WorldWideScience

Sample records for density maps obtained

  1. Mapping Bone Mineral Density Obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2017-01-01

    Methods for relating or mapping estimates of volumetric Bone Mineral Density (vBMD) obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction (BVF) are outlined mathematically. The methods are based on definitions of bone properties, cited experimental studies and regression relations derived from them for trabecular bone in the proximal femur. Using an experimental range of values in the intertrochanteric region obtained from male and female human subjects, age 18 to 49, the BVF values calculated from four different methods were compared to the experimental average and numerical range. The BVF values computed from the conversion method used data from two sources. One source provided pre bed rest vBMD values in the intertrochanteric region from 24 bed rest subject who participated in a 70 day study. Another source contained preflight vBMD values from 18 astronauts who spent 4 to 6 months on the ISS. To aid the use of a mapping from BMD to BVF, the discussion includes how to formulate them for purpose of computational modeling. An application of the conversions would be used to aid in modeling of time varying changes in vBMD as it relates to changes in BVF via bone remodeling and/or modeling.

  2. Biometric recognition via fixation density maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, Ioannis; Komogortsev, Oleg V.

    2014-05-01

    This work introduces and evaluates a novel eye movement-driven biometric approach that employs eye fixation density maps for person identification. The proposed feature offers a dynamic representation of the biometric identity, storing rich information regarding the behavioral and physical eye movement characteristics of the individuals. The innate ability of fixation density maps to capture the spatial layout of the eye movements in conjunction with their probabilistic nature makes them a particularly suitable option as an eye movement biometrical trait in cases when free-viewing stimuli is presented. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, the method is evaluated on three different datasets containing a wide gamut of stimuli types, such as static images, video and text segments. The obtained results indicate a minimum EER (Equal Error Rate) of 18.3 %, revealing the perspectives on the utilization of fixation density maps as an enhancing biometrical cue during identification scenarios in dynamic visual environments.

  3. Dynamical maps and density matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asorey, M [Departamento de Fisica Teorica. Facultad de Ciencias. Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Kossakowski, A [Institute of Physics, Nicolaus Copernicus University Torun 87-100 (Poland); Marmo, G [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita Federico II di Napoli and INFN, Sezione di Napoli Complesso University di Monte Sant' Angelo, Via Cintia, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Sudarshan, E C G [Department of Physics. University of Texas at Austin Austin, Texas 78712-1081 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    The relations between dynamical maps and quantum states of bipartite systems are analyzed from the perspective of quantum conditional probability. In particular, we explore new interesting relations between completely positive maps, which correspond to quantum channels, and states of bipartite systems which correspond to correlations between the initial and final states. The new connection emerges in a natural way from the generalisation of the classical concept of conditional probability. We develop applications of these relations which prove to be very useful in both directions, either for the classification of positive maps which are not completely positive, the classification of non-decomposable dynamical maps or for the classification of positive partial transpose and entangled states.

  4. Active Free Surface Density Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelen, S.

    2016-10-01

    Percolation problems were occupied to many physical problems after their establishment in 1957 by Broadbent and Hammersley. They can be used to solve complex systems such as bone remodeling. Volume fraction method was adopted to set some algorithms in the literature. However, different rate of osteoporosis could be observed for different microstructures which have the same mass density, mechanical stimuli, hormonal stimuli and nutrition. Thus it was emphasized that the bone might have identical porosity with different specific surfaces. Active free surface density of bone refers the used total area for its effective free surface. The purpose of this manuscript is to consolidate a mathematical approach which can be called as “active free surface density maps” for different surface patterns and derive their formulations. Active free surface density ratios were calculated for different Archimedean lattice models according to Helmholtz free energy and they were compared with their site and bond percolation thresholds from the background studies to derive their potential probability for bone remodeling.

  5. Covariance and correlation estimation in electron-density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altomare, Angela; Cuocci, Corrado; Giacovazzo, Carmelo; Moliterni, Anna; Rizzi, Rosanna

    2012-03-01

    Quite recently two papers have been published [Giacovazzo & Mazzone (2011). Acta Cryst. A67, 210-218; Giacovazzo et al. (2011). Acta Cryst. A67, 368-382] which calculate the variance in any point of an electron-density map at any stage of the phasing process. The main aim of the papers was to associate a standard deviation to each pixel of the map, in order to obtain a better estimate of the map reliability. This paper deals with the covariance estimate between points of an electron-density map in any space group, centrosymmetric or non-centrosymmetric, no matter the correlation between the model and target structures. The aim is as follows: to verify if the electron density in one point of the map is amplified or depressed as an effect of the electron density in one or more other points of the map. High values of the covariances are usually connected with undesired features of the map. The phases are the primitive random variables of our probabilistic model; the covariance changes with the quality of the model and therefore with the quality of the phases. The conclusive formulas show that the covariance is also influenced by the Patterson map. Uncertainty on measurements may influence the covariance, particularly in the final stages of the structure refinement; a general formula is obtained taking into account both phase and measurement uncertainty, valid at any stage of the crystal structure solution.

  6. Spatial mapping of humeral head bone density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidousti, Hamidreza; Giles, Joshua W; Emery, Roger J H; Jeffers, Jonathan

    2017-09-01

    Short-stem humeral replacements achieve fixation by anchoring to the metaphyseal trabecular bone. Fixing the implant in high-density bone can provide strong fixation and reduce the risk of loosening. However, there is a lack of data mapping the bone density distribution in the proximal humerus. The aim of the study was to investigate the bone density in proximal humerus. Eight computed tomography scans of healthy cadaveric humeri were used to map bone density distribution in the humeral head. The proximal humeral head was divided into 12 slices parallel to the humeral anatomic neck. Each slice was then divided into 4 concentric circles. The slices below the anatomic neck, where short-stem implants have their fixation features, were further divided into radial sectors. The average bone density for each of these regions was calculated, and regions of interest were compared using a repeated-measures analysis of variance with significance set at P density was found to decrease from proximal to distal regions, with the majority of higher bone density proximal to the anatomic neck of the humerus (P density increases from central to peripheral regions, where cortical bone eventually occupies the space (P density distribution in the medial calcar region was also observed. This study indicates that it is advantageous with respect to implant fixation to preserve some bone above the anatomic neck and epiphyseal plate and to use the denser bone at the periphery. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of pansharpening techniques in obtaining accurate vegetation thematic maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarrola-Ulzurrun, Edurne; Gonzalo-Martin, Consuelo; Marcello-Ruiz, Javier

    2016-10-01

    In last decades, there have been a decline in natural resources, becoming important to develop reliable methodologies for their management. The appearance of very high resolution sensors has offered a practical and cost-effective means for a good environmental management. In this context, improvements are needed for obtaining higher quality of the information available in order to get reliable classified images. Thus, pansharpening enhances the spatial resolution of the multispectral band by incorporating information from the panchromatic image. The main goal in the study is to implement pixel and object-based classification techniques applied to the fused imagery using different pansharpening algorithms and the evaluation of thematic maps generated that serve to obtain accurate information for the conservation of natural resources. A vulnerable heterogenic ecosystem from Canary Islands (Spain) was chosen, Teide National Park, and Worldview-2 high resolution imagery was employed. The classes considered of interest were set by the National Park conservation managers. 7 pansharpening techniques (GS, FIHS, HCS, MTF based, Wavelet `à trous' and Weighted Wavelet `à trous' through Fractal Dimension Maps) were chosen in order to improve the data quality with the goal to analyze the vegetation classes. Next, different classification algorithms were applied at pixel-based and object-based approach, moreover, an accuracy assessment of the different thematic maps obtained were performed. The highest classification accuracy was obtained applying Support Vector Machine classifier at object-based approach in the Weighted Wavelet `à trous' through Fractal Dimension Maps fused image. Finally, highlight the difficulty of the classification in Teide ecosystem due to the heterogeneity and the small size of the species. Thus, it is important to obtain accurate thematic maps for further studies in the management and conservation of natural resources.

  8. Spatial Density Maps from a Debris Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, L.; Kindl, S.; Binz, C.

    2016-09-01

    A debris cloud from a fragmentation on orbit may be modeled by transformation of variables from the instantaneous velocity distribution at the fragmentation time to the spatial distribution at some elapsed time later. There are no Gaussian distributions assumed and the evolution map is quite nonlinear, being derived from the solution of the Lambert, two-point boundary value, problem and the state transition matrix for unperturbed propagation, so the traditional tools of analysis that assume these qualities fail dramatically. The transformation of variables technique does not suffer from any such assumptions, and unlike the Monte Carlo method, is not subject to sampling errors or approximations. Structures and features are evident in the density maps, and these structures show promise for simplified approximation of the density map. Most prominent of the structures is the well-known pinch point at the fragmentation location in inertial space. The anti-pinch line, or wedge, is also observed. Bands on the opposite side of the fragmentation are very noticeable, and their existence may be motivated from simple orbit dynamics. These bands make the anti-pinch line actually more of a set of anti-pinch line segments. By computing these density maps over time, the evolution may be studied. There is a density generator, a density band at roughly the same altitude as the pinch point, that cycles around the earth and appears a source of the bands, with newly created bands moving radially outward and diminishing in density. Although the initial velocity distribution affects the final spatial distribution, the Lambert solutions, which are the most time consuming to compute, need only be computed once. Therefore, different initial distributions may be changed and the results recomputed with relative speed. A comparison of the effects of initial distributions is shown in this paper.

  9. Density Functional Approach Based on Numerically Obtained Bridge Functional

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUShi-Qi

    2002-01-01

    The ornstein-zenike equation is solved with the Rogers-Young approximation for bulk hard sphere fluid and Lennard-Jones fluid for several state points.Then the resulted bulk fluid radial distribution function combined with the test particle method is employed to determine numerically the function relationship of bridge functional as a function of indirect correlation function.It is found that all of the calculated points from different phase space state points for a same type of fluid collapse onto a same smooth curve.Then the numerically obtained curve is used to substitute the analytic expression of the bridge functional as a function of indirect correlation function required in the methodology [J.Chem.Phys,112(2000)8079] to determine the density distribution of non-uniform hard sphere fluid and Lennard-Jones fluid.The good agreement of theoretical predictions with the computer simulation data is obtained.The present numerical procedure incroporates the knowledge of bulk fluid radial distribution function into the constructing of the density functional approximation and makes the original methodology more accurate and more filexible for various interaction potential fluid.

  10. Density Functional Approach Based on Numerically Obtained Bridge Functional

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shi-Qi

    2002-01-01

    The Ornstein Zernike equation is solved with the Rogers Young approximation for bulk hard sphere fluidand Lennard-Jones fluid for several state points. Then the resulted bulk fluid radial distribution function combinedwith the test particle method is employed to determine numerically the function relationship of bridge functional as afunction of indirect correlation function. It is found that all of the calculated points from different phase space statepoints for a same type of fluid collapse onto a same smooth curve. Then the numerically obtained curve is used tosubstitute the analytic expression of the bridge functional as a function of indirect correlation function required in themethodology [J. Chem. Phys. 112 (2000) 8079] to deterrnine the density distribution of non-uniform hard spherefluid and Lennard Jones fluid. The good agreement of theoretical predictions with the computer simulation data isobtained. The present numerical procedure incorporates the knowledge of bulk fluid radial distribution function intothe constructing of the density functional approximation and makes the original methodology more accurate and moreflexible for various interaction potential fluid.

  11. Analysis of multiplex gene expression maps obtained by voxelation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Desmond J

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression signatures in the mammalian brain hold the key to understanding neural development and neurological disease. Researchers have previously used voxelation in combination with microarrays for acquisition of genome-wide atlases of expression patterns in the mouse brain. On the other hand, some work has been performed on studying gene functions, without taking into account the location information of a gene's expression in a mouse brain. In this paper, we present an approach for identifying the relation between gene expression maps obtained by voxelation and gene functions. Results To analyze the dataset, we chose typical genes as queries and aimed at discovering similar gene groups. Gene similarity was determined by using the wavelet features extracted from the left and right hemispheres averaged gene expression maps, and by the Euclidean distance between each pair of feature vectors. We also performed a multiple clustering approach on the gene expression maps, combined with hierarchical clustering. Among each group of similar genes and clusters, the gene function similarity was measured by calculating the average gene function distances in the gene ontology structure. By applying our methodology to find similar genes to certain target genes we were able to improve our understanding of gene expression patterns and gene functions. By applying the clustering analysis method, we obtained significant clusters, which have both very similar gene expression maps and very similar gene functions respectively to their corresponding gene ontologies. The cellular component ontology resulted in prominent clusters expressed in cortex and corpus callosum. The molecular function ontology gave prominent clusters in cortex, corpus callosum and hypothalamus. The biological process ontology resulted in clusters in cortex, hypothalamus and choroid plexus. Clusters from all three ontologies combined were most prominently expressed in

  12. Canopy Density Mapping on Ultracam-D Aerial Imagery in Zagros Woodlands, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanifard, Y.; Khodaee, Z.

    2013-09-01

    Canopy density maps express different characteristics of forest stands, especially in woodlands. Obtaining such maps by field measurements is so expensive and time-consuming. It seems necessary to find suitable techniques to produce these maps to be used in sustainable management of woodland ecosystems. In this research, a robust procedure was suggested to obtain these maps by very high spatial resolution aerial imagery. It was aimed to produce canopy density maps by UltraCam-D aerial imagery, newly taken in Zagros woodlands by Iran National Geographic Organization (NGO), in this study. A 30 ha plot of Persian oak (Quercus persica) coppice trees was selected in Zagros woodlands, Iran. The very high spatial resolution aerial imagery of the plot purchased from NGO, was classified by kNN technique and the tree crowns were extracted precisely. The canopy density was determined in each cell of different meshes with different sizes overlaid on the study area map. The accuracy of the final maps was investigated by the ground truth obtained by complete field measurements. The results showed that the proposed method of obtaining canopy density maps was efficient enough in the study area. The final canopy density map obtained by a mesh with 30 Ar (3000 m2) cell size had 80% overall accuracy and 0.61 KHAT coefficient of agreement which shows a great agreement with the observed samples. This method can also be tested in other case studies to reveal its capability in canopy density map production in woodlands.

  13. Cardiac activation mapping using ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsson, Ragnar; Witte, Russell S; Jia, Congxian; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Kim, Kang; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    We describe the first mapping of biological current in a live heart using ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI). Ablation procedures that treat severe heart arrhythmias require detailed maps of the cardiac activation wave. The conventional procedure is time-consuming and limited by its poor spatial resolution (5-10 mm). UCSDI can potentially improve on existing mapping procedures. It is based on a pressure-induced change in resistivity known as the acousto-electric (AE) effect, which is spatially confined to the ultrasound focus. Data from 2 experiments are presented. A 540 kHz ultrasonic transducer (f/# = 1, focal length = 90 mm, pulse repetition frequency = 1600 Hz) was scanned over an isolated rabbit heart perfused with an excitation-contraction decoupler to reduce motion significantly while retaining electric function. Tungsten electrodes inserted in the left ventricle recorded simultaneously the AE signal and the low-frequency electrocardiogram (ECG). UCSDI displayed spatial and temporal patterns consistent with the spreading activation wave. The propagation velocity estimated from UCSDI was 0.25 +/- 0.05 mm/ms, comparable to the values obtained with the ECG signals. The maximum AE signal-to-noise ratio after filtering was 18 dB, with an equivalent detection threshold of 0.1 mA/ cm(2). This study demonstrates that UCSDI is a potentially powerful technique for mapping current flow and biopotentials in the heart.

  14. Exact Maps in Density Functional Theory for Lattice Models

    CERN Document Server

    Dimitrov, Tanja; Fuks, Johanna I; Rubio, Angel

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we employ exact diagonalization for model systems on a real-space lattice to explicitly construct the exact density-to-potential and for the first time the exact density-to-wavefunction map that underly the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem in density functional theory. Having the explicit wavefunction-to- density map at hand, we are able to construct arbitrary observables as functionals of the ground-state density. We analyze the density-to-potential map as the distance between the fragments of a system increases and the correlation in the system grows. We observe a feature that gradually develops in the density-to-potential map as well as in the density-to-wavefunction map. This feature is inherited by arbitrary expectation values as functional of the ground-state density. We explicitly show the excited-state energies, the excited-state densities, and the correlation entropy as functionals of the ground-state density. All of them show this exact feature that sharpens as the coupling of the fragmen...

  15. Unraveling protein dynamics through fast spectral density mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropars, Virginie; Bouguet-Bonnet, Sabine; Auguin, Daniel; Barthe, Philippe; Canet, Daniel; Roumestand, Christian

    2007-03-01

    Spectral density mapping at multiple NMR field strengths is probably the best method to describe the dynamical behavior of a protein in solution through the analysis of 15N heteronuclear relaxation parameters. Nevertheless, such analyses are scarcely reported in the literature, probably because this method is excessively demanding in spectrometer measuring time. Indeed, when using n different magnetic fields and assuming the validity of the high frequency approximation, the discrete sampling of the spectral density function with 2n + 1 points needs the measurement of 3n 15N heteronuclear relaxation measurements (n R1, n R2, and n15N{1H}NOEs). Based on further approximations, we proposed a new strategy that allows us to describe the spectral density with n + 2 points, with the measurement of a total of n + 2 heteronuclear relaxation parameters. Applied to the dynamics analysis of the protein p13( MTCP1) at three different NMR fields, this approach allowed us to divide by nearly a factor of two the total measuring time, without altering further results obtained by the "model free" analysis of the resulting spectral densities. Furthermore, simulations have shown that this strategy remains applicable to any low isotropically tumbling protein (tauc>3 ns), and is valid for the types of motion generally envisaged for proteins.

  16. Exact maps in density functional theory for lattice models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Tanja; Appel, Heiko; Fuks, Johanna I.; Rubio, Angel

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we employ exact diagonalization for model systems on a real-space lattice to explicitly construct the exact density-to-potential and graphically illustrate the complete exact density-to-wavefunction map that underly the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem in density functional theory. Having the explicit wavefunction-to-density map at hand, we are able to construct arbitrary observables as functionals of the ground-state density. We analyze the density-to-potential map as the distance between the fragments of a system increases and the correlation in the system grows. We observe a feature that gradually develops in the density-to-potential map as well as in the density-to-wavefunction map. This feature is inherited by arbitrary expectation values as functional of the ground-state density. We explicitly show the excited-state energies, the excited-state densities, and the correlation entropy as functionals of the ground-state density. All of them show this exact feature that sharpens as the coupling of the fragments decreases and the correlation grows. We denominate this feature as intra-system steepening and discuss how it relates to the well-known inter-system derivative discontinuity. The inter-system derivative discontinuity is an exact concept for coupled subsystems with degenerate ground state. However, the coupling between subsystems as in charge transfer processes can lift the degeneracy. An important conclusion is that for such systems with a near-degenerate ground state, the corresponding cut along the particle number N of the exact density functionals is differentiable with a well-defined gradient near integer particle number.

  17. Optimally focused cold atom systems obtained using density-density correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, Andika; Campbell, Daniel L; Price, Ryan M; De, Subhadeep; Spielman, I B

    2014-01-01

    Resonant absorption imaging is a common technique for detecting the two-dimensional column density of ultracold atom systems. In many cases, the system's thickness along the imaging direction greatly exceeds the imaging system's depth of field, making the identification of the optimally focused configuration difficult. Here we describe a systematic technique for bringing Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) and other cold-atom systems into an optimal focus even when the ratio of the thickness to the depth of field is large: a factor of 8 in this demonstration with a BEC. This technique relies on defocus-induced artifacts in the Fourier-transformed density-density correlation function (the power spectral density, PSD). The spatial frequency at which these artifacts first appear in the PSD is maximized on focus; the focusing process therefore both identifies and maximizes the range of spatial frequencies over which the PSD is uncontaminated by finite-thickness effects.

  18. Landslides density map of S. Miguel Island, Azores archipelago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Valadão

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Azores archipelago is located in the Atlantic Ocean and is composed of nine volcanic islands. S. Miguel, the largest one, is formed by three active, E-W trending, trachytic central volcanoes with caldera (Sete Cidades, Fogo and Furnas. Chains of basaltic cinder cones link those major volcanic structures. An inactive trachytic central volcano (Povoação and an old basaltic volcanic complex (Nordeste comprise the easternmost part of the island. Since the settlement of the island early in the 15th century, several destructive landslides triggered by catastrophic rainfall episodes, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occurred in different areas of S. Miguel. One unique event killed thousands of people in 1522. Houses and bridges were destroyed, roads were cut, communications, water and energy supply systems became frequently disrupted and areas of fertile land were often buried by mud. Based on (1 historical documents, (2 aerial photographs and (3 field observations, landslide sites were plotted on a topographic map, in order to establish a landslide density map for the island. Data obtained showed that landslide hazard is higher on (1 the main central volcanoes where the thickness of unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits is considerable high and (2 the old basaltic volcanic complex, marked by deep gullies developed on thick sequences of lava flows. In these areas, caldera walls, fault scarps, steep valley margins and sea cliffs are potentially hazardous.

  19. Landslides density map of S. Miguel Island, Azores archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadão, P.; Gaspar, J. L.; Queiroz, G.; Ferreira, T.

    The Azores archipelago is located in the Atlantic Ocean and is composed of nine volcanic islands. S. Miguel, the largest one, is formed by three active, E-W trending, trachytic central volcanoes with caldera (Sete Cidades, Fogo and Furnas). Chains of basaltic cinder cones link those major volcanic structures. An inactive trachytic central volcano (Povoação) and an old basaltic volcanic complex (Nordeste) comprise the easternmost part of the island. Since the settlement of the island early in the 15th century, several destructive landslides triggered by catastrophic rainfall episodes, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occurred in different areas of S. Miguel. One unique event killed thousands of people in 1522. Houses and bridges were destroyed, roads were cut, communications, water and energy supply systems became frequently disrupted and areas of fertile land were often buried by mud. Based on (1) historical documents, (2) aerial photographs and (3) field observations, landslide sites were plotted on a topographic map, in order to establish a landslide density map for the island. Data obtained showed that landslide hazard is higher on (1) the main central volcanoes where the thickness of unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits is considerable high and (2) the old basaltic volcanic complex, marked by deep gullies developed on thick sequences of lava flows. In these areas, caldera walls, fault scarps, steep valley margins and sea cliffs are potentially hazardous.

  20. High-Density Genetic Linkage Map Construction and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping for Hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida Bunge).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuhui; Su, Kai; Wang, Gang; Zhang, Liping; Zhang, Jijun; Li, Junpeng; Guo, Yinshan

    2017-07-14

    Genetic linkage maps are an important tool in genetic and genomic research. In this study, two hawthorn cultivars, Qiujinxing and Damianqiu, and 107 progenies from a cross between them were used for constructing a high-density genetic linkage map using the 2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD) sequencing method, as well as for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) for flavonoid content. In total, 206,411,693 single-end reads were obtained, with an average sequencing depth of 57× in the parents and 23× in the progeny. After quality trimming, 117,896 high-quality 2b-RAD tags were retained, of which 42,279 were polymorphic; of these, 12,951 markers were used for constructing the genetic linkage map. The map contained 17 linkage groups and 3,894 markers, with a total map length of 1,551.97 cM and an average marker interval of 0.40 cM. QTL mapping identified 21 QTLs associated with flavonoid content in 10 linkage groups, which explained 16.30-59.00% of the variance. This is the first high-density linkage map for hawthorn, which will serve as a basis for fine-scale QTL mapping and marker-assisted selection of important traits in hawthorn germplasm and will facilitate chromosome assignment for hawthorn whole-genome assemblies in the future.

  1. Processing and analysis of cardiac optical mapping data obtained with potentiometric dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughner, Jacob I; Ng, Fu Siong; Sulkin, Matthew S; Arthur, R Martin; Efimov, Igor R

    2012-10-01

    Optical mapping has become an increasingly important tool to study cardiac electrophysiology in the past 20 years. Multiple methods are used to process and analyze cardiac optical mapping data, and no consensus currently exists regarding the optimum methods. The specific methods chosen to process optical mapping data are important because inappropriate data processing can affect the content of the data and thus alter the conclusions of the studies. Details of the different steps in processing optical imaging data, including image segmentation, spatial filtering, temporal filtering, and baseline drift removal, are provided in this review. We also provide descriptions of the common analyses performed on data obtained from cardiac optical imaging, including activation mapping, action potential duration mapping, repolarization mapping, conduction velocity measurements, and optical action potential upstroke analysis. Optical mapping is often used to study complex arrhythmias, and we also discuss dominant frequency analysis and phase mapping techniques used for the analysis of cardiac fibrillation.

  2. Land use, forest density, soil mapping, erosion, drainage, salinity limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassoglou, N. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The results of analyses show that it is possible to obtain information of practical significance as follows: (1) A quick and accurate estimate of the proper use of the valuable land can be made on the basis of temporal and spectral characteristics of the land features. (2) A rather accurate delineation of the major forest formations in the test areas was achieved on the basis of spatial and spectral characteristics of the studied areas. The forest stands were separated into two density classes; dense forest, and broken forest. On the basis of ERTS-1 data and the existing ground truth information a rather accurate mapping of the major vegetational forms of the mountain ranges can be made. (3) Major soil formations are mapable from ERTS-1 data: recent alluvial soils; soil on quarternary deposits; severely eroded soil and lithosol; and wet soils. (4) An estimation of cost benefits cannot be made accurately at this stage of the investigation. However, a rough estimate of the ratio of the cost for obtaining the same amount information from ERTS-1 data and from conventional operations would be approximately 1:6 to 1:10, in favor of the ERTS-1.

  3. Spectral density function mapping using 15N relaxation data exclusively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, N A; Zhang, O; Szabo, A; Torchia, D A; Kay, L E

    1995-09-01

    A method is presented for the determination of values of the spectral density function, J(omega), describing the dynamics of amide bond vectors from 15N relaxation parameters alone. Assuming that the spectral density is given by the sum of Lorentzian functions, the approach allows values of J(omega) to be obtained at omega = 0, omega N and 0.870 omega H, where omega N and omega H are Larmor frequencies of nitrogen and proton nuclei, respectively, from measurements of 15N T1, T2 and 1H-15N steady-state NOE values at a single spectrometer frequency. Alternatively, when measurements are performed at two different spectrometer frequencies of i and j MHz, J(omega) can be mapped at omega = 0, omega iN, omega jN, 0.870 omega iH and 0.870 omega iH, where omega iN, for example, is the 15N Larmor frequency for a spectrometer operating at 1 MHz. Additionally, measurements made at two different spectrometer frequencies enable contributions to transverse relaxation from motions on millisecond-microsecond time scales to be evaluated and permit assessment of whether a description of the internal dynamics is consistent with a correlation function consisting of a sum of exponentials. No assumptions about the specific form of the spectral density function describing the dynamics of the 15N-NH bond vector are necessary, provided that dJ(omega)/d omega is relatively constant between omega = omega H + omega N to omega = omega H - omega N. Simulations demonstrate that the method is accurate for a wide range of protein motions and correlation times, and experimental data establish the validity of the methodology. Results are presented for a folded and an unfolded form of the N-terminal SH3 domain of the protein drk.

  4. Density vs distance for the DUNE beam from two recent geology density maps

    CERN Document Server

    Roe, Byron P

    2016-01-01

    The densities passed through for neutrinos going from Fermilab to Sanford lab are obtained using two recent density tables, crustal [1] and Shen-Ritzwoller[2], as well as the values from an older table PEMC[3].

  5. A facile method to compare EFTEM maps obtained from materials changing composition over time

    KAUST Repository

    Casu, Alberto

    2015-10-31

    Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy (EFTEM) is an analytical tool that has been successfully and widely employed in the last two decades for obtaining fast elemental maps in TEM mode. Several studies and efforts have been addressed to investigate limitations and advantages of such technique, as well as to improve the spatial resolution of compositional maps. Usually, EFTEM maps undergo post-acquisition treatments by changing brightness and contrast levels, either via dedicated software or via human elaboration, in order to maximize their signal-to-noise ratio and render them as visible as possible. However, elemental maps forming a single set of EFTEM images are usually subjected to independent map-by-map image treatment. This post-acquisition step becomes crucial when analyzing materials that change composition over time as a consequence of an external stimulus, because the map-by-map approach doesn\\'t take into account how the chemical features of the imaged materials actually progress, in particular when the investigated elements exhibit very low signals. In this article, we present a facile procedure applicable to whole sets of EFTEM maps acquired on a sample that is evolving over time. The main aim is to find a common method to treat the images features, in order to make them as comparable as possible without affecting the information there contained. Microsc. Res. Tech. 78:1090–1097, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, David, E-mail: davidwa@earth.ox.ac.uk [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Hansen, Lars N. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Ben Britton, T. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Royal School of Mines, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (<0.01°) than conventional EBSD (~0.5°), allowing very low dislocation densities to be analysed. We develop the application of HR-EBSD to olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation. - Highlights: • Lattice orientation gradients in olivine were measured using HR-EBSD. • The limited number of olivine slip systems enable simple least squares inversion for GND

  7. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars N; Ben Britton, T; Wilkinson, Angus J

    2016-09-01

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation.

  8. Local thermodynamic mapping for effective liquid density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrlidis, Agathagelos; Brown, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    The structural-mapping approximation introduced by Lutsko and Baus (1990) in the generalized effective-liquid approximation is extended to include a local thermodynamic mapping based on a spatially dependent effective density for approximating the solid phase in terms of the uniform liquid. This latter approximation, called the local generalized effective-liquid approximation (LGELA) yields excellent predictions for the free energy of hard-sphere solids and for the conditions of coexistence of a hard-sphere fcc solid with a liquid. Moreover, the predicted free energy remains single valued for calculations with more loosely packed crystalline structures, such as the diamond lattice. The spatial dependence of the weighted density makes the LGELA useful in the study of inhomogeneous solids.

