself. A sketch such as the one depicted in Fig. 1 is often presented in elementary science textbooks, as a demonstration that air has weight. A search of the Internet will reveal that this misleading approach is often presented as the simplest one for this kind of measurement at an elementary level and represents one among other common misconceptions that can be found in K-6 science textbooks as discussed, for instance, in Ref. 2. For a more detailed description of the flaws inherent to the measurement of air's weight with a rubber balloon, see Ref. 3. In this paper we will describe two procedures to measure the density of air: weighing a PET bottle and a vacuum rigid container. There are other interesting ways to estimate the weight of air; see, for instance, the experiment of Zhu and Se-yuen using carbon dioxide and Archimedes' principle.4 We emphasize the experimental implications and the physical reasons for the accuracy and conceptual correctness of each method. It is important not to undervalue the importance of both simplicity and reliability for any experimental measurement made in a didactic context.

  11. Intrinsic temperature-dependent evolutions in the electron-boson spectral density obtained from optical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jungseek

    2016-03-01

    We investigate temperature smearing effects on the electron-boson spectral density function (I2χ(ω)) obtained from optical data using a maximum entropy inversion method. We start with two simple model input I2χ(ω), calculate the optical scattering rates at selected temperatures using the model input spectral density functions and a generalized Allen’s formula, then extract back I2χ(ω) at each temperature from the calculated optical scattering rate using the maximum entropy method (MEM) which has been used for analysis of optical data of high-temperature superconductors including cuprates, and finally compare the resulting I2χ(ω) with the input ones. From this approach we find that the inversion process can recover the input I2χ(ω) almost perfectly when the quality of fits is good enough and also temperature smearing (or thermal broadening) effects appear in the I2χ(ω) when the quality of fits is not good enough. We found that the coupling constant and the logarithmically averaged frequency are robust to the temperature smearing effects and/or the quality of fits. We use these robust properties of the two quantities as criterions to check whether experimental data have intrinsic temperature-dependent evolutions or not. We carefully apply the MEM to two material systems (one optimally doped and the other underdoped cuprates) and conclude that the I2χ(ω) extracted from the optical data contain intrinsic temperature-dependent evolutions.

  12. Mapping Bone Mineral Density Obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2017-01-01

    Methods for relating or mapping estimates of volumetric Bone Mineral Density (vBMD) obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction (BVF) are outlined mathematically. The methods are based on definitions of bone properties, cited experimental studies and regression relations derived from them for trabecular bone in the proximal femur. Using an experimental range of values in the intertrochanteric region obtained from male and female human subjects, age 18 to 49, the BVF values calculated from four different methods were compared to the experimental average and numerical range. The BVF values computed from the conversion method used data from two sources. One source provided pre bed rest vBMD values in the intertrochanteric region from 24 bed rest subject who participated in a 70 day study. Another source contained preflight vBMD values from 18 astronauts who spent 4 to 6 months on the ISS. To aid the use of a mapping from BMD to BVF, the discussion includes how to formulate them for purpose of computational modeling. An application of the conversions would be used to aid in modeling of time varying changes in vBMD as it relates to changes in BVF via bone remodeling and/or modeling.

  13. Measurement results obtained from air quality monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turzanski, P.K.; Beres, R. [Provincial Inspection of Environmental Protection, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    An automatic system of air pollution monitoring operates in Cracow since 1991. The organization, assembling and start-up of the network is a result of joint efforts of the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Cracow environmental protection service. At present the automatic monitoring network is operated by the Provincial Inspection of Environmental Protection. There are in total seven stationary stations situated in Cracow to measure air pollution. These stations are supported continuously by one semi-mobile (transportable) station. It allows to modify periodically the area under investigation and therefore the 3-dimensional picture of creation and distribution of air pollutants within Cracow area could be more intelligible.

  14. Helium measurements of pore-fluids obtained from SAFOD drillcore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, S.; Stute, M.; Torgersen, T.; Winckler, G.; Kennedy, B.M.

    2010-04-15

    {sup 4}He accumulated in fluids is a well established geochemical tracer used to study crustal fluid dynamics. Direct fluid samples are not always collectable; therefore, a method to extract rare gases from matrix fluids of whole rocks by diffusion has been adapted. Helium was measured on matrix fluids extracted from sandstones and mudstones recovered during the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling in California, USA. Samples were typically collected as subcores or from drillcore fragments. Helium concentration and isotope ratios were measured 4-6 times on each sample, and indicate a bulk {sup 4}He diffusion coefficient of 3.5 {+-} 1.3 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} at 21 C, compared to previously published diffusion coefficients of 1.2 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) to 3.0 x 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (150 C) in the sands and clays. Correcting the diffusion coefficient of {sup 4}He{sub water} for matrix porosity ({approx}3%) and tortuosity ({approx}6-13) produces effective diffusion coefficients of 1 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) and 1 x 10{sup -7} (120 C), effectively isolating pore fluid {sup 4}He from the {sup 4}He contained in the rock matrix. Model calculations indicate that <6% of helium initially dissolved in pore fluids was lost during the sampling process. Complete and quantitative extraction of the pore fluids provide minimum in situ porosity values for sandstones 2.8 {+-} 0.4% (SD, n=4) and mudstones 3.1 {+-} 0.8% (SD, n=4).

  15. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Y; Kiyama, S; Fujiwara, Y; Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm(2)) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E(ib) ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E(ib) is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  16. Standardizing CT lung density measure across scanner manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen-Mayer, Huaiyu Heather; Fuld, Matthew K; Hoppel, Bernice; Judy, Philip F; Sieren, Jered P; Guo, Junfeng; Lynch, David A; Possolo, Antonio; Fain, Sean B

    2017-03-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) imaging of the lung, reported in Hounsfield Units (HU), can be parameterized as a quantitative image biomarker for the diagnosis and monitoring of lung density changes due to emphysema, a type of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). CT lung density metrics are global measurements based on lung CT number histograms, and are typically a quantity specifying either the percentage of voxels with CT numbers below a threshold, or a single CT number below which a fixed relative lung volume, nth percentile, falls. To reduce variability in the density metrics specified by CT attenuation, the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) Lung Density Committee has organized efforts to conduct phantom studies in a variety of scanner models to establish a baseline for assessing the variations in patient studies that can be attributed to scanner calibration and measurement uncertainty. Data were obtained from a phantom study on CT scanners from four manufacturers with several protocols at various tube potential voltage (kVp) and exposure settings. Free from biological variation, these phantom studies provide an assessment of the accuracy and precision of the density metrics across platforms solely due to machine calibration and uncertainty of the reference materials. The phantom used in this study has three foam density references in the lung density region, which, after calibration against a suite of Standard Reference Materials (SRM) foams with certified physical density, establishes a HU-electron density relationship for each machine-protocol. We devised a 5-step calibration procedure combined with a simplified physical model that enabled the standardization of the CT numbers reported across a total of 22 scanner-protocol settings to a single energy (chosen at 80 keV). A standard deviation was calculated for overall CT numbers for each density, as well as by scanner and other variables, as a measure of the variability, before and after the

  17. Application of resistograph to obtain the density and to differentiate wood species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acuña, Luis

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This project offers a methodology for the analysis of resistographic profiles obtained from samples of wood and the extraction of precise data from these profiles. Tests were conducted on healthy samples of wood from six different species, as well as on “old” wood in use as part of timber structures with an age of 80-120 years. Based on the data collected using the resistograph, a series of variables was determined, and statistically analysed. An analysis of the data reveals the close relation between the resistographic variables and wood density (R2> 90%. Equally, in the case of healthy wood, an analysis of the defined variables permits the identification of the species of the sample with a very high probability and, therefore, its indirect resistance values.

    En este trabajo se aporta una metodología para realizar el análisis de los perfiles resistográficos obtenidos de piezas de madera y poder con ello obtener con precisión determinados datos de las mismas. Los ensayos se realizaron sobre madera sana de seis especies distintas, así como sobre piezas de madera “antigua” en uso, pertenecientes a estructuras de edificaciones con unos 80-120 años de servicio. A partir de los datos recogidos por el resistógrafo se definieron una serie de variables, y fueron analizadas estadísticamente. Del análisis de los datos cabe destacar la magnífica relación existente entre las variables resistográficas y la densidad de la madera (R2> 90%. Igualmente, en el caso de madera sana, el análisis de las variables definidas permite asignar con una probabilidad muy elevada, la especie a la que pueda pertenecer y, por consiguiente, sus valores resistentes indirectos.

  18. Simple Method Obtaining Analytical Expressions of Particle and Kinetic—Energy Densities for One—Dimensional Confined Fermi Gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGXiao-Xue; WUYing

    2002-01-01

    We develop a simple approach to obtain explicitly exact analytical expressions of particle and kineticenergy densities for noninteracting Fermi gases in one-dimensional harmonic confinement,and in one-dimensional box confinement as well.

  19. Simple Method Obtaining Analytical Expressions of Particle and Kinetic-Energy Densities for One-Dimensional Confined Fermi Gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XiaoXue; WU Ying

    2002-01-01

    We develop a simple approach to obtain explicitly exact analytical expressions of particle and kinetic-energy densities for noninteracting Fermi gases in one-dimensional harmonic confinement, and in one-dimensional boxconfinement as well.

  20. Reineke’s stand density index: a quantitative and non-unitless measure of stand density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis L. VanderSchaaf

    2013-01-01

    When used as a measure of relative density, Reineke’s stand density index (SDI) can be made unitless by relating the current SDI to a standard density but when used as a quantitative measure of stand density SDI is not unitless. Reineke’s SDI relates the current stand density to an equivalent number of trees per unit area in a stand with a quadratic mean diameter (Dq)...

  1. Statistical Analysis of the Spectral Density Estimate Obtained via Coifman Scaling Function

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Spectral density built as Fourier transform of covariance sequence of stationary random process is determining the process characteristics and makes for analysis of it’s structure. Thus, one of the main problems in time series analysis is constructing consistent estimates of spectral density via successive, taken after equal periods of time observations of stationary random process. This article is devoted to investigation of problems dealing with application of wavelet anal...

  2. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars N; Ben Britton, T; Wilkinson, Angus J

    2016-09-01

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation.

  3. 46 CFR 164.009-17 - Density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Density measurement. 164.009-17 Section 164.009-17... measurement. (a) The measurements described in this section are made to determine the density of a sample. (b... the specimen. The average of at least four measurements of each dimension is determined. (c) If...

  4. Procedure for Uranium-Molybdenum Density Measurements and Porosity Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-13

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for preparing uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) specimens, performing density measurements, and computing sample porosity. Typical specimens (solids) will be sheared to small rectangular foils, disks, or pieces of metal. A mass balance, solid density determination kit, and a liquid of known density will be used to determine the density of U-Mo specimens using the Archimedes principle. A standard test weight of known density would be used to verify proper operation of the system. By measuring the density of a U-Mo sample, it is possible to determine its porosity.

  5. A microscopic "social norm" model to obtain realistic macroscopic velocity and density pedestrian distributions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Zanlungo

    Full Text Available We propose a way to introduce in microscopic pedestrian models a "social norm" in collision avoiding and overtaking, i.e. the tendency, shared by pedestrians belonging to the same culture, to avoid collisions and perform overtaking in a preferred direction. The "social norm" is implemented, regardless of the specific collision avoiding model, as a rotation in the perceived velocity vector of the opponent at the moment of computation of the collision avoiding strategy, and justified as an expectation that the opponent will follow the same "social norm" (for example a tendency to avoid on the left and overtake on the right, as proposed in this work for Japanese pedestrians. By comparing with real world data, we show that the introduction of this norm allows for a better reproduction of macroscopic pedestrian density and velocity patterns.

  6. A Bone Sample Containing a Bone Graft Substitute Analyzed by Correlating Density Information Obtained by X-ray Micro Tomography with Compositional Information Obtained by Raman Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Charwat-Pessler

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of bone graft substitutes to promote new bone formation has been increasingly used in the medical field to repair skeletal defects or to replace missing bone in a broad range of applications in dentistry and orthopedics. A common way to assess such materials is via micro computed tomography (µ-CT, through the density information content provided by the absorption of X-rays. Information on the chemical composition of a material can be obtained via Raman spectroscopy. By investigating a bone sample from miniature pigs containing the bone graft substitute Bio Oss®, we pursued the target of assessing to what extent the density information gained by µ-CT imaging matches the chemical information content provided by Raman spectroscopic imaging. Raman images and Raman correlation maps of the investigated sample were used in order to generate a Raman based segmented image by means of an agglomerative, hierarchical cluster analysis. The resulting segments, showing chemically related areas, were subsequently compared with the µ-CT image by means of a one-way ANOVA. We found out that to a certain extent typical gray-level values (and the related histograms in the µ-CT image can be reliably related to specific segments within the image resulting from the cluster analysis.

  7. Intercomparison of snow density measurements: bias, precision and spatial resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Proksch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Density is a fundamental property of porous media such as snow. A wide range of snow properties and physical processes are linked to density, but few studies have addressed the uncertainty in snow density measurements. No study has yet considered the recent advances in snow measurement methods such as micro-computed tomography (CT. During the MicroSnow Davos 2014 workshop different approaches to measure snow density were applied in a controlled laboratory environment and in the field. Overall, the agreement between CT and gravimetric methods (density cutters was 5 to 9 %, with a bias of −5 to 2 %, expressed as percentage of the mean CT density. In the field, the density cutters tend to overestimate (1 to 6 % densities below and underestimate (1 to 6 % densities above 296 to 350 kg m−3, respectively, depending on the cutter type. Using the mean per layer of all measurement methods applied in the field (CT, box, wedge and cylinder cutter and ignoring ice layers, the variation of layer density between the methods was 2 to 5 % with a bias of −1 to 1 %. In general, our result suggests that snow densities measured by different methods agree within 9 %. However, the density profiles resolved by the measurement methods differed considerably. In particular, the millimeter scale density variations revealed by the high resolution CT contrasted the thick layers with sharp boundaries introduced by the observer. In this respect, the unresolved variation, i.e. the density variation within a layer, which is lost by sampling with lower resolution or layer aggregation, is critical when snow density measurements are used as boundary or initial conditions in numerical simulations.

  8. Neutron Flux Density Measured by Analysis of Annealing Heat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Fan; SHI; Yong-qian; ZHU; Qing-fu; LU; Jin; LI; Lai-dong

    2015-01-01

    Neutron flux density measurement by thermal analysis is a new method different from the previous.This method is first put the sample to the neutron field.Second,measure the annealingheat of the sample.Find out the suitable mixture of crystal boron and apatite to measure the neutron flux density.Then put the sample to the neutron field in

  9. Evaluation of Modified Pycnometric Method for Accurately Measuring the Density of Molten Nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; FANG Liang; FU Yuechao; YANG Lingchuan

    2004-01-01

    A modified pycnometric method has been developed to obtain accurate densities of molten nickel.The new method allows continuous measurement of density over a wide temperature range from a single experiment.The measurement error of the method was analyzed, and the total uncertainty of the measurement was estimated to be within ±0.34%. The measured density of molten nickel decreases linearly with increasing temperature over a range from the melting point to 1873K. The density at the melting point and the thermal expansion coefficient of molten nickel are 7.90Mg·m-3 and 1.92×10-4 K-1,respectively.

  10. Size and average density spectra of macromolecules obtained from hydrodynamic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, G M

    2007-02-01

    It is proposed to normalize the Mark-Kuhn-Houwink-Sakurada type of equation relating the hydrodynamic characteristics, such as intrinsic viscosity, velocity sedimentation coefficient and translational diffusion coefficient of linear macromolecules to their molecular masses for the values of linear density M(L) and the statistical segment length A. When the set of data covering virtually all known experimental information is normalized for M(L), it is presented as a size spectrum of linear polymer molecules. Further normalization for the A value reduces all data to two regions: namely the region exhibiting volume interactions and that showing hydrodynamic draining. For chains without intachain excluded volume effects these results may be reproduced using the Yamakawa-Fujii theory of wormlike cylinders. Data analyzed here cover a range of contour lengths of linear chains varying by three orders of magnitude, with the range of statistical segment lengths varying approximately 500 times. The plot of the dependence of [eta]M on M represents the spectrum of average specific volumes occupied by linear and branched macromolecules. Dendrimers and globular proteins for which the volume occupied by the molecule in solution is directly proportional to M have the lowest specific volume. The homologous series of macromolecules in these plots are arranged following their fractal dimensionality.

  11. Sperm fractions obtained following density gradient centrifugation in human ejaculates show differences in sperm DNA longevity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime Goslvez; Stephen Johnston; Carmen Lpez-Fernndez; Altea Goslbez; Francisca Arroyo; Jose Lus Fernndez; Juan G lvarez

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the DNA longevity characteristics associated with each resultant fraction following density gradient centrifugation (DGC) in comparison to that of the original neat ejaculated sample. Methods:An aliquot of neat semen (NSS) collected from 7 patients was processed using DGC resulting in 3 fractions;Fraction 1:seminal plasma/40%gradient interface (GI);Fraction 2:40%GI/80%GI;Fraction 3:80%GI/pellet. An aliquot of each fraction and NSS was cryopreserved, thawed and incubated at 37 ℃for 24h;the increase of sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed using the Dyn-Halosperm assay following 0, 3, 6 and 24h of incubation. Results:While there was a significant reduction in the incidence of baseline sperm DNA fragmentation following DGC in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity was shown to be higher in the NSS than in any other sub-population following incubation. The highest levels of baseline DNA damage were found in Fractions 1 and 2;these fractions also showed the highest rate DNA fragmentation following incubation, subsequently exhibiting the lowest DNA longevity. Conclusion:1) Unnecessary incubation of spermatozoa prior to artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization, should be avoided, since sperm DNA longevity is significantly reduced after ex vivo sperm handling and 2) Although sperm selection by DCG significantly reduces the baseline levels of SDF of sperm in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity in this fraction was ultimately lower following 24 h incubation when compared to sperm recovered from non-centrifuged NSS.

  12. The impact of mammographic imaging systems on density measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damases, Christine N.; Brennan, Patrick C.; McEntee, Mark F.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer equipment will affect a woman's breast density (BD) measurement. The data set comprised of 40 cases, each containing a combined image of the left craniocaudal (LCC) and left mediolateral oblique (LMLO). These images were obtained from 20 women age between 42-89 years. The images were acquired on two imaging systems (GE and Hologic) one year apart. Volumetric BD was assessed by using Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average BD% (AvBD%). Twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) examiners assessed the same images using the BIRADS BD scale 1-4. Statistical comparisons were performed on the means using Mann-Whitney, on correlation using Spearman's rank coefficient of correlation and agreement using Cohen's Kappa. The absolute median BIRADS difference between GE and Hologic was 0.225 (2.00 versus 2.00; pBIRADS for GE and Hologic systems showed strong positive correlation (ρ=0.904; pBIRADS density shown with Cohen's Kappa (κ=0.692; p<0.001), however the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG (κ=0.933; p<0.001).

  13. Quantum probability measures and tomographic probability densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amosov, GG; Man'ko, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Using a simple relation of the Dirac delta-function to generalized the theta-function, the relationship between the tomographic probability approach and the quantum probability measure approach with the description of quantum states is discussed. The quantum state tomogram expressed in terms of the

  14. Effect of geometrical features various objects on the data quality obtained with measured by TLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowicz, J. A.

    2017-08-01

    Collecting data on different building structures using Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) has become in recent years a very popular due to minimize the time required to complete the task as compared to traditional methods. Technical parameters of 3D scanning devices (digitizers) are increasingly being improved, and the accuracy of the data collected allows you to play not only the geometry of an existing object in a digital image, but also enables the assessment of his condition. This is possible thanks to the digitalization of existing objects e.g., a 3D laser scanner, with which is obtained a digital data base is presented in the form of a cloud of points and by using reverse engineering. Measurements using laser scanners depends to a large extent, on the quality of the returning beam reflected from the target surface, towards the receiver. High impact on the strength and quality of the beam returning to the geometric features of the object. These properties may contribute to the emergence of some, sometimes even serious errors during scanning of various shapes. The study defined the effect of the laser beam distortion during the measurement objects with the same material but with different geometrical features on their three-dimensional imaging obtained from measurements made using TLS. We present the problem of data quality, dependent on the deflection of the beam intensity and shape of the object selected examples. The knowledge of these problems allows to obtain valuable data necessary for the implementation of digitization and the visualization of virtually any building structure made of any materials. The studies has been proven that the increase in the density of scanning does not affect the values of mean square error. The increase in the angle of incidence of the beam onto a flat surface, however, causes a decrease in the intensity of scattered radiation that reaches the receiver. The article presents an analysis of the laser beam reflected from broken at

  15. Hydrogen concentration and mass density of diamondlike carbon films obtained by x-ray and neutron reflectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Findeisen, E.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Vigild, Martin Etchells

    1994-01-01

    Specular reflectivity of neutrons and x rays can be used to determine the scattering length density profile of a material perpendicular to its surface. We have applied these techniques to study amorphous, diamondlike, hydrocarbon films. By the combination of these two techniques we obtain not only...... the mass density, but also the concentration of hydrogen, which varies in our case between 0 and 30 at.%. This method is a new and nondestructive way to determine the concentration of hydrogen within an error of less than 2 at.% in samples with sharp interfaces. It is especially suited for diamondlike...... carbon films....

  16. Direct Measurement of the Density Matrix of a Quantum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekkadath, G. S.; Giner, L.; Chalich, Y.; Horton, M. J.; Banker, J.; Lundeen, J. S.

    2016-09-01

    One drawback of conventional quantum state tomography is that it does not readily provide access to single density matrix elements since it requires a global reconstruction. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a scheme that can be used to directly measure individual density matrix elements of general quantum states. The scheme relies on measuring a sequence of three observables, each complementary to the last. The first two measurements are made weak to minimize the disturbance they cause to the state, while the final measurement is strong. We perform this joint measurement on polarized photons in pure and mixed states to directly measure their density matrix. The weak measurements are achieved using two walk-off crystals, each inducing a polarization-dependent spatial shift that couples the spatial and polarization degrees of freedom of the photons. This direct measurement method provides an operational meaning to the density matrix and promises to be especially useful for large dimensional states.

  17. Reconstruction of conductivity and current density images using only one component of magnetic field measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jin Keun; Yoon, Jeong-Rock; Woo, Eung Je; Kwon, Ohin

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) is to provide current density images of a subject using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner with a current injection apparatus. The injection current generates a magnetic field that we can measure from MR phase images. We obtain internal current density images from the measured magnetic flux densities via Ampere's law. However, we must rotate the subject to acquire all of the three components of the induced magnetic flux density. This subject rotation is impractical in clinical MRI scanners when the subject is a human body. In this paper, we propose a way to eliminate the requirement of subject rotation by careful mathematical analysis of the MRCDI problem. In our new MRCDI technique, we need to measure only one component of the induced magnetic flux density and reconstruct both cross-sectional conductivity and current density images without any subject rotation.

  18. Non-invasive fluid density and viscosity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2012-05-01

    The noninvasively measurement of the density and viscosity of static or flowing fluids in a section of pipe such that the pipe performs as the sensing apparatus, is described. Measurement of a suitable structural vibration resonance frequency of the pipe and the width of this resonance permits the density and viscosity to be determined, respectively. The viscosity may also be measured by monitoring the decay in time of a vibration resonance in the pipe.

  19. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaub, S. C., E-mail: sschaub@mit.edu; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 167 Albany St., Bldg. NW16, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  20. Paramagnetic ionic liquids for measurements of density using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwambok, David K; Thuo, Martin M; Atkinson, Manza B J; Mirica, Katherine A; Shapiro, Nathan D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-09-03

    Paramagnetic ionic liquids (PILs) provide new capabilities to measurements of density using magnetic levitation (MagLev). In a typical measurement, a diamagnetic object of unknown density is placed in a container containing a PIL. The container is placed between two magnets (typically NdFeB, oriented with like poles facing). The density of the diamagnetic object can be determined by measuring its position in the magnetic field along the vertical axis (levitation height, h), either as an absolute value or relative to internal standards of known density. For density measurements by MagLev, PILs have three advantages over solutions of paramagnetic salts in aqueous or organic solutions: (i) negligible vapor pressures; (ii) low melting points; (iii) high thermal stabilities. In addition, the densities, magnetic susceptibilities, glass transition temperatures, thermal decomposition temperatures, viscosities, and hydrophobicities of PILs can be tuned over broad ranges by choosing the cation-anion pair. The low melting points and high thermal stabilities of PILs provide large liquidus windows for density measurements. This paper demonstrates applications and advantages of PILs in density-based analyses using MagLev.

  1. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Kurth, William; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, f_{uhr}, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  2. Optical density measurements in a multiphase cryogenic fluid flow system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin; Wiley, John; Gregory, Don A.

    2006-05-01

    An accurate determination of fluid flow in a cryogenic propulsion environment is difficult under the best of circumstances. The extreme thermal environment increases the mechanical constraints, and variable density conditions create havoc with traditional flow measurement schemes. Presented here are secondary results of cryogenic testing of an all-optical sensor capable of a mass flow measurement by directly interrogating the fluid's density state and a determination of the fluid's velocity. The sensor's measurement basis does not rely on any inherent assumptions as to the state of the fluid flow (density or otherwise). The fluid sensing interaction model will be discussed. Current test and evaluation data and future development work will be presented.

  3. A magnetic suspension system for measuring liquid density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Centeno González

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Density is a derived quantity of mass and length; it is defined as mass per volume unit and its SI unit is kg/m3. National metrology institutes have been designing and building their own magnetic suspension systems during the last 5 decades for making fluid density measurements; this has allowed them to carry out research into liquids and gases’ physical characteristics. This paper was aimed at designing and developing a magnetic suspension system for a magnetic balance used in determining liquid density to be used in CENAM’s metrology density laboratories.

  4. Mammographic density measurement: a comparison of automated volumetric density measurement to BIRADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Mark F.; Damases, Christine N.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare mammographic breast density assessment with automated volumetric software with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) categorization by radiologists on two imaging systems. A data set of 120 mammograms was classified by twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) Examiners. The mammograms were of 20 women (mean age, 60 years; range, 42-89 years). These women were image twice once with GE system and the following year with Hologic system. These images also had their volumetric density classified by using Volpara Density Grade (VDG). The radiologists were asked to estimate the mammographic density according to BIRADS categories (1- 4). There was a moderate agreement between VDG classification and radiologist BIRADS density shown with Cohen's Kappa (K=0.45; pBIRADS having a mean of 2.13 and the mean VDG higher at 2.50 (t = -11.99; pBIRADS showed a positive strong correlation (r=0.84; pBIRADS and VDG AvBD% also showed a strong positive correlation (r=0.86; pBIRADS categories for each of the VDG AvBD% classifications. Using Volpara, the Hologic system showed a higher meanAvBD% (10.02 vs. 9.97). However using BIRADS the Hologic systems showed a lower mean (2.05 vs. 2.21). Automated systems demonstrated higher internal validity. The results demonstrated a moderate agreement and a strong correlation between VDG classification and radiologist BIRADS density assessment.

  5. Hydrogen density measurements using an open-ended microwave cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, N. C.; Smetana, J.

    1972-01-01

    The density measurement of liquid hydrogen and two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous hydrogen is considered. This paper describes a complete prototype system that uses an open-ended microwave cavity for making dynamic density measurements of flowing hydrogen in a transfer line. The theory of operation along with test results for both the single- and two-phase cases are presented and discussed.

  6. The new method for the residual gas density measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Anashin, V V; Krasnov, A A; Malyshev, O B; Nas'mov, V P; Pyata, E I; Shaftan, T V

    2001-01-01

    A new method of measurement for residual gas density in the vacuum chambers in presence of synchrotron radiation (SR) is described. The method is based on using a photomultiplier tube for the detection of the SR-stimulated residual gas luminescence, which is proportional to the residual gas density and SR intensity. The design of the experimental setup and results of the measurements of densities of residual gases (H sub 2 , CO sub 2 , CO, N sub 2 , Ar and O sub 2) are submitted.

  7. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymantas Kazys

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10−3 g/cm3 (1%.

  8. Obtaining Highly Excited Eigenstates of Many-Body Localized Hamiltonians by the Density Matrix Renormalization Group Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemani, Vedika; Pollmann, Frank; Sondhi, S L

    2016-06-17

    The eigenstates of many-body localized (MBL) Hamiltonians exhibit low entanglement. We adapt the highly successful density-matrix renormalization group method, which is usually used to find modestly entangled ground states of local Hamiltonians, to find individual highly excited eigenstates of MBL Hamiltonians. The adaptation builds on the distinctive spatial structure of such eigenstates. We benchmark our method against the well-studied random field Heisenberg model in one dimension. At moderate to large disorder, the method successfully obtains excited eigenstates with high accuracy, thereby enabling a study of MBL systems at much larger system sizes than those accessible to exact-diagonalization methods.

  9. Tree architecture and forest canopy structure obtained from terrestrial LiDAR measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Reiner; Bittner, Sebastian; Ritter, Daniel; Priesack, Eckart

    2013-04-01

    The modelling of the water transfer in vegetation on a small scale is important when the interaction of single plants and the competition of species are in focus of interest. Explicit geometrical functional-structural models that simulate the water flow in the single plant components such as roots, stem, and branches have been developed recently. These models need an explicit geometrical model of the plant hydrology, more precisely the possible pathway of the xylem and phloem water flow. Roots, stem, and branches are represented by connected porous cylinder elements that are divided into the inner heartwood cylinders surrounded by xylem and phloem. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) has been successfully applied to assess the structure of the aboveground vegetation in situ in the last years. Based on the technique of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) this method provides a set of three dimensional points that are located on the surface of objects such as vegetation. A further data processing of this three dimensional point cloud (typically consistent of some million points) enables to obtain structural properties like the spatial leaf distribution or large scale characteristics such as the stand height or plant density. Whereas the resolution and detection rate of the laser scanners have increased in the last years, there is still a need for a data handling especially in the field of ecology. We present the results of a skeleton extraction algorithm that is able to obtain the position and size of branch and stem cylinder elements from a three-dimensional point cloud obtained by TLS field measurements. No manual data processing is necessary to apply the algorithm allowing the analysis of a high number of individual plants. The resulting hydraulic architecture determines the possible pathway of water through the stem and the branches. It can consist of several thousands of connected cylinders depending on the plants that are observed. Examples are given and discussed

  10. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Emilie M.M. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Yoo, Albert J. [Texas Stroke Institute, Plano, TX (United States); Beenen, Ludo F.; Majoie, Charles B. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berkhemer, Olvert A. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Neurology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Blanken, Mark D. den; Wismans, Carrie [AMC, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Niessen, Wiro J. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft (Netherlands); Marquering, Henk A. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); AMC, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: on behalf of the MR CLEAN investigators

    2016-02-15

    Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and non-expert observers. For 132 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, three experts and two trained observers determined thrombus density by placing three standardized regions of interest (ROIs) in the thrombus and corresponding contralateral arterial segment. Subsequently, absolute and relative thrombus densities were determined using either one or three ROIs. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was determined, and Bland-Altman analysis was performed to evaluate interobserver and intermethod agreement. Accuracy of the trained observer was evaluated with a reference expert observer using the same statistical analysis. The highest interobserver agreement was obtained for absolute thrombus measurements using three ROIs (ICCs ranging from 0.54 to 0.91). In general, interobserver agreement was lower for relative measurements, and for using one instead of three ROIs. Interobserver agreement of trained non-experts and experts was similar. Accuracy of the trained observer measurements was comparable to the expert interobserver agreement and was better for absolute measurements and with three ROIs. The agreement between the one ROI and three ROI methods was good. Absolute thrombus density measurement has superior interobserver agreement compared to relative density measurement. Interobserver variation is smaller when multiple ROIs are used. Trained non-expert observers can accurately and reproducibly assess absolute thrombus densities using three ROIs. (orig.)

  11. Measured Predictively by a Density-Salinity Refractometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Lorenzon

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are major contributors to hemolymph density, and the present study correlates the easy and low cost measure of hemolymph density by a density-salinity refractometer with the total protein concentration, measured with a colorimetric method. Moreover, the study evaluates the accuracy of the relationship and provides a conversion factor from hemolymph density to protein in seven species of crustaceans, representative of taxa far apart in the phylogenetic tree and characterized by different life habits. Measuring serum-protein concentration by using a refractometer can provide a non-destructive field method to assess crustacean populations/species protein-related modifications of physiological state without need of costly laboratory facilities and procedures.

  12. Wireless Sensor Node for Surface Seawater Density Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Saletti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An electronic meter to measure surface seawater density is presented. It is based on the measurement of the difference in displacements of a surface level probe and a weighted float, which according to Archimedes’ law depends on the density of the water. The displacements are simultaneously measured using a high-accuracy magnetostrictive sensor, to which a custom electronic board provides a wireless connection and power supply so that it can become part of a wireless sensor network. The electronics are designed so that different kinds of wireless networks can be used, by simply changing the wireless module and the relevant firmware of the microcontroller. Lastly, laboratory and at-sea tests are presented and discussed in order to highlight the functionality and the performance of a prototype of the wireless density meter node in a Bluetooth radio network. The experimental results show a good agreement of the values of the calculated density compared to reference hydrometer readings.

  13. Regional time-density measurement of myocardial perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusemann, Christian D.; Breen, Jerome F.; Robb, Richard A.

    2003-05-01

    The measurement of time-density relationships of the myocardium in studies of Magnetic Resonance perfusion data sets is a clinical technique used in assessing myocardial perfusion. Traditionally, to measure the time-density relationship a physician draws a region on the same 2-D image of the myocardium in sequential cardiac cycles. Throughout multiple cardiac cycles the density changes in this region are measured. A major limitation of this technique is change in anatomy relative to the selected region on the myocardium during consecutive cardiac cycles. This causes measurement errors, which are amplified if the traced region does not encompass the entire myocardial thickness, or includes a boundary exterior to the epicardial or endocardial surface. The technique described in this paper uses approximately the same myocardial region throughout the entire perfusion study, which insures inclusion of the entire endocardial to epicardial region and exclusion of exterior regions. Moreover, this region can be subdivided into smaller regions of interest. This can be accomplished by careful segmentation and reformatting of the data into polar coordinates. This allows sectioning both axially and transaxially through the myocardium permitting regional assessment of perfusion specific values such as maximum and/or the time to reach maximum density. These values can then be illustrated using density-mapped colors or time-density curves. This measurement and display technique may provide enhanced detection and evaluation of regional deficits in myocardial contractility and perfusion.

  14. Mode I Critical Stress Intensity Factor of Medium - Density Fiberboard Obtained by Single-Edge - Notched Bending Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yoshihara

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mode I critical stress intensity factor (KIc obtained by single-edge-notched bending (SENB tests of medium-density fiberboard (MDF was experimentally analyzed. In the SENB test, the critical load for crack propagation (Pc was determined from the relationship between load/loading-line displacement and load/crack opening displacement (COD. A double cantilever beam (DCB test was also conducted and the results were compared with those of SENB tests. The value of Mode I critical stress intensity factor was obtained by introducing an additional crack length, when the crack length ranged from 0.5 to 0.7 times the depth of the specimen. This range coincided well with that used to derive the appropriate KIc value in the single-edge-notched tension (SENT test, which was conducted using the specimens with a similar confi guration cut from the MDF panel used in this study.

  15. Plasma density evolution in plasma opening switch obtained by a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Ren, Jing; Guo, Fan; Zhou, LiangJi; Li, Ye; He, An; Jiang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    To understand the formation process of vacuum gap in coaxial microsecond conduction time plasma opening switch (POS), we have made measurements of the line-integrated plasma density during switch operation using a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer. The conduction current and conduction time in experiments are about 120 kA and 1 μs, respectively. As a result, more than 85% of conduction current has been transferred to an inductive load with rise time of 130 ns. The radial dependence of the density is measured by changing the radial location of the line-of-sight for shots with the same nominal POS parameters. During the conduction phase, the line-integrated plasma density in POS increases at all radial locations over the gun-only case by further ionization of material injected from the guns. The current conduction is observed to cause a radial redistribution of the switch plasma. A vacuum gap forms rapidly in the plasma at 5.5 mm from the center conductor, which is consistent with the location where magnetic pressure is the largest, allowing current to be transferred from the POS to the load.

  16. A Multi-Point Sensor Based on Optical Fiber for the Measurement of Electrolyte Density in Lead-Acid Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao-Paz, Ana M.; Marcos-Acevedo, Jorge; del Río-Vázquez, Alfredo; Martínez-Peñalver, Carlos; Lago-Ferreiro, Alfonso; Nogueiras-Meléndez, Andrés A.; Doval-Gandoy, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a multi-point optical fiber-based sensor for the measurement of electrolyte density in lead-acid batteries. It is known that the battery charging process creates stratification, due to the different densities of sulphuric acid and water. In order to study this process, density measurements should be obtained at different depths. The sensor we describe in this paper, unlike traditional sensors, consists of several measurement points, allowing density measurements at different depths inside the battery. The obtained set of measurements helps in determining the charge (SoC) and state of health (SoH) of the battery. PMID:22319262

  17. Finding the Density of Objects without Measuring Mass and Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumba, Frackson; Tsige, Mesfin

    2007-01-01

    A simple method based on the moment of forces and Archimedes' principle is described for finding density without measuring the mass and volume of an object. The method involves balancing two unknown objects of masses M[subscript 1] and M[subscript 2] on each side of a pivot on a metre rule and measuring their corresponding moment arms. The object…

  18. WSN-Based Space Charge Density Measurement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dawei; Yuan, Haiwen; Lv, Jianxun; Ju, Yong

    2017-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission line endures the drawback of large area, because of which the utilization of cable for space charge density monitoring system is of inconvenience. Compared with the traditional communication network, wireless sensor network (WSN) shows advantages in small volume, high flexibility and strong self-organization, thereby presenting great potential in solving the problem. Additionally, WSN is more suitable for the construction of distributed space charge density monitoring system as it has longer distance and higher mobility. A distributed wireless system is designed for collecting and monitoring the space charge density under HVDC transmission lines, which has been widely applied in both Chinese state grid HVDC test base and power transmission projects. Experimental results of the measuring system demonstrated its adaptability in the complex electromagnetic environment under the transmission lines and the ability in realizing accurate, flexible, and stable demands for the measurement of space charge density.

  19. Void alignment and density profile applied to measuring cosmological parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, De-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We study the orientation and density profiles of the cosmological voids with SDSS10 data. Using voids to test Alcock-Paczynski effect has been proposed and tested in both simulations and actual SDSS data. Previous observations imply that there exist an empirical stretching factor which plays an important role in the voids' orientation. Simulations indicate that this empirical stretching factor is caused by the void galaxies' peculiar velocities. Recently Hamaus et al. found that voids' density profiles are universal and their average velocities satisfy linear theory very well. In this article we first confirm that the stretching effect exists using independent analysis. We then apply the universal density profile to measure the cosmological parameters. We find that the void density profile can be a tool to measure the cosmological parameters.

  20. Measurements of electron density profiles using an angular filter refractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberberger, D., E-mail: dhab@lle.rochester.edu; Ivancic, S.; Hu, S. X.; Boni, R.; Barczys, M.; Craxton, R. S.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A novel diagnostic technique, angular filter refractometry (AFR), has been developed to characterize high-density, long-scale-length plasmas relevant to high-energy-density physics experiments. AFR measures plasma densities up to 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3} with a 263-nm probe laser and is used to study the plasma expansion from CH foil and spherical targets that are irradiated with ∼9 kJ of ultraviolet (351-nm) laser energy in a 2-ns pulse. The data elucidate the temporal evolution of the plasma profile for the CH planar targets and the dependence of the plasma profile on target radius for CH spheres.

  1. Density and Temperature Measurements in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2003-10-01

    We present electron density and temperature measurements from an active region observed above the limb with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Density-sensitive line ratios from Si VIII and S X indicate densities greater than 108 cm-3 as high as 200" (or 145 Mm) above the limb. At these heights, static, uniformly heated loop models predict densities close to 107 cm-3. Differential emission measure analysis shows that the observed plasma is nearly isothermal with a mean temperature of about 1.5 MK and a dispersion of about 0.2 MK. Both the differential emission measure and the Si XI/Si VIII line ratios indicate only small variations in the temperature at the heights observed. These measurements confirm recent observations from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer of ``overdense'' plasma at temperatures near 1 MK in solar active regions. Time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations suggest that impulsive heating models can account for the large densities, but they have a difficult time reproducing the narrow range of observed temperatures. The observations of overdense, nearly isothermal plasma in the solar corona provide a significant challenge to theories of coronal heating.

  2. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects.

  3. Comparison of local stress values obtained by two measuring methods on blast furnace shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bigoš

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes measuring of time behaviour specified for local stress increments on the blast furnace shell that were performed using strain gauge sensors. These results are compared with values obtained by means of the second specific measuring method. There is also presented in this paper a commentary and discussion concerning the measured time behaviour obtained from the both measuring methods. This article presents results from another of experimental analysis series concerning the blast furnace shell in one concrete metallurgical plant.

  4. Simulation of density measurements in plasma wakefields using photo acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Sadler, James; Burrows, Philip N; Trines, Raoul; Holloway, James; Wing, Matthew; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One obstacle in plasma accelerator development is the limitation of techniques to diagnose and measure plasma wakefield parameters. In this paper, we present a novel concept for the density measurement of a plasma wakefield using photon acceleration, supported by extensive particle in cell simulations of a laser pulse that copropagates with a wakefield. The technique can provide the perturbed electron density profile in the laser’s reference frame, averaged over the propagation length, to be accurate within 10%. We discuss the limitations that affect the measurement: small frequency changes, photon trapping, laser displacement, stimulated Raman scattering, and laser beam divergence. By considering these processes, one can determine the optimal parameters of the laser pulse and its propagation length. This new technique allows a characterization of the density perturbation within a plasma wakefield accelerator.

  5. TRACTOGRAPHY DENSITY AND NETWORK MEASURES IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Gautam; Nir, Talia M; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-04-01

    Brain connectivity declines in Alzheimer's disease (AD), both functionally and structurally. Connectivity maps and networks derived from diffusion-based tractography offer new ways to track disease progression and to understand how AD affects the brain. Here we set out to identify (1) which fiber network measures show greatest differences between AD patients and controls, and (2) how these effects depend on the density of fibers extracted by the tractography algorithm. We computed brain networks from diffusion-weighted images (DWI) of the brain, in 110 subjects (28 normal elderly, 56 with early and 11 with late mild cognitive impairment, and 15 with AD). We derived connectivity matrices and network topology measures, for each subject, from whole-brain tractography and cortical parcellations. We used an ODF lookup table to speed up fiber extraction, and to exploit the full information in the orientation distribution function (ODF). This made it feasible to compute high density connectivity maps. We used accelerated tractography to compute a large number of fibers to understand what effect fiber density has on network measures and in distinguishing different disease groups in our data. We focused on global efficiency, transitivity, path length, mean degree, density, modularity, small world, and assortativity measures computed from weighted and binary undirected connectivity matrices. Of all these measures, the mean nodal degree best distinguished diagnostic groups. High-density fiber matrices were most helpful for picking up the more subtle clinical differences, e.g. between mild cognitively impaired (MCI) and normals, or for distinguishing subtypes of MCI (early versus late). Care is needed in clinical analyses of brain connectivity, as the density of extracted fibers may affect how well a network measure can pick up differences between patients and controls.

  6. Measurement of hard tissue density of head phantom based on the HU by using CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Sun; Kang, Dong Wan; Kim, Jae Duk [School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine a conversion coefficient for Hounsfield Units(HU) to material density (g cm{sup -3}) obtained from cone-beam computed tomography (CBMercuRay{sup TM}) data and to measure the hard tissue density based on the Hounsfield scale on dental head phantom. CT Scanner Phantom (AAPM) equipped with CT Number Insert consists of five cylindrical pins of materials with different densities and teflon ring was scanned by using the CBMercuRay{sup TM} (Hitachi, Tokyo, Japan) volume scanner. The raw data were converted into DICOM format and the HU of different areas of CT number insert measured by using CBWorks{sup TM}. Linear regression analysis and Student t-test were performed statistically. There was no significant difference (P>0.54) between real densities and measured densities. A linear regression was performed using the density, {rho} (g cm{sup -3}), as the dependent variable in terms of the HU (H). The regression equation obtained was {rho}=0.00072 H-0.01588 with an R2 value of 0.9968. Density values based on the Hounsfield scale was 1697.1 {+-} 24.9 HU in cortical bone, 526.5 {+-} 44.4 HU in trabecular bone, 2639.1 {+-} 48.7 HU in enamel, 1246.1 {+-} 39.4 HU in dentin of dental head phantom. CBCT provides an effective option for determination of material density expressed as Hounsfield Units.

  7. Density measurements of compressed-liquid dimethyl ether + pentane mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outcalt, Stephanie L; Lemmon, Eric W

    2016-01-01

    Compressed-liquid densities of three compositions of the binary mixture dimethyl ether (CAS No. 115-10-6) + pentane (CAS No. 109-66-0) have been measured with a vibrating U-tube densimeter. Measurements were made at temperatures from 270 K to 390 K with pressures from 1.0 MPa to 50 MPa. The overall combined uncertainty (k=2) of the density data is 0.81 kg·m(-3). Data presented here have been used to improve a previously formulated Helmholtz energy based mixture model. The newly derived parameters are given.

  8. Spectral density matrix of a single photon measured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Wojciech; Kolenderski, Piotr; Frankowski, Robert

    2007-09-21

    We propose and demonstrate a method for measuring the spectral density matrix of a single photon pulse. The method is based on registering Hong-Ou-Mandel interference between a photon to be measured and a pair of attenuated and suitably delayed laser pulses described by a known spectral amplitude. The density matrix is retrieved from a two-dimensional interferogram of coincidence counts. The method has been implemented for a type-I down-conversion source, pumped by ultrashort laser pulses. The experimental results agree well with a theoretical model which takes into account the temporal as well as spatial effects in the source.

  9. Spectral density matrix of a single photon measured

    CERN Document Server

    Wasilewski, W; Frankowski, R; Wasilewski, Wojciech; Kolenderski, Piotr; Frankowski, Robert

    2007-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a method for measuring the spectral density matrix of a single photon pulse. The method is based on registering Hong-Ou-Mandel interference between photon to be measured and a pair of attenuated and suitably delayed laser pulses described by a known spectral amplitude. The density matrix is retrieved from a two-dimensional interferogram of coincidence counts. The method has been implemented for a type-I downconversion source, pumped by ultrashort laser pulses. The experimental results agree well with a theoretical model which takes into account the temporal as well as spatial effects in the source.

  10. Outcomes of bone density measurements in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolland, Mark J; Grey, Andrew; Rowbotham, David S

    2016-01-29

    Some guidelines recommend that patients with newly diagnosed coeliac disease undergo bone density scanning. We assessed the bone density results in a cohort of patients with coeliac disease. We searched bone density reports over two 5-year periods in all patients from Auckland District Health Board (2008-12) and in patients under 65 years from Counties Manukau District Health Board (2009-13) for the term 'coeliac.' Reports for 137 adults listed coeliac disease as an indication for bone densitometry. The average age was 47 years, body mass index (BMI) 25 kg/m(2), and 77% were female. The median time between coeliac disease diagnosis and bone densitometry was 261 days. The average bone density Z-score was slightly lower than expected (Z-score -0.3 to 0.4) at the lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck, but 88-93% of Z-scores at each site lay within the normal range. Low bone density was strongly related to BMI: the proportions with Z-score 30 kg/m(2) were 28%, 15%, 6% and 0% respectively. Average bone density was normal, suggesting that bone density measurement is not indicated routinely in coeliac disease, but could be considered on a case-by-case basis for individuals with strong risk factors for fracture.

  11. Comparison of bone density measurement techniques: DXA and Archimedes' principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, M J; Hegsted, M; Jones, K L; Delany, J P; Kime, J C; Melancon, L E; Tulley, R T; Hong, K D

    1997-11-01

    The standard method for determination of density (g/cm3) of bones from small animals has been the application of Archimedes' principle. A recent development has been software for the determination of "density" (g/cm2) of small animal bones with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We compared Archimedes' principle and DXA (Hologic QDR-2000) in the measurement of the densities of whole and hollowed femurs of 5- to 6-month-old retired female breeder rats. In an attempt to ensure detectable treatment differences, rats were used from a low-vitamin D Holtzman and a supplemental-vitamin D Sprague-Dawley colony. Whole femur densities were higher for supplemental-vitamin D colony rats than for low vitamin D rats using both techniques (Archimedes' principle, p Archimedes' principle than for DXA. Other variables such as femur ash weight and calcium content were also highly correlated to densities with both techniques. Hollowed femur density values were higher than whole femur values with Archimedes' principle but lower with DXA. Colony effects for hollowed femur densities were diminished with Archimedes' principle (p < 0.03) and eliminated with DXA (p < 0.53). Investigation of whole bones is more biologically relevant, and both techniques were effective in detecting differences between whole femurs from low-vitamin D and supplemental-vitamin D colony rats.

  12. Spatially resolved density and ionization measurements of shocked foams using x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, M. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Scott, H. A.; Biener, M. M.; Fein, J. R.; Fournier, K. B.; Gamboa, E. J.; Kemp, G. E.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J. -E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.

    2016-09-28

    We present experiments at the Trident laser facility demonstrating the use of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to simultaneously measure density, ionization state populations, and electron temperature in shocked foams. An imaging x-ray spectrometer obtained spatially resolved measurements of Ti K-α emission. Density profiles were measured from K-α intensity. Ti ionization state distributions and electron temperatures were inferred by fitting K-α spectra to spectra from CRETIN simulations. This work shows that XRF provides a powerful tool to complement other diagnostics to make equation of state measurements of shocked materials containing a suitable tracer element.