  9. Is it possible to obtain cosmic accelerated expansion through energy transfer between different energy densities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Recai

    2017-03-01

    The equation of state of an energy density may be significantly modified by coupling it to another energy density. In the light of this observation we check the possibility of producing cosmic accelerated expansion in this way. In particular we consider the case where matter is converted to radiation (or vice versa by particle physics processes). We find that cosmic accelerated expansion can be obtained in this way only if an intermediate state with negative equation of state forms during the conversion.

  10. Density equalizing map projections (cartograms) in public health applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, D.W.

    1998-05-01

    In studying geographic disease distributions, one normally compares rates among arbitrarily defined geographic subareas (e.g. census tracts), thereby sacrificing some of the geographic detail of the original data. The sparser the data, the larger the subareas must be in order to calculate stable rates. This dilemma is avoided with the technique of Density Equalizing Map Projections (DEMP){copyright}. Boundaries of geographic subregions are adjusted to equalize population density over the entire study area. Case locations plotted on the transformed map should have a uniform distribution if the underlying disease risk is constant. On the transformed map, the statistical analysis of the observed distribution is greatly simplified. Even for sparse distributions, the statistical significance of a supposed disease cluster can be calculated with validity. The DEMP algorithm was applied to a data set previously analyzed with conventional techniques; namely, 401 childhood cancer cases in four counties of California. The distribution of cases on the transformed map was analyzed visually and statistically. To check the validity of the method, the identical analysis was performed on 401 artificial cases randomly generated under the assumption of uniform risk. No statistically significant evidence for geographic non-uniformity of rates was found, in agreement with the original analysis performed by the California Department of Health Services.

  11. Maps for electron cloud density in Large Hadron Collider dipoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Demma

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The generation of a quasistationary electron cloud inside the beam pipe through beam-induced multipacting processes has become an area of intensive study. The analyses performed so far have been based on heavy computer simulations taking into account photoelectron production, secondary emission, electron dynamics, and space charge effects, providing a detailed description of the electron-cloud evolution. Iriso and Peggs [U. Iriso and S. Peggs, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 024403 (2005PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.024403] have shown that, for the typical parameters of RHIC, the bunch-to-bunch evolution of the average electron-cloud density at a point can be represented by a cubic map. Simulations based on this map formalism are orders of magnitude faster compared to those based on standard particle tracking codes. In this communication we show that the map formalism is also applicable to the case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, and that, in particular, it reproduces the average electron-cloud densities computed using a reference code to within ∼15% for general LHC bunch filling patterns. We also illustrate the dependence of the polynomial map coefficients on the physical parameters affecting the electron cloud (secondary emission yield, bunch charge, bunch spacing, etc..

  12. Mapping of an Approximate Neutral Density Surface with Ungridded Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A neutral density surface is a logical study frame for water-mass mixing since water parcels spread along such a surface without doing work against buoyancy restoring force. Mesoscale eddies are believed to stir and subsequently mix predominantly along such surfaces. Because of the nonlinear nature of the equation of state of seawater, the process of accurately mapping a neutral density surface necessarily involves lateral computation from one conductivity, temperature and depth (CTD) cast to the next in a logical sequence. By contrast, the depth of a potential density surface on any CTD cast is found solely from the data on this cast. The lateral calculation procedure causes a significant inconvenience. In a previous paper by present author published in this journal (You,2006), the mapping of neutral density surfaces with regularly gridded data such as Levitus data has been introduced. In this note, I present a new method to find the depth of a neutral density surface from a cast without having to specify an integration path in space.An appropriate reference point is required that is on the neutral density surface and thereafter the neutral density surface can be determined by using the CTD casts in any order. This method is only approximate and the likely errors can be estimated by plotting a scatter diagram of all the pressures and potential temperatures on the neutral density surfaces. The method assumes that the variations of potential temperature and pressure (with respect to the values at the reference point) on the neutral density surface are proportional.It is important to select the most appropriate reference point in order to approximately satisfy this assumption, and in practice this is found by inspecting the θ-p plot of data on the surface. This may require that the algorithm be used twice. When the straight lines on the θ-p plot, drawn from the reference point to other points on the neutral density surface, enclose an area that is external to the

  13. A Bone Sample Containing a Bone Graft Substitute Analyzed by Correlating Density Information Obtained by X-ray Micro Tomography with Compositional Information Obtained by Raman Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Charwat-Pessler

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of bone graft substitutes to promote new bone formation has been increasingly used in the medical field to repair skeletal defects or to replace missing bone in a broad range of applications in dentistry and orthopedics. A common way to assess such materials is via micro computed tomography (µ-CT, through the density information content provided by the absorption of X-rays. Information on the chemical composition of a material can be obtained via Raman spectroscopy. By investigating a bone sample from miniature pigs containing the bone graft substitute Bio Oss®, we pursued the target of assessing to what extent the density information gained by µ-CT imaging matches the chemical information content provided by Raman spectroscopic imaging. Raman images and Raman correlation maps of the investigated sample were used in order to generate a Raman based segmented image by means of an agglomerative, hierarchical cluster analysis. The resulting segments, showing chemically related areas, were subsequently compared with the µ-CT image by means of a one-way ANOVA. We found out that to a certain extent typical gray-level values (and the related histograms in the µ-CT image can be reliably related to specific segments within the image resulting from the cluster analysis.

  14. Particle visualization in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering. I. 2D density mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britun, Nikolay, E-mail: nikolay.britun@umons.ac.be; Palmucci, Maria; Konstantinidis, Stephanos [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Snyders, Rony [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2015-04-28

    Time-resolved characterization of an Ar-Ti high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been performed. This paper deals with two-dimensional density mapping in the discharge volume obtained by laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The time-resolved density evolution of Ti neutrals, singly ionized Ti atoms (Ti{sup +}), and Ar metastable atoms (Ar{sup met}) in the area above the sputtered cathode is mapped for the first time in this type of discharges. The energetic characteristics of the discharge species are additionally studied by Doppler-shift laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The questions related to the propagation of both the neutral and ionized discharge particles, as well as to their spatial density distributions, are discussed.

  15. Poisson brackets of mappings obtained as ( q,- p) reductions of lattice equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Dinh T.; van der Kamp, Peter H.; Quispel, G. R. W.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we present Poisson brackets of certain classes of mappings obtained as general periodic reductions of integrable lattice equations. The Poisson brackets are derived from a Lagrangian, using the so-called Ostrogradsky transformation. The ( q,- p) reductions are ( p + q)-dimensional maps and explicit Poisson brackets for such reductions of the discrete KdV equation, the discrete Lotka-Volterra equation, and the discrete Liouville equation are included. Lax representations of these equations can be used to construct sufficiently many integrals for the reductions. As examples we show that the (3,-2) reductions of the integrable partial difference equations are Liouville integrable in their own right.

  16. X-ray structure refinement using aspherical atomic density functions obtained from quantum-mechanical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayatilaka, Dylan; Dittrich, Birger

    2008-05-01

    An approach is outlined for X-ray structure refinement using atomic density fragments obtained by Hirshfeld partitioning of quantum-mechanical density fragments. Results are presented for crystal structure refinements of urea and benzene using these 'Hirshfeld atoms'. Using this procedure, the quantum-mechanical non-spherical electron density is taken into account in the structural model based on the conformation found in the crystal. Contrary to current consensus in structure refinement, the anisotropic displacement parameters of H atoms can be reproduced from neutron diffraction measurements simply from a least-squares fit using the Hirshfeld atoms derived from the BLYP level of theory and including a simple point-charge model to treat the crystal environment.

  17. Flow rate of particles through apertures obtained from self-similar density and velocity profiles

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    ‘‘Beverloo’s law’’ is considered as the standard expression to estimate the flow rate of particles through apertures. This relation was obtained by simple dimensional analysis and includes empirical parameters whose physical meaning is poorly justified. In this Letter, we study the density and velocity profiles in the flow of particles through an aperture. We find that, for the whole range of apertures studied, both profiles are self-similar. Hence, by means of the functionality obtained for the...

  18. Effect of electrolysis parameters on the morphologies of copper powder obtained at high current densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Gökhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of copper ion concentrations and electrolyte temperature on the morphologies and on the apparent densities of electrolytic copper powders at high current densities under galvanostatic regime were examined. These parameters were evaluated by the current efficiency of hydrogen evolution. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was used for analyzing the morphology of the copper powders. It was found that the morphology was dependent over the copper ion concentration and electrolyte temperature under same current density (CD conditions. At 150 mA cm-2 and the potential of 1000±20 mV (vs. SCE, porous and disperse copper powders were obtained at low concentrations of Cu ions (0.120 M Cu2+ in 0.50 M H2SO4. Under this condition, high rate of hydrogen evolution reaction took place parallel to copper electrodeposition. The morphology was changed from porous, disperse and cauliflower-like to coral-like, shrub-like and stalk-stock like morphology with the increasing of Cu ion concentrations towards 0.120 M, 0.155 M, 0.315 M, 0.475 M and 0.630 M Cu2+ in 0.5 M H2SO4 respectively at the same CD. Similarly, as the temperature was increased, powder morphology and apparent density were observed to be changed. The apparent density values of copper powders were found to be suitable for many of the powder metallurgy applications.

  19. Mapping the density of scattering centers limiting the electron mean free path in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannazzo, Filippo; Sonde, Sushant; Nigro, Raffaella Lo; Rimini, Emanuele; Raineri, Vito

    2011-11-09

    Recently, giant carrier mobility μ (>10(5) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and micrometer electron mean free path (l) have been measured in suspended graphene or in graphene encapsulated between inert and ultraflat BN layers. Much lower μ values (10000-20000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) are typically reported in graphene on common substrates (SiO(2), SiC) used for device fabrication. The debate on the factors limiting graphene electron mean free path is still open with charged impurities (CI) and resonant scatterers (RS) indicated as the most probable candidates. As a matter of fact, the inhomogeneous distribution of such scattering sources in graphene is responsible of nanoscale lateral inhomogeneities in the electronic properties, which could affect the behavior of graphene nanodevices. Hence, high resolution two-dimensional (2D) mapping of their density is very important. Here, we used scanning capacitance microscopy/spectroscopy to obtain 2D maps of l in graphene on substrates with different dielectric permittivities, that is, SiO(2) (κ(SiO2) = 3.9), 4H-SiC (0001) (κ(SiC) = 9.7) and the very-high-κ perovskite strontium titanate, SrTiO(3) (001), briefly STO (κ(STO) = 330). After measuring l versus the gate bias V(g) on an array of points on graphene, maps of the CI density (N(CI)) have been determined by the neutrality point shift from V(g) = 0 V in each curve, whereas maps of the RS density (N(RS)) have been extracted by fitting the dependence of l on the carrier density (n). Laterally inhomogeneous densities of CI and RS have been found. The RS distribution exhibits an average value ∼3 × 10(10) cm(-2) independently on the substrate. For the first time, a clear correlation between the minima in the l map and the maxima in the N(CI) map is obtained for graphene on SiO(2) and 4H-SiC, indicating that CI are the main source of the lateral inhomogeneity of l. On the contrary, the l and N(CI) maps are uncorrelated in graphene on STO, while a clear correlation is found between l

  20. Using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer to deduce nitrogen density mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaoud, F.; Lemerini, M.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents an optical method using the Mach-Zehnder interferometer. We especially diagnose a pure nitrogen gas subjected to a point to plane corona discharge, and visualize the density spatial map. The interelectrode distance equals 6 mm and the variation of the optical path has been measured at different pressures: 220 Torr, 400 Torr, and 760 Torr. The interferograms are recorded with a CCD camera, and the numerical analysis of these interferograms is assured by the inverse Abel transformation. The nitrogen density is extracted through the Gladstone-Dale relation. The obtained results are in close agreement with values available in the literature.

  1. Obtaining the Probability Vector Current Density in Canonical Quantum Mechanics by Linear Superposition

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffmann, Steven Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    The quantum mechanics status of the probability vector current density has long seemed to be marginal. On one hand no systematic prescription for its construction is provided, and the special examples of it that are obtained for particular types of Hamiltonian operator could conceivably be attributed to happenstance. On the other hand this concept's key physical interpretation as local average particle flux, which flows from the equation of continuity that it is supposed to satisfy in conjunction with the probability scalar density, has been claimed to breach the uncertainty principle. Given the dispiriting impact of that claim, we straightaway point out that the subtle directional nature of the uncertainty principle makes it consistent with the measurement of local average particle flux. We next focus on the fact that the unique closed-form linear-superposition quantization of any classical Hamiltonian function yields in tandem the corresponding unique linear-superposition closed-form divergence of the proba...

  2. Obtaining raised density connections by thermosonic microwelding in 3D integrated microcircuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanin V. L.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the processes of obtaining raised density microwelded connections in 3D-integrated microcircuits by the thermosonic microwelding. The processes include the use of the raised frequencies of ultrasound, application of the microinstrument with a thinning of the working end and precision devices for ball formation, which provide reproducibility of connections quality. At a small step of contact pads, the use of a wire of small diameter (not more than 25 µm is necessary for devices with a multilevel arrangement of leads and chess arrangement of contact pads on the chip, providing the maximum length of the formed crosspieces does not exceed 4—5 mm.

  3. Flow Rate of Particles through Apertures Obtained from Self-Similar Density and Velocity Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Alvaro; Zuriguel, Iker; Maza, Diego

    2012-06-01

    “Beverloo’s law” is considered as the standard expression to estimate the flow rate of particles through apertures. This relation was obtained by simple dimensional analysis and includes empirical parameters whose physical meaning is poorly justified. In this Letter, we study the density and velocity profiles in the flow of particles through an aperture. We find that, for the whole range of apertures studied, both profiles are self-similar. Hence, by means of the functionality obtained for them the mass flow rate is calculated. The comparison of this expression with the Beverloo’s one reveals some differences which are crucial to understanding the mechanism that governs the flow of particles through orifices.

  4. Low density ionogels obtained by rapid gellification of tetraethyl orthosilane assisted by ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abhishek Kumar; Singh, Manish Pratap; Singh, Rajendra Kumar; Chandra, Suresh

    2012-05-28

    A non-hydrolytic one pot sol-gel method has been used to synthesize mesoporous silica ionogels with the confined ionic liquid (IL) 1-ethyl 3-methyl imidazolium tetra fluoro-borate [EMIM][BF(4)]. The precursor for obtaining the SiO(2) matrix was tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and formic acid was used as a catalyst. These ionogels have been characterized by density measurements, TEM, BET, DSC, TGA and FTIR. The incorporation of the ionic liquid [EMIM][BF(4)] enhances the gellification rate which results in the ionogels having very low density (~0.3 g cm(-3)). The low density has been explained on the basis of the creation of 'blind embedded pores' in the matrix (apart from open pores) due to very rapid gellification (~1 min). Morphological studies provide experimental evidence for the presence of blind pores/voids inside the ionogel ingots. We have also shown that the IL entrapped in nanopores (~7-8 nm pore size) of the SiO(2) matrix has different physical properties than the bulk IL viz. (a) the phase transition temperatures (T(g), T(c) and T(m)) of the IL change upon confinement, (b) the thermal stability reduces upon confinement, and (c) the pore wall interaction with the IL results in changes in the C-H vibrations of the imidazolium ring and alkyl chain (the former increasing) which is also indicated in our DFT-calculation.

  5. Effect of intraband variability on stable isotope and density time series obtained from banded corals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chakraborty; R Ramesh; J M Lough

    2000-03-01

    Density, 18O and 13C were measured along two tracks, one close to the central growth axis and the other, ∼20° off the axis, in a coral (Porites lutea) collected from the Stanley Reef, Central Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The 18O variations in the coral are well correlated with sea surface temperature changes. The common variances between the two tracks were about 60% in the 18O, 13C and the skeletal density variations. Part of the noise (40%) could be due to the difficulty of sampling exactly time contemporaneous parts of each band along the two tracks and part of it could be due to genuine intraband variability. In spite of the intraband variability, the time series obtained from the two tracks are similar, indicating that the dominant causative factor for the isotopic variations is external, i.e., the environmental conditions that prevail during the growth of the coral; density band formation does not appear to be directly controlled by the sea surface temperature.

  6. A laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for obtaining neutral hydrogen densities in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, X.Z.; Yang, T.F.; Chang-Diaz, F.R. [Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The resonance fluorescence of neutral hydrogen illuminated by {ital H}{sub {alpha}} radiation has been used as a technique for the spatially and temporally resolved density measurements of neutral hydrogen in high temperature plasmas, such as in the tokamak and magnetic mirror plasma fusion devices. The fluorescence signal, usually very weak and buried in the background of stray laser light and {ital H}{sub {alpha}} emission, is very difficult to extract and its measurements are inaccurate. This paper discusses the improvement of the signal extraction using two optical path laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) methods. One optical path carries the fluorescence signal and the background (the stray laser light and {ital H}{sub {alpha}} emission), whereas the other path carries only the background signal. By combining these two signals, a clean fluorescence signal can be isolated by subtracting out the background using a differential amplifier. The measurement is obtained instantaneously from these two signals which are taken simultaneously in one pulse rather than being extracted from two separate spectra taken in two sequential pulses (double pulses). This method, therefore, makes a significant improvement on the double pulse technique in terms of the accuracy of the measurement and the time resolution. Using this LIF technique the measurement of the neutral density profile in the exhaust of a tandem mirror plasma propulsion device is obtained and presented. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  7. Image Clustering Method Based on Density Maps Derived from Self-Organizing Mapping: SOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A new method for image clustering with density maps derived from Self-Organizing Maps (SOM is proposed together with a clarification of learning processes during a construction of clusters. It is found that the proposed SOM based image clustering method shows much better clustered result for both simulation and real satellite imagery data. It is also found that the separability among clusters of the proposed method is 16% longer than the existing k-mean clustering. It is also found that the separability among clusters of the proposed method is 16% longer than the existing k-mean clustering. In accordance with the experimental results with Landsat-5 TM image, it takes more than 20000 of iteration for convergence of the SOM learning processes.

  8. Portable cosmic particle detectors for subsurface density mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, László; Gábor Barnaföldi, Gergely; Hamar, Gergö; Surányi, Gergely; Varga, Dezsö

    2016-04-01

    Muography deduces the density length in the interior of the investigated geological object, such as a mountain or volcano by the measurement of the cosmic muon absorption along different paths through the object. If path lengths (average densities) are measured, the average density (path length) can be deduced along the muon paths. A portable, low power consumption cosmic particle tracking detector based on Close Cathode multi-wire proportional chambers [1,2] has been developed for muography based on our earlier developments and experiences at the Wigner RCP of the HAS in Budapest [3,4,5]. The newly developed tracking system consists of six layers with the sensitive area of 0.25 m2 [6]. The spatial resolution of 2 mm provides an angular resolution of 15 mrad. This instrument has been optimized for underground and outdoor measurements: it has a Raspberry pi controlled data acquisition system which includes a custom designed board with a coincidence unit and allows high level remote control, data management and analysis. The individual trigger signals, number of missed triggers, analogue signals from chambers and the temperature are recorded. The duration of data readout (dead time) is 100 microsec. The DAQ software runs on the Raspberry Pi. For standard operation, a graphical user interface has been developed, running on any remote computer with Internet connection (both of wired and wireless) to the Raspberry Pi. A temperature-controlled high-voltage power supply provides a stable and reasonable (> 95 %) tracking performance for the measurements. With total power consumption of 5W, a portable tracking detector can operate for 5 days with a standard 50 Ah battery and with gas (non flammable Ar-CO2 mixture) consumption of 0.5 liter per hour, a 10 l bottle at pressure of 150 bar is enough for four month. The portability (total weight of less than 30 kg) allowed that our tracking detectors have been applied in underground caverns for subsurface density mapping. The

  9. Pulmonary Hypertension: Scientometric Analysis and Density-Equalizing Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götting, Michael; Schwarzer, Mario; Gerber, Alexander; Groneberg, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by the increase of the mean pulmonary arterial pressure in the lung circulation. Despite the large number of experimental and clinical studies conducted on pulmonary hypertension, there is no comprehensive work that analyzed the global research activity on PH so far. We retrieved the bibliometric data of the publications on pulmonary hypertension for two periods from the Web of science database. Here, we set the first investigation period from 1900 to 2007 (t1) due to the cited half life of articles and the relating difficulties to interpret the citation parameters. The second evaluation period (t2) covers the time interval from 2008 onwards including the year 2015. The data were analyzed and processed to density-equalizing maps using the NewQIS platform. A total number of 18,986 publications were identified in t1 that come from 85 countries. The US published the highest number of publications (n = 7,290), followed by the UK, Germany, Japan and France. In t2 19,676 items could be found worked out by 130 countries. The raking started just the same with the USA as most publishing nation with 7,127 publications on PH, followed by the UK and Germany. Japan fell back on 6th place, whereas China came into view on the 5th position. Analyzing the average citation rate as a parameter for research quality, Mexico reached the highest value in t1 and Ireland in t2. While, the country specific h-index underlined the leading position of the US research in both evaluation periods again. The average number of international collaboration items was expanding from none in 1978 to 530 items in 2015 with the USA as the country with the highest number of collaboration articles. The present study is the first large scale density-equalizing mapping and scientometric analysis of global PH research activity. Our data draw a sketch of the global research architecture in this field, indicating a need for specific research programs in countries with

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension: Scientometric Analysis and Density-Equalizing Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götting, Michael; Schwarzer, Mario; Gerber, Alexander; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Groneberg, David A

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by the increase of the mean pulmonary arterial pressure in the lung circulation. Despite the large number of experimental and clinical studies conducted on pulmonary hypertension, there is no comprehensive work that analyzed the global research activity on PH so far. We retrieved the bibliometric data of the publications on pulmonary hypertension for two periods from the Web of science database. Here, we set the first investigation period from 1900 to 2007 (t1) due to the cited half life of articles and the relating difficulties to interpret the citation parameters. The second evaluation period (t2) covers the time interval from 2008 onwards including the year 2015. The data were analyzed and processed to density-equalizing maps using the NewQIS platform. A total number of 18,986 publications were identified in t1 that come from 85 countries. The US published the highest number of publications (n = 7,290), followed by the UK, Germany, Japan and France. In t2 19,676 items could be found worked out by 130 countries. The raking started just the same with the USA as most publishing nation with 7,127 publications on PH, followed by the UK and Germany. Japan fell back on 6th place, whereas China came into view on the 5th position. Analyzing the average citation rate as a parameter for research quality, Mexico reached the highest value in t1 and Ireland in t2. While, the country specific h-index underlined the leading position of the US research in both evaluation periods again. The average number of international collaboration items was expanding from none in 1978 to 530 items in 2015 with the USA as the country with the highest number of collaboration articles. The present study is the first large scale density-equalizing mapping and scientometric analysis of global PH research activity. Our data draw a sketch of the global research architecture in this field, indicating a need for specific research programs in countries with

  11. Intrinsic temperature-dependent evolutions in the electron-boson spectral density obtained from optical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jungseek

    2016-03-01

    We investigate temperature smearing effects on the electron-boson spectral density function (I2χ(ω)) obtained from optical data using a maximum entropy inversion method. We start with two simple model input I2χ(ω), calculate the optical scattering rates at selected temperatures using the model input spectral density functions and a generalized Allen’s formula, then extract back I2χ(ω) at each temperature from the calculated optical scattering rate using the maximum entropy method (MEM) which has been used for analysis of optical data of high-temperature superconductors including cuprates, and finally compare the resulting I2χ(ω) with the input ones. From this approach we find that the inversion process can recover the input I2χ(ω) almost perfectly when the quality of fits is good enough and also temperature smearing (or thermal broadening) effects appear in the I2χ(ω) when the quality of fits is not good enough. We found that the coupling constant and the logarithmically averaged frequency are robust to the temperature smearing effects and/or the quality of fits. We use these robust properties of the two quantities as criterions to check whether experimental data have intrinsic temperature-dependent evolutions or not. We carefully apply the MEM to two material systems (one optimally doped and the other underdoped cuprates) and conclude that the I2χ(ω) extracted from the optical data contain intrinsic temperature-dependent evolutions.

  12. The formation heights of coronal shocks from 2D density and Alfv\\'en speed maps

    CERN Document Server

    Zucca, Pietro; Bloomfield, D Shaun; Gallagher, Peter T

    2014-01-01

    Super-Alfv\\'enic shock waves associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can produce radio emission known as Type II bursts. In the absence of direct imaging, accurate estimates of coronal electron densities, magnetic field strengths and Alfv\\'en speeds are required in order to calculate the kinematics of shocks. To date, 1D radial models have been used, but these are not appropriate for shocks propagating in non-radial directions. Here, we study a coronal shock wave associated with a CME and Type II radio burst using 2D electron density and Alfv\\'en speed maps to determine the locations that shocks are excited as the CME expands through the corona. Coronal density maps were obtained from emission measures derived from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory ($SDO$) and polarized brightness measurements from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory ($SOHO$). Alfv\\'en speed maps were calculated using these dens...

  13. Mapping Mangrove Density from Rapideye Data in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Nguyen-Thanh; Chen, Chi-Farn; Chen, Cheng-Ru

    2017-06-01

    Mangrove forests provide a wide range of socioeconomic and ecological services for coastal communities. Extensive aquaculture development of mangrove waters in many developing countries has constantly ignored services of mangrove ecosystems, leading to unintended environmental consequences. Monitoring the current status and distribution of mangrove forests is deemed important for evaluating forest management strategies. This study aims to delineate the density distribution of mangrove forests in the Gulf of Fonseca, Central America with Rapideye data using the support vector machines (SVM). The data collected in 2012 for density classification of mangrove forests were processed based on four different band combination schemes: scheme-1 (bands 1-3, 5 excluding the red-edge band 4), scheme-2 (bands 1-5), scheme-3 (bands 1-3, 5 incorporating with the normalized difference vegetation index, NDVI), and scheme-4 (bands 1-3, 5 incorporating with the normalized difference red-edge index, NDRI). We also hypothesized if the obvious contribution of Rapideye red-edge band could improve the classification results. Three main steps of data processing were employed: (1) data pre-processing, (2) image classification, and (3) accuracy assessment to evaluate the contribution of red-edge band in terms of the accuracy of classification results across these four schemes. The classification maps compared with the ground reference data indicated the slightly higher accuracy level observed for schemes 2 and 4. The overall accuracies and Kappa coefficients were 97% and 0.95 for scheme-2 and 96.9% and 0.95 for scheme-4, respectively.

  14. High-density surface EMG maps from upper-arm and forearm muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas-Martínez Monica

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background sEMG signal has been widely used in different applications in kinesiology and rehabilitation as well as in the control of human-machine interfaces. In general, the signals are recorded with bipolar electrodes located in different muscles. However, such configuration may disregard some aspects of the spatial distribution of the potentials like location of innervation zones and the manifestation of inhomogineties in the control of the muscular fibers. On the other hand, the spatial distribution of motor unit action potentials has recently been assessed with activation maps obtained from High Density EMG signals (HD-EMG, these lasts recorded with arrays of closely spaced electrodes. The main objective of this work is to analyze patterns in the activation maps, associating them with four movement directions at the elbow joint and with different strengths of those tasks. Although the activation pattern can be assessed with bipolar electrodes, HD-EMG maps could enable the extraction of features that depend on the spatial distribution of the potentials and on the load-sharing between muscles, in order to have a better differentiation between tasks and effort levels. Methods An experimental protocol consisting of isometric contractions at three levels of effort during flexion, extension, supination and pronation at the elbow joint was designed and HD-EMG signals were recorded with 2D electrode arrays on different upper-limb muscles. Techniques for the identification and interpolation of artifacts are explained, as well as a method for the segmentation of the activation areas. In addition, variables related to the intensity and spatial distribution of the maps were obtained, as well as variables associated to signal power of traditional single bipolar recordings. Finally, statistical tests were applied in order to assess differences between information extracted from single bipolar signals or from HD-EMG maps and to analyze

  15. Herschel-Planck dust optical depth and column density maps - II. Perseus

    CERN Document Server

    Zari, E; Alves, J; Lada, C J; Bouy, H

    2015-01-01

    We present optical depth and temperature maps of the Perseus molecular cloud, obtained combining dust emission data from the Herschel and Planck satellites and 2MASS/NIR dust extinction maps. The maps have a resolution of 36 arcsec in the Herschel regions, and of 5 arcmin elsewhere. The dynamic range of the optical depth map ranges from $1\\times10^{-2}\\, \\mathrm{mag}$ up to $20 \\,\\mathrm{mag}$ in the equivalent K band extinction. We also evaluate the ratio between the $2.2 \\,\\mathrm{\\mu m}$ extinction coefficient and the $850 \\,\\mathrm{\\mu m}$ opacity. The value we obtain is close to the one found in the Orion B molecular cloud. We show that the cumulative and the differential area function of the data (which is proportional to the probability distribution function of the cloud column density) follow power laws with index respectively $\\simeq -2$, and $\\simeq -3$. We use WISE data to improve current YSO catalogues based mostly on \\emph{Spitzer} data and we build an up-to-date selection of Class~I/0 objects. U...

  16. Obtaining Thickness Maps of Corneal Layers Using the Optimal Algorithm for Intracorneal Layer Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Hossein; Kafieh, Rahele; Kazemian Jahromi, Mahdi; Jorjandi, Sahar; Mehri Dehnavi, Alireza; Hajizadeh, Fedra; Peyman, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is one of the most informative methodologies in ophthalmology and provides cross sectional images from anterior and posterior segments of the eye. Corneal diseases can be diagnosed by these images and corneal thickness maps can also assist in the treatment and diagnosis. The need for automatic segmentation of cross sectional images is inevitable since manual segmentation is time consuming and imprecise. In this paper, segmentation methods such as Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM), Graph Cut, and Level Set are used for automatic segmentation of three clinically important corneal layer boundaries on OCT images. Using the segmentation of the boundaries in three-dimensional corneal data, we obtained thickness maps of the layers which are created by these borders. Mean and standard deviation of the thickness values for normal subjects in epithelial, stromal, and whole cornea are calculated in central, superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal zones (centered on the center of pupil). To evaluate our approach, the automatic boundary results are compared with the boundaries segmented manually by two corneal specialists. The quantitative results show that GMM method segments the desired boundaries with the best accuracy.

  17. Existence, uniqueness, and construction of the density-potential mapping in time-dependent density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggenthaler, Michael; Penz, Markus; van Leeuwen, Robert

    2015-05-27

    In this work we review the mapping from densities to potentials in quantum mechanics, which is the basic building block of time-dependent density-functional theory and the Kohn-Sham construction. We first present detailed conditions such that a mapping from potentials to densities is defined by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We specifically discuss intricacies connected with the unboundedness of the Hamiltonian and derive the local-force equation. This equation is then used to set up an iterative sequence that determines a potential that generates a specified density via time propagation of an initial state. This fixed-point procedure needs the invertibility of a certain Sturm-Liouville problem, which we discuss for different situations. Based on these considerations we then present a discussion of the famous Runge-Gross theorem which provides a density-potential mapping for time-analytic potentials. Further we give conditions such that the general fixed-point approach is well-defined and converges under certain assumptions. Then the application of such a fixed-point procedure to lattice Hamiltonians is discussed and the numerical realization of the density-potential mapping is shown. We conclude by presenting an extension of the density-potential mapping to include vector-potentials and photons.

  18. Functional magnetic resonance maps obtained by personal computer; Mapas de resonancia magnetica funcional obtenidos con PC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, F. j.; Manjon, J. V.; Robles, M. [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain); Marti-Bonmati, L.; Dosda, R. [Cinica Quiron. Valencia (Spain); Molla, E. [Universidad de Valencia (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance (fMR) is of special relevance in the analysis of certain types of brain activation. The present report describes the development of a simple software program for use with personal computers (PCs) that analyzes these images and provides functional activation maps. Activation maps are based on the temporal differences in oxyhemoglobin in tomographic images. To detect these differences, intensities registered repeatedly during brain control and activation are compared. The experiments were performed with a 1.5-Tesla MR unit. To verify the reliability of the program fMR studies were carried out in 4 healthy individuals (12 contiguous slices, 80 images per slice every 3.1 seconds for a total of 960 images). All the images were transferred to a PC and were processed pixel by pixel within each sequence to obtain an intensity/time curve. The statistical study of the results (Student's test and cross correlation analysis) made it possible to establish the activation of each pixel. The images were prepared using spatial filtering, temporal filtering, baseline correction, normalization and segmentation of the parenchyma. The postprocessing of the results involved the elimination of single pixels, superposition of an anatomical image of greater spatial resolution and anti-aliasing. The application (Xfun 1.0, Valencia, Spain) was developed in Microsoft Visual C++5.0 Developer Studio for Windows NT Workstation. As a representative example, the program took 8.2 seconds to calculate and present the results of the entire study (12 functional maps). In the motor and visual activation experiments, the activation corresponding to regions proximal to the central sulcus of the hemisphere contralateral to the hand that moved and in the occipital cortex were observed. While programs that calculate activation maps are available, the development of software for PCs running Microsoft Windows ensures several key features for its use on a daily basis: it is

  19. A High-Density Consensus Map of Common Wheat Integrating Four Mapping Populations Scanned by the 90K SNP Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Weie; He, Zhonghu; Gao, Fengmei; Liu, Jindong; Jin, Hui; Zhai, Shengnan; Qu, Yanying; Xia, Xianchun

    2017-01-01

    A high-density consensus map is a powerful tool for gene mapping, cloning and molecular marker-assisted selection in wheat breeding. The objective of this study was to construct a high-density, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based consensus map of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by integrating genetic maps from four recombinant inbred line populations. The populations were each genotyped using the wheat 90K Infinium iSelect SNP assay. A total of 29,692 SNP markers were mapped on 21 linkage groups corresponding to 21 hexaploid wheat chromosomes, covering 2,906.86 cM, with an overall marker density of 10.21 markers/cM. Compared with the previous maps based on the wheat 90K SNP chip detected 22,736 (76.6%) of the SNPs with consistent chromosomal locations, whereas 1,974 (6.7%) showed different chromosomal locations, and 4,982 (16.8%) were newly mapped. Alignment of the present consensus map and the wheat expressed sequence tags (ESTs) Chromosome Bin Map enabled assignment of 1,221 SNP markers to specific chromosome bins and 819 ESTs were integrated into the consensus map. The marker orders of the consensus map were validated based on physical positions on the wheat genome with Spearman rank correlation coefficients ranging from 0.69 (4D) to 0.97 (1A, 4B, 5B, and 6A), and were also confirmed by comparison with genetic position on the previously 40K SNP consensus map with Spearman rank correlation coefficients ranging from 0.84 (6D) to 0.99 (6A). Chromosomal rearrangements reported previously were confirmed in the present consensus map and new putative rearrangements were identified. In addition, an integrated consensus map was developed through the combination of five published maps with ours, containing 52,607 molecular markers. The consensus map described here provided a high-density SNP marker map and a reliable order of SNPs, representing a step forward in mapping and validation of chromosomal locations of SNPs on the wheat 90K array. Moreover, it can be

  20. Galaxy Bias from the DES Science Verification Data: Combining Galaxy Density Maps and Weak Lensing Maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.; et al.

    2016-01-04

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias from a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a $\\sim$116 deg$^{2}$ area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. (2012) and later re-examined in a companion paper (Pujol et al., in prep) with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1$\\sigma$ error bars in 4 photometric redshift bins to be 1.33$\\pm$0.18 (z=0.2-0.4), 1.19$\\pm$0.23 (z=0.4-0.6), 0.99$\\pm$0.36 ( z=0.6-0.8), and 1.66$\\pm$0.56 (z=0.8-1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 1-2$\\sigma$ level with mea- surements on the same dataset using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with CMB lensing. In addition, our method provides the only $\\sigma_8$-independent constraint among the three. We forward-model the main observational effects using mock galaxy catalogs by including shape noise, photo-z errors and masking effects. We show that our bias measurement from the data is consistent with that expected from simulations. With the forthcoming full DES data set, we expect this method to provide additional constraints on the galaxy bias measurement from more traditional methods. Furthermore, in the process of our measurement, we build up a 3D mass map that allows further exploration of the dark matter distribution and its relation to galaxy evolution.

  1. Galaxy bias from the DES Science Verification Data: combining galaxy density maps and weak lensing maps

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C; Gaztanaga, E; Amara, A; Refregier, A; Bacon, D; Becker, M R; Bonnett, C; Carretero, J; Castander, F J; Crocce, M; Fosalba, P; Giannantonio, T; Hartley, W; Jain, B; Jarvis, M; Kacprzak, T; Ross, A J; Sheldon, E; Troxel, M A; Vikram, V; Zuntz, J; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Annis, J; Benoit-Levy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Lima, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, P; Melchior, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Mohr, J J; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Reil, K; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Rykoff, E S; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Walker, A R

    2016-01-01

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias from a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a $\\sim$116 deg$^{2}$ area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. (2012) and later re-examined in a companion paper (Pujol et al., in prep) with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1$\\sigma$ error bars in 4 photometric redshift bins to be 1.33$\\pm$0.18 (z=0.2-0.4), 1.19$\\pm$0.23 (z=0.4-0.6), 0.99$\\pm$0.36 ( z=0.6-0.8), and 1.66$\\pm$0.56 (z=0.8-1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 1-2$\\sigma$ level with mea- surements on the same dataset using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with CMB lensing. In addition, our method provides the only $\\sigma_8$-independent constraint amon...

  2. Per pixel uncertainty modelling and its spatial representation on land cover maps obtained by hybrid classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Xavier; Sevillano, Eva; Moré, Gerard; Serra, Pere; Cornford, Dan; Ninyerola, Miquel

    2013-04-01

    The usage of remote sensing imagery combined with statistical classifiers to obtain categorical cartography is now common practice. As in many other areas of geographic information quality assessment, knowing the accuracy of these maps is crucial, and the spatialization of quality information is becoming ever more important for a large range of applications. Whereas some classifiers (e.g., maximum likelihood, linear discriminant analysis, naive Bayes, etc) permit the estimation and spatial representation of the uncertainty through a pixel level probabilistic estimator (and, from that, to compute a global accuracy estimator for the whole map), for other methods such a direct estimator does not exist. Regardless of the classification method applied, ground truth data is almost always available (to train the classifier and/or to compute the global accuracy and, usually, a confusion matrix). Our research is devoted to the development of a protocol to spatialize the error on a general framework based on the classifier parameters, and some ground truth reference data. In the methodological experiment presented here we provide an insight into uncertainty modelling for a hybrid classifier that combines unsupervised and supervised stages (implemented in the MiraMon GIS). In this work we describe what we believe is the first attempt to characterise pixel level uncertainty in a two stage classification process. We describe the model setup, show the preliminary results and identify future work that will be undertaken. The study area is a Landsat full frame located at the North-eastern region of the Iberian Peninsula. The six non-thermal bands + NDVI of a multi-temporal set of six geometrically and radiometrically corrected Landsat-5 images (between 2005 and 2007) were submitted to a hybrid classification process, together with some ancillary data (climate, slopes, etc). Training areas were extracted from the Land Cover Map of Catalonia (MCSC), a 0.5 m resolution map created by

  3. MAPPING OF PLANETARY SURFACE AGE BASED ON CRATER STATISTICS OBTAINED BY AN AUTOMATIC DETECTION ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Salih

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the impact crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD is a well-established approach to the determination of the age of planetary surfaces. Classically, estimation of the CSFD is achieved by manual crater counting and size determination in spacecraft images, which, however, becomes very time-consuming for large surface areas and/or high image resolution. With increasing availability of high-resolution (nearly global image mosaics of planetary surfaces, a variety of automated methods for the detection of craters based on image data and/or topographic data have been developed. In this contribution a template-based crater detection algorithm is used which analyses image data acquired under known illumination conditions. Its results are used to establish the CSFD for the examined area, which is then used to estimate the absolute model age of the surface. The detection threshold of the automatic crater detection algorithm is calibrated based on a region with available manually determined CSFD such that the age inferred from the manual crater counts corresponds to the age inferred from the automatic crater detection results. With this detection threshold, the automatic crater detection algorithm can be applied to a much larger surface region around the calibration area. The proposed age estimation method is demonstrated for a Kaguya Terrain Camera image mosaic of 7.4 m per pixel resolution of the floor region of the lunar crater Tsiolkovsky, which consists of dark and flat mare basalt and has an area of nearly 10,000 km2. The region used for calibration, for which manual crater counts are available, has an area of 100 km2. In order to obtain a spatially resolved age map, CSFDs and surface ages are computed for overlapping quadratic regions of about 4.4 x 4.4 km2 size offset by a step width of 74 m. Our constructed surface age map of the floor of Tsiolkovsky shows age values of typically 3.2-3.3 Ga, while for small regions lower (down to

  4. Mapping of Planetary Surface Age Based on Crater Statistics Obtained by AN Automatic Detection Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, A. L.; Mühlbauer, M.; Grumpe, A.; Pasckert, J. H.; Wöhler, C.; Hiesinger, H.

    2016-06-01

    The analysis of the impact crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) is a well-established approach to the determination of the age of planetary surfaces. Classically, estimation of the CSFD is achieved by manual crater counting and size determination in spacecraft images, which, however, becomes very time-consuming for large surface areas and/or high image resolution. With increasing availability of high-resolution (nearly) global image mosaics of planetary surfaces, a variety of automated methods for the detection of craters based on image data and/or topographic data have been developed. In this contribution a template-based crater detection algorithm is used which analyses image data acquired under known illumination conditions. Its results are used to establish the CSFD for the examined area, which is then used to estimate the absolute model age of the surface. The detection threshold of the automatic crater detection algorithm is calibrated based on a region with available manually determined CSFD such that the age inferred from the manual crater counts corresponds to the age inferred from the automatic crater detection results. With this detection threshold, the automatic crater detection algorithm can be applied to a much larger surface region around the calibration area. The proposed age estimation method is demonstrated for a Kaguya Terrain Camera image mosaic of 7.4 m per pixel resolution of the floor region of the lunar crater Tsiolkovsky, which consists of dark and flat mare basalt and has an area of nearly 10,000 km2. The region used for calibration, for which manual crater counts are available, has an area of 100 km2. In order to obtain a spatially resolved age map, CSFDs and surface ages are computed for overlapping quadratic regions of about 4.4 x 4.4 km2 size offset by a step width of 74 m. Our constructed surface age map of the floor of Tsiolkovsky shows age values of typically 3.2-3.3 Ga, while for small regions lower (down to 2.9 Ga) and higher

  5. High-Density Genetic Map Construction and Gene Mapping of Basal Branching Habit and Flowers per Leaf Axil in Sesame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Hongxian; Liu, Yanyang; Du, Zhenwei; Wu, Ke; Cui, Chengqi; Jiang, Xiaolin; Zhang, Haiyang; Zheng, Yongzhan

    2017-01-01

    A good genetic map can provide the framework for quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis, map-based gene cloning, and genome sequence assembling. The main objectives of this study were to develop a high-density genetic linkage map using specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) in sesame. In the result, a high-resolution genetic map with 9,378 SLAF markers and 13 linkage groups (LGs) was constructed. The map spanned a total genetic distance of 1,974.23 cM, and the mean LG length was 151.86 cM, with an average genetic distance of 0.22 cM between adjacent markers. Based on the newly constructed genetic map, genes for basal branching habit (SiBH) and flowers per leaf axil (SiFA) were mapped to LG5 and LG11, respectively. PMID:28496450

  6. Application of resistograph to obtain the density and to differentiate wood species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acuña, Luis

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This project offers a methodology for the analysis of resistographic profiles obtained from samples of wood and the extraction of precise data from these profiles. Tests were conducted on healthy samples of wood from six different species, as well as on “old” wood in use as part of timber structures with an age of 80-120 years. Based on the data collected using the resistograph, a series of variables was determined, and statistically analysed. An analysis of the data reveals the close relation between the resistographic variables and wood density (R2> 90%. Equally, in the case of healthy wood, an analysis of the defined variables permits the identification of the species of the sample with a very high probability and, therefore, its indirect resistance values.

    En este trabajo se aporta una metodología para realizar el análisis de los perfiles resistográficos obtenidos de piezas de madera y poder con ello obtener con precisión determinados datos de las mismas. Los ensayos se realizaron sobre madera sana de seis especies distintas, así como sobre piezas de madera “antigua” en uso, pertenecientes a estructuras de edificaciones con unos 80-120 años de servicio. A partir de los datos recogidos por el resistógrafo se definieron una serie de variables, y fueron analizadas estadísticamente. Del análisis de los datos cabe destacar la magnífica relación existente entre las variables resistográficas y la densidad de la madera (R2> 90%. Igualmente, en el caso de madera sana, el análisis de las variables definidas permite asignar con una probabilidad muy elevada, la especie a la que pueda pertenecer y, por consiguiente, sus valores resistentes indirectos.

  7. Diffusion-based method for producing density equalizing maps

    CERN Document Server

    Gastner, M T; Gastner, Michael T.

    2004-01-01

    Map makers have long searched for a way to construct cartograms -- maps in which the sizes of geographic regions such as countries or provinces appear in proportion to their population or some other analogous property. Such maps are invaluable for the representation of census results, election returns, disease incidence, and many other kinds of human data. Unfortunately, in order to scale regions and still have them fit together, one is normally forced to distort the regions' shapes, potentially resulting in maps that are difficult to read. Many methods for making cartograms have been proposed, some of them extremely complex, but all suffer either from this lack of readability or from other pathologies, like overlapping regions or strong dependence on the choice of coordinate axes. Here we present a new technique based on ideas borrowed from elementary physics that suffers none of these drawbacks. Our method is conceptually simple and produces useful, elegant, and easily readable maps. We illustrate the metho...

  8. Ovarian cancer: density equalizing mapping of the global research architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggmann, Dörthe; Pulch, Katharina; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Groneberg, David A

    2017-01-13

    Despite its impact on female health worldwide, no efforts have been made to depict the global architecture of ovarian cancer research and to understand the trends in the related literature. Hence, it was the objective of this study to assess the global scientific performance chronologically, geographically and in regards to economic benchmarks using bibliometric tools and density equalizing map projections. The NewQIS platform was employed to identify all ovarian cancer related articles published in the Web of Science since 1900. The items were analyzed regarding quantitative aspects (e.g. publication date, country of origin) and parameters describing the recognition of the work by the scientific community (e.g. citation rates). 23,378 articles on ovarian cancer were analyzed. The USA had the highest activity of ovarian cancer research with a total of n = 9312 ovarian cancer-specific publications, followed by the UK (n = 1900), China (n = 1813), Germany (n = 1717) and Japan (n = 1673). Ovarian cancer-specific country h-index also showed a leading position of the USA with an h-index (HI) of 207, followed by the UK (HI = 122), Canada (HI = 99), Italy (HI = 97), Germany (HI = 84), and Japan (HI = 81). In the socio-economic analysis, the USA were ranked first with an average of 175.6 ovarian cancer-related publications per GDP per capita in 1000 US-$, followed by Italy with an index level of 46.85, the UK with 45.48, and Japan with 43.3. Overall, the USA and Western European nations, China and Japan constituted the scientific power players publishing the majority of highly cited ovarian cancer-related articles and dominated international collaborative efforts. African, Asian and South American countries played almost no visible role in the scientific community. The quantity and scientific recognition of publications related to ovarian cancer are continuously increasing. The research endeavors in the field are concentrated in high-income countries

  9. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals.

  10. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map and Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping in the Sea Cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Meilin; Li, Yangping; Jing, Jing; Mu, Chuang; Du, Huixia; Dou, Jinzhuang; Mao, Junxia; Li, Xue; Jiao, Wenqian; Wang, Yangfan; Hu, Xiaoli; Wang, Shi; Wang, Ruijia; Bao, Zhenmin

    2015-10-06

    Genetic linkage maps are critical and indispensable tools in a wide range of genetic and genomic research. With the advancement of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) methods, the construction of a high-density and high-resolution linkage maps has become achievable in marine organisms lacking sufficient genomic resources, such as echinoderms. In this study, high-density, high-resolution genetic map was constructed for a sea cucumber species, Apostichopus japonicus, utilizing the 2b-restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD) method. A total of 7839 markers were anchored to the linkage map with the map coverage of 99.57%, to our knowledge, this is the highest marker density among echinoderm species. QTL mapping and association analysis consistently captured one growth-related QTL located in a 5 cM region of linkage group (LG) 5. An annotated candidate gene, retinoblastoma-binding protein 5 (RbBP5), which has been reported to be an important regulator of cell proliferation, was recognized in the QTL region. This linkage map represents a powerful tool for research involving both fine-scale QTL mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS), and will facilitate chromosome assignment and improve the whole-genome assembly of sea cucumber in the future.

  11. Simple Method Obtaining Analytical Expressions of Particle and Kinetic—Energy Densities for One—Dimensional Confined Fermi Gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGXiao-Xue; WUYing

    2002-01-01

    We develop a simple approach to obtain explicitly exact analytical expressions of particle and kineticenergy densities for noninteracting Fermi gases in one-dimensional harmonic confinement,and in one-dimensional box confinement as well.

  12. Simple Method Obtaining Analytical Expressions of Particle and Kinetic-Energy Densities for One-Dimensional Confined Fermi Gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XiaoXue; WU Ying

    2002-01-01

    We develop a simple approach to obtain explicitly exact analytical expressions of particle and kinetic-energy densities for noninteracting Fermi gases in one-dimensional harmonic confinement, and in one-dimensional boxconfinement as well.

  13. Statistical Analysis of the Spectral Density Estimate Obtained via Coifman Scaling Function

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Spectral density built as Fourier transform of covariance sequence of stationary random process is determining the process characteristics and makes for analysis of it’s structure. Thus, one of the main problems in time series analysis is constructing consistent estimates of spectral density via successive, taken after equal periods of time observations of stationary random process. This article is devoted to investigation of problems dealing with application of wavelet anal...

  14. SU-E-J-233: Effect of Brachytherapy Seed Artifacts in T2 and Proton Density Maps in MR Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mashouf, S [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Dept of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Fatemi-Ardekani, A [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Song, W [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); University of Toronto, Dept of Radiation Oncology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study aims at investigating the influence of brachytherapy seeds on T2 and proton density (PD) maps generated from MR images. Proton density maps can be used to extract water content. Since dose absorbed in tissue surrounding low energy brachytherapy seeds are highly influenced by tissue composition, knowing the water content is a first step towards implementing a heterogeneity correction algorithm using MR images. Methods: An LDR brachytherapy (IsoAid Advantage Pd-103) seed was placed in the middle of an agar-based gel phantom and imaged using a 3T Philips MR scanner with a 168-channel head coil. A multiple echo sequence with TE=20, 40, 60, 80, 100 (ms) with large repetition time (TR=6259ms) was used to extract T2 and PD maps. Results: Seed artifacts were considerably reduced on T2 maps compared to PD maps. The variation of PD around the mean was obtained as −97% to 125% (±1%) while for T2 it was recorded as −71% to 24% (±1%). Conclusion: PD maps which are required for heterogeneity corrections are susceptible to artifacts from seeds. Seed artifacts on T2 maps, however, are significantly reduced due to not being sensitive to B0 field variation.

  15. nowCOAST's Map Service for NOAA NWS Emulated GOES-R Lightning Strike Density (Time Enabled)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Map Information: This nowCOAST time-enabled map service provides maps of lightning strike density data from the NOAA/National Weather Service/NCEP's Ocean Prediction...

  16. Construction of High Density Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium L.) Linkage Maps Using Microsatellite Markers and SNPs Detected by Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guajardo, Verónica; Solís, Simón; Sagredo, Boris; Gainza, Felipe; Muñoz, Carlos; Gasic, Ksenija; Hinrichsen, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Linkage maps are valuable tools in genetic and genomic studies. For sweet cherry, linkage maps have been constructed using mainly microsatellite markers (SSRs) and, recently, using single nucleotide polymorphism markers (SNPs) from a cherry 6K SNP array. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), a new methodology based on high-throughput sequencing, holds great promise for identification of high number of SNPs and construction of high density linkage maps. In this study, GBS was used to identify SNPs from an intra-specific sweet cherry cross. A total of 8,476 high quality SNPs were selected for mapping. The physical position for each SNP was determined using the peach genome, Peach v1.0, as reference, and a homogeneous distribution of markers along the eight peach scaffolds was obtained. On average, 65.6% of the SNPs were present in genic regions and 49.8% were located in exonic regions. In addition to the SNPs, a group of SSRs was also used for construction of linkage maps. Parental and consensus high density maps were constructed by genotyping 166 siblings from a 'Rainier' x 'Rivedel' (Ra x Ri) cross. Using Ra x Ri population, 462, 489 and 985 markers were mapped into eight linkage groups in 'Rainier', 'Rivedel' and the Ra x Ri map, respectively, with 80% of mapped SNPs located in genic regions. Obtained maps spanned 549.5, 582.6 and 731.3 cM for 'Rainier', 'Rivedel' and consensus maps, respectively, with an average distance of 1.2 cM between adjacent markers for both 'Rainier' and 'Rivedel' maps and of 0.7 cM for Ra x Ri map. High synteny and co-linearity was observed between obtained maps and with Peach v1.0. These new high density linkage maps provide valuable information on the sweet cherry genome, and serve as the basis for identification of QTLs and genes relevant for the breeding of the species.

  17. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibrationa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappatou, A.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Delabie, E.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Jakobs, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  18. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marchuk, O.; Biel, W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Julich (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  19. Comparison of the Volume Charge Density of Nanofiltration Membranes Obtained from Retention and Conductivity Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, J.; Silva, V.; Pradanos, P.

    2010-01-01

    A version of the Donnan steric-partitioning pore model with dielectrical exclusion (DSPM-DE) has been used to get information on the pore size and charge density of a commercial membrane, NF45 from FilmTec, from its retention of KCl solutions. The conductivity inside the pores has been measured...... of the membrane. These two methods give results in fair accordance which probes that the sometimes controversial method of DSPM-DE can give accurate results for the charge as well as for the mean pore size of a nanofiltration membrane. Sonic clues to improve the way this model can be used are given as well....

  20. A partial 45 MHz sky temperature map obtained from the observations of five ST radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Campistron

    Full Text Available A sky temperature map at 45 MHz covering declination between + 30° and + 60°  is presented. The sampling in right ascension is 20 min (~5° and 2°  in declination in most of the map. The originality of the work was to use cosmic emission measurements from five VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST radars collected during long periods of routine meteorological surveys. This map, which has an accuracy in temperature of about 600 K, is intended first for radar reflectivity calibration and system performance monitoring. The presence of two strong radio sources, Cassiopeia A and Cygnus A, can also serve as the verification of the beam diagram, beam width, and beam pointing direction of the antenna. Finally, this work is an attempt to show the potentiality of ST radar for astronomical purposes.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques – Radio science (radio astronomy

  1. Mechanical properties of low density polymeric foams obtained from full-field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierron F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory paper presents some preliminary results on the use of fullfield deformation measurements on low density polymeric foams to identify the evolution of Poisson’s ratio with compressive strain. Two types of foams were tested: a standard low density polyurethane foam and an auxetic foam manufactured from a similar precursor. 2D digital image correlation was used to measure the strain field at the specimens surfaces. Then, Poisson’s ratios were identified using a dedicated inverse method called the Virtual Fields Method (VFM and the results compared with the standard approaches. The results illustrate the advantages of the VFM compared to the standard procedure. It was also found that for the standard foam, very strong localization effects resulted in biased Poisson’s ratio evaluation. It was shown that this could be corrected by taking into account these localization effects thanks to the full-field information.

  2. Construction of the High-Density Genetic Linkage Map and Chromosome Map of Large Yellow Croaker (Larimichthys crocea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqun Ao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available High-density genetic maps are essential for genome assembly, comparative genomic analysis and fine mapping of complex traits. In this study, 31,191 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs evenly distributed across the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea genome were identified using restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq. Among them, 10,150 high-confidence SNPs were assigned to 24 consensus linkage groups (LGs. The total length of the genetic linkage map was 5451.3 cM with an average distance of 0.54 cM between loci. This represents the densest genetic map currently reported for large yellow croaker. Using 2889 SNPs to target specific scaffolds, we assigned 533 scaffolds, comprising 421.44 Mb (62.04% of the large yellow croaker assembled sequence, to the 24 linkage groups. The mapped assembly scaffolds in large yellow croaker were used for genome synteny analyses against the stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus and medaka (Oryzias latipes. Greater synteny was observed between large yellow croaker and stickleback. This supports the hypothesis that large yellow croaker is more closely related to stickleback than to medaka. Moreover, 1274 immunity-related genes and 195 hypoxia-related genes were mapped to the 24 chromosomes of large yellow croaker. The integration of the high-resolution genetic map and the assembled sequence provides a valuable resource for fine mapping and positional cloning of quantitative trait loci associated with economically important traits in large yellow croaker.

  3. A microscopic "social norm" model to obtain realistic macroscopic velocity and density pedestrian distributions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Zanlungo

    Full Text Available We propose a way to introduce in microscopic pedestrian models a "social norm" in collision avoiding and overtaking, i.e. the tendency, shared by pedestrians belonging to the same culture, to avoid collisions and perform overtaking in a preferred direction. The "social norm" is implemented, regardless of the specific collision avoiding model, as a rotation in the perceived velocity vector of the opponent at the moment of computation of the collision avoiding strategy, and justified as an expectation that the opponent will follow the same "social norm" (for example a tendency to avoid on the left and overtake on the right, as proposed in this work for Japanese pedestrians. By comparing with real world data, we show that the introduction of this norm allows for a better reproduction of macroscopic pedestrian density and velocity patterns.

  4. Ambiguities in results obtained with 2D gel replicon mapping techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linskens, Maarten H.K.; Huberman, Joel A.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, two 2-dimensional (2D) gel techniques, termed neutral/neutral and neutral/alkaline, have been developed and employed to map replication origins in eukaryotic plasmids and chromosomal DNA. The neutral/neutral technique, which requires less DNA for analysis, has been preferentially used in r

  5. Assessment studies on the inversion of satellite to satellite electron content to obtain electron density profiles in the ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Hochegger, G P

    2000-01-01

    The electron content data, obtained by satellite-to-satellite occultations of radio signals can lead to height profiles of electron density by discrete inversion. Since there is no possibility to verify such profiles by means of other measurements (practically never measurements at the same time and same location) it was necessary to simulate occultation scenarios by means of an ionosphere model to obtain a large number of comparisons sufficient for investigations on a statistical basis. The obtained electron contents were inverted and compared with electron density height profiles, obtained with the same ionospheric model for the occultation point. The differences between these profiles were investigated (difference between the F2-peak maxima, the height of the maxima, the shape of the topside and bottom side ionosphere). Since simulations were done for chosen locations (250 randomly spread on the globe) for every month and every second hour and for two solar activity levels (HSA and LSA), a whole year was '...

  6. A SNP based high-density linkage map of Apis cerana reveals a high recombination rate similar to Apis mellifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yuan Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Eastern honey bee, Apis cerana Fabricius, is distributed in southern and eastern Asia, from India and China to Korea and Japan and southeast to the Moluccas. This species is also widely kept for honey production besides Apis mellifera. Apis cerana is also a model organism for studying social behavior, caste determination, mating biology, sexual selection, and host-parasite interactions. Few resources are available for molecular research in this species, and a linkage map was never constructed. A linkage map is a prerequisite for quantitative trait loci mapping and for analyzing genome structure. We used the Chinese honey bee, Apis cerana cerana to construct the first linkage map in the Eastern honey bee. RESULTS: F2 workers (N = 103 were genotyped for 126,990 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. After filtering low quality and those not passing the Mendel test, we obtained 3,000 SNPs, 1,535 of these were informative and used to construct a linkage map. The preliminary map contains 19 linkage groups, we then mapped the 19 linkage groups to 16 chromosomes by comparing the markers to the genome of A. mellfiera. The final map contains 16 linkage groups with a total of 1,535 markers. The total genetic distance is 3,942.7 centimorgans (cM with the largest linkage group (180 loci measuring 574.5 cM. Average marker interval for all markers across the 16 linkage groups is 2.6 cM. CONCLUSION: We constructed a high density linkage map for A. c. cerana with 1,535 markers. Because the map is based on SNP markers, it will enable easier and faster genotyping assays than randomly amplified polymorphic DNA or microsatellite based maps used in A. mellifera.