  13. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudisco, O; Lucca Fabris, A; Falcetta, C; Accatino, L; De Angelis, R; Manente, M; Ferri, F; Florean, M; Neri, C; Mazzotta, C; Pavarin, D; Pollastrone, F; Rocchi, G; Selmo, A; Tasinato, L; Trezzolani, F; Tuccillo, A A

    2013-03-01

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10(16) m(-3) and 10(19) m(-3)) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small (λ = 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02° has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 × 10(16) m(-3).

  14. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tudisco, O.; Falcetta, C.; De Angelis, R.; Florean, M.; Neri, C.; Mazzotta, C.; Pollastrone, F.; Rocchi, G.; Tuccillo, A. A. [ENEA CR Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Lucca Fabris, A.; Manente, M.; Ferri, F.; Tasinato, L.; Trezzolani, F. [CISAS ' G.Colombo,' Universita degli studi di Padova, Via Venezia 15, 35131 Padova (Italy); Accatino, L. [ACC Antenna and MW tech, Via Trieste 16/B, 10098 Rivoli (Italy); Pavarin, D. [Dip. di Ingegneria Industriale (DII), Universita degli Studi di Padova, Via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova (Italy); Selmo, A. [RESIA, Studio Progettazione e Realizzazione di Apparati Elettronici, via Roma 17, 37041 Albaredo d' Adige (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10{sup 16} m{sup -3} and 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small ({lambda}= 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02 Degree-Sign has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}.

  15. Crystal fields of dilute Tb, Dy, or Er in Sc obtained by magnetization measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, J.; Touborg, P.

    1976-01-01

    Crystal-field parameters for dilute Sc-Tb, Sc-Dy, and Sc-Er alloys have been obtained by fitting theoretical expressions to the experimentally measured paramagnetic susceptibility. The initial susceptibility was measured and corrected for the effects of ordering at the lowest temperatures in the ...

  16. Comparison of low-density lipoprotein obtained from the Friedewald formula and new formulae in a heterogeneous population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Guevara-Cuéllar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C should ideally be determined by beta quantification or enzymatic methods, there are limitations in developing countries. The goal of this study is to compare LDL-C obtained through three formulae (LDL-Cnf with LDL-C obtained through the Friedewald formula (LDL-Cf using LDL-C through enzymatic methods as the most-accepted reference method in clinical practice (LDL-Cr.Methods: A concordance study was carried out in a reference laboratory in Cali, Colombia. The three formulae were (mg/dl: Men with triglycerides under 400 mg/dl: LDL-C = Total Cholesterol (TC - triglycerides (TG /6.5 - 45; men with triglycerides equal to or greater than 400 mg/dl: LDL-C = (TC - (TG / 7 -50 and women: LDL-C = (TC-(TG /6.5 - 70.Results: Three-hundred fifteen values were obtained of which 53% were for women. The mean age and LDL-Cr were 54 years (±15.8 and 112.1 mg/dl (±32.5, respectively. The median (interquartile range, mg/dl of TC, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C and TG were 204 mg/dl (171-229, 51 mg/dl (41-61, and 156 mg/dl (99-237, respectively. There were no differences between mean values of LDL-Cr and LDL-Cnf (113.48 vs. 112.67 mg/dl; p=0.45. The intraclass correlation coefficient among LDL-Cr and LDL-Cf and LDL-Cnf were high (R=0.93 and 0.92, respectively. The correlation between LDL-Cf and LDL-Cnf was 0.95. There is no difference between the areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve with the level of LDL-Cr at 160 mg/dl for LDL-Cnf and LDL-Cf. (0.94 vs. 0.93; p=0.27.Conclusion: There is high concordance between LDL-Cf and LDL-Cnf. These formulae could be an alternative when there are limitations to determine LDL-C because of the lack of enzymatic methods or through Friedewald formula due to the absence of HDL-C.

  17. Comparison of low-density lipoprotein obtained from the Friedewald formula and new formulae in a heterogeneous population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Guevara-Amador

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C should ideally be determined by beta quantification or enzymatic methods, there are limitations in developing countries. The goal of this study is to compare LDL-C obtained through three formulae (LDL-Cnf with LDL-C obtained through the Friedewald formula (LDL-Cf using LDL-C through enzymatic methods as the most-accepted reference method in clinical practice (LDL-Cr. Methods: A concordance study was carried out in a reference laboratory in Cali, Colombia. The three formulae were (mg/dl: Men with triglycerides under 400 mg/dl: LDL-C = Total Cholesterol (TC - triglycerides (TG /6.5 - 45; men with triglycerides equal to or greater than 400 mg/dl: LDL-C = (TC - (TG / 7 -50 and women: LDL-C = (TC-(TG /6.5 - 70. Results: Three-hundred fifteen values were obtained of which 53% were for women. The mean age and LDL-Cr were 54 years (±15.8 and 112.1 mg/dl (±32.5, respectively. The median (interquartile range, mg/dl of TC, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C and TG were 204 mg/dl (171-229, 51 mg/dl (41-61, and 156 mg/dl (99-237, respectively. There were no differences between mean values of LDL-Cr and LDL-Cnf (113.48 vs. 112.67 mg/dl; p=0.45. The intraclass correlation coefficient among LDL-Cr and LDL-Cf and LDL-Cnf were high (R=0.93 and 0.92, respectively. The correlation between LDL-Cf and LDL-Cnf was 0.95. There is no difference between the areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve with the level of LDL-Cr at 160 mg/dl for LDL-Cnf and LDL-Cf. (0.94 vs. 0.93; p=0.27. Conclusion: There is high concordance between LDL-Cf and LDL-Cnf. These formulae could be an alternative when there are limitations to determine LDL-C because of the lack of enzymatic methods or through Friedewald formula due to the absence of HDL-C.

  18. Improved measurement of ice layer density in seasonal snowpacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Watts

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ice layers in snowpacks introduce uncertainty in satellite derived estimates of snow water equivalent, have ecological impacts on plants and animals, and change the thermal and vapour transport properties of the snowpack. The microstructure and specifically the density of ice layers is poorly quantified. Here we present a new field method, for measuring the density of ice layers caused by melt or rain-on-snow events. The method was used on 87 ice layer samples in the Canadian Arctic and mid-latitudes; the mean measured ice layer density was 909 ± 18 kg m−3 with a standard deviation of 23 kg m−3, significantly higher than values typically used in the literature.

  19. Urinary density measurement and analysis methods in neonatal unit care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão Cardoso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess urine collection methods through cotton in contact with genitalia and urinary collector to measure urinary density in newborns. This is a quantitative intervention study carried out in a neonatal unit of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil, in 2010. The sample consisted of 61 newborns randomly chosen to compose the study group. Most neonates were full term (31/50.8% males (33/54%. Data on urinary density measurement through the methods of cotton and collector presented statistically significant differences (p<0.05. The analysis of interquartile ranges between subgroups resulted in statistical differences between urinary collector/reagent strip (1005 and cotton/reagent strip (1010, however there was no difference between urinary collector/ refractometer (1008 and cotton/ refractometer. Therefore, further research should be conducted with larger sampling using methods investigated in this study and whenever possible, comparing urine density values to laboratory tests.

  20. 3 dimensional ionospheric electron density reconstruction based on GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, C.; Schlüter, S.; Jacobi, C.; Jakowski, N.

    When radio waves as sended by the naviagtion system GPS are passing through the ionosphere they are subject to delays in phase, travel time and polarisation which is an effect of the free electrons. The measured integrated value of Total Electron Content can be utilised for three-dimensional reconstruction of electron density patterns in the ionosphere. Here a tomographic approach is represented. Scince the distribution of data is very sparse and patchy we decided for an algebraic iterative algorithm. The ground based GPS data collected by IGS receivers can be combined by space based GPS of radio limb sounding, incoherent scatter radar and ionosondes data. Hereby, radio occultation data improve beside the amount of available data especially the vertical resolution of electron density distribution. Ionosonde peack electron densities are taken as stop criteria determination for iteration. Reconstructed ionospheric scenarios and validations of the system by independent measurements are presented.

  1. Applicability of concentrations obtained by working environment measurement to assessment of personal exposure concentrations of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shinobu; Natsumeda, Shuichiro; Hara, Kunio; Yoshida, Satoru; Sakurai, Haruhiko; Ichiba, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the applicability of Japanese working environment measurements to assessment of personal exposure concentrations of chemicals by comparing both levels of concentrations. The chemicals measured in this study comprised eight kinds of vaporous chemicals as well as two kinds of chemicals in dust. Personal exposure measurements, Japanese working environment measurements and spot sampling measurements were undertaken in 70 companies. Personal exposure concentrations and the arithmetic mean value (EA2) of the working environment measurement concentrations obtained according to the Japanese working environment control system had statistically positive correlations (r=0.732-0.893, pvalues of personal exposure concentrations divided by EA2 ranged from 0.17 to 7.69 for vaporous chemicals and from 0.27 to 18.06 for dust. There was a relatively large difference between the personal exposure concentrations and the EA2 obtained in weighing, forming and bonding use-processes. In such cases, the B-value measured in ten minutes in the Japanese working environment control system, which is almost the same as the spot measurement concentration in this study, is supposed to be substituted for the EA2 value. Ten times the EA2 of the working environment measurement concentrations, or ten times the B-value, obtained according to the Japanese working environment control system can be used to conservatively estimate the personal exposure concentrations in EU workplaces as well as in occupational exposure scenarios of the Regulation on Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals.

  2. X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogel

    CERN Document Server

    Tabata, Makoto; Adachi, Ichiro; Morita, Takeshi; Nishikawa, Keiko; 10.1016/j.nima.2012.09.001

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogels used as radiator in proximity-focusing ring-imaging Cherenkov detectors. To obtain high performance in a large-area detector, a key characteristic of radiator is the density (i.e. refractive index) uniformity of an individual aerogel monolith. At a refractive index of n = 1.05, our requirement for the refractive index uniformity in the transverse plane direction of an aerogel tile is |\\delta (n - 1)/(n - 1)| < 4% in a focusing dual layer radiator (with different refractive indices) scheme. We applied the radiographic technique to evaluate the density uniformity of our original aerogels from a trial production and that of Panasonic products (SP-50) as a reference, and to confirm they have sufficient density uniformity within \\pm 1% along the transverse plane direction. The measurement results show that the proposed technique can quantitatively estimate the density uniformity of aerogels.

  3. Quantitative measurement of the orbital angular momentum density of light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we derive expressions for the orbital angular momentum (OAM) density of light, for both symmetric and nonsymmetric optical fields, that allow a direct comparison between theory and experiment. We present a simple method for measuring...

  4. Measurement of D-region electron density by partial reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, R. O.; Mott, D. L.; Gammill, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of electron density in the lower ionosphere were made at White Sands Missile Range throughout the STRATCOM VIII launch day using a partial-reflection sounder. Information regarding the sounder's antenna pattern was gained from the passage of the balloon over the array.

  5. Current Density Measurements of an Annular-Geometry Ion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Rohit; Patterson, Michael J.; Herman, Daniel A.; Foster, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the annular-geometry ion engine, or AGI-Engine, has been shown to have many potential benefits when scaling electric propulsion technologies to higher power. However, the necessary asymmetric location of the discharge cathode away from thruster centerline could potentially lead to non-uniformities in the discharge not present in conventional geometry ion thrusters. In an effort to characterize the degree of this potential nonuniformity, a number of current density measurements were taken on a breadboard AGI-Engine. Fourteen button probes were used to measure the ion current density of the discharge along a perforated electrode that replaced the ion optics during conditions of simulated beam extraction. Three Faraday probes spaced apart in the vertical direction were also used in a separate test to interrogate the plume of the AGI-Engine during true beam extraction. It was determined that both the discharge and the plume of the AGI-Engine are highly uniform, with variations under most conditions limited to 10% of the average current density in the discharge and 5% of the average current density in the plume. Beam flatness parameter measured 30 mm from the ion optics ranged from 0.85 0.95, and overall uniformity was shown to generally increase with increasing discharge and beam currents. These measurements indicate that the plasma is highly uniform despite the asymmetric location of the discharge cathode.

  6. Measuring the Densities of Aqueous Glasses at Cryogenic Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Julius, Ethan F; Tyree, Timothy J; Dan, Ritwik; Moreau, David W; Thorne, Robert

    2017-06-28

    We demonstrate a method for determining the vitreous phase cryogenic temperature densities of aqueous mixtures, and other samples that require rapid cooling, to prepare the desired cryogenic temperature phase. Microliter to picoliter size drops are cooled by projection into a liquid nitrogen-argon (N2-Ar) mixture. The cryogenic temperature phase of the drop is evaluated using a visual assay that correlates with X-ray diffraction measurements. The density of the liquid N2-Ar mixture is adjusted by adding N2 or Ar until the drop becomes neutrally buoyant. The density of this mixture and thus of the drop is determined using a test mass and Archimedes principle. With appropriate care in drop preparation, management of gas above the liquid cryogen mixture to minimize icing, and regular mixing of the cryogenic mixture to prevent density stratification and phase separation, densities accurate to <0.5% of drops as small as 50 pL can readily be determined. Measurements on aqueous cryoprotectant mixtures provide insight into cryoprotectant action, and provide quantitative data to facilitate thermal contraction matching in biological cryopreservation.

  7. Measures of frontal plane lower limb alignment obtained from static radiographs and dynamic gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Michael A; Birmingham, Trevor B; Jenkyn, Thomas R; Giffin, J Robert; Jones, Ian C

    2008-05-01

    Currently, lower limb alignment is measured statically from radiographs that may not accurately represent the condition of the limb when moving and weight-bearing. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to introduce and examine a novel measure of dynamic lower limb alignment obtained during walking in patients with knee OA. In this cross-sectional study, standing, full-length lower limb radiographs were acquired from 80 individuals with confirmed knee OA, who also underwent three-dimensional gait analyses with reflective markers placed on the segments of the lower limb. Frontal plane lower limb alignment was measured using the static radiographs (mechanical axis) and gait analyses (marker-based alignment) by identifying the centres of the hip, knee, and ankle from both methods. Simple linear regression indicated these measures were highly correlated (r=0.84), however, 30% of the variance in the marker-based measure of lower limb alignment was not explained by the mechanical axis despite using the same anatomical landmarks. Results from this study suggest that a valid measure of dynamic lower limb alignment can be obtained from a standard quantitative gait analysis and highlight the differences in measures of lower limb alignment obtained in static and dynamic situations. Future research into the clinical utility of measures of dynamic alignment in the treatment of OA may aid in the development of interventions specifically tailored to one's dynamic lower limb biomechanics during gait.

  8. Comparison of subjective and fully automated methods for measuring mammographic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshina, Nataliia; Roman, Marta; Sebuødegård, Sofie; Waade, Gunvor G; Ursin, Giske; Hofvind, Solveig

    2017-01-01

    Background Breast radiologists of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program subjectively classified mammographic density using a three-point scale between 1996 and 2012 and changed into the fourth edition of the BI-RADS classification since 2013. In 2015, an automated volumetric breast density assessment software was installed at two screening units. Purpose To compare volumetric breast density measurements from the automated method with two subjective methods: the three-point scale and the BI-RADS density classification. Material and Methods Information on subjective and automated density assessment was obtained from screening examinations of 3635 women recalled for further assessment due to positive screening mammography between 2007 and 2015. The score of the three-point scale (I = fatty; II = medium dense; III = dense) was available for 2310 women. The BI-RADS density score was provided for 1325 women. Mean volumetric breast density was estimated for each category of the subjective classifications. The automated software assigned volumetric breast density to four categories. The agreement between BI-RADS and volumetric breast density categories was assessed using weighted kappa (kw). Results Mean volumetric breast density was 4.5%, 7.5%, and 13.4% for categories I, II, and III of the three-point scale, respectively, and 4.4%, 7.5%, 9.9%, and 13.9% for the BI-RADS density categories, respectively ( P for trend density categories was kw = 0.5 (95% CI = 0.47-0.53; P density increased with increasing density category of the subjective classifications. The agreement between BI-RADS and volumetric breast density categories was moderate.

  9. Grain bulk density measurement based on wireless network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Fangming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To know the accurate quantity of stored grain, grain density sensors must be used to measure the grain’s bulk density. However, multi-sensors should be inserted into the storage facility, to quickly collect data during the inventory checking of stored grain. In this study, the ZigBee and Wi-Fi coexistence network’s ability to transmit data collected by density sensors was investigated. A system consisting of six sensor nodes, six router nodes, one gateway and one Android Pad was assembled to measure the grain’s bulk density and calculate its quantity. The CC2530 chip with ZigBee technology was considered as the core of the information processing, and wireless nodes detection in sensor, and router nodes. ZigBee worked in difference signal channel with Wi-Fi to avoid interferences and connected with Wi-Fi module by UART serial communications interfaces in gateway. The Android Pad received the measured data through the gateway and processed this data to calculate quantity. The system enabled multi-point and real-time parameter detection inside the grain storage. Results show that the system has characteristics of good expansibility, networking flexibility and convenience.

  10. Development of a Lithium Beam Probe and Measurement of Density Pedestal in JT-60U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Atsushi; Kamiya, Kensaku; Fujita, Takaaki; Kubo, Hirotaka; Iguchi, Harukazu; Oyama, Naoyuki; Suzuki, Takahiro; Kamada, Yutaka; JT-60 Team

    A lithium beam probe (LiBP) has been developed for the measurement of electron density profiles with highly spatial and temporal resolutions in JT-60U. Using an electron beam heating ion source with a capability of 10 mA extraction, a 5.5 mA beam has been injected to the plasmas. It corresponds to the equivalent neutral beam current of 2 mA. A spectrum width of the beam emission has been small enough to separate Zeeman splitting. By use of the LiBP, time evolutions of pedestal density profiles during type I and grassy edge localized modes (ELMs) have been obtained for the first time. After a type I ELM crash, the drop of the line-integrated density measured by an interferometer delays by 2 ms later than that of the pedestal density. Comparing the line-integrated density to the line integration of the edge density profile measured by the LiBP, it is found that the recovery from the type I ELM crash is correlated with the reduction of core plasma density. As for grassy ELMs, grassy ELMs have smaller density crashes than that of type I ELMs, which is mainly derived from the narrower ELM affected area.

  11. Two dimensional density and its fluctuation measurements by using phase imaging method in GAMMA 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Negishi, S.; Shima, Y.; Hojo, H.; Imai, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Mase, A. [Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kogi, Y. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, 3-30-1 Wajiro-higashi, Higashiku, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Two dimensional (2D) plasma image analysis is useful to study the improvement of plasma confinement in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We have constructed a 2D interferometer system with phase imaging method for studying 2D plasma density distribution and its fluctuation measurement in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10. 2D profiles of electron density and its fluctuation have been successfully obtained by using this 2D phase imaging system. We show that 2D plasma density and fluctuation profiles clearly depends on the axial confining potential formation with application of plug electron cyclotron heating in GAMMA 10.

  12. DIFFUSE MOLECULAR CLOUD DENSITIES FROM UV MEASUREMENTS OF CO ABSORPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, Paul F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    We use UV measurements of interstellar CO toward nearby stars to calculate the density in the diffuse molecular clouds containing the molecules responsible for the observed absorption. Chemical models and recent calculations of the excitation rate coefficients indicate that the regions in which CO is found have hydrogen predominantly in molecular form and that collisional excitation is by collisions with H{sub 2} molecules. We carry out statistical equilibrium calculations using CO-H{sub 2} collision rates to solve for the H{sub 2} density in the observed sources without including effects of radiative trapping. We have assumed kinetic temperatures of 50 K and 100 K, finding this choice to make relatively little difference to the lowest transition. For the sources having T{sup ex}{sub 10} only for which we could determine upper and lower density limits, we find (n(H{sub 2})) = 49 cm{sup -3}. While we can find a consistent density range for a good fraction of the sources having either two or three values of the excitation temperature, there is a suggestion that the higher-J transitions are sampling clouds or regions within diffuse molecular cloud material that have higher densities than the material sampled by the J = 1-0 transition. The assumed kinetic temperature and derived H{sub 2} density are anticorrelated when the J = 2-1 transition data, the J = 3-2 transition data, or both are included. For sources with either two or three values of the excitation temperature, we find average values of the midpoint of the density range that is consistent with all of the observations equal to 68 cm{sup -3} for T{sup k} = 100 K and 92 cm{sup -3} for T{sup k} = 50 K. The data for this set of sources imply that diffuse molecular clouds are characterized by an average thermal pressure between 4600 and 6800 K cm{sup -3}.

  13. Obtaining Heat Stress Measurements. Module 15. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on obtaining heat stress measurements. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) naming and describing the…

  14. Cumulative sum quality control for calibrated breast density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heine, John J.; Cao Ke; Beam, Craig [Cancer Prevention and Control Division, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St., Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Although various methods are used to estimate breast density, there is no standard measurement for this important factor. The authors are developing a breast density standardization method for use in full field digital mammography (FFDM). The approach calibrates for interpatient acquisition technique differences. The calibration produces a normalized breast density pixel value scale. The method relies on first generating a baseline (BL) calibration dataset, which required extensive phantom imaging. Standardizing prospective mammograms with calibration data generated in the past could introduce unanticipated error in the standardized output if the calibration dataset is no longer valid. Methods: Sample points from the BL calibration dataset were imaged approximately biweekly over an extended timeframe. These serial samples were used to evaluate the BL dataset reproducibility and quantify the serial calibration accuracy. The cumulative sum (Cusum) quality control method was used to evaluate the serial sampling. Results: There is considerable drift in the serial sample points from the BL calibration dataset that is x-ray beam dependent. Systematic deviation from the BL dataset caused significant calibration errors. This system drift was not captured with routine system quality control measures. Cusum analysis indicated that the drift is a sign of system wear and eventual x-ray tube failure. Conclusions: The BL calibration dataset must be monitored and periodically updated, when necessary, to account for sustained system variations to maintain the calibration accuracy.

  15. Pulse compression radar reflectometry for density measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costley, A.; Prentice, R. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Laviron, C. [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), 78 - Velizy-Villacoublay (France); Prentice, R. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements

    1994-07-01

    On tokamaks and other toroidal machines, reflectometry is a very rapidly developing technique for density profile measurements, particularly near the edge. Its principle relies on the total reflection of an electromagnetic wave at a cutoff layer, where the critical density is reached and the local refractive index goes to zero. With the new fast frequency synthesizers now available, a method based on pulse compression radar is proposed for plasma reflectometry, overcoming the limitations of the previous reflectometry methods. The measurement can be made on a time-scale which is effectively very short relatively to the plasma fluctuations, and the very high reproducibility and stability of the source allows an absolute calibration of the waveguides to be made, which corrects for the effects of the parasitic reflections. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  17. EPR measurement and the origin of cosmic density fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morikawa Masahiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We explore consistent application of quantum mechanics to the objects in the Universe and in laboratories. The measurement dynamics in quantum mechanics is modeled as a physical process of spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB which is described by the generalized effective action method. A violation of the Bell inequality is observed in this model and the generation of the density fluctuations in the early Universe is described as the SSB process of the spatially translational symmetry.

  18. An ultracold neutron storage bottle for UCN density measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bison, G; Daum, M; Kirch, K; Krempel, J; Lauss, B; Meier, M; Ries, D; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Zsigmond, G

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a storage bottle for ultracold neutrons (UCN) in order to measure the UCN density at the beamports of the Paul Scherrer Institute's (PSI) UCN source. This paper describes the design, construction and commissioning of the robust and mobile storage bottle with a volume comparable to typical storage experiments 32 liter e.g. searching for an electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  19. An ultracold neutron storage bottle for UCN density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bison, G.; Burri, F.; Daum, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kirch, K. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Krempel, J. [Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Lauss, B., E-mail: bernhard.lauss@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Meier, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ries, D., E-mail: dieter.ries@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-09-11

    We have developed a storage bottle for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in order to measure the UCN density at the beamports of the Paul Scherrer Institute's (PSI) UCN source. This paper describes the design, construction and commissioning of the robust and mobile storage bottle with a volume comparable to typical storage experiments (32 L) e.g. searching for an electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  20. Microwave/Sonic Apparatus Measures Flow and Density in Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, G. D.; Ngo, Phong; Carl, J. R.; Byerly, Kent A.

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the rate of flow and the mass density of a liquid or slurry includes a special section of pipe instrumented with microwave and sonic sensors, and a computer that processes digitized readings taken by the sensors. The apparatus was conceived specifically for monitoring a flow of oil-well-drilling mud, but the basic principles of its design and operation are also applicable to monitoring flows of other liquids and slurries.

  1. Measurement of density and water content of soil using photon multiple scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertek, C.; Haselberger, N.

    1984-11-01

    A quantitative measure of density and of water content in soil was determined by photon multiple scattering following sample irradiation by a 0.7 mCi 137Cs source. Counting was effected using a stabilized single channel scintillation detector and counter system in the differential mode. Scattered photons of 80 keV energy were measured using a 20 keV window. The moving source method was applied to find the density of soil and count rate ratios of dry soil to wet soil. Independent calibrations were applied for the moisture measurements. Four curves were obtained for the soil density range of 0.5-1.5 g/cm 3 by using soil standards of 2.6, 7.0, 10.6 and 16.1 wt.% water content. Direct influence of photons was measured by blocking the direct path of photons to the detector by shielding both the Cs source and the detector.

  2. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  3. Development of density measurement method of negative ion in plasmas using laser Thomson scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, Yukihiko; Saiho, Hiroatsu; Uchino, Kiichiro; Muraoka, Katsunori

    2004-09-01

    Measurements of negative ion density in plasmas have been an important subject for many years. We have proposed a new method to measure the negative ion density in plasmas using laser Thomson scattering (LTS), and successfully measured O^- ion density in an radio frequency inductively coupled plasma [1]. In order to ensure the reliability of this technique and to estimate the accuracy, we have measured O^- ion density in the same experimental conditions using the second (SHG) and third harmonics (THG) of a Nd:YAG laser as different laser sources. The LTS spectra measured at pure argon plasma (500 W, 20 mTorr) fitted in a straight line well in both SHG and THG cases. As for the plasma at 500 W in 20 mTorr with Ar/O_2=95%/5%, a clear bump in LTS spectra, which is caused by photo-detached electrons, was observed below 0.9 eV for the SHG case and 2 eV for the case, as predicted by a difference between the electron affinity of O^- ion and the laser photon energy. The electron temperatures, the electron densities and the O^- ion densities, which were obtained from the spectral shape and intensity of both LTS spectra, were in agreement each other within an experimental error. [1] M. Noguchi, K. Ariga, T. Hirao, P. Suanpoot, Y. Yamagata, K. Uchino, K. Muraoka, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol., 11 (2002) 57.

  4. Current density imaging using directly measured harmonic Bz data in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Kwon, Oh In

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures magnetic flux density signals through the use of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to visualize the internal conductivity and/or current density. Understanding the reconstruction procedure for the internal current density, we directly measure the second derivative of Bz data from the measured k-space data, from which we can avoid a tedious phase unwrapping to obtain the phase signal of Bz . We determine optimal weighting factors to combine the derivatives of magnetic flux density data, [Symbol: see text](2) Bz , measured using the multi-echo train. The proposed method reconstructs the internal current density using the relationships between the induced internal current and the measured [Symbol: see text](2) Bz data. Results from a phantom experiment demonstrate that the proposed method reduces the scanning time and provides the internal current density, while suppressing the background field inhomogeneity. To implement the real experiment, we use a phantom with a saline solution including a balloon, which excludes other artifacts by any concentration gradient in the phantom.

  5. Far-infrared Michelson interferometer for tokamak electron density measurements using computer-generated reference fringes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, P.A.; Stimson, P.A.; Falconer, I.S.

    1986-11-01

    A simple far-infrared interferometer which uses the 394 ..mu..m laser line from optically-pumped formic acid vapour to measure tokamak electron density is described. This interferometer is unusual in requiring only one detector and a single probing beam since reference fringes during the plasma shot are obtained by computer interpolation between the fringes observed immediately before and after the shot. Electron density has been measured with a phase resolution corresponding to + - 1/20 wavelength fringe shift, which is equivalent to a central density resolution of + - 0.1 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/ for an assumed parabolic density distribution in a plasma of diameter of 0.2 m, and with a time resolution of 0.2 ms.

  6. Bone mineral density measurement over the shoulder region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, A M; Faber, J; Lynnerup, N

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1). establish a method for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) over the shoulder region; (2). compare the relationship between shoulder BMD levels with hip BMD and body mass index (BMI); and (3). discuss the relevance of the shoulder scan as an early indicator...... to the least relative influence of weight and stress loading because of migration of calcium to weight and stress-bearing areas. Since the effect of this migration could mask local osteoporotic bone loss, shoulder BMD measurement is likely to minimize false indicators of healthy bone in women with high BMI...

  7. Reflectometry techniques for density profile measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviron, C. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Donne, A.J.H. [Associatie Euratom-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands). FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica; Manso, M.E. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Lab. de Quimica Organica; Sanchez, J. [EURATOM-CIEMAT for Fusion Association, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-03-01

    Reflectometry applied to the measurement of density profiles on fusion plasmas has been subject to many recent developments. After a brief reminder of the principles of reflectometry, the theoretical accuracy of reflectometry measurements is discussed. The main difficulties limiting the performance, namely the plasma fluctuations and the quality of the transmission lines, are analysed. The different techniques used for reflectometry are then presented. The present status and achievements of actual implementations of these techniques are shown, with an analysis of their respective limitations and merits, as well as foreseen developments. (author). 70 refs.

  8. Reproducibility, reliability and validity of measurements obtained from Cecile3 digital models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Adolfo Watanabe-Kanno

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the reproducibility, reliability and validity of measurements in digital models compared to plaster models. Fifteen pairs of plaster models were obtained from orthodontic patients with permanent dentition before treatment. These were digitized to be evaluated with the program Cécile3 v2.554.2 beta. Two examiners measured three times the mesiodistal width of all the teeth present, intercanine, interpremolar and intermolar distances, overjet and overbite. The plaster models were measured using a digital vernier. The t-Student test for paired samples and interclass correlation coefficient (ICC were used for statistical analysis. The ICC of the digital models were 0.84 ± 0.15 (intra-examiner and 0.80 ± 0.19 (inter-examiner. The average mean difference of the digital models was 0.23 ± 0.14 and 0.24 ± 0.11 for each examiner, respectively. When the two types of measurements were compared, the values obtained from the digital models were lower than those obtained from the plaster models (p < 0.05, although the differences were considered clinically insignificant (differences < 0.1 mm. The Cécile digital models are a clinically acceptable alternative for use in Orthodontics.

  9. Multifractal analysis of high resolution solar wind proton density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Carbone, Francesco; Leonardis, Ersilia; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Šafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdenek

    2017-03-01

    The solar wind is a highly turbulent medium, with a high level of field fluctuations throughout a broad range of scales. These include an inertial range where a turbulent cascade is assumed to be active. The solar wind cascade shows intermittency, which however may depend on the wind conditions. Recent observations have shown that ion-scale magnetic turbulence is almost self-similar, rather than intermittent. A similar result was observed for the high resolution measurements of proton density provided by the spacecraft Spektr-R. Intermittency may be interpreted as the result of the multifractal properties of the turbulent cascade. In this perspective, this paper is devoted to the description of the multifractal properties of the high resolution density measurements. In particular, we have used the standard coarse-graining technique to evaluate the generalized dimensions Dq , and from these the multifractal spectrum f (α) , in two ranges of scale. A fit with the p-model for intermittency provided a quantitative measure of multifractality. Such indicator was then compared with alternative measures: the width of the multifractal spectrum, the peak of the kurtosis, and its scaling exponent. The results indicate that the small-scale fluctuations are multifractal, and suggest that different measures of intermittency are required to fully understand the small scale cascade.

  10. Measurement of bone mineral density in patients with psoriasis vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurgül Köse

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine thechanges of bone mineral density in patients with psoriasisvulgaris.Methods: 33 patients, diagnosed with psoriasis vulgarisin Erciyes University, Medical School, Department of Dermatology,and 23 healthy subjects as control group wereincluded in this study. Lumbar and femur bone mineraldensity of all patients and control group were measured.Biochemical tests related to bone metabolism were performed.Results: We did not find statistically significant differencebetween patient and control groups’ bone mineral density.However, the lumbar spine t score of men, were found tobe significantly lower in the patient group than the controlgroup (p<0.05. There was no statistically significant differencein bone mineral density of women between thepatient and control groups. The effects on bone mineraldensity of disease period and using the topical corticosteroidswere not statistically significant.Conclusion: Our study indicates that bone mineral densityof patients with psoriasis vulgaris was not differentfrom healthy subject.Key words: Psoriasis vulgaris, bone mineral density, osteoporosis

  11. Neutralino relic density from ILC measurements in the CPV MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Bélanger, G; Kraml, Sabine; Martyn, H -U; Pukhov, A

    2008-01-01

    We discuss ILC measurements for a specific MSSM scenario with CP phases, where the lightest neutralino is a good candidate for dark matter, annihilating efficiently through t-channel exchange of light staus. These prospective (CP-even) ILC measurements are then used to fit the underlying model parameters. A collider prediction of the relic density of the neutralino from this fit gives 0.116measurements of electric dipole moments is also discussed. Finally we comment on collider measurements at higher energies for refining the prediction of Omega h^2.

  12. Why should we keep measuring zenital dependence of muon flux? Results obtained at Campinas (SP) BR

    CERN Document Server

    Daniel, B; Nunes, M; Vieira, T V; Kemp, E

    2013-01-01

    The zenital dependence of muon flux which reaches the earth's surface is well known as proportional to cos^n(\\theta). Generally, for practical purposes and simplicity in calculations, n is taken as 2. However, compilations of measurements show dependence on the geographical location of the experiments as well as the muons energy range. Since analytical solutions appear to be increasingly less necessary because of the higher accessibility to low cost computational power, accurate and precise determination of the value of the exponent n, under different conditions, can be useful in the necessary calculations to estimate signals and backgrounds, either for terrestrial and underground experiments. In this work we discuss a method for measuring n using a simple muon telescope and the results obtained for measurements taken at Campinas (SP), Brazil. After validation of the method, we intend to extend the measurements for different geographic locations due to the simplicity of the method, and thus collect more value...

  13. Using New Approaches to obtain Gibbs Measures of Vannimenus model on a Cayley tree

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider Vannimenus model with competing nearest-neighbors and prolonged next-nearest-neighbors interactions on a Cayley tree. For this model we define Markov random fields with memory of length 2. By using a new approach, we obtain new sets of Gibbs measures of Ising-Vannimenus model on Cayley tree of order 2. We construct the recurrence equations corresponding Ising-Vannimenus model. We prove the Kolmogorov consistency condition. We investigate the translation-invariant an...

  14. Two-resonance probe for measuring electron density in low-pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, W. Y.

    2017-04-01

    A technique for measuring double-checked electron density using two types of microwave resonance is presented. Simultaneous measurement of the resonances (plasma and quarter-wavelength resonator resonances), which were used for the cutoff probe (CP) and hairpin probe (HP), was achieved by the proposed microwave resonance probe. The developed two-resonance probe (TRP) consists of parallel separated coaxial cables exposing the radiation and detection tips. The structure resembles that of the CP, except the gapped coaxial cables operate not only as a microwave feeder for the CP but also as a U- shaped quarter-wavelength resonator for the HP. By virtue of this structure, the microwave resonances that have typically been used for measuring the electron density for the CP and HP were clearly identified on the microwave transmission spectrum of the TRP. The two types of resonances were measured experimentally under various power and pressure conditions for the plasma. A three-dimensional full-wave simulation model for the TRP is also presented and used to investigate and reproduce the resonances. The electron densities inferred from the resonances were compared and showed good agreement. Quantitative differences between the densities were attributed to the effects of the sheath width and spatial density gradient on the resonances. This accessible technique of using the TRP to obtain double-checked electron densities may be useful for comparative study and provides complementary uses for the CP and HP.

  15. Measurement of solar wind electron density and temperature in the shocked region of Venus and the density and temperature of photoelectrons within the ionosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, William C.; Jones, Douglas E.; Peterson, Bryan G.; Knadler, Charles E.

    2016-08-01

    Presented herein are measurements of the solar wind electron number density and temperature near and within the bow shock of Venus. The measurements were made by the Pioneer Venus mission Orbiter Retarding Potential Analyzer operating in its suprathermal electron mode. The measurements are essentially point measurements. The spacecraft travels approximately 0.8 km during the 0.1 s time interval required to record a single I-V curve. The dual measurement of a density and temperature is obtained from one sweep by least squares fitting a mathematical Maxwellian expression to the I-V curve. The distance between successive measurements is approximately 100 km. In many orbits, when the spacecraft is crossing or traveling within the bow shock, the derived densities and temperatures (high density, high temperature (HDHT)) are large, densities of the order of 100 cm-3 and temperatures of the order of several hundred eV. We interpret these HDHT measurements as measurements in regions where the large, directed kinetic energy of the solar wind ions is being degraded into randomized, more thermal-like energy distributions of the electrons and ions through wave-particle interactions. The HDHT values define the electron energy distribution in the limited energy interval 0 to 50 eV. We assume that the underlying electron flux distributions are flat topped like those measured in the Earth's bow shock. We also report densities and temperatures of EUV produced photoelectron energy distributions measured within the ionosphere.

  16. Rocket-borne measurements of electron temperature and density with the Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I. J.; Widholm, M.; Lessard, M. R.; Riley, P.; Heavisides, J.; Moen, J. I.; Clausen, L. B. N.; Bekkeng, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Determining electron temperature in the ionosphere is a fundamentally important measurement for space science. Obtaining measurements of electron temperatures at high altitudes (>700 km) is difficult because of limitations on ground-based radar and classic spacecraft instrumentation. In light of these limitations, the rocket-borne Electron Retarding Potential Analyzer (ERPA) was developed to allow for accurate in situ measurement of ionospheric electron temperature with a simple and low-resource instrument. The compact ERPA, a traditional retarding potential analyzer with multiple baffle collimators, allows for a straightforward calculation of electron temperature. Since its first mission in 2004, it has amassed significant flight heritage and obtained data used in multiple studies investigating a myriad of phenomena related to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. In addition to highlighting the scientific contributions of the ERPA instrument, this paper outlines its theory and operation, the methodology used to obtain electron temperature measurements, and a comparative study suggesting that the ERPA can also provide electron density measurements.

  17. Plasma dynamics near critical density inferred from direct measurements of laser hole boring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Tochitsky, Sergei Ya; Fiuza, Frederico; Pigeon, Jeremy J; Joshi, Chan

    2016-06-01

    We have used multiframe picosecond optical interferometry to make direct measurements of the hole boring velocity, v_{HB}, of the density cavity pushed forward by a train of CO_{2} laser pulses in a near critical density helium plasma. As the pulse train intensity rises, the increasing radiation pressure of each pulse pushes the density cavity forward and the plasma electrons are strongly heated. After the peak laser intensity, the plasma pressure exerted by the heated electrons strongly impedes the hole boring process and the v_{HB} falls rapidly as the laser pulse intensity falls at the back of the laser pulse train. A heuristic theory is presented that allows the estimation of the plasma electron temperature from the measurements of the hole boring velocity. The measured values of v_{HB}, and the estimated values of the heated electron temperature as a function of laser intensity are in reasonable agreement with those obtained from two-dimensional numerical simulations.

  18. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikov, V

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm.

  19. Measurement of the density of animal bone by absorptiometry: some preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonnelli, Eduardo; Costa, Vladimir Eliodoro; Rezende, Marcos Antonio de; Hormaza, Joel Mesa; Machado, Vania Maria de Vasconcelos [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Measurement of bone mineral content for different bone types at various sites of the human body has been extensively studied in the last three decades. There are several methods for the determination of bone mineral density and strength by using non ionizing and ionizing radiation, as well as by other techniques, such as ultrasound. In humans, the accuracy and precision of those kind of measurement varies between the methods and, in all the cases, reference values are adopted as a function of sex, age and nutritional parameters. In this work, we have presented some preliminary results of the measurement of the density in animal bone obtained experimentally by absorptiometry, which is based on the fact that attenuation of a gamma ray beam is proportional to the coefficient of mass attenuation of an object in the path of the beam: with the increase of the density of the object, less photons will pass through it. Starting from this, we can calculate the bone mineral density in any point of the material. The radionuclide (through a sealed and shielded source of the radioisotope {sup 241}Am with an activity of 7.4 GBq and an energy of 59.6 keV) is the photons source and a scintillation detector quantify the transmitted photons through the bone to determine the density. The results obtained experimentally were compared with theoretical ones calculated by simulation with the MCNPX based Monte Carlo transport code. (author)

  20. The Physical Density of the City—Deconstruction of the Delusive Density Measure with Evidence from Two European Megacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Taubenböck

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Density is among the most important descriptive as well as normative measures in urban research. While its basic concept is generally understandable, approaches towards the density measure are manifold, diverse and of multidimensional complexity. This evolves from differing thematic, spatial and calculative specifications. Consequently, applied density measures are often used in a subjective, non-transparent, unspecific and thus non-comparable manner. In this paper, we aim at a systematic deconstruction of the measure density. Varying thematic, spatial and calculative dimensions show significant influence on the measure. With both quantitative and qualitative techniques of evaluation, we assess the particular influences on the measure density. To do so, we reduce our experiment setting to a mere physical perspective; that is, the quantitative measures building density, degree of soil sealing, floor space density and, more specifically, the density of generic structural classes such as open spaces and highest built-up density areas. Using up-to-date geodata derived from remote sensing and volunteered geographic information, we build upon high-quality spatial information products such as 3-D city models. Exemplified for the comparison of two European megacities, namely Paris and London, we reveal and systemize necessary variables to be clearly defined for meaningful conclusions using the density measure.

  1. Electron-boson spectral density function of correlated multiband systems obtained from optical data: Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and LiFeAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jungseek

    2016-03-31

    We introduce an approximate method which can be used to simulate the optical conductivity data of correlated multiband systems for normal and superconducting cases by taking advantage of a reversed process in comparison to a usual optical data analysis, which has been used to extract the electron-boson spectral density function from measured optical spectra of single-band systems, like cuprates. We applied this method to optical conductivity data of two multiband pnictide systems (Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and LiFeAs) and obtained the electron-boson spectral density functions. The obtained electron-boson spectral density consists of a sharp mode and a broad background. The obtained spectral density functions of the multiband systems show similar properties as those of cuprates in several aspects. We expect that our method helps to reveal the nature of strong correlations in the multiband pnictide superconductors.

  2. Temperature and Density Measurements in a Quiet Coronal Streamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Warshall, Andrew D.

    2002-06-01

    Many previous studies have used emission line or broadband filter ratios to infer the presence of temperature gradients in the quiet solar corona. Recently it has been suggested that these temperature gradients are not real, but result from the superposition of isothermal loops with different temperatures and density scale heights along the line of sight. A model describing this hydrostatic weighting bias has been developed by Aschwanden & Acton. In this paper we present the application of the Aschwanden & Acton differential emission measure model to Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) observations of a quiet coronal streamer. Simultaneous Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT) observations show increases in the filter ratios with height above the limb, indicating an increase in temperature. The application of the Aschwanden & Acton model to these SUMER data, however, show that the temperature is constant with height and that the distribution of temperatures in the corona is much too narrow for the hydrostatic weighting bias to have any effect on the SXT filter ratios. We consider the possibility that there is a tenuous hot component (~3 MK) that accounts for the SXT observations. We find that a hot plasma with an emission measure sufficient to reproduce the observed SXT fluxes would also produce significant count rates in the high-temperature emission lines in the SUMER wavelength range. These lines are not observed, and we conclude that the SUMER spectra are not consistent with the SXT filter ratio temperatures. Calculations from a hydrodynamic loop model suggest that nonuniform footpoint heating may be consistent with the temperatures and densities observed at most heights, consistent with the recent analysis of relatively cool (~1 MK) active region loops. We also find, however, that at the lowest heights the observed densities are smaller than those predicted by uniform or footpoint heating.

  3. Obtaining the Knowledge of a Server Performance from Non-Intrusively Measurable Metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Ohta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Most network services are provided by server computers. To provide these services with good quality, the server performance must be managed adequately. For the server management, the performance information is commonly obtained from the operating system (OS and hardware of the managed computer. However, this method has a disadvantage. If the performance is degraded by excessive load or hardware faults, it becomes difficult to collect and transmit information. Thus, it is necessary to obtain the information without interfering with the server’s OS and hardware. This paper investigates a technique that utilizes non-intrusively measureable metrics that are obtained through passive traffic monitoring and electric currents monitored by the sensors attached to the power supply. However, these metrics do not directly represent the performance experienced by users. Hence, it is necessary to discover the complicated function that maps the metrics to the true performance information. To discover this function from the measured samples, a machine learning technique based on a decision tree is examined. The technique is important because it is applicable to the power management of server clusters and the immigration control of virtual servers

  4. IN SITU MEASUREMENTS OF THE SIZE AND DENSITY OF TITAN AEROSOL ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoerst, S. M.; Tolbert, M. A, E-mail: sarah.horst@colorado.edu [Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2013-06-10

    The organic haze produced from complex CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} chemistry in the atmosphere of Titan plays an important role in processes that occur in the atmosphere and on its surface. The haze particles act as condensation nuclei and are therefore involved in Titan's methane hydrological cycle. They also may behave like sediment on Titan's surface and participate in both fluvial and aeolian processes. Models that seek to understand these processes require information about the physical properties of the particles including their size and density. Although measurements obtained by Cassini-Huygens have placed constraints on the size of the haze particles, their densities remain unknown. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments and measured the size, number density, and particle density of Titan aerosol analogs, or tholins, for CH{sub 4} concentrations from 0.01% to 10% using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that the densities currently in use by many Titan models are higher than the measured densities of our tholins.

  5. Morphological and Functional Measurements of the Heart Obtained by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Brazilians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, Robson, E-mail: robmacedo@yahoo.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Fernandes, Juliano Lara [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Andrade, Solange Souza; Rochitte, Carlos Eduardo [Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lima, Kênio Costa; Maciel, Álvaro Campos Cavalcanti [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Maciel, Fernanda Cunha; Alves, Geraldo Souza Pinho [Universidade Potiguar, Natal, RN (Brazil); Coelho, Otávio Rizzi [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Diniz, Rosiane Viana Zuza [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2013-07-15

    Still today, measurements used as a reference in the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging have been obtained mainly from studies carried out in North-American and European populations. To obtain measurements of the diastolic diameter, systolic diameter, end diastolic volume, end systolic volume, ejection fraction, and myocardial mass of the left and right ventricles in Brazilians. 54 men and 53 women, with mean age of 43.4 ± 13.1 years, asymptomatic, with no cardiomyopathies, have been subjected to the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, using a balanced steady state free precession technique. The averages and the standard deviations of the parameters for the left ventricle have been: diastolic diameter =4.8 ± 0.5 cm; systolic diameter = 3.0 ± 0.6 cm; end diastolic volume = 128.4 ± 29.6 mL; end systolic volume = 45.2 ± 16.6 mL; ejection fraction = 65.5 ± 6.3%; mass = 95.2 ± 30.8 g. For the right ventricle, they have been: diastolic diameter = 3.9 ± 1.3 cm; systolic diameter = 2.5 ± 0.5 cm; end diastolic volume = 126.5 ± 30.7 mL; end systolic volume = 53.6 ± 18.4 mL; ejection fraction = 58.3 ± 8.0%, and mass = 26.1 ± 6.1 g. The masses and the volumes were significantly greater in the men, except for the end systolic volume of the left ventricle. The ejection fraction of the right ventricle has been significantly greater in the women. There has been a significant and inverted correlation of the systolic volume of the right volume with the progression of the age. This study has described, for the first time, cardiac measurements obtained through the cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in Brazilians, asymptomatic, with no cardiomyopathies, showing differences in accordance with gender and age.

  6. The correlation between superparamagnetic blocking temperatures and peak temperatures obtained from ac magnetization measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel Esmarch; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Mørup, Steen

    2008-01-01

    We study the correlation between the superparamagnetic blocking temperature TB and the peak positions Tp observed in ac magnetization measurements for nanoparticles of different classes of magnetic materials. In general, Tp=α+βTB . The parameters α and β are different for the in-phase (χ') and out......-of-phase (χ") components and depend on the width σv of the log-normal volume distribution and the class of magnetic material (ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic). Consequently, knowledge of both α and β is required if the anisotropy energy barrier KV and the attempt time To are to be reliably obtained from...

  7. A Re-examination of Density Effects in Eddy Covariance Measurements of CO2 Fluxes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heping LIU

    2009-01-01

    Corrections of density effects resulting from air-parcel expansion/compression are important in interpreting eddy covariance fluxes of water vapor and CO2 when open-path systems are used. To account for these effects, mean vertical velocity and perturbation of the density of dry air are two critical parameters in treating those physical processes responsible for density variations. Based on various underlying assumptions, different studies have obtained different formulas for the mean vertical velocity and perturbation of the density of dry air, leading to a number of approaches to correct density effects. In this study, we re-examine physical processes related to different assumptions that are made to formulate the density effects. Specifically, we re-examine the assumptions of a zero dry air flux and a zero moist air flux in the surface layer, used for treating density variations, and their implications for correcting density effects. It is found that physical processes in relation to the assumption of a zero dry air flux account for the influence of dry air expansion/compression on density variations. Meanwhile, physical processes in relation to the assumption of a zero moist air flux account for the influence of moist air expansion/compression on density variations. In this study, we also re-examine mixing ratio issues. Our results indicate that the assumption of a zero dry air flux favors the use of the mixing ratio relative to dry air, while the assumption of a zero moist air flux favors the use of the mixing ratio relative to the total moist air. Additionally, we compare different formula for the mean vertical velocity, generated by air-parcel expansion/compression, and for density effect corrections using eddy covariance data measured over three boreal ecosystems.