  7. The multifractal structure of satellite sea surface temperature maps can be used to obtain global maps of streamlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Turiel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays Earth observation satellites provide information about many relevant variables of the ocean-climate system, such as temperature, moisture, aerosols, etc. However, to retrieve the velocity field, which is the most relevant dynamical variable, is still a technological challenge, specially in the case of oceans. New processing techniques, emerged from the theory of turbulent flows, have come to assist us in this task. In this paper, we show that multifractal techniques applied to new Sea Surface Temperature satellite products opens the way to build maps of ocean currents with unprecedented accuracy. With the application of singularity analysis, we show that global ocean circulation patterns can be retrieved in a daily basis. We compare these results with high-quality altimetry-derived geostrophic velocities, finding a quite good correspondence of the observed patterns both qualitatively and quantitatively. The implications of this findings from the perspective both of theory and of operational applications are discussed.

  8. Size and average density spectra of macromolecules obtained from hydrodynamic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, G M

    2007-02-01

    It is proposed to normalize the Mark-Kuhn-Houwink-Sakurada type of equation relating the hydrodynamic characteristics, such as intrinsic viscosity, velocity sedimentation coefficient and translational diffusion coefficient of linear macromolecules to their molecular masses for the values of linear density M(L) and the statistical segment length A. When the set of data covering virtually all known experimental information is normalized for M(L), it is presented as a size spectrum of linear polymer molecules. Further normalization for the A value reduces all data to two regions: namely the region exhibiting volume interactions and that showing hydrodynamic draining. For chains without intachain excluded volume effects these results may be reproduced using the Yamakawa-Fujii theory of wormlike cylinders. Data analyzed here cover a range of contour lengths of linear chains varying by three orders of magnitude, with the range of statistical segment lengths varying approximately 500 times. The plot of the dependence of [eta]M on M represents the spectrum of average specific volumes occupied by linear and branched macromolecules. Dendrimers and globular proteins for which the volume occupied by the molecule in solution is directly proportional to M have the lowest specific volume. The homologous series of macromolecules in these plots are arranged following their fractal dimensionality.

  9. A novel three-dimensional variant of the watershed transform for segmentation of electron density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Electron density maps at moderate resolution are often difficult to interpret due to the lack of recognizable features. This is especially true for electron tomograms that suffer in addition to the resolution limitation from low signal-to-noise ratios. Reliable segmentation of such maps into smaller, manageable units can greatly facilitate interpretation. Here, we present a segmentation approach targeting three-dimensional electron density maps derived by electron microscopy. The approach consists of a novel three-dimensional variant of the immersion-based watershed algorithm. We tested the algorithm on calculated data and applied it to a wide variety of electron density maps ranging from reconstructions of single macromolecules to tomograms of subcellular structures. The results indicate that the algorithm is reliable, efficient, accurate, and applicable to a wide variety of biological problems.

  10. Topographically Derived Maps of Valley Networks and Drainage Density in the Mare Tyrrhenum Quadrangle on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, W.; Stepinski, T. F.

    2006-12-01

    A novel, automated technique for delineating Martian valley networks from digital terrain data is applied to the Mare Tyrrhenum quadrangle on Mars, yielding a detailed map for the entire quadrangle. The resultant average value of drainage density for the Noachian part of the quadrangle is D ~ 0.05 km-1, an order of magnitude higher than the value inferred from a global map based on Viking images, and comparable to the values inferred from the precision mapping of selected focus sites. Valleys are omnipresent in Noachian terrain even outside the "highly dissected" Npld unit. This suggests fluvial erosion throughout the Noachian, implying widespread precipitation. The map of continuous drainage density is constructed to study spatial variations of D. This map reveals significant variations in degree of dissection in Noachian on scale of > 100 km. These variations do not correlate with any terrain parameter and their origin requires further study.

  11. Classification and assessment of retrieved electron density maps in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using multivariate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) is one of the techniques used to visualize structures of non-crystalline particles of micrometer to submicrometer size from materials and biological science. In the structural analysis of CXDI, the electron density map of a sample particle can theoretically be reconstructed from a diffraction pattern by using phase-retrieval (PR) algorithms. However, in practice, the reconstruction is difficult because diffraction patterns are affected by Poisson noise and miss data in small-angle regions due to the beam stop and the saturation of detector pixels. In contrast to X-ray protein crystallography, in which the phases of diffracted waves are experimentally estimated, phase retrieval in CXDI relies entirely on the computational procedure driven by the PR algorithms. Thus, objective criteria and methods to assess the accuracy of retrieved electron density maps are necessary in addition to conventional parameters monitoring the convergence of PR calculations. Here, a data analysis scheme, named ASURA, is proposed which selects the most probable electron density maps from a set of maps retrieved from 1000 different random seeds for a diffraction pattern. Each electron density map composed of J pixels is expressed as a point in a J-dimensional space. Principal component analysis is applied to describe characteristics in the distribution of the maps in the J-dimensional space. When the distribution is characterized by a small number of principal components, the distribution is classified using the k-means clustering method. The classified maps are evaluated by several parameters to assess the quality of the maps. Using the proposed scheme, structure analysis of a diffraction pattern from a non-crystalline particle is conducted in two stages: estimation of the overall shape and determination of the fine structure inside the support shape. In each stage, the most accurate and probable density maps are objectively selected. The validity

  12. Sperm fractions obtained following density gradient centrifugation in human ejaculates show differences in sperm DNA longevity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime Goslvez; Stephen Johnston; Carmen Lpez-Fernndez; Altea Goslbez; Francisca Arroyo; Jose Lus Fernndez; Juan G lvarez

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the DNA longevity characteristics associated with each resultant fraction following density gradient centrifugation (DGC) in comparison to that of the original neat ejaculated sample. Methods:An aliquot of neat semen (NSS) collected from 7 patients was processed using DGC resulting in 3 fractions;Fraction 1:seminal plasma/40%gradient interface (GI);Fraction 2:40%GI/80%GI;Fraction 3:80%GI/pellet. An aliquot of each fraction and NSS was cryopreserved, thawed and incubated at 37 ℃for 24h;the increase of sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed using the Dyn-Halosperm assay following 0, 3, 6 and 24h of incubation. Results:While there was a significant reduction in the incidence of baseline sperm DNA fragmentation following DGC in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity was shown to be higher in the NSS than in any other sub-population following incubation. The highest levels of baseline DNA damage were found in Fractions 1 and 2;these fractions also showed the highest rate DNA fragmentation following incubation, subsequently exhibiting the lowest DNA longevity. Conclusion:1) Unnecessary incubation of spermatozoa prior to artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization, should be avoided, since sperm DNA longevity is significantly reduced after ex vivo sperm handling and 2) Although sperm selection by DCG significantly reduces the baseline levels of SDF of sperm in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity in this fraction was ultimately lower following 24 h incubation when compared to sperm recovered from non-centrifuged NSS.

  13. Breast density mapping based upon system calibration, x-ray techniques, and FFDM images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biao; Smith, Andrew P.; Jing, Zhenxue; Wu, Tao

    2007-03-01

    Clinical studies have correlated a high breast density to a women's risk of breast cancer. A breast density measurement that can quantitatively depict the volume distribution and percentage of dense tissues in breasts would be very useful for risk factor assessment of breast cancer, and might be more predictive of risks than the common but subjective and coarse 4-point BIRADS scale. This paper proposes to use a neural-network mapping to compute the breast density information based upon system calibration data, x-ray techniques, and Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) images. The mapping consists of four modules, namely, system calibration, generator of beam quality, generator of normalized absorption, and a multi-layer feed-forward neural network. As the core of breast density mapping, the network accepts x-ray target/filter combination, normalized x-ray absorption, pixel-wise breast thickness map, and x-ray beam quality during image acquisition as input elements, and exports a pixel-wise breast density distribution and a single breast density percentage for the imaged breast. Training and testing data sets for the design and verification of the network were formulated from calibrated x-ray beam quality, imaging data with a step wedge phantom under a variety x-ray imaging techniques, and nominal breast densities of tissue equivalent materials. The network was trained using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm based back-propagation learning method. Various thickness and glandular density phantom studies were performed with clinical x-ray techniques. Preliminary results showed that the neural network mapping is promising in accurately computing glandular density distribution and breast density percentage.

  14. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-08-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far been capable of mapping surface charge densities under physiologically relevant conditions. Here, we use a scanning nanopipette setup (scanning ion-conductance microscope) combined with a novel algorithm to investigate the surface conductivity near supported lipid bilayers, and we present a new approach, quantitative surface conductivity microscopy (QSCM), capable of mapping surface charge density with high-quantitative precision and nanoscale resolution. The method is validated through an extensive theoretical analysis of the ionic current at the nanopipette tip, and we demonstrate the capacity of QSCM by mapping the surface charge density of model cationic, anionic and zwitterionic lipids with results accurately matching theoretical values.

  15. The multifractal structure of satellite sea surface temperature maps can be used to obtain global maps of streamlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Turiel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays Earth observation satellites provide information about many relevant variables of the ocean-climate system, such as temperature, moisture, aerosols, etc. However, to retrieve the velocity field, which is the most relevant dynamical variable, is still a technological challenge, specially in the case of oceans. New processing techniques, emerged from the theory of turbulent flows, have come to assist us in this task. In this paper, we show that multifractal techniques applied to new Sea Surface Temperature satellite products opens the way to build maps of ocean currents with unprecedented accuracy. With the application of singularity analysis, we show that global ocean circulation patterns can be retrieved in a daily basis. We compare these results with high-quality altimetry-derived geostrophic velocities, finding a quite good correspondence of the observed patterns both qualitatively and quantitatively; and this is done for the first time on a global basis, even for less active areas. The implications of this findings from the perspective both of theory and of operational applications are discussed.

  16. Models of asthma: density-equalizing mapping and output benchmarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Tanja C

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the large amount of experimental studies already conducted on bronchial asthma, further insights into the molecular basics of the disease are required to establish new therapeutic approaches. As a basis for this research different animal models of asthma have been developed in the past years. However, precise bibliometric data on the use of different models do not exist so far. Therefore the present study was conducted to establish a data base of the existing experimental approaches. Density-equalizing algorithms were used and data was retrieved from a Thomson Institute for Scientific Information database. During the period from 1900 to 2006 a number of 3489 filed items were connected to animal models of asthma, the first being published in the year 1968. The studies were published by 52 countries with the US, Japan and the UK being the most productive suppliers, participating in 55.8% of all published items. Analyzing the average citation per item as an indicator for research quality Switzerland ranked first (30.54/item and New Zealand ranked second for countries with more than 10 published studies. The 10 most productive journals included 4 with a main focus allergy and immunology and 4 with a main focus on the respiratory system. Two journals focussed on pharmacology or pharmacy. In all assigned subject categories examined for a relation to animal models of asthma, immunology ranked first. Assessing numbers of published items in relation to animal species it was found that mice were the preferred species followed by guinea pigs. In summary it can be concluded from density-equalizing calculations that the use of animal models of asthma is restricted to a relatively small number of countries. There are also differences in the use of species. These differences are based on variations in the research focus as assessed by subject category analysis.

  17. Hydrogen concentration and mass density of diamondlike carbon films obtained by x-ray and neutron reflectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Findeisen, E.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Vigild, Martin Etchells

    1994-01-01

    Specular reflectivity of neutrons and x rays can be used to determine the scattering length density profile of a material perpendicular to its surface. We have applied these techniques to study amorphous, diamondlike, hydrocarbon films. By the combination of these two techniques we obtain not only...... the mass density, but also the concentration of hydrogen, which varies in our case between 0 and 30 at.%. This method is a new and nondestructive way to determine the concentration of hydrogen within an error of less than 2 at.% in samples with sharp interfaces. It is especially suited for diamondlike...... carbon films....

  18. Cowichan Valley energy mapping and modelling. Report 5 - Energy density mapping projections. Final report. [Vancouver Island, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    The driving force behind the Integrated Energy Mapping and Analysis project was the identification and analysis of a suite of pathways that the Cowichan Valley Regional District (CVRD) can utilise to increase its energy resilience, as well as reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions, with a primary focus on the residential sector. Mapping and analysis undertaken will support provincial energy and GHG reduction targets, and the suite of pathways outlined will address a CVRD internal target that calls for 75% of the region's energy within the residential sector to come from locally sourced renewables by 2050. The target has been developed as a mechanism to meet resilience and climate action target. The maps and findings produced are to be integrated as part of a regional policy framework currently under development. Task 5 focused on energy projection mapping to estimate and visualise the energy consumption density and GHG emissions under different scenarios. The scenarios from task 4 were built around the energy consumption density of the residential sector under future land use patterns and rely on different energy source combinations (the suite of pathways). In task 5 the energy usage under the different scenarios were fed back into GIS, thereby giving a visual representation of forecasted residential energy consumption per unit area. The methodology is identical to that used in task 2 where current usage was mapped, whereas the mapping in this task is for future forecasts. These results are documented in this report. In addition, GHG mapping under the various scenarios was also undertaken. (LN)

  19. Local activation time sampling density for atrial tachycardia contact mapping: how much is enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Steven E; Harrison, James L; Chubb, Henry; Whitaker, John; Kiedrowicz, Radek; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Cooklin, Michael; Wright, Matthew; Niederer, Steven; O'Neill, Mark D

    2017-04-03

    Local activation time (LAT) mapping forms the cornerstone of atrial tachycardia diagnosis. Although anatomic and positional accuracy of electroanatomic mapping (EAM) systems have been validated, the effect of electrode sampling density on LAT map reconstruction is not known. Here, we study the effect of chamber geometry and activation complexity on optimal LAT sampling density using a combined in silico and in vivo approach. In vivo 21 atrial tachycardia maps were studied in three groups: (1) focal activation, (2) macro-re-entry, and (3) localized re-entry. In silico activation was simulated on a 4×4cm atrial monolayer, sampled randomly at 0.25-10 points/cm2 and used to re-interpolate LAT maps. Activation patterns were studied in the geometrically simple porcine right atrium (RA) and complex human left atrium (LA). Activation complexity was introduced into the porcine RA by incomplete inter-caval linear ablation. In all cases, optimal sampling density was defined as the highest density resulting in minimal further error reduction in the re-interpolated maps. Optimal sampling densities for LA tachycardias were 0.67 ± 0.17 points/cm2 (focal activation), 1.05 ± 0.32 points/cm2 (macro-re-entry) and 1.23 ± 0.26 points/cm2 (localized re-entry), P = 0.0031. Increasing activation complexity was associated with increased optimal sampling density both in silico (focal activation 1.09 ± 0.14 points/cm2; re-entry 1.44 ± 0.49 points/cm2; spiral-wave 1.50 ± 0.34 points/cm2, P density (0.61 ± 0.22 points/cm2 vs. 1.0 ± 0.34 points/cm2, P = 0.0015). Optimal sampling densities can be identified to maximize diagnostic yield of LAT maps. Greater sampling density is required to correctly reveal complex activation and represent activation across complex geometries. Overall, the optimal sampling density for LAT map interpolation defined in this study was ∼1.0-1.5 points/cm2.

  20. Cowichan Valley energy mapping and modelling. Report 2 - Energy consumption and density mapping. Final report. [Vancouver Island, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-06-15

    The driving force behind the Integrated Energy Mapping and Analysis project was the identification and analysis of a suite of pathways that the Cowichan Valley Regional District (CVRD) can utilise to increase its energy resilience, as well as reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions, with a primary focus on the residential sector. Mapping and analysis undertaken will support provincial energy and GHG reduction targets, and the suite of pathways outlined will address a CVRD internal target that calls for 75% of the region's energy within the residential sector to come from locally sourced renewables by 2050. The target has been developed as a mechanism to meet resilience and climate action target. The maps and findings produced are to be integrated as part of a regional policy framework currently under development. The second task in the overall project was the mapping of regional energy consumption density. Combined with the findings from task one, this enables comparison of energy consumption density per area unit with the renewable energy resource availability. In addition, it provides an energy baseline against which future energy planning activities can be evaluated. The mapping of the energy consumption density was divided into categories to correspond with local British Columbia Assessment Authority (BCAA) reporting. The residential sub-categories were comprised of single family detached dwellings, single family attached dwellings, apartments, and moveable dwellings. For commercial and industrial end-users the 14 sub-categories are also in line with BCAA as well as the on-going provincial TaNDM project of which the CVRD is a partner. The results of task two are documented in this report. (LN)

  1. High density genetic linkage map and bin mapping for disease resistance QTLs in peanut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapping and identification of QTLs are important for efficient marker-assisted breeding and for analysis of the molecular mechanisms regulating traits. Diseases, such as early and late leaf spots, Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), cause significant loses to peanut growers. Our goal is to develop a h...

  2. Mapping dust column density in dark clouds by using NIR scattered light : Case of the Lupus 3 dark cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Nakajima, Yasushi; Tamura, Motohide; Nagata, Tetsuya; Sato, Shuji; Sugitani, Koji

    2008-01-01

    We present a method of mapping dust column density in dark clouds by using near-infrared scattered light. Our observations of the Lupus 3 dark cloud indicate that there is a well defined relation between (1) the H-Ks color of an individual star behind the cloud, i.e., dust column density, and (2) the surface brightness of scattered light toward the star in each of the J, H, and Ks bands. In the relation, the surface brightnesses increase at low H-Ks colors, then saturate and decrease with increasing H-Ks. Using a simple one-dimensional radiation transfer model, we derive empirical equations which plausibly represent the observed relationship between the surface brightness and the dust column density. By using the empirical equations, we estimate dust column density of the cloud for any directions toward which even no background stars are seen. We obtain a dust column density map with a pixel scale of 2.3 x 2.3 arcsec^2 and a large dynamic range up to Av = 50 mag. Compared to the previous studies by Juvela et ...

  3. Positive maps of density matrix and a tomographic criterion of entanglement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Man' ko, V.I.; Marmo, G.; Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Zaccaria, F

    2004-07-12

    The positive and not completely positive maps of density matrices are discussed. Probability representation of spin states (spin tomography) is reviewed and U(N)-tomogram of spin states is presented. Unitary U({infinity})-group tomogram of photon state in Fock basis is constructed. Notion of tomographic purity of spin states is introduced. An entanglement criterion for multipartite spin-system is given in terms of a function depending on unitary group parameters and semigroup of positive map parameters. Some two-qubit and two-qutrit states are considered as examples of entangled states using depolarizing map semigroup.

  4. Keratometry obtained by corneal mapping versus the IOLMaster in the prediction of postoperative refraction in routine cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulku, Simon; Smith, Henry B; Antcliff, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    To establish whether simulated keratometry values obtained by corneal mapping (videokeratography) would provide a superior refractive outcome to those obtained by Zeiss IOLMaster (partial coherence interferometry) in routine cataract surgery. Prospective, non-randomized, single-surgeon study set at the The Royal United Hospital, Bath, UK, District General Hospital. Thirty-three patients undergoing routine cataract surgery in the absence of significant ocular comorbidity. Conventional biometry was recorded using the Zeiss IOLMaster. Postoperative refraction was calculated using the SRK/T formula and the most appropriate power of lens implanted. Preoperative keratometry values were also obtained using Humphrey Instruments Atlas Version A6 corneal mapping. Achieved refraction was compared with predicted refraction for the two methods of keratometry after the A-constants were optimized to obtain a mean arithmetic error of zero dioptres for each device. The mean absolute prediction error was 0.39 dioptres (standard deviation 0.29) for IOLMaster and 0.48 dioptres (standard deviation 0.31) for corneal mapping (P = 0.0015). Keratometry readings between the devices were highly correlated by Spearman correlation (0.97). The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated close agreement between keratometers, with a bias of 0.0079 dioptres and 95% limits of agreement of -0.48-0.49 dioptres. The IOLMaster was superior to Humphrey Atlas A6 corneal mapping in the prediction of postoperative refraction. This difference could not have been predicted from the keratometry readings alone. When comparing biometry devices, close agreement between readings should not be considered a substitute for actual postoperative refraction data. © 2012 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2012 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  5. Geomatics for Smart Cities: Obtaining the Urban Planning Baf Index from Existing Digital Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, V.; Franzini, M.; De Lotto, R.

    2016-06-01

    The urban analytics expression is spreading out. To our understanding, it deals with the capability of measuring cities and their communities, as a support to their effective planning and management. In other words, being an analytically well-known city is a precondition for pursuing smartness. Urban planning is a very important item for city management and is interrelated with many layers, including urban environmental quality, air quality and well-being. Effective urban planning is based on the knowledge of quantitative parameters such as the biotope area factor (BAF), which was originally proposed for the city of Berlin and is currently used in other cities. The BAF index is used to evaluate the degree of soil permeability and measures, to a certain extent and from a specific point of view, how a city is eco-friendly. The usual way of evaluating the BAF is based on the manual construction of dedicated maps, using existing orthophotos and oblique imagery as a support. But this method is expensive, time-consuming and non-objective, as it is prone to different interpretations. The paper presents a newly-developed methodology for calculating the BAF. It is based on the use of existing digital cartography and on the application of geoprocessing techniques from GIS science: it is therefore fully automated and objective. The Pavia city (Northern Italy) is used as a testsite and a careful validation of the developed methodology is carried out, by comparison to 12 manually surveyed test areas, corresponding to 5% of the built-up areas of the municipality.

  6. Comparison of high latitude electron density profiles obtained with the GPS radio occultation technique and EISCAT measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stolle

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a comprehensive view on high latitude processes by applying different observation techniques, the SIRCUS campaign was initiated in 2001/2002. This paper compares electron density profiles derived from CHAMP radio occultation data and those measured with the EISCAT facility. Since ionospheric profiling with the help of space-based received GPS is a relatively new technique, validations with established independent instruments are of crucial need. We present 28 profiling events for quasi-statistical analyses, which occurred during the SIRCUS campaigns and describe some of them in more detail. We found out that the majority of profile comparisons in electron density peak value and height, as well as in TEC, lie within the error ranges of the two methods. Differences in the ionospheric quantities do not necessarily occur when the locations of the occultation and of the radar site show considerable distances. Differences are more pronounced when the ionosphere is remarkably structured.

  7. Increasing the Accuracy of Mapping Urban Forest Carbon Density by Combining Spatial Modeling and Spectral Unmixing Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Sun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Accurately mapping urban vegetation carbon density is challenging because of complex landscapes and mixed pixels. In this study, a novel methodology was proposed that combines a linear spectral unmixing analysis (LSUA with a linear stepwise regression (LSR, a logistic model-based stepwise regression (LMSR and k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN, to map the forest carbon density of Shenzhen City of China, using Landsat 8 imagery and sample plot data collected in 2014. The independent variables that contributed to statistically significantly improving the fit of a model to data and reducing the sum of squared errors were first selected from a total of 284 spectral variables derived from the image bands. The vegetation fraction from LSUA was then added as an independent variable. The results obtained using cross-validation showed that: (1 Compared to the methods without the vegetation information, adding the vegetation fraction increased the accuracy of mapping carbon density by 1%–9.3%; (2 As the observed values increased, the LSR and kNN residuals showed overestimates and underestimates for the smaller and larger observations, respectively, while LMSR improved the systematical over and underestimations; (3 LSR resulted in illogically negative and unreasonably large estimates, while KNN produced the greatest values of root mean square error (RMSE. The results indicate that combining the spatial modeling method LMSR and the spectral unmixing analysis LUSA, coupled with Landsat imagery, is most promising for increasing the accuracy of urban forest carbon density maps. In addition, this method has considerable potential for accurate, rapid and nondestructive prediction of urban and peri-urban forest carbon stocks with an acceptable level of error and low cost.

  8. Can the current density map topology be extracted from the nucleus independent chemical shifts?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Damme, Sofie; Acke, Guillaume; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Bultinck, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are characterised by the presence of a ring current when in a magnetic field. As a consequence, current density maps are used to assess (the degree of) aromaticity of a compound. However, often a more discrete set of so-called Nucleus Independent Chemical Shift (NICS) values is us

  9. Mapping the Local Density of Optical States of a Photonic Crystal with Single Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qin; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We use single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots as internal probes to map the local density of optical states of photonic crystal membranes. The employed technique separates contributions from nonradiative recombination and spin-flip processes by properly accounting for the role of the exciton...

  10. Invariant Measures with Bounded Variation Densities for Piecewise Area Preserving Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiwei

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the properties of absolutely continuous invariant probability measures (ACIPs) for piecewise area preserving maps (PAPs) on $\\mathbb{R}^d$. This class of maps unifies piecewise isometries (PWIs) and piecewise hyperbolic maps where Lebesgue measure is locally preserved. In particular for PWIs, we use a functional approach to explore the relationship between topological transitivity and uniqueness of ACIPs, especially those measures with bounded variation densities. Our results "partially" answer one of the fundamental questions posed in \\cite{Goetz03} - determine all invariant non-atomic probability Borel measures in piecewise rotations. When reducing to interval exchange transformations (IETs), we demonstrate that for non-uniquely ergodic IETs with two or more ACIPs, these ACIPs have very irregular densities (namely of unbounded variation and discontinuous everywhere) and intermingle with each other.

  11. Obtaining Highly Excited Eigenstates of Many-Body Localized Hamiltonians by the Density Matrix Renormalization Group Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemani, Vedika; Pollmann, Frank; Sondhi, S L

    2016-06-17

    The eigenstates of many-body localized (MBL) Hamiltonians exhibit low entanglement. We adapt the highly successful density-matrix renormalization group method, which is usually used to find modestly entangled ground states of local Hamiltonians, to find individual highly excited eigenstates of MBL Hamiltonians. The adaptation builds on the distinctive spatial structure of such eigenstates. We benchmark our method against the well-studied random field Heisenberg model in one dimension. At moderate to large disorder, the method successfully obtains excited eigenstates with high accuracy, thereby enabling a study of MBL systems at much larger system sizes than those accessible to exact-diagonalization methods.

  12. Mode I Critical Stress Intensity Factor of Medium - Density Fiberboard Obtained by Single-Edge - Notched Bending Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yoshihara

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Mode I critical stress intensity factor (KIc obtained by single-edge-notched bending (SENB tests of medium-density fiberboard (MDF was experimentally analyzed. In the SENB test, the critical load for crack propagation (Pc was determined from the relationship between load/loading-line displacement and load/crack opening displacement (COD. A double cantilever beam (DCB test was also conducted and the results were compared with those of SENB tests. The value of Mode I critical stress intensity factor was obtained by introducing an additional crack length, when the crack length ranged from 0.5 to 0.7 times the depth of the specimen. This range coincided well with that used to derive the appropriate KIc value in the single-edge-notched tension (SENT test, which was conducted using the specimens with a similar confi guration cut from the MDF panel used in this study.

  13. Direct mapping of local redox current density on a monolith electrode by laser scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Lopez, Jeffrey; Saraf, Ravi F

    2013-09-15

    An optical method of mapping local redox reaction over a monolith electrode using simple laser scanning is described. As the optical signal is linearly proportional to the maximum redox current that is measured concomitantly by voltammetry, the optical signal quantitatively maps the local redox current density distribution. The method is demonstrated on two types of reactions: (1) a reversible reaction where the redox moieties are ionic, and (2) an irreversible reaction on two different types of enzymes immobilized on the electrode where the reaction moieties are nonionic. To demonstrate the scanning capability, the local redox behavior on a "V-shaped" electrode is studied where the local length scale and, hence, the local current density, is nonuniform. The ability to measure the current density distribution by this method will pave the way for multianalyte analysis on a monolith electrode using a standard three-electrode configuration. The method is called Scanning Electrometer for Electrical Double-layer (SEED).

  14. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far...... approach, quantitative surface conductivity microscopy (QSCM), capable of mapping surface charge density with high-quantitative precision and nanoscale resolution. The method is validated through an extensive theoretical analysis of the ionic current at the nanopipette tip, and we demonstrate the capacity...... been capable of mapping surface charge densities under physiologically relevant conditions. Here, we use a scanning nanopipette setup (scanning ion-conductance microscope) combined with a novel algorithm to investigate the surface conductivity near supported lipid bilayers, and we present a new...

  15. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Y; Kiyama, S; Fujiwara, Y; Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H

    2015-11-01

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm(2)) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E(ib) ≈ 150-200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E(ib) is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  16. MRSA: a density-equalizing mapping analysis of the global research architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addicks, Johann P; Uibel, Stefanie; Jensen, Anna-Maria; Bundschuh, Matthias; Klingelhoefer, Doris; Groneberg, David A

    2014-09-30

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has evolved as an alarming public health thread due to its global spread as hospital and community pathogen. Despite this role, a scientometric analysis has not been performed yet. Therefore, the NewQIS platform was used to conduct a combined density-equalizing mapping and scientometric study. As database, the Web of Science was used, and all entries between 1961 and 2007 were analyzed. In total, 7671 entries were identified. Density equalizing mapping demonstrated a distortion of the world map for the benefit of the USA as leading country with a total output of 2374 publications, followed by the UK (1030) and Japan (862). Citation rate analysis revealed Portugal as leading country with a rate of 35.47 citations per article, followed by New Zealand and Denmark. Country cooperation network analyses showed 743 collaborations with US-UK being most frequent. Network citation analyses indicated the publications that arose from the cooperation of USA and France as well as USA and Japan as the most cited (75.36 and 74.55 citations per collaboration article, respectively). The present study provides the first combined density-equalizing mapping and scientometric analysis of MRSA research. It illustrates the global MRSA research architecture. It can be assumed that this highly relevant topic for public health will achieve even greater dimensions in the future.

  17. StreamMap: Smooth Dynamic Visualization of High-Density Streaming Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenhui; Baciu, George; Yu, Han

    2017-02-13

    Interactive visualization of streaming points for real-time scatterplots and linear blending of correlation patterns is increasingly becoming the dominant mode of visual analytics for both big data and streaming data from active sensors and broadcasting media. To better visualize and interact with inter-stream patterns, it is generally necessary to smooth out gaps or distortions in the streaming data. Previous approaches either animate the points directly or present a sampled static heatmap. We propose a new approach, called StreamMap, to smoothly blend high-density streaming points and create a visual flow that emphasizes the density pattern distributions. In essence, we present three new contributions for the visualization of high-density streaming points. The first contribution is a density-based method called super kernel density estimation that aggregates streaming points using an adaptive kernel to solve the overlapping problem. The second contribution is a robust density morphing algorithm that generates several smooth intermediate frames for a given pair of frames. The third contribution is a trend representation design that can help convey the flow directions of the streaming points. The experimental results on three datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of StreamMap when dynamic visualization and visual analysis of trend patterns on streaming points are required.

  18. Genotyping by Sequencing Using Specific Allelic Capture to Build a High-Density Genetic Map of Durum Wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Holtz

    Full Text Available Targeted sequence capture is a promising technology which helps reduce costs for sequencing and genotyping numerous genomic regions in large sets of individuals. Bait sequences are designed to capture specific alleles previously discovered in parents or reference populations. We studied a set of 135 RILs originating from a cross between an emmer cultivar (Dic2 and a recent durum elite cultivar (Silur. Six thousand sequence baits were designed to target Dic2 vs. Silur polymorphisms discovered in a previous RNAseq study. These baits were exposed to genomic DNA of the RIL population. Eighty percent of the targeted SNPs were recovered, 65% of which were of high quality and coverage. The final high density genetic map consisted of more than 3,000 markers, whose genetic and physical mapping were consistent with those obtained with large arrays.

  19. Genotyping by Sequencing Using Specific Allelic Capture to Build a High-Density Genetic Map of Durum Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtz, Yan; Ardisson, Morgane; Ranwez, Vincent; Besnard, Alban; Leroy, Philippe; Poux, Gérard; Roumet, Pierre; Viader, Véronique; Santoni, Sylvain; David, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Targeted sequence capture is a promising technology which helps reduce costs for sequencing and genotyping numerous genomic regions in large sets of individuals. Bait sequences are designed to capture specific alleles previously discovered in parents or reference populations. We studied a set of 135 RILs originating from a cross between an emmer cultivar (Dic2) and a recent durum elite cultivar (Silur). Six thousand sequence baits were designed to target Dic2 vs. Silur polymorphisms discovered in a previous RNAseq study. These baits were exposed to genomic DNA of the RIL population. Eighty percent of the targeted SNPs were recovered, 65% of which were of high quality and coverage. The final high density genetic map consisted of more than 3,000 markers, whose genetic and physical mapping were consistent with those obtained with large arrays.

  20. Construction of High Density Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium L. Linkage Maps Using Microsatellite Markers and SNPs Detected by Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Guajardo

    Full Text Available Linkage maps are valuable tools in genetic and genomic studies. For sweet cherry, linkage maps have been constructed using mainly microsatellite markers (SSRs and, recently, using single nucleotide polymorphism markers (SNPs from a cherry 6K SNP array. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS, a new methodology based on high-throughput sequencing, holds great promise for identification of high number of SNPs and construction of high density linkage maps. In this study, GBS was used to identify SNPs from an intra-specific sweet cherry cross. A total of 8,476 high quality SNPs were selected for mapping. The physical position for each SNP was determined using the peach genome, Peach v1.0, as reference, and a homogeneous distribution of markers along the eight peach scaffolds was obtained. On average, 65.6% of the SNPs were present in genic regions and 49.8% were located in exonic regions. In addition to the SNPs, a group of SSRs was also used for construction of linkage maps. Parental and consensus high density maps were constructed by genotyping 166 siblings from a 'Rainier' x 'Rivedel' (Ra x Ri cross. Using Ra x Ri population, 462, 489 and 985 markers were mapped into eight linkage groups in 'Rainier', 'Rivedel' and the Ra x Ri map, respectively, with 80% of mapped SNPs located in genic regions. Obtained maps spanned 549.5, 582.6 and 731.3 cM for 'Rainier', 'Rivedel' and consensus maps, respectively, with an average distance of 1.2 cM between adjacent markers for both 'Rainier' and 'Rivedel' maps and of 0.7 cM for Ra x Ri map. High synteny and co-linearity was observed between obtained maps and with Peach v1.0. These new high density linkage maps provide valuable information on the sweet cherry genome, and serve as the basis for identification of QTLs and genes relevant for the breeding of the species.

  1. Phenotypic transition maps of 3D breast acini obtained by imaging-guided agent-based modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jonathan; Enderling, Heiko; Becker-Weimann, Sabine; Pham, Christopher; Polyzos, Aris; Chen, Chen-Yi; Costes, Sylvain V

    2011-02-18

    We introduce an agent-based model of epithelial cell morphogenesis to explore the complex interplay between apoptosis, proliferation, and polarization. By varying the activity levels of these mechanisms we derived phenotypic transition maps of normal and aberrant morphogenesis. These maps identify homeostatic ranges and morphologic stability conditions. The agent-based model was parameterized and validated using novel high-content image analysis of mammary acini morphogenesis in vitro with focus on time-dependent cell densities, proliferation and death rates, as well as acini morphologies. Model simulations reveal apoptosis being necessary and sufficient for initiating lumen formation, but cell polarization being the pivotal mechanism for maintaining physiological epithelium morphology and acini sphericity. Furthermore, simulations highlight that acinus growth arrest in normal acini can be achieved by controlling the fraction of proliferating cells. Interestingly, our simulations reveal a synergism between polarization and apoptosis in enhancing growth arrest. After validating the model with experimental data from a normal human breast line (MCF10A), the system was challenged to predict the growth of MCF10A where AKT-1 was overexpressed, leading to reduced apoptosis. As previously reported, this led to non growth-arrested acini, with very large sizes and partially filled lumen. However, surprisingly, image analysis revealed a much lower nuclear density than observed for normal acini. The growth kinetics indicates that these acini grew faster than the cells comprising it. The in silico model could not replicate this behavior, contradicting the classic paradigm that ductal carcinoma in situ is only the result of high proliferation and low apoptosis. Our simulations suggest that overexpression of AKT-1 must also perturb cell-cell and cell-ECM communication, reminding us that extracellular context can dictate cellular behavior.

  2. Gains in QTL detection using an ultra-high density SNP map based on population sequencing relative to traditional RFLP/SSR markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui Yu

    Full Text Available Huge efforts have been invested in the last two decades to dissect the genetic bases of complex traits including yields of many crop plants, through quantitative trait locus (QTL analyses. However, almost all the studies were based on linkage maps constructed using low-throughput molecular markers, e.g. restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs and simple sequence repeats (SSRs, thus are mostly of low density and not able to provide precise and complete information about the numbers and locations of the genes or QTLs controlling the traits. In this study, we constructed an ultra-high density genetic map based on high quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from low-coverage sequences of a recombinant inbred line (RIL population of rice, generated using new sequencing technology. The quality of the map was assessed by validating the positions of several cloned genes including GS3 and GW5/qSW5, two major QTLs for grain length and grain width respectively, and OsC1, a qualitative trait locus for pigmentation. In all the cases the loci could be precisely resolved to the bins where the genes are located, indicating high quality and accuracy of the map. The SNP map was used to perform QTL analysis for yield and three yield-component traits, number of tillers per plant, number of grains per panicle and grain weight, using data from field trials conducted over years, in comparison to QTL mapping based on RFLPs/SSRs. The SNP map detected more QTLs especially for grain weight, with precise map locations, demonstrating advantages in detecting power and resolution relative to the RFLP/SSR map. Thus this study provided an example for ultra-high density map construction using sequencing technology. Moreover, the results obtained are helpful for understanding the genetic bases of the yield traits and for fine mapping and cloning of QTLs.

  3. MCTP system model based on linear programming optimization of apertures obtained from sequencing patient image data maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ureba, A. [Dpto. Fisiología Médica y Biofísica. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Salguero, F. J. [Nederlands Kanker Instituut, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Ziekenhuis, 1066 CX Ámsterdam, The Nederlands (Netherlands); Barbeiro, A. R.; Jimenez-Ortega, E.; Baeza, J. A.; Leal, A., E-mail: alplaza@us.es [Dpto. Fisiología Médica y Biofísica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Miras, H. [Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Linares, R.; Perucha, M. [Servicio de Radiofísica, Hospital Infanta Luisa, E-41010 Sevilla (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    irradiation case (Case II) solved with photon and electron modulated beams (IMRT + MERT); and a prostatic bed case (Case III) with a pronounced concave-shaped PTV by using volumetric modulated arc therapy. In the three cases, the required target prescription doses and constraints on organs at risk were fulfilled in a short enough time to allow routine clinical implementation. The quality assurance protocol followed to check CARMEN system showed a high agreement with the experimental measurements. Conclusions: A Monte Carlo treatment planning model exclusively based on maps performed from patient imaging data has been presented. The sequencing of these maps allows obtaining deliverable apertures which are weighted for modulation under a linear programming formulation. The model is able to solve complex radiotherapy treatments with high accuracy in an efficient computation time.

  4. Transport of phase space densities through tetrahedral meshes using discrete flow mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Bajars, Janis; Sondergaard, Niels; Tanner, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Discrete flow mapping was recently introduced as an efficient ray based method determining wave energy distributions in complex built up structures. Wave energy densities are transported along ray trajectories through polygonal mesh elements using a finite dimensional approximation of a ray transfer operator. In this way the method can be viewed as a smoothed ray tracing method defined over meshed surfaces. Many applications require the resolution of wave energy distributions in three-dimensional domains, such as in room acoustics, underwater acoustics and for electromagnetic cavity problems. In this work we extend discrete flow mapping to three-dimensional domains by propagating wave energy densities through tetrahedral meshes. The geometric simplicity of the tetrahedral mesh elements is utilised to efficiently compute the ray transfer operator using a mixture of analytic and spectrally accurate numerical integration. The important issue of how to choose a suitable basis approximation in phase space whilst m...

  5. Assessing accuracy in varying Lidar data point densities in Digital Elevation Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis discusses the production of Digital Elevation Maps (DEM) using varying density of data points from a Lidar (Laser or Light Detection And Ranging) collection. Additionally, this thesis contains information on the multiple space missions that use laser altimetry or Lidar to gather data about planet earth, the moon, asteroids, Mars and Mercury. The thesis covers the accuracy of different amounts of data used when generating a DEM in Quick Terrain Modeler software package and the ...

  6. Comparison of low-density lipoprotein obtained from the Friedewald formula and new formulae in a heterogeneous population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Guevara-Cuéllar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C should ideally be determined by beta quantification or enzymatic methods, there are limitations in developing countries. The goal of this study is to compare LDL-C obtained through three formulae (LDL-Cnf with LDL-C obtained through the Friedewald formula (LDL-Cf using LDL-C through enzymatic methods as the most-accepted reference method in clinical practice (LDL-Cr.Methods: A concordance study was carried out in a reference laboratory in Cali, Colombia. The three formulae were (mg/dl: Men with triglycerides under 400 mg/dl: LDL-C = Total Cholesterol (TC - triglycerides (TG /6.5 - 45; men with triglycerides equal to or greater than 400 mg/dl: LDL-C = (TC - (TG / 7 -50 and women: LDL-C = (TC-(TG /6.5 - 70.Results: Three-hundred fifteen values were obtained of which 53% were for women. The mean age and LDL-Cr were 54 years (±15.8 and 112.1 mg/dl (±32.5, respectively. The median (interquartile range, mg/dl of TC, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C and TG were 204 mg/dl (171-229, 51 mg/dl (41-61, and 156 mg/dl (99-237, respectively. There were no differences between mean values of LDL-Cr and LDL-Cnf (113.48 vs. 112.67 mg/dl; p=0.45. The intraclass correlation coefficient among LDL-Cr and LDL-Cf and LDL-Cnf were high (R=0.93 and 0.92, respectively. The correlation between LDL-Cf and LDL-Cnf was 0.95. There is no difference between the areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve with the level of LDL-Cr at 160 mg/dl for LDL-Cnf and LDL-Cf. (0.94 vs. 0.93; p=0.27.Conclusion: There is high concordance between LDL-Cf and LDL-Cnf. These formulae could be an alternative when there are limitations to determine LDL-C because of the lack of enzymatic methods or through Friedewald formula due to the absence of HDL-C.

  7. Comparison of low-density lipoprotein obtained from the Friedewald formula and new formulae in a heterogeneous population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Augusto Guevara-Amador

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C should ideally be determined by beta quantification or enzymatic methods, there are limitations in developing countries. The goal of this study is to compare LDL-C obtained through three formulae (LDL-Cnf with LDL-C obtained through the Friedewald formula (LDL-Cf using LDL-C through enzymatic methods as the most-accepted reference method in clinical practice (LDL-Cr. Methods: A concordance study was carried out in a reference laboratory in Cali, Colombia. The three formulae were (mg/dl: Men with triglycerides under 400 mg/dl: LDL-C = Total Cholesterol (TC - triglycerides (TG /6.5 - 45; men with triglycerides equal to or greater than 400 mg/dl: LDL-C = (TC - (TG / 7 -50 and women: LDL-C = (TC-(TG /6.5 - 70. Results: Three-hundred fifteen values were obtained of which 53% were for women. The mean age and LDL-Cr were 54 years (±15.8 and 112.1 mg/dl (±32.5, respectively. The median (interquartile range, mg/dl of TC, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C and TG were 204 mg/dl (171-229, 51 mg/dl (41-61, and 156 mg/dl (99-237, respectively. There were no differences between mean values of LDL-Cr and LDL-Cnf (113.48 vs. 112.67 mg/dl; p=0.45. The intraclass correlation coefficient among LDL-Cr and LDL-Cf and LDL-Cnf were high (R=0.93 and 0.92, respectively. The correlation between LDL-Cf and LDL-Cnf was 0.95. There is no difference between the areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve with the level of LDL-Cr at 160 mg/dl for LDL-Cnf and LDL-Cf. (0.94 vs. 0.93; p=0.27. Conclusion: There is high concordance between LDL-Cf and LDL-Cnf. These formulae could be an alternative when there are limitations to determine LDL-C because of the lack of enzymatic methods or through Friedewald formula due to the absence of HDL-C.

  8. On the equivalence between kernel self-organising maps and self-organising mixture density networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hujun

    2006-01-01

    The kernel method has become a useful trick and has been widely applied to various learning models to extend their nonlinear approximation and classification capabilities. Such extensions have also recently occurred to the Self-Organising Map (SOM). In this paper, two recently proposed kernel SOMs are reviewed, together with their link to an energy function. The Self-Organising Mixture Network is an extension of the SOM for mixture density modelling. This paper shows that with an isotropic, density-type kernel function, the kernel SOM is equivalent to a homoscedastic Self-Organising Mixture Network, an entropy-based density estimator. This revelation on the one hand explains that kernelising SOM can improve classification performance by acquiring better probability models of the data; but on the other hand it also explains that the SOM already naturally approximates the kernel method.

  9. Genotyping-by-Sequencing derived High-Density Linkage Map and its Application to QTL Mapping of Flag Leaf Traits in Bread Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hard red winter wheat parents ‘Harry’ (drought tolerant) and ‘Wesley’ (drought susceptible) was used to develop a recombinant inbred population to identify genomic regions associated with drought and adaptation. To precisely map genomic regions high-density linkage maps are a prerequisite. In this s...

  10. Galaxy bias from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data: combining galaxy density maps and weak lensing maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.; Pujol, A.; Gaztañaga, E.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Ross, A. J.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Cunha, C. E.; D' Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-04-15

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias from a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a $\\sim$116 deg$^{2}$ area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. (2012) and later re-examined in a companion paper (Pujol et al., in prep) with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1$\\sigma$ error bars in 4 photometric redshift bins to be 1.33$\\pm$0.18 (z=0.2-0.4), 1.19$\\pm$0.23 (z=0.4-0.6), 0.99$\\pm$0.36 ( z=0.6-0.8), and 1.66$\\pm$0.56 (z=0.8-1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 1-2$\\sigma$ level with mea- surements on the same dataset using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with CMB lensing. In addition, our method provides the only $\\sigma_8$-independent constraint among the three. We forward-model the main observational effects using mock galaxy catalogs by including shape noise, photo-z errors and masking effects. We show that our bias measurement from the data is consistent with that expected from simulations. With the forthcoming full DES data set, we expect this method to provide additional constraints on the galaxy bias measurement from more traditional methods. Furthermore, in the process of our measurement, we build up a 3D mass map that allows further exploration of the dark matter distribution and its relation to galaxy evolution.

  11. Galaxy bias from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data: combining galaxy density maps and weak lensing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.; Pujol, A.; Gaztañaga, E.; Amara, A.; Réfrégier, A.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; Fosalba, P.; Giannantonio, T.; Hartley, W.; Jarvis, M.; Kacprzak, T.; Ross, A. J.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Vikram, V.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Kind, M. Carrasco; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-07-01

    We measure the redshift evolution of galaxy bias for a magnitude-limited galaxy sample by combining the galaxy density maps and weak lensing shear maps for a ˜116 deg2 area of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data. This method was first developed in Amara et al. and later re-examined in a companion paper with rigorous simulation tests and analytical treatment of tomographic measurements. In this work we apply this method to the DES SV data and measure the galaxy bias for a i < 22.5 galaxy sample. We find the galaxy bias and 1σ error bars in four photometric redshift bins to be 1.12 ± 0.19 (z = 0.2-0.4), 0.97 ± 0.15 (z = 0.4-0.6), 1.38 ± 0.39 (z = 0.6-0.8), and 1.45 ± 0.56 (z = 0.8-1.0). These measurements are consistent at the 2σ level with measurements on the same data set using galaxy clustering and cross-correlation of galaxies with cosmic microwave background lensing, with most of the redshift bins consistent within the 1σ error bars. In addition, our method provides the only σ8 independent constraint among the three. We forward model the main observational effects using mock galaxy catalogues by including shape noise, photo-z errors, and masking effects. We show that our bias measurement from the data is consistent with that expected from simulations. With the forthcoming full DES data set, we expect this method to provide additional constraints on the galaxy bias measurement from more traditional methods. Furthermore, in the process of our measurement, we build up a 3D mass map that allows further exploration of the dark matter distribution and its relation to galaxy evolution.

  12. Critical point representations of electron density maps for the comparison of benzodiazepine-type ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leherte, L; Meurice, N; Vercauteren, D P

    2000-01-01

    A procedure for the comparison of three-dimensional electron density distributions is proposed for similarity searches between pharmacological ligands at various levels of crystallographic resolution. First, a graph representation of molecular electron density distributions is generated using a critical point analysis approach. Pairwise as well as multiple comparisons between the obtained graphs of critical points are then carried out using a Monte Carlo/simulated annealing technique, and results are compared with genetic algorithm solutions.

  13. Multi-scale Planck corrections to Herschel dust continuum emission maps: Implications for column density and temperature maps

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu-Vicente, J; Robitaille, T; Henning, Th; Keto, E

    2016-01-01

    We present a Fourier space method to combine the publicly available Herschel PACS and SPIRE data with the Planck thermal dust emission model. The method effectively combines the Planck large angular scale emission with the small scale \\herschel emission, similar to the feathering method used in interferometry and recently implemented by Csengeri et al. to correct the ground-based ATLASGAL data. This method eliminates the pervasive negative fluxes present in the PACS 160 micron archive data while preserving the structure in the background of both the PACS and SPIRE data. We generate column density and temperature maps from data calibrated with this method. We analyze the validity of our new method using star-forming regions in a range of environments: low-mass Bok Globules (B68), nearby star-forming regions (Perseus), and high-mass star forming regions in the Galactic plane (including IRDC G11 and W31). We accurately recover low column density material, comparing well to previous near-infrared extinction metho...

  14. Effect of Co-segregating Markers on High-Density Genetic Maps and Prediction of Map Expansion Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amidou N’Diaye

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Advances in sequencing and genotyping methods have enable cost-effective production of high throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers, making them the choice for linkage mapping. As a result, many laboratories have developed high-throughput SNP assays and built high-density genetic maps. However, the number of markers may, by orders of magnitude, exceed the resolution of recombination for a given population size so that only a minority of markers can accurately be ordered. Another issue attached to the so-called ‘large p, small n’ problem is that high-density genetic maps inevitably result in many markers clustering at the same position (co-segregating markers. While there are a number of related papers, none have addressed the impact of co-segregating markers on genetic maps. In the present study, we investigated the effects of co-segregating markers on high-density genetic map length and marker order using empirical data from two populations of wheat, Mohawk × Cocorit (durum wheat and Norstar × Cappelle Desprez (bread wheat. The maps of both populations consisted of 85% co-segregating markers. Our study clearly showed that excess of co-segregating markers can lead to map expansion, but has little effect on markers order. To estimate the inflation factor (IF, we generated a total of 24,473 linkage maps (8,203 maps for Mohawk × Cocorit and 16,270 maps for Norstar × Cappelle Desprez. Using seven machine learning algorithms, we were able to predict with an accuracy of 0.7 the map expansion due to the proportion of co-segregating markers. For example in Mohawk × Cocorit, with 10 and 80% co-segregating markers the length of the map inflated by 4.5 and 16.6%, respectively. Similarly, the map of Norstar × Cappelle Desprez expanded by 3.8 and 11.7% with 10 and 80% co-segregating markers. With the increasing number of markers on SNP-chips, the proportion of co-segregating markers in high-density maps will continue to increase

  15. High-Density SNP Map Construction and QTL Identification for the Apetalous Character in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Yu, Kunjiang; Li, Hongge; Peng, Qi; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Song; Hu, Maolong; Zhang, Jiefu

    2015-01-01

    The apetalous genotype is a morphological ideotype for increasing seed yield and should be of considerable agricultural use; however, only a few studies have focused on the genetic control of this trait in Brassica napus. In the present study, a recombinant inbred line, the AH population, containing 189 individuals was derived from a cross between an apetalous line ‘APL01’ and a normally petalled variety ‘Holly’. The Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array harboring 52,157 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers was used to genotype the AH individuals. A high-density genetic linkage map was constructed based on 2,755 bins involving 11,458 SNPs and 57 simple sequence repeats, and was used to identify loci associated with petalous degree (PDgr). The linkage map covered 2,027.53 cM, with an average marker interval of 0.72 cM. The AH map had good collinearity with the B. napus reference genome, indicating its high quality and accuracy. After phenotypic analyses across five different experiments, a total of 19 identified quantitative trait loci (QTLs) distributed across chromosomes A3, A5, A6, A9 and C8 were obtained, and these QTLs were further integrated into nine consensus QTLs by a meta-analysis. Interestingly, the major QTL qPD.C8-2 was consistently detected in all five experiments, and qPD.A9-2 and qPD.C8-3 were stably expressed in four experiments. Comparative mapping between the AH map and the B. napus reference genome suggested that there were 328 genes underlying the confidence intervals of the three steady QTLs. Based on the Gene Ontology assignments of 52 genes to the regulation of floral development in published studies, 146 genes were considered as potential candidate genes for PDgr. The current study carried out a QTL analysis for PDgr using a high-density SNP map in B. napus, providing novel targets for improving seed yield. These results advanced our understanding of the genetic control of PDgr regulation in B. napus. PMID:26779193

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging. Density equalizing mapping analysis of global research architecture; Magnetresonanztomographie. Eine Density-equalizing-mapping-Analyse der globalen Forschungsarchitektur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlendorf, D.; Schwarze, B.; Groneberg, D.A.; Schwarzer, M. [Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt/M, Institut fuer Arbeitsmedizin, Sozialmedizin und Umweltmedizin, Frankfurt/M (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Despite the great medical importance, there is still no comprehensive scientometric analysis regarding the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the development of the importance for the healthcare system. This paper evaluated and analyzed the entire research publication results on the topic of MRI for the period 1981-2007 based on scientometric methods and parameters. A scientometric analysis (database: ISI Web of Science 1981-2007, search terms MRI and magnetic resonance imaging) was performed. The following parameters were analyzed: number of publications, countries of publication, number of citations, citation rate and collaborations, using various analytical and display techniques, including density equalizing map projections. Most of the 49,122 publications on MRI could be attributed to the USA (32.5 %), which also has the most cooperative collaborations. Within Europe, Germany (10.3 %) is the country with the highest number of publications followed by the UK (9.3 %). The western industrialized nations dominate over the rest of the world in terms of scientific developments of MRI. The thematic focus of the publications lies in the fields of radiology and neuroscience. In addition to the journal Neurology most scientific articles were published in Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Circulation. The results show that the current trend is continuing and the scientific interest in MRI is continuously increasing. (orig.) [German] Trotz der grossen medizinischen Bedeutung existiert bis heute keine umfassende szientometrische Analyse bzgl. der Forschungsergebnisse zur Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) und der Entwicklung ihrer Bedeutung fuer das Gesundheitssystem. Im vorliegenden Beitrag soll anhand szientometrischer Methoden und Parameter das gesamte Forschungsaufkommen zum Thema MRT fuer den Zeitraum 1981-2007 evaluiert und analysiert werden. Es wurde eine szientometrische Analyse (Datenbank: ISI-Web of Science, 1981-2007; Suchterm &apos

  17. Noise-amplitude dependence of the invariant density for noisy, fully chaotic one-dimensional maps

    CERN Document Server

    Seshadri, S R; Lakshmibala, S

    1999-01-01

    We present some analytic, non-perturbative results for the invariant density rho(x) for noisy one-dimensional maps at fully developed chaos. Under periodic boundary conditions, the Fourier expansion method is used to show precisely how noise makes rho(x) absolutely continuous and smoothens it out. Simple solvable models are used to illustrate the explicit dependence of rho(x) on the amplitude eta of the noise distribution, all the way from the case of zero noise (eta > 0) to the completely noise-dominated limit (eta=1).

  18. A High-Density Map for Navigating the Human Polycomb Complexome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauri, Simon; Comoglio, Federico; Seimiya, Makiko;

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are major determinants of gene silencing and epigenetic memory in higher eukaryotes. Here, we systematically mapped the human PcG complexome using a robust affinity purification mass spectrometry approach. Our high-density protein interaction network uncovered...... complexes, which contain the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase OGT1 and several transcription factors. Finally, genome-wide profiling of PR-DUB components indicated that the human PR-DUB and PRC1 complexes bind distinct sets of target genes, suggesting differential impact on cellular processes...

  19. LAND-COVER DENSITY-BASED APPROACH TO URBAN LAND USE MAPPING USING HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiu-ying; FENG Xue-zhi; DENG Hui

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, remote sensing imagery, especially with its high spatial resolution, has become an indispensable tool to provide timely up-gradation of urban land use and land cover information, which is a prerequisite for proper urban planning and management. The possible method described in the present paper to obtain urban land use types is based on the principle that land use can be derived from the land cover existing in a neighborhood. Here, moving window is used to represent the spatial pattern of land cover within a neighborhood and seven window sizes (61m×61 m,68m×68m, 75m×75m, 87m×87m, 99m×99m, 110m×110m and 121m×121m) are applied to determining the most proper window size. Then, the unsupervised method of ISODATA is employed to classify the layered land cover density maps obtained by the moving window. The results of accuracy evaluation show that the window size of 99m×99m is proper to infer urban land use categories and the proposed method has produced a land use map with a total accuracy of 85%.

  20. All of the Sky: HEALPix Density Maps of Gaia-scale Datasets from the Database to the Desktop

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, M B; Demleitner, M

    2016-01-01

    The Gaia Archive provides access to observations of around a billion sky sources. The primary access to this archive is via TAP services such as GACS and ARI-Gaia, which allow execution of SQL-like queries against a large remote database returning a result set of manageable size for client-side use. Such services are generally used for extracting relatively small source lists according to potentially complex selection criteria. But they can also be used to obtain statistical information about all, or a large fraction of, the observed sources by building histogram-like results. We examine here the practicalities of producing and consuming all-sky HEALPix weighted density maps in this way for Gaia and other large datasets. We present some modest requirements on TAP/RDBMS services to enable such queries, and discuss visualisation and serialization options for the results including some new capabilities in recent versions of TOPCAT.

  1. Analysis of low-density lipoprotein-associated proteins using the method of digitized native protein mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ya; Chen, Jin; Wang, Ahui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Shumin; Manabe, Takashi; Tan, Wen

    2016-07-01

    The method of digitized native protein mapping, combining nondenaturing micro 2DE, grid gel-cutting, and quantitative LC-MS/MS (in data-independent acquisition mode, or MS(E) ), was improved by using a new MS/MS mode, ion mobility separation enhanced-MS(E) (HDMS(E) ), and applied to analyze the area of human plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL). An 18 mm × 4.8 mm rectangular area which included LDL on a nondenaturing micro 2D gel of human plasma was grid-cut into 72 square gel pieces and subjected to quantitative LC-MS/MS. Compared with MS(E) , HDMS(E) showed significantly higher performance, by assigning 50% more proteins and detecting each protein in more squares. A total of 253 proteins were assigned with LC-HDMS(E) and the quantity distribution of each was reconstructed as a native protein map. The maps showed that Apo B-100 was the most abundant protein in the grid-cut area, concentrated at pI ca. 5.4-6.1 and apparent mass ca. 1000 kDa, which corresponded to four gel pieces, squares 39-42. An Excel macro was prepared to search protein maps which showed protein quantity peaks localized within this concentrated region of Apo B-100. Twenty-two proteins out of the 252 matched this criterion, in which 19 proteins have been reported to be associated with LDL. This method only requires several microliters of a plasma sample and the principle of the protein separation is totally different from the commonly used ultracentrifugation. The results obtained by this method would provide new insights on the structure and function of LDL.