  8. Density Measurement of Compact Toroid with Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufman-Wollitzer, Lauren; Endrizzi, Doug; Brookhart, Matt; Flanagan, Ken; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    Utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) built by Tri Alpha Energy, a dense compact toroid (CT) is created and injected at high speed into the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory (WiPAL) vessel. A modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer from the Line-Tied Reconnection Experiment (LTRX) provides an absolute measurement of electron density. The interferometer is located such that the beam intersects the plasma across the diameter of the MCPG drift region before the CT enters the vessel. This placement ensures that the measurement is taken before the CT expand. Results presented will be used to further analyze characteristics of the CT. Funding provided by DoE, NSF, and WISE Summer Research.

  9. Analytical representations of the spread harmonic measure density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2015-05-01

    We study the spread harmonic measure that characterizes the spatial distribution of reaction events on a partially reactive surface. For Euclidean domains in which Brownian motion can be split into independent lateral and transverse displacements, we derive analytical formulas for the spread harmonic measure density and analyze its asymptotic behavior. This analysis is applicable to slab domains, general cylindrical domains, and a half-space. We investigate the spreading effect due to multiple reflections on the surface, and the underlying role of finite reactivity. We discuss further extensions and applications of analytical results to describe Laplacian transfer phenomena such as permeation through semipermeable membranes, secondary current distribution on partially blocking electrodes, and surface relaxation in nuclear magnetic resonance.

  10. Selection and Evaluation of a new Pu Density Measurement Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dziewinska, Krystyna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peters, Michael A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Patrick P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dziewinski, Jacek J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pugmire, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Stephen M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; La Verne, Jake A [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Rajesh, P [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts leading to selection of a new fluid for the determination of the density of large Pu parts. Based on an extended literature search, perfluorotributylamine (FC-43) was chosen for an experimental study. Plutonium coupon corrosion studies were performed by exposing Pu to deaerated and aerated solutions and measuring corrosion gravimetrically. Corrosion rates were determined. Samples of deaerated and aerated perfuluorotributylamine (FC-43) were also irradiated with {sup 60}Co gamma rays (96 Gy/min) to various doses. The samples were extracted with NaOH and analyzed by IC and showed the presence of F and Cl{sup -}. The G-values were established. In surface study experiments Pu coupons were exposed to deaerated and aerated solutions of FC-43 and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS data indicate that there is no detectable surface effect caused by the new fluid. In conclusion the FC-43 was determined to be a very effective and practical fluid for Pu density measurements.

  11. Precision and agreement of corneal power measurements obtained using a new corneal topographer OphthaTOP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhai Huang

    Full Text Available To evaluate repeatability and reproducibility of anterior corneal power measurements obtained with a new corneal topographer OphthaTOP (Hummel AG, Germany and agreement with measurements by a rotating Scheimpflug camera (Pentacam HR, Oculus, Germany and an automated keratometer (IOLMaster, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Germany.The right eyes of 79 healthy subjects were prospectively measured three times with all three devices. Another examiner performed three additional scans with the OphthaTOP in the same session. Within one week, the first examiner repeated the measurements using the OphthaTOP. The flat simulated keratometry (Kf, steep K (Ks, mean K (Km, J0, and J45 were noted. Repeatability and reproducibility of measurements were assessed by within-subject standard deviation (Sw, repeatability (2.77 Sw, coefficient of variation (CoV, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Agreement between devices was assessed using 95% limits of agreement (LoA.Intraobserver repeatability and interobserver and intersession reproducibility of all measured parameters showed a 2.77 Sw of 0.29 diopter or less, a CoV of less than 0.24%, and an ICC of more than 0.906. Statistically significant differences (P<0.001 were found between the parameters analyzed by the three devices, except J0 and J45. The mean differences between OphthaTOP and the other two devices were small, and the 95% LoA was narrow for all results.The OphthaTOP showed excellent intraobserver repeatability and interobserver and intersession reproducibility of corneal power measurements. Good agreements with the other two devices in these parameters were found in healthy eyes.

  12. Comparison of arterial blood pressure measurements and hypertension scores obtained by use of three indirect measurement devices in hospitalized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernick, Morena B; Höpfner, Robert M; Francey, Thierry; Howard, Judith

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate the agreement of blood pressure measurements and hypertension scores obtained by use of 3 indirect arterial blood pressure measurement devices in hospitalized dogs. Design-Diagnostic test evaluation. 29 client-owned dogs. 5 to 7 consecutive blood pressure readings were obtained from each dog on each of 3 occasions with a Doppler ultrasonic flow detector, a standard oscillometric device (STO), and a high-definition oscillometric device (HDO). When the individual sets of 5 to 7 readings were evaluated, the coefficient of variation for systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) exceeded 20% for 0% (Doppler), 11 % (STO), and 28% (HDO) of the sets of readings. After readings that exceeded a 20% coefficient of variation were discarded, repeatability was within 25 (Doppler), 37 (STO), and 39 (HDO) mm Hg for SAP. Correlation of mean values among the devices was between 0.47 and 0.63. Compared with Doppler readings, STO underestimated and HDO overestimated SAP. Limits of agreement between mean readings of any 2 devices were wide. With the hypertension scale used to score SAP, the intraclass correlation of scores was 0.48. Linear-weighted inter-rater reliability between scores was 0.40 (Doppler vs STO), 0.38 (Doppler vs HDO), and 0.29 (STO vs HDO). Results of this study suggested that no meaningful clinical comparison can be made between blood pressure readings obtained from the same dog with different indirect blood pressure measurement devices.

  13. Corneal Topographic and Aberrometric Measurements Obtained with a Multidiagnostic Device in Healthy Eyes: Intrasession Repeatability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Piñero

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the intrasession repeatability of corneal curvature, eccentricity, and aberrometric measurements obtained with a multidiagnostic device in healthy eyes. Methods. This study enrolled 107 eyes of 107 patients ranging in age from 23 to 65 years. All of them underwent a complete anterior segment examination with the VX120 system (Visionix-Luneau Technologies, Chartres, France. Three consecutive measurements were obtained. The within-subject standard deviation (Sw, intrasubject precision (1.96×Sw, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC were calculated. Results. All Sw for corneal power measurements were below 0.26 D, with ICC above 0.982. The Sw for corneal astigmatism at different areas (3, 5, and 7 mm was below 0.21 D, with ICC above 0.913. Concerning the axis of astigmatism, its Sw was below 11.27°, with ICC above 0.975. The Sw and ICC for corneal eccentricity were 0.067 and 0.957, respectively. The Sw and ICC for high-order aberration root mean square (RMS were 0.048 µm and 0.901, respectively. For 3rd- and 4th-order aberrometric parameters, all Sw were below 0.037 µm and all ICC were higher than 0.84, except for quadrafoil RMS (ICC: 0.689. Conclusions. The multidiagnostic device evaluated is able to provide consistent measurements of corneal power, eccentricity, and third- and fourth-order aberrations in healthy eyes.

  14. X-ray beam hardening correction for measuring density in linear accelerator industrial computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Ri-Feng; WANG Jue; CHEN Wei-Min

    2009-01-01

    Due to X-ray attenuation being approximately proportional to material density, it is possible to measure the inner density through Industrial Computed Tomography (ICT) images accurately. In practice, however, a number of factors including the non-linear effects of beam hardening and diffuse scattered radia-tion complicate the quantitative measurement of density variations in materials. This paper is based on the linearization method of beam hardening correction, and uses polynomial fitting coefficient which is obtained by the curvature of iron polychromatic beam data to fit other materials. Through theoretical deduction, the paper proves that the density measure error is less than 2% if using pre-filters to make the spectrum of linear accelerator range mainly 0.3 MeV to 3 MeV. Experiment had been set up at an ICT system with a 9 MeV electron linear accelerator. The result is satisfactory. This technique makes the beam hardening correction easy and simple, and it is valuable for measuring the ICT density and making use of the CT images to recognize materials.

  15. A Catalytic Sensor for Measurement of Radical Density in CO2 Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Vesel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A catalytic sensor for the measurement of radical density in weakly ionized CO2 plasmas, created in a low-pressure electrodeless discharge, is presented. The CO2 plasma was created in a 4 cm wide borosilicate glass tube inside a copper coil connected to a radio frequency generator operating at 27.12 MHz with a nominal power of 250 W. The dissociation fraction of the CO2 molecules was measured in the early afterglow at pressures ranging from 10 Pa to 100 Pa, and at distances of up to 35 cm along the gas stream from the glowing plasma. The radical density peaked (2 × 1020 m–3 at 80 Pa. The density quickly decreased with increasing distance from the glowing plasma despite a rather large drift velocity. The dissociation fraction showed similar behavior, except that the maximum was obtained at somewhat lower pressure. The results were explained by rather intense surface recombination of radicals.

  16. Comparison of radiographic measurements obtained with conventional an indirect digital imaging during endontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Buloto Schmitd

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the quality of indirect digitized radiographic images taken during endodontic procedures and to compare the measurements recorded with this technique to those obtained from conventional radiographs. Two-hundred conventional periapical radiographs taken at the undergraduate Endodontics Clinic of the Dental School of Bauru were digitized. The conventional and indirect digitized images were compared by three examiners as to the quality and accuracy of the measurements recorded during endodontic treatment, in canal length determination, gutta-percha adaptation, lateral condensation and final obturation. The conventional radiographs were observed on a film viewer, surrounded by a dark card, and measured with magnifying glass and a millimeter ruler; the indirect digitized images were evaluated on the Digora® for Windows software, with free utilization of the bright/contrast tool. Unlike the conventional radiographic images, all indirect digitized images were considered as having a high quality. The distance between the filling material and the root apex was 0.117 mm larger, on average, for the Digora® system (p<0.01. The measurements achieved by the investigated radiographic methods were clinically similar and they are thus equivalent. Changes in brightness and contrast of the images using Digora®software improved the diagnosis.

  17. COMPARISON OF RADIOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENTS OBTAINED WITH CONVENTIONAL AND INDIRECT DIGITAL IMAGING DURING ENDODONTIC TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitd, Ligia Buloto; Lima, Tatiana de Castro; Chinellato, Luiz Eduardo Montenegro; Bramante, Clóvis Monteiro; Garcia, Roberto Brandão; de Moraes, Ivaldo Gomes; Bernardineli, Norberti

    2008-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the quality of indirect digitized radiographic images taken during endodontic procedures and to compare the measurements recorded with this technique to those obtained from conventional radiographs. Two-hundred conventional periapical radiographs taken at the undergraduate Endodontics Clinic of the Dental School of Bauru were digitized. The conventional and indirect digitized images were compared by three examiners as to the quality and accuracy of the measurements recorded during endodontic treatment, in canal length determination, gutta-percha adaptation, lateral condensation and final obturation. The conventional radiographs were observed on a film viewer, surrounded by a dark card, and measured with magnifying glass and a millimeter ruler; the indirect digitized images were evaluated on the Digora® for Windows software, with free utilization of the bright/contrast tool. Unlike the conventional radiographic images, all indirect digitized images were considered as having a high quality. The distance between the filling material and the root apex was 0.117 mm larger, on average, for the Digora® system (p<0.01). The measurements achieved by the investigated radiographic methods were clinically similar and they are thus equivalent. Changes in brightness and contrast of the images using Digora® software improved the diagnosis. PMID:19089211

  18. Comparison of Anterior Segment Measurements Obtained by Three Different Devices in Healthy Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Lopez de la Fuente

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the normal values and the repeatability of the Galilei Dual Scheimpflug Analyzer (GDSA, the biometer IOL Master, and the autokerato/refractometer WAM 5500 in anterior segment examinations. Methods. Eighty-eight eyes from 88 healthy volunteers were prospectively and consecutively recruited. The repeatability was assessed, calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Results. The correlations among the repeated measurements showed nearly perfect reliability (ICC > 0.81 for all of the parameters, except corneal astigmatism Galilei (0.79 and WAM (0.68. There were statistically significant differences (P<0.001 between the values of the flat simulated keratometry (SimK and the steep SimK measured by GDSA and the other methods; however, there were no statistically significant differences for the values obtained with the IOL Master and WAM 5500 (P=0.302 and P=0.172, resp. or between the values of the ACD (P<0.001 and WTW (P=0.007 measured by the IOL Master and GDSA. Conclusions. The anterior segment measurements from the IOL Master and WAM 5500 were highly repeatable, comparable, and well correlated. In healthy young persons, the evaluated parameters had very good repeatability, although significant differences were found between the GDSA and IOL Master and between the GDSA and WAM 5500.

  19. Measurement of negative ion density in a pulsed multicusp negative ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coonan, B.; Mellon, K.N.; Hopkins, M.B. (Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland))

    1992-10-05

    The production of negative ion beams for use in neutral beam injection heating has become an important area of research in recent years. This paper discusses the negative ion densities measured in a pulsed multicusp volume ion source using photodetachment diagnostic technique. A pulse modulated negative ion source is being used as an alternative to the tandem source and an increase in negative ion extracted current has previously been observed by Hopkins and Mellon. Work with photodetachment quoted in this paper shows an increase in negative ion density during the post discharge similar to previous results obtained using an accelerator to extract the negative ions.

  20. Measurement of Density Inhomogeneity for Source Masses in Time-of-Swing Method of Measuring G

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lin-Xia; SHAO Cheng-Gang; TU Liang-Cheng; LUO Jun

    2009-01-01

    A method with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is presented to measure the density inhomogeneity of the stainless steel (SS316) sphere prepared for measuring G using time-of-swing method. The experimental result shows that the relative density inhomogeneity of the sphere is better than 5.9 × 10-4 over the volume of 0.272 × 0.234 × 0.005 mm3. If we assume that the density inhomogeneity of the spheres used in our G measurement is the same as that of the sphere destroyed in testing, it will contribute to G value with an uncertainty of less than O.034 ppm in our G measurement. Furthermore, the mass centre offset from the geometric centre of the sphere will be less than 4.3 × 10-4 μm due to this inhomogeneity.

  1. Schlieren technique applied to the arc temperature measurement in a high energy density cutting torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevosto, L.; Artana, G.; Mancinelli, B.; Kelly, H.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma temperature and radial density profiles of the plasma species in a high energy density cutting arc have been obtained by using a quantitative schlieren technique. A Z-type two-mirror schlieren system was used in this research. Due to its great sensibility such technique allows measuring plasma composition and temperature from the arc axis to the surrounding medium by processing the gray-level contrast values of digital schlieren images recorded at the observation plane for a given position of a transverse knife located at the exit focal plane of the system. The technique has provided a good visualization of the plasma flow emerging from the nozzle and its interactions with the surrounding medium and the anode. The obtained temperature values are in good agreement with those values previously obtained by the authors on the same torch using Langmuir probes.

  2. Reliability of quantitative EEG (qEEG) measures and LORETA current source density at 30 days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Rex L; Baldwin, Debora R; Shaw, Tiffany L; Diloreto, Dominic J; Phillips, Sherman M; Scruggs, Annie M; Riehl, Timothy C

    2012-06-14

    There is a growing interest for using quantitative EEG and LORETA current source density in clinical and research settings. Importantly, if these indices are to be employed in clinical settings then the reliability of these measures is of great concern. Neuroguide (Applied Neurosciences) is sophisticated software developed for the analyses of power, and connectivity measures of the EEG as well as LORETA current source density. To date there are relatively few data evaluating topographical EEG reliability contrasts for all 19 channels and no studies have evaluated reliability for LORETA calculations. We obtained 4 min eyes-closed and eyes-opened EEG recordings at 30-day intervals. The EEG was analyzed in Neuroguide and FFT power, coherence and phase was computed for traditional frequency bands (delta, theta, alpha and beta) and LORETA current source density was calculated in 1 Hz increments and summed for total power in eight regions of interest (ROI). In order to obtain a robust measure of reliability we utilized a random effects model with an absolute agreement definition. The results show very good reproducibility for total absolute power and coherence. Phase shows lower reliability coefficients. LORETA current source density shows very good reliability with an average 0.81 for ECB and 0.82 for EOB. Similarly, the eight regions of interest show good to very good agreement across time. Implications for future directions and use of qEEG and LORETA in clinical populations are discussed.

  3. A method for obtaining distributed surface flux measurements in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, M. H.; Pardyjak, E.; Nadeau, D. F.; Barrenetxea, G.; Brutsaert, W. H.; Parlange, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    Sonic anemometers and gas analyzers can be used to measure fluxes of momentum, heat, and moisture over flat terrain, and with the proper corrections, over sloping terrain as well. While this method of obtaining fluxes is currently the most accurate available, the instruments themselves are costly, making installation of many stations impossible for most campaign budgets. Small, commercial automatic weather stations (Sensorscope) are available at a fraction of the cost of sonic anemometers or gas analyzers. Sensorscope stations use slow-response instruments to measure standard meteorological variables, including wind speed and direction, air temperature, humidity, surface skin temperature, and incoming solar radiation. The method presented here makes use of one sonic anemometer and one gas analyzer along with a dozen Sensorscope stations installed throughout the Val Ferret catchment in southern Switzerland in the summers of 2009, 2010 and 2011. Daytime fluxes are calculated using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in conjunction with the surface energy balance at each Sensorscope station as well as at the location of the sonic anemometer and gas analyzer, where a suite of additional slow-response instruments were co-located. Corrections related to slope angle were made for wind speeds and incoming shortwave radiation measured by the horizontally-mounted cup anemometers and incoming solar radiation sensors respectively. A temperature correction was also applied to account for daytime heating inside the radiation shield on the slow-response temperature/humidity sensors. With these corrections, we find a correlation coefficient of 0.77 between u* derived using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory and that of the sonic anemometer. Calculated versus measured heat fluxes also compare well and local patterns of latent heat flux and measured surface soil moisture are correlated.

  4. Modeling of Production and Quality of Bioethanol Obtained from Sugarcane Fermentation Using Direct Dissolved Sugars Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Velazquez-Marti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bioethanol production from sugarcane represents an opportunity for urban-agricultural development in small communities of Ecuador. Despite the fact that the industry for bioethanol production from sugarcane in Brazil is fully developed, it is still considered expensive as a small rural business. In order to be able to reduce the costs of monitoring the production process, and avoid the application of expensive sensors, the aim of this research was modeling the kinetics of production of bioethanol based on direct measurements of Brix grades, instead of the concentration of alcohol, during the process of cane juice bio-fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This avoids the application of expensive sensors that increase the investment costs. Fermentation experiments with three concentrations of yeast and two temperatures were carried out in a laboratory reactor. In each case Brix grades, amount of ethanol and alcoholic degree were measured. A mathematical model to predict the quality and production of bioethanol was developed from Brix grade measurements, obtaining an adjusted coefficient of determination of 0.97. The model was validated in a pilot plant.

  5. Density of Zeros on the Lee-Yang circle obtained from magnetization data of a two-dimensional Ising ferromagnet

    OpenAIRE

    Binek, Ch.

    1998-01-01

    In order to provide an experimental access to the statistical theory of Lee and Yang (1952) the density function g(theta) of zeros on the Lee-Yang circle has been determined for the first time by analyzing isothermal magnetization data, m(H), of the Ising ferromagnet FeCl2 in axial magnetic fields, H, at temperatures 34 < T < 99K. The validity of our approach is demonstrated by the perfect agreement of magnetic specific heat data as calculated from g(theta) and m(H) via Maxwells relation, res...

  6. Measurement of Bone Mineral Density in Male Detainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Bakan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to investigate the increased risk for osteoporosis due to closed environment and sedentary lifestyle of prisoners. In this way, we planned to inform prisoners and supervisors for protective measures that should be taken if low bone mineral density (BMD is detected compared with normal population. Materials and Methods: Sixty six prisoner men over the age of 45 as the study group and 66 male volunteers who are not detainees over the age of 45 as a control group were included in the study. All participants' age, occupation, duration in prison, habits, nutrition, exercise, diseases and medications used were noted. BMD values were measured using a phalangeal radiographic absorptiometry (Alara Metriscan®. Results: BMD values in the study group were measured as 0.341±0.030 g/cm2 and as 0.346±0.029 g/cm2 in the control group (p=0.968. BMD values of the study group were lower than those of the control group. Conclusion: In this study, we found that BMD values of the detainees were lower than those of the control group but this difference was not statistically significant. However, there was a negative correlation between BMD values and duration in prison. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2012;18: 81-5

  7. Impact of lens distortions on strain measurements obtained with 2D digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lava, P.; Van Paepegem, W.; Coppieters, S.; De Baere, I.; Wang, Y.; Debruyne, D.

    2013-05-01

    The determination of strain fields based on displacements obtained via digital image correlation (DIC) at the micro-strain level (≤1000 μm/m) is still a cumbersome task. In particular when high-strain gradients are involved, e.g. in composite materials with multidirectional fibre reinforcement, uncertainties in the experimental setup and errors in the derivation of the displacement fields can substantially hamper the strain identification process. In this contribution, the aim is to investigate the impact of lens distortions on strain measurements. To this purpose, we first perform pure rigid body motion experiments, revealing the importance of precise correction of lens distortions. Next, a uni-axial tensile test on a textile composite with spatially varying high strain gradients is performed, resulting in very accurately determined strains along the fibers of the material.

  8. Deep S-wave velocity structure at Hawaii Islands obtained by microtremor array measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Microtremor array measurements and three-component microtremor measurements have been performed at the west coast of Hawaii Island (Figure.1). Two seismographs with three-component accelerometers were used for data acquisition. At each site, one seismograph was fixed in one place and data was acquired at that location for the entire survey. Data was acquired by a second seismograph at larger separations ranging from 5 to 3403m from the fixed seismograph. Data acquisition was repeated at each new separation. In each measurement, 10 to 60 minutes of ambient noise was recorded. As the separations of seismographs increased, the record length of ambient noise was increased. The sampling interval used was 10msec. An entire measurement took several hours. Data acquisition was performed in the day-time and the seismographs were placed in relatively quiet places such as in parks or residential areas. A spatial autocorrelation was used for calculating phase velocity and a clear dispersion curve (Figure 2a) was obtained in frequency range from 0.2 to 30 Hz. A joint inversion was applied to the observed dispersion curve, and H/V spectrum, and S-wave velocity model was analyzed for the site. In the inversion, phase velocities of the dispersion curve and the absolute value and peak frequencies of the H/V spectra were used as observation data. The unknown parameters were layer thickness and S-wave velocity. A Genetic Algorithm was used for optimization. Theoretical H/V spectra and phase velocities are generated by calculating the weighted average of the fundamental mode and higher modes (up to the 5th mode) based on medium response. Figure 2b shows an S-wave velocity model obtained by the inversion. We can see that a low velocity layer with S-wave velocity from 250 to 700 m/s exists to a depth of 90 m. A velocity layer with S-wave velocity from 900 to 1500 m/s exists at a depth range of 90 to 1300 m. Bedrock with S-wave velocity about 3000 m/s exists at a depth of 2200 m.

  9. Comparison of Relative Activation Energies Obtained by Density Functional Theory and the Random Phase Approximation for Several Claisen Rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Madeline K; Vine, Seanna; Walsh, Elizabeth; Avrantinis, Sara; Daub, G William; Cave, Robert J

    2016-03-03

    We investigate several representative density functional theory approaches for the calculation of relative activation energies and free energies of a set of model pericyclic reactions, some of which have been studied experimentally. In particular, we use a standard hybrid functional (B3LYP), the same hybrid functional augmented with a basis set superposition error and dispersion correction, a meta-hybrid functional developed to treat transition states and weak interactions (M06-2X), and the recently implemented random phase approximation (RPA) based on Kohn-Sham orbitals from conventional density functional theory by Furche and co-workers. We apply these methods to calculate relative activation energies and estimated free energies for the amide acetal Claisen rearrangement. We focus on relative activation energies to assess the effects of steric and weak interactions in the various methods and compare with experiment where possible. We also discuss the advantages of using this set of reactions as a test bed for the comparison of treatments of weak interactions. We conclude that all methods yield similar trends in relative reactivity, but the RPA yields results in best agreement with the experimental values.

  10. Density Measurements of Low Silica CaO-SiO2-Al2O3 Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhmood, Luckman; Seetharaman, Seshadri

    2010-08-01

    Density measurements of a low-silica CaO-SiO2-Al2O3 system were carried out using the Archimedes principle. A Pt 30 pct Rh bob and wire arrangement was used for this purpose. The results obtained were in good agreement with those obtained from the model developed in the current group as well as with other results reported earlier. The density for the CaO-SiO2 and the CaO-Al2O3 binary slag systems also was estimated from the ternary values. The extrapolation of density values for high-silica systems also showed good agreement with previous works. An estimation for the density value of CaO was made from the current experimental data. The density decrease at high temperatures was interpreted based on the silicate structure. As the mole percent of SiO2 was below the 33 pct required for the orthosilicate composition, discrete {text{SiO}}4^{4 - } tetrahedral units in the silicate melt would exist along with O2- ions. The change in melt expansivity may be attributed to the ionic expansions in the order of {text{Al}}^{ 3+ } - {text{O}}^{ 2- } < {text{Ca}}^{ 2+ } - {text{O}}^{ 2- } < {text{Ca}}^{ 2+ } - {text{O}}^{ - } Structural changes in the ternary slag also could be correlated to a drastic change in the value of enthalpy of mixing.

  11. Measurements of plasma density fluctuations and electric wave fields using spherical electrostatic probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, A.I.; Bostroem, R.

    1995-04-01

    Spherical electrostatic probes are in wide use for the measurements of electric fields and plasma density. This report concentrates on the measurements of fluctuations of these quantities rather than background values. Potential problems with the technique include the influence of density fluctuations on electric field measurements and vice versa, effects of varying satellite potential, and non-linear rectification in the probe and satellite sheaths. To study the actual importance of these and other possible effects, we simulate the response of the probe-satellite system to various wave phenomena in the plasma by applying approximate analytical as well as numerical methods. We use a set of non-linear probe equations, based on probe characteristics experimentally obtained in space, and therefore essentially independent of any specific probe theory. This approach is very useful since the probe theory for magnetized plasmas is incomplete. 47 refs.

  12. Interpretation of very low frequency electromagnetic measurements in terms of normalized current density over variable topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anand; Sharma, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    A 2D inversion approach is developed to interpret VLF electromagnetic measurement recorded over variable topography. To depict the variable topography accurately, an octree mesh discretization is incorporated. Subsurface structure is modeled in terms of apparent current density distribution and compared with the inversion results for actual resistivity distribution obtained using numerical techniques. The study demonstrates that the results obtained using both approaches (current density and resistivity distribution) are comparable, but due to analytical expression, current density imaging is faster. The conjugate gradient method is used to reduce the computation time and storage space when solving the matrix equations, resulting in feasible and practical imaging inversion of VLF data. The preconditioned matrix, which is determined by the distances between the blocks and observation points, has an important function in improving the resolution. In case of flat earth, preconditioned conjugate gradient inversion of data results in images that are comparable to those obtained using resistivity inversion. We also test whether topography variation in the order of skin depth is significant to incorporate topography in the modeling. The example of a topographical field VLF data inversion shows the efficacy of the presented approach to appraise the subsurface structure in terms of current density.

  13. Measuring the Density of Different Materials by Using the Collimated Fast Neutron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudac, D.; Nad, K.; Orlic, Z.; Obhodas, J. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Valkovic, V. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Kvinticka 62, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-07-01

    It was demonstrated in the previous work that various threat materials could be detected inside the sea going cargo container by measuring the three variables, carbon and oxygen concentration and density of investigated material. Density was determined by measuring transmitted neutrons, which is not always practical in terms of setting up the instrument geometry. In order to enable more geometry flexibility, we have investigated the possibility of using the scattered neutrons in cargo material identification. For that purpose, the densities of different materials were measured depending on the position of neutron detectors and neutron generator with respect to the target position. One neutron detector was put above the target, one behind and one in front of the target, above the neutron generator. It was shown that all three positions of neutron detectors can be successfully used to measure the target density, but only if the detected neutrons are successfully discriminated from the gamma rays. Although the associated alpha particle technique/associate particle imaging (API) was used to discriminate the neutrons from the gamma rays, it is believed that the same results would be obtained by using the pulse shape discrimination method. In that way API technique can be avoided and the neutron generator which produces much higher beam intensity than 10{sup 8} n/s can be used. (authors)

  14. {sup 10}B concentration evaluation in autoradiography images by optical density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portu, A., E-mail: portu@cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atomico Constituyentes (CAC), Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Av. Gral. Paz 1499, AC: B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Rivadavia 1917, AC: C1033AAJ, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Saint Martin, G., E-mail: gisaint@cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atomico Constituyentes (CAC), Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Av. Gral. Paz 1499, AC: B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Brandizzi, D., E-mail: brandizzi@cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atomico Constituyentes (CAC), Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Av. Gral. Paz 1499, AC: B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Laboratorio de Microespectrofotometria (LANAIS-MEF), CONICET-CNEA (Argentina); Bernaola, O.A., E-mail: bernaola@cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atomico Constituyentes (CAC), Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Av. Gral. Paz 1499, AC: B1650KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-12-15

    The quantification and analysis of the tracks forming the autoradiography image of a tissue section is essential for the measurement of particle emitter concentration and distribution (e.g. {sup 10}B) in the sample. Conventional counting techniques cannot be used when track density is high because of track overlapping. A densitometry supported by image analysis method suitable for these cases has been developed. Optical density measurements obtained for boron solutions of known concentrations showed a linear behavior in the range of concentrations under consideration. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A nuclear tracks quantification method was developed applying optical densitometry supported by image analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It will provide information about {sup 10}B distribution in samples whose autoradiographies present high density of tracks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A calibration curve for optical density versus boron concentration was constructed and applied to the analysis of boron-doped silicon wafers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results were compared with those from an individual counting technique, obtaining a good agreement.

  15. How to measure the charm density in the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, N Ya

    2012-01-01

    We study two experimental ways to measure the heavy-quark content of the proton: using the Callan-Gross ratio $R(x,Q^2)=F_L/F_T$ and/or the azimuthal $\\cos(2\\varphi)$ asymmetry in DIS. Our approach is based on the following observations. First, the ratio $R(x,Q^2)=F_L/F_T$ and azimuthal $\\cos(2\\varphi)$ asymmetry in heavy-quark leptoproduction are stable, both parametrically and perturbatively, within pQCD. Second, both these quantities are sensitive to resummation of the mass logarithms of the type $\\alpha_{s}\\ln(Q^{2}/m^{2})$. We conclude that the heavy-quark densities in the nucleon can, in principle, be determined from high-$Q^2$ data on the Callan-Gross ratio and/or the azimuthal asymmetry. In particular, the charm content of the proton can be measured in future studies at the proposed Large Hadron-Electron (LHeC) and Electron-Ion (EIC) Colliders.

  16. Effect of Clothing on Measurement of Bone Mineral Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Elizabeth A; Feldman, Anna Z; Malabanan, Alan O; Abate, Ejigayehu G; Whittaker, LaTarsha G; Yano-Litwin, Amanda; Dorazio, Jolene; Rosen, Harold N

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown whether allowing patients to have BMD (bone mineral density) studies acquired while wearing radiolucent clothing adlib contributes appreciably to the measurement error seen. To examine this question, a spine phantom was scanned 30 times without any clothing, while draped with a gown, and while draped with heavy winter clothing. The effect on mean BMD and on SD (standard deviation) was assessed. The effect of clothing on mean or SD of the area was not significant. The effect of clothing on mean and SD for BMD was small but significant and was around 1.6% for the mean. However, the effect on BMD precision was much more clinically important. Without clothing the spine phantom had an least significant change of 0.0077 gm/cm(2), while when introducing variability of clothing the least significant change rose as high as 0.0305 gm/cm(2). We conclude that, adding clothing to the spine phantom had a small but statistically significant effect on the mean BMD and on variance of the measurement. It is unlikely that the effect on mean BMD has any clinical significance, but the effect on the reproducibility (precision) of the result is likely clinically significant.

  17. First measurements results of the LHC longitudinal density monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Jeff , A; Bravin, E; Boccardi, A; Bozyigit, S; Lefevre, T; Rabiller, A; Roncarolo, F; Welsch, C P; Fisher, A S

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the longitudinal distribution of particles is important for various aspects of accelerator operation, for example to check the injection quality and to characterize the development of ghost bunches before and during the physics periods. A new detector, the LHC Longitudinal Density Monitor (LDM) is a single-photon counting system measuring synchrotron light by means of an avalanche photodiode detector. The unprecedented energies reached in the LHC allow synchrotron light diagnostics to be used with both protons and heavy ions. The LDM is able to longitudinally profile the whole ring with a resolution close to the target of 50 ps. On-line correction for the effects of the detector deadtime, pile-up and afterpulsing allow a dynamic range of 105 to be achieved. The LDM operated during the 2010 lead ion run and during 2011 with protons. Measurements from both runs are presented in this contribution along with an analysis of the LDM performance and an outlook for future upgrades.

  18. Measurements of density field in a swirling flame by 2D spontaneous Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaborin, D. K.; Dulin, V. M.; Lobasov, A. S.; Markovich, D. M.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of the density distribution in swirling turbulent premixed flames. The measurement principle is based on registration of spontaneous Raman scattering, when the reacting gas flow is illuminated by a laser sheet. Evaluation of 1D and 2D distributions of density and temperature were performed in a laminar Bunsen flame as a test case for validation of experimental technique. Time-averaged 2D images of the scattering during rovibronic transitions of nitrogen molecules were captured in turbulent premixed low-swirl and high-swirl (Re = 5000) propane-air flames in a wide range of equivalence ratio. The obtained density fields are useful for better understanding of heat and mass transfer in swirl-stabilized turbulent flames and for validation of CFD results.

  19. In Situ Measurements of the Size and Density of Titan Aerosol Analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Horst, Sarah M

    2013-01-01

    The organic haze produced from complex CH4/N2 chemistry in the atmosphere of Titan plays an important role in processes that occur in the atmosphere and on its surface. The haze particles act as condensation nuclei and are therefore involved in Titan's methane hydrological cycle. They also may behave like sediment on Titan's surface and participate in both fluvial and aeolian processes. Models that seek to understand these processes require information about the physical properties of the particles including their size and density. Although measurements obtained by Cassini-Huygens have placed constraints on the size of the haze particles, their densities remain unknown. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments and measured the size, number density, and particle density of Titan aerosol analogues, or tholins, for CH4 concentrations from 0.01% to 10% using two different energy sources, spark discharge and UV. We find that the densities currently in use by many Titan models are highe...

  20. Human photoreceptor cone density measured with adaptive optics technology (rtx1 device) in healthy eyes: Standardization of measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleska-Żmijewska, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew M; Ulińska, Magdalena; Szaflik, Jerzy; Dąbrowska, Anna; Szaflik, Jacek P

    2017-06-01

    The anatomic structures of the anterior segment of the eye enable correct reception of stimuli by the retina, which contains receptors that receive light impulses and transmit them to the visual cortex. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the size of the sampling window in an adaptive optics (AO) flood-illumination retinal camera (rtx1) on cone density measurements in the eyes of healthy individuals and to investigate the differences in cone density and spacing in different quadrants of the retina. Thirty-three subjects with no ophthalmic or systemic disease underwent a detailed ophthalmologic examination. Photographs of retinal fragments 3 degrees from the fovea were taken using the rtx1 AO retinal camera. We used sampling windows with 3 sizes (50 × 50, 100 × 100, and 250 × 250 μm). Cone density, spacing, and shape were determined using AOdetect software. The median (interquartile range) cone density was 19,269 (4964) cones/mm. There were statistically significant differences between measurements taken with the 50/50 and 250/250-m windows. There were no significant differences in the cone spacing results between any of the windows examined, but the measurements differed according to location between the superior and temporal quadrants. The most common cone shape was hexagonal (47.6%) for all window sizes and locations. These findings may help in the development of a normative database for variation in cone density in healthy subjects and to allow the best window to be chosen for obtain the most correct values for eccentricity measurements of 3 degrees. In our study, the optimal sampling window was 100 × 100 μm.

  1. Density and Viscosity Measurement of Diesel Fuels at Combined High Pressure and Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Schaschke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report the measurement of the viscosity and density of various diesel fuels, obtained from British refineries, at elevated pressures up to 500 MPa and temperatures in the range 298 K to 373 K. The measurement and prediction procedures of fluid properties under high pressure conditions is of increasing interest in many processes and systems including enhanced oil recovery, automotive engine fuel injection, braking, and hydraulic systems. Accurate data and understanding of the fluid characteristic in terms of pressure, volume and temperature is required particularly where the fluid is composed of a complex mixture or blend of aliphatic or aromatic hydrocarbons. In this study, high pressure viscosity data was obtained using a thermostatically-controlled falling sinker-type high pressure viscometer to provide reproducible and reliable viscosity data based on terminal velocity sinker fall times. This was supported with density measurements using a micro-pVT device. Both high-pressure devices were additionally capable of illustrating the freezing points of the hydrocarbon mixtures. This work has, thus, provided data that can extend the application of mixtures of commercially available fuels and to test the validity of available predictive density and viscosity models. This included a Tait-style equation for fluid compressibility prediction. For complex diesel fuel compositions, which have many unidentified components, the approach illustrates the need to apply appropriate correlations, which require accurate knowledge or prediction of thermodynamic properties.

  2. Measuring protoplanetary disk gas surface density profiles with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    McPartland, Jonathan P Williams Conor

    2016-01-01

    The gas and dust are spatially segregated in protoplanetary disks due to the vertical settling and radial drift of large grains. A fuller accounting of the mass content and distribution in disks therefore requires spectral line observations. We extend the modeling approach presented in Williams & Best (2014) to show that gas surface density profiles can be measured from high fidelity 13CO integrated intensity images. We demonstrate the methodology by fitting ALMA observations of the HD 163296 disk to determine a gas mass, Mgas = 0.048 solar masse, and accretion disk characteristic size Rc = 213au and gradient gamma = 0.39. The same parameters match the C18O 2--1 image and indicates an abundance ratio [13CO]/[C18O] of 700 independent of radius. To test how well this methodology can be applied to future line surveys of smaller, lower mass T Tauri disks, we create a large 13CO 2--1 image library and fit simulated data. For disks with gas masses 3-10 Jupiter masses at 150pc, ALMA observations with a resolutio...

  3. Obtaining Good Performance With Triple-ζ-Type Basis Sets in Double-Hybrid Density Functional Theory Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Bun; Radom, Leo

    2011-09-13

    A variety of combinations of B-LYP-based double-hybrid density functional theory (DHDFT) procedures and basis sets have been examined. A general observation is that the optimal combination of exchange contributions is in the proximity of 30% Becke 1988 (B88) exchange and 70% Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange, while for the correlation contributions, the use of independently optimized spin-component-scaled Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (SCS-MP2) parameters (MP2OS and MP2SS) is beneficial. The triple-ζ Dunning aug'-cc-pVTZ+d and Pople 6-311+G(3df,2p)+d basis sets are found to be cost-effective for DHDFT methods. As a result, we have formulated the DuT-D3 DHDFT procedure, which employs the aug'-cc-pVTZ+d basis set and includes 30% B88 and 70% HF exchange energies, 59% LYP, 47% MP2OS, and 36% MP2SS correlation energies, and a D3 dispersion correction with the parameters s6 = 0.5, sr,6 = 1.569, and s8 = 0.35. Likewise, the PoT-D3 DHDFT procedure was formulated with the 6-311+G(3df,2p)+d basis set and has 32% B88 and 68% HF exchange energies, 63% LYP, 46% MP2OS, and 27% MP2SS correlation energies, and the D3 parameters s6 = 0.5, sr,6 = 1.569, and s8 = 0.30. Testing using the large E3 set of 740 energies demonstrates the robustness of these methods. Further comparisons show that the performance of these methods, particularly DuT-D3, compares favorably with the previously reported DSD-B-LYP and DSD-B-LYP-D3 methods used in conjunction with quadruple-ζ aug'-pc3+d and aug'-def2-QZVP basis sets but at lower computational expense. The previously reported ωB97X-(LP)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) procedure also performs very well. Our findings highlight the cost-effectiveness of appropriate- and moderate-sized triple-ζ basis sets in the application of DHDFT procedures.

  4. CO{sub 2} laser diagnostics for measurements of the plasma density profile and plasma density fluctuations on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyacheslavov, L.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    A CO{sub 2} laser based diagnostics complimentary to the existing FIR interferometer is proposed. It combines interferometry for plasma density profile measurement under conditions of large density gradients, and both imaging and scattering techniques for observation of plasma fluctuations. Two-colour interferometer with a slablike probe beam and a single multichannel linear detector array provide observation of plasma density profile and density fluctuations at two locations along the probe beam. Basic characteristics of the diagnostics are considered as well as some effects that include dispersion and are critical for two colour imaging technique. The results of the bench-top experiments with the prototype of the interferometer are presented. (author)

  5. Electron density profile measurements from hydrogen line intensity ratio method in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YooSung; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Yang, Jeong-hun; Kim, SeongCheol; Kim, Young-Gi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Yang, Seongmoo; Jo, Jungmin; Oh, Soo-Ghee; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density profiles of versatile experiment spherical torus plasmas are measured by using a hydrogen line intensity ratio method. A fast-frame visible camera with appropriate bandpass filters is used to detect images of Balmer line intensities. The unique optical system makes it possible to take images of Hα and Hβ radiation simultaneously, with only one camera. The frame rate is 1000 fps and the spatial resolution of the system is about 0.5 cm. One-dimensional local emissivity profiles have been obtained from the toroidal line of sight with viewing dumps. An initial result for the electron density profile is presented and is in reasonable agreement with values measured by a triple Langmuir probe.

  6. Microwave frequency sweep interferometer for plasma density measurements in ECR ion sources: Design and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Giuseppe; Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Leonardi, Ornella; Sorbello, Gino; Celona, Luigi; Castro, Giuseppe; Agnello, Riccardo; Caruso, Antonio; Passarello, Santi; Longhitano, Alberto; Isernia, Tommaso; Gammino, Santo

    2016-02-01

    The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) development is strictly related to the availability of new diagnostic tools, as the existing ones are not adequate to such compact machines and to their plasma characteristics. Microwave interferometry is a non-invasive method for plasma diagnostics and represents the best candidate for plasma density measurement in hostile environment. Interferometry in ECRISs is a challenging task mainly due to their compact size. The typical density of ECR plasmas is in the range 1011-1013 cm-3 and it needs a probing beam wavelength of the order of few centimetres, comparable to the chamber radius. The paper describes the design of a microwave interferometer developed at the LNS-INFN laboratories based on the so-called "frequency sweep" method to filter out the multipath contribution in the detected signals. The measurement technique and the preliminary results (calibration) obtained during the experimental tests will be presented.

  7. Microwave frequency sweep interferometer for plasma density measurements in ECR ion sources: Design and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, Giuseppe [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria (Italy); Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Leonardi, Ornella; Celona, Luigi; Castro, Giuseppe; Agnello, Riccardo; Caruso, Antonio; Passarello, Santi; Longhitano, Alberto; Gammino, Santo [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Sorbello, Gino [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); University of Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Isernia, Tommaso [University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) development is strictly related to the availability of new diagnostic tools, as the existing ones are not adequate to such compact machines and to their plasma characteristics. Microwave interferometry is a non-invasive method for plasma diagnostics and represents the best candidate for plasma density measurement in hostile environment. Interferometry in ECRISs is a challenging task mainly due to their compact size. The typical density of ECR plasmas is in the range 10{sup 11}–10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} and it needs a probing beam wavelength of the order of few centimetres, comparable to the chamber radius. The paper describes the design of a microwave interferometer developed at the LNS-INFN laboratories based on the so-called “frequency sweep” method to filter out the multipath contribution in the detected signals. The measurement technique and the preliminary results (calibration) obtained during the experimental tests will be presented.

  8. In Situ Density Measurement of Basaltic Melts at High Pressure by X-ray Absorption Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, R.; Ohtani, E.; Suzuki, A.; Urakawa, S.; Katayama, Y.

    2004-12-01

    -ray beam was 25 keV and the beam size was reduced to 0.1*0.1 mm2 by two slits. Intensities of X-ray beam were measured by ion chambers. The starting material was a glass with the MORB composition (SiO2-Al2O3-FeO-MgO-CaO-Na2O). Experiments were made from 1 atm to 5GPa, from 300 to 1873 K. We measured the density of basaltic glass, crystals (eclogite) and melt. A density error of this method is less than 2 %. We calculated the bulk modulus of the glass at 773K, crystals at 1273K and melt at 1873 K, and obtained Kglass(773K)=46(4) GPa, Kcrystals(1273K)=100(7) GPa, Kmelt(1873K)=16.5(1.5) GPa assuming K'=4. This Kmelt(1873K) value is consistent with the previous study by the sink-float method (Ohtani and Maeda (2001); K=18.7(2.1) GPa). We can conclude this method is applicable for silicate melts.

  9. Measurement of the viscosity-density product using multiple reflections of ultrasonic shear horizontal waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Margaret S; Adamson, Justus D; Bond, Leonard J

    2006-12-22

    We have developed an on-line computer-controlled sensor, based on ultrasound reflection measurements, to determine the product of the viscosity and density of a liquid or slurry for Newtonian fluids and the shear impedance of the liquid for non-Newtonian fluids. A 14 MHz shear wave transducer is bonded to one side of a 45-90 degrees fused silica wedge and the base is in contract with the liquid. Twenty-eight echoes were observed due to the multiple reflections of an ultrasonic shear horizontal (SH) wave within the wedge. The fast Fourier transform of each echo was obtained for a liquid and for water, which serves as the calibration fluid, and the reflection coefficient at the solid-liquid interface was obtained. Data were obtained for 11 sugar water solutions ranging in concentration from 10% to 66% by weight. The viscosity values are shown to be in good agreement with those obtained independently using a laboratory viscometer. The data acquisition time is 14s and this can be reduced by judicious selection of the echoes for determining the reflection coefficient. The measurement of the density results in a determination of the viscosity for Newtonian fluids or the shear wave velocity for non-Newtonian fluids. The sensor can be deployed for process control in a pipeline, with the base of the wedge as part of the pipeline wall, or immersed in a tank.

  10. BEME systematic review : Predictive values of measurements obtained in medical schools and future performance in medical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdy, H; Prasad, K; Anderson, MB

    2006-01-01

    Background: Effectiveness of medical education programs is most meaningfully measured as performance of its graduates. Objectives: To assess the value of measurements obtained in medical schools in predicting future performance in medical practice. Methods: Search strategy: The English literature fr

  11. The role of adequate reference materials in density measurements in hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, A.; Moutinho, J.; Moura, S.; Oliveira, F.; Filipe, E.

    2015-02-01

    In hemodialysis, oscillation-type density meters are used to measure the density of the acid component of the dialysate solutions used in the treatment of kidney patients. An incorrect density determination of this solution used in hemodialysis treatments can cause several and adverse events to patients. Therefore, despite the Fresenius Medical Care (FME) tight control of the density meters calibration results, this study shows the benefits of mimic the matrix usually measured to produce suitable reference materials for the density meter calibrations.

  12. Experiment to measure oxygen opacity at high density and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, Paul; Mussack, Katie; Orban, Chris; Colgan, James; Ducret, Jean-Eric; Fontes, Christopher J.; Guzik, Joyce Ann; Heeter, Robert F.; Kilcrease, Dave; Le Pennec, Maelle; Mancini, Roberto; Perry, Ted; Turck-Chièze, Sylvaine; Trantham, Matt

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a debate over the abundances of heavy elements (Z >2) in the solar interior. Recent solar atmosphere models [Asplund 2009] find a significantly lower abundance for C, N, and O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. This discrepancy has led to an investigation of opacities through laboratory experiments and improved opacity models for many of the larger contributors to the sun’s opacity, including iron and oxygen. Recent opacity measurements of iron disagree with opacity model predictions [Bailey et al, 2015]. Although these results are still controversial, repeated scrutiny of the experiment and data has not produced a conclusive reason for the discrepancy. New models have been implemented in the ATOMIC opacity code for C, O and Fe to address the solar abundance issue [Colgan, 2013]. Armstrong et al [2014] have also implemented changes in the ATOMIC code for low-Z elements. However, no data currently exists to test the low-Z material models in the regime relevant to the solar convection zone. We present an experimental design using the opacity platform developed at the National Ignition Facility to study the oxygen opacity at densities and temperatures near the solar convection zone conditions.This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HEDPLP, grant No. DE-NA0001840, and the NLUF Program, grant No. DE-NA0000850, and through LLE, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  13. Laser ultrasonics for bulk-density distribution measurement on green ceramic tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, G. M.; Cavuto, A.; Pandarese, G.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper a Laser Ultrasonics (LUT) system is developed and applied to measure bulk density distribution of green ceramic tiles, which are porous materials with low heat conductivity. Bulk density of green ceramic bodies is a fundamental parameter to be kept under control in the industrial production of ceramic tiles. The LUT system proposed is based on a Nd:YAG pulsed laser for excitation and an air-coupled electro-capacitive transducer for detection. The paper reports experimental apparent bulk-density measurements on white ceramic bodies after a calibration procedures. The performances observed are better than those previously achieved by authors using air-coupled ultrasonic probes for both emission and detection, allowing to reduce average uncertainty down to about ±6 kg/m3 (±0.3%), thanks to the increase in excitation efficiency and lateral resolution, while maintaining potential flexibility for on-line application. The laser ultrasonic procedure proposed is available for both on-line and off-line application. In this last case it is possible to obtain bulk density maps with high spatial resolution by a 2D scan without interrupting the production process.

  14. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Jain, Nupur; Ghiran, Ionita Calin; Tasoglu, Savas

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary) and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary) relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform.

  15. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Knowlton

    Full Text Available Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform.

  16. Calculation of correction factors for ionization chamber measurements with small fields in low-density media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisaturo, O; Pachoud, M; Bochud, F O; Moeckli, R

    2012-07-21

    The quantity of interest for high-energy photon beam therapy recommended by most dosimetric protocols is the absorbed dose to water. Thus, ionization chambers are calibrated in absorbed dose to water, which is the same quantity as what is calculated by most treatment planning systems (TPS). However, when measurements are performed in a low-density medium, the presence of the ionization chamber generates a perturbation at the level of the secondary particle range. Therefore, the measured quantity is close to the absorbed dose to a volume of water equivalent to the chamber volume. This quantity is not equivalent to the dose calculated by a TPS, which is the absorbed dose to an infinitesimally small volume of water. This phenomenon can lead to an overestimation of the absorbed dose measured with an ionization chamber of up to 40% in extreme cases. In this paper, we propose a method to calculate correction factors based on the Monte Carlo simulations. These correction factors are obtained by the ratio of the absorbed dose to water in a low-density medium □D(w,Q,V1)(low) averaged over a scoring volume V₁ for a geometry where V₁ is filled with the low-density medium and the absorbed dose to water □D(w,QV2)(low) averaged over a volume V₂ for a geometry where V₂ is filled with water. In the Monte Carlo simulations, □D(w,QV2)(low) is obtained by replacing the volume of the ionization chamber by an equivalent volume of water, according to the definition of the absorbed dose to water. The method is validated in two different configurations which allowed us to study the behavior of this correction factor as a function of depth in phantom, photon beam energy, phantom density and field size.

  17. Obtaining the Knowledge of a Server Performance from Non-Intrusively Measurable Metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Satoru Ohta

    2016-01-01

    Most network services are provided by server computers. To provide these services with good quality, the server performance must be managed adequately. For the server management, the performance information is commonly obtained from the operating system (OS) and hardware of the managed computer. However, this method has a disadvantage. If the performance is degraded by excessive load or hardware faults, it becomes difficult to collect and transmit information. Thus, it is necessary to obtain ...

  18. Quantum cascade laser-based measurement of metal alkylamide density during atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslar, James E; Kimes, William A; Sperling, Brent A

    2012-03-01

    An in situ gas-phase diagnostic for the metal alkylamide compound tetrakis(ethylmethylamido) hafnium (TEMAH), Hf[N(C(2)H(5))(CH(3))](4), was demonstrated. This diagnostic is based on direct absorption measurement of TEMAH vapor using an external cavity quantum cascade laser emitting at 979 cm(-1), coinciding with the most intense TEMAH absorption in the mid-infrared spectral region, and employing 50 kHz amplitude modulation with synchronous detection. Measurements were performed in a single-pass configuration in a research-grade atomic layer deposition (ALD) chamber. To examine the detection limit of this technique for use as a TEMAH delivery monitor, this technique was demonstrated in the absence of any other deposition reactants or products, and to examine the selectivity of this technique in the presence of deposition products that potentially interfere with detection of TEMAH vapor, it was demonstrated during ALD of hafnium oxide using TEMAH and water. This technique successfully detected TEMAH at molecular densities present during simulated industrial ALD conditions. During hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, absorbance from gas-phase reaction products did not interfere with TEMAH measurements while absorption by reaction products deposited on the optical windows did interfere, although interfering absorption by deposited reaction products corresponded to only ≈4% of the total derived TEMAH density. With short measurement times and appropriate signal averaging, estimated TEMAH minimum detectable densities as low as ≈2 × 10(12) molecules/cm(3) could be obtained. While this technique was demonstrated specifically for TEMAH delivery and hafnium oxide ALD using TEMAH and water, it should be readily applicable to other metal alkylamide compounds and associated metal oxide and nitride deposition chemistries, assuming similar metal alkylamide molar absorptivity and molecular density in the measurement chamber.

  19. Understanding compressible turbulence in the solar wind with multipoint density measurements derived from spacecraft potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Owen

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of spacecraft potential can often be used to derive the electron number density with higher time resolution than is typically available with plasma instruments. On board the Cluster spacecraft the potential is measured with the Electric Fields and Waves instrument (EFW) which consists of four booms in the spin plane of the spacecraft. Consequently the potential measurement is affected by spin and wake effects. This makes the study of frequencies larger than the spin frequency challenging. To overcome these caveats a statistical model of the potential is obtained as a function of the angle the spacecraft is facing. When this variation is known it can be removed from the potential data, resulting in a much more accurate determination of the electron density and a cleaner power spectrum. Spikes at harmonics of the spin frequency can be removed without the need to use a notch filter on the time series. The treated data can then be used as an input to the k-filtering technique, which has previously been applied to the incompressible components of the magnetic field. This allows determination of the three dimensional power distribution in wave space as well as the wavevectors and plasma frame frequencies. Results for the compressible component (using electron density and magnitude of the magnetic field as inputs) and the incompressible component (three components of the magnetic field) will be compared.

  20. Electron Density and Temperature Measurements, and Abundance Anomalies in the Solar Atmosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anita Mohan; Bhola N. Dwivedi; Enrico Landi

    2000-09-01

    Using spectra obtained from the SUMER (Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation) spectrograph on the spacecraft SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory), we investigate the height dependence of electron density, temperature and abundance anomalies in the solar atmosphere. In particular, we present the behaviour of the solar FIP effect (the abundance enhancement of elements with first ionization potential < 10 eV in the corona with respect to photospheric values) with height above an active region observed at the solar limb, with emphasis on the so-called transition region lines.

  1. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, E.M.; Yoo, A.J.; Beenen, L.F.; Berkhemer, O.A.; Blanken, M.D. den; Wismans, C.; Niessen, W.J.; Majoie, C.B.; Marquering, H.A.; Dijk, E.J. van

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and

  2. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M.M. Santos (Emilie M.); A.J. Yoo (Albert J.); L.F.M. Beenen (Ludo); O.A. Berkhemer (Olvert); M.D. Den Blanken (Mark D.); C. Wismans (Carrie); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); C.B. Majoie (Charles); H. Marquering (Henk)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by

  3. Density-based similarity measures for content based search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hush, Don R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruggiero, Christy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We consider the query by multiple example problem where the goal is to identify database samples whose content is similar to a coUection of query samples. To assess the similarity we use a relative content density which quantifies the relative concentration of the query distribution to the database distribution. If the database distribution is a mixture of the query distribution and a background distribution then it can be shown that database samples whose relative content density is greater than a particular threshold {rho} are more likely to have been generated by the query distribution than the background distribution. We describe an algorithm for predicting samples with relative content density greater than {rho} that is computationally efficient and possesses strong performance guarantees. We also show empirical results for applications in computer network monitoring and image segmentation.

  4. Effect of Head Position on Facial Soft Tissue Depth Measurements Obtained Using Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caple, Jodi M; Stephan, Carl N; Gregory, Laura S; MacGregor, Donna M

    2016-01-01

    Facial soft tissue depth (FSTD) studies employing clinical computed tomography (CT) data frequently rely on depth measurements from raw 2D orthoslices. However, the position of each patient's head was not standardized in this method, potentially decreasing measurement reliability and accuracy. This study measured FSTDs along the original orthoslice plane and compared these measurements to those standardized by the Frankfurt horizontal (FH). Subadult cranial CT scans (n = 115) were used to measure FSTDs at 18 landmarks. Significant differences were observed between the methods at eight of these landmarks (p < 0.05), demonstrating that high-quality data are not generated simply by employing modern imaging modalities such as CT. Proper technique is crucial to useful results, and maintaining control over head position during FSTD data collection is important. This is easily and most readily achieved in CT techniques by rotating the head to the FH plane after constructing a 3D rendering of the data.

  5. The Correlation between Dispersion Measure and X-ray Column Density from Radio Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    He, C; Kaspi, V M

    2013-01-01

    Pulsars are remarkable objects that emit across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, providing a powerful probe of the interstellar medium. In this study, we investigate the relation between dispersion measure (DM) and X-ray absorption column density NH using 68 radio pulsars detected at X-ray energies with the Chandra X-ray Observatory or XMM-Newton. We find a best-fit empirical linear relation of NH (10^20 cm^-2)= 0.30+0.13-0.09 DM (pc cm^-3), which corresponds to an average ionization of 10+4-3%, confirming the ratio of one free electron per ten neutral hydrogen atoms commonly assumed in the literature. We also compare different NH estimates and note that some NH values obtained from X-ray observations are higher than the total Galactic HI column density along the same line of sight, while the optical extinction generally gives the best NH predictions.

  6. Multiple Traffic Control Using Wireless Sensor and Density Measuring Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita RAI

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present scenario vehicular travel is increasing all over the world, especially in large urban areas. Therefore for simulating and optimizing traffic control to better accommodate this increasing demand is arises. In this paper we studied the optimization of traffic light controller in a City using wireless sensor and CCTV (Camera. We have proposed a traffic light controller and simulator that allows us to study different situation of traffic density in City and controlling the traffic of entire City by visual monitoring using CCTV. Using wireless sensor we can easily senses the density of traffic because the general architecture of wireless sensor network is an infrastructure less communication network.

  7. The kinematics of the swing phase obtained from accelerometer and gyroscope measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyn, Andreas; Mayagoitia, Ruth E.; Nene, Anand V.; Veltink, Peter H.

    1996-01-01

    The kinematics needed to calculate the knee moment during the initial swing phase were obtained from a set of eight leg-mounted uni-axial accelerometers and two gyroscopes. The angular and linear accelerations of shank and thigh were calculated from the signals of two accelerometers mounted on each

  8. Fundamental-measure density functional for the fluid of aligned hard hexagons: Further insights in fundamental measure theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitán, José A; Cuesta, José A

    2007-07-01

    In this article we obtain a fundamental measure functional for the model of aligned hard hexagons in the plane. Our aim is not just to provide a functional for an admittedly academic model, but to investigate the structure of fundamental measure theory. A model of aligned hard hexagons has similarities with the hard disk model. Both share "lost cases," i.e. admit configurations of three particles in which there is pairwise overlap but not triple overlap. These configurations are known to be problematic for fundamental measure functionals, which are not able to capture their contribution correctly. This failure lies in the inability of these functionals to yield a correct low density limit of the third order direct correlation function. Here we derive the functional by projecting aligned hard cubes on the plane x+y+z=0 . The correct dimensional crossover behavior of these functionals permits us to follow this strategy. The functional of aligned hard cubes, however, does not have lost cases, so neither had the resulting functional for aligned hard hexagons. The latter exhibits, in fact, a peculiar structure as compared to the one for hard disks. It depends on a uniparametric family of weighted densities through an additional term not appearing in the functional for hard disks. Apart from studying the freezing of this system, we discuss the implications of the functional structure for further developments of fundamental measure theory.

  9. Measurement of the optical density of packable composites: comparison between direct and indirect digital systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziottin Luiz Felipe Rodrigues

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to measure the optical density of four packable composite resins with widths of 1, 2, 3 and 4 mm, by means of Digora® (direct and DentScan DentView® (indirect digital imaging systems, in order to compare both methods. Twenty acrylic plates, with the proposed thicknesses, were used, each one containing a sample of each resin. Each acrylic plate was radiographed three times, under a standardized technique. For the Digora® system, an optical plate was used under each resin sample, and, for the DentScan DentView® system, occlusal films were employed, totalizing 60 exposures for each system. Optical plates and films were scanned and three consecutive optical readouts were carried out, totalizing 1,440 readouts. The results were submitted to statistical analysis and revealed that the average optical density of the four resins always increased as thickness increased. Regarding the comparisons between the composite resins, in both analysis the resin with the greater optical density was SurefilTM followed by ProdigyTM Condensable, AlertTM and Solitaire®. The correlations between the results of Digora® and DentScan DentView® were significant for the different thicknesses and materials. The observed tendency is that as the values obtained with the Digora® system increase, so do the values obtained with DentScan DentView®. While thickness increased, the values of optical density in both Digora® and DentScan DentView® tended to approach each other. The Digora® system presented smaller amplitude between the results obtained in adjacent thicknesses.

  10. Peptides as Quorum Sensing Molecules: Measurement Techniques and Obtained Levels In vitro and In vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Frederick; De Craemer, Severine; Debunne, Nathan; Janssens, Yorick; Wynendaele, Evelien; Van de Wiele, Christophe; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2017-01-01

    The expression of certain bacterial genes is regulated in a cell-density dependent way, a phenomenon called quorum sensing. Both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria use this type of communication, though the signal molecules (auto-inducers) used by them differ between both groups: Gram-negative bacteria use predominantly N-acyl homoserine lacton (AHL) molecules (autoinducer-1, AI-1) while Gram-positive bacteria use mainly peptides (autoinducer peptides, AIP or quorum sensing peptides). These quorum sensing molecules are not only involved in the inter-microbial communication, but can also possibly cross-talk directly or indirectly with their host. This review summarizes the currently applied analytical approaches for quorum sensing identification and quantification with additionally summarizing the experimentally found in vivo concentrations of these molecules in humans. PMID:28446863

  11. Use of aluminum nitride to obtain temperature measurements in a high temperature and high radiation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsman, Bernard R.; Blasi, Raymond J.; Tittman, Bernhard R.; Parks, David A.

    2016-04-26

    An aluminum nitride piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer successfully operates at temperatures of up to 1000.degree. C. and fast (>1 MeV) neutron fluencies of more than 10.sup.18 n/cm.sup.2. The transducer comprises a transparent, nitrogen rich aluminum nitride (AlN) crystal wafer that is coupled to an aluminum cylinder for pulse-echo measurements. The transducer has the capability to measure in situ gamma heating within the core of a nuclear reactor.

  12. Ensuring validity of radiometric temperature measurements obtained in the field using infrared imagers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mudau, AE

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A high temperature Electro Optics Industries extended-area blackbody Introduction Temperature is one of the principal parameters of thermodynamics. It is one of the most important parameters in almost all fields of science and engineering... including agriculture, biomedicine, chemical and material processing, earth and atmospheric sciences, manufacturing and remote sensing and yet remains one of the most difficult to measure. Temperature can be measured with either a contact or a non...

  13. A Method to Improve Electron Density Measurement of Cone-Beam CT Using Dual Energy Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Men

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop a dual energy imaging method to improve the accuracy of electron density measurement with a cone-beam CT (CBCT device. Materials and Methods. The imaging system is the XVI CBCT system on Elekta Synergy linac. Projection data were acquired with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively, to set up a basis material decomposition model. Virtual phantom simulation and phantoms experiments were carried out for quantitative evaluation of the method. Phantoms were also scanned twice with the high and low energy X-ray, respectively. The data were decomposed into projections of the two basis material coefficients according to the model set up earlier. The two sets of decomposed projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images of the basis material coefficients. Then, the images of electron densities were calculated with these CBCT images. Results. The difference between the calculated and theoretical values was within 2% and the correlation coefficient of them was about 1.0. The dual energy imaging method obtained more accurate electron density values and reduced the beam hardening artifacts obviously. Conclusion. A novel dual energy CBCT imaging method to calculate the electron densities was developed. It can acquire more accurate values and provide a platform potentially for dose calculation.

  14. A stepwedge-based method for measuring breast density: observer variability and comparison with human reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffey, Jenny; Berks, Michael; Hufton, Alan; Chung, Camilla; Verow, Rosanne; Morrison, Joanna; Wilson, Mary; Boggis, Caroline; Morris, Julie; Maxwell, Anthony; Astley, Susan

    2010-04-01

    Breast density is positively linked to the risk of developing breast cancer. We have developed a semi-automated, stepwedge-based method that has been applied to the mammograms of 1,289 women in the UK breast screening programme to measure breast density by volume and area. 116 images were analysed by three independent operators to assess inter-observer variability; 24 of these were analysed on 10 separate occasions by the same operator to determine intra-observer variability. 168 separate images were analysed using the stepwedge method and by two radiologists who independently estimated percentage breast density by area. There was little intra-observer variability in the stepwedge method (average coefficients of variation 3.49% - 5.73%). There were significant differences in the volumes of glandular tissue obtained by the three operators. This was attributed to variations in the operators' definition of the breast edge. For fatty and dense breasts, there was good correlation between breast density assessed by the stepwedge method and the radiologists. This was also observed between radiologists, despite significant inter-observer variation. Based on analysis of thresholds used in the stepwedge method, radiologists' definition of a dense pixel is one in which the percentage of glandular tissue is between 10 and 20% of the total thickness of tissue.

  15. Variations of the ionospheric parameters obtained from ground based measurements of ULF magnetic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakova, Elena; Kotik, Dmitry; Bösinger, Tilmann

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of the amplitude spectra and polarization parameter (epsilon)[1] of magnetic ULF noise were investigated during different seasons and high geomagnetic activity time using the data on the horizontal magnetic components monitoring at mid-latitude (New Life, Russia, 56 N, 46 E) and low-latitude stations (Crete, 35.15 N, 25.20 E). It was found that abrupt changes in the spectral polarization parameters can be linked as with variation of height of maximum and the electron density of the F-layer, and with a change in ionospheric parameters profiles at lower altitudes, for example, with the appearance of sporadic Es-layers and intermediate layers, located between the E and F-layers. It was detected the peculiarities in the daily dynamics of the epsilon parameter at low latitudes: a) the appearance in some cases more complicated than in the mid-latitudes, epsilon structure of the spectrum associated with the presence of two different values of the boundary frequency fB [2]; b) a decreasing of fB near local midnight observed in 70% of cases; c) observation of typical for dark time epsilon spectra after sunrise in the winter season. The numerical calculations of epsilon parameter were made using the IRI-2012 model with setting the models of sporadic and intermediate layers. The results revealed the dependence of the polarization spectra of the intensity and height of such thin layers. The specific changes in the electron density at altitudes of 80-350 km during the recovery phase of strong magnetic storms were defined basing on a comparative analysis of the experimental spectra and the results of the numerical calculations. References. 1. E. N. Ermakova, D. S. Kotik, A. V.Ryabov, A. V.Pershin, T. B.osinger, and Q. Zhou, Studying the variation of the broadband spectral maximum parameters in the natural ULF fields, Radiophysics and Quantum Electronics, Vol. 55, No. 10-11, March, 2013 p. 605-615. 2. T. Bosinger, A. G. Demekhov, E. N. Ermakova, C. Haldoupis and Q

  16. An analysis of boundary-effects in obtaining the frequency dependent specific heat by effusivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tage Emil; Behrens, Claus

    The frequency dependent specific heat is a significant response function characterizing the glass transition. Contrary to the dielectric response it is not easily measured over many decades. The introduction of the 3-omega method, where the temperature oscillations at a planar oscillatoric heat...... generator is measured, made this possible. The method relied on a 1-d solution to the heat diffusion equation. There have been attempts to invoke the boundary effects to first order. However we present the fully 3-d solution to the problem including these effects. The frequency range can hereby...

  17. Density measurement of confined water with neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang [ORNL; Faraone, Antonio [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Kamitakahara, William [ORNL; Liu, Kao-Hsiang [National Taiwan University; Mou, Chung-Yuan [National Taiwan University; Leao, Juscelino B [ORNL; Chang, Sung C [ORNL; Chen, Sow-hsin H [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This is a response to Soper's two comments (1) regarding our papers (2, 3) in PNAS that (a) the distribution of water across the pores is not uniform and (b) the majority of water may reside outside the pores. Here, we show that we have given proper consideration to both issues and have reconfirmed the validity of our method and conclusion as elaborated in the following. The possibility that layering effects across the pores may introduce errors in associating the (100) interchannel peak height with density is not a new idea (reference 3 in ref. 1), and it has already been addressed (2). The arguments of Sopor (4) mainly rest on the assumption that the average density of water does not depend on temperature.

  18. Measurements of cardiac output obtained with transesophageal echocardiography and pulmonary artery thermodilution are not interchangeable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Sørensen, H; Graeser, K; Hansen, K L

    2014-01-01

    was placed in the following successive positions: supine, head-down tilt, head-up tilt, supine, supine with phenylephrine administration, pace heart rate 80 beats per minute (bpm), pace heart rate 110 bpm. TEE CO and PAC CO were measured simultaneously. The agreement was analysed by Bland-Altman plots...

  19. Methods for obtaining true particle size distributions from cross section measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lord, Kristina Alyse [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Sectioning methods are frequently used to measure grain sizes in materials. These methods do not provide accurate grain sizes for two reasons. First, the sizes of features observed on random sections are always smaller than the true sizes of solid spherical shaped objects, as noted by Wicksell [1]. This is the case because the section very rarely passes through the center of solid spherical shaped objects randomly dispersed throughout a material. The sizes of features observed on random sections are inversely related to the distance of the center of the solid object from the section [1]. Second, on a plane section through the solid material, larger sized features are more frequently observed than smaller ones due to the larger probability for a section to come into contact with the larger sized portion of the spheres than the smaller sized portion. As a result, it is necessary to find a method that takes into account these reasons for inaccurate particle size measurements, while providing a correction factor for accurately determining true particle size measurements. I present a method for deducing true grain size distributions from those determined from specimen cross sections, either by measurement of equivalent grain diameters or linear intercepts.

  20. The Effects of Survey Timing on Student Evaluation of Teaching Measures Obtained Using Online Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelami, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Teaching evaluations are an important measurement tool used by business schools in gauging the level of student satisfaction with the educational services delivered by faculty. The growing use of online teaching evaluations has enabled educational administrators to expand the time period during which student evaluation of teaching (SET) surveys…

  1. Maxwell-Schrodinger Equation for X-Ray Laser Propagation and Interferometry Measurement of Plasma Electron Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘承宜; 郭弘; 付喜泉; 胡巍; 喻松

    2001-01-01

    By starting with the Maxwell theory of x-ray laser propagation in collisionless plasmas, we study the phase difference of the probe and reference beams of x-ray laser interferometry in measuring the plasma electron density. The basic idea is to reduce the Maxwell equation to a Schrodinger-like equation. By using the quantum mechanical technique and introducing a novel picture, we obtain a modified relation between the phase and the electron density, where the phase corresponds to the interference of probe and reference light and the contribution of gradient of the electron density has been taken into account.

  2. Density Measurement System for Weights of 1 kg to 20 kg Using Hydrostatic Weighing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jae; Lee, Woo Gab; Abdurahman, Mohammed; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    This paper presents a density measurement system to determine density of weights from 1 kg to 20 kg using hydrostatic weighing. The system works based on Archimedes principle. The density of reference liquid is determined using this setup while determining the density of the test weight. Density sphere is used as standard density ball to determine density of the reference liquid. A new immersion pan is designed for dual purpose to carry the density sphere and the cylindrical test weight for weighing in liquid. Main parts of the setup are an electronic balance, a thermostat controlled liquid bath, reference weights designed for bottom weighing, dual purpose immersion pans and stepping motors to load and unload in weighing process. The results of density measurement will be evaluated as uncertainties for weights of 1 kg to 20 kg.

  3. Vertical variation of particle speed and flux density in aeolian saltation: Measurement and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Keld R.; SøRensen, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Particle dynamics in aeolian saltation has been studied in a boundary layer wind tunnel above beds composed of quartz grains having diameters of either 242 μm or 320 μm. The cross section of the tunnel is 600 mm × 900 mm, and its thick boundary layer allows precise estimation of the fluid friction speed. Saltation is modeled using a numerical saltation model, and predicted grain speeds agree fairly well with experimental results obtained from laser-Doppler anemometry. The use of laser-Doppler anemometry to study aeolian saltation is thoroughly discussed and some pitfalls are identified. At 80 mm height the ratio between air speed and grain speed is about 1.1 and from there it increases toward the bed so that at 5 mm it is about 2.0. All grain speed profiles converge toward a common value of about 1 m/s at 2-3 mm height. Moreover, the estimated launch velocity distributions depend only very weakly on the friction speed in contrast to what has often been assumed in the literature. Flux density profiles measured with a laser-Doppler appear to be similar to most other density profiles measured with vertical array compartment traps; that is, two exponential segments will fit data between heights from a few millimeters to 100-200 mm. The experimental flux density profiles are found to agree well with model predictions. Generally, validation rates are low from 30 to 50% except at the highest level of 80 mm, where they approach 80%. When flux density profiles based on the validated data are used to estimate the total mass transport rate results are in fair agreement with measured transport rates except for conditions near threshold where as much as 50% difference is observed.

  4. Molecular dynamics-based refinement of nanodiamond size measurements obtained with dynamic light scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Koniakhin, S V; Terterov, I N; Shvidchenko, A V; Eidelman, E D; Dubina, M V

    2016-01-01

    The determination of particle size by dynamic light scattering uses the Stokes-Einstein relation, which can break down for nanoscale objects. Here we employ a molecular dynamics simulation of fully solvated 1-5 nm carbon nanoparticles for the refinement of the experimental data obtained for nanodiamonds in water by using dynamic light scattering. We performed molecular dynamics simulations in differently sized boxes and calculated nanoparticles diffusion coefficients using the velocity autocorrelation function and mean-square displacement. We found that the predictions of the Stokes-Einstein relation are accurate for nanoparticles larger than 3 nm while for smaller nanoparticles the diffusion coefficient should be corrected and different boundary conditions should be taken into account.

  5. Drude's Model Optical Parameters and the Color of TiNx Films Obtained Through Reflectivity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L. A.; Sagás, J. C.; Damião, A. J.; Fontana, L. C.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) has been applied as decorative coating due to its high reflectivity and goldish color, having high hardness and wear resistance. In the present work, TiNx films were deposited by grid-assisted magnetron sputtering. The color and reflectivity were investigated by spectrophotometry as a function of the working gas ratio N2/Ar used during films deposition. The crystalline phases were identified by X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD). The TiNx plasma frequency ( ω p) and the relaxation time ( τ) were determined by fitting the experimental reflectivity curves, according to the Drude model. The color parameters obtained by the CieLab method were used to compare TiNx films with gold film.

  6. NO density and gas temperature measurements in atmospheric pressure nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges by Mid-IR QCLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeni Simeni, Marien; Stancu, Gabi-Daniel; Laux, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Nitric oxide is a key species for many processes: in combustion, in human skin physiology... Recently, NO-ground state absolute density measurements produced by atmospheric pressure NRP discharges were carried out in air as a function of the discharge parameters, using Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy. These measurements were space averaged and performed in the post-discharge region in a large gas volume. Here we present radial profiles of NO density and temperature measured directly in the discharge for different configurations. Small plasma volume and species densities, high temperature and EM noise environment make the absorption diagnostic challenging. For this purpose the QCLAS sensitivity was improved using a two-detector system. We conducted lateral absorbance measurements with a spatial resolution of 300 μm for two absorption features at 1900.076 and 1900.517 cm-1. The radial temperature and NO density distributions were obtained from the Abel inverted lateral measurements. Time averaged NO densities of about 1.E16 cm-3 and gas temperature of about 1000K were obtained in the center of the discharge. PLASMAFLAME Project (Grant No ANR-11-BS09-0025).

  7. Polarization measurement and vertical aperture optimization for obtaining circularly polarized bend-magnet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.; Hussain, Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Growing interest in utilizing circular polarization prompted the design of bend-magnet beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, covering the 30-1500 eV spectral region, to include vertical aperturing capabilities for optimizing the collection of circular polarization above and below the orbit plane. After commissioning and early use of the beamline, a multilayer polarimeter was used to characterize the polarization state of the beam as a function of vertical aperture position. This report partially summarizes the polarimetry measurements and compares results with theoretical calculations intended to simulate experimental conditions.

  8. Multi Point Velocity, Density and Temperature Measurements using LITA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Laser induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a nonintrusive, transient-grating optical technique that provides simultaneous high-accuracy measurements of velocity,...

  9. Evaluation of Hydraulic Parameters Obtained by Different Measurement Methods for Heterogeneous Gravel Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zeng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of soil hydraulic parameters for the van Genuchten function is important to characterize soil water movement for watershed management. Accurate and rapid prediction of soil water flow in heterogeneous gravel soil has become a hot topic in recent years. However, it is difficult to precisely estimate hydraulic parameters in a heterogeneous soil with rock fragments. In this study, the HYDRUS-2D numerical model was used to evaluate hydraulic parameters for heterogeneous gravel soil that was irregularly embedded with rock fragments in a grape production base. The centrifugal method (CM, tensiometer method (TM and inverse solution method (ISM were compared for various parameters in the van Genuchten function. The soil core method (SCM, disc infiltration method (DIM and inverse solution method (ISM were also investigated for measuring saturated hydraulic conductivity. Simulation with the DIM approach revealed a problem of overestimating soil water infiltration whereas simulation with the SCM approach revealed a problem of underestimating water movement as compared to actual field observation. The ISM approach produced the best simulation result even though this approach slightly overestimated soil moisture by ignoring the impact of rock fragments. This study provides useful information on the overall evaluation of soil hydraulic parameters attained with different measurement methods for simulating soil water movement and distribution in heterogeneous gravel soil.

  10. Limitations on Space-based Air Fluorescence Detector Apertures obtained from IR Cloud Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Krizmanic, J F; Streitmatter, R E; Krizmanic, John; Sokolsky, Pierre; Streitmatter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The presence of clouds between an airshower and a space-based detector can dramatically alter the measured signal characteristics due to absorption and scattering of the photonic signals. Furthermore, knowledge of the cloud cover in the observed atmosphere is needed to determine the instantaneous aperture of such a detector. Before exploring the complex nature of cloud-airshower interactions, we examine a simpler issue. We investigate the fraction of ultra-high energy cosmic ray events that may be expected to occur in volumes of the viewed atmosphere non-obscured by clouds. To this end, we use space-based IR data in concert with Monte Carlo simulated $10^{20}$ eV airshowers to determine the acceptable event fractions. Earth-observing instruments, such as MODIS, measure detailed cloud configurations via a CO$_2$-slicing technique that can be used to determine cloud-top altitudes over large areas. Thus, events can be accepted if their observed 3-dimensional endpoints occur above low clouds as well as from areas...

  11. Event generator tunes obtained from underlying event and multiparton scattering measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; 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Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; 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Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Soares, Mara Senghi; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Gecit, Fehime Hayal; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozcan, Merve; Ozdemir, Kadri; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Gastler, Daniel; Lawson, Philip; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova PANEVA, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Derdzinski, Mark; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Jung, Andreas Werner; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Cocoros, Alice; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    New sets of parameters (``tunes'') for the underlying-event (UE) modeling of the PYTHIA8, PYTHIA6 and HERWIG++ Monte Carlo event generators are constructed using different parton distribution functions. Combined fits to CMS UE data at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 7 TeV and to UE data from the CDF experiment at lower $\\sqrt{s}$, are used to study the UE models and constrain their parameters, providing thereby improved predictions for proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV. In addition, it is investigated whether the values of the parameters obtained from fits to UE observables are consistent with the values determined from fitting observables sensitive to double-parton scattering processes. Finally, comparisons of the UE tunes to ``minimum bias'' (MB) events, multijet, and Drell--Yan ($ \\mathrm{ q \\bar{q} } \\rightarrow \\mathrm{Z} / \\gamma^* \\rightarrow$ lepton-antilepton + jets) observables at 7 and 8 TeV are presented, as well as predictions of MB and UE observables at 13 TeV.

  12. Event generator tunes obtained from underlying event and multiparton scattering measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Awad, Adel; Mahrous, Ayman; Mohammed, Yasser; Radi, Amr; Calpas, Betty

    2016-03-17

    New sets of parameters (``tunes'') for the underlying-event (UE) modeling of the PYTHIA8, PYTHIA6 and HERWIG++ Monte Carlo event generators are constructed using different parton distribution functions. Combined fits to CMS UE data at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 7 TeV and to UE data from the CDF experiment at lower $\\sqrt{s}$, are used to study the UE models and constrain their parameters, providing thereby improved predictions for proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV. In addition, it is investigated whether the values of the parameters obtained from fits to UE observables are consistent with the values determined from fitting observables sensitive to double-parton scattering processes. Finally, comparisons of the UE tunes to ``minimum bias'' (MB) events, multijet, and Drell--Yan ($ \\mathrm{ q \\bar{q} } \\rightarrow \\mathrm{Z} / \\gamma^* \\rightarrow$ lepton-antilepton + jets) observables at 7 and 8 TeV are presented, as well as predictions of MB and UE observables at 13 TeV.

  13. Event generator tunes obtained from underlying event and multiparton scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Knünz, V; König, A; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Lauwers, J; Luyckx, S; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Van Parijs, I; Barria, P; Brun, H; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Fasanella, G; Favart, L; Grebenyuk, A; Karapostoli, G; Lenzi, T; Léonard, A; Maerschalk, T; Marinov, A; Perniè, L; Randle-Conde, A; Seva, T; Vander Velde, C; Yonamine, R; Vanlaer, P; Yonamine, R; Zenoni, F; Zhang, F; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Crucy, S; Dobur, D; Fagot, A; Garcia, G; Gul, M; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Poyraz, D; Ryckbosch, D; Salva, S; Sigamani, M; Tytgat, M; Van Driessche, W; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bondu, O; Brochet, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Da Silveira, G G; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jafari, A; Jez, P; Komm, M; Lemaitre, V; Mertens, A; Musich, M; Nuttens, C; Perrini, L; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Quertenmont, L; Selvaggi, M; Vidal Marono, M; Beliy, N; Hammad, G H; Júnior, W L Aldá; Alves, F L; Alves, G A; Brito, L; Correa Martins Junior, M; Hamer, M; Hensel, C; Moraes, A; Pol, M E; Rebello Teles, P; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Huertas Guativa, L M; Malbouisson, H; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mora Herrera, C; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Ahuja, S; Bernardes, C A; De Souza Santos, A; Dogra, S; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Mercadante, P G; Moon, C S; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Romero Abad, D; Ruiz Vargas, J C; Aleksandrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Glushkov, I; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Ahmad, M; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Du, R; Jiang, C H; Plestina, R; Romeo, F; Shaheen, S M; Spiezia, A; Tao, J; Wang, C; Wang, Z; Zhang, H; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Li, Q; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Xu, Z; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Florez, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Puljak, I; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Micanovic, S; Sudic, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Bodlak, M; Finger, M; Finger, M; Abdelalim, A A; Awad, A; Mahrous, A; Mohammed, Y; Radi, A; Calpas, B; Kadastik, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Tiko, A; Veelken, C; Eerola, P; Pekkanen, J; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Talvitie, J; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Favaro, C; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Machet, M; Malcles, J; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Zghiche, A; Antropov, I; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Busson, P; Cadamuro, L; Chapon, E; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Davignon, O; Filipovic, N; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Jo, M; Lisniak, S; Mastrolorenzo, L; Miné, P; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Ortona, G; Paganini, P; Pigard, P; Regnard, S; Salerno, R; Sauvan, J B; Sirois, Y; Strebler, T; Yilmaz, Y; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Aubin, A; Bloch, D; Brom, J-M; Buttignol, M; Chabert, E C; Chanon, N; Collard, C; Conte, E; Coubez, X; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Le Bihan, A-C; Merlin, J A; Skovpen, K; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Bernet, C; Boudoul, G; Bouvier, E; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Courbon, B; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fan, J; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Lagarde, F; Laktineh, I B; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Pequegnot, A L; Perries, S; Ruiz Alvarez, J D; Sabes, D; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Toriashvili, T; Lomidze, D; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heister, A; Kiesel, M K; Klein, K; Lipinski, M; Ostapchuk, A; Preuten, M; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schulte, J F; Verlage, T; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Brodski, M; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Endres, M; Erdmann, M; Erdweg, S; Esch, T; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Knutzen, S; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Millet, P; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Pook, T; Radziej, M; Reithler, H; Rieger, M; Scheuch, F; Sonnenschein, L; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Künsken, A; Lingemann, J; Nehrkorn, A; Nowack, A; Nugent, I M; Pistone, C; Pooth, O; Stahl, A; Aldaya Martin, M; Asin, I; Bartosik, N; Behnke, O; Behrens, U; Bell, A J; Borras, K; Burgmeier, A; Campbell, A; Choudhury, S; Costanza, F; Diez Pardos, C; Dolinska, G; Dooling, S; Dorland, T; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Eichhorn, T; Flucke, G; Gallo, E; Garcia, J Garay; Geiser, A; Gizhko, A; Gunnellini, P; Hauk, J; Hempel, M; Jung, H; Kalogeropoulos, A; Karacheban, O; Kasemann, M; Katsas, P; Kieseler, J; Kleinwort, C; Korol, I; Lange, W; Leonard, J; Lipka, K; Lobanov, A; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marfin, I; Melzer-Pellmann, I-A; Meyer, A B; Mittag, G; Mnich, J; Mussgiller, A; Naumann-Emme, S; Nayak, A; Ntomari, E; Perrey, H; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Raspereza, A; Roland, B; Sahin, M Ö; Saxena, P; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Seitz, C; Spannagel, S; Trippkewitz, K D; Walsh, R; Wissing, C; Blobel, V; Centis Vignali, M; Draeger, A R; Erfle, J; Garutti, E; Goebel, K; Gonzalez, D; Görner, M; Haller, J; Hoffmann, M; Höing, R S; Junkes, A; Klanner, R; Kogler, R; Kovalchuk, N; Lapsien, T; Lenz, T; Marchesini, I; Marconi, D; Meyer, M; Nowatschin, D; Ott, J; Pantaleo, F; Peiffer, T; Perieanu, A; Pietsch, N; Poehlsen, J; Rathjens, D; Sander, C; Scharf, C; Schettler, H; Schleper, P; Schlieckau, E; Schmidt, A; Schwandt, J; Sola, V; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Tholen, H; Troendle, D; Usai, E; Vanelderen, L; Vanhoefer, A; Vormwald, B; Barth, C; Baus, C; Berger, J; Böser, C; Butz, E; Chwalek, T; Colombo, F; De Boer, W; Descroix, A; Dierlamm, A; Fink, S; Frensch, F; Friese, R; Giffels, M; Gilbert, A; 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Feng, L; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Martin, C; Osherson, M; Roskes, J; Sady, A; Sarica, U; Swartz, M; Xiao, M; Xin, Y; You, C; Xiao, M; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Bruner, C; Kenny, R P; Majumder, D; Majumder, D; Malek, M; Murray, M; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Wang, Q; Ivanov, A; Kaadze, K; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Mohammadi, A; Saini, L K; Skhirtladze, N; Toda, S; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Anelli, C; Baden, A; Baron, O; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Ferraioli, C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Jabeen, S; Jabeen, S; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Kunkle, J; Lu, Y; Mignerey, A C; Shin, Y H; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Baty, A; Bierwagen, K; Brandt, S; Bierwagen, K; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Demiragli, Z; Di Matteo, L; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gulhan, D; Iiyama, Y; Innocenti, G M; Klute, M; Kovalskyi, D; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Marini, A C; Mcginn, C; Mironov, C; Narayanan, S; Niu, X; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Stephans, G S F; Sumorok, K; Varma, M; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wang, J; Wang, T W; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; Evans, A; Finkel, A; Gude, A; Hansen, P; Kalafut, S; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Lesko, Z; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Ruckstuhl, N; Rusack, R; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Fangmeier, C; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kamalieddin, R; Keller, J; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Meier, F; Monroy, J; Ratnikov, F; Siado, J E; Snow, G R; Alyari, M; Dolen, J; George, J; Godshalk, A; Harrington, C; Iashvili, I; Kaisen, J; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Roozbahani, B; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Hortiangtham, A; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Teixeira De Lima, R; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Sung, K; Trovato, M; Velasco, M; Brinkerhoff, A; Dev, N; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Marinelli, N; Meng, F; Mueller, C; Musienko, Y; Planer, M; Reinsvold, A; Ruchti, R; Smith, G; Taroni, S; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Ji, W; Ling, T Y; Liu, B; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Winer, B L; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Palmer, C; Piroué, P; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Zuranski, A; Malik, S; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bortoletto, D; Gutay, L; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, K; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Primavera, F; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Sun, J; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Chen, Z; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Guilbaud, M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Northup, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Rorie, J; Tu, Z; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Han, J; Harel, A; Hindrichs, O; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Petrillo, G; Tan, P; Verzetti, M; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Lath, A; Nash, K; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Foerster, M; Riley, G; Rose, K; Spanier, S; York, A; Bouhali, O; Castaneda Hernandez, A; Celik, A; Dalchenko, M; De Mattia, M; Delgado, A; Dildick, S; Dildick, S; Eusebi, R; Gilmore, J; Huang, T; Kamon, T; Krutelyov, V; Krutelyov, V; Mueller, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Patel, R; Patel, R; Perloff, A; Rose, A; Safonov, A; Tatarinov, A; Ulmer, K A; Akchurin, N; Cowden, C; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Faulkner, J; Kunori, S; Lamichhane, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Undleeb, S; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Janjam, R; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Ni, H; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Xu, Q; Arenton, M W; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Li, H; Lin, C; Neu, C; Sinthuprasith, T; Sun, X; Wang, Y; Wolfe, E; Wood, J; Xia, F; Clarke, C; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sturdy, J; Belknap, D A; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Dodd, L; Duric, S; Gomber, B; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Sharma, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Woods, N

    New sets of parameters ("tunes") for the underlying-event (UE) modelling of the pythia8, pythia6 and herwig++ Monte Carlo event generators are constructed using different parton distribution functions. Combined fits to CMS UE proton-proton ([Formula: see text]) data at [Formula: see text] and to UE proton-antiproton ([Formula: see text]) data from the CDF experiment at lower [Formula: see text], are used to study the UE models and constrain their parameters, providing thereby improved predictions for proton-proton collisions at 13[Formula: see text]. In addition, it is investigated whether the values of the parameters obtained from fits to UE observables are consistent with the values determined from fitting observables sensitive to double-parton scattering processes. Finally, comparisons are presented of the UE tunes to "minimum bias" (MB) events, multijet, and Drell-Yan ([Formula: see text] lepton-antilepton+jets) observables at 7 and 8[Formula: see text], as well as predictions for MB and UE observables at 13[Formula: see text].

  14. Event generator tunes obtained from underlying event and multiparton scattering measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-03-17

    New sets of parameters (“tunes”) for the underlying-event (UE) modelling of the pythia8, pythia6 and herwig++ Monte Carlo event generators are constructed using different parton distribution functions. Combined fits to CMS UE proton–proton ( $\\mathrm {p}\\mathrm {p}$ ) data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7\\,\\text {TeV} $ and to UE proton–antiproton ( $\\mathrm {p}\\overline{\\mathrm{p}} $ ) data from the CDF experiment at lower $\\sqrt{s}$ , are used to study the UE models and constrain their parameters, providing thereby improved predictions for proton–proton collisions at 13 $\\,\\text {TeV}$ . In addition, it is investigated whether the values of the parameters obtained from fits to UE observables are consistent with the values determined from fitting observables sensitive to double-parton scattering processes. Finally, comparisons are presented of the UE tunes to “minimum bias” (MB) events, multijet, and Drell–Yan ( $ \\mathrm{q} \\overline{\\mathrm{q}} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{Z}/ \\gamma ^* \\rightarrow $ lepton-antilepton+jets) observables at 7 and 8 $\\,\\text {TeV}$ , as well as predictions for MB and UE observables at 13 $\\,\\text {TeV}$ .

  15. Effect of Selenium-Enriched Agaricus bisporus (Higher Basidiomycetes) Extracts, Obtained by Pressurized Water Extraction, on the Expression of Cholesterol Homeostasis Related Genes by Low-Density Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Soler-Rivas, Cristina; Rodriguez-Casado, Arantxa; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Reglero, Guillermo; Marín, Francisco Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Culinary-medicinal mushrooms are able to lower blood cholesterol levels in animal models by different mechanisms. They might impair the endogenous cholesterol synthesis and exogenous cholesterol absorption during digestion. Mushroom extracts, obtained using pressurized water extractions (PWE) from Agaricus bisporus basidiomes, supplemented or not supplemented with selenium, were applied to HepG2 cell cultures to study the expression of 19 genes related to cholesterol homeostasis by low-density arrays (LDA). Only the PWE fractions obtained at 25°C showed 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) inhibitory activity. Besides the enzymatic inhibition, PWE extracts may downregulate some of the key genes involved in the cholesterol homeostasis, such as the squalene synthase gene (FDFT1), since its mRNA expression falls by one third of its initial value. In summary, A. bisporus extracts may also modulate biological cholesterol levels by molecular mechanisms further than the enzymatic way previously reported.

  16. Highly Sensitive Measurement of Liquid Density in Air Using Suspended Microcapillary Resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Malvar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the use of commercially available glass microcapillaries as micromechanical resonators for real-time monitoring of the mass density of a liquid that flows through the capillary. The vibration of a suspended region of the microcapillary is optically detected by measuring the forward scattering of a laser beam. The resonance frequency of the liquid filled microcapillary is measured for liquid binary mixtures of ethanol in water, glycerol in water and Triton in ethanol. The method achieves a detection limit in an air environment of 50 µg/mL that is only five times higher than that obtained with state-of-the-art suspended microchannel resonators encapsulated in vacuum. The method opens the door to novel advances for miniaturized total analysis systems based on microcapillaries with the add-on of mechanical transduction for sensing the rheological properties of the analyzed fluids without the need for vacuum encapsulation of the resonators.

  17. Highly Sensitive Measurement of Liquid Density in Air Using Suspended Microcapillary Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvar, Oscar; Ramos, Daniel; Martínez, Carmen; Kosaka, Priscila; Tamayo, Javier; Calleja, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    We report the use of commercially available glass microcapillaries as micromechanical resonators for real-time monitoring of the mass density of a liquid that flows through the capillary. The vibration of a suspended region of the microcapillary is optically detected by measuring the forward scattering of a laser beam. The resonance frequency of the liquid filled microcapillary is measured for liquid binary mixtures of ethanol in water, glycerol in water and Triton in ethanol. The method achieves a detection limit in an air environment of 50 µg/mL that is only five times higher than that obtained with state-of-the-art suspended microchannel resonators encapsulated in vacuum. The method opens the door to novel advances for miniaturized total analysis systems based on microcapillaries with the add-on of mechanical transduction for sensing the rheological properties of the analyzed fluids without the need for vacuum encapsulation of the resonators. PMID:25831083

  18. Size and CT density of iodine-containing ethosomal vesicles obtained by membrane extrusion: potential for use as CT contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Bomin; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Bumsang

    2013-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the primary non-invasive imaging technique used for most patients with suspected liver disease. In order to improve liver-specific imaging properties and prevent toxic effects in patients with compromised renal function, we investigated the encapsulation of iodine within ethosomal vesicles. As a first step in the development of novel contrast agents using ethosomes for CT imaging applications, iodine was entrapped within ethosomes and iodine-containing ethosomes of the desired size were obtained by extrusion using a polycarbonate membrane with a defined pore size. Ethosomes containing iodine showed a relatively high CT density, which decreased when they were extruded, due to the rupture and re-formation of the lipid bilayer of the ethosome. However, when a solution with a high iodine concentration was used as a dispersion media during the extrusion process, the decrease in CT density could be prevented. In addition, ethosomes containing iodine were taken up efficiently by macrophages, which are abundant in the liver, and these ethosomes exhibited no cellular toxicity. These results demonstrate that iodine could be entrapped within ethosomal vesicles, giving the ethosomes a relatively high CT density, and that the extrusion technique used in this study could conveniently and reproducibly produce ethosomal vesicles with a desired size. Therefore, ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents with applications in CT imaging.

  19. Accuracy of cutoff probe for measuring electron density: simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Woong; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Si-June; Lee, Jang-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung; Oh, Wang-Yuhl

    2016-09-01

    The electron density has been used for characterizing the plasma for basic research as well as industrial application. To measure the exact electron density, various type of microwave probe has been developed and improved. The cutoff probe is a promising technique inferring the electron density from the plasma resonance peak on the transmission spectrum. In this study, we present the accuracy of electron density inferred from cutoff probe. The accuracy was investigated by electromagnetic simulation and experiment. The discrepancy between the electron densities from the cutoff probe and other sophisticated microwave probes were investigated and discussed. We found that the cutoff probe has good accuracy in inferred electron density. corresponding author.

  20. Two new methods to detect cosmic voids without density measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Elyiv, Andrii; Pollina, Giorgia; Baldi, Marco; Branchini, Enzo; Cimatti, Andrea; Moscardini, Lauro

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic voids are effective cosmological probes to discriminate among competing world models. Their precise and unbiased identification is a prerequisite to perform accurate observational tests. The identification is generally based on density or geometry criteria that, because of their very nature, are prone to shot noise errors. In this work we propose two new void finders that are based on dynamical and clustering criteria to select voids in the Lagrangian coordinates and minimise the impact of sparse sampling. The first approach exploits the Zeldovich approximation to trace back in time the orbits of galaxies located in the voids and their surroundings, whereas the second uses the observed galaxy-galaxy correlation function to relax the objects' spatial distribution to homogeneity and isotropy. In both cases voids are defined as regions of the negative velocity divergence in Lagrangian coordinates, that can be regarded as sinks of the back-in-time streamlines of the mass tracers. To assess the performance ...