  2. Magnetic resonance fiber density mapping of age-related white matter changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas, E-mail: andi@nmr.at [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, A-3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Ganslandt, Oliver [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Salomonowitz, Erich [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, A-3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Buchfelder, Michael [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Hammen, Thilo [Department of Neurology, Epilepsy Center, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, D-90429 Erlangen (Germany); Bachmair, Johanna [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, A-3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Eberhardt, Knut [Krankenhaus Schloss Werneck, MRT-Kompetenzzentrum, Balthasar-Neumann-Platz 1, D-97440 Werneck (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: To introduce fiber density mapping (FDM) for investigation of age-related white matter (WM) changes and to compare its capabilities with conventional diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) post-processing. Methods: DTI data with 1.9 mm{sup 3} isotropic voxels were acquired from 44 healthy volunteers (18–88 years) at 3 T. FDM is a 3-step approach which includes diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, fiber reconstruction for the whole brain, and calculation of fiber density (FD) values. Maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were additionally calculated. Voxel-based analyses were performed to determine volume clusters of significant correlation with age. Bivariate linear regression models and Hotelling–Williams tests were used to detect significant differences between correlations. Results: FDM detected a larger WM volume affected by age-related changes concomitant with fewer significant clusters compared to FA and MD. This indicates that WM alterations due to normal aging occur rather globally than locally. FD values showed a significant stronger correlation with age in frontal lobes (prefrontal and precentral gyrus), limbic lobes (cingulate and parahippocampal gyrus), the corpus callosum (genu) and temporal lobes. Conclusions: FDM shows higher sensitivity for detection of age-related WM changes because it includes all surrounding fiber structures into the evaluation of each DTI data voxel.

  3. Transport of phase space densities through tetrahedral meshes using discrete flow mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajars, Janis; Chappell, David J.; Søndergaard, Niels; Tanner, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Discrete flow mapping was recently introduced as an efficient ray based method determining wave energy distributions in complex built up structures. Wave energy densities are transported along ray trajectories through polygonal mesh elements using a finite dimensional approximation of a ray transfer operator. In this way the method can be viewed as a smoothed ray tracing method defined over meshed surfaces. Many applications require the resolution of wave energy distributions in three-dimensional domains, such as in room acoustics, underwater acoustics and for electromagnetic cavity problems. In this work we extend discrete flow mapping to three-dimensional domains by propagating wave energy densities through tetrahedral meshes. The geometric simplicity of the tetrahedral mesh elements is utilised to efficiently compute the ray transfer operator using a mixture of analytic and spectrally accurate numerical integration. The important issue of how to choose a suitable basis approximation in phase space whilst maintaining a reasonable computational cost is addressed via low order local approximations on tetrahedral faces in the position coordinate and high order orthogonal polynomial expansions in momentum space.

  4. A pilot study of high-density electromyographic maps of muscle activity in normal deglutition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Zhu, Mingxing; Xu, Lisheng; Li, Guanglin

    2013-01-01

    While various methods have been used to study physiological aspects of swallowing, few studies have been conducted to investigate the dynamics of a swallowing procedure with the activation pattern of swallowing muscles. In this pilot study we investigated the feasibility of surface electromyographic (sEMG) dynamic topography as a new approach for continuously visualizing muscle activity of normal swallowing. The dynamic sEMG topographies (or potential mappings) of swallowing were constructed with high-density sEMG recordings from three subjects without any swallowing disorders. The root mean square (RMS) of the sEMG signals was calculated as a function of both position and time to produce two-dimension dynamic sEMG maps of the muscle activity during swallowing. The sEMG maps could provide the information about the dynamic characteristics of swallowing muscles, which is accordance with physiological and biomechanical laws of a normal swallowing. With the results of the present study, we might conclude that the dynamic topography would provide a noninvasive means to continuously visualize the distribution of surface EMG signals of complex muscle activities of normal deglutition.

  5. Joint Mapping of Mobility and Trap Density in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Stadler, Philipp

    2013-07-23

    Field-effect transistors have been widely used to study electronic transport and doping in colloidal quantum dot solids to great effect. However, the full power of these devices to elucidate the electronic structure of materials has yet to be harnessed. Here, we deploy nanodielectric field-effect transistors to map the energy landscape within the band gap of a colloidal quantum dot solid. We exploit the self-limiting nature of the potentiostatic anodization growth mode to produce the thinnest usable gate dielectric, subject to our voltage breakdown requirements defined by the Fermi sweep range of interest. Lead sulfide colloidal quantum dots are applied as the active region and are treated with varying solvents and ligands. In an analysis complementary to the mobility trends commonly extracted from field-effect transistor studies, we focus instead on the subthreshold regime and map out the density of trap states in these nanocrystal films. The findings point to the importance of comprehensively mapping the electronic band- and gap-structure within real quantum solids, and they suggest a new focus in investigating quantum dot solids with an aim toward improving optoelectronic device performance. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  6. A new algebraic method for quantitative proton density mapping using multi-channel coil data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Dietmar; Yang, Zhengshi; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Sreenivasan, Karthik; Mishra, Virendra; Hua, Le H

    2017-08-01

    A difficult problem in quantitative MRI is the accurate determination of the proton density, which is an important quantity in measuring brain tissue organization. Recent progress in estimating proton density in vivo has been based on using the inverse linear relationship between the longitudinal relaxation rate T1 and proton density. In this study, the same type of relationship is being used, however, in a more general framework by constructing 3D basis functions to model the receiver bias field. The novelty of this method is that the basis functions developed are suitable to cover an entire range of inverse linearities between T1 and proton density. The method is applied by parcellating the human brain into small cubes with size 30mm x 30mm x 30mm. In each cube the optimal set of basis functions is determined to model the receiver coil sensitivities using multi-channel (32 element) coil data. For validation, we use arbitrary data from a numerical phantom where the data satisfy the conventional MR signal equations. Using added noise of different magnitude and realizations, we show that the proton densities obtained have a bias close to zero and also low noise sensitivity. The obtained root-mean-square-error rate is less than 0.2% for the estimated proton density in a realistic 3D simulation. As an application, the method is used in a small cohort of MS patients, and proton density values for specific brain structures are determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Principal component analysis of the CT density histogram to generate parametric response maps of COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, N.; Capaldi, D. P. I.; Pike, D.; McCormack, D. G.; Cunningham, I. A.; Parraga, G.

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary x-ray computed tomography (CT) may be used to characterize emphysema and airways disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One analysis approach - parametric response mapping (PMR) utilizes registered inspiratory and expiratory CT image volumes and CT-density-histogram thresholds, but there is no consensus regarding the threshold values used, or their clinical meaning. Principal-component-analysis (PCA) of the CT density histogram can be exploited to quantify emphysema using data-driven CT-density-histogram thresholds. Thus, the objective of this proof-of-concept demonstration was to develop a PRM approach using PCA-derived thresholds in COPD patients and ex-smokers without airflow limitation. Methods: Fifteen COPD ex-smokers and 5 normal ex-smokers were evaluated. Thoracic CT images were also acquired at full inspiration and full expiration and these images were non-rigidly co-registered. PCA was performed for the CT density histograms, from which the components with the highest eigenvalues greater than one were summed. Since the values of the principal component curve correlate directly with the variability in the sample, the maximum and minimum points on the curve were used as threshold values for the PCA-adjusted PRM technique. Results: A significant correlation was determined between conventional and PCA-adjusted PRM with 3He MRI apparent diffusion coefficient (p<0.001), with CT RA950 (p<0.0001), as well as with 3He MRI ventilation defect percent, a measurement of both small airways disease (p=0.049 and p=0.06, respectively) and emphysema (p=0.02). Conclusions: PRM generated using PCA thresholds of the CT density histogram showed significant correlations with CT and 3He MRI measurements of emphysema, but not airways disease.

  8. Construction of a high-density genetic map for sesame based on large scale marker development by specific length amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The genetics and molecular biology of sesame has only recently begun to be studied even though sesame is an important oil seed crop. A high-density genetic map for sesame has not been published yet due to a lack of sufficient molecular markers. Specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recently developed high-resolution strategy for large-scale de novo SNP discovery and genotyping. SLAF-seq was employed in this study to obtain sufficient markers to construct a high-density genetic map for sesame. Results In total, 28.21 Gb of data containing 201,488,285 pair-end reads was obtained after sequencing. The average coverage for each SLAF marker was 23.48-fold in the male parent, 23.38-fold in the female parent, and 14.46-fold average in each F2 individual. In total, 71,793 high-quality SLAFs were detected of which 3,673 SLAFs were polymorphic and 1,272 of the polymorphic markers met the requirements for use in the construction of a genetic map. The final map included 1,233 markers on the 15 linkage groups (LGs) and was 1,474.87 cM in length with an average distance of 1.20 cM between adjacent markers. To our knowledge, this map is the densest genetic linkage map to date for sesame. 'SNP_only’ markers accounted for 87.51% of the markers on the map. A total of 205 markers on the map showed significant (P sesame. The map was constructed using an F2 population and the SLAF-seq approach, which allowed the efficient development of a large number of polymorphic markers in a short time. Results of this study will not only provide a platform for gene/QTL fine mapping, map-based gene isolation, and molecular breeding for sesame, but will also serve as a reference for positioning sequence scaffolds on a physical map, to assist in the process of assembling the sesame genome sequence. PMID:24060091

  9. Construction of a high-density genetic map for sesame based on large scale marker development by specific length amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxin; Wang, Linhai; Xin, Huaigen; Li, Donghua; Ma, Chouxian; Ding, Xia; Hong, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiurong

    2013-09-24

    The genetics and molecular biology of sesame has only recently begun to be studied even though sesame is an important oil seed crop. A high-density genetic map for sesame has not been published yet due to a lack of sufficient molecular markers. Specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is a recently developed high-resolution strategy for large-scale de novo SNP discovery and genotyping. SLAF-seq was employed in this study to obtain sufficient markers to construct a high-density genetic map for sesame. In total, 28.21 Gb of data containing 201,488,285 pair-end reads was obtained after sequencing. The average coverage for each SLAF marker was 23.48-fold in the male parent, 23.38-fold in the female parent, and 14.46-fold average in each F2 individual. In total, 71,793 high-quality SLAFs were detected of which 3,673 SLAFs were polymorphic and 1,272 of the polymorphic markers met the requirements for use in the construction of a genetic map. The final map included 1,233 markers on the 15 linkage groups (LGs) and was 1,474.87 cM in length with an average distance of 1.20 cM between adjacent markers. To our knowledge, this map is the densest genetic linkage map to date for sesame. 'SNP_only' markers accounted for 87.51% of the markers on the map. A total of 205 markers on the map showed significant (P sesame. The map was constructed using an F2 population and the SLAF-seq approach, which allowed the efficient development of a large number of polymorphic markers in a short time. Results of this study will not only provide a platform for gene/QTL fine mapping, map-based gene isolation, and molecular breeding for sesame, but will also serve as a reference for positioning sequence scaffolds on a physical map, to assist in the process of assembling the sesame genome sequence.

  10. BCL::EM-Fit: rigid body fitting of atomic structures into density maps using geometric hashing and real space refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woetzel, Nils; Lindert, Steffen; Stewart, Phoebe L; Meiler, Jens

    2011-09-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) can visualize large macromolecular assemblies at resolutions often below 10Å and recently as good as 3.8-4.5 Å. These density maps provide important insights into the biological functioning of molecular machineries such as viruses or the ribosome, in particular if atomic-resolution crystal structures or models of individual components of the assembly can be placed into the density map. The present work introduces a novel algorithm termed BCL::EM-Fit that accurately fits atomic-detail structural models into medium resolution density maps. In an initial step, a "geometric hashing" algorithm provides a short list of likely placements. In a follow up Monte Carlo/Metropolis refinement step, the initial placements are optimized by their cross correlation coefficient. The resolution of density maps for a reliable fit was determined to be 10 Å or better using tests with simulated density maps. The algorithm was applied to fitting of capsid proteins into an experimental cryoEM density map of human adenovirus at a resolution of 6.8 and 9.0 Å, and fitting of the GroEL protein at 5.4 Å. In the process, the handedness of the cryoEM density map was unambiguously identified. The BCL::EM-Fit algorithm offers an alternative to the established Fourier/Real space fitting programs. BCL::EM-Fit is free for academic use and available from a web server or as downloadable binary file at http://www.meilerlab.org.

  11. Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map Based on Large-Scale Marker Development in Mango Using Specific-Locus Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chun; Shu, Bo; Yao, Quangsheng; Wu, Hongxia; Xu, Wentian; Wang, Songbiao

    2016-01-01

    Genetic maps are particularly important and valuable tools for quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping and marker assisted selection (MAS) of plant with desirable traits. In this study, 173 F1 plants from a cross between Mangifera indica L. “Jin-Hwang” and M. indica L. “Irwin” and their parent plants were subjected to high-throughput sequencing and specific-locus amplified fragment (SLAF) library construction. After preprocessing, 66.02 Gb of raw data containing 330.64 M reads were obtained. A total of 318,414 SLAFs were detected, of which 156,368 were polymorphic. Finally, 6594 SLAFs were organized into a linkage map consisting of 20 linkage groups (LGs). The total length of the map was 3148.28 cM and the average distance between adjacent markers was 0.48 cM. This map could be considered, to our knowledge, the first high-density genetic map of mango, and might form the basis for fine QTL mapping and MAS of mango. PMID:27625670

  12. Construction of a high-density linkage map and fine mapping of QTLs for growth and gonad related traits in blunt snout bream

    OpenAIRE

    Shi-Ming Wan; Hong Liu; Bo-Wen Zhao; Chun-Hong Nie; Wei-Min Wang; Ze-Xia Gao

    2017-01-01

    High-density genetic maps based on SNPs are essential for fine mapping loci controlling specific traits for fish species. Using restriction-site associated DNA tag sequencing (RAD-Seq) technology, we identified 42,784 SNPs evenly distributed across the Megalobrama amblycephala genome. Based on 2 parents and 187 intra-specific hybridization progenies, a total of 14,648 high-confidence SNPs were assigned to 24 consensus linkage groups (LGs) of maternal and paternal map. The total length of the ...

  13. Rapid genotyping with DNA micro-arrays for high-density linkage mapping and QTL mapping in common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Shiori; Hara, Takashi; Ueno, Mariko; Enoki, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Tatsuro; Nishimura, Satoru; Yasui, Yasuo; Ohsawa, Ryo; Iwata, Hiroyoshi

    2014-12-01

    For genetic studies and genomics-assisted breeding, particularly of minor crops, a genotyping system that does not require a priori genomic information is preferable. Here, we demonstrated the potential of a novel array-based genotyping system for the rapid construction of high-density linkage map and quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. By using the system, we successfully constructed an accurate, high-density linkage map for common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench); the map was composed of 756 loci and included 8,884 markers. The number of linkage groups converged to eight, which is the basic number of chromosomes in common buckwheat. The sizes of the linkage groups of the P1 and P2 maps were 773.8 and 800.4 cM, respectively. The average interval between adjacent loci was 2.13 cM. The linkage map constructed here will be useful for the analysis of other common buckwheat populations. We also performed QTL mapping for main stem length and detected four QTL. It took 37 days to process 178 samples from DNA extraction to genotyping, indicating the system enables genotyping of genome-wide markers for a few hundred buckwheat plants before the plants mature. The novel system will be useful for genomics-assisted breeding in minor crops without a priori genomic information.

  14. A High-Density Map for Navigating the Human Polycomb Complexome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hauri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb group (PcG proteins are major determinants of gene silencing and epigenetic memory in higher eukaryotes. Here, we systematically mapped the human PcG complexome using a robust affinity purification mass spectrometry approach. Our high-density protein interaction network uncovered a diverse range of PcG complexes. Moreover, our analysis identified PcG interactors linking them to the PcG system, thus providing insight into the molecular function of PcG complexes and mechanisms of recruitment to target genes. We identified two human PRC2 complexes and two PR-DUB deubiquitination complexes, which contain the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase OGT1 and several transcription factors. Finally, genome-wide profiling of PR-DUB components indicated that the human PR-DUB and PRC1 complexes bind distinct sets of target genes, suggesting differential impact on cellular processes in mammals.

  15. Local Density-of-States Mapping in Photonic Crystal Resonators by Deterministically Positioned Germanium Quantum Dots

    CERN Document Server

    Schatzl, Magdalena; Glaser, Martin; Brehm, Moritz; Simbula, Angelica; Galli, Matteo; Fromherz, Thomas; Schäffler, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    We report on mapping of the local density of states in L3 photonic crystal resonators (PCR) via deterministically positioned single Ge quantum dots (QDs). Perfect site-control of Ge QDs on pre-patterned silicon-on-insulator substrates was exploited to fabricate in one processing run almost 300 L3 PCRs containing single QDs in systematically varying positions in the cavities. The alignment precision of the QD emitters was better than 20 nm. This type of parallel processing is essentially based on standard Si device technologies and is therefore scalable to any number and configuration of PCR structures. As a first demonstrator, we probed the coupling efficiency of a single Ge QD to the L3 cavity modes as a function of their spatial overlap. The results are in excellent agreement with finite-difference time-domain simulations.

  16. High-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes using ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Søren; Rockberg, Johan; Forsström, Björn

    2012-01-01

    -resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes, we have used ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays generating several hundred thousand different peptides per array. Using exhaustive length and substitution analysis, we have successfully examined the specificity of a panel of polyclonal antibodies raised against......Antibodies empower numerous important scientific, clinical, diagnostic, and industrial applications. Ideally, the epitope(s) targeted by an antibody should be identified and characterized, thereby establishing antibody reactivity, highlighting possible cross-reactivities, and perhaps even warning...... against unwanted (e.g. autoimmune) reactivities. Antibodies target proteins as either conformational or linear epitopes. The latter are typically probed with peptides, but the cost of peptide screening programs tends to prohibit comprehensive specificity analysis. To perform high-throughput, high...

  17. Plasma density evolution in plasma opening switch obtained by a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Ren, Jing; Guo, Fan; Zhou, LiangJi; Li, Ye; He, An; Jiang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    To understand the formation process of vacuum gap in coaxial microsecond conduction time plasma opening switch (POS), we have made measurements of the line-integrated plasma density during switch operation using a time-resolved sensitive He-Ne interferometer. The conduction current and conduction time in experiments are about 120 kA and 1 μs, respectively. As a result, more than 85% of conduction current has been transferred to an inductive load with rise time of 130 ns. The radial dependence of the density is measured by changing the radial location of the line-of-sight for shots with the same nominal POS parameters. During the conduction phase, the line-integrated plasma density in POS increases at all radial locations over the gun-only case by further ionization of material injected from the guns. The current conduction is observed to cause a radial redistribution of the switch plasma. A vacuum gap forms rapidly in the plasma at 5.5 mm from the center conductor, which is consistent with the location where magnetic pressure is the largest, allowing current to be transferred from the POS to the load.

  18. Column Density Maps of the I-GALFA HI Survey: Evidence for Dark Gas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Steven J.; Koo, B.; Douglas, K. A.; Newton, J. H.; Peek, J. E.; Hughes, J. M.; Spraggs, M.; Park, G.; Kang, J.; Heiles, C. E.; Korpela, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    The gas in galactic disks, including our own, occurs in a wide range of temperatures and densities, most of which are unsuitable for star formation. Somehow, diffuse atomic clouds are collected into colder, denser molecular clouds that can collapse under their own gravity. The molecular condensation process is not directly observable, and the gas itself is often ``dark'' to standard probes like optically thin HI 21cm emission or the CO 2.6mm line. However, the presence of this dark gas can often be inferred from infrared dust emission in excess of what is expected for the observed HI and CO content. We have mapped apparent HI column densities in the Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array (I-GALFA) survey, which covers a 1600 square degree region at 4-arcminute resolution in the first Galactic quadrant. We compare these ``naive'' HI columns to others derived from Planck first-release CO and dust maps and NE2001 model dispersion measures to identify a number of areas with potentially significant dark gas. We discuss whether optically thick HI or CO-free H2 is more likely to dominate the dark column, and we consider the effects of possible biases on our results. We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation, the NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium, Western Kentucky University, and the Gatton Academy. I-GALFA (www.naic.edu igalfa) is a GALFA-HI survey observed with the 7-beam ALFA receiver on the 305-meter William E. Gordon Telescope. The Arecibo Observatory is a U.S. National Science Foundation facility operated under sequential cooperative agreements with Cornell University and SRI International, the latter in alliance with the Ana G. Mendez-Universidad Metropolitana and the Universities Space Research Association.

  19. Type 2 Diabetes Research Yield, 1951-2012: Bibliometrics Analysis and Density-Equalizing Mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Geaney

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to provide a detailed evaluation of type 2 diabetes mellitus research output from 1951-2012, using large-scale data analysis, bibliometric indicators and density-equalizing mapping. Data were retrieved from the Science Citation Index Expanded database, one of the seven curated databases within Web of Science. Using Boolean operators "OR", "AND" and "NOT", a search strategy was developed to estimate the total number of published items. Only studies with an English abstract were eligible. Type 1 diabetes and gestational diabetes items were excluded. Specific software developed for the database analysed the data. Information including titles, authors' affiliations and publication years were extracted from all files and exported to excel. Density-equalizing mapping was conducted as described by Groenberg-Kloft et al, 2008. A total of 24,783 items were published and cited 476,002 times. The greatest number of outputs were published in 2010 (n=2,139. The United States contributed 28.8% to the overall output, followed by the United Kingdom (8.2% and Japan (7.7%. Bilateral cooperation was most common between the United States and United Kingdom (n=237. Harvard University produced 2% of all publications, followed by the University of California (1.1%. The leading journals were Diabetes, Diabetologia and Diabetes Care and they contributed 9.3%, 7.3% and 4.0% of the research yield, respectively. In conclusion, the volume of research is rising in parallel with the increasing global burden of disease due to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Bibliometrics analysis provides useful information to scientists and funding agencies involved in the development and implementation of research strategies to address global health issues.

  20. Type 2 Diabetes Research Yield, 1951-2012: Bibliometrics Analysis and Density-Equalizing Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geaney, Fiona; Scutaru, Cristian; Kelly, Clare; Glynn, Ronan W; Perry, Ivan J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to provide a detailed evaluation of type 2 diabetes mellitus research output from 1951-2012, using large-scale data analysis, bibliometric indicators and density-equalizing mapping. Data were retrieved from the Science Citation Index Expanded database, one of the seven curated databases within Web of Science. Using Boolean operators "OR", "AND" and "NOT", a search strategy was developed to estimate the total number of published items. Only studies with an English abstract were eligible. Type 1 diabetes and gestational diabetes items were excluded. Specific software developed for the database analysed the data. Information including titles, authors' affiliations and publication years were extracted from all files and exported to excel. Density-equalizing mapping was conducted as described by Groenberg-Kloft et al, 2008. A total of 24,783 items were published and cited 476,002 times. The greatest number of outputs were published in 2010 (n=2,139). The United States contributed 28.8% to the overall output, followed by the United Kingdom (8.2%) and Japan (7.7%). Bilateral cooperation was most common between the United States and United Kingdom (n=237). Harvard University produced 2% of all publications, followed by the University of California (1.1%). The leading journals were Diabetes, Diabetologia and Diabetes Care and they contributed 9.3%, 7.3% and 4.0% of the research yield, respectively. In conclusion, the volume of research is rising in parallel with the increasing global burden of disease due to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Bibliometrics analysis provides useful information to scientists and funding agencies involved in the development and implementation of research strategies to address global health issues.

  1. Endometriosis and its global research architecture: an in-depth density-equalizing mapping analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggmann, Dörthe; Elizabeth-Martinez, Alexandra; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Quarcoo, David; Jaque, Jenny M; Groneberg, David A

    2016-09-21

    Endometriosis is one of the most common gynecological diseases. It is still a chameleon in many aspects and urges intense research activities in the fields of diagnosis, therapy and prevention. Despite the need to foster research in this area, no in-depth analysis of the global architecture of endometriosis research exists yet. We here used the NewQIS platform to conduct a density equalizing mapping study, using the Web of Science as database with endometriosis related entries between 1900 and 2009. Density equalizing maps of global endometriosis research encompassing country-specific publication activities, and semi-qualitative indices such as country specific citations, citation rates, h-Indices were created. In total, 11,056 entries related to endometriosis were found. The USA was leading the field with 3705 publications followed by the United Kingdom (952) and Japan (846). Concerning overall citations and country-specific h-Indices, the USA again was the leading nation with 74,592 citations and a modified h-Index of 103, followed by the UK with 15,175 citations (h-Index 57). Regarding the citation rate, Sweden and Belgium were at top positions with rates of 22.46 and 22.26, respectively. Concerning collaborative studies, there was a steep increase in numbers present; analysis of the chronological evolution indicated a strong increase in international collaborations in the past 10 years. This study is the first analysis that illustrates the global endometriosis research architecture. It shows that endometriosis research is constantly gaining importance but also underlines the need for further efforts and investments to foster research and ultimately improve endometriosis management on a global scale.

  2. Low-resolution density maps from atomic models: how stepping "back" can be a step "forward".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belnap, D M; Kumar, A; Folk, J T; Smith, T J; Baker, T S

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-resolution structures have had a tremendous impact on modern biological science. Much useful information also has been gleaned by merging and correlating atomic-resolution structural details with lower-resolution (15-40 A), three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions computed from images recorded with cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryoTEM) procedures. One way to merge these structures involves reducing the resolution of an atomic model to a level comparable to a cryoTEM reconstruction. A low-resolution density map can be derived from an atomic-resolution structure by retrieving a set of atomic coordinates editing the coordinate file, computing structure factors from the model coordinates, and computing the inverse Fourier transform of the structure factors. This method is a useful tool for structural studies primarily in combination with 3D cryoTEM reconstructions. It has been used to assess the quality of 3D reconstructions, to determine corrections for the phase-contrast transfer function of the transmission electron microscope, to calibrate the dimensions and handedness of 3D reconstructions, to produce difference maps, to model features in macromolecules or macromolecular complexes, and to generate models to initiate model-based determination of particle orientation and origin parameters for 3D reconstruction.

  3. Polycystic ovary syndrome: analysis of the global research architecture using density equalizing mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggmann, Dörthe; Berges, Lea; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Bauer, Jan; Bendels, Michael; Louwen, Frank; Jaque, Jenny; Groneberg, David A

    2017-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of female infertility worldwide. Although the related research output is constantly growing, no detailed global map of the scientific architecture has so far been created encompassing quantitative, qualitative, socioeconomic and gender aspects. We used the NewQIS platform to assess all PCOS-related publications indexed between 1900 and 2014 in the Web of Science, and applied density equalizing mapping projections, scientometric techniques and economic benchmarking procedures. A total of 6261 PCOS-specific publications and 703 international research collaborations were found. The USA was identified as the most active country in total and collaborative research activity. In the socioeconomic analysis, the USA was also ranked first (25.49 PCOS-related publications per gross domestic product [GDP]/capita), followed by the UK, Italy and Greece. When research activity was related to population size, Scandinavian countries and Greece were leading the field. For many highly productive countries, gender analysis revealed a high ratio of female scientists working on PCOS with the exception of Japan. In this study, we have created the first picture of global PCOS research, which largely differs from other gynaecologic conditions and indicates that most related research and collaborations originate from high-income countries. Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High-Density LiDAR Mapping of the Ancient City of Mayapán

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Hare

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 2013 survey of a 40 square kilometer area surrounding Mayapán, Yucatan, Mexico used high-density LiDAR data to map prehispanic architecture and related natural features. Most of the area is covered by low canopy dense forest vegetation over karstic hilly terrain that impedes full coverage archaeological survey. We used LiDAR at 40 laser points per square meter to generate a bare earth digital elevation model (DEM. Results were evaluated with comparisons to previously mapped areas and with traditional archaeological survey methods for 38 settlement clusters outside of the city wall. Ground checking employed full coverage survey of selected 500 m grid squares, as well as documentation of the chronology and detail of new public and domestic settlement features and cenotes. Results identify the full extent of continued, contemporary Postclassic settlement (A.D. 1150–1450 outside of the city wall to at least 500 meters to the east, north, and west. New data also reveal an extensive modified landscape of terraformed residential hills, rejolladas, and dense settlement dating from Preclassic through Classic Periods. The LiDAR data also allow for the identification of rooms, benches, and stone property walls and lanes within the city.