  1. Repeatability and reproducibility of measurements of the suburethral tape location obtained in pelvic floor ultrasound performed with a transvaginal probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Magdalena Dresler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Implants used to treat patients with urogynecological conditions are well visible in US examination. The position of the suburethral tape (sling is determined in relation to the urethra or the pubic symphysis. Aim of the study: The study was aimed at assessing the accuracy of measurements determining suburethral tape location obtained in pelvic US examination performed with a transvaginal probe. Material and methods: The analysis covered the results of sonographic measurements obtained according to a standardized technique in women referred for urogynecological diagnostics. Data from a total of 68 patients were used to analyse the repeatability and reproducibility of results obtained on the same day. Results: The intraclass correlation coefficient for the repeatability and reproducibility of the sonographic measurements of suburethral tape location obtained with a transvaginal probe ranged from 0.6665 to 0.9911. The analysis of the measurements confirmed their consistency to be excellent or good. Conclusions: Excellent and good repeatability and reproducibility of the measurements of the suburethral tape location obtained in a pelvic ultrasound performed with a transvaginal probe confirm the test’s validity and usefulness for clinical and academic purposes.

  2. Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility in linear measurements on axial images obtained by cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Nathália Cristine; Barriviera, Maurício; Junqueira, José Luiz Cintra; Panzarella, Francine Kühl

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to investigate the intra- and inter-observer variability in linear measurements with axial images obtained by PreXion (PreXion Inc., San Mateo, USA) and i-CAT (Imaging Sciences International, Xoran Technologies Inc., Hatfield, USA) CBCT scanners, with different voxel sizes. Materials and Methods A cylindrical object made from nylon with radiopaque markers (phantom) was scanned by i-CAT and PreXion 3D devices. For each axial image, measurements were taken twice in the horizontal (distance A-B) and vertical (distance C-D) directions, randomly, with a one-week interval between measurements, by four oral radiologists with five years or more experience in the use of these measuring tools. Results All of the obtained linear measurements had lower values than those of the phantom. The statistical analysis showed high intra- and inter-observer reliability (p=0.297). Compared to the real measurements, the measurements obtained using the i-CAT device and PreXion tomography, on average, revealed absolute errors ranging from 0.22 to 0.59 mm and from 0.23 to 0.63 mm, respectively. Conclusion It can be concluded that both scanners are accurate, although the linear measurements are underestimations, with no significant differences between the evaluators. PMID:28361024

  3. Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility in linear measurements on axial images obtained by cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Silva, Nathalia Cristine; Junqueira, Jose Luiz Cinta; Panzarella, Francine Keuhi; Raitz, Ricardo [Sao Leopoldo Mandic Research Center, Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Brriviera, Mauricio [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Catholic University of Brasilia, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    This study was performed to investigate the intra- and inter-observer variability in linear measurements with axial images obtained by PreXion (PreXion Inc., San Mateo, USA) and i-CAT (Imaging Sciences International, Xoran Technologies Inc., Hatfield, USA) CBCT scanners, with different voxel sizes. A cylindrical object made from nylon with radiopaque markers (phantom) was scanned by i-CAT and PreXion 3D devices. For each axial image, measurements were taken twice in the horizontal (distance A-B) and vertical (distance C-D) directions, randomly, with a one-week interval between measurements, by four oral radiologists with five years or more experience in the use of these measuring tools. All of the obtained linear measurements had lower values than those of the phantom. The statistical analysis showed high intra- and inter-observer reliability (p=0.297). Compared to the real measurements, the measurements obtained using the i-CAT device and PreXion tomography, on average, revealed absolute errors ranging from 0.22 to 0.59 mm and from 0.23 to 0.63 mm, respectively. It can be concluded that both scanners are accurate, although the linear measurements are underestimations, with no significant differences between the evaluators.

  4. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  5. Obtaining biophysical measurements of woody vegetation from high resolution digital aerial photography in tropical and arid environments: Northern Territory, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staben, G. W.; Lucieer, A.; Evans, K. G.; Scarth, P.; Cook, G. D.

    2016-10-01

    Biophysical parameters obtained from woody vegetation are commonly measured using field based techniques which require significant investment in resources. Quantitative measurements of woody vegetation provide important information for ecological studies investigating landscape change. The fine spatial resolution of aerial photography enables identification of features such as trees and shrubs. Improvements in spatial and spectral resolution of digital aerial photographic sensors have increased the possibility of using these data in quantitative remote sensing. Obtaining biophysical measurements from aerial photography has the potential to enable it to be used as a surrogate for the collection of field data. In this study quantitative measurements obtained from digital aerial photography captured at ground sampling distance (GSD) of 15 cm (n = 50) and 30 cm (n = 52) were compared to woody biophysical parameters measured from 1 ha field plots. Supervised classification of the aerial photography using object based image analysis was used to quantify woody and non-woody vegetation components in the imagery. There was a high correlation (r ≥ 0.92) between all field measured woody canopy parameters and aerial derived green woody cover measurements, however only foliage projective cover (FPC) was found to be statistically significant (paired t-test; α = 0.01). There was no significant difference between measurements derived from imagery captured at either GSD of 15 cm and 30 cm over the same field site (n = 20). Live stand basal area (SBA) (m2 ha-1) was predicted from the aerial photographs by applying an allometric equation developed between field-measured live SBA and woody FPC. The results show that there was very little difference between live SBA predicted from FPC measured in the field or from aerial photography. The results of this study show that accurate woody biophysical parameters can be obtained from aerial photography from a range of woody vegetation

  6. Effect of object location on the density measurement in cone-beam computed tomography versus multislice computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandarloo, Amir; Abdinian, Mehrdad; Salemi, Fatemeh; Hashemzadeh, Zahra; Safaei, Mehran

    2012-12-01

    Bone density measurement in a radiographic view is a valuable method for evaluating the density of bone quality before performing some dental procedures such as, dental implant placements. It seems that Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) can be used as a diagnostic tool for evaluating the density of the bone, prior to any treatment, as the reported radiation dose in this method is minimal. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of object location on the density measurement in CBCT versus Multislice computed tomography (CT). In an experimental study, three samples with similar dimensions, but different compositions, different densities (Polyethylene, Polyamide, Polyvinyl Chloride), and three bone pieces of different parts of the mandibular bone were imaged in three different positions by CBCT and Multislice CT sets. The average density value was computed for each sample in each position. Then the data obtained from each CBCT was converted to a Hounsfield unit and evaluated using a single variable T analysis. A P value <0.05 was considered to be significant. The density in a Multislice CT is stable in the form of a Hounsfield Number, but this density is variable in the images acquired through CBCT, and the change in the position results in significant changes in the density. In this study, a statistically significant difference (P value = 0.000) has been observed for the position of the sample and its density in CBCT in comparison to Multislice CT. Density values in CBCT are not real because they are affected by the position of the object in the machine.

  7. Modeling dendrite density from magnetic resonance diffusion measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Kroenke, CD; Østergaard, Leif;

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides a noninvasive tool to probe tissue microstructure. We propose a simplified model of neural cytoarchitecture intended to capture the essential features important for water diffusion as measured by NMR. Two components contribute to the NMR signal in this mo...

  8. Bioimpedance for the spot measurement of tissue density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylke, E. S.; Ward, L. C.; Stannard, C.; Leigh, A.; Kilbreath, S. L.

    2013-04-01

    Long-standing lymphoedema is characterised by tissues changes which are currently not detectable using bioimpedance spectroscopy. It has been suggested that a combination of bipolar and tetrapolar measurements may be used to detect these tissues changes for a single site in the transverse direction. This was technique was trialled in a group of control participants with no history of lymphoedema or recent upper limb trauma. Repeated spot measurements were done without removal of electrodes to determine biological variability as well as with removal of electrodes to determine technical reproducibility. The inter-limb spot ratio of the controls was then compared to that of a number of women previously diagnosed with secondary lymphoedema in the forearm. Biological variability was not found to greatly influence repeated measures but only moderate technical reliability was found despite excellent co-efficient of variation for the majority of the measurements. A difference was seen between those with more severe swelling and the controls. This novel technique shows promise in detecting tissue changes associated with long-standing lymphoedema.

  9. Emission considering self-absorption of OH to simultaneously obtain the OH density and gas temperature: validation, non-equilibrium effects and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yanjun; Nayak, Gaurav; Oinuma, Gaku; Ding, Yanjun; Peng, Zhimin; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2017-09-01

    The measurement of absolute densities of ubiquitous OH radicals and gas temperatures in water containing plasmas has recently drawn a lot of attention. In this paper, we extend the self-absorption model introduced in Du et al 2016 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 25 04LT02 with a description of the excited state by a superposition of two Boltzmann distributions to take the non-thermal rotational distribution of the excited state into account. This technique is applied to a diffuse He + H2O RF discharge and it is shown that in addition to the determination of the ground state OH density and rotational temperature, the properties of the excited state OH(A) can also be simultaneously determined. A model of the steady-state distribution of the hot and cold group density of OH(A) is able to describe the dependence of the rotational population distributions of the excited state as a function of the water concentration. The method is also applied to a filamentary Ar + H2O DBD. While the non-homogeneous nature of the DBD leads to complications, the production of OH(A) by multiple production mechanisms leading to a complex nascent rotational population distribution causes the fitting procedure of the emission spectrum (with self-absorption) to break down.

  10. Development and Miniaturization of RF based probes for Electron Density Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keiji

    2016-09-01

    To make a diagnostics on plasmas for materials processing plasmas accompanying with deposition of non-conducting films in etching and/or CVD processes, curling probe (CP) with a spiral slot antenna has been recently developed as a compact diagnostic tool which enables the local electron density measurement. The electron density is obtained from a shift of the probe resonance frequency in discharge ON and OFF monitored by a network analyzer (NWA). A conventional CP has a diameter larger than 15 mm typically, because a slot length of the CP is as long as several tens millimeters for its resonance frequency less than several GHz. Further miniaturization of the CP was required to expand applicable range to various plasma sources like a narrow-gap parallel plate discharge. We tried miniaturization of the CP down to less than 3 mm in the probe diameter by fabricating narrow spiral slot antenna, and experimentally and numerically the miniaturized probe was investigated how much influence the slot width has on probe resonance characteristics and electron density measurements. In the case of the conventional CP made of stainless steel, 0.3-mm-wide normal slot antenna, the resonance spectra was clearly observed regardless of antenna materials of copper or stainless steel (SS). However, when the slot width was reduced down to 0.03 mm, the slot resonance was strongly dependent on the antenna materials. Namely the resonance peak was almost vanished for the SS antenna, whereas clearly appeared for the copper antenna. In general, the narrower the slot is, the higher attenuation factor the slot has for electromagnetic wave propagating along the slot. In such an attenuated transmission line of the narrow slot, high electric conductivity of the antenna seems preferable for the slot resonance. Furthermore, the miniaturized CP with the copper antenna was also introduced into low pressure (< 1Pa) Ar plasma. The resonance frequency was confirmed to changes sensitively with electron

  11. Plasma Density Measurements on Refuelling by Solid Hydrogen Pellets in a Rotating Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma.......The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma....

  12. Measuring the Student Group Capacity for Obtaining Geometric Information in the van Hiele Developmental Thought Process:A Fuzzy Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The student group possibilistic uncertainty in the van Hiele process of geometric reasoning is considered as the student group capacity for obtaining geometric information. Hence, the student group capacity for obtaining geometric information can be measured by the total possibilistic uncertainty T(r) of an ordered possibility distribution. The capacities of three student groups are found by calculating the total possibilistic uncertainties of these groups. These capacity values set an expectation of future group performance. Future research indications of how the total possibilistic uncertainty may be applied to other models of learning and development will help to establish it as a viable measure in educational psychology.

  13. Integrated Bayesian Estimation of Zeff in the TEXTOR Tokamak from Bremsstrahlung and CX Impurity Density Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoolaege, G.; Von Hellermann, M. G.; Jaspers, R.; Ichir, M. M.; Van Oost, G.

    2006-11-01

    The validation of diagnostic date from a nuclear fusion experiment is an important issue. The concept of an Integrated Data Analysis (IDA) allows the consistent estimation of plasma parameters from heterogeneous data sets. Here, the determination of the ion effective charge (Zeff) is considered. Several diagnostic methods exist for the determination of Zeff, but the results are in general not in agreement. In this work, the problem of Zeff estimation on the TEXTOR tokamak is approached from the perspective of IDA, in the framework of Bayesian probability theory. The ultimate goal is the estimation of a full Zeff profile that is consistent both with measured bremsstrahlung emissivities, as well as individual impurity spectral line intensities obtained from Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS). We present an overview of the various uncertainties that enter the calculation of a Zeff profile from bremsstrahlung date on the one hand, and line intensity data on the other hand. We discuss a simple linear and nonlinear Bayesian model permitting the estimation of a central value for Zeff and the electron density ne on TEXTOR from bremsstrahlung emissivity measurements in the visible, and carbon densities derived from CXRS. Both the central Zeff and ne are sampled using an MCMC algorithm. An outlook is given towards possible model improvements.

  14. A New Measurement of the Electron Density in the Local Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Brian E.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1997-01-01

    Using the echelle-A grating of the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph, we have observed the C II λλ1335, 1336 emission lines of the nearby (d = 13.3 pc) star system Capella (G8 III + G1 III). Interstellar C II absorption features are detected within both stellar emission lines. The ground-state and excited-state C II column densities derived from these absorption lines imply an electron density of ne = 0.11+0.12-0.06 cm-3 in the local interstellar medium (LISM). Unlike previous derivations of ne from Mg II/Mg I ratios, the density suggested by the C II lines is independent of assumptions about ionization equilibrium. Current estimates of the H I density in the LISM are in the range 0.1-0.2 cm-3. The He I/H I ratio toward the white dwarf G191-B2B, which is only 7° from Capella, has been measured to be He I/H I = 0.068-0.082 from the Extreme-Ultraviolet Explorer data. These results indicate hydrogen and helium ionization fractions toward Capella of X(H) = 0.45 +/- 0.25 and X(He) = 0.57 +/- 0.23, respectively, confirming that hydrogen and helium are substantially ionized in the LISM. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  15. Aerosol effective density measurement using scanning mobility particle sizer and quartz crystal microbalance with the estimation of involved uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Bighnaraj; Aggarwal, Shankar G.; Sinha, Deepak; Gupta, Prabhat K.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we have used a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to estimate the effective density of aerosol particles. This approach is tested for aerosolized particles generated from the solution of standard materials of known density, i.e. ammonium sulfate (AS), ammonium nitrate (AN) and sodium chloride (SC), and also applied for ambient measurement in New Delhi. We also discuss uncertainty involved in the measurement. In this method, dried particles are introduced in to a differential mobility analyser (DMA), where size segregation is done based on particle electrical mobility. Downstream of the DMA, the aerosol stream is subdivided into two parts. One is sent to a condensation particle counter (CPC) to measure particle number concentration, whereas the other one is sent to the QCM to measure the particle mass concentration simultaneously. Based on particle volume derived from size distribution data of the SMPS and mass concentration data obtained from the QCM, the mean effective density (ρeff) with uncertainty of inorganic salt particles (for particle count mean diameter (CMD) over a size range 10-478 nm), i.e. AS, SC and AN, is estimated to be 1.76 ± 0.24, 2.08 ± 0.19 and 1.69 ± 0.28 g cm-3, values which are comparable with the material density (ρ) values, 1.77, 2.17 and 1.72 g cm-3, respectively. Using this technique, the percentage contribution of error in the measurement of effective density is calculated to be in the range of 9-17 %. Among the individual uncertainty components, repeatability of particle mass obtained by the QCM, the QCM crystal frequency, CPC counting efficiency, and the equivalence of CPC- and QCM-derived volume are the major contributors to the expanded uncertainty (at k = 2) in comparison to other components, e.g. diffusion correction, charge correction, etc. Effective density for ambient particles at the beginning of the winter period in New Delhi was measured to be 1.28 ± 0.12 g cm-3

  16. One versus Two Breast Density Measures to Predict 5- and 10-Year Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlikowske, Karla; Gard, Charlotte C; Sprague, Brian L; Tice, Jeffrey A; Miglioretti, Diana L

    2015-06-01

    One measure of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density improves 5-year breast cancer risk prediction, but the value of sequential measures is unknown. We determined whether two BI-RADS density measures improve the predictive accuracy of the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium 5-year risk model compared with one measure. We included 722,654 women of ages 35 to 74 years with two mammograms with BI-RADS density measures on average 1.8 years apart; 13,715 developed invasive breast cancer. We used Cox regression to estimate the relative hazards of breast cancer for age, race/ethnicity, family history of breast cancer, history of breast biopsy, and one or two density measures. We developed a risk prediction model by combining these estimates with 2000-2010 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results incidence and 2010 vital statistics for competing risk of death. The two-measure density model had marginally greater discriminatory accuracy than the one-measure model (AUC, 0.640 vs. 0.635). Of 18.6% of women (134,404 of 722,654) who decreased density categories, 15.4% (20,741 of 134,404) of women whose density decreased from heterogeneously or extremely dense to a lower density category with one other risk factor had a clinically meaningful increase in 5-year risk from breast cancer risk and improves risk classification for women with risk factors and a decrease in density. A two-density model should be considered for women whose density decreases when calculating breast cancer risk. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation: obtaining efficiency and accuracy with in situ optimised local orbitals

    CERN Document Server

    Zuehlsdorff, Tim J; Payne, Mike C; Haynes, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    We present a solution of the full TDDFT eigenvalue equation in the linear response formalism exhibiting a linear-scaling computational complexity with system size, without relying on the simplifying Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The implementation relies on representing the occupied and unoccupied subspace with two different sets of in situ optimised localised functions, yielding a very compact and efficient representation of the transition density matrix of the excitation with the accuracy associated with a systematic basis set. The TDDFT eigenvalue equation is solved using a preconditioned conjugate-gradients algorithm that is very memory-efficient. The algorithm is validated on a test molecule and a good agreement with results obtained from standard quantum chemistry packages is found, with the preconditioner yielding a significant improvement in convergence rates. The method developed in this work is then used to reproduce experimental results of the absorption spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) i...

  18. Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

  19. Study of density field measurement based on NPLS technique in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Due to the influence of shock wave and turbulence, supersonic density field exhibits strongly inhomogeneous and unsteady characteristics. Applying traditional density field measurement techniques to supersonic flows yields three problems: low spatiotemporal resolution, limitation of measuring 3D density field, and low signal to noise ratio (SNR). A new method based on Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering (NPLS) technique is proposed in this paper to measure supersonic density field. This method measures planar transient density field in 3D supersonic flow by calibrating the relationship between density and concentration of tracer particles, which would display the density fluctuation due to the influence of shock waves and vortexes. The application of this new method to density field measurement of supersonic optical bow cap is introduced in this paper, and the results reveal shock wave, turbulent boundary layer in the flow with the spatial resolution of 93.2 μm/pixel. By analyzing the results at interval of 5 μs, temporal evolution of density field can be observed.

  20. Study of density field measurement based on NPLS technique in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN LiFeng; YI ShiHe; ZHAO YuXin; HE Lin; CHENG ZhongYu

    2009-01-01

    Due to the influence of shock wave and turbulence,supersonic density field exhibits strongly inho-mogeneous and unsteady characteristics.Applying traditional density field measurement techniques to supersonic flows yields three problems: low spatiotemporal resolution,limitation of measuring 3D density field,and low signal to noise ratio (SNR).A new method based on Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering (NPLS) technique is proposed in this paper to measure supersonic density field.This method measures planar transient density field in 3D supersonic flow by calibrating the relationship between density and concentration of tracer particles,which would display the density fluctuation due to the influence of shock waves and vortexes.The application of this new method to density field measurement of supersonic optical bow cap is introduced in this paper,and the results reveal shock wave,turbulent boundary layer in the flow with the spatial resolution of 93.2 pm/pixel.By analyzing the results at interval of 5 μs,temporal evolution of density field can be observed.

  1. Exchange Flow Rate Measurement Technique in Density Different Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoo Fumizawa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Buoyancy-driven exchange flows of helium-air through inclined a narrow tube was investigated. Exchange flows may occur following the opening of a window for ventilation, as well as when a pipe ruptures in a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The experiment in this paper was carried out in a test chamber filled with helium and the flow was visualized using the smoke wire method. A high-speed camera recorded the flow behavior. The image of the flow was transferred to digital data, and the slow flow velocity, i.e. micro flow rate was measured by PIV software. Numerical simulation was carried out by the code of moving particle method with Lagrange method.

  2. Biodiesel Fuel Production from Marine Microalgae Isochrysis galbana, Pavlova lutheri, Dunaliella salina and Measurement of its Viscosity and Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sujin Jeba Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is a fuel derives from transesterification of fats and oils. It is renewable and non-toxic ecofriendly fuel with less CO2 and NO2 emissions. Microalgae are known to contain more lipid content than macroalgae and most other oil crops. In this study, we extracted biodiesel from three microalgae Isochrysis galbana, Pavlova lutheri, Dunaliella salina and also measured the density and viscosity of biofuel obtained from these microalgae. Pavlova lutheri yielded more oil than the other two algae with biomass left over Dunaliella salina was more. The density of biodiesel obtained from these microalgae was between 0.86 g/cm3 and 0.90 g/cm3 with viscosity in the range 3.92 mm2/sec to 4.5 mm2/sec showing high density than the other oils.

  3. Simultaneous measurements of temperature, density, and pressure in a supersonic turbulent flow using laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Gross, K. P.; Logan, P.

    1985-01-01

    A pulsed laser-induced fluorescence technique is described that provides simultaneous measurements of temperature, density, and pressure in low-temperature, turbulent flows. The measurements are made with spatial and temporal resolution comparable to that obtained with modern laser anemometer techniques used for turbulent boundary layer research. The capabilities of the method are briefly described and its demonstration in a simple two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer at Mach 2 is reported. The results are compared with conventional hot-wire anemometer data obtained in the same flow.

  4. Elasticity-density and viscoelasticity-density relationships at the tibia mid-diaphysis assessed from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Simon; Schneider, Joannes; Varga, Peter; Laugier, Pascal; Raum, Kay; Grimal, Quentin

    2016-02-01

    Cortical bone tissue is an anisotropic material characterized by typically five independent elastic coefficients (for transverse isotropy) governing shear and longitudinal deformations in the different anatomical directions. It is well established that the Young's modulus in the direction of the bone axis of long bones has a strong relationship with mass density. It is not clear, however, whether relationships of similar strength exist for the other elastic coefficients, for they have seldom been investigated, and the results available in the literature are contradictory. The objectives of the present work were to document the anisotropic elastic properties of cortical bone at the tibia mid-diaphysis and to elucidate their relationships with mass density. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) was used to measure the transverse isotropic stiffness tensor of 55 specimens from 19 donors. Except for Poisson's ratios and the non-diagonal stiffness coefficient, strong linear correlations between the different elastic coefficients (0.7 tibia. RUS also measures the viscous part of the stiffness tensor. An anisotropy ratio close to two was found for damping coefficients. Damping increased as the mass density decreased. The data suggest that a relatively accurate estimation of all the mid-tibia elastic coefficients can be derived from mass density. This is of particular interest (1) to design organ-scale bone models in which elastic coefficients are mapped according to Hounsfield values from computed tomography scans as a surrogate for mass density and (2) to model ultrasound propagation at the mid-tibia, which is an important site for the in vivo assessment of bone status with axial transmission techniques.

  5. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L., E-mail: lianglin@ucla.edu; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (∼1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ∼0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  6. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L; Ding, W X; Brower, D L

    2014-11-01

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (∼1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ∼0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  7. Large density amplification measured on jets ejected from a magnetized plasma gun

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Gunsu S.; You, Setthivoine; Bellan, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    Observation of a large density amplification in the collimating plasma jet ejected from a coplanar coaxial plasma gun is reported. The jet velocity is ~30 km s^-1 and the electron density increases from ~10^20 to 10^(22–23) m^-3. In previous spheromak experiments, electron density of the order 10^(19–21) m^-3 had been measured in the flux conserver region, but no density measurement had been reported for the source gun region. The coplanar geometry of our electrodes permits direct observation...

  8. Frequency spectra from current vs. magnetic flux density measurements for mobile phones and other electrical appliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straume, Aksel; Johnsson, Anders; Oftedal, Gunnhild; Wilén, Jonna

    2007-10-01

    The frequency spectra of electromagnetic fields have to be determined to evaluate human exposure in accordance to ICNIRP guidelines. In the literature, comparisons with magnetic field guidelines have been performed by using the frequency distribution of the current drawn from the battery. In the present study we compared the frequency spectrum in the range 217 Hz to 2.4 kHz of the magnetic flux density measured near the surface of a mobile phone with the frequency spectrum of the supply current. By using the multiple frequency rule, recommended in the ICNIRP guidelines, we estimated the magnetic field exposure in the two cases. Similar measurements and estimations were done for an electric drill, a hair dryer, and a fluorescent desk lamp. All the devices have a basic frequency of 50 Hz, and the frequency spectra were evaluated up to 550 Hz. We also mapped the magnetic field in 3D around three mobile phones. The frequency distributions obtained from the two measurement methods are not equal. The frequency content of the current leads to an overestimation of the magnetic field exposure by a factor up to 2.2 for the mobile phone. For the drill, the hair dryer, and the fluorescent lamp, the supply current signal underestimated the exposure by a factor up to 2.3. In conclusion, an accurate exposure evaluation requires the magnetic flux density spectrum of the device to be measured directly. There was no indication that the devices studied would exceed the reference levels at the working distances normally used.

  9. Separate density and viscosity measurements of unknown liquid using quartz crystal microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Tan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous liquids have a wide range of applications in many fields. Basic physical properties like the density and the viscosity have great impacts on the functionalities of a given ionic liquid. For the millions kinds of existing liquids, only a few have been systematically measured with the density and the viscosity using traditional methods. However, these methods are limited to measure the density and the viscosity of an ionic liquid simultaneously especially in processing micro sample volumes. To meet this challenge, we present a new theoretical model and a novel method to separate density and viscosity measurements with single quartz crystal microbalance (QCM in this work. The agreement of experimental results and theocratical calculations shows that the QCM is capable to measure the density and the viscosity of ionic liquids.

  10. Numerical shadows: measures and densities on the numerical range

    CERN Document Server

    Dunkl, Charles F; Holbrook, John A; Puchała, Zbigniew; Zyczkowski, Karol \\

    2010-01-01

    For any operator $M$ acting on an $N$-dimensional Hilbert space $H_N$ we introduce its numerical shadow, which is a probability measure on the complex plane supported by the numerical range of $M$. The shadow of $M$ at point $z$ is defined as the probability that the inner product $(Mu,u)$ is equal to $z$, where $u$ stands for a random complex vector from $H_N$, satisfying $||u||=1$. In the case of N=2 the numerical shadow of a non-normal operator can be interpreted as a shadow of a hollow sphere projected on a plane. A similar interpretation is provided also for higher dimensions. For a hermitian $M$ its numerical shadow forms a probability distribution on the real axis which is shown to be a one dimensional $B$-spline. In the case of a normal $M$ the numerical shadow corresponds to a shadow of a transparent solid simplex in $R^{N-1}$ onto the complex plane. Numerical shadow is found explicitly for Jordan matrices $J_N$, direct sums of matrices and in all cases where the shadow is rotation invariant. Results...

  11. Blood Density Is Nearly Equal to Water Density: A Validation Study of the Gravimetric Method of Measuring Intraoperative Blood Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitello, Dominic J; Ripper, Richard M; Fettiplace, Michael R; Weinberg, Guy L; Vitello, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The gravimetric method of weighing surgical sponges is used to quantify intraoperative blood loss. The dry mass minus the wet mass of the gauze equals the volume of blood lost. This method assumes that the density of blood is equivalent to water (1 gm/mL). This study's purpose was to validate the assumption that the density of blood is equivalent to water and to correlate density with hematocrit. Methods. 50 µL of whole blood was weighed from eighteen rats. A distilled water control was weighed for each blood sample. The averages of the blood and water were compared utilizing a Student's unpaired, one-tailed t-test. The masses of the blood samples and the hematocrits were compared using a linear regression. Results. The average mass of the eighteen blood samples was 0.0489 g and that of the distilled water controls was 0.0492 g. The t-test showed P = 0.2269 and R (2) = 0.03154. The hematocrit values ranged from 24% to 48%. The linear regression R (2) value was 0.1767. Conclusions. The R (2) value comparing the blood and distilled water masses suggests high correlation between the two populations. Linear regression showed the hematocrit was not proportional to the mass of the blood. The study confirmed that the measured density of blood is similar to water.

  12. Role of Effective Density in improving the accuracy of bottom pressure based sea level measurements - A case study from Gulf of Guinea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Mehra, P.; Desai, R.G.P.; Dotse, J.; Odametey, J.T.; Nkebi, E.K.; Vijaykumar, K.; Prabhudesai, S.P.

    (approx equal to 0.25% &9472; 1.84%) its bulk density, rho sub(b) obtained from precision density measurements made on discrete water samples Thus, use of rho sub(b) to estimate sea level elevation yields an underestimation of this order in sea level...

  13. Electron/positron measurements obtained with the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector on the surface of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F.; Appel, J. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Experimental and Applied Physics; and others

    2016-04-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures the energetic charged and neutral particles and the radiation dose rate on the surface of Mars. Although charged and neutral particle spectra have been investigated in detail, the electron and positron spectra have not been investigated yet. The reason for that is that they are difficult to separate from each other and because of the technical challenges involved in extracting energy spectra from the raw data. We use GEANT4 to model the behavior of the RAD instrument for electron/positron measurements.We compare Planetocosmics predictions for different atmospheric pressures and different modulation parameters Φ with the obtained RAD electron/positron measurements.We find that the RAD electron/positron measurements agree well with the spectra predicted by Planetocosmics. Both RAD measurements and Planetocosmics simulation show a dependence of the electron/positron fluxes on both atmospheric pressure and solar modulation potential.

  14. Lack of correlation of glucose levels in filtered blood plasma to density and conductivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David M; Ash, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to determine whether the glucose level of a blood plasma sample from a diabetic patient could be predicted by measuring the density and conductivity of ultrafiltrate of plasma created by a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. Conductivity of the plasma filtrate measures electrolyte concentration and should correct density measurements for changes in electrolytes and water concentration. In vitro studies were performed measuring conductivity and density of solutions of varying glucose and sodium chloride concentrations. Plasma from seven hospitalized patients with diabetes was filtered across a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. The filtrate density and conductivity were measured and correlated to glucose levels. In vitro studies confirmed the ability to predict glucose from density and conductivity measurements, in varying concentrations of glucose and saline. In plasma filtrate, the conductivity and density measurements of ultrafiltrate allowed estimation of glucose in some patients with diabetes but not others. The correlation coefficient for the combined patient data was 0.45 which was significant but only explained 20% of the variability in the glucose levels. Individually, the correlation was significant in only two of the seven patients with correlation coefficients of 0.79 and 0.88. The reasons for lack of correlation are not clear, and cannot be explained by generation of idiogenic osmoles, effects of alcohol dehydrogenase, water intake, etc. This combination of physical methods for glucose measurement is not a feasible approach to measuring glucose in plasma filtrate.

  15. Density Measurements of Na2WO4-WO3-ZnO Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on Archimedes principle, the densities of Na2WO4-WO3-ZnO melts at a fixed mole ratio of 3.43 of Na2WO4 to ZnO were measured. The results indicated that there was a linear relationship between the densities and temperatures at a fixed composition. At a fixed temperature, the linear relationship between densities and compositions showed different slop within different composition regions. The reasons were explained in view of ionic composition changes.

  16. 3-D density imaging with muon flux measurements from underground galleries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesparre, N.; Cabrera, J.; Marteau, J.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric muon flux measurements provide information on subsurface density distribution. In this study, muon flux was measured underground, in the Tournemire experimental platform (France). The objective was to image the medium between the galleries and the surface and evaluate the feasibility to detect the presence of discontinuities, for example, produced by secondary subvertical faults or by karstic networks. Measurements were performed from three different sites with a partial overlap of muon trajectories, offering the possibility to seek density variations at different depths. The conversion of the measured muon flux to average density values showed global variations further analysed through a 3-D nonlinear inversion procedure. Main results are the presence of a very low density region at the level of the upper aquifer, compatible with the presence of a karstic network hosting local cavities, and the absence of secondary faults. We discuss the validity of the present results and propose different strategies to improve the accuracy of such measurements and analysis.

  17. Characterizing Molecular Structure by Combining Experimental Measurements with Density Functional Theory Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Encarnacion, Juan M.

    2016-06-01

    In this talk, the power and synergy of combining experimental measurements with density functional theory computations as a single tool to unambiguously characterize the molecular structure of complex atomic systems is shown. Here, we bring three beautiful cases where the interaction between the experiment and theory is in very good agreement for both finite and extended systems: 1) Characterizing Metal Coordination Environments in Porous Organic Polymers: A Joint Density Functional Theory and Experimental Infrared Spectroscopy Study 2) Characterization of Rhenium Compounds Obtained by Electrochemical Synthesis After Aging Process and 3) Infrared Study of H(D)2 + Co4+ Chemical Reaction: Characterizing Molecular Structures. J.M. López-Encarnación, K.K. Tanabe, M.J.A. Johnson, J. Jellinek, Chemistry-A European Journal 19 (41), 13646-13651 A. Vargas-Uscategui, E. Mosquera, J.M. López-Encarnación, B. Chornik, R. S. Katiyar, L. Cifuentes, Journal of Solid State Chemistry 220, 17-21

  18. Precision measurement of thermal neutron beam densities using a 3He proportional counter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Bahnsen, A.; Brown, W.K.

    1967-01-01

    A new method, based on the 3He(n, p)T reaction, has been developed for the accurate determination of thermal neutron beam densities. Several comparisons were made with the conventional Au-foil activation method, and agreement was obtained between the two methods within an experimental uncertainty...... of ±0.4%. Fundamental advantages of the method include the 1ν dependence of the 3He(n, p)T cross section up to 1 keV, and the assurance of homogeneity even for very small macroscopic cross sections, because of the gaseous detector material. Although the method requires a relatively clean neutron beam......, it can be used over a wide range of neutron densities and, in particular, is capable of measuring extremely weak beams. A detector has been constructed with a well-defined efficiency and which is able to accept beams of diameters up to 10 cm. The 3He counter method is proposed as a precision standard...

  19. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation: Obtaining efficiency and accuracy with in situ optimised local orbitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuehlsdorff, T. J., E-mail: tjz21@cam.ac.uk; Payne, M. C. [Cavendish Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Hine, N. D. M. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Haynes, P. D. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Thomas Young Centre for Theory and Simulation of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-28

    We present a solution of the full time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) eigenvalue equation in the linear response formalism exhibiting a linear-scaling computational complexity with system size, without relying on the simplifying Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The implementation relies on representing the occupied and unoccupied subspaces with two different sets of in situ optimised localised functions, yielding a very compact and efficient representation of the transition density matrix of the excitation with the accuracy associated with a systematic basis set. The TDDFT eigenvalue equation is solved using a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm that is very memory-efficient. The algorithm is validated on a small test molecule and a good agreement with results obtained from standard quantum chemistry packages is found, with the preconditioner yielding a significant improvement in convergence rates. The method developed in this work is then used to reproduce experimental results of the absorption spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll in an organic solvent, where it is demonstrated that the TDA fails to reproduce the main features of the low energy spectrum, while the full TDDFT equation yields results in good qualitative agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the need for explicitly including parts of the solvent into the TDDFT calculations is highlighted, making the treatment of large system sizes necessary that are well within reach of the capabilities of the algorithm introduced here. Finally, the linear-scaling properties of the algorithm are demonstrated by computing the lowest excitation energy of bacteriochlorophyll in solution. The largest systems considered in this work are of the same order of magnitude as a variety of widely studied pigment-protein complexes, opening up the possibility of studying their properties without having to resort to any semiclassical approximations to parts of the protein environment.

  20. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation: Obtaining efficiency and accuracy with in situ optimised local orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuehlsdorff, T. J.; Hine, N. D. M.; Payne, M. C.; Haynes, P. D.

    2015-11-01

    We present a solution of the full time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) eigenvalue equation in the linear response formalism exhibiting a linear-scaling computational complexity with system size, without relying on the simplifying Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The implementation relies on representing the occupied and unoccupied subspaces with two different sets of in situ optimised localised functions, yielding a very compact and efficient representation of the transition density matrix of the excitation with the accuracy associated with a systematic basis set. The TDDFT eigenvalue equation is solved using a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm that is very memory-efficient. The algorithm is validated on a small test molecule and a good agreement with results obtained from standard quantum chemistry packages is found, with the preconditioner yielding a significant improvement in convergence rates. The method developed in this work is then used to reproduce experimental results of the absorption spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll in an organic solvent, where it is demonstrated that the TDA fails to reproduce the main features of the low energy spectrum, while the full TDDFT equation yields results in good qualitative agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the need for explicitly including parts of the solvent into the TDDFT calculations is highlighted, making the treatment of large system sizes necessary that are well within reach of the capabilities of the algorithm introduced here. Finally, the linear-scaling properties of the algorithm are demonstrated by computing the lowest excitation energy of bacteriochlorophyll in solution. The largest systems considered in this work are of the same order of magnitude as a variety of widely studied pigment-protein complexes, opening up the possibility of studying their properties without having to resort to any semiclassical approximations to parts of the protein environment.

  1. Aerosol effective density measurement using scanning mobility particle sizer and quartz crystal microbalance with the estimation of involved uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sarangi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have used scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM to estimate the effective density of aerosol particles. This approach is tested for aerosolized particles generated from the solution of standard materials of known density, i.e. ammonium sulfate (AS, ammonium nitrate (AN and sodium chloride (SC, and also applied for ambient measurement in New Delhi. We also discuss uncertainty involved in the measurement. In this method, dried particles are introduced in to a differential mobility analyzer (DMA, where size segregation was done based on particle electrical mobility. At the downstream of DMA, the aerosol stream is subdivided into two parts. One is sent to a condensation particle counter (CPC to measure particle number concentration, whereas other one is sent to QCM to measure the particle mass concentration simultaneously. Based on particle volume derived from size distribution data of SMPS and mass concentration data obtained from QCM, the mean effective density (ρeff with uncertainty of inorganic salt particles (for particle count mean diameter (CMD over a size range 10 to 478 nm, i.e. AS, SC and AN is estimated to be 1.76 ± 0.24, 2.08 ± 0.19 and 1.69 ± 0.28 g cm−3, which are comparable with the material density (ρ values, 1.77, 2.17 and 1.72 g cm−3, respectively. Among individual uncertainty components, repeatability of particle mass obtained by QCM, QCM crystal frequency, CPC counting efficiency, and equivalence of CPC and QCM derived volume are the major contributors to the expanded uncertainty (at k = 2 in comparison to other components, e.g. diffusion correction, charge correction, etc. Effective density for ambient particles at the beginning of winter period in New Delhi is measured to be 1.28 ± 0.12 g cm−3. It was found that in general, mid-day effective density of ambient aerosols increases with increase in CMD of particle size measurement but particle photochemistry is an

  2. Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities at surface monitoring sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Morino

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities were developed in two independent systems: one utilizing a grating-based desktop optical spectrum analyzer (OSA with a resolution enough to resolve rotational lines of CO2 and CH4 in the regions of 1565–1585 and 1674–1682 nm, respectively; the other is an application of an optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI to obtain the CO2 column density. Direct sunlight was collimated via a small telescope installed on a portable sun tracker and then transmitted through an optical fiber into the OSA or the FFPI for optical analysis. The near infrared spectra of the OSA were retrieved by a least squares spectral fitting algorithm. The CO2 and CH4 column densities deduced were in excellent agreement with those measured by a Fourier transform spectrometer with high resolution. The rovibronic lines in the wavelength region of 1570–1575 nm were analyzed by the FFPI. The I0 and I values in the Beer-Lambert law equation to obtain CO2 column density were deduced by modulating temperature of the FFPI, which offered column CO2 with the statistical error less than 0.2% for six hours measurement.

  3. HCHO column density retrieval using Pandora measurements in Seoul, Korea: Temporal characteristics and comparison with OMI measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junsung; Lee, Hanlim; Kim, Jhoon; Herman, Jay; Kim, Daewon

    2017-04-01

    We, for the first time, retrieved the Formaldehyde (HCHO) vertical column density (VCD) using Pandora instruments in Seoul, a megacity in northeast Asia, for the period between 2012 and 2014. We retrieved HCHO slant column density (SCD) using the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method. Then HCHO SCD was converted to HCHO VCD using geometric Air Mass Factor (AMF), since Pandora is the direct-sun measurement. The HCHO VCDs were generally highest at 12:00 local time (LT) and were low at the 10:00 (LT) and 14:00 (LT) throughout all seasons. The mean HCHO VCDs at 12:00 LT were 1.57×1016, 2.29×1016, 9.94× 1015, and 8.33×1015 molecules cm-2 in the spring, summer, autumn, and winter, respectively, whereas those at 10:00 (14:00) LT were 1.22×1016 (8.68×1015), 1.25×1016 (1.54×1016), 1.13×1016 (1.33×1016), and 6.58×1015 (5.11×1015) molecules cm-2 in the spring, summer, autumn, and winter, respectively. In terms of seasonal variations, HCHO VCD was highest in summer due to the photo-oxidation whereas it showed the lowest value in winter during the entire measurement period. The Pandora HCHO VCDs range from 4.10×1015 molecules cm-2 to 2.89×1016 molecules cm-2. In comparison with the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements, the HCHO VCDs obtained from the OMI were higher than those were the Pandora HCHO VCDs. We found a correlation coefficient of 0.74, with slop of 0.35 between the Pandora HCHO VCDs and the OMI HCHO VCDs. Furthermore, to investigate HCHO mixing ratio level within Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL), we converted Pandora HCHO VCDs to HCHO mixing ratio in the PBL using an empirical linear model with the inputs of PBL data obtained from the Atmospheric InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and other meteorological data.

  4. Measurements relating fire radiative energy density and surface fuel consumption - RxCADRE 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Matthew B. Dickinson; Benjamin C. Bright; Robert L. Kremens; E. Louise Loudermilk; Joseph J. O' Brien; Benjamin S. Hornsby; Roger D. Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale experiments have demonstrated that fire radiative energy is linearly related to fuel combusted but such a relationship has not been shown at the landscape level of prescribed fires. This paper presents field and remotely sensed measures of pre-fire fuel loads, consumption, fire radiative energy density (FRED) and fire radiative power flux density (FRFD),...

  5. Measurement of Plasma Density Produced in Dielectric Barrier Discharge for Active Aerodynamic Control with Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHANG Yi; XU Yan-Ji; LIN Bin; LI Yu-Tong; ZHU Jun-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    We utilize an interferometer to investigate the changes of the refractive index caused by dielectric barrier discharge plasma.The electronic density of the plasma produced is measured and analyzed tentatively.The results show that density of the plasma increases linearly with exciting voltages.

  6. arXiv A method and tool for combining differential or inclusive measurements obtained with simultaneously constrained uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Kieseler, Jan

    A method is discussed that allows combining sets of differential or inclusive measurements. It is assumed that at least one measurement was obtained with simultaneously fitting a set of nuisance parameters, representing sources of systematic uncertainties. As a result of beneficial constraints from the data all such fitted parameters are correlated among each other. The best approach for a combination of these measurements would be the maximisation of a combined likelihood, for which the full fit model of each measurement and the original data are required. However, only in rare cases this information is publicly available. In absence of this information most commonly used combination methods are not able to account for these correlations between uncertainties, which can lead to severe biases as shown in this article. The method discussed here provides a solution for this problem. It relies on the public result and its covariance or Hessian, only, and is validated against the combined-likelihood approach. A d...

  7. Short Communication: Testosterone Measured with an Automatic Immunoassay Compares Reasonbly Well to Results Obtained by LC-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Cindy Søndersø; Højskov, Carsten Schriver; Møller, Holger Jon

    2016-01-01

    hormonebinding globulin (SHBG), and albumin employing Cobas e601/c501. Testosterone, androstenedione (andro), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) concentrations were measured employing LC-MS/MS. We evaluated the difference between testosterone measured by the two methods...... for the difference between results obtained by the two methods and the sample concentration of DHEAS and andro: Diff (Cobas e601 - LC-MS/MS) = 0.116 x DHEAS - 0.396, r = 0.84 and Diff (Cobas e601 - LC-MS/MS) = 0.08 andro - 0.380, r = 0.58. No statistically significant interference was observed for progesterone, 17......-OHP, SHBG, and albumin. Conclusions: We report significant differences between testosterone measurements employing an automatic second generation immunoassay and LC-MS/MS. The difference can be correlated with the measured concentrations of DHEAS and andro, and its magnitude is judged to be of limited...

  8. Convection-Diffusion Model for Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jets: Obtaining Off-Axis Data from On-Axis Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Dünnbier, Mario; Winter, Jörn; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan

    2012-10-01

    An analytical convection-diffusion model for atmospheric pressure plasma jets is presented. The model can be applied both for ambient air species diffusion and for heat transfer into a jets effluent. Using on-axis data from experiments as input, the model can be used to extrapolate the measured quantities to the complete domain for laminar flows and near-axis region for turbulent flows. The method is applied to experimental data obtained from molecular beam mass spectrometry as well as from a VUV absorption spectrometry method using the plasma jet itself as a VUV emitter. The measurements are conducted on a turbulent atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet with a protective gas nozzle, allowing for the creation of a shielding gas curtain around the plasma jets effluent. The results obtained from the hybrid analytical-experimental method are compared to computational fluid dynamics simulations.

  9. Biodiesel Fuel Production from Marine Microalgae Isochrysis galbana, Pavlova lutheri, Dunaliella salina and Measurement of its Viscosity and Density

    OpenAIRE

    T. Sujin Jeba Kumar; C.K. Balavigneswaran; K.P. Srinivasakumar

    2013-01-01

    Biodiesel is a fuel derives from transesterification of fats and oils. It is renewable and non-toxic ecofriendly fuel with less CO2 and NO2 emissions. Microalgae are known to contain more lipid content than macroalgae and most other oil crops. In this study, we extracted biodiesel from three microalgae Isochrysis galbana, Pavlova lutheri, Dunaliella salina and also measured the density and viscosity of biofuel obtained from these microalgae. Pavlova lutheri yielded more oil than the other two...

  10. Crystal Fields in Dilute Rare-Earth Metals Obtained from Magnetization Measurements on Dilute Rare-Earth Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touborg, P.; Høg, J.

    1974-01-01

    Crystal field parameters of Tb, Dy, and Er in Sc, Y, and Lu are summarized. These parameters are obtained from magnetization measurements on dilute single crystals, and successfully checked by a number of different methods. The crystal field parameters vary unpredictably with the rare-earth solute....... B40, B60, and B66 are similar in Y and Lu. Crystal field parameters for the pure metals Tb, Dy, and Er are estimated from the crystal fields in Y and Lu....

  11. Relationships between snowfall density and solid hydrometeors, based on measured size and fall speed, for snowpack modeling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaka, Masaaki; Motoyoshi, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Nakai, Sento; Shiina, Toru; Muramoto, Ken-ichiro

    2016-11-01

    The initial density of deposited snow is mainly controlled by snowfall hydrometeors. The relationship between snowfall density and hydrometeors has been qualitatively examined by previous researchers; however, a quantitative relationship has not yet been established due to difficulty in parameterizing the hydrometeor characteristics of a snowfall event. Thus, in an earlier study, we developed a new variable, the centre of mass flux distribution (CMF), which we used to describe the main hydrometeors contributing to a snowfall event. The CMF is based on average size and fall speed weighted by the mass flux estimated from all measured hydrometeors in a snowfall event. It provides a quantitative representation of the predominant hydrometeor characteristics of the event. In this study, we examine the relationships between the density of newly fallen snow and predominant snow type as indicated by the CMFs. We measured snowfall density at Nagaoka, Japan, where riming and aggregation are predominant, simultaneously observing the size and fall speed of snowfall hydrometeors, and deduced the predominant hydrometeor characteristics of each snowfall event from their CMFs. Snow density measurements were carried out for short periods, 1 or 2 h, during which the densification of the deposited snow was negligible. Also, we grouped snowfall events based on similar hydrometeor characteristics. As a result, we were able to obtain not only the qualitative relationships between the main types of snow and snowfall density as reported by previous researchers, but also quantitative relationships between snowfall density and the CMF density introduced here. CMF density is defined as the ratio between mass and volume, assuming the diameter of a sphere is equal to the CMF size component. This quantitative relationship provides a means for more precise estimation of snowfall density based on snow type (hydrometeor characteristics), by using hydrometeor size and fall speed data to derive

  12. Utilization of α-olefins obtained by pyrolysis of waste high density polyethylene to synthesize α-olefin-succinic-anhydride based cold flow improvers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norbert MISKOLCZI; Richard SAGI; László BARTHA; Lívia FORCEK

    2009-01-01

    A new route of utilization of α-olefin rich hydrocarbon fractions obtained by waste polymer pyrolysis was investigated. α-olefin-succinic-anhydride intermediate-based pour point depressant additives for diesel fuel were synthesized, in which reactions needed α-olefins were obtained by pyrolysis of waste high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Fraction of α-olefins was produced by the de-polymerization of plastic waste in a tube reactor at 500℃ in the absence of catalysts and air. C17~22 range of mixtures of olefins and paraffins were separated for synthesis and then, these hydrocarbons were reacted with maleic-anhydride (MA) for formation of α-olefin-succinic-anhydride intermediates. The olefin-rich hydrocarbon fraction contained approximately 60% of olefins, including 90%~95% α-olefins. Other intermediates were produced in the same way by using commercial C20 α-olefin instead of C17~22 olefin mixture. The two different experimental intermediates with number average molecular weights of 1850g/mol and 1760g/mol were reacted with different alcohols: 1-butanol, 1-hexanol, 1-octanol, i-butanol, and c-hexanol to produce their ester derivatives. The synthesized ten experimental pour point depressants were added in different concentrations to conventional diesel fuel, which had no other additive content before. The structure and efficiency of experimental additives were followed by different standardized and non-standardized methods. Results showed that the experimental additives on the basis of the product of waste pyrolysis were able to decrease not only the pour but also the cloud point and cold filter plugging point (CFPP) of diesel fuel, whose effects could be observed even if the concentration of additives was low. Furthermore, all additives had anti-wear and anti-friction effects in diesel fuel.

  13. Density manifolds, geometric measures and high-energy physics in transfinite dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nada, S.I. [Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar)], E-mail: snada@qu.edu.qa

    2009-11-15

    We discuss certain manifolds with density. Furthermore, we outline natural connections leading to E-infinity theory and high-energy physics from a geometric measure and transfinite dimensional theoretical viewpoints.

  14. Modal decomposition for measuring the orbital angular momentum density of light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel technique to measure the orbital angular momentum (OAM) density of light. The technique is based on modal decomposition, enabling the complete reconstruction of optical fields, including the reconstruction of the beams Poynting...

  15. Precision (Repeatability and Reproducibility and Agreement of Corneal Power Measurements Obtained by Topcon KR-1W and iTrace.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun Hua

    Full Text Available To evaluate the repeatability and reproducibility of corneal power measurements obtained by Topcon KR-1W and iTrace, and assess the agreement with measurements obtained by Allegro Topolyzer and IOLMaster.The right eyes of 100 normal subjects were prospectively scanned 3 times using all the 4 devices. Another observer performed additional 3 consecutive scans using the Topcon KR-1W and iTrace in the same session. About one week later, the first observer repeated the measurements using the Topcon KR-1W and iTrace. The steep keratometry (Ks, flat keratometry (Kf, mean keratometry (Km, J0 and J45 were analyzed. Repeatability and reproducibility of measurements were evaluated by the within-subject standard deviation (Sw, coefficient of variation (CoV, test-retest repeatability (2.77Sw, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Agreements between devices were assessed using Bland-Altman analysis and 95% limits of agreement (LoA.Intraobserver repeatability and interobserver and intersession reproducibility of the Ks, Kf and Km showed a CoV of no more than 0.5%, a 2.77Sw of 0.70 D or less, and an ICC of no less than 0.99. However, J0 and J45 showed poor intraobserver repeatability and interobserver and intersession reproducibility (all ICCs not greater than 0.446. Statistically significant differences existed between Topcon KR-1W and IOLMaster, Topcon KR-1W and iTrace, Topcon KR-1W and Topolyzer, iTrace and Topolyzer, iTrace and IOLMaster for Ks, Kf and Km measurements (all P < 0.05. The mean differences between Topcon KR-1W, iTrace, and the other 2 devices were small. The 95% LoA were approximately 1.0 D to 1.5 D for all measurements.The Ks, Kf and Km obtained by Topcon KR-1W and iTrace showed excellent intraobserver repeatability and interobserver and intersession reproducibility in normal eyes. The agreement between Topcon KR-1W and Topolyzer, Topcon KR-1W and IOLMaster, iTrace and Topolyzer, iTrace and IOLMaster, Topcon KR-1W and iTrace were not

  16. Speckle-interferometric measurement system of 3D deformation to obtain thickness changes of thin specimen under tensile loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowarsch, Robert; Zhang, Jiajun; Sguazzo, Carmen; Hartmann, Stefan; Rembe, Christian

    2017-06-01

    The analysis of materials and geometries in tensile tests and the extraction of mechanic parameters is an important field in solid mechanics. Especially the measurement of thickness changes is important to obtain accurate strain information of specimens under tensile loads. Current optical measurement methods comprising 3D digital image correlation enable thickness-change measurement only with nm-resolution. We present a phase-shifting electronic speckle-pattern interferometer in combination with speckle-correlation technique to measure the 3D deformation. The phase-shift for the interferometer is introduced by fast wavelength tuning of a visible diode laser by injection current. In a post-processing step, both measurements can be combined to reconstruct the 3D deformation. In this contribution, results of a 3Ddeformation measurement for a polymer membrane are presented. These measurements show sufficient resolution for the detection of 3D deformations of thin specimen in tensile test. In future work we address the thickness changes of thin specimen under tensile loads.

  17. Measurements using orthodontic analysis software on digital models obtained by 3D scans of plaster casts : Intrarater reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnota, Judith; Hey, Jeremias; Fuhrmann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the reliability and validity of measurements performed on digital models with a desktop scanner and analysis software in comparison with measurements performed manually on conventional plaster casts. A total of 20 pairs of plaster casts reflecting the intraoral conditions of 20 fully dentate individuals were digitized using a three-dimensional scanner (D700; 3Shape). A series of defined parameters were measured both on the resultant digital models with analysis software (Ortho Analyzer; 3Shape) and on the original plaster casts with a digital caliper (Digimatic CD-15DCX; Mitutoyo). Both measurement series were repeated twice and analyzed for intrarater reliability based on intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). The results from the digital models were evaluated for their validity against the casts by calculating mean-value differences and associated 95 % limits of agreement (Bland-Altman method). Statistically significant differences were identified via a paired t test. Significant differences were obtained for 16 of 24 tooth-width measurements, for 2 of 5 sites of contact-point displacement in the mandibular anterior segment, for overbite, for maxillary intermolar distance, for Little's irregularity index, and for the summation indices of maxillary and mandibular incisor width. Overall, however, both the mean differences between the results obtained on the digital models versus on the plaster casts and the dispersion ranges associated with these differences suggest that the deviations incurred by the digital measuring technique are not clinically significant. Digital models are adequately reproducible and valid to be employed for routine measurements in orthodontic practice.

  18. Spatial variability of soil water conductivities obtained with classical laboratory methods and their relation to electrical resistivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dathe, Annette; Nemes, Attila; Bloem, Esther; Patterson, Matthew; Giménez, Daniel; Szõcs, Júlia; Koestel, Johannes; Jarvis, Nicholas

    2017-04-01

    Soil water conductivity plays a critical role when estimating water transport using the Richard's equation. Modelers often take one value of the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) per soil layer and that value is decreased for unsaturated conditions following the equations of Mualem and van Genuchten. This approach can lead to inconsistencies between model and natural soil, because in the field Ksat can vary by several orders of magnitude on short (centimeter) distances and Ksat often expresses water movement through macropores which cannot be downscaled without caution towards matrix flux. To improve existing knowledge we established a field experiment on an agriculturally used silty clay loam (Stagnosol) in SE Norway. More than 100 undisturbed soil samples were taken to determine soil water retention, saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities and bulk density in the laboratory. A subset of these samples was scanned at the computer tomography facility at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences in Uppsala with special emphasis on characterizing macroporosity. Centimeter to decimeter scale heterogeneities were investigated in the field by using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a quasi-3D and a real 3D approach. The latter covered the soil volume of 2x1x1 m where the soil samples were taken. We will present comparisons between hydraulic conductivities obtained in the laboratory using different methods, and between laboratory hydraulic conductivity results and electrical resistivities obtained in the field.

  19. On a low intensity 241Am Compton spectrometer for measurement of electron momentum density

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B L Ahuja; N L Heda

    2007-05-01

    In this paper, a new design and construction of a low intensity (100 mCi) 241Am -ray Compton spectrometer is presented. The planar spectrometer is based on a small disc source with the shortest geometry. Measurement of the momentum density of polycrystalline Al is used to evaluate the performance of the new design. The measured profile is in good agreement with the existing theoretical data and our density functional calculations.

  20. Density measurement of thin layers by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jürgen; Ramm, Jürgen; Gemming, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    A method to measure the density of thin layers is presented which utilizes electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques within a transmission electron microscope. The method is based on the acquisition of energy filtered images in the low loss region as well as of an element distribution map using core loss edges. After correction of multiple inelastic scattering effects, the intensity of the element distribution map is proportional to density and thickness. The dependence of the intensities of images with low energy loss electrons on the density is different from that. This difference allows the calculation of the relative density pixel by pixel and to determine lateral density gradients or fluctuations in thin films without relying on a constant specimen thickness. The method is demonstrated at thin carbon layers produced with density gradients.

  1. Measurement of lung density in congestive heart failure by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Masanori; Miyagi, Yutaka; Tachi, Keiji; Sakabe, Yoshiyuki; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Hishida, Hitoshi; Mizuno, Yasushi; Sasaki, Fumio; Koga, Sukehiko (Fujita-Gakuen Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan))

    1984-11-01

    The computed tomography (CT) number within the region of interest (ROI) was used as a parameter to assess lung density in patients with congestive heart failure. Thirty-eight patients with valvular heart disease (VHD) and 34 patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) were studied. Based on the New York Heart Association (NYHA) classification, 24 VHD patients were in class I or II (VHD I-II) and the other 14 were in NYHA class III or IV (VHD III-IV). Eighteen patients with IHD were in NYHA class I or II (IHD I-II) and 16 were in class III or IV (IHD III-IV). The CT number was measured bilaterally at the upper, middle and lower levels of the chest and compared with the corresponding value in 21 normal subjects (Group N). In a preliminary study on Group N, the CT numbers were insensitive to the size of the ROI, but were closely related to its location. In clinical applications, the mean values of the CT numbers in all six lung fields increased in the order of IHD I-II, to VHD I-II, IHD III-IV and VHD III-IV. Except for patients in IHD I-II, they were significantly larger than in Group N. The relationship between the CT number and the systolic and mean pulmonary arterial pressures and the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure were evaluated in 36 patients. Significant correlations were obtained in all six lung fields (r=0.65-0.78, p < 0.001). The results suggest that measurement of lung density by CT is useful for the quantitative evaluation of the severity of disease in patients with congestive heart failure.

  2. Brief communication: Improved measurement of ice layer density in seasonal snowpacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Tom; Rutter, Nick; Toose, Peter; Derksen, Chris; Sandells, Melody; Woodward, John

    2016-09-01

    The microstructure and density of ice layers in snowpacks is poorly quantified. Here we present a new field method for measuring the density of ice layers caused by melt or rain-on-snow events. The method was used on 87 ice layer samples taken from natural and artificial ice layers in the Canadian Arctic and mid-latitudes. Mean measured ice layer density was 909 ± 28 kg m-3 with a standard deviation of 23 kg m-3, significantly higher than values typically used in the literature.

  3. Imaging polychromator for density measurements of polystyrene pellet cloud on the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharov, I. A., E-mail: i.sharov@spbstu.ru; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Miroshnikov, I. V. [Saint-Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tamura, N.; Sudo, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Kuteev, B. V. [Russian Scientific Centre Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-15

    Experimental data on spatial distributions of a pellet cloud electron density are necessary for the development of many applications of pellet injection, namely, plasma fuelling, discharge control, and plasma diagnostics. An improved approach of electron density measurements inside the cloud of a polystyrene pellet ablating in hot plasma of the large helical device is described. Density values of (1-30) × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} depending on the background plasma parameters and distance from the solid pellet were measured.

  4. Measuring the mass, density, and size of particles and cells using a suspended microchannel resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Michel; Bryan, Andrea K.; Burg, Thomas P.; Babcock, Ken; Manalis, Scott R.

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of mass, density, and size of cells and nanoparticles using suspended microchannel resonators. The masses of individual particles are quantified as transient frequency shifts, while the particles transit a microfluidic channel embedded in the resonating cantilever. Mass histograms resulting from these data reveal the distribution of a population of heterogeneously sized particles. Particle density is inferred from measurements made in different carrier fluids since the frequency shift for a particle is proportional to the mass difference relative to the displaced solution. We have characterized the density of polystyrene particles, Escherichia coli, and human red blood cells with a resolution down to 10-4g/cm3.

  5. Density Fluctuation Measurements Using FIR Interferometer on HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yan; PENG Bei-Bin; YANG Qing-wei; DUAN Xu-Ru; DING Xuan-Tong; LI Lian-Cai; LI Yong-Gao; JIAO Yi-Ming; DENG Zhong-Chao; YI Jiang; LIU Yi; ZHAO Kai-Jun; JI Xiao-Quan

    2008-01-01

    Denity fluctuations were first measured in the core region of HL-2A tokamak plasma using a newly developed multi-channel FIR interferometer system. In divertor ohmic discharges, we measured the radial density fluctuation levels of 5%, which increase to 10-20% during the appearance of MHD activity. Most of the power density in the density fluctuation spectrum is directly associated with m=2 tearing modes. The fluctuation levels reduce to 1/3 and plasma confinement is improved during off-axis electron-cyclotron-resonance heating (ECRH).Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 10575030 and 10675043.

  6. Does the prediction of breast cancer improve using a combination of mammographic density measures compared to individual measures alone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Sik Hee, Joseph Ryan; Harkness, Elaine F.; Gadde, Soujanya; Lim, Yit Y.; Maxwell, Anthony J.; Evans, D. Gareth; Howell, Anthony; Astley, Susan M.

    2017-03-01

    High mammographic density is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, however whether the association is stronger when there is agreement across measures is unclear. This study investigates whether a combination of density measures is a better predictor of breast cancer risk than individual methods alone. Women recruited to the Predicting Risk of Cancer At Screening (PROCAS) study and with mammographic density assessed using three different methods were included (n=33,304). Density was assessed visually using Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) and by two fully automated methods, Quantra and Volpara. Percentage breast density was divided into (high, medium and low) and combinations of measures were used to further categorise individuals (e.g. `all high'). A total of 667 breast cancers were identified and logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between breast density and breast cancer risk. In total, 44% of individuals were in the same tertile for all three measures, 8.6% were in non-adjacent (high and low) or mixed categories (high, medium and low). For individual methods the strongest association with breast cancer risk was for medium and high tertiles of VAS with odds ratios (OR) adjusted for age and BMI of 1.63 (95% CI 1.31-2.03) and 2.33 (1.87-2.90) respectively. For the combination of density methods the strongest association was for `all high' (OR 2.42, 1.77-3.31) followed by "two high" (OR 1.90, 1.35-3.31) and "two medium" (OR 1.88, 1.40-2.52). Combining density measures did not affect the magnitude of risk compared to using individual methods.

  7. An evaluation of International Reference Ionosphere electron density in the polar cap and cusp using EISCAT Svalbard radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merete Bjoland, Lindis; Belyey, Vasyl; Løvhaug, Unni Pia; La Hoz, Cesar

    2016-09-01

    Incoherent scatter radar measurements are an important source for studies of ionospheric plasma parameters. In this paper the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) long-term database is used to evaluate the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model. The ESR started operations in 1996, and the accumulated database up to 2012 thus covers 16 years, giving an overview of the ionosphere in the polar cap and cusp during more than one solar cycle. Data from ESR can be used to obtain information about primary plasma parameters: electron density, electron and ion temperature, and line-of-sight plasma velocity from an altitude of about 50 and up to 1600 km. Monthly averages of electron density and temperature and ion temperature and composition are also provided by the IRI model from an altitude of 50 to 2000 km. We have compared electron density data obtained from the ESR with the predicted electron density from the IRI-2016 model. Our results show that the IRI model in general fits the ESR data well around the F2 peak height. However, the model seems to underestimate the electron density at lower altitudes, particularly during winter months. During solar minimum the model is also less accurate at higher altitudes. The purpose of this study is to validate the IRI model at polar latitudes.

  8. Body-density measurement in children: the BOD POD versus Hydrodensitometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jason C; Gibson, Ann L; Cremades, J Gualberto; Mier, Constance M

    2011-06-01

    To compare estimates of body density (Db) from air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) with measured and predicted thoracic-gas-volume (TGV) measurements and those from hydrodensitometry (HD) in children. Seventeen participants (13 male and 4 female; 10.1 ± 2.20 yr, 42.0 ± 15.03 kg, 145.6 ± 17.41 cm, 30.0 ± 8.66 kg/m²) were tested using ADP and HD, with ADP always preceding HD. Db estimates were compared between ADP with measured TGV, ADP with predicted TGV, and the reference measure, HD. Regression analyses were used to assess the accuracy of the ADP methods, and potential bias between the ADP procedures and HD were evaluated using Bland-Altman analyses. The cross-validation criteria described by Lohman for estimating Db relative to HD were used to interpret the results of the study. A significant difference was found between Db estimates from ADP with measured TGV (1.0453 ± 0.01934 g/cm³) and ADP with predicted TGV (1.0415 ± 0.01858 g/cm³); however, neither was significantly different from Db obtained by the reference HD procedure (1.0417 ± 0.02391 g/cm³). For both ADP procedures, regression analyses produced an r = .737-.738, r² = .543-.544, and SEE = 0.02 g/cm³, and the regression lines deviated significantly from the line of identity; however, no significant biases were indicated. Despite no significant mean differences between Db estimates from the ADP procedures and HD, more cross-validation research is needed before recommending the BOD POD for routine use with children in clinical and research settings.

  9. Multichannel Microwave Interferometer for Simultaneous Measurement of Electron Density and its Fluctuation on HL-2A Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peiwan; Shi, Zhongbing; Chen, Wei; Zhong, Wulyu; Yang, Zengchen; Jiang, Min; Zhang, Boyu; Li, Yonggao; Yu, Liming; Liu, Zetian; Ding, Xuantong

    2016-07-01

    A multichannel microwave interferometer system has been developed on the HL-2A tokomak. Its working frequency is well designed to avoid the fringe jump effect. Taking the structure of HL-2A into account, its antennas are installed in the horizontal direction, i.e. one launcher in high field side (HFS) and four receivers in low field side (LFS). The fan-shaped measurement area covers those regions where the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities are active. The heterodyne technique contributes to its high temporal resolution (1 μs). It is possible for the multichannel system to realize simultaneous measurements of density and its fluctuation. The quadrature phase detection based on the zero-crossing method is introduced to density measurement. With this system, reliable line-averaged densities and density profiles are obtained. The location of the saturated internal kink mode can be figured out from the mode showing different intensities on four channels, and the result agrees well with that measured by electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI). supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB104002, 2013GB107002, 2014GB107001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475058, 11475057, 11261140326, 11405049)

  10. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    CERN Document Server

    Öz, E; Muggli, P

    2016-01-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE)~\\cite{bib:awake} project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook~\\cite{bib:Hook} method and has been described in great detail in the work by W. Tendell Hill et. al.~\\cite{bib:densitymeter}. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of $1\\%$ for the vapor density-length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach-Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prot...

  11. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, E.; Batsch, F.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE) (Assmann et al., 2014 [1]) project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook (Marlow, 1967 [2]) method and has been described in great detail in the work by Hill et al. (1986) [3]. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of 1% for the vapor density-length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach-Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prototype 8 cm long novel Rb vapor cell.

  12. Microsecond resolved electron density measurements with a hairpin resonator probe in a pulsed ICP discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, David; Larson, Lynda; Shannon, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Time resolved electron density measurements in pulsed RF discharges are shown using a hairpin resonance probe using low cost electronics, on par with normal Langmuir probe boxcar mode operation. Time resolution of less than one microsecond has been demonstrated. A signal generator produces the applied microwave frequency; the reflected waveform is passed through a directional coupler and filtered to remove the RF component. The signal is heterodyned with a frequency mixer and read by an oscilloscope. At certain points during the pulse, the plasma density is such that the applied frequency is the same as the resonance frequency of the probe/plasma system, creating a dip in the reflected signal. The applied microwave frequency is shifted in small increments in a frequency boxcar routine to determine the density as a function of time. The system uses a grounded probe to produce low cost, high fidelity, and highly reproducible electron density measurements that can work in harsh chemical environments. Measurement...

  13. Principles for microwave moisture and density measurement in grain and seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Stuart O; Trabelsi, Samir

    2004-01-01

    The importance of cereal grain moisture content in determining time of harvest and in preserving grain quality is described. Techniques for moisture measurement, including electronic moisture meters, are also discussed briefly, and the need for better moisture sensing techniques for modern agricultural on-line moisture monitoring is described. Principles of microwave free-space measurements involving attenuation and phase-shift determination are explained, and density-independent functions of the grain permittivity are presented that permit reliable moisture sensing applicable to moving grain in which bulk density variation occurs. Three different approaches are discussed for determining moisture content and bulk density of grain from microwave measurement of the dielectric properties. A new moisture calibration function, based on complex-plane plots of dielectric constant and loss factor, each divided by bulk density, is described, which promises a universal calibration for different types of grain and seed. This important advantage should encourage commercial development for practical use.

  14. Summer sudden Na number density enhancements measured with the ALOMAR Weber Na Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Heinrich

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We present summer Na-densities and atmospheric temperatures measured 80 to 110 km above the Arctic Lidar Observatory for Middle Atmosphere Research (ALOMAR. The Weber Na Lidar is part of ALOMAR, located at 69° N in Norway, 150 km north of the Arctic Circle. The sun does not set here during the summer months, and measurements require a narrowband Faraday Anomalous Dispersion Optical Filter (FADOF.

    We discuss an observed sudden enhancement in the Na number density around 22:00 UT on 1 to 2 June 2006. We compare this observation with previous summer measurements and find a frequent appearance of Na number density enhancements near local midnight. We describe the time of appearance, the altitude distribution, the duration and the strength of these enhancements and compare them to winter observations. We investigate possible formation mechanisms and, as others before, we find a strong link between these Na number density enhancements and sporadic E layers.

  15. Design of Q-band FMCW reflectometry for electron density profile measurement on the Joint TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linghan, Wan; Zhoujun, Yang; Ruobing, Zhou; Xiaoming, Pan; Chi, Zhang; Xianli, Xie; Bowen, Ruan

    2017-02-01

    The Q-band (33-50 GHz) fast sweep frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) reflectometry has been recently developed for electron density profile measurement on the Joint TEXT tokamak. It operates in ordinary mode (O-mode) with a 20 μs sweeping period, covering the density range from 1 × 1019 m-3 to 3 × 1019 m-3. On the bench test, a Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) filter is used for the dynamic calibration of the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) to obtain a linear frequency sweep. Besides, the use of a power combiner helps to improve the side-band suppression level of the single side-band modulator (SSBM). The reconstructed density profiles are presented, which demonstrate the capability of the reflectometry.

  16. Special performance measurements of a {open_quotes}high-tube-density{close_quotes} condenser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoglie, C.; Novak, W.; Kreidler, T.; Arnal, M. [ABB Power Generation, Ltd., Baden (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Performance measurements of a High-Tube-Density (HTD) Condenser have been made and evaluated. The condenser is an example of the ABB modular tube-bundle design and is derived from the established, high-performance ABB CM Condenser. It is a two-pass condenser designed for situations where space limitations make it necessary to have horizontally divided waterboxes. It is further characterized by its compactness which is a result in part, of the high tubesheet drill-out coefficient. As a part of continuing development work it was of particular interest to determine the performance characteristics of the condenser while in normal operation. Tests at seven different electrical loads were carried out for a load range of 65% to 98%. The experimental data show very good agreement with design values. Measured values of the cooling water pressure loss and overall heat transfer coefficient were superior to design values. Very satisfactory results for condensate subcooling and O{sub 2} concentration were also obtained. A vacuum drop test demonstrated that the condenser is well sealed and that the venting system capability is sufficient. 6 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Remote measurement of water color in coastal waters. [spectral radiance data used to obtain quantitative values for chlorophyll and turbidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to develop procedure to obtain quantitative values for chlorophyll and turbidity in coastal waters by observing the changes in spectral radiance of the backscattered spectrum. The technique under consideration consists of Examining Exotech model 20-D spectral radiometer data and determining which radiance ratios best correlated with chlorophyll and turbidity measurements as obtained from analyses of water samples and sechi visibility readings. Preliminary results indicate that there is a correlation between backscattered light and chlorophyll concentration and secchi visibility. The tests were conducted with the spectrometer mounted in a light aircraft over the Mississippi Sound at altitudes of 2.5K, 2.8K and 10K feet.

  18. Moment-independent importance measure of basic random variable and its probability density evolution solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the effect of basic variable on failure probability in reliability analysis,a moment-independent importance measure of the basic random variable is proposed,and its properties are analyzed and verified.Based on this work,the importance measure of the basic variable on the failure probability is compared with that on the distribution density of the response.By use of the probability density evolution method,a solution is established to solve two importance measures,which can efficiently avoid the difficulty in solving the importance measures.Some numerical examples and engineering examples are used to demonstrate the proposed importance measure on the failure probability and that on the distribution density of the response.The results show that the proposed importance measure can effectively describe the effect of the basic variable on the failure probability from the distribution density of the basic variable.Additionally,the results show that the established solution on the probability density evolution is efficient for the importance measures.

  19. Retrieval of tropospheric column densities of NO2 from combined SCIAMACHY nadir/limb measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The SCIAMACHY instrument onboard the ESA satellite ENVISAT allows the retrieval of column densities of various trace gases, among them NO2. As only instrument of its kind, SCIAMACHY measures in an alternating limb/nadir mode. The limb measurements allow a direct determination of stratospheric column densities, which are needed to extract tropospheric from the total column density measurements performed in (quasi simultaneous nadir geometry. Here we discuss the potential and limitations of SCIAMACHY limb measurements for estimating stratospheric column densities of NO2 in comparison to a simple reference sector method, and the consequences for the resulting tropospheric column densities. A direct, absolute limb correction scheme improves spatial patterns of tropospheric NO2 column densities at high latitudes compared to the simple reference sector method. However, it results in artificial zonal stripes at low latitudes. Thus, also a relative limb correction scheme was defined, which turned out to successfully reduce stratospheric artefacts in the resulting tropospheric data product without introducing new ones. This relative limb correction scheme is rather simple, robust, and, in essence, based on measurements alone. The effect of the different stratospheric estimation schemes on tropospheric column densities is discussed with respect to zonal and temporal dependencies. In addition, error quantities are defined from the nadir/limb measurements which indicate remaining systematic errors as function of latitude and day. Our new suggested stratospheric estimation scheme, the relative limb correction, improves monthly mean tropospheric slant column densities significantly, e.g. from −1×1015 molec/cm2 (using a simple reference sector method to ≈0 in the Atlantic ocean, and from +1×1015 molec/cm2 to ≈0 over Siberia, at 50° N in January.

  20. Performance potential of low-defect density silicon thin-film solar cells obtained by electron beam evaporation and laser crystallisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim K. H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A few microns thick silicon films on glass coated with a dielectric intermediate layer can be crystallised by a single pass of a line-focused diode laser beam. Under favorable process conditions relatively large linear grains with low defect density are formed. Most grain boundaries are defect-free low-energy twin-boundaries. Boron-doped laser crystallised films are processed into solar cells by diffusing an emitter from a phosphorous spin-on-dopant source, measuring up to 539 mV open-circuit voltage prior to metallisation. After applying a point-contact metallisation the best cell achieves 7.8% energy conversion efficiency, open-circuit voltage of 526 mV and short-circuit current of 26 mA/cm2. The efficiency is significantly limited by a low fill-factor of 56% due to the simplified metallisation approach. The internal quantum efficiency of laser crystallised cells is consistent with low front surface recombination. By improving cell metallisation and enhancing light-trapping the efficiencies of above 13% can be achieved.

  1. Evaluation of the Pavement Quality Indicator (PQI for the on-site density measurement of asphalt emulsion mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Echevarría, M. J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Pavement Quality Indicator (PQI is a non-nuclear gauge used for the on-site density measurement of asphalt pavements without the need to extract core samples. Previous studies of hot asphalt mixes found that PQI density readings were very similar to laboratory density measurements of pavement cores. This paper describes the first stage of a research project whose objective is to analyze PQI density measurements of mixes manufactured with an asphalt emulsion binder. The PQI density variability for such mixes was verified and compared with the results obtained with other on-site methods for measuring pavement density.

    El equipo Pavement Quality Indicator es un dispositivo para la determinación de densidad in situ en pavimentos asfálticos sin extracción de testigos. Las experiencias con este equipo en mezclas bituminosas en caliente, recogidas en diferentes fuentes bibliográficas, muestran que las densidades medidas in situ con el PQI son muy similares a las obtenidas mediante la extracción de testigos. En este artículo se expone la primera etapa de un proyecto de investigación que tiene por objeto analizar los resultados de mediciones efectuadas con PQI en mezclas bituminosas donde se utiliza emulsión asfáltica como ligante. Se comprueba la variabilidad de la densidad obtenida con el equipo para este tipo de mezclas, y se comparan los resultados con otros métodos de medida de densidad in situ.

  2. Bayesian Semiparametric Density Deconvolution in the Presence of Conditionally Heteroscedastic Measurement Errors

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Abhra

    2014-10-02

    We consider the problem of estimating the density of a random variable when precise measurements on the variable are not available, but replicated proxies contaminated with measurement error are available for sufficiently many subjects. Under the assumption of additive measurement errors this reduces to a problem of deconvolution of densities. Deconvolution methods often make restrictive and unrealistic assumptions about the density of interest and the distribution of measurement errors, e.g., normality and homoscedasticity and thus independence from the variable of interest. This article relaxes these assumptions and introduces novel Bayesian semiparametric methodology based on Dirichlet process mixture models for robust deconvolution of densities in the presence of conditionally heteroscedastic measurement errors. In particular, the models can adapt to asymmetry, heavy tails and multimodality. In simulation experiments, we show that our methods vastly outperform a recent Bayesian approach based on estimating the densities via mixtures of splines. We apply our methods to data from nutritional epidemiology. Even in the special case when the measurement errors are homoscedastic, our methodology is novel and dominates other methods that have been proposed previously. Additional simulation results, instructions on getting access to the data set and R programs implementing our methods are included as part of online supplemental materials.

  3. A molecular Rayleigh scattering setup to measure density fluctuations in thermal boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.

    2016-12-01

    A Rayleigh scattering-based density fluctuation measurement system was set up inside a low-speed wind tunnel of NASA Ames Research Center. The immediate goal was to study the thermal boundary layer on a heated flat plate. A large number of obstacles had to be overcome to set up the system, such as the removal of dust particles using air filters, the use of photoelectron counting electronics to measure low intensity light, an optical layout to minimize stray light contamination, the reduction in tunnel vibration, and an expanded calibration process to relate photoelectron arrival rate to air density close to the plate surface. To measure spectra of turbulent density fluctuations, a two-PMT cross-correlation system was used to minimize the shot noise floor. To validate the Rayleigh measurements, temperature fluctuations spectra were calculated from density spectra and then compared with temperature spectra measured with a cold-wire probe operated in constant current mode. The spectra from the downstream half of the plate were found to be in good agreement with cold-wire probe, whereas spectra from the leading edge differed. Various lessons learnt are discussed. It is believed that the present effort is the first measurement of density fluctuations spectra in a boundary layer flow.

  4. Evaluating outer segment length as a surrogate measure of peak foveal cone density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Melissa A; Wilk, Brandon M; Langlo, Christopher S; Cooper, Robert F; Carroll, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) imaging tools enable direct visualization of the cone photoreceptor mosaic, which facilitates quantitative measurements such as cone density. However, in many individuals, low image quality or excessive eye movements precludes making such measures. As foveal cone specialization is associated with both increased density and outer segment (OS) elongation, we sought to examine whether OS length could be used as a surrogate measure of foveal cone density. The retinas of 43 subjects (23 normal and 20 albinism; aged 6-67years) were examined. Peak foveal cone density was measured using confocal adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), and OS length was measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and longitudinal reflectivity profile-based approach. Peak cone density ranged from 29,200 to 214,000cones/mm(2) (111,700±46,300cones/mm(2)); OS length ranged from 26.3 to 54.5μm (40.5±7.7μm). Density was significantly correlated with OS length in albinism (pdensity as a function of OS length was created based on histology and optimized to fit the albinism data. The model includes triangular cone packing, a cylindrical OS with a fixed volume of 136.6μm(3), and a ratio of OS to inner segment width that increased linearly with increasing OS length (R(2)=0.72). Normal subjects showed no apparent relationship between cone density and OS length. In the absence of adequate AOSLO imagery, OS length may be used to estimate cone density in patients with albinism. Whether this relationship exists in other patient populations with foveal hypoplasia (e.g., premature birth, aniridia, isolated foveal hypoplasia) remains to be seen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Separate measurement of the density and viscosity of a liquid using a quartz crystal microbalance based on admittance analysis (QCM-A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Atsushi; Ichihashi, Motoko

    2011-01-01

    We previously used a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to identify a frequency f2 that allows measurement of the mass load without being affected by the viscous load of a liquid in the liquid phase. Here, we determined that frequency in order to separately measure the density and viscosity of a Newtonian liquid. Martin et al separately measured the density and viscosity of a liquid by immersing two quartz resonators, i.e. a smooth-surface resonator and a textured-surface resonator, in the liquid. We used a QCM based on admittance analysis (QCM-A) in the current study to separately measure the viscosity and density of a liquid using only a textured-surface resonator. In the current experiments, we measured the density and viscosity of 500 µl of 10%, 30%, and 50% aqueous glycerol solutions and compared the measured values to reference values. The density obtained had an error of ±1.5% of reference values and the viscosity had an error of about ±5% of reference values. Similar results were obtained with 500 µl of 10%, 30%, and 50% ethanol solutions. Measurement was possible with a quartz resonator, so measurements were made with even smaller samples. The density and viscosity of a liquid were successfully determined with an extremely small amount of liquid, i.e. 10 µl, with almost the same precision as when using 500 µl of the liquid.

  6. Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities at surface monitoring sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Matsumi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities were developed in two independent systems: one utilizing a grating-based desktop optical spectrum analyzer (OSA with a resolution enough to resolve rotational lines of CO2 and CH4 in the region of 1565–1585 and 1674–1682 nm, respectively; the other is an application of an optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI to the CO2 column density. Direct sunlight was collimated via a small telescope installed on a portable sun tracker and then transmitted through an optical fiber into the OSA or the FFPI for optical analysis. The near infrared spectra of the OSA were retrieved by a least squares spectral fitting algorithm. The CO2 and CH4 column densities deduced were in excellent agreement with those measured by a Fourier transform spectrometer with high resolution. The rovibronic lines in the wavelength region of 1570–1575 nm were analyzed by the FFPI. The I0 and I values in the Beer-Lambert law equation to obtain CO2 column density were deduced by modulating temperature of the FFPI, which offered column CO2 with the statistical error less than 0.2% for six hours measurement.

  7. The effects of iterative reconstruction and kernel selection on quantitative computed tomography measures of lung density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Alfonso; Ranallo, Frank N; Judy, Philip F; Fain, Sean B

    2017-06-01

    To determine the effects of iterative reconstruction (IR) and high-frequency kernels on quantitative computed tomography (qCT) density measures at reduced X-ray dose. The COPDGene 2 Phantom (CTP 698, The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) with four embedded lung mimicking foam densities (12lb, 20lb, and 4lb), as well as water, air, and acrylic reference inserts, was imaged using a GE 64 slice CT750 HD scanner in helical mode with four current-time products ranging from 12 to 100 mAs. The raw acquired data were reconstructed using standard (STD - low frequency) and Bone (high frequency) kernels with filtered back projection (FBP), 100% ASiR, and Veo reconstruction algorithms. The reference density inserts were manually segmented using Slicer3D (www.slicer.org), and the mean, standard deviation, and histograms of the segmented regions were generated using Fiji (http://fiji.sc/Fiji) for each reconstruction. Measurements of threshold values placed on the cumulative frequency distribution of voxels determined by these measured histograms at 5%, PD5phant , and 15%, PD15phant , (analogous to the relative area below -950 HU (RA-950) and percent density 15 (PD15) in human lung emphysema quantification, respectively), were also performed. The use of high-resolution kernels in conjunction with ASiR and Veo did not significantly affect the mean Hounsfield units (HU) of each of the density standards (density regions. The density histogram became more sharply peaked, and standard deviation was reduced for IR, directly effecting density thresholds, PD5phant and PD15phant, placed on the cumulative frequency distribution of each region in the phantom, which serve as analogs to RA-950 and PD15 typically used in lung density quantitation. The combination of high-frequency kernels (Bone) with ASiR mitigates this effect and preserves density measures derived from the image histogram. Moreover, previous studies have shown improved accuracy of qCT airway measures of wall thickness (WT) and

  8. Density-independent algorithm for sensing moisture content of sawdust based on reflection measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    A density-independent algorithm for moisture content determination in sawdust, based on a one-port reflection measurement technique is proposed for the first time. Performance of this algorithm is demonstrated through measurement of the dielectric properties of sawdust with an open-ended haft-mode s...

  9. Particle image velocimetry measurements and numerical modeling of a saline density current

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gerber, G

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Particle image velocimetry scalar measurements were carried out on the body of a stably stratified density current with an inlet Reynolds number of 2,300 and bulk Richardson number of 0.1. These measurements allowed the mass and momentum transport...

  10. Measuring the orbital angular momentum density for a superposition of Bessel beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To measure the Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) density of superposition fields two steps are needed: generation and measurement. An azimuthally-varying phase (bounded by a ring-slit) placed in the spatial frequency domain produces a higher...

  11. Density measurements under pressure for the binary system (ethanol plus methylcyclohexane)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Lugo, L.; Fernandez, J.

    2005-01-01

    The density of the asymmetrical binary system composed of ethanol and methylcyclohexane has been measured under pressure using a vibrating tube densimeter. The measurements have been performed for eight different compositions as well as the pure compounds at eight temperatures in the range 283.15...

  12. Reaching Higher Densities for Laboratory White Dwarf Photospheres to Measure Spectroscopic Line Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Falcon, Ross E; Gomez, T A; Schaeuble, M; Nagayama, T; Montgomery, M H; Winget, D E; Rochau, G A

    2016-01-01

    As part of our laboratory investigation of the theoretical line profiles used in white dwarf atmosphere models, we extend the electron-density ($n_{\\rm e}$) range measured by our experiments to higher densities (up to $n_{e}\\sim80\\times10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$). Whereas inferred parameters using the hydrogen-$\\beta$ spectral line agree among different line-shape models for $n_{\\rm e}\\lesssim30\\times10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$, we now see divergence between models. These are densities beyond the range previously benchmarked in the laboratory, meaning theoretical profiles in this regime have not been fully validated. Experimentally exploring these higher densities enables us to test and constrain different line-profile models, as the differences in their relative H-Balmer line shapes are more pronounced at such conditions. These experiments also aid in our study of occupation probabilities because we can measure these from relative line strengths.

  13. Reconstruction of the ionospheric 3D electron density distribution by assimilation of ionosonde measurements and operational TEC estimations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzen, Tatjana; Wilken, Volker; Jakowski, Norbert; Hoque, Mainul M.

    2013-04-01

    New methods to generate maps of the F2 layer peak electron density of the ionosphere (NmF2) and to reconstruct the ionospheric 3D electron density distribution will be presented. For validation, reconstructed NmF2 maps will be compared with peak electron density measurements from independent ionosonde stations. The ionosphere is the ionized part of the upper Earth's atmosphere lying between about 50 km and 1000 km above the Earth's surface. From the applications perspective the electron density, Ne, is certainly one of the most important parameters of the ionosphere because of its strong impact on radio signal propagation. Especially the critical frequency, foF2, which is related to the F2 layer peak electron density, NmF2, according to the equation NmF2-m3 = 1.24 ? 1010(foF2-MHz)2 and builds the lower limit for the maximum usable frequency MUF, is of particular interest with regard to the HF radio communication applications. In a first order approximation the ionospheric delay of transionospheric radio waves of frequency f is proportional to 1-f2 and to the integral of the electron density (total electron content - TEC) along the ray path. Thus, the information about the total electron content along the receiver-to-satellite ray path can be obtained from the dual frequency measurements permanently transmitted by GNSS satellites. As data base for our reconstruction approaches we use the vertical sounding measurements of the ionosonde stations providing foF2 and routinely generated TEC maps in SWACI (http://swaciweb.dlr.de) at DLR Neustrelitz. The basic concept of our approach is the following one: To reconstruct NmF2 maps we assimilate the ionosonde data into the global Neustrelitz F2 layer Peak electron Density Model (NPDM) by means of a successive corrections method. The TEC maps are produced by assimilating actual ground based GPS measurements providing TEC into an operational version of Neustrelitz TEC Model (NTCM). Finally, the derived NmF2 and TEC maps in

  14. Viscosity and Liquid Density of Asymmetric n-Alkane Mixtures: Measurement and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queimada, António J.; Marrucho, Isabel M.; Coutinho, João A.P.

    2005-01-01

    Viscosity and liquid density Measurements were performed, at atmospheric pressure. in pure and mixed n-decane. n-eicosane, n-docosane, and n-tetracosane from 293.15 K (or above the melting point) up to 343.15 K. The viscosity was determined with a rolling ball viscometer and liquid densities with...... of state and a corresponding states model recently proposed for surface tension, viscosity, vapor pressure, and liquid densities of the series of n-alkanes. Advantages and shortcoming of these models are discussed....

  15. Intensity ratio measurements for density sensitive lines of highly charged Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Safdar, E-mail: safdaruetian@gmail.com; Shimizu, Erina [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan); Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi [National Institute for Fusion Science (Japan); Yamamoto, Norimasa [Chubu University (Japan); Hara, Hirohisa; Watanabe, Tetsuya [The Graduate University of Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI) (Japan); Nakamura, Nobuyuki, E-mail: n-nakamu@ils.uec.ac.jp [Institute for Laser Science, The University of Electro-Communications (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Intensity ratio of density sensitive emission lines emitted from Fe ions in the extreme ultraviolet region is important for astrophysics applications. We report high-resolution intensity ratio measurements for Fe ions performed at Tokyo EBIT laboratory by employing a flat-field grazing incidence spectrometer. The experimental intensity ratios of Fe X and Fe XII are plotted as a function of electron density for different electron beam currents. The experimental results are compared with the predicted intensity ratios from the model calculations.

  16. Density Measurement of Liquid Ni-Ta Alloys by a Modified Sessile Drop Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Liang; XIAO Feng; TAO Zainan; Kusuhiro Mukai

    2005-01-01

    The density of liquid Ni-Ta alloys was measured by using a modified sessile drop method. It is found that the density of the liquid Ni-Ta alloys decreases with the increasing temperature, but increases with the increase of tantalum concentration in the alloys. The molar volume of liquid Ni-Ta binary alloys increases with the increase of temperature and tantalum concentration.

  17. Density measurements of potassium phosphate buffer from 4 to 45 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiel, John E; Hage, David S

    2005-01-30

    Potassium phosphate buffer is often used in methods such as equilibrium dialysis, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) for characterizing the binding of drugs and hormones with proteins or other ligands within the body. In these experiments, the buffer density is often approximated to be that of water and the concentrations of all reagents are assumed to be constant with temperature. However, some difference in density between phosphate buffer and water would be expected, and variations in this density could lead to significant changes in the concentrations of dissolved solutes with temperature. This, in turn, could affect the binding observed for a solute-ligand system in such a buffer. In this study, the densities of potassium phosphate buffers with concentrations up to 0.10M were measured at or near physiological pH for temperatures ranging from 4-45 degrees C. The general change in density versus temperature followed a quadratic equation, while the changes in density with concentration and pH followed a linear response. The results were used to formulate a general equation that could be used to calculate the density of potassium phosphate buffer at any pH, temperature, and concentration within the tested range. This equation and more specialized relationships developed in the temperature, concentration, and pH studies were found to give much greater accuracy in describing the density of these buffers versus a previous relationship developed for solutions containing only potassium dihydrogen phosphate.

  18. Glacial density and GIA in Alaska estimated from ICESat, GPS and GRACE measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shuanggen; Zhang, T. Y.; Zou, F.

    2017-01-01

    The density of glacial volume change in Alaska is a key factor in estimating the glacier mass loss from altimetry observations. However, the density of Alaskan glaciers has large uncertainty due to the lack of in situ measurements. In this paper, using the measurements of Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), Global Positioning System (GPS), and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) from 2003 to 2009, an optimal density of glacial volume change with 750 kg/m3 is estimated for the first time to fit the measurements. The glacier mass loss is -57.5 ± 6.5 Gt by converting the volumetric change from ICESat with the estimated density 750 kg/m3. Based on the empirical relation, the depth-density profiles are constructed, which show glacial density variation information with depths in Alaska. By separating the glacier mass loss from glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) effects in GPS uplift rates and GRACE total water storage trends, the GIA uplift rates are estimated in Alaska. The best fitting model consists of a 60 km elastic lithosphere and 110 km thick asthenosphere with a viscosity of 2.0 × 1019 Pa s over a two-layer mantle.

  19. The gas density measurement of one long distance supersonic molecular beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Han, J. F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Bai, L. X.; Zhou, J. X.

    2016-12-01

    The gas density of the supersonic molecular beam (SMB) is a crucial parameter for the fueling or diagnostic process in the tokamak experiments. Using the microphone, one improved method of gas density measurement is proposed, which can greatly improve the measurement capacity by about 3 orders of magnitude by studying the pulsed signal characteristic of the microphone when it is pushed by the SMB. The gas density of the SMB is measured within the axial range of 20-2000 mm, and the axial central density at 2000 mm is about 100 times less than that at 20 mm. It is also found that the radial density distribution follows the Gaussian function in both free expansion (where the SMB can expand freely without any influence from the vacuum chamber) and restricted expansion (where the expansion of the SMB is restricted inside the flight tube of the vacuum system). And the axial central density decreases with the axial distance, which follows the inverse square law in the free expansion, but it deviates from this law in the restricted expansion.

  20. Use of micro-photoluminescence as a contactless measure of the 2D electron density in a GaAs quantum well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamburov, D.; Baldwin, K. W.; West, K. W.; Lyon, S.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; Pinczuk, A.

    2017-06-01

    We compare micro-photoluminescence (μPL) as a measure of the electron density in a clean, two-dimensional (2D) system confined in a GaAs quantum well (QW) to the standard magneto-transport technique. Our study explores the PL shape evolution across a number of molecular beam epitaxy-grown samples with different QW widths and 2D electron densities and notes its correspondence with the density obtained in magneto-transport measurements on these samples. We also measure the 2D density in a top-gated quantum well sample using both PL and transport and find that the two techniques agree to within a few percent over a wide range of gate voltages. We find that the PL measurements are sensitive to gate-induced 2D density changes on the order of 109 electrons/cm2. The spatial resolution of the PL density measurement in our experiments is 40 μm, which is already substantially better than the millimeter-scale resolution now possible in spatial density mapping using magneto-transport. Our results establish that μPL can be used as a reliable high spatial resolution technique for future contactless measurements of density variations in a 2D electron system.

  1. VUV emission spectroscopy combined with H- density measurements in the ion source Prometheus I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleiferis, S.; Laulainen, J.; Svarnas, P.; Tarvainen, O.; Bacal, M.; Béchu, S.

    2017-08-01

    "Prometheus I" is a volume H- negative ion source, driven by a network of dipolar electron cyclotron resonance (ECR; 2.45 GHz) modules. The vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) emission spectrum of low-temperature hydrogen plasmas may be related to molecular and atomic processes involved directly or indirectly in the production of negative ions. In this work, VUV spectroscopy has been performed in the above source, Prometheus I, both in the ECR zones and the bulk (far from ECR zones and surfaces) plasma. The acquired VUV spectra are correlated with the negative ion densities, as measured by means of laser photodetachment, and the possible mechanisms of negative ion production are considered. The well-established H- formation process of dissociative attachment to vibrationally excited molecules is evaluated, while an additional production path (i.e. neutral resonant ionization) is tested due to the recently attracted interest. The obtained results indicate that for the source Prometheus I, the dominant formation process is dissociative attachment.

  2. Analysis of reliability metrics and quality enhancement measures in current density imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foomany, F H; Beheshti, M; Magtibay, K; Masse, S; Foltz, W; Sevaptsidis, E; Lai, P; Jaffray, D A; Krishnan, S; Nanthakumar, K; Umapathy, K

    2013-01-01

    Low frequency current density imaging (LFCDI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique which enables calculation of current pathways within the medium of study. The induced current produces a magnetic flux which presents itself in phase images obtained through MRI scanning. A class of LFCDI challenges arises from the subject rotation requirement, which calls for reliability analysis metrics and specific image registration techniques. In this study these challenges are formulated and in light of proposed discussions, the reliability analysis of calculation of current pathways in a designed phantom and a pig heart is presented. The current passed is measured with less than 5% error for phantom, using CDI method. It is shown that Gauss's law for magnetism can be treated as reliability metric in matching the images in two orientations. For the phantom and pig heart the usefulness of image registration for mitigation of rotation errors is demonstrated. The reliability metric provides a good representation of the degree of correspondence between images in two orientations for phantom and pig heart. In our CDI experiments this metric produced values of 95% and 26%, for phantom, and 88% and 75% for pig heart, for mismatch rotations of 0 and 20 degrees respectively.