  5. Magnetic resonance Q mapping reveals a decrease in microvessel density in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna eIelacqua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in density and morphology of the cerebral microvasculature have been reported to occur in Alzheimer`s disease patients and animal models of the disease. In this study we compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques for their utility to detect age-dependent changes of the cerebral vasculature in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC-MRI was performed by tracking the passage of a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle in the brain with dynamic gradient echo echo planar imaging. From this measurements relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV(DSC and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF were estimated. For the same animal maps of the relaxation shift index Q were computed from high resolution gradient echo and spin echo data that were acquired before and after superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle injection. Q values were used to derive estimates of microvessel density. The change in the relaxation rates ΔR2* obtained from pre- and post-contrast gradient echo data was used for the alternative determination of rCBV (rCBV(ΔR2*. Linear mixed effects modeling found no significant association between rCBV(DSC, rCBV(ΔR2*, rCBF and Q with genotype in 13-month old mice (compared to age-matched non-transgenic littermates for any of the evaluated brain regions. In 24-month old mice there was a significant association for rCBV(DSC with genotype in the cerebral cortex, and for rCBV(ΔR2* in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. For rCBF there was a significant association in the cerebellum but not in other brain regions. Q values in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebellum in 24-month old mice were significantly associated with genotype. In those regions Q values were reduced between 11-26 % in arcAβ mice compared to age-matched non-transgenic littermates. Vessel staining with CD31 immunohistochemistry confirmed a reduction of microvessel density in the old

  6. Magnetic Resonance Q Mapping Reveals a Decrease in Microvessel Density in the arcAβ Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ielacqua, Giovanna D; Schlegel, Felix; Füchtemeier, Martina; Xandry, Jael; Rudin, Markus; Klohs, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in density and morphology of the cerebral microvasculature have been reported to occur in Alzheimer's disease patients and animal models of the disease. In this study we compared magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for their utility to detect age-dependent changes of the cerebral vasculature in the arcAβ mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MRI was performed by tracking the passage of a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle in the brain with dynamic gradient echo planar imaging (EPI). From this measurements relative cerebral blood volume [rCBV(DSC)] and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were estimated. For the same animal maps of the relaxation shift index Q were computed from high resolution gradient echo and spin echo data that were acquired before and after superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle injection. Q-values were used to derive estimates of microvessel density. The change in the relaxation rates [Formula: see text] obtained from pre- and post-contrast gradient echo data was used for the alternative determination of rCBV [rCBV([Formula: see text])]. Linear mixed effects modeling found no significant association between rCBV(DSC), rCBV([Formula: see text]), rCBF, and Q with genotype in 13-month old mice [compared to age-matched non-transgenic littermates (NTLs)] for any of the evaluated brain regions. In 24-month old mice there was a significant association for rCBV(DSC) with genotype in the cerebral cortex, and for rCBV([Formula: see text]) in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. For rCBF there was a significant association in the cerebellum but not in other brain regions. Q-values in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebellum in 24-month old mice were significantly associated with genotype. In those regions Q-values were reduced between 11 and 26% in arcAβ mice compared to age-matched NTLs. Vessel staining with CD31 immunohistochemistry confirmed a

  7. Development and Integration of Genome-Wide Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers onto a Reference Linkage Map for Constructing a High-Density Genetic Map of Chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajuria, Yash Paul; Saxena, Maneesha S; Gaur, Rashmi; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Jain, Mukesh; Parida, Swarup K; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    The identification of informative in silico polymorphic genomic and genic microsatellite markers by comparing the genome and transcriptome sequences of crop genotypes is a rapid, cost-effective and non-laborious approach for large-scale marker validation and genotyping applications, including construction of high-density genetic maps. We designed 1494 markers, including 1016 genomic and 478 transcript-derived microsatellite markers showing in-silico fragment length polymorphism between two parental genotypes (Cicer arietinum ICC4958 and C. reticulatum PI489777) of an inter-specific reference mapping population. High amplification efficiency (87%), experimental validation success rate (81%) and polymorphic potential (55%) of these microsatellite markers suggest their effective use in various applications of chickpea genetics and breeding. Intra-specific polymorphic potential (48%) detected by microsatellite markers in 22 desi and kabuli chickpea genotypes was lower than inter-specific polymorphic potential (59%). An advanced, high-density, integrated and inter-specific chickpea genetic map (ICC4958 x PI489777) having 1697 map positions spanning 1061.16 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.625 cM was constructed by assigning 634 novel informative transcript-derived and genomic microsatellite markers on eight linkage groups (LGs) of our prior documented, 1063 marker-based genetic map. The constructed genome map identified 88, including four major (7-23 cM) longest high-resolution genomic regions on LGs 3, 5 and 8, where the maximum number of novel genomic and genic microsatellite markers were specifically clustered within 1 cM genetic distance. It was for the first time in chickpea that in silico FLP analysis at genome-wide level was carried out and such a large number of microsatellite markers were identified, experimentally validated and further used in genetic mapping. To best of our knowledge, in the presently constructed genetic map, we mapped highest

  8. Development and Integration of Genome-Wide Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers onto a Reference Linkage Map for Constructing a High-Density Genetic Map of Chickpea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yash Paul Khajuria

    Full Text Available The identification of informative in silico polymorphic genomic and genic microsatellite markers by comparing the genome and transcriptome sequences of crop genotypes is a rapid, cost-effective and non-laborious approach for large-scale marker validation and genotyping applications, including construction of high-density genetic maps. We designed 1494 markers, including 1016 genomic and 478 transcript-derived microsatellite markers showing in-silico fragment length polymorphism between two parental genotypes (Cicer arietinum ICC4958 and C. reticulatum PI489777 of an inter-specific reference mapping population. High amplification efficiency (87%, experimental validation success rate (81% and polymorphic potential (55% of these microsatellite markers suggest their effective use in various applications of chickpea genetics and breeding. Intra-specific polymorphic potential (48% detected by microsatellite markers in 22 desi and kabuli chickpea genotypes was lower than inter-specific polymorphic potential (59%. An advanced, high-density, integrated and inter-specific chickpea genetic map (ICC4958 x PI489777 having 1697 map positions spanning 1061.16 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.625 cM was constructed by assigning 634 novel informative transcript-derived and genomic microsatellite markers on eight linkage groups (LGs of our prior documented, 1063 marker-based genetic map. The constructed genome map identified 88, including four major (7-23 cM longest high-resolution genomic regions on LGs 3, 5 and 8, where the maximum number of novel genomic and genic microsatellite markers were specifically clustered within 1 cM genetic distance. It was for the first time in chickpea that in silico FLP analysis at genome-wide level was carried out and such a large number of microsatellite markers were identified, experimentally validated and further used in genetic mapping. To best of our knowledge, in the presently constructed genetic map, we mapped

  9. Development and Integration of Genome-Wide Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers onto a Reference Linkage Map for Constructing a High-Density Genetic Map of Chickpea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Rashmi; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Jain, Mukesh; Parida, Swarup K.; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    The identification of informative in silico polymorphic genomic and genic microsatellite markers by comparing the genome and transcriptome sequences of crop genotypes is a rapid, cost-effective and non-laborious approach for large-scale marker validation and genotyping applications, including construction of high-density genetic maps. We designed 1494 markers, including 1016 genomic and 478 transcript-derived microsatellite markers showing in-silico fragment length polymorphism between two parental genotypes (Cicer arietinum ICC4958 and C. reticulatum PI489777) of an inter-specific reference mapping population. High amplification efficiency (87%), experimental validation success rate (81%) and polymorphic potential (55%) of these microsatellite markers suggest their effective use in various applications of chickpea genetics and breeding. Intra-specific polymorphic potential (48%) detected by microsatellite markers in 22 desi and kabuli chickpea genotypes was lower than inter-specific polymorphic potential (59%). An advanced, high-density, integrated and inter-specific chickpea genetic map (ICC4958 x PI489777) having 1697 map positions spanning 1061.16 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.625 cM was constructed by assigning 634 novel informative transcript-derived and genomic microsatellite markers on eight linkage groups (LGs) of our prior documented, 1063 marker-based genetic map. The constructed genome map identified 88, including four major (7–23 cM) longest high-resolution genomic regions on LGs 3, 5 and 8, where the maximum number of novel genomic and genic microsatellite markers were specifically clustered within 1 cM genetic distance. It was for the first time in chickpea that in silico FLP analysis at genome-wide level was carried out and such a large number of microsatellite markers were identified, experimentally validated and further used in genetic mapping. To best of our knowledge, in the presently constructed genetic map, we mapped highest

  10. High-Density Genetic Mapping with Interspecific Hybrids of Two Sea Urchins, Strongylocentrotus nudus and S. intermedius, by RAD Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zunchun; Liu, Shikai; Dong, Ying; Gao, Shan; Chen, Zhong; Jiang, Jingwei; Yang, Aifu; Sun, Hongjuan; Guan, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Bei; Wang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Sea urchins have long been used as research model organisms for developmental biology and evolutionary studies. Some of them are also important aquaculture species in East Asia. In this work, we report the construction of RAD-tag based high-density genetic maps by genotyping F1 interspecific hybrids derived from a crossing between a female sea urchin Strongylocentrotus nudus and a male Strongylocentrotus intermedius. With polymorphisms present in these two wild individuals, we constructed a female meiotic map containing 3,080 markers for S. nudus, and a male meiotic map for S. intermedius which contains 1,577 markers. Using the linkage maps, we were able to anchor a total of 1,591 scaffolds (495.9 Mb) accounting for 60.8% of the genome assembly of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. A genome-wide scan resulted in the identification of one putative QTL for body size which spanned from 25.3 cM to 30.3 cM. This study showed the efficiency of RAD-Seq based high-density genetic map construction using F1 progenies for species with no prior genomic information. The genetic maps are essential for QTL mapping and are useful as framework to order and orientate contiguous scaffolds from sea urchin genome assembly. The integration of the genetic map with genome assembly would provide an unprecedented opportunity to conduct QTL analysis, comparative genomics, and population genetics studies.

  11. Density of Zeros on the Lee-Yang circle obtained from magnetization data of a two-dimensional Ising ferromagnet

    OpenAIRE

    Binek, Ch.

    1998-01-01

    In order to provide an experimental access to the statistical theory of Lee and Yang (1952) the density function g(theta) of zeros on the Lee-Yang circle has been determined for the first time by analyzing isothermal magnetization data, m(H), of the Ising ferromagnet FeCl2 in axial magnetic fields, H, at temperatures 34 < T < 99K. The validity of our approach is demonstrated by the perfect agreement of magnetic specific heat data as calculated from g(theta) and m(H) via Maxwells relation, res...

  12. Scientometric analysis and combined density-equalizing mapping of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Vitzthum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Passive exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS is estimated to exert a major burden of disease. Currently, numerous countries have taken legal actions to protect the population against ETS. Numerous studies have been conducted in this field. Therefore, scientometric methods should be used to analyze the accumulated data since there is no such approach available so far. METHODS AND RESULTS: A combination of scientometric methods and novel visualizing procedures were used, including density-equalizing mapping and radar charting techniques. 6,580 ETS-related studies published between 1900 and 2008 were identified in the ISI database. Using different scientometric approaches, a continuous increase of both quantitative and qualitative parameters was found. The combination with density-equalizing calculations demonstrated a leading position of the United States (2,959 items published in terms of quantitative research activities. Charting techniques demonstrated that there are numerous bi- and multilateral networks between different countries and institutions in this field. Again, a leading position of American institutions was found. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first comprehensive scientometric analysis of data on global scientific activities in the field of environmental tobacco smoke research. The present findings can be used as a benchmark for funding allocation processes.

  13. Current density distribution mapping in PEM fuel cells as an instrument for operational measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geske, M.; Heuer, M.; Heideck, G.; Styczynski, Z. A. [Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Chair Electric Power Networks and Renewable Energy Sources, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes. (author)

  14. Current Density Distribution Mapping in PEM Fuel Cells as An Instrument for Operational Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Geske

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed measurement system for current density distribution mapping has enabled a new approach for operational measurements in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC. Taking into account previously constructed measurement systems, a method based on a multi layer printed circuit board was chosen for the development of the new system. This type of system consists of a sensor, a special electronic device and the control and visualization PC. For the acquisition of the current density distribution values, a sensor device was designed and installed within a multilayer printed circuit board with integrated shunt resistors. Varying shunt values can be taken into consideration with a newly developed and evaluated calibration method. The sensor device was integrated in a PEM fuel cell stack to prove the functionality of the whole measurement system. A software application was implemented to visualize and save the measurement values. Its functionality was verified by operational measurements within a PEMFC system. Measurement accuracy and possible negative reactions of the sensor device during PEMFC operation are discussed in detail in this paper. The developed system enables operational measurements for different operating phases of PEM fuel cells. Additionally, this can be seen as a basis for new opportunities of optimization for fuel cell design and operation modes.

  15. Comparison of Relative Activation Energies Obtained by Density Functional Theory and the Random Phase Approximation for Several Claisen Rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Madeline K; Vine, Seanna; Walsh, Elizabeth; Avrantinis, Sara; Daub, G William; Cave, Robert J

    2016-03-03

    We investigate several representative density functional theory approaches for the calculation of relative activation energies and free energies of a set of model pericyclic reactions, some of which have been studied experimentally. In particular, we use a standard hybrid functional (B3LYP), the same hybrid functional augmented with a basis set superposition error and dispersion correction, a meta-hybrid functional developed to treat transition states and weak interactions (M06-2X), and the recently implemented random phase approximation (RPA) based on Kohn-Sham orbitals from conventional density functional theory by Furche and co-workers. We apply these methods to calculate relative activation energies and estimated free energies for the amide acetal Claisen rearrangement. We focus on relative activation energies to assess the effects of steric and weak interactions in the various methods and compare with experiment where possible. We also discuss the advantages of using this set of reactions as a test bed for the comparison of treatments of weak interactions. We conclude that all methods yield similar trends in relative reactivity, but the RPA yields results in best agreement with the experimental values.

  16. Localized excitations with and without propagating properties in (2+1)-dimensions obtained by a mapping approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Chun-Long; Fang Jian-Ping; Chen Li-Qun

    2005-01-01

    By means of an extended mapping approach, a new type of variable-separation excitation is derived with two arbitrary functions in a (2+1)-dimensional modified dispersive water-wave system. Based on the derived variable-separation excitation, abundant nonpropagating and propagating solitons such as dromions, rings, peakons and compactons are revealed by selecting appropriate functions in this paper.

  17. EM-fold: de novo atomic-detail protein structure determination from medium-resolution density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindert, Steffen; Alexander, Nathan; Wötzel, Nils; Karakaş, Mert; Stewart, Phoebe L; Meiler, Jens

    2012-03-07

    Electron density maps of membrane proteins or large macromolecular complexes are frequently only determined at medium resolution between 4 Å and 10 Å, either by cryo-electron microscopy or X-ray crystallography. In these density maps, the general arrangement of secondary structure elements (SSEs) is revealed, whereas their directionality and connectivity remain elusive. We demonstrate that the topology of proteins with up to 250 amino acids can be determined from such density maps when combined with a computational protein folding protocol. Furthermore, we accurately reconstruct atomic detail in loop regions and amino acid side chains not visible in the experimental data. The EM-Fold algorithm assembles the SSEs de novo before atomic detail is added using Rosetta. In a benchmark of 27 proteins, the protocol consistently and reproducibly achieves models with root mean square deviation values <3 Å.

  18. Development of spatial density maps based on geoprocessing web services: application to tuberculosis incidence in Barcelona, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominkovics, Pau; Granell, Carlos; Pérez-Navarro, Antoni; Casals, Martí; Orcau, Angels; Caylà, Joan A

    2011-11-29

    Health professionals and authorities strive to cope with heterogeneous data, services, and statistical models to support decision making on public health. Sophisticated analysis and distributed processing capabilities over geocoded epidemiological data are seen as driving factors to speed up control and decision making in these health risk situations. In this context, recent Web technologies and standards-based web services deployed on geospatial information infrastructures have rapidly become an efficient way to access, share, process, and visualize geocoded health-related information. Data used on this study is based on Tuberculosis (TB) cases registered in Barcelona city during 2009. Residential addresses are geocoded and loaded into a spatial database that acts as a backend database. The web-based application architecture and geoprocessing web services are designed according to the Representational State Transfer (REST) principles. These web processing services produce spatial density maps against the backend database. The results are focused on the use of the proposed web-based application to the analysis of TB cases in Barcelona. The application produces spatial density maps to ease the monitoring and decision making process by health professionals. We also include a discussion of how spatial density maps may be useful for health practitioners in such contexts. In this paper, we developed web-based client application and a set of geoprocessing web services to support specific health-spatial requirements. Spatial density maps of TB incidence were generated to help health professionals in analysis and decision-making tasks. The combined use of geographic information tools, map viewers, and geoprocessing services leads to interesting possibilities in handling health data in a spatial manner. In particular, the use of spatial density maps has been effective to identify the most affected areas and its spatial impact. This study is an attempt to demonstrate how web

  19. Constructing a high-density linkage map for Gossypium hirsutum ? Gossypium barbadense and identifying QTLs for lint percentage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuzhen Shi; Haihong Shang; Juwu Gong; Wankui Gong; Zemao Yang; Feiy Tang; Zhi Liu; Weiping Zhu; Jianxiong Jiang; Xiaonan Yu; Tao Wang; Wentan Li; Wei Wang; Tingting Chen; Kunbo Wang; Zhengsheng Zhang; Youlu Yuan; Aiguo Li; Ruihua Ge; Baocai Zhang; Junzhi Li; Guangping Liu; Junwen Li; Aiying Liu

    2015-01-01

    To introgress the good fiber quality and yield from Gossypium barbadense into a commercial Upland cotton variety, a high‐density simple sequence repeat (SSR) genetic linkage map was developed from a BC1F1 population of Gossypium hirsutum ? Gossypium barbadense. The map com-prised 2,292 loci and covered 5115.16 centiMorgan (cM) of the cotton AD genome, with an average marker interval of 2.23 cM. Of the marker order for 1,577 common loci on this new map, 90.36% agrees well with the marker order on the D genome sequence genetic map. Compared with five pub-lished high‐density SSR genetic maps, 53.14% of marker loci were newly discovered in this map. Twenty‐six quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for lint percentage (LP) were identified on nine chromosomes. Nine stable or common QTLs could be used for marker‐assisted selection. Fifty percent of the QTLs were from G. barbadense and increased LP by 1.07%–2.41%. These results indicated that the map could be used for screening chromosome substitution segments from G. barbadense in the Upland cotton background, identifying QTLs or genes from G. barbadense, and further developing the gene pyramiding effect for improving fiber yield and quality.

  20. Versatility of Approximating Single-Particle Electron Microscopy Density Maps Using Pseudoatoms and Approximation-Accuracy Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavica Jonić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional Gaussian functions have been shown useful in representing electron microscopy (EM density maps for studying macromolecular structure and dynamics. Methods that require setting a desired number of Gaussian functions or a maximum number of iterations may result in suboptimal representations of the structure. An alternative is to set a desired error of approximation of the given EM map and then optimize the number of Gaussian functions to achieve this approximation error. In this article, we review different applications of such an approach that uses spherical Gaussian functions of fixed standard deviation, referred to as pseudoatoms. Some of these applications use EM-map normal mode analysis (NMA with elastic network model (ENM (applications such as predicting conformational changes of macromolecular complexes or exploring actual conformational changes by normal-mode-based analysis of experimental data while some other do not use NMA (denoising of EM density maps. In applications based on NMA and ENM, the advantage of using pseudoatoms in EM-map coarse-grain models is that the ENM springs are easily assigned among neighboring grains thanks to their spherical shape and uniformed size. EM-map denoising based on the map coarse-graining was so far only shown using pseudoatoms as grains.

  1. The link between diffusion MRI and tumor heterogeneity: Mapping cell eccentricity and density by diffusional variance decomposition (DIVIDE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepankiewicz, Filip; van Westen, Danielle; Englund, Elisabet; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Lätt, Jimmy; Sundgren, Pia C; Nilsson, Markus

    2016-11-15

    The structural heterogeneity of tumor tissue can be probed by diffusion MRI (dMRI) in terms of the variance of apparent diffusivities within a voxel. However, the link between the diffusional variance and the tissue heterogeneity is not well-established. To investigate this link we test the hypothesis that diffusional variance, caused by microscopic anisotropy and isotropic heterogeneity, is associated with variable cell eccentricity and cell density in brain tumors. We performed dMRI using a novel encoding scheme for diffusional variance decomposition (DIVIDE) in 7 meningiomas and 8 gliomas prior to surgery. The diffusional variance was quantified from dMRI in terms of the total mean kurtosis (MKT), and DIVIDE was used to decompose MKT into components caused by microscopic anisotropy (MKA) and isotropic heterogeneity (MKI). Diffusion anisotropy was evaluated in terms of the fractional anisotropy (FA) and microscopic fractional anisotropy (μFA). Quantitative microscopy was performed on the excised tumor tissue, where structural anisotropy and cell density were quantified by structure tensor analysis and cell nuclei segmentation, respectively. In order to validate the DIVIDE parameters they were correlated to the corresponding parameters derived from microscopy. We found an excellent agreement between the DIVIDE parameters and corresponding microscopy parameters; MKA correlated with cell eccentricity (r=0.95, pMKT parameter reflects both variable cell eccentricity and cell density, and therefore lacks specificity in terms of microstructure characteristics. However, specificity was obtained by decomposing the two contributions; MKA was associated only to cell eccentricity, and MKI only to cell density variance. The variance in meningiomas was caused primarily by microscopic anisotropy (mean±s.d.) MKA=1.11±0.33 vs MKI=0.44±0.20 (p<10(-3)), whereas in the gliomas, it was mostly caused by isotropic heterogeneity MKI=0.57±0.30 vs MKA=0.26±0.11 (p<0.05). In

  2. High-density genetic map construction and QTLs identification for plant height in white jute (Corchorus capsularis L.) using specific locus amplified fragment (SLAF) sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Aifen; Huang, Long; Wu, Guifen; Afshar, Reza Keshavarz; Qi, Jianmin; Xu, Jiantang; Fang, Pingping; Lin, Lihui; Zhang, Liwu; Lin, Peiqing

    2017-05-08

    Genetic mapping and quantitative trait locus (QTL) detection are powerful methodologies in plant improvement and breeding. White jute (Corchorus capsularis L.) is an important industrial raw material fiber crop because of its elite characteristics. However, construction of a high-density genetic map and identification of QTLs has been limited in white jute due to a lack of sufficient molecular markers. The specific locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) strategy combines locus-specific amplification and high-throughput sequencing to carry out de novo single nuclear polymorphism (SNP) discovery and large-scale genotyping. In this study, SLAF-seq was employed to obtain sufficient markers to construct a high-density genetic map for white jute. Moreover, with the development of abundant markers, genetic dissection of fiber yield traits such as plant height was also possible. Here, we present QTLs associated with plant height that were identified using our newly constructed genetic linkage groups. An F8 population consisting of 100 lines was developed. In total, 69,446 high-quality SLAFs were detected of which 5,074 SLAFs were polymorphic; 913 polymorphic markers were used for the construction of a genetic map. The average coverage for each SLAF marker was 43-fold in the parents, and 9.8-fold in each F8 individual. A linkage map was constructed that contained 913 SLAFs on 11 linkage groups (LGs) covering 1621.4 cM with an average density of 1.61 cM per locus. Among the 11 LGs, LG1 was the largest with 210 markers, a length of 406.34 cM, and an average distance of 1.93 cM between adjacent markers. LG11 was the smallest with only 25 markers, a length of 29.66 cM, and an average distance of 1.19 cM between adjacent markers. 'SNP_only' markers accounted for 85.54% and were the predominant markers on the map. QTL mapping based on the F8 phenotypes detected 11 plant height QTLs including one major effect QTL across two cultivation locations, with each QTL

  3. Obtaining Good Performance With Triple-ζ-Type Basis Sets in Double-Hybrid Density Functional Theory Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Bun; Radom, Leo

    2011-09-13

    A variety of combinations of B-LYP-based double-hybrid density functional theory (DHDFT) procedures and basis sets have been examined. A general observation is that the optimal combination of exchange contributions is in the proximity of 30% Becke 1988 (B88) exchange and 70% Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange, while for the correlation contributions, the use of independently optimized spin-component-scaled Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (SCS-MP2) parameters (MP2OS and MP2SS) is beneficial. The triple-ζ Dunning aug'-cc-pVTZ+d and Pople 6-311+G(3df,2p)+d basis sets are found to be cost-effective for DHDFT methods. As a result, we have formulated the DuT-D3 DHDFT procedure, which employs the aug'-cc-pVTZ+d basis set and includes 30% B88 and 70% HF exchange energies, 59% LYP, 47% MP2OS, and 36% MP2SS correlation energies, and a D3 dispersion correction with the parameters s6 = 0.5, sr,6 = 1.569, and s8 = 0.35. Likewise, the PoT-D3 DHDFT procedure was formulated with the 6-311+G(3df,2p)+d basis set and has 32% B88 and 68% HF exchange energies, 63% LYP, 46% MP2OS, and 27% MP2SS correlation energies, and the D3 parameters s6 = 0.5, sr,6 = 1.569, and s8 = 0.30. Testing using the large E3 set of 740 energies demonstrates the robustness of these methods. Further comparisons show that the performance of these methods, particularly DuT-D3, compares favorably with the previously reported DSD-B-LYP and DSD-B-LYP-D3 methods used in conjunction with quadruple-ζ aug'-pc3+d and aug'-def2-QZVP basis sets but at lower computational expense. The previously reported ωB97X-(LP)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) procedure also performs very well. Our findings highlight the cost-effectiveness of appropriate- and moderate-sized triple-ζ basis sets in the application of DHDFT procedures.

  4. Investigating the Capability of IRS-P6-LISS IV Satellite Image for Pistachio Forests Density Mapping (case Study: Northeast of Iran)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, F.; Darvishsefat, A. A.; Zargham, N.

    2012-07-01

    In order to investigate the capability of satellite images for Pistachio forests density mapping, IRS-P6-LISS IV data were analyzed in an area of 500 ha in Iran. After geometric correction, suitable training areas were determined based on fieldwork. Suitable spectral transformations like NDVI, PVI and PCA were performed. A ground truth map included of 34 plots (each plot 1 ha) were prepared. Hard and soft supervised classifications were performed with 5 density classes (0-5%, 5-10%, 10-15%, 15-20% and > 20%). Because of low separability of classes, some classes were merged and classifications were repeated with 3 classes. Finally, the highest overall accuracy and kappa coefficient of 70% and 0.44, respectively, were obtained with three classes (0-5%, 5-20%, and > 20%) by fuzzy classifier. Considering the low kappa value obtained, it could be concluded that the result of the classification was not desirable. Therefore, this approach is not appropriate for operational mapping of these valuable Pistachio forests.

  5. Construction of a high-density genetic map for grape using next generation restriction-site associated DNA sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Nian

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic mapping and QTL detection are powerful methodologies in plant improvement and breeding. Construction of a high-density and high-quality genetic map would be of great benefit in the production of superior grapes to meet human demand. High throughput and low cost of the recently developed next generation sequencing (NGS technology have resulted in its wide application in genome research. Sequencing restriction-site associated DNA (RAD might be an efficient strategy to simplify genotyping. Combining NGS with RAD has proven to be powerful for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP marker development. Results An F1 population of 100 individual plants was developed. In-silico digestion-site prediction was used to select an appropriate restriction enzyme for construction of a RAD sequencing library. Next generation RAD sequencing was applied to genotype the F1 population and its parents. Applying a cluster strategy for SNP modulation, a total of 1,814 high-quality SNP markers were developed: 1,121 of these were mapped to the female genetic map, 759 to the male map, and 1,646 to the integrated map. A comparison of the genetic maps to the published Vitis vinifera genome revealed both conservation and variations. Conclusions The applicability of next generation RAD sequencing for genotyping a grape F1 population was demonstrated, leading to the successful development of a genetic map with high density and quality using our designed SNP markers. Detailed analysis revealed that this newly developed genetic map can be used for a variety of genome investigations, such as QTL detection, sequence assembly and genome comparison.

  6. Probability density function and estimation for error of digitized map coordinates in GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童小华; 刘大杰

    2004-01-01

    Traditionally, it is widely accepted that measurement error usually obeys the normal distribution. However, in this paper a new idea is proposed that the error in digitized data which is a major derived data source in GIS does not obey the normal distribution but the p-norm distribution with a determinate parameter. Assuming that the error is random and has the same statistical properties, the probability density function of the normal distribution,Laplace distribution and p-norm distribution are derived based on the arithmetic mean axiom, median axiom and pmedian axiom, which means that the normal distribution is only one of these distributions but not the least one.Based on this idea, distribution fitness tests such as Skewness and Kurtosis coefficient test, Pearson chi-square x2 test and Kolmogorov test for digitized data are conducted. The results show that the error in map digitization obeys the p-norm distribution whose parameter is close to 1.60. A least p-norm estimation and the least square estimation of digitized data are further analyzed, showing that the least p-norm adiustment is better than the least square adjustment for digitized data processing in GIS.

  7. Automatic sulcal line extraction on cortical surfaces using geodesic path density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Troter, A; Auzias, G; Coulon, O

    2012-07-16

    We present here a method that is designed to automatically extract sulcal lines on the mesh of any cortical surface. The method is based on the definition of a new function, the Geodesic Path Density Map (GPDM), within each sulcal basin (i.e. regions with a negative mean curvature). GPDM indicates at each vertex the likelihood that a shortest path between any two points of the basins boundary goes through that vertex. If the distance used to compute shortest path is anisotropic and constrained by a geometric information such as the depth, the GPDM indicates the likelihood that a vertex belongs to the sulcal line in the basin. An automatic GPDM adaptive thresholding procedure is proposed and sulcal lines are then defined. The process has been validated on a set of 25 subjects by comparing results to the manual segmentation from an expert and showed an average error below 2mm. It is also compared to our previous reference method in the context of inter-subject cortical surface registration and shows an significant improvement in performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tobacco Control: Visualisation of Research Activity Using Density-Equalizing Mapping and Scientometric Benchmarking Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Groneberg-Kloft

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco smoking continues to be a major preventable cause of death and disease and therefore tobacco control research is extremely important. However, research in this area is often hampered by a lack in funding and there is a need for scientometric techniques to display research efforts. Methods: The present study combines classical bibliometric tools with novel scientometric and visualizing techniques in order to analyse and categorise research in the field of tobacco control. Results: All studies related to tobacco control and listed in the ISI database since 1900 were identified by the use of defined search terms.Using bibliometric approaches, a continuous increase in qualitative markers such as collaboration numbers or citations were found for tobacco control research. The combination with density equalizing mapping revealed a distinct global pattern of research productivity and citation activity. Radar chart techniques were used to visualize bi- and multilateral research cooperation and institutional cooperation. Conclusions: The present study supplies a first scientometricapproach that visualises research activity in the field of tobacco control. It provides data that can be used for funding policy and the identification of research clusters.