  3. Characteristics of ionospheric plasma drifts as obtained from Doppler ionosonde measurements at magnetic equator over Indian sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samireddipalle, Sripathi; Banola, Sridhar; Singh, Ram

    2016-07-01

    We present equatorial plasma drifts over Tirunelveli (8.73°N, 77.70°E; Dip 0.5°N), an equatorial site over Indian region using Doppler interferometry technique of Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI) system. In the Doppler interferometry technique, it is possible to infer three dimensional bulk motion of the scatterers as reflected from the ionosphere at selected frequencies using spaced receivers arranged in mag. east-west, north-south directions. Spectral phases and amplitudes are calculated using FFT to identify the Doppler frequencies and their drifts. This technique produces reliable drifts when sharp refractive index gradients exists which produces higher scattering sources. The vertical drifts so obtained are compared with same drifts from Digisonde at Trivandrum. After having compared with Digisonde drifts, we studied the temporal and seasonal variability of these drifts during quiet periods for the year 2012. It is seen that vertical drifts exhibited equinoctial maximum in the Pre-Reversal-Enhancement (PRE) followed by winter and summer respectively. A comparison of these vertical drifts is made with drifts obtained from (a) virtual height measured at 4 MHz and (b) Fejer drift model. The comparison suggests that Doppler vertical drifts are relatively higher as compared to the drifts obtained from model and virtual height. However, the correlation seems to be good around evening PRE times. The zonal drifts, on the other hand, showed westward drifts during daytime with mean drifts of ~250 m/s, while they are eastward during nighttime with mean drifts of ~150 m/s. These drifts seems to be higher as compared to zonal drifts obtained in the South American sector. However, the zonal drifts so obtained showed good correlation with Equatorial Electrojet (EEJ) strength suggesting zonal drifts are influenced by E region drifts during daytime in agreement with Woodman et al., 2013 paper. The magnitude of these drifts are comparable to other independent

  4. Independent measurement of femoral cortical thickness and cortical bone density using clinical CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treece, G M; Gee, A H

    2015-02-01

    The local structure of the proximal femoral cortex is of interest since both fracture risk, and the effects of various interventions aimed at reducing that risk, are associated with cortical properties focused in particular regions rather than dispersed over the whole bone. Much of the femoral cortex is less than 3mm thick, appearing so blurred in clinical CT that its actual density is not apparent in the data, and neither thresholding nor full-width half-maximum techniques are capable of determining its width. Our previous work on cortical bone mapping showed how to produce more accurate estimates of cortical thickness by assuming a fixed value of the cortical density for each hip. However, although cortical density varies much less over the proximal femur than thickness, what little variation there is leads to errors in thickness measurement. In this paper, we develop the cortical bone mapping technique by exploiting local estimates of imaging blur to correct the global density estimate, thus providing a local density estimate as well as more accurate estimates of thickness. We also consider measurement of cortical mass surface density and the density of trabecular bone immediately adjacent to the cortex. Performance is assessed with ex vivo clinical QCT scans of proximal femurs, with true values derived from high resolution HRpQCT scans of the same bones. We demonstrate superior estimation of thickness than is possible with alternative techniques (accuracy 0.12 ± 0.39 mm for cortices in the range 1-3mm), and that local cortical density estimation is feasible for densities >800 mg/cm(3).

  5. Measurement of powder bed density in powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, G.; Donmez, A.; Slotwinski, J.; Moylan, S.

    2016-11-01

    Many factors influence the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) processes, resulting in a high degree of variation in process outcomes. Therefore, quantifying these factors and their correlations to process outcomes are important challenges to overcome to enable widespread adoption of emerging AM technologies. In the powder bed fusion AM process, the density of the powder layers in the powder bed is a key influencing factor. This paper introduces a method to determine the powder bed density (PBD) during the powder bed fusion (PBF) process. A complete uncertainty analysis associated with the measurement method was also described. The resulting expanded measurement uncertainty, U PBD (k  =  2), was determined as 0.004 g · cm-3. It was shown that this expanded measurement uncertainty is about three orders of magnitude smaller than the typical powder bed density. This method enables establishing correlations between the changes in PBD and the direction of motion of the powder recoating arm.

  6. Vibration-Induced Conductivity Fluctuation Measurement for Soil Bulk Density Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kishne, Andrea Sz; Chang, Hung-Chih; Kish, Laszlo B

    2007-01-01

    Soil bulk density affects water storage, water and nutrient movement, and plant root activity in the soil profile. Its measurement is difficult in field conditions. Vibration-induced conductivity fluctuation was investigated to quantify soil bulk density with possible field applications in the future. The AC electrical conductivity of soil was measured using a pair of blade-like electrodes while exposing the soil to periodic vibration. The blades were positioned longitudinally and transversally to the direction of the induced vibration to enable the calculation of a normalized index. The normalized index was expected to provide data independent from the vibration strength and to reduce the effect of soil salinity and water content. The experiment was conducted on natural and salinized fine sand at two moisture conditions and four bulk densities. The blade-shaped electrodes improved electrode-soil contact compared to cylindrical electrodes, and thereby, reduced measurement noise. Simulations on a simplified re...

  7. Development and application of diagnostic instrumentation for measurement of electron density and conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, L.E.

    1990-05-01

    The purpose of this contract was to assemble and demonstrate in the laboratory a Faraday rotation system for measurement of electron density and conductivity, with the intent to produce a system suitable for diagnostic support of the development of pulsed, space-based magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power systems. Two system configurations were tested: (1) a rotating polarizer and (2) a beam splitting polarizer. Due to the short path length plasma produced in the laboratory flame, the long wavelength 496 {mu}m methyl fluoride laser line was used and only the more sensitive rotating polarizer configuration was used for the demonstration experiments. Electron number densities from 2 {times} 10{sup 19} to 9 {times} 10{sup 19} were measured with good agreement to statistical equilibrium (Saha) calculations using emission absorption-measured flame temperatures and neutral seed atom number seed atom nuclear densities. The electron collision frequencies were measured by transmission measurements. Combining these two measurements gave measured electron conductivities of between 4 and 12 mohs/m. These results compared reasonably well with those found with an electron collision frequency model combined with chemical equilibrium calculations and the emission absorption measurements. Ellipticity measurements of electron collision frequency were not possible due to the short path length of the laboratory plasma. 46 refs., 25 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. Measurements of solar flux density distribution on a plane receiver due to a flat heliostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayed, M.M.; Fathalah, K.A.; Al-Rabghi, O.M. [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-06-01

    An experimental facility is designed and manufactured to measure the solar flux density distribution on a central flat receiver due to a single flat heliostat. The tracking mechanism of the heliostat is controlled by two stepping motors, one for tilt angle control and the other for azimuth angle control. A x-y traversing mechanism is also designed and mounted on a vertical central receiver plane, where the solar flux density is to be measured. A miniature solar sensor is mounted on the platform of the traversing mechanism, where it is used to measure the solar flux density distribution on the receiver surface. The sensor is connected to a data acquisition card in a host computer. The two stepping motors of the heliostat tracking mechanism and the two stepping motors of the traversing mechanism are all connected to a controller card in the same host computer. A software `TOWER` is prepared to let the heliostat track the sun, move the platform of the traversing mechanism to the points of a preselected grid, and to measure the solar flux density distribution on the receiver plane. Measurements are carried out using rectangular flat mirrors of different dimensions at several distances from the central receiver. Two types of images were identified on the receiver plane - namely, apparent (or visible) and mirror-reflected radiation images. Comparison between measurements and a mathematical model validates the mathematical model. 13 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  9. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öz, E.; Batsch, F.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE) (Assmann et al., 2014 [1]) project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook (Marlow, 1967 [2]) method and has been described in great detail in the work by Hill et al. (1986) [3]. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of 1% for the vapor density–length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach–Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prototype 8 cm long novel Rb vapor cell.

  10. Free-space reflection method for measuring moisture content and bulk density of particulate materials at microwave frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxiao; Han, Bing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-03-01

    A measurement system based on free-space reflection method is designed for simultaneous and independent determination of moisture content and bulk density of particulate materials. The proposed system consists of microwave cavity oscillator, horn antenna, slide rail, sample holder, mixer, and digital meter. Sand and rice with different moisture contents and bulk densities are chosen as samples. Calibration models for moisture content and bulk density are proposed according to the measurement of the position of the minimum of the traveling-standing wave and the ratio of the maximum-to-minimum field strength of the traveling-standing wave at different temperatures. The moisture constant, ranging from 0% to 24.6%, is obtained with a coefficient of determination (R2) greater than 0.982 and a standard error of prediction (SEP) value of less than 0.695%. The bulk density, ranging from 0.501 g/cm3 to 1.822 g/cm3, is determined with a R2 ≥ 0.961 and a SEP value ranging from 0.0144 g/cm3 to 0.0382 g/cm3 for different samples.

  11. Thermodynamic magnetization of two-dimensional electron gas measured over wide range of densities

    OpenAIRE

    Reznikov, M.; Kuntsevich, A. Yu.; Teneh, N.; Pudalov, V. M.

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements of dm/dn in Si MOSFET, where m is the magnetization of the two-dimensional electron gas and n is its density. We extended the density range of measurements from well in the metallic to deep in the insulating region. The paper discusses in detail the conditions under which this extension is justified, as well as the corrections one should make to extract dm/dn properly. At low temperatures, dm/dn was found to be strongly nonlinear already in weak magnetic fields, on a sc...

  12. High-pressure density measurements for the binary system ethanol plus heptane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watson, G.; Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Baylaucq, A.

    2006-01-01

    The density of the asymmetrical binary system composed of ethanol and heptane has been measured (630 points) for nine different compositions including the pure compounds at five temperatures in the range (293.15 to 333.15) K and 14 isobars up to 65 MPa with a vibrating-tube densimeter, The experi......The density of the asymmetrical binary system composed of ethanol and heptane has been measured (630 points) for nine different compositions including the pure compounds at five temperatures in the range (293.15 to 333.15) K and 14 isobars up to 65 MPa with a vibrating-tube densimeter...

  13. Is It Possible To Obtain Coupled Cluster Quality Energies at near Density Functional Theory Cost? Domain-Based Local Pair Natural Orbital Coupled Cluster vs Modern Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Dimitrios G; Neese, Frank

    2015-09-08

    The recently developed domain-based local pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) delivers results that are closely approaching those of the parent canonical coupled cluster method at a small fraction of the computational cost. A recent extended benchmark study established that, depending on the three main truncation thresholds, it is possible to approach the canonical CCSD(T) results within 1 kJ (default setting, TightPNO), 1 kcal/mol (default setting, NormalPNO), and 2-3 kcal (default setting, LoosePNO). Although thresholds for calculations with TightPNO are 2-4 times slower than those based on NormalPNO thresholds, they are still many orders of magnitude faster than canonical CCSD(T) calculations, even for small and medium sized molecules where there is little locality. The computational effort for the coupled cluster step scales nearly linearly with system size. Since, in many instances, the coupled cluster step in DLPNO-CCSD(T) is cheaper or at least not much more expensive than the preceding Hartree-Fock calculation, it is useful to compare the method against modern density functional theory (DFT), which requires an effort comparable to that of Hartree-Fock theory (at least if Hartree-Fock exchange is part of the functional definition). Double hybrid density functionals (DHDF's) even require a MP2-like step. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the cost vs accuracy ratio of DLPNO-CCSD(T) against modern DFT (including the PBE, B3LYP, M06-2X, B2PLYP, and B2GP-PLYP functionals and, where applicable, their van der Waals corrected counterparts). To eliminate any possible bias in favor of DLPNO-CCSD(T), we have chosen established benchmark sets that were specifically proposed for evaluating DFT functionals. It is demonstrated that DLPNO-CCSD(T) with any of the three default thresholds is more accurate than any of the DFT functionals. Furthermore, using the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set and

  14. A comprehensive assessment of the precision and agreement of anterior corneal power measurements obtained using 8 different devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinmei Wang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To comprehensively assess the precision and agreement of anterior corneal power measurements using 8 different devices. METHODS: Thirty-five eyes from 35 healthy subjects were included in the prospective study. In the first session, a single examiner performed on each subject randomly measurements with the RC-5000 (Tomey Corp., Japan, KR-8000 (Topcon, Japan, IOLMaster (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Germany, E300 (Medmont International, Australia, Allegro Topolyzer (Wavelight AG, Germany, Vista (EyeSys, TX, Pentacam (Oculus, Germany and Sirius (CSO, Italy. Measurements were repeated in the second session (1 to 2 weeks later. Repeatability and reproducibility of corneal power measurements were assessed based on the intrasession and intersession within-subject standard deviation (Sw, repeatability (2.77Sw, coefficient of variation (COV, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC. Agreement was evaluated by 95% limits of agreement (LoA. RESULTS: All devices demonstrated high repeatability and reproducibility of the keratometric values (2.77Sw0.98. Repeated-measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni post test showed statistically significant differences (P<0.01 among mean keratometric values of most instruments; the largest differences were observed between the EyeSys Vista and Medmont E300. Good agreement (i.e., 95%LoA within ± 0.5D was found between most instruments for flat, steep and mean keratometry, except for EyeSys and Medmont. Repeatability and reproducibility of vectors J(0 and J(45 was good, as the ICCs were higher than 0.9, except J(45 of Medmont and Pentacam. For the 95% LoAs of J(0 and J(45, they were all ≤ ± 0.31 among any two paired devices. CONCLUSIONS: The 8 devices showed excellent repeatability and reproducibility. The results obtained using the RC-5000, KR-8000, IOLMaster, Allegro Topolyzer, Pentacam and Sirius were comparable, suggesting that they could be used interchangeably in most clinical settings. Caution is

  15. Intercomparison of peroxy radical measurements obtained at atmospheric conditions by laser-induced fluorescence and electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hofzumahaus

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of hydroperoxy radical (HO2 and organic peroxy radical (RO2 concentrations were performed by two different techniques in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany. The first technique was the well-established Matrix Isolation Electron Spin Resonance (MIESR, which provides absolute measurements with a time resolution of 30 min and high accuracy (10%, 2 σ. The other technique, ROxLIF, has been newly developed. It is based on the selective chemical conversion of ROx radicals (HO2 and RO2 to OH, which is detected with high sensitivity by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF. ROxLIF is calibrated by quantitative photolysis of water vapor at 185 nm and provides ambient measurements at a temporal resolution of 1 min and accuracy of 20% (2 σ. The measurements of HO2 and RO2 obtained by the two techniques were compared for two types of atmospheric simulation experiments. In one experiment, HO2 and CH3O2 radicals were produced by photooxidation of methane in air at tropospheric conditions. In the second experiment, HO2 and C2H5O2 were produced by ozonolysis of 1-butene in air at dark conditions. The radical concentrations were within the range of 16 to 100 pptv for HO2 and 12 to 45 pptv for RO2. Good agreement was found in the comparison of the ROxLIF and MIESR measurements within their combined experimental uncertainties. Linear regressions to the combined data set yield slopes of 1.02±0.13 (1 σ for RO2 and 0.98±0.08 (1 σ for HO2 without significant offsets. The results confirm the calibration of the ROxLIF instrument and demonstrate that it can be applied with good accuracy for measurements of atmospheric peroxy radical concentrations.

  16. Toward in Situ Measurement of the Density of Liquid Benzene Using Optical Kerr Effect Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, John S; Cohen, Samuel R; He, Xiaoxiao; Fourkas, John T; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-09-01

    The high-frequency portion of the optical Kerr effect (OKE) spectrum of benzene shifts to higher frequency with decreasing temperature at constant pressure. This behavior has been interpreted previously in terms of an increase in librational frequencies due to the decrease in free volume with liquid densification. However, decreasing temperature also provides less access to the more repulsive portion of the intermolecular potential, which would cause the blue edge of the spectrum to red-shift. To explore the relative importance of these phenomena, molecular dynamics simulations of benzene are used to isolate the effects of temperature and density on the spectrum. The simulations show that, at constant density, the high-frequency portion of the spectrum shifts to lower frequency with decreasing temperature. In contrast, at constant temperature, the high-frequency portion of the spectrum shifts to higher frequency with increasing density. These results indicate that density plays a greater role in determining the position of the blue edge of the low-frequency Raman spectrum of benzene than does temperature. Empirical fits show that the effects of changing density or temperature are similar in experimental and simulated OKE spectra. Furthermore, line-shape analysis of simulated spectra under isochoric and isothermal conditions shows that the effects of density and temperature are separable, suggesting that OKE spectroscopy is a viable technique for in situ measurement of the density of van der Waals liquids.

  17. A novel ultrasonic method for measuring breast density and breast cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K.; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter J.

    2008-03-01

    Women with high mammographic breast density are at 4- to 6-fold increased risk of developing breast cancer compared to women with fatty breasts. However, current breast density estimations rely on mammography, which cannot provide accurate volumetric breast representation. Therefore, we explored two techniques of breast density evaluation via ultrasound tomography. A sample of 93 patients was imaged with our clinical prototype; each dataset contained 45-75 tomograms ranging from near the chest wall through the nipple. Whole breast acoustic velocity was determined by creating image stacks and evaluating the sound speed frequency distribution. Ultrasound percent density (USPD) was determined by segmenting high sound speed areas from each tomogram using k-means clustering, integrating over the entire breast, and dividing by total breast area. Both techniques were independently evaluated using two mammographic density measures: (1) qualitative, determined by a radiologist's visual assessment using BI-RADS Categories, and (2) quantitative, via semi-automatic segmentation to calculate mammographic percent density (MPD) for craniocaudal and medio-lateral oblique mammograms. ~140 m/s difference in acoustic velocity was observed between fatty and dense BI-RADS Categories. Increased sound speed was found with increased BI-RADS Category and quantitative MPD. Furthermore, strong positive associations between USPD, BI-RADS Category, and calculated MPD were observed. These results confirm that utilizing sound speed, both for whole-breast evaluation and segmenting locally, can be implemented to evaluate breast density.

  18. SOL plasma measurements during high density and long duration current drive on TRIAM-1M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemura, Takeharu; Kawasaki, Shoji; Jotaki, Eriko; Makino, Ken-ichi; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Nakamura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yukio; Itoh, Sanae; Itoh, Satoshi [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1997-02-01

    In the superconducting, strong magnetic field tokamak, TRIAM-1M, for the purpose of maintaining high density plasma for long time, the current drive experiment using 8.2 GHz lower hybrid wave has been carried out. For maintaining high density plasma for long time, it is indispensable to control gas puff and recycling from wall, as these are closely related to the structure and characteristics of boundary plasma including scrape-off layer (SOL). In this study, in the high density, long time current drive using 8.2 GHz lower hybrid wave, the electron density and electron temperature of SOL plasma were measured by using double probe, and the z-direction distribution and the toroidal magnetic field dependence of the electron density and electron temperature of SOL plasma were examined and compared with OH discharge. Also the dependence of the electron density of SOL plasma on the phase difference in a adjoining waveguide tubes was examined. The experimental setup and the double probe theory are explained. The experimental results of the change with time lapse, the z-direction distribution and the magnetic field dependence of the electron density and electron temperature of SOL plasma are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Density Fluctuation Measurements by Far-Forward Collective Scattering in the HSX Stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, C.; Brower, D. L.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K.; Lore, J.; Schmitt, J. C.; Talmadge, J. N.; Wilcox, R.; Zhai, K.

    2010-11-01

    The multichannel interferometer system on the HSX stellarator is reconfigured to perform far-forward collective scattering measurements of electron density fluctuations. The collective scattering system has 9 viewing chords with 1.5 cm spacing. The source is a bias-tuned Gunn diode at 96 GHz with passive solid-state tripler providing output at 288 GHz (˜5 mW). The scattered power is measured using a homodyne detection scheme. Far-forward collective scattering provides a line-integrated measurement of fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering wave number range: k< 2 cm-1. The perpendicular wave number consists of poloidal and radial contributions which vary with chord position. Comparison of density fluctuations measured using scattering and interferometry techniques will be made. Both coherent modes and broadband fluctuations are measured. Comparison of fluctuation amplitude and frequency spectra for quasi-helically symmetric and non-axisymmetric magnetic configuration will be presented.

  20. Measurement of output power density from mobile phone as a function of input sound frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Emanuele; Magazù, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of power density emitted by a mobile phone were carried out as a function of the sound frequency transmitted by a sound generator, ranging from 250 to 14000 Hz. Output power density was monitored by means of the selective radiation meter Narda SRM 3000 in spectrum analysis mode, and the octave frequency analysis of each tone used for the experimental design was acquired by the sound level meter Larson Davis LxT Wind. Vodafone providers were used for mobile phone calls with respect to various local base station in Southern-Italy. A relationship between the mobile phone microwaves power density and the sound frequencies transmitted by the sound generator was observed. In particular, microwaves power density level decreases significantly at sound frequency values larger than 4500 Hz. This result can be explained assuming that discontinuous transmission mode of global system for mobile communications is powered not only in silence-mode, but also at frequencies larger than 4500 Hz.

  1. [Rapid measurements of CO2 flux density and water use efficiency of crop community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhilin; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Renhua; Su, Hongbo; Tang, Xinzai

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, Eddy Correlation (EC) method was employed to measure the latent heat and CO2 flux density and to calculate Water Use Efficiency (WUE) of winter wheat community in Yucheng district, Shandong Province in 1997. The results showed that the CO2 flux density had an obvious diurnal change, with a maximum about 1.5 mg x s(-1) x m(-2), which appeared at about 9:00-10:00 am in general. The WUE of wheat community presented a fall trend from morning to afternoon, and the CO2 flux density and WUE also had an obvious seasonal change, being lower in the early and late growth stages, and higher in the middle growth stage. The ranges of daily mean CO2 flux density and WUE were 0.2-0.9 mg x s(-1) x m(-2) and 5-20 gCO2 x kg(-1) H2O, respectively.

  2. Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system for current density measurement on EAST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H Q; Jie, Y X; Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Zou, Z Y; Li, W M; Wang, Z X; Qian, J P; Yang, Y; Zeng, L; Lan, T; Wei, X C; Li, G S; Hu, L Q; Wan, B N

    2014-11-01

    A multichannel far-infrared laser-based POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system utilizing the three-wave technique is under development for current density and electron density profile measurements in the EAST tokamak. Novel molybdenum retro-reflectors are mounted in the inside wall for the double-pass optical arrangement. A Digital Phase Detector with 250 kHz bandwidth, which will provide real-time Faraday rotation angle and density phase shift output, have been developed for use on the POINT system. Initial calibration indicates the electron line-integrated density resolution is less than 5 × 10(16) m(-2) (∼2°), and the Faraday rotation angle rms phase noise is <0.1°.

  3. Partial-reflection studies of D-region winter variability. [electron density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, B. W.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    D-region electron densities were measured from December, 1972, to July, 1973, at Urbana, Illinois (latitude 40.2N) using the partial-reflection technique. During the winter, electron densities at altitudes of 72, 76.5, and 81 km show cyclical changes with a period of about 5 days that are highly correlated between these altitudes, suggesting that the mechanism responsible for the winter anomaly in D-region ionization applies throughout this height region. From January 13 to February 3, a pronounced wave-like variation occurred in the partial-reflection measurements, apparently associated with a major stratospheric warming that developed in that period. During the same time period, a traveling periodic variation is observed in the 10-mb height; it is highly correlated with the partial-reflection measurements. Electron density enhancements occur approximately at the same time as increases in the 10-mb height. Comparison of AL and A3 absorption measurements with electron density measurements below 82 km indicates that the winter anomaly in D-region ionization is divided into two types. Type 1, above about 82 km, extends horizontally for about 200 km while type 2, below about 82 km, extends for a horizontal scale of at least 1000 km.

  4. Thermophysical properties of medium density fiberboards measured by quasi-stationary method: experimental and numerical evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troppová, Eva; Tippner, Jan; Hrčka, Richard

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental measurement of thermal properties of medium density fiberboards with different thicknesses (12, 18 and 25 mm) and sample sizes (50 × 50 mm and 100 × 100 mm) by quasi-stationary method. The quasi-stationary method is a transient method which allows measurement of three thermal parameters (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and heat capacity). The experimentally gained values were used to verify a numerical model and furthermore served as input parameters for the numerical probabilistic analysis. The sensitivity of measured outputs (time course of temperature) to influential factors (density, heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivities) was established and described by the Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. The dependence of thermal properties on density was confirmed by the data measured. Density was also proved to be an important factor for sensitivity analyses as it highly correlated with all output parameters. The accuracy of the measurement method can be improved based on the results of the probabilistic analysis. The relevancy of the experiment is mainly influenced by the choice of a proper ratio between thickness and width of samples.

  5. Novel analysis technique for measuring edge density fluctuation profiles with reflectometry in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creely, A. J.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsujimura, T.; Akiyama, T.; Sakamoto, R.; Emoto, M.; Tanaka, K.; Michael, C. A.

    2017-07-01

    A new method for measuring density fluctuation profiles near the edge of plasmas in the Large Helical Device (LHD) has been developed utilizing reflectometry combined with pellet-induced fast density scans. Reflectometer cutoff location was calculated by proportionally scaling the cutoff location calculated with fast far infrared laser interferometer (FIR) density profiles to match the slower time resolution results of the ray-tracing code LHD-GAUSS. Plasma velocity profile peaks generated with this reflectometer mapping were checked against velocity measurements made with charge exchange spectroscopy (CXS) and were found to agree within experimental uncertainty once diagnostic differences were accounted for. Measured density fluctuation profiles were found to peak strongly near the edge of the plasma, as is the case in most tokamaks. These measurements can be used in the future to inform inversion methods of phase contrast imaging (PCI) measurements. This result was confirmed with both a fixed frequency reflectometer and calibrated data from a multi-frequency comb reflectometer, and this method was applied successfully to a series of discharges. The full width at half maximum of the turbulence layer near the edge of the plasma was found to be only 1.5-3 cm on a series of LHD discharges, less than 5% of the normalized minor radius.

  6. Systematic comparison between line integrated densities measured with interferometry and polarimetry at JET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombin, M; Boboc, A; Murari, A; Zilli, E; Giudicotti, L

    2009-06-01

    A systematic comparison between the line integrated electron density derived from interferometry and polarimetry at JET has been carried out. For the first time the reliability of the measurements of the Cotton-Mouton effect has been analyzed for a wide range of main plasma parameters and the possibility to evaluate the electron density directly from polarimetric data has been studied. The purpose of this work is to recover the interferometric data with the density derived from the measured Cotton-Mouton effect, when the fringe jump phenomena occur. The results show that the difference between the line integrated electron density from interferometry and polarimetry is with one fringe (1.143 x 10(19) m(-2)) for more than 90% of the cases. It is possible to consider polarimetry as a satisfactory alternative method to interferometry to measure the electron density and it could be used to recover interferometric signal when a fringe jumps occurs, preventing difficulties for the real-time control of many experiments at the JET machine.

  7. Two-Dimensional Electron Density Measurement of Positive Streamer Discharge in Atmospheric-Pressure Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yuki; Ono, Ryo; Kumada, Akiko; Hidaka, Kunihiko; Maeyama, Mitsuaki

    2016-09-01

    The electron density of streamer discharges propagating in atmospheric-pressure air is crucially important for systematic understanding of the production mechanisms of reactive species utilized in wide ranging applications such as medical treatment, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, ozone production and environmental pollutant processing. However, electron density measurement during the propagation of the atmospheric-pressure streamers is extremely difficult by using the conventional localized type measurement systems due to the streamer initiation jitters and the irreproducibility in the discharge paths. In order to overcome the difficulties, single-shot two-dimensional electron density measurement was conducted by using a Shack-Hartmann type laser wavefront sensor. The Shack-Hartmann sensor with a temporal resolution of 2 ns was applied to pulsed positive streamer discharges generated in an air gap between pin-to-plate electrodes. The electron density a few ns after the streamer initiation was 7*1021m-3 and uniformly distributed along the streamer channel. The electron density and its distribution profile were compared with a previous study simulating similar streamers, demonstrating good agreement. This work was supported in part by JKA and its promotion funds from KEIRIN RACE. The authors like to thank Mr. Kazuaki Ogura and Mr. Kaiho Aono of The University of Tokyo for their support during this work.

  8. [Flow density measurements using optical coherence tomography angiography : Impact of age and gender].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnawaiseh, M; Brand, C; Lauermann, J L; Eter, N

    2017-07-19

    This article presents the normative data for flow density measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography and the impact of age and gender is evaluated. In this study 58 eyes from 58 healthy volunteers with no history of any ocular disease or ocular surgery were included. The OCT angiography imaging was performed using the RTVue XR Avanti with the AngioVue (Optovue, Fremont, CA). The macula was imaged using a 3 × 3 mm scan, and the flow density data in the superficial retinal OCT angiogram and deep retinal OCT angiogram were extracted and analyzed. The groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U‑test and the degree of correlation between two variables was expressed as the Spearman's correlation coefficient (rSp.) RESULTS: The mean subject age was 38.3 ± 14.6 years. The flow density (whole en face) in the deep retinal OCT angiogram was significantly higher compared to the flow density in the superficial retinal OCT angiogram (p density in superficial and deep OCT angiograms of the macula between males (n = 27) and females (n = 31). There was a significant correlation between the flow density in the deep retinal OCT angiogram and age (rSp. = -0.41, p = 0.001). Whereas gender has no impact on the flow density measured using OCT angiography, there was a significant correlation between the flow density in the deep retinal OCT angiogram and age.

  9. Conceptual design of the tangentially viewing combined interferometer-polarimeter for ITER density measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zeeland, M A; Boivin, R L; Brower, D L; Carlstrom, T N; Chavez, J A; Ding, W X; Feder, R; Johnson, D; Lin, L; O'Neill, R C; Watts, C

    2013-04-01

    One of the systems planned for the measurement of electron density in ITER is a multi-channel tangentially viewing combined interferometer-polarimeter (TIP). This work discusses the current status of the design, including a preliminary optical table layout, calibration options, error sources, and performance projections based on a CO2/CO laser system. In the current design, two-color interferometry is carried out at 10.59 μm and 5.42 μm and a separate polarimetry measurement of the plasma induced Faraday effect, utilizing the rotating wave technique, is made at 10.59 μm. The inclusion of polarimetry provides an independent measure of the electron density and can also be used to correct the conventional two-color interferometer for fringe skips at all densities, up to and beyond the Greenwald limit. The system features five chords with independent first mirrors to reduce risks associated with deposition, erosion, etc., and a common first wall hole to minimize penetration sizes. Simulations of performance for a projected ITER baseline discharge show the diagnostic will function as well as, or better than, comparable existing systems for feedback density control. Calculations also show that finite temperature effects will be significant in ITER even for moderate temperature plasmas and can lead to a significant underestimate of electron density. A secondary role TIP will fulfill is that of a density fluctuation diagnostic; using a toroidal Alfvén eigenmode as an example, simulations show TIP will be extremely robust in this capacity and potentially able to resolve coherent mode fluctuations with perturbed densities as low as δn∕n ≈ 10(-5).

  10. Measurement of Single Cell Refractive Index, Dry Mass, Volume, and Density Using a Transillumination Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Jacques, Steven L.; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2012-09-01

    Phase contrast microscopy has become ubiquitous in the field of biology, particularly in qualitative investigations of cellular morphology. However, the use of quantitative phase retrieval methods and their connection to cellular refractive index and dry mass density remain under utilized. This is due in part to the restriction of phase and cellular mass determination to custom built instruments, involved mathematical analysis, and prohibitive sample perturbations. We introduce tomographic bright field imaging, an accessible optical imaging technique enabling the three dimensional measurement of cellular refractive index and dry mass density using a standard transillumination optical microscope. The validity of the technique is demonstrated on polystyrene spheres. The technique is then applied to the measurement of the refractive index, dry mass, volume, and density of red blood cells. This optical technique enables a simple and robust means to perform quantitative investigations of engineered and biological specimens in three dimensions using standard optical microscopes.

  11. Phase space density as a measure of cooling performance for the international muon ionization cooling experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment to demonstrate ionization cooling of a muon beam in a beamline that shares characteristics with one that might be used for a muon collider or neutrino factory. I describe a way to quantify cooling performance by examining the phase space density of muons, and determining how much that density increases. This contrasts with the more common methods that rely on the covariance matrix and compute emittances from that. I discuss why a direct measure of phase space density might be preferable to a covariance matrix method. I apply this technique to an early proposal for the MICE final step beamline. I discuss how matching impacts the measured performance.

  12. Measuring the Density of a Molecular Cluster Injector via Visible Emission from an Electron Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, D. P.; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. M.; Stotler, D. P.

    2010-06-28

    A method to measure the density distribution of a dense hydrogen gas jet is pre- sented. A Mach 5.5 nozzle is cooled to 80K to form a flow capable of molecular cluster formation. A 250V, 10mA electron beam collides with the jet and produces Hα emission that is viewed by a fast camera. The high density of the jet, several 1016cm-3, results in substantial electron depletion, which attenuates the Hα emission. The attenuated emission measurement, combined with a simplified electron-molecule collision model, allows us to determine the molecular density profile via a simple iterative calculation.

  13. On the reliability of observational measurements of column density probability distribution functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, Volker; Schneider, Nicola; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S

    2016-01-01

    Probability distribution functions (PDFs) of column densities are an established tool to characterize the evolutionary state of interstellar clouds. Using simulations, we show to what degree their determination is affected by noise, line-of-sight contamination, field selection, and the incomplete sampling in interferometric measurements. We solve the integrals that describe the convolution of a cloud PDF with contaminating sources and study the impact of missing information on the measured column density PDF. The effect of observational noise can be easily estimated and corrected for if the root mean square (rms) of the noise is known. For $\\sigma_{noise}$ values below 40\\,\\% of the typical cloud column density, $N_{peak}$, this involves almost no degradation of the accuracy of the PDF parameters. For higher noise levels and narrow cloud PDFs the width of the PDF becomes increasingly uncertain. A contamination by turbulent foreground or background clouds can be removed as a constant shield if the PDF of the c...

  14. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  15. [A study on image processing of digital radiography and measure of material micro-density directly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ping; Xu, Guang-Ming; Yin, Song; Liu, Sheng-Quan; Xu, Lian-Yuan

    2008-05-01

    Due to the high influents of the device itself and the surrounding environment, the background brightness of the digital radiography image is uniform and the image shows big noise. Therefore, in order to identify digital radiography images precisely, a further image processing is necessary. In this study, adaptive filtering, histogram equalization techniques and difference image methods were used for image processing and the results show that these techniques were useful to denoise, to intensify brightness and to rectify the background. In order to verify the feasibility of these techniques, poplar wood samples of heterogeneous material were used as experimental materials and Micro-density was measured directly by applying the linear relationship between grey scale of DR image and penetrate material density and contrasted with the result of microdensitometer. The results show these techniques were feasible and even gave a more precise measurement on wood micro-density compared to microdensitometer.

  16. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Temperature, Velocity, and Density Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy R.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chi-Jen

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 16 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in an air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 16 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. A low speed heated jet is used to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations and an acoustically excited nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements. Power spectral density calculations of the property fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are presented. Temperature fluctuation results are compared with constant current anemometry measurements and velocity fluctuation results are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements at the same locations.

  17. Comparison of neurite density measured by MRI and histology after TBI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Functional recovery after brain injury in animals is improved by marrow stromal cells (MSC which stimulate neurite reorganization. However, MRI measurement of neurite density changes after injury has not been performed. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of MRI measurement of neurite density in an animal model of traumatic brain injury (TBI with and without MSC treatment. METHODS: Fifteen male Wistar rats, were treated with saline (n = 6 or MSCs (n = 9 and were sacrificed at 6 weeks after controlled cortical impact (CCI. Healthy non-CCI rats (n = 5, were also employed. Ex-vivo MRI scans were performed two days after the rats were sacrificed. Multiple-shell hybrid diffusion imaging encoding scheme and spherical harmonic expansion of a two-compartment water diffusion displacement model were used to extract neurite related parameters. Bielshowski and Luxol Fast blue was used for staining axons and myelin, respectively. Modified Morris water maze and neurological severity score (mNSS test were performed for functional evaluation. The treatment effects, the correlations between neurite densities measured by MRI and histology, and the correlations between MRI and functional variables were calculated by repeated measures analysis of variance, the regression correlation analysis tests, and spearman correlation coefficients. RESULTS: Neurite densities exhibited a significant correlation (R(2>0.80, p<1E-20 between MRI and immuno-histochemistry measurements with 95% lower bound of the intra-correlation coefficient (ICC as 0.86. The conventional fractional anisotropy (FA correlated moderately with histological neurite density (R(2 = 0.59, P<1E-5 with 95% lower bound of ICC as 0.76. MRI data revealed increased neurite reorganization with MSC treatment compared with saline treatment, confirmed by histological data from the same animals. mNSS were significantly correlated with MRI neurite density in the hippocampus region

  18. Particle Size, Number Density, And Velocity Measurements In A 2800 K Combustion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, W. M.; Schwartz, F. A.; Stallings, E. S.; Belz, R. A.

    1983-10-01

    Particle size and velocity measurements have been obtained in a low-speed (6 to 10 m/s), 2800 K combustor 30 cm in diameter. The measurements were obtained using a particle-sizing interferometer coupled to a 0.5 m spectrometer for background light rejection from radiant particles. Results obtained for the combustion of powdered coke clearly indicate the capabilities of this type of instrument to estimate combustor efficiency as a function of temperature. Comparison of the optically sampled measurements with other sampling techniques shows reasonable agreement.

  19. Feasibility of measuring density and temperature of laser produced plasmas using spectroscopic techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edens, Aaron D.

    2008-09-01

    A wide variety of experiments on the Z-Beamlet laser involve the creation of laser produced plasmas. Having a direct measurement of the density and temperature of these plasma would an extremely useful tool, as understanding how these quantities evolve in space and time gives insight into the causes of changes in other physical processes, such as x-ray generation and opacity. We propose to investigate the possibility of diagnosing the density and temperature of laser-produced plasma using temporally and spatially resolved spectroscopic techniques that are similar to ones that have been successfully fielded on other systems. Various researchers have measured the density and temperature of laboratory plasmas by looking at the width and intensity ratio of various characteristic lines in gases such as nitrogen and hydrogen, as well as in plasmas produced off of solid targets such as zinc. The plasma conditions produce two major measurable effects on the characteristic spectral lines of that plasma. The 1st is the Stark broadening of an individual line, which depends on the electron density of the plasma, with higher densities leading to broader lines. The second effect is a change in the ratio of various lines in the plasma corresponding to different ionization states. By looking at the ratio of these lines, we can gain some understanding of the plasma ionization state and consequently its temperature (and ion density when coupled with the broadening measurement). The hotter a plasma is, the higher greater the intensity of lines corresponding to higher ionization states. We would like to investigate fielding a system on the Z-Beamlet laser chamber to spectroscopically study laser produced plasmas from different material targets.

  20. Absorption Measurement of Zn Atom Density during ICP-assisted Magnetron Sputter-deposition of Al-doped ZnO Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the outlines of hollow cathode (HCD) lamp absorption system for the density measurement of sputtered metal atoms in the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) assisted sputter-deposition process of Al doped ZnO thin films. As a result, absorbance of about 6.5% was obtained, which corresponds to the Zn atom density of 1.5×1012 cm-3.

  1. Measurement of average density and relative volumes in a dispersed two-phase fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreepada, Sastry R.; Rippel, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for measuring the average density and relative volumes in an essentially transparent, dispersed two-phase fluid. A laser beam with a diameter no greater than 1% of the diameter of the bubbles, droplets, or particles of the dispersed phase is directed onto a diffraction grating. A single-order component of the diffracted beam is directed through the two-phase fluid and its refraction is measured. Preferably, the refracted beam exiting the fluid is incident upon a optical filter with linearly varing optical density and the intensity of the filtered beam is measured. The invention can be combined with other laser-based measurement systems, e.g., laser doppler anemometry.

  2. Invariant Measures with Bounded Variation Densities for Piecewise Area Preserving Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiwei

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the properties of absolutely continuous invariant probability measures (ACIPs) for piecewise area preserving maps (PAPs) on $\\mathbb{R}^d$. This class of maps unifies piecewise isometries (PWIs) and piecewise hyperbolic maps where Lebesgue measure is locally preserved. In particular for PWIs, we use a functional approach to explore the relationship between topological transitivity and uniqueness of ACIPs, especially those measures with bounded variation densities. Our results "partially" answer one of the fundamental questions posed in \\cite{Goetz03} - determine all invariant non-atomic probability Borel measures in piecewise rotations. When reducing to interval exchange transformations (IETs), we demonstrate that for non-uniquely ergodic IETs with two or more ACIPs, these ACIPs have very irregular densities (namely of unbounded variation and discontinuous everywhere) and intermingle with each other.

  3. 40 CFR 63.5395 - How do I measure the density of a finish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... finish? 63.5395 Section 63.5395 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Leather Finishing Operations Testing and Initial Compliance Requirements § 63.5395 How do I measure the density of a finish? (a) To determine the...

  4. STEREOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF HYDRATION OF CARBOHYDRATES IN AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS .3. DENSITY AND ULTRASOUND MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GALEMA, SA; HOILAND, H

    1991-01-01

    Density and ultrasound measurements have been performed in aqueous solutions of pentoses, hexoses, methylpyranosides, and disaccharides as a function of molality of carbohydrate (0-0.3 mol kg-1). Partial molar volumes, partial molar isentropic compressibilities, and hydration numbers have been calcu

  5. [Equipment for measuring the optical density of wide-format x-ray films].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaĭlov, V A; Ennenberg, M G

    1980-01-01

    For qualitative estimation of the dynamics of medical treatment in the patients with pulmonary diseases a device has been produced based on measuring the optical density of X-ray films. This device comprises the optical part of the microphotometer MF-2, a modified microscope stand, with its moving mechanism, electronic circuit with a logarithmic amplifier, control circuit and a double-coordinate-recorder.

  6. High-resolution gamma ray attenuation density measurements on mining exploration drill cores, including cut cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P.-S.; Bourke, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physical property measurements are increasingly important in mining exploration. For density determinations on rocks, one method applicable on exploration drill cores relies on gamma ray attenuation. This non-destructive method is ideal because each measurement takes only 10 s, making it suitable for high-resolution logging. However calibration has been problematic. In this paper we present new empirical, site-specific correction equations for whole NQ and BQ cores. The corrections force back the gamma densities to the "true" values established by the immersion method. For the NQ core caliber, the density range extends to high values (massive pyrite, 5 g/cm3) and the correction is thought to be very robust. We also present additional empirical correction factors for cut cores which take into account the missing material. These "cut core correction factors", which are not site-specific, were established by making gamma density measurements on truncated aluminum cylinders of various residual thicknesses. Finally we show two examples of application for the Abitibi Greenstone Belt in Canada. The gamma ray attenuation measurement system is part of a multi-sensor core logger which also determines magnetic susceptibility, geochemistry and mineralogy on rock cores, and performs line-scan imaging.

  7. Measurement of the orbital angular momentum density of light by modal decomposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a versatile method for the measurement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) density of an optical field. By performing a modal decomposition with digital holograms, we reconstruct the full optical field from a small set of single...

  8. MISCIBILITY, SOLUBILITY, VISCOSITY, AND DENSITY MEASUREMENTS FOR R-236FA WITH POTENTIAL LUBRICANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of miscibility, solubility, viscosity, and density measurements for refrigerant R-236fa and two potential lubricants . (The data are needed to determine the suitability of refrigerant/lubricant combinations for use in refrigeration systems.) The tested oi...

  9. Simultaneous Reconstructions of Absorption Density and Wave Speed with Photoacoustic Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Kirsch, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we propose an approach for \\emph{simultaneous} identification of the \\emph{absorption density} and the \\emph{speed of sound} by photoacoustic measurements. Experimentally our approach can be realized with sliced photoacoustic experiments. The mathematical model for such an experiment is developed and exact reconstruction formulas for both parameters are presented.

  10. STEREOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF HYDRATION OF CARBOHYDRATES IN AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS .3. DENSITY AND ULTRASOUND MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GALEMA, SA; HOILAND, H

    1991-01-01

    Density and ultrasound measurements have been performed in aqueous solutions of pentoses, hexoses, methylpyranosides, and disaccharides as a function of molality of carbohydrate (0-0.3 mol kg-1). Partial molar volumes, partial molar isentropic compressibilities, and hydration numbers have been

  11. Interpretation of fast measurements of plasma potential, temperature and density in SOL of ASDEX Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horacek, J.; Adamek, J.; Müller, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on interpretation of fast (1 µs) and local (2–4 mm) measurements of plasma density, potential and electron temperature in the edge plasma of tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. Steady-state radial profiles demonstrate the credibility of the ball-pen probe. We demonstrate that floating poten...

  12. Sap flow measurements combining sap-flux density radial profiles with punctual sap-flux density measurements in oak trees (Quercus ilex and Quercus pyrenaica) - water-use implications in a water-limited savanna-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J. Leonardo; Lubczynski1, Maciek W.

    2010-05-01

    measurements using the HFD-measured radial profiles. The standard TDP daily mean of sap-flux density was 95% higher than the 2cm equivalent of the HFD for Q. ilex and 70% higher for Q. pyrenaica. NTG-corrected TDP daily mean of sap-flux density was 34% higher than HFD for Q. ilex and 47% lower for Q. pyrenaica. Regarding sap flow measurements, the standard TDP sap flow was 81% higher than HFD sap flow for Q. ilex and 297% for Q. pyrenaica. The NTG-corrected TDP sap flow was 24% higher than HFD sap flow for Q. ilex and 23% for Q. pyrenaica. The radial correction, for TDP-NTG-corrected sap-flux density, produced sap-flow measurements in well agreement with HFD, just slightly lower (-3% Q.i. and -4% Q.p.). The TDP-HFD sap flow data acquired in dry season over the savanna type of sparsely distributed oak trees (Q. ilex & Q. pyrenaica) showed that the TDP method must be corrected for NTG and for radial variability of sap flux density in trees with sapwood thicker than 2 cm. If such corrections are not taken into consideration, the amount of accounted water used by the trees is prone to overestimation, especially for Quercus pyrenaica. The obtained results indicate also that the combination of HFD and TDP leads to an efficient and accurate operational sap flow measurement schema that is currently in the optimization stage.

  13. Evaluation of char combustion models: measurement and analysis of variability in char particle size and density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, Daniel J; Monazam, Esmail R; Casleton, Kent H; Shaddix, Christopher R

    2008-08-01

    Char samples representing a range of combustion conditions and extents of burnout were obtained from a well-characterized laminar flow combustion experiment. Individual particles from the parent coal and char samples were characterized to determine distributions in particle volume, mass, and density at different extent of burnout. The data were then compared with predictions from a comprehensive char combustion model referred to as the char burnout kinetics model (CBK). The data clearly reflect the particle- to-particle heterogeneity of the parent coal and show a significant broadening in the size and density distributions of the chars resulting from both devolatilization and combustion. Data for chars prepared in a lower oxygen content environment (6% oxygen by vol.) are consistent with zone II type combustion behavior where most of the combustion is occurring near the particle surface. At higher oxygen contents (12% by vol.), the data show indications of more burning occurring in the particle interior. The CBK model does a good job of predicting the general nature of the development of size and density distributions during burning but the input distribution of particle size and density is critical to obtaining good predictions. A significant reduction in particle size was observed to occur as a result of devolatilization. For comprehensive combustion models to provide accurate predictions, this size reduction phenomenon needs to be included in devolatilization models so that representative char distributions are carried through the calculations.

  14. A compact fast ionization gauge for in situ measurement of high-density neutral flow dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T E; Intrator, T P

    2014-04-01

    A compact ionization gauge has been developed to carry out in situ measurements of high density (10(20)-10(22) m(-3)) neutral gas flow dynamics with high temporal and spatial resolution. Key design aspects are discussed including gauge sensitivity and time response scaling with decreased probe dimensions, high-pressure operation, improved driver circuit bandwidth, and techniques for constructing a miniaturized probe head. Gas adsorption was discovered to significantly alter emission current and gauge sensitivity over timescales of several seconds. This effect must be taken into consideration when making time-resolved, high-density measurements. Over short timescales gauge response was predicted by scaling the sensitivity of a nominal Bayard-Alpert gauge to account for variations in probe dimensions and species-dependent ionization cross-section. Time-resolved neutral density profiles have been acquired in the Magnetized Shock Experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory, providing data on the initial conditions of the ionization, plasmoid formation, and translation processes. It is shown that the desired density profiles can be achieved using a dynamic gas fill and that density can be scaled independently of the spatial profile.

  15. Simultaneous measurement of electron temperature and density by a line pair method in the RFP plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masayuki; Shimizu, S.; Ogawa, H.; Shinohara, T.

    2009-11-01

    A line-pair-method has been applied for a simultaneous measurement of the electron temperature and density in ATRAS RFP plasma. Three helium spectrum lines (668nm, 706nm, 728nm) were measured during the discharge at the same time and the electron temperature and density is estimated by using a Collision-Radiation model. To get the signal of the helium impunity line from the RFP discharge, the RFP plasma in the hydrogen gas with a few mixed helium gas was formed. In the typical ATRAS RFP discharge of the plasma current of 60kA, the electron temperature was approximately 50-150 eV and the electron density is the order of 10^18 m-3. During the discharge, the change of the temperature and density are mutually related and this correlation was the almost reverse phase. The periodically change of the temperature and density were also observed. This change synchronizes with a periodically increase of the averaged toroidal magnetic field, which is caused by the toroidal rotation of the increase of the toroidal magnetic field. This rotation, which is deeply related with dynamo effect, makes the plasma energy lose and particles also diffuse toward the plasma edge. As a result, the recycling of the particle and energy are occurred at the same time.

  16. Hole boring velocity measurements in near critical density plasmas by a CO2 laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Tochitsky, Sergei; Pigeon, Jeremy; Joshi, Chan

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of plasma dynamics during the interaction of a high-power laser pulse with an above critical density plasma is important for understanding absorption, transport and particle acceleration mechanisms. An important process that affects these mechanisms is hole boring occurring at the critical density because of the radiation pressure of the laser pulse. Yet, no systematic measurements of the hole boring velocity's (vhb) dependence on laser intensity (I) have been made. In this talk, we present experimental results of vhb in near critical density plasmas produced by CO2 laser as a function of I in the range of 1*1015 to 1.6*1016 W/cm2. A novel four frame Mach-Zehnder interferometer using a 1 ps, 532 nm probe laser pulse was developed to record the evolution of the plasma density profile and the motion of the near critical density layer. Using this diagnostic, we observed the motion of the steepened plasma profile due to the incident, time-structured CO2 laser pulse. Experimental results show the hole boring velocity increases from 0.004c to 0.007c as the laser intensity is increased from 1*1015 to 1.6*1016 W/cm2. This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-92-ER40727, NSF grant PHY-0936266 at UCLA.

  17. Imaging of 5f densities of states in resonant photoemission measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arko, A.J.; Koelling, D.D.; Capasso, C.; del Giudice, M.; Olson, C.G.

    1988-07-15

    Medium-resolution spectra (..delta..E = 0.25 eV) at the 5f Fano resonance in uranium intermetallics are compared to spectra above and below the resonance region to show that the 5f (and 6d) spectral weight obtained from resonant photoemission (RP) compares well to the 5f spectral weight obtained at other photon energies. In well-hybridized systems, the 5f signal from RP gives an excellent representation of the 5f density of states (DOS). In narrow-band and localized systems, a satellite may appear in addition to 5f DOS-like structure, indicative of correlation effects.

  18. Accuracy analysis of intrahepatic fat density measurements using dual-energy computed tomography: Validation using a test phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Tomohiro; Misawa, Masaki; Arai, Miki; Shinozaki, Masafumi; Sakamoto, Kayo; Yajima, Yoshinobu; Nozaki, Yuichi; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Masanori; Hinoshita, Fumihiko

    2017-01-01

    Currently, no standardized method for measuring intrahepatic fat density via conventional computed tomography (CT) exists. We aim to quantify intrahepatic fat density via material decomposition analysis using rapid kilovolt peak-switching dual-energy (RSDE) CT. Homogenized porcine liver and fat (lard) were mixed in various ratios to produce phantoms for fat density verification. The actual fat density was measured on the basis of the phantom volume and weight, and these measurements were used as reference densities. The fat and liver mass attenuation coefficients, which were used as the material basis pairs, were employed in the material decomposition analysis. Then, the measured fat density of each phantom was compared with the reference densities. For fat content differences exceeding 2%, the measured fat density for the phantoms became statistically significant (p densities and RSDE-measured fat densities was reasonably high (R > 0.9997); this indicates the validity of this analysis method. Intrahepatic fat density can be measured using the mass attenuation coefficients of fat and liver in a material decomposition analysis. Given the knowledge of the accuracy and the limitations found in this study, our method can quantitatively evaluate fat density.

  19. Measurement and Analysis of Density of Molten Ni-W Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Liang; XIAO Feng; TAO Zainan; MuKai Kusuhiro

    2005-01-01

    The density of molten Ni-W alloys was measured with a modified pycnometric method. It is found that the density of the molten Ni- W alloys decreases with temperature rising, but increases with the increase of tungsten concentration in the alloys. The molar volume of molten Ni- W binary alloys increases with the increase of temperature and tungsten concentration. The partial molar volume of tungsten in liquid Ni- W binary alloy has been calculated approximately as ( - 1.59+ 5.64 × 10-3 T) × 10-6m3 ·mol-1.

  20. Electronic Structure Measurement of Solid Density Plasmas using X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Landen, O L; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R

    2003-08-23

    We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

  1. The decay of excited He from stochastic density-functional theory: a quantum measurement theory interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushong, Neil; Di Ventra, Massimiliano [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0319 (United States)], E-mail: diventra@physics.ucsd.edu

    2008-10-01

    Recently, time-dependent current-density-functional theory has been extended to include the dynamical interaction of quantum systems with external environments (Di Ventra and D'Agosta 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 226403). Here we show that such a theory allows us to study a fundamentally important class of phenomena previously inaccessible by standard density-functional methods: the decay of excited systems. As an example we study the decay of an ensemble of excited He atoms, and discuss these results in the context of quantum measurement theory.

  2. Molar Volume Analysis of Molten Ni-Al-Co Alloy by Measuring the Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; FANG Liang; FU Yuechao; YANG Lingchuan

    2004-01-01

    The density of molten Ni-Al-Co alloys was measured in the temperature range of 1714~1873K using a modified pycnometric method, and the molar volume of molten alloys was analyzed. The density of molten Ni-Al-Co alloys was found to decrease with increasing temperature and Co concentration in alloys. The molar volume of molten Ni-Al-Co alloys increases with increasing Co concentration in alloys. The molar volume of molten Ni-Al-Co alloys shows a negative deviation from the linear molar volume.

  3. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  4. Measurement for titanium density distribution on Ti:sapphire rods for high intensity pump source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usami, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Akihiko; Sugiyama, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kizu, Kyoto (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    2001-10-01

    A Ti:sapphire rod of 190 mm length made by Czochralski (CZ) technique was used in the flashlamp pumped high intensity laser for Yb:glass chirped pulse amplification. In the absorption spectroscopy of the rod immersed in an index matching liquid of methylene iodide, heterogeneous Ti{sup 3+} density distribution was measured along the direction of length. It has been first clarified that the Ti:sapphire rod grown by the CZ technique has 20% difference of the Ti{sup 3+} density at the both ends. (author)

  5. Estimation of electrical conductivity distribution within the human head from magnetic flux density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Nuo; Zhu, S A; He, Bin

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a new algorithm for magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), which uses only one component of the magnetic flux density to reconstruct the electrical conductivity distribution within the body. The radial basis function (RBF) network and simplex method are used in the present approach to estimate the conductivity distribution by minimizing the errors between the 'measured' and model-predicted magnetic flux densities. Computer simulations were conducted in a realistic-geometry head model to test the feasibility of the proposed approach. Single-variable and three-variable simulations were performed to estimate the brain-skull conductivity ratio and the conductivity values of the brain, skull and scalp layers. When SNR = 15 for magnetic flux density measurements with the target skull-to-brain conductivity ratio being 1/15, the relative error (RE) between the target and estimated conductivity was 0.0737 +/- 0.0746 in the single-variable simulations. In the three-variable simulations, the RE was 0.1676 +/- 0.0317. Effects of electrode position uncertainty were also assessed by computer simulations. The present promising results suggest the feasibility of estimating important conductivity values within the head from noninvasive magnetic flux density measurements.

  6. Measuring surface state density and energy distribution in InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halpern, Eliezer; Cohen, Gilad; Gross, Shahar; Henning, Alexander; Matok, Max; Rosenwaks, Yossi [Department of Physical Electronics, School of Electrical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University (Israel); Kretinin, Andrey V. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Shtrikman, Hadas [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Braun Center for Submicrometer Research, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel)

    2014-02-15

    Semiconducting nanowires are expected to have applications in various areas as transistors, sensors, resonators, solar cells, and thermoelectric systems. Understanding the surface properties is crucial for the fabrication of high-performance devices. Due to the large surface-to-volume ratio of nanowires, their surface electronic properties, like surface states, can a have a large effect on the performance of both electronic and optoelectronic devices. At present, determination of the surface state density depends on a combination of experimental measurements of the capacitance and/or drain current, in a nanowire field-effect transistor, and a fitting to simulation. This technique follows certain assumptions, which can severely harm the accuracy of the extracted density of states. In this report, we demonstrate a direct measurement of the surface state density of individual InAs and silicon nanowires. The method is based on measuring the surface potential of a nanowire field-effect transistor, with respect to a changing gate bias. The extracted density of states at the surface helps to explain various electronic phenomena in such devices. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Byrd, J; Sonnad, K; Caspers, Friedhelm; Kroyer, T; Krasnykh, A; Pivi, M

    2009-01-01

    Clouds of low energy electrons in the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solen...

  8. A fundamental measure density functional for fluid and crystal phases of the Asakura-Oosawa model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavifar, Mostafa; Oettel, Martin

    2016-06-01

    We investigate a density functional for the Asakura-Oosawa model of colloid-polymer mixtures, describing both fluid and crystal phases. It is derived by linearizing the two-component fundamental-measure hard sphere tensor functional in the second (polymer) component. We discuss the formulation of an effective density functional for colloids only. For small polymer-colloid size ratios the effective, polymer-induced potential between colloids is short-range attractive and of two-body form but we show that the effective density functional is not equivalent to standard mean-field approaches where attractions are taken into account by terms second order in the colloid density. We calculate numerically free energies and phase diagrams in good agreement with available simulations, furthermore we discuss the colloid and polymer distributions in the crystal and determine equilibrium vacancy concentrations. Numerical results reveal a fairly strong sensitivity to the specific type of underlying fundamental measure hard sphere functional which could aid further development of fundamental measure theory.

  9. Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnad, Kiran; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom; Krasnykh, Anatoly; Pivi, Mauro

    2008-06-01

    Clouds of low energy electronsin the vacuum beam pipes of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energyelectron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We have developed a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave that is independently excited and transmitted over a section of the accelerator. We infer the absolute phase shift with relatively high accuracy from the phase modulation of the transmission due to the modulation of the electron cloud density from a gap in the positively charged beam. We have used this technique for the first time to measure the average electron cloud density over a 50 m straight section in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We have also measured the variation of the density by using low field solenoid magnets to control the electrons.

  10. Design and theoretical analysis of a resonant sensor for liquid density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dezhi; Shi, Jiying; Fan, Shangchun

    2012-01-01

    In order to increase the accuracy of on-line liquid density measurements, a sensor equipped with a tuning fork as the resonant sensitive component is designed in this paper. It is a quasi-digital sensor with simple structure and high precision. The sensor is based on resonance theory and composed of a sensitive unit and a closed-loop control unit, where the sensitive unit consists of the actuator, the resonant tuning fork and the detector and the closed-loop control unit comprises precondition circuit, digital signal processing and control unit, analog-to-digital converter and digital-to-analog converter. An approximate parameters model of the tuning fork is established and the impact of liquid density, position of the tuning fork, temperature and structural parameters on the natural frequency of the tuning fork are also analyzed. On this basis, a tuning fork liquid density measurement sensor is developed. In addition, experimental testing on the sensor has been carried out on standard calibration facilities under constant 20 °C, and the sensor coefficients are calibrated. The experimental results show that the repeatability error is about 0.03% and the accuracy is about 0.4 kg/m(3). The results also confirm that the method to increase the accuracy of liquid density measurement is feasible.

  11. The Effective Number Density of Galaxies for Weak Lensing Measurements in the LSST Project

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C; Jain, B; Kahn, S M; Kirkby, D; Connolly, A; Krughoff, S; Peng, E; Peterson, J R

    2013-01-01

    Future weak lensing surveys potentially hold the highest statistical power for constraining cosmological parameters compared to other cosmological probes. The statistical power of a weak lensing survey is determined by the sky coverage, the inverse of the noise in shear measurements, and the galaxy number density. The combination of the latter two factors is often expressed in terms of $n_{\\rm eff}$ -- the "effective number density of galaxies used for weak lensing measurements". In this work, we estimate $n_{\\rm eff}$ for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) project, the most powerful ground-based lensing survey planned for the next two decades. We investigate how the following factors affect the resulting $n_{\\rm eff}$ of the survey with detailed simulations: (1) survey time, (2) shear measurement algorithm, (3) algorithm for combining multiple exposures, (4) inclusion of data from multiple filter bands, (5) redshift distribution of the galaxies, and (6) masking and blending. For the first time, we qu...

  12. Uncertainty Quantification for Nuclear Density Functional Theory and Information Content of New Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    McDonnell, J D; Higdon, D; Sarich, J; Wild, S M; Nazarewicz, W

    2015-01-01

    Statistical tools of uncertainty quantification can be used to assess the information content of measured observables with respect to present-day theoretical models; to estimate model errors and thereby improve predictive capability; to extrapolate beyond the regions reached by experiment; and to provide meaningful input to applications and planned measurements. To showcase new opportunities offered by such tools, we make a rigorous analysis of theoretical statistical uncertainties in nuclear density functional theory using Bayesian inference methods. By considering the recent mass measurements from the Canadian Penning Trap at Argonne National Laboratory, we demonstrate how the Bayesian analysis and a direct least-squares optimization, combined with high-performance computing, can be used to assess the information content of the new data with respect to a model based on the Skyrme energy density functional approach. Employing the posterior probability distribution computed with a Gaussian process emulator, w...

  13. AFM-porosimetry: density and pore volume measurements of particulate materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörensen, Malin H; Valle-Delgado, Juan J; Corkery, Robert W; Rutland, Mark W; Alberius, Peter C

    2008-06-01

    We introduced the novel technique of AFM-porosimetry and applied it to measure the total pore volume of porous particles with a spherical geometry. The methodology is based on using an atomic force microscope as a balance to measure masses of individual particles. Several particles within the same batch were measured, and by plotting particle mass versus particle volume, the bulk density of the sample can be extracted from the slope of the linear fit. The pore volume is then calculated from the densities of the bulk and matrix materials, respectively. In contrast to nitrogen sorption and mercury porosimetry, this method is capable of measuring the total pore volume regardless of pore size distribution and pore connectivity. In this study, three porous samples were investigated by AFM-porosimetry: one ordered mesoporous sample and two disordered foam structures. All samples were based on a matrix of amorphous silica templated by a block copolymer, Pluronic F127, swollen to various degrees with poly(propylene glycol). In addition, the density of silica spheres without a template was measured by two independent techniques: AFM and the Archimedes principle.

  14. The Effect of the Presence and Density of Shewanella oneidensis on Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, K.; Halsey, J.

    2011-12-01

    A recent interest in the use of non-invasive geophysical methods to detect the presence of and measure the growth of microbes in the subsurface has arisen due to the potential use of such methods to monitor the progress of bioremediation. Previous research to this end has focused on electrical measurements, such as complex resistivity, which are sensitive to the presence of microbes but can be difficult to interpret. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), an emerging near-surface geophysical method, is sensitive to the presence and physiochemical environment of hydrogen. Typically, NMR measurements in geophysics are used to detect hydrogen in water or hydrocarbons and to determine its pore environment; however, NMR imaging measurements have shown that NMR can also detect hydrogen in microbes. Geophysical NMR measurements thus have the potential to directly detect microbes in geologic material or indirectly detect the way in which the presence of microbes alters the physical and chemical properties of a water-saturated geologic material. This laboratory-scale study was designed to explore the effect of the presence and density of microbes on NMR relaxation measurements. Measurements were collected on microbial slurries and microbes in porous media both during microbial growth and on samples with known microbial density. Shewanella oneidensis was used as a representative environmental microbe in this study. The research shows that low field NMR measurements are sensitive to the presence and density of microbes and provides fundamental information required to determine if low-field NMR measurements can be used to monitor microbial growth during bioremediation.

  15. Current density distribution mapping in PEM fuel cells as an instrument for operational measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geske, M.; Heuer, M.; Heideck, G.; Styczynski, Z. A. [Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Chair Electric Power Networks and Renewable Energy Sources, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes. (author)

  16. Current Density Distribution Mapping in PEM Fuel Cells as An Instrument for Operational Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Geske

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC. Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes.

  17. Measurement of local current density of all-vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wen-Yen; Leu, Chih-Hsing; Wu, Chun-Hsing; Chen, Yong-Song

    2014-12-01

    This article presents a preliminary study of the measurement of local current density in all-vanadium redox flow batteries. Two batteries are designed and manufactured in this study, and the experimental results are compared. In the first cell, the current collector is divided into 25 segments, and the flow field plate is not segmented, whereas in the other cell, the flow field plate is segmented. The effects of the electrolyte flow rate on the battery efficiencies and the local current density variation are investigated. The experimental results show that the current density near the outlet significantly decreases when the discharge capacity approaches zero. In addition, the battery has a larger discharge depth at a higher electrolyte flow rate.

  18. Investigation of zonal flows by using the collective scattering measurement of density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H. G.; Yu, Y.; Lan, T.; Li, Y. D.; Liu, A. D.; Xie, J. L.; Liu, W. D.; Yu, C. X.; Zhang, W. Y.; Ti, A.; Li, J. G.

    2015-09-01

    The poloidal {{E}r}× {{B}\\text{T}} rotation velocities in the core plasma region are studied using the instantaneous frequency method (IFM) with the density fluctuations measured by the CO2 laser collective scattering diagnostics on the HT-7 tokamak. A coherent mode is observed in the fluctuations of poloidal velocities with the mode frequency from 10 to 20 kHz. It is identified as geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) zonal flow with poloidal symmetry (m = 0) and its mode frequency coinciding with the theoretical expected GAM frequency. The nonlinear interactions are investigated by applying the envelope analysis on the density fluctuations. The results confirm that the envelope modulation in the high frequency density fluctuations only comes from the shearing by GAM. The comparison between IFM and envelope analysis is also discussed.

  19. Differential heating: A versatile method for thermal conductivity measurements in high-energy-density matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping, Y.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Correa, A.; Shepherd, R.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Sterne, P. A.; Whitley, H. D.; Fratanduono, D.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Sio, H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We propose a method for thermal conductivity measurements of high energy density matter based on differential heating. A temperature gradient is created either by surface heating of one material or at an interface between two materials by different energy deposition. The subsequent heat conduction across the temperature gradient is observed by various time-resolved probing techniques. Conceptual designs of such measurements using laser heating, proton heating, and x-ray heating are presented. The sensitivity of the measurements to thermal conductivity is confirmed by simulations.

  20. Spectral discrete probability density function of measured wind turbine noise in the far field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtiani, Payam; Denison, Adelaide

    2015-01-01

    Of interest is the spectral character of wind turbine noise at typical residential set-back distances. In this paper, a spectral statistical analysis has been applied to immission measurements conducted at three locations. This method provides discrete probability density functions for the Turbine ONLY component of the measured noise. This analysis is completed for one-third octave sound levels, at integer wind speeds, and is compared to existing metrics for measuring acoustic comfort as well as previous discussions on low-frequency noise sources.

  1. Spectral discrete probability density function of measured wind turbine noise in the far field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam eAshtiani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Of interest is the spectral character of wind turbine noise at typical residential set-back distances. In this paper a spectral statistical analysis has been applied to immission measurements conducted at three locations. This method provides discrete probability density functions for the Turbine ONLY component of the measured noise. This analysis is completed for 1/3rd Octave sound levels, at integer wind speeds, and is compared to existing metrics for measuring acoustic comfort as well as previous discussions on low frequency noise sources.

  2. Systematic measurements of opacity dependence on temperature, density, and atomic number at stellar interior conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, James; Nagayama, T.; Loisel, G. P.; Rochau, G. A.; Blancard, C.; Colgan, J.; Cosse, Ph.; Faussurier, G.; Fontes, C. J.; Golovkin, I.; Hansen, S. B.; Iglesias, C. A.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Mancini, R. C.; Nahar, S. N.; Orban, C.; Pradhan, A. K.; Sherrill, M.; Wilson, B. G.; Pain, J. C.; Gilleron, F.

    2016-10-01

    Model predictions for iron opacity are notably different from measurements performed at conditions similar to the boundary between the solar radiation and convection zone. New measurements at the Sandia Z facility with chromium, iron, and nickel are providing a systematic study of how opacity changes with temperature, density, and atomic number. These measurements help further evaluate possibilities for experiment errors and help constrain hypotheses for opacity model refinements. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. TO COMPARE THE ACCURACY OF PREDICTED BIRTH WEIGHT BY ULTRASONOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENTS OBTAINED JUST BEFORE AND AT TERM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debraj

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fetal weight measurement by ultrasonographic methods can be considered as an important modality for antenatal prediction of fetal weight (preferable single USG should be done at 34 - 36.9wks to rule out various complications of pregnancy such as macrosomia, IUGR etc which enable us to be prepared for the delivery of the baby and prevent any further dreaded complications resulting out of these conditions including shoulder dystocia, severely compromised baby AIM: To compare the accuracy of predicted birth weight by ultrasonographic measurements obtained just before and at term. METHOD: The study was performed in a tertiary care Hospital in West Bengal between 1st July 2012 to 30th June 2013 on 100 Pregnant women attending Antenatal Clinic (34 - 36.9 wks with a live singleton pregnancy, all women underwent ultrasound examination twice( 37 weeks. The estimated fetal weight calculated using Hadlock’s formula. D ata were then compared for each pair of sonograms from the same patient using a paired t test. P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: The study included 100 patients undergoing 200 sonograms. The mean absolute error of the predicted birth weight was smaller for period 1 (34 - 36.9 wks than for period 2 (≥ 37 wks (152 ± 125g compared with 193.5 ± 121g, P=0.0001. The overall mean absolute percent errors in predicting birth weight were 5.6 ± 4.7 (Period 1 & 7.6 ± 4.3 (Period 2 for IUGR and 5.4 ± 3.9 (Period 1 & 6 ± 3 (Period 2 for Macrosomia. Averaging data from both gestational periods did not improve the prediction of birth weight. Our study did not show any correlation between latency and the accuracy of birth weight predictions. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that serial sonograms in the late third trimester do not improve the ability to predict birth weight, even in abnormally grown fetuses. So, a single sonogram between 34 and 37 weeks’ gestation is recommended for prediction of birth

  4. Collaborating with the local community of Kullorsuaq, Greenland to obtain high-quality hydrographic measurements near Alison Glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D. F.; Turrin, M.; Tinto, K. J.; Giulivi, C. F.; Cochran, J. R.; Bell, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Warming ocean waters around Greenland have been implicated, along with warmer air temperatures, in the rapid increase of melt of the tidewater glaciers that drain the ice sheet. Most available regional oceanographic measurements have been collected during the summer seasons and are concentrated near the largest and most accessible glaciers. In order to gain a more comprehensive picture of the changing environment around the entirety of Greenland, more fjords, especially in the north, must be sampled. In July 2014, we travelled to Kullorsuaq in Northwest Greenland in order to foster a partnership with the local community to obtain new hydrographic data from CTD casts near Alison Glacier (74.6N, 57W). The terminus of this glacier abruptly retreated 10 km between 2000 and 2006. Although adequate observations from that time period are unavailable, our recently collected temperature and salinity data suggests that the deep water near Alison is similar to the waters further south, where near-synchronous ocean warming and glacial acceleration has been documented. Over the course of two sampling days, a hand-operated winch from a small boat was used to make standard CTD casts in front of Alison Glacier. We find evidence of glacial and mélange melt and the signature of both Polar and Atlantic Water masses at depth. Along-fjord casts illustrate how the ocean waters are modified as they circulate in and out of the fjord and the interaction of this water with the melting glacial front. At 500m depths, ocean temperatures are about 3°C above the in-situ freezing point of seawater, suggesting a possible influence of warm ocean waters on the mass loss of Alison Glacier. Using NASA Operation IceBridge and satellite altimetry data, we relate our new hydrographic data to the observed recent changes in Alison Glacier. An additional important result is that this short field campaign uncovered the possibility of working with local Greenlandic communities to aid scientists in both

  5. Development of a spectroscopic technique for simultaneous magnetic field, electron density, and temperature measurements in ICF-relevant plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, E. C.; Koch, J. A.; Presura, R.; Angermeier, W. A.; Darling, T.; Haque, S.; Mancini, R. C.; Covington, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Spectroscopic techniques in the visible range are often used in plasma experiments to measure B-field induced Zeeman splitting, electron densities via Stark broadening, and temperatures from Doppler broadening. However, when electron densities and temperatures are sufficiently high, the broadening of the Stark and Doppler components can dominate the emission spectra and obscure the Zeeman component. In this research, we are developing a time-resolved multi-axial technique for measuring the Zeeman, Stark, and Doppler broadened line emission of dense magnetized plasmas for Z-pinch and Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) accelerators. The line emission is used to calculate the electron densities, temperatures, and B-fields. In parallel, we are developing a line-shape modeling code that incorporates the broadening effects due to Stark, Doppler, and Zeeman effects for dense magnetized plasma. This manuscript presents the details of the experimental setup and line shape code, along with the results obtained from an Al iii doublet at the University of Nevada, Reno at Nevada Terawatt Facility. Future tests are planned to further evaluate the technique and modeling on other material wire array, gas puff, and DPF platforms.

  6. Reproducibility of the cutoff probe for the measurement of electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Oh, W. Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); You, S. J., E-mail: sjyou@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, J. H.; You, K. H.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H., E-mail: jhkim86@kriss.re.kr [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-306 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.-S. [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gunsan 573-540 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Since a plasma processing control based on plasma diagnostics attracted considerable attention in industry, the reproducibility of the diagnostics using in this application has become a great interest. Because the cutoff probe is one of the potential candidates for this application, knowing the reproducibility of the cutoff probe measurement becomes quit important in the cutoff probe application research. To test the reproducibility of the cutoff probe measurement, in this paper, a comparative study among the different cutoff probe measurements was performed. The comparative study revealed remarkable result: the cutoff probe has a great reproducibility for the electron density measurement, i.e., there are little differences among measurements by different probes made by different experimenters. The discussion including the reason for the result was addressed via this paper by using a basic measurement principle of cutoff probe and a comparative experiment with Langmuir probe.

  7. Measurement and modeling of neutral, radical, and ion densities in H2-N2-Ar plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sode, M.; Jacob, W.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Kersten, H.

    2015-02-01

    A comprehensive experimental investigation of absolute ion and neutral species densities in an inductively coupled H2-N2-Ar plasma was carried out. Additionally, the radical and ion densities were calculated using a zero-dimensional rate equation model. The H2-N2-Ar plasma was studied at a pressure of 1.5 Pa and an rf power of 200 W. The N2 partial pressure fraction was varied between fN2=0 % and 56% by a simultaneous reduction of the H2 partial pressure fraction. The Ar partial pressure fraction was held constant at about 1%. NH3 was found to be produced almost exclusively on the surfaces of the chamber wall. NH3 contributes up to 12% to the background gas. To calculate the radical densities with the rate equation model, it is necessary to know the corresponding wall loss times twrad of the radicals. twrad was determined by the temporal decay of radical densities in the afterglow with ionization threshold mass spectrometry during pulsed operation and based on these experimental data the absolute densities of the radical species were calculated and compared to measurement results. Ion densities were determined using a plasma monitor (mass and energy resolved mass spectrometer). H3+ is the dominant ion in the range of 0.0 ≤fN2reasonably well. The ion chemistry, i.e., the production and loss processes of the ions and radicals, is discussed in detail. The main features, i.e., the qualitative abundance of the ion species and the ion density dependence on the N2 partial pressure fraction, are well reproduced by the model.

  8. Sourceless formation evaluation. An LWD solution providing density and neutron measurements without the use of radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, R.; Reichel, N. [Schlumberger, Sungai Buloh (Malaysia)

    2013-08-01

    For many years the industry has been searching for a way to eliminate the logistical difficulties and risk associated with deployment of radioisotopes for formation evaluation. The traditional gamma-gamma density (GGD) measurement uses the scattering of 662-keV gamma rays from a 137Cs radioisotopic source, with a 30.17-year half-life, to determine formation density. The traditional neutron measurement uses an Am-Be source emitting neutrons with an energy around 4 MeV, with a half-life of 432 years. Both these radioisotopic sources pose health, security, and environmental risks. Pulsed-neutron generators have been used in the industry for several decades in wireline tools and more recently in logging-while-drilling tools. These generators produce 14-MeV neutrons, many of which interact with the nuclei in the formation. Elastic collisions allow a neutron porosity measurement to be derived, which has been available to the industry since 2005. Inelastic interactions are typically followed by the emission of a variety of high-energy gamma rays. Similar to the case of the GGD measurement, the transport and attenuation of these gamma rays is a strong function of the formation density. However, the gamma-ray source is now distributed over a volume within the formation, where gamma rays have been induced by neutron interactions and the source can no longer be considered to be a point as in the case of a radioisotopic source. In addition, the extent of the induced source region depends on the transport of the fast neutrons from the source to the point of gamma-ray production. Even though the physics is more complex, it is possible to measure the formation density if the fast neutron transport is taken into account when deriving the density answer. This paper briefly reviews the physics underlying the sourceless neutron porosity and recently introduced neutron-gamma density (SNGD) measurement, demonstrates how they can be used in traditional workflows and illustrates their

  9. A new and facile method for measurement of apparent density of monodisperse polymer beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Li, Yuanpeng; Jing, Ying; Xing, Chengguo; Chang, Jin; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2010-03-15

    The apparent density, an intrinsic physical property of polymer beads, plays an important role in the application of beads in micro-total analysis systems and separation. Here we have developed a new, facile and milligram-scale method to describe the motion of beads in aqueous solution and further detect the apparent density of beads. The motion of beads in solutions is determined by the viscosity of solutions and the density difference between beads and solutions. In this study, using various glycerol aqueous solutions with certain viscosities and densities, the motion time (i.e. floating or sedimentation time) of hybrid polymer beads was experimentally measured and theoretically deduced, and consequently, the apparent density of monodisperse beads can be quickly and easily calculated. The results indicated that the present method provided a more precise way to predict the movement of hybrid beads in aqueous solution compared with the approach for commercial use. This new method can be potentially employed in flow cytometry, suspension stability, and particle analysis systems.

  10. Conductrometric, density and thermal measurements of the M2S2O7 (M = Na, K, Rb, Cs) salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatem, Gerard; Abdoun, Fatma; Gaune-Escard, Marcelle;

    1998-01-01

    Physico-chemical properties, such as densities, conductivities, enthalpies of phase transitions and melting points, have been measured and summarised for the alkali pyrosulphates Na2S2O7, K2S2O7, Rb2S2O7, CS2S2O7. The densities of the molten pyrosulphates could be expressed by the linear expressi...... rho=A+B(T-T-m) where T-m is the middle temperature of the temperature range measured, i.e. from the melting point and up to 550 degrees C at the maximum. The specific conductivities of the molten pyrosulphates have been expressed by the equation rho=A+B(T-T-m)+C(T-T-m)(2)+ D(T-T-m)(3......) in the temperature range from the melting point and up to 500 degrees C at the maximum. From these measurements also the activation energy for the equivalent conductivity of the alkali cations in the melts could be calculated and compared to the analogous alkalisulphates. By calorimetric investigations of the alkali...... pyrosulphates the temperatures of fusion, the enthalpies and entropies of fusion and possible solid-solid transitions together with the molar heat capacities of the solid and liquid pyrosulphates at 300-800 K, have been obtained and discussed in relation to the conductrometric measurements and the few related...

  11. Feasibility Studies of the Two Filters Method in TJ-II for Electron Temperature Measurements in High Density Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baiao, D.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.; Varandas, C.

    2009-07-01

    The TJ-II plasma soft X-ray emission was studied in order to establish an adequate setup for an electron temperature diagnostic suitable for high density, with spatial and temporal resolutions, based on the two-filters method. The preliminary experimental results reported were obtained with two diagnostics (an X-ray PHA based on a Ge detector and a tomography system) already installed in TJ-II stellarator. These results lead to the conclusion that the two-filters method was a suitable option for an electron temperature diagnostic for high-density plasmas in TJ-II. We present the design and fi rst results obtained with a prototype for the measurement of electron temperature in TJ-II plasmas heated with energetic neutral beams. This system consists in two AXUV20A detectors which measure the soft X-ray plasma emissivity trough beryllium filters of different thickness. From the two-filters technique it is possible to estimate the electron temperature. The analyses carried out allowed concluding which filter thicknesses are most suited for TJ-II plasmas, and enhanced the need of a computer code to simulate signals and plasma compositions. (Author) 7 refs.

  12. Measurement of induced magnetic flux density using injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Ohin; Woo, Eung Je

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures induced magnetic flux densities subject to externally injected currents in order to visualize conductivity distributions inside an electrically conducting object. Injection currents induce magnetic flux densities that appear in phase parts of acquired MR image data. In the conventional current injection method, we inject currents during the time segment between the end of the first RF pulse and the beginning of the reading gradient in order to ensure the gradient linearity. Noting that longer current injections can accumulate more phase changes, we propose a new pulse sequence called injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) where the duration of the injection current pulse is extended until the end of the reading gradient. Since the current injection during the reading gradient disturbs the gradient linearity, we first analyze the MR signal produced by the ICNE pulse sequence and suggest a novel algorithm to extract the induced magnetic flux density from the acquired MR signal. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments show that the new method is clearly advantageous in terms of the reduced noise level in measured magnetic flux density data. The amount of noise reduction depends on the choice of the data acquisition time and it was about 24% when we used a prolonged data acquisition time of 10.8 ms. The ICNE method will enhance the clinical applicability of the MREIT technique when it is combined with an appropriate phase artefact minimization method.

  13. Measurements of electron cloud density in the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron with the microwave transmission method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Federmann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron cloud effect can pose severe performance limitations in high-energy particle accelerators as the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS. Mitigation techniques such as vacuum chamber thin film coatings with low secondary electron yields (SEY<1.3 aim to reduce or even suppress this effect. The microwave transmission method, developed and first applied in 2003 at the SPS, measures the integrated electron cloud density over a long section of an accelerator. This paper summarizes the theory and measurement principle and describes the new SPS microwave transmission setup used to study the electron cloud mitigation of amorphous carbon coated SPS dipole vacuum chambers. Comparative results of carbon coated and bare stainless steel dipole vacuum chambers are given for the beam with nominal LHC 25 ns bunch-to-bunch spacing in the SPS and the electron cloud density is derived.

  14. Double-cavity radiometer for high-flux density solar radiation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parretta, A; Antonini, A; Armani, M; Nenna, G; Flaminio, G; Pellegrino, M

    2007-04-20

    A radiometric method has been developed, suitable for both total power and flux density profile measurement of concentrated solar radiation. The high-flux density radiation is collected by a first optical cavity, integrated, and driven to a second optical cavity, where, attenuated, it is measured by a conventional radiometer operating under a stationary irradiation regime. The attenuation factor is regulated by properly selecting the aperture areas in the two cavities. The radiometer has been calibrated by a pulsed solar simulator at concentration levels of hundreds of suns. An optical model and a ray-tracing study have also been developed and validated, by which the potentialities of the radiometer have been largely explored.

  15. Electron Cloud Density Measurements in Accelerator Beam-pipe Using Resonant Microwave Excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Sikora, John P

    2013-01-01

    An accelerator beam can generate low energy electrons in the beam-pipe, generally called electron cloud, that can produce instabilities in a positively charged beam. One method of measuring the electron cloud density is by coupling microwaves into and out of the beam-pipe and observing the response of the microwaves to the presence of the electron cloud. This paper describes a technique in which the beam-pipe is resonantly excited with microwaves and the electron cloud density calculated from the change that it produces in the resonant frequency of the beam-pipe. The resonant technique has the advantage that measurements can be localized to sections of beam-pipe that are a meter or less in length, as well as greatly improving the signal to noise ratio.

  16. Cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius, and number density measurements using a Raman lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteman, David N. [Laser Remote Sensing Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States); Melfi, S. Harvey [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore (United States)

    1999-12-27

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius, and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid microspheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested. (c) 1999 American Geophysical Union.

  17. Plasma Density Measurements in Cable Gun Experiments with a Sensitive He-Ne Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lin; HE An; JIANG Wei; XU Min; WU Shoudong; LI Ye

    2007-01-01

    A time-resolved sensitive He-Ne laser interferometer without complicated active stabilization was built up and applied to low-density plasma measurements. A precision of about 0.2° in phase measurements was achieved with a minimum line-integrated plasma density as low as 8.3×l013 cm-2. With this interferometer, the characteristics of the plasma generated by a cable plasma gun was investigated systematically. The reproducibility, spatial and temporal distributions and the averaged injection velocity of the plasma are presented. In addition, the interaction of the plasma flow with a conductor was studied by placing a metal plate in the downstream of the cable gun.

  18. Apparatus for accurate density measurements of fluids based on a magnetic suspension balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Maoqiong; Li, Huiya; Guo, Hao; Dong, Xueqiang; Wu, J. F.

    2012-06-01

    A new apparatus for accurate pressure, density and temperature (p, ρ, T) measurements over wide ranges of (p, ρ, T) (90 K to 290 K; 0 MPa to 3 MPa; 0 kg/m3 to 2000 kg/m3) is described. This apparatus is based on a magnetic suspension balance which applies the Archimedes' buoyancy principle. In order to verify the new apparatus, comprehensive (p, ρ, T) measurements on pure nitrogen were carried out. The maximum relative standard uncertainty is 0.09% in density. The maximum standard uncertainty in temperature is 5 mK, and that in pressure is 250 Pa for 1.5 MPa and 390 Pa for 3MPa full scale range respectively. The experimental data were compared with selected literature data and good agreements were found.

  19. Cloud Liquid Water, Mean Droplet Radius and Number Density Measurements Using a Raman Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, David N.; Melfi, S. Harvey

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for measuring cloud liquid water, mean droplet radius and droplet number density is outlined. The technique is based on simultaneously measuring Raman and Mie scattering from cloud liquid droplets using a Raman lidar. Laboratory experiments on liquid micro-spheres have shown that the intensity of Raman scattering is proportional to the amount of liquid present in the spheres. This fact is used as a constraint on calculated Mie intensity assuming a gamma function particle size distribution. The resulting retrieval technique is shown to give stable solutions with no false minima. It is tested using Raman lidar data where the liquid water signal was seen as an enhancement to the water vapor signal. The general relationship of retrieved average radius and number density is consistent with traditional cloud physics models. Sensitivity to the assumed maximum cloud liquid water amount and the water vapor mixing ratio calibration are tested. Improvements to the technique are suggested.

  20. Simultaneous streak and frame interferometry for electron density measurements of laser produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, H. J., E-mail: hjquevedo@utexas.edu; McCormick, M.; Wisher, M.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, T. [Center for High Energy Density Science, Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    A system of two collinear probe beams with different wavelengths and pulse durations was used to capture simultaneously snapshot interferograms and streaked interferograms of laser produced plasmas. The snapshots measured the two dimensional, path-integrated, electron density on a charge-coupled device while the radial temporal evolution of a one dimensional plasma slice was recorded by a streak camera. This dual-probe combination allowed us to select plasmas that were uniform and axisymmetric along the laser direction suitable for retrieving the continuous evolution of the radial electron density of homogeneous plasmas. Demonstration of this double probe system was done by measuring rapidly evolving plasmas on time scales less than 1 ns produced by the interaction of femtosecond, high intensity, laser pulses with argon gas clusters. Experiments aimed at studying homogeneous plasmas from high intensity laser-gas or laser-cluster interaction could benefit from the use of this probing scheme.

  1. Simultaneous streak and frame interferometry for electron density measurements of laser produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, H. J.; McCormick, M.; Wisher, M.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Ditmire, T.

    2016-01-01

    A system of two collinear probe beams with different wavelengths and pulse durations was used to capture simultaneously snapshot interferograms and streaked interferograms of laser produced plasmas. The snapshots measured the two dimensional, path-integrated, electron density on a charge-coupled device while the radial temporal evolution of a one dimensional plasma slice was recorded by a streak camera. This dual-probe combination allowed us to select plasmas that were uniform and axisymmetric along the laser direction suitable for retrieving the continuous evolution of the radial electron density of homogeneous plasmas. Demonstration of this double probe system was done by measuring rapidly evolving plasmas on time scales less than 1 ns produced by the interaction of femtosecond, high intensity, laser pulses with argon gas clusters. Experiments aimed at studying homogeneous plasmas from high intensity laser-gas or laser-cluster interaction could benefit from the use of this probing scheme.

  2. Mobile lidar system for measurement of water vapor mixing ratio and ozone number density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, D.

    1988-01-01

    The Water Vapor Lidar was modified and extended to make differential absorption measurements of ozone. Water vapor measurements make use of a weak molecular scattering process known as Raman scattering. It is characterized by a shift in wavelength of the scattered beam of light relative to the incident one. Some of the energy of the incident photon is converted to vibrational or rotational energy within the molecule leaving the scattered photon shifted to a slightly longer wavelength. When performing water vapor measurements, profiles are acquired of water vapor mixing ratio from near the ground to beyond 7 km every 2 minutes. By forming a color composite image of the individual profiles, the spatial and temporal evolution of water vapor is visible with vertical resolution of 75 to 150m and temporal resolution of 2 minutes. The ozone lidar is intended for use as a cross calibration facility for other stationary ozone lidar systems. The ozone measurement employs the technique known as differential absorption. The backscattered laser radiation from two different wavelengths is measured. Successful measurements of 308 nm returns were made from 80 km with an averaging period of 6 hours. Using these data and a standard atmosphere density curve, an ozone number density profile was made which agrees very well with the standard ozone curve between 20 and 40 km.

  3. MEASUREMENT OF ROOT LENGTH DENSITY IN INTACT SAMPLES USING X-RADIOGRAPHY AND IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Pierret

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of root system attributes is of critical importance to understand and model plant growth. Root length density, the length of roots per unit volume of soil, is one of the important parameters required to understand plant performance. Measuring techniques currently in use to assess this parameter, such as for example core washing, are notoriously imprecise and labour-intensive. Roots and soil being inextricably linked, it is virtually impossible to separate them without loosing a significant amount of the root sample to be measured. This noticeably compromises the accuracy of washing techniques. For this reason, non-invasive measurement approaches are highly desirable. Here, a method based on the combination of X-radiography and image analysis is proposed as a new alternative for the measurement of root length density from intact samples. The successive steps of the method, from sampling to image acquisition are briefly described. A specific measurement algorithm, designed to account for the complex spatial arrangement of the roots within the samples is then presented and discussed in detail.

  4. Scattered and (n,2n) neutrons as a measure of areal density in ICF capsules

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, D C; Disdier, L; Houry, M; Bourgade, J L; Murphy, T J

    2002-01-01

    The fraction of low-energy neutrons created from 14 MeV neutrons by elastic scattering and (n,2n) reactions on D and T has been proposed as a measure of the areal density (radial integral of density) of ICF targets. In simple situations the fraction of neutrons between 9.4 (the upper energy of T+T neutrons) and 13 MeV (below the Doppler broadened 14.1 MeV peak) is proportional to the at the time of neutron production. This ratio does not depend upon the temperature of the fuel, as does the number of reaction-in-flight neutrons. The ratio of neutrons elastically scattered at a specific energy (e.g. 13 MeV) to the total number of neutrons can be measured along different lines of sight. The ratio of two perpendicular measurements provides a quantitative measure of asymmetry. A detector can be placed inside the target chamber to measure these low-energy neutrons. If it is close enough to the target that measurements are made before the 14 MeV neutrons reach the chamber wall, gamma rays can be a negligible back...

  5. Multiple-capillary measurement of RBC speed, flux, and density with optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghwan; Wu, Weicheng; Lesage, Frederic; Boas, David A

    2013-11-01

    As capillaries exhibit heterogeneous and fluctuating dynamics even during baseline, a technique measuring red blood cell (RBC) speed and flux over many capillaries at the same time is needed. Here, we report that optical coherence tomography can capture individual RBC passage simultaneously over many capillaries located at different depths. Further, we demonstrate the ability to quantify RBC speed, flux, and linear density. This technique will provide a means to monitor microvascular flow dynamics over many capillaries at different depths at the same time.

  6. A fibre based triature interferometer for measuring rapidly evolving, ablatively driven plasma densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, J.; Bland, S. N.; Threadgold, J.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the first use of a fibre interferometer incorporating triature analysis for measuring rapidly evolving plasma densities of ne ˜ 1013/cm3 and above, such as those produced by simple coaxial plasma guns. The resultant system is extremely portable, easy to field in experiments, relatively cheap to produce, and—with the exception of a small open area in which the plasma is sampled—safe in operation as all laser light is enclosed.

  7. Using the Time-Lag-Correlation function of Dual-Aperture-Scintillometer measurements to obtain the Crosswind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinther, van D.; Hartogensis, O.K.

    2014-01-01

    The wind component perpendicular to airport runways, the so-called crosswind (U⊥), introduces a safety risk for airplanes landing and taking off. The crosswind U⊥ on the runway is in general measured by cup anemometers and wind vanes, which are point measurements. The U⊥ measured by a scintillometer

  8. Do the values of prostate specific antigen obtained from fresh and dried urine reflect the serum measurements?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan S Saglam

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions : We conclude that PSA values obtained from fresh and dried urine could not reflect serum PSA values. But, because dried urine on a filter paper can be stable for years, it could be used for forensic purposes.

  9. A Noncontact Measurement Technique for the Density and Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Solid and Liquid Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang K.; Thiessen, David B.; Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1996-01-01

    A noncontact measurement technique for the density and the thermal expansion refractory materials in their molten as well as solid phases is presented. This technique is based on the video image processing of a levitated sample. Experiments were performed using the high-temperature electrostatic levitator (HTESL) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in which 2-3 mm diameter samples can be levitated, melted, and radiatively cooled in a vacuum. Due to the axisymmetric nature of the molten samples when levitated in the HTESL, a rather simple digital image analysis can be employed to accurately measure the volumetric change as a function of temperature. Density and the thermal expansion coefficient measurements were made on a pure nickel sample to test the accuracy of the technique in the temperature range of 1045-1565 C. The result for the liquid phase density can be expressed by p = 8.848 + (6.730 x 10(exp -4)) x T (degC) g/cu cm within 0.8% accuracy, and the corresponding thermal expansion coefficient can be expressed by Beta=(9.419 x 10(exp -5)) - (7.165 x 10(exp -9) x T (degC)/K within 0.2% accuracy.

  10. Sensing fluid viscosity and density through mechanical impedance measurement using a whisker transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Feng; Ling, Shih-Fu

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a new technique for fluid viscosity and density sensing through measuring the mechanical impedance of the fluid load applied on a sphere. A piezoelectric whisker transducer (WT) is proposed which acts simultaneously as both the actuator to excite the sphere tip to oscillate in the fluid and the sensor to measure the force, velocity and mechanical impedance. The relationship between mechanical impedance of the fluid load and electrical impedance of the WT is derived based on a transduction matrix model which characterizes the electro-mechanical transduction process of the WT in both directions. The mechanical impedance is further related to the fluid viscosity and density using a theoretical model. The establishment of this fluid-mechanical-electrical relationship allows the WT to extract the fluid viscosity and density conveniently and accurately just from its electrical impedance. Experimental studies are carried out to calibrate the WT and test its performance using glycerol-water mixtures. It is concluded that the WT is capable of providing results comparable to those of standard viscometers within a wide measurement range due to its low working frequency and large vibration amplitude. Its unique self-actuation-and-sensing feature makes it a suitable solution for online fluid sensing.

  11. First results from plasma density measurements in the FTU tokamak by means of a two-frequency pulsed time-of-flight refractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, V. G.; Malyshev, A. Yu.; Markov, V. K.; Petrov, A. A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Avino, F.; Angelis, R. de; Tudisco, O. [ENEA-UT Fusione Centro Ricerche Frascati (Italy)

    2012-04-15

    A pulsed time-of-flight refractometer was developed and tested to determine the mean plasma density in the T-11M tokamak by measuring the propagation time of nanosecond microwave pulses in plasma. Later, it was also proposed to use such an instrument to measure and control the mean plasma density in the ITER tokamak by probing the plasma with an extraordinary wave, the electric field of which is perpendicular to the magnetic field in plasma, in the transparency window at frequencies of 50-100 GHz. To avoid the effect of the density profile shape on the measurement results in the nonlinear mode of refractometer operation (near the cutoff), a system operating at two different probing frequencies was developed and tested. Such a system provides two values of the time delay, which can be used to estimate the peaking factor of the density distribution {alpha} and correctly determine the linear density Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket Nl Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket , regardless of the density profile (assuming a smooth density profile of the form of N({rho}) = N(0)(1 - {rho}{sup 2}){sup {alpha}}, where N(0) is the central plasma density and {rho} = r/a is the normalized plasma radius). The first experiments on density measurements in the FTU tokamak performed with this refractometer are described, and results from these experiments are presented. The formation of a thin dense plasma layer in the zone of a strong magnetic field (the so-called MARFE layer) at a relatively low (for FTU) plasma density of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} was detected. The thickness of this layer, determined from the refractometry data, agrees well with the data obtained using a digital camera.

  12. Density measurements under pressure for the binary system 1-propanol plus toluene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeberg-Mikkelsen, Claus Kjær; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    2005-01-01

    The density of the binary system composed of 1-propanol and toluene has been measured under pressure using a vibrating-tube densimeter. The measurements have been performed for four different compositions as well as the pure compounds at four temperatures in the range of (303.15 to 333.15) K and ...... but also due to the electron donor- acceptor-type formation of hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl group of 1-propanol and the pi electrons of toluene because aromatic hydrocarbons can act as electron donors....

  13. Density distribution of {sup 14}Be from reaction cross-section measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriguchi, T. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ozawa, A., E-mail: ozawa@tac.tsukuba.ac.jp [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ishimoto, S. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Abe, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Fukuda, M. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Hachiuma, I. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Ishibashi, Y.; Ito, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Kuboki, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Lantz, M. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nagae, D. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Namihira, K. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Nishimura, D. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ohtsubo, T. [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Ooishi, H. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Suda, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, H. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Takechi, M.; Tanaka, K. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); and others

    2014-09-15

    We measured the reaction cross sections of the two-neutron halo nucleus {sup 14}Be with proton and carbon targets at about 41 and 76 MeV/nucleon. Based on a Glauber model calculation, we deduced the matter density distribution of {sup 14}Be in which previously measured interaction cross sections at relativistic energies were also included. An s-wave dominance in {sup 14}Be has been confirmed, although the halo tail of {sup 14}Be is not distributed as much as that of {sup 11}Li. Significant mixing of the p-wave in addition to the s- and d-wave is also suggested.

  14. Morphology and gas sensing characteristics of density-controlled CuO nanostructures obtained by varying the oxygen partial pressure during growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongjin; Jin, Changhyun; Noh, Youngwook; Park, Seokhyun; Choi, Sun-Woo

    2016-07-01

    By exerting different O2 partial pressures (0, 20, 40, and 60 sccm) onto copper substrates, we discovered that the growth parameter, namely, the O2 flow rate, affects the degree of nucleation, diameter, length, and crystalline quality of CuO nanowires (NWs). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to analyze the evolution of the morphological and the microstructural changes in the CuO nanostructures. The formation of a Cu2O interlayer between the Cu and the CuO layers could be adjusted by controlling more precisely the O2 flow rate. In addition, the reducing (H2S) and the oxidizing (O2, NO2, and SO2) gas sensing performances of these O2-assisted CuO NWs were compared with those of CuO NWs grown in static air. The response to the reducing H2S of the sensors based on CuO NWs grown using O2 at 40 sccm showed a higher electrical change and fas