  9. A Variable-Density Absorption Event in NGC 3227 mapped with Suzaku and Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Beuchert, T; Krauß, F; Miniutti, G; Longinotti, A L; Guainazzi, M; de La Calle, I; Malkan, M; Elvis, M; Miyaji, T; Hiriart, D; López, J M; Agudo, I; Dauser, T; Garcia, J; Kreikenbohm, A; Kadler, M; Wilms, J

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of the circumnuclear gas accreting onto supermassive black holes in Seyfert galaxies remains a topic of much debate. As the innermost regions of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are spatially unresolved, X-ray spectroscopy, and in particular line-of-sight absorption variability, is a key diagnostic to map out the distribution of gas. Observations of variable X-ray absorption in multiple Seyferts and over a wide range of timescales indicate the presence of clumps/clouds of gas within the circumnuclear material. Eclipse events by clumps transiting the line of sight allow us to explore the properties of the clumps over a wide range of radial distances from the optical/UV Broad Line Region (BLR) to beyond the dust sublimation radius. Time-resolved absorption events have been extremely rare so far, but suggest a range of density profiles across Seyferts. We resolve a weeks-long absorption event in the Seyfert NGC 3227. We examine six Suzaku and twelve Swift observations from a 2008 campaign spanning 5 w...

  10. A high-resolution optical measurement system for rapid acquisition of radiation flux density maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Martin; Raeder, Christian; Willsch, Christian; Dibowski, Gerd

    2017-06-01

    To identify the power and flux density of concentrated solar radiation the Institute of Solar Research at the German Aerospace Center (DLR - Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt e. V.) has used the camera-based measurement system FATMES (Flux and Temperature Measurement System) since 1995. The disadvantages of low resolution, difficult handling and poor computing power required a revision of the existing measurement system. The measurement system FMAS (Flux Mapping Acquisition system) is equipped with state-of-the-art-hardware, is compatible with computers off-the-shelf and is programmed in LabView. The expenditure of time for an image evaluation is reduced by the factor 60 compared to FATMES. The new measurement system is no longer associated with the facilities Solar Furnace and High Flux Solar Simulator at the DLR in Cologne but is also applicable as a mobile system. The data and the algorithms are transparent throughout the complete process. The measurement accuracy of FMAS is determined to at most ±3 % until now. The error of measurement of FATMES is at least 2 % higher according to the conducted comparison tests.

  11. Nanometer scale mapping of the density of states in an inhomogeneous superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cren, T.; Roditchev, D.; Sacks, W.; Klein, J. [Univ. Paris 7 et Paris 6 (France). Groupe de Physique des Solides

    2001-04-01

    Using high-speed scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we perform a full mapping of the quasiparticle density of states (DOS) in single crystals of Bi{sub 2-x}Pb{sub x}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}0{sub 8+{delta}}. The measurements carried out at 5 K showed a complex spatial pattern of important variations of the local DOS on the nanometer scale. Superconducting areas, characterized by a well-pronounced superconducting gap, are coexisting with regions of a peakless gap structure which we attribute to the pseudogap. Within the large superconducting regions, the spectra reveal strong peak/dip/hump signatures, identical to the pristine Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}0{sub 8+{delta}} case. On the contrary, in very small superconducting regions this fine structure is attenuated. Such a behavior of the local DOS suggests that the peak/dip/hump fine structure is not only a consequence of the superconducting state, but is also directly related to the scale of the phase coherence. The role of Bi-Pb substitutional disorder is discussed. (orig.)

  12. World-wide architecture of osteoporosis research: density-equalizing mapping studies and gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggmann, D; Mäule, L-S; Klingelhöfer, D; Schöffel, N; Gerber, A; Jaque, J M; Groneberg, D A

    2016-10-01

    While research activities on osteoporosis grow constantly, no concise description of the global research architecture exists. Hence, we aim to analyze and depict the world-wide scientific output on osteoporosis combining bibliometric tools, density-equalizing mapping projections and gender analysis. Using the NewQIS platform, we analyzed all osteoporosis-related publications authored from 1900 to 2012 and indexed by the Web of Science. Bibliometric details were analyzed related to quantitative and semi-qualitative aspects. The majority of 57 453 identified publications were original research articles. The USA and Western Europe dominated the field regarding cooperation activity, publication and citation performance. Asia, Africa and South America played a minimal role. Gender analysis revealed a dominance of male scientists in almost all countries except Brazil. Although the scientific performance on osteoporosis is increasing world-wide, a significant disparity in terms of research output was visible between developed and low-income countries. This finding is particularly concerning since epidemiologic evaluations of future osteoporosis prevalences predict enormous challenges for the health-care systems in low-resource countries. Hence, our study underscores the need to address these disparities by fostering future research endeavors in these nations with the aim to successfully prevent a growing global burden related to osteoporosis.

  13. Caesarean Section--A Density-Equalizing Mapping Study to Depict Its Global Research Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggmann, Dörthe; Löhlein, Lena-Katharina; Louwen, Frank; Quarcoo, David; Jaque, Jenny; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Groneberg, David A

    2015-11-17

    Caesarean section (CS) is a common surgical procedure. Although it has been performed in a modern context for about 100 years, there is no concise analysis of the international architecture of caesarean section research output available so far. Therefore, the present study characterizes the global pattern of the related publications by using the NewQIS (New Quality and Quantity Indices in Science) platform, which combines scientometric methods with density equalizing mapping algorithms. The Web of Science was used as a database. 12,608 publications were identified that originated from 131 countries. The leading nations concerning research activity, overall citations and country-specific h-Index were the USA and the United Kingdom. Relation of the research activity to epidemiologic data indicated that Scandinavian countries including Sweden and Finland were leading the field, whereas, in relation to economic data, countries such as Israel and Ireland led. Semi-qualitative indices such as country-specific citation rates ranked Sweden, Norway and Finland in the top positions. International caesarean section research output continues to grow annually in an era where caesarean section rates increased dramatically over the past decades. With regard to increasing employment of scientometric indicators in performance assessment, these findings should provide useful information for those tasked with the improvement of scientific achievements.

  14. Abnormal brain processing of pain in migraine without aura: a high-density EEG brain mapping study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, L L; Jensen, R; Buchgreitz, L

    2010-01-01

    In the present study we used high-density EEG brain mapping to investigate spatio-temporal aspects of brain activity in response to experimentally induced muscle pain in 17 patients with migraine without aura and 15 healthy controls. Painful electrical stimuli were applied to the trapezius muscle...... to the tonic muscle pain condition (z = 29 mm vs. z =¿-13 mm, P aura....

  15. Obtaining and Using Planetary Spatial Data into the Future: The Role of the Mapping and Planetary Spatial Infrastructure Team (MAPSIT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radebaugh, J.; Thomson, B. J.; Archinal, B.; Hagerty, J.; Gaddis, L.; Lawrence, S. J.; Sutton, S.

    2017-01-01

    Planetary spatial data, which include any remote sensing data or derived products with sufficient positional information such that they can be projected onto a planetary body, continue to rapidly increase in volume and complexity. These data are the hard-earned fruits of decades of planetary exploration, and are the end result of mission planning and execution. Maintaining these data using accessible formats and standards for all scientists has been necessary for the success of past, present, and future planetary missions. The Mapping and Planetary Spatial Infrastructure Team (MAPSIT) is a group of planetary community members tasked by NASA Headquarters to work with the planetary science community to identify and prioritize their planetary spatial data needs to help determine the best pathways for new data acquisition, usable product derivation, and tools/capability development that supports NASA's planetary science missions.

  16. Structure, evolution, and comparative genomics of tetraploid cotton based on a high-density genetic linkage map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ximei; Jin, Xin; Wang, Hantao; Zhang, Xianlong; Lin, Zhongxu

    2016-06-01

    A high-density linkage map was constructed using 1,885 newly obtained loci and 3,747 previously published loci, which included 5,152 loci with 4696.03 cM in total length and 0.91 cM in mean distance. Homology analysis in the cotton genome further confirmed the 13 expected homologous chromosome pairs and revealed an obvious inversion on Chr10 or Chr20 and repeated inversions on Chr07 or Chr16. In addition, two reciprocal translocations between Chr02 and Chr03 and between Chr04 and Chr05 were confirmed. Comparative genomics between the tetraploid cotton and the diploid cottons showed that no major structural changes exist between DT and D chromosomes but rather between AT and A chromosomes. Blast analysis between the tetraploid cotton genome and the mixed genome of two diploid cottons showed that most AD chromosomes, regardless of whether it is from the AT or DT genome, preferentially matched with the corresponding homologous chromosome in the diploid A genome, and then the corresponding homologous chromosome in the diploid D genome, indicating that the diploid D genome underwent converted evolution by the diploid A genome to form the DT genome during polyploidization. In addition, the results reflected that a series of chromosomal translocations occurred among Chr01/Chr15, Chr02/Chr14, Chr03/Chr17, Chr04/Chr22, and Chr05/Chr19.

  17. High-density Linkage Map of Cultivated Allotetraploid Cotton Based on SSR, TRAP, SRAP and AFLP Markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiwen Yu; Shuxun Yu; Cairui Lu; Wu Wang; Shuli Fan; Meizhen Song; Zhongxu Lin; Xianlong Zhang; Jinfa Zhang

    2007-01-01

    A high-density linkage map was constructed for an F2 population derived from an interspecific cross of cultivated allotetraploid species between Gossyplum hirsutum L. and G. barbadense L. A total of 186 F2 individuals from the interspecific cross of "CRI 36 × Hai 7124" were genotyped at 1 252 polymorphic loci including a novel marker system,target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP). The map consists of 1 097 markers, including 697 simple sequence repeats (SSRs), 171 TRAPs, 129 sequence-related amplified polymorphisms, 98 amplified fragment length polymorphisms, and two morphological markers, and spanned 4 536.7 cM with an average genetic distance of 4.1 cM per marker. Using 45 duplicated SSR loci among chromosomes, 11 of the 13 pairs of homologous chromosomes were identified in tetraplold cotton. This map will provide an essential resource for high resolution mapping of quantitative trait loci and molecular breeding in cotton.

  18. A High-Density Genetic Map for Cucumber (Cucumis Sativus L. Based on Specific Length Amplified Fragment (SLAF Sequencing and QTL Analysis of Fruit Traits in Cucumber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenying eZhu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available High-density genetic linkage map plays an important role in genome assembly and QTL fine mapping. Since the coming of next-generation sequencing (NGS, makes the structure of high-density linkage maps much more convenient and practical, which simplifies SNP discovery and high-throughput genotyping. In this research, a high-density linkage map of cucumber was structured using specific length amplified fragment sequencing, using 153 F2 populations of S1000×S1002. The high-density genetic map composed 3,057 SLAFs, including 4,475 SNP markers on 7 chromosomes, and spanned 1061.19cM. The average genetic distance is 0.35cM. Based on this high-density genome map, QTL analysis was performed on two cucumber fruit traits, fruit length and fruit diameter. There are 15 QTLs for the two fruit traits were detected.

  19. Doppler Spectrometry for Ultrafast Temporal Mapping of Density Dynamics in Laser-Induced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, S.; Lad, Amit D.; Ahmed, Saima; Narayanan, V.; Pasley, J.; Rajeev, P. P.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2010-09-01

    We present high resolution measurements of the ultrafast temporal dynamics of the critical surface in moderately overdense, hot plasma by using two-color, pump-probe Doppler spectrometry. Our measurements clearly capture the initial inward motion of the plasma inside the critical surface of the pump laser which is followed by outward expansion. The measured instantaneous velocity and acceleration profiles are very well reproduced by a hybrid simulation that uses a 1D electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation for the initial evolution and a hydrodynamics simulation for the later times. The combination of high temporal resolution and dynamic range in our measurements clearly provides quantitative unraveling of the dynamics in this important region, enabling this as a powerful technique to obtain ultrafast snapshots of plasma density and temperature profiles for providing benchmarks for simulations.

  20. Novel algorithm for identifying T-wave current density alternans using synthesized 187-channel vector-projected body surface mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Kenji; Takahashi, Shin; Suzuki, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Futagawa, Keisuke; Shoda, Morio; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Ken; Okabayashi, Hitoshi; Itoh, Manabu; Kasanuki, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    The noninvasive evaluation of ventricular T-wave alternans (TWA) in patients with lethal ventricular arrhythmias is an important issue. In this study, we propose a novel algorithm to identify T-wave current density alternans (TWCA) using synthesized 187-channel vector-projected body surface mapping (187-ch SAVP-ECG). We recorded 10 min of 187-ch SAVP-ECG using a Mason-Likar lead system in the supine position. A recovery time (RT) dispersion map was obtained by averaging the 187-ch SAVP-ECG. The TWCA value was determined from the relative changes in the averaged current density in the T-wave zone (Tpeak ± 50 ms) for two T-wave types. We registered 20 ECG recordings from normal controls and 11 ECG recordings from nine subjects with long QT syndrome (LQT). We divided LQT syndrome subjects into two groups: group 1 provided 9 ECG recordings without visually apparent TWAs, and group 2 provided 2 ECG recordings with visually apparent TWAs. The QTc interval values in the LQT groups were higher than those in the control (515 ± 60 ms in LQT G-1, 600 ± 27 ms in LQT G-2 vs. 415 ± 19 ms in control, P < 0.001). The RTendc dispersion values among the LQT subjects were higher than those of the control subjects (48 ± 19 ms in LQT G-1, 65 ± 30 ms in LQT G-2 vs. 24 ± 10 ms in control, P < 0.01). The mean TWCA value was significantly higher in the LQT G-2 group with visually apparent TWCAs (0.5 ± 0.2% in control, 2.1 ± 1.2% in LQT G-1, and 32.3 ± 6.9% in LQT G-2). Interestingly, the two-dimensional distribution of TWCA in LQT was inhomogeneous and correlated with the distribution of increased RT dispersion. We conclude that a novel algorithm using 187-ch SAVP-ECG might provide new insights into body surface TWCA.

  1. Optical coherence tomography angiography vessel density mapping at various retinal layers in healthy and normal tension glaucoma eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joong Won; Sung, Kyung Rim; Lee, Ji Yun; Kwon, Junki; Seong, Mincheol

    2017-06-01

    To investigate peripapillary vessel density at various spatial locations and layers in healthy and normal tension glaucoma eyes using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). A commercial OCTA device (AngioPlex; Carl Zeiss Meditec) was used to image microvasculature in a 6 × 6-mm optic disc region. Vessel densities of superficial and deep retinal layers were calculated using an automatic thresholding algorithm. Vessel density maps were plotted by averaging individual angiogram images. The spatial characteristics of vessel densities were analyzed at clock-hour sectors and in five 0.7-mm-thick concentric circles from a diameter of 2.0 to 5.5 mm. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves (AUCs) assessed the glaucoma diagnostic ability. Vessel density maps of superficial and deep retinal layers were significantly reduced at the 7 and 11 o'clock positions in glaucomatous eyes. In superficial layer, vessel density significantly decreased as the distance from the optic disc margin increased, except in the innermost circle (2.0-2.7-mm). There were significant differences in AUCs of superficial vessel density between innermost circle and the other outer circles. In the deep layer, the innermost circle showed significantly higher vessel density than the outer circles. Vessel density at 7 o'clock showed the best diagnostic performance (AUCs, 0.898 and 0.789) both in the superficial and deep layers. The innermost circle showed eccentric feature compared to the outer circles in terms of spatial characteristics and diagnostic ability. Understanding of the spatial characteristics of peripapillary vasculature may be helpful in clinical practice and determining the optimal measurement area of vessel density.

  2. Energy density distribution of shaped waves inside scattering media mapped onto a complete set of diffusion modes

    CERN Document Server

    Ojambati, Oluwafemi S; Vellekoop, Ivo M; Lagendijk, Ad; Vos, Willem L

    2016-01-01

    We show that the spatial distribution of the energy density of optimally shaped waves inside a scattering medium can be described by considering only a few of the lowest eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation. Taking into account only the fundamental eigenfunction, the total internal energy inside the sample is underestimated by only 2%. The spatial distribution of the shaped energy density is very similar to the fundamental eigenfunction, up to a cosine distance of about 0.01. We obtained the energy density inside a quasi-1D disordered waveguide by numerical calculation of the joined scattering matrix. Computing the transmission-averaged energy density over all transmission channels yields the ensemble averaged energy density of shaped waves. From the averaged energy density obtained, we reconstruct its spatial distribution using the eigenfunctions of the diffusion equation. The results from our study have exciting applications in controlled biomedical imaging, efficient light harvesting in solar cells, en...

  3. Constructing an initial map of transmission distortion based on high density HapMap SNPs across the human autosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Libin; Zhang, Dake; Richards, Elliott; Tang, Xiaoli; Fang, Jin; Long, Fei; Wang, Yan

    2009-12-01

    Transmission distortion (TD) is a significant departure from Mendelian predictions of genes or chromosomes to offspring. While many biological processes have been implicated, there is still much to be understood about TD in humans. Here we present our findings from a genome-wide scan for evidence of TD using haplotype data of 60 trio families from the International HapMap Project. Fisher's exact test was applied to assess the extent of TD in 629,958 SNPs across the autosomes. Based on the empirical distribution of P(Fisher) and further permutation tests, we identified 1,205 outlier loci and 224 candidate genes with TD. Using the PANTHER gene ontology database, we found 19 categories of biological processes with an enrichment of candidate genes. In particular, the "protein phosphorylation" category contained the largest number of candidates in both HapMap samples. Further analysis uncovered an intriguing non-synonymous change in PPP1R12B, a gene related to protein phosphorylation, which appears to influence the allele transmission from male parents in the YRI (Yoruba from Ibadan, Nigeria) population. Our findings also indicate an ethnicity-related property of TD signatures in HapMap samples and provide new clues for our understanding of TD in humans.

  4. Functional connectivity density mapping of depressive symptoms and loneliness in non-demented elderly male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Chia eLan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression and loneliness are prevalent and highly correlated phenomena among the elderly and influence both physical and mental health. Brain functional connectivity changes associated with depressive symptoms and loneliness are not fully understood.Methods: A cross-sectional functional MRI study was conducted among 85 non-demented male elders. Geriatric depression scale-short form and loneliness scale were used to evaluate the severity of depressive symptoms and loneliness, respectively. Whole brain voxel-wise resting-state functional connectivity density (FCD mapping was performed to delineate short-range FCD (SFCD and long-range FCD (LFCD. Regional correlations between depressive symptoms or loneliness and SFCD or LFCD were examined using general linear model, with age incorporated as a covariate and depressive symptoms and loneliness as predictors.Results: Positive correlations between depressive symptoms and LFCD were observed in left rectal gyrus, left superior frontal gyrus, right supraorbital gyrus, and left inferior temporal gyrus. Positive correlations between depressive symptoms and SFCD were observed in left middle frontal gyrus, left superior frontal gyrus, bilateral superior medial frontal gyrus, left inferior temporal gyrus, and left middle occipital region. Positive correlations between SFCD and loneliness were centered over bilateral lingual gyrus.Conclusion: Depressive symptoms are associated with FCD changes over frontal and temporal regions, which may involve the cognitive control, affective regulation, and default mode networks. Loneliness is associated with FCD changes in bilateral lingual gyri that are known to be important in social cognition. Depressive symptoms and loneliness may be associated with different brain regions in non-demented elderly male.

  5. Developing a Penetrometer-Based Mapping System for Visualizing Silage Bulk Density from the Bunker Silo Face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menghua; Jungbluth, Kerstin H; Sun, Yurui; Cheng, Qiang; Maack, Christian; Buescher, Wolfgang; Lin, Jianhui; Zhou, Haiyang; Wang, Zhongyi

    2016-07-05

    For silage production, high bulk density (BD) is critical to minimize aerobic deterioration facilitated by oxygen intrusion. To precisely assess packing quality for bunker silos, there is a desire to visualize the BD distribution within the silage. In this study, a penetrometer-based mapping system was developed. The data processing included filtering of the penetration friction component (PFC) out of the penetration resistance (PR), transfer of the corrected penetration resistance (PRc) to BD, incorporation of Kriged interpolation for data expansion and map generation. The experiment was conducted in a maize bunker silo (width: 8 m, middle height: 3 m). The BD distributions near the bunker silo face were represented using two map groups, one related to horizontal- and the other to vertical-density distribution patterns. We also presented a comparison between the map-based BD results and core sampling data. Agreement between the two measurement approaches (RMSE = 19.175 kg·m(-3)) demonstrates that the developed penetrometer mapping system may be beneficial for rapid assessment of aerobic deterioration potential in bunker silos.

  6. Developing a Penetrometer-Based Mapping System for Visualizing Silage Bulk Density from the Bunker Silo Face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menghua Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available For silage production, high bulk density (BD is critical to minimize aerobic deterioration facilitated by oxygen intrusion. To precisely assess packing quality for bunker silos, there is a desire to visualize the BD distribution within the silage. In this study, a penetrometer-based mapping system was developed. The data processing included filtering of the penetration friction component (PFC out of the penetration resistance (PR, transfer of the corrected penetration resistance (PRc to BD, incorporation of Kriged interpolation for data expansion and map generation. The experiment was conducted in a maize bunker silo (width: 8 m, middle height: 3 m. The BD distributions near the bunker silo face were represented using two map groups, one related to horizontal- and the other to vertical-density distribution patterns. We also presented a comparison between the map-based BD results and core sampling data. Agreement between the two measurement approaches (RMSE = 19.175 kg·m−3 demonstrates that the developed penetrometer mapping system may be beneficial for rapid assessment of aerobic deterioration potential in bunker silos.

  7. Developing a Penetrometer-Based Mapping System for Visualizing Silage Bulk Density from the Bunker Silo Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menghua; Jungbluth, Kerstin H.; Sun, Yurui; Cheng, Qiang; Maack, Christian; Buescher, Wolfgang; Lin, Jianhui; Zhou, Haiyang; Wang, Zhongyi

    2016-01-01

    For silage production, high bulk density (BD) is critical to minimize aerobic deterioration facilitated by oxygen intrusion. To precisely assess packing quality for bunker silos, there is a desire to visualize the BD distribution within the silage. In this study, a penetrometer-based mapping system was developed. The data processing included filtering of the penetration friction component (PFC) out of the penetration resistance (PR), transfer of the corrected penetration resistance (PRc) to BD, incorporation of Kriged interpolation for data expansion and map generation. The experiment was conducted in a maize bunker silo (width: 8 m, middle height: 3 m). The BD distributions near the bunker silo face were represented using two map groups, one related to horizontal- and the other to vertical-density distribution patterns. We also presented a comparison between the map-based BD results and core sampling data. Agreement between the two measurement approaches (RMSE = 19.175 kg·m−3) demonstrates that the developed penetrometer mapping system may be beneficial for rapid assessment of aerobic deterioration potential in bunker silos. PMID:27399703

  8. Obtaining Photospheric Electric Field Maps and Poynting Fluxes from vector magnetograms and Doppler data: Tests and Data Driving Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazachenko, Maria; Fisher, George; Welsch, Brian

    Quantitative studies of the flow of magnetic energy through the solar photosphere require a knowledge of the magnetic field vector B - and knowledge of the electric field E as well. We have modified and improved the technique Fisher et al. developed in 2012, which combines a poloidal-toroidal decomposition (PTD) to determine contributions to E from Faraday's law, with additional non-inductive contributions arising from flux emergence near polarity inversion lines, determined from Doppler measurements. The new technique, which we call the ``PTD Doppler FLCT Ideal'' (or PDFI) technique, incorporates Doppler information from non-normal viewing angles, and adopts the faster and more robust FISHPACK software for solutions of the two-dimensional Poisson equations. We demonstrate the performance using synthetic data from the anelastic pseudo-spectral ANMHD simulations that were used in the recent comparison of velocity inversion techniques (Welsch et al. 2007) and the PTD inversion (Fisher et al. 2012). We find that the PDFI method has roughly 10% reconstruction errors (it predicts roughly 100% of the photospheric Poynting flux and 110% of the helicity flux rate at normal viewing angles, consistent with Fisher et al. (2012) results, and 90% of Poynting flux and 110% helicity flux at theta=30 degrees). We conclude that the PDFI method can be routinely applied to observed magnetic field data and, as an example, apply it to the 6-day HMI/SDO vector magnetogram sequence centered at AR11158, where an X2.2 flare occurred. We discuss how our electric field maps are used to drive coronal magnetic field with a global evolutionary model, or CGEM, a collaborative effort from the UC Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory (SSL), Stanford University, and Lockheed-Martin.

  9. Ultrahigh-density linkage map for cultivated cucumber (Cucumis sativus L. using a single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mor Rubinstein

    Full Text Available Genotyping arrays are tools for high-throughput genotyping, which is beneficial in constructing saturated genetic maps and therefore high-resolution mapping of complex traits. Since the report of the first cucumber genome draft, genetic maps have been constructed mainly based on simple-sequence repeats (SSRs or on combinations of SSRs and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP. In this study, we developed the first cucumber genotyping array consisting of 32,864 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. These markers cover the cucumber genome with a median interval of ~2 Kb and have expected genotype calls in parents/F1 hybridizations as a training set. The training set was validated with Fluidigm technology and showed 96% concordance with the genotype calls in the parents/F1 hybridizations. Application of the genotyping array was illustrated by constructing a 598.7 cM genetic map based on a '9930' × 'Gy14' recombinant inbred line (RIL population comprised of 11,156 SNPs. Marker collinearity between the genetic map and reference genomes of the two parents was estimated at R2 = 0.97. We also used the array-derived genetic map to investigate chromosomal rearrangements, regional recombination rate, and specific regions with segregation distortions. Finally, 82% of the linkage-map bins were polymorphic in other cucumber variants, suggesting that the array can be applied for genotyping in other lines. The genotyping array presented here, together with the genotype calls of the parents/F1 hybridizations as a training set, should be a powerful tool in future studies with high-throughput cucumber genotyping. An ultrahigh-density linkage map constructed by this genotyping array on RIL population may be invaluable for assembly improvement, and for mapping important cucumber QTLs.

  10. Improvement in White Matter Tract Reconstruction with Constrained Spherical Deconvolution and Track Density Mapping in Low Angular Resolution Data: A Pediatric Study and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Toselli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionDiffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI allows noninvasive investigation of brain structure in vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is a frequently used application of DW-MRI that assumes a single main diffusion direction per voxel, and is therefore not well suited for reconstructing crossing fiber tracts. Among the solutions developed to overcome this problem, constrained spherical deconvolution with probabilistic tractography (CSD-PT has provided superior quality results in clinical settings on adult subjects; however, it requires particular acquisition parameters and long sequences, which may limit clinical usage in the pediatric age group. The aim of this work was to compare the results of DTI with those of track density imaging (TDI maps and CSD-PT on data from neonates and children, acquired with low angular resolution and low b-value diffusion sequences commonly used in pediatric clinical MRI examinations.Materials and methodsWe analyzed DW-MRI studies of 50 children (eight neonates aged 3–28 days, 20 infants aged 1–8 months, and 22 children aged 2–17 years acquired on a 1.5 T Philips scanner using 34 gradient directions and a b-value of 1,000 s/mm2. Other sequence parameters included 60 axial slices; acquisition matrix, 128 × 128; average scan time, 5:34 min; voxel size, 1.75 mm × 1.75 mm × 2 mm; one b = 0 image. For each subject, we computed principal eigenvector (EV maps and directionally encoded color TDI maps (DEC-TDI maps from whole-brain tractograms obtained with CSD-PT; the cerebellar-thalamic, corticopontocerebellar, and corticospinal tracts were reconstructed using both CSD-PT and DTI. Results were compared by two neuroradiologists using a 5-point qualitative score.ResultsThe DEC-TDI maps obtained presented higher anatomical detail than EV maps, as assessed by visual inspection. In all subjects, white matter (WM tracts were successfully reconstructed using both

  11. Magnetic structure of Bayonnaise knoll caldera including Hakurei hydrothermal site obtained from near-bottom magnetic vector field mapping by autonomous underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsho, C.; Ura, T.; Kim, K.

    2012-12-01

    The Bayonnaise knoll caldera is one of the silicic submarine calderas in the Izu-Ogasawara Arc in Japan. In 2003, a large-scale hydrothermal deposit was found in the caldera, called the Hakurei deposit. The caldera had been explored by four surveys using autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) from 2008 to 2011, and the near-bottom magnetic field was mapped over about 75% of the caldera floor. We carried out detailed correction for the magnetic field produced by the vehicle body, which allowed us to take advantage of the vector anomaly instead of the total anomaly for the magnetic inversion. We applied the inversion method using the block model together with the Akaike's Bayesian information criterion (ABIC). One remarkable thing is that we recognized significant difference between the magnetic inversion result using the vector anomaly and that using the total anomaly: the latter result explains the observed total anomalies excellently, but does not explain the vector anomalies adequately. Except for a rare case where the vector anomaly is perpendicular to the main field throughout, the total anomaly should be sufficient for evaluating the entire field, provided that the data is collected in sufficiently high density. In fact, the track lines of our survey sometimes separate from each other by about twice the altitude of the vehicle (100 m), which can lead to considerable aliasing in the sampled field. The vector anomaly can provide vital information in such a situation. The obtained magnetization distribution is well correlated with the topography. The caldera rim and central cone have weak magnetization, which is consistent with the fact that they consist of dacite rocks. On the other hand, the caldera floor shows high magnetization, which implies the existence of basaltic rocks. The high magnetization appears to continue north and south beyond the caldera rim, forming an NS-trending high magnetization zone. Because the caldera floor is generally covered with

  12. The Double-Reduction Landscape in Tetraploid Potato as Revealed by a High-Density Linkage Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Peter M; Voorrips, Roeland E; Visser, Richard G F; Maliepaard, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The creation of genetic linkage maps in polyploid species has been a long-standing problem for which various approaches have been proposed. In the case of autopolyploids, a commonly used simplification is that random bivalents form during meiosis. This leads to relatively straightforward estimation of recombination frequencies using maximum likelihood, from which a genetic map can be derived. However, autopolyploids such as tetraploid potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) may exhibit additional features, such as double reduction, not normally encountered in diploid or allopolyploid species. In this study, we produced a high-density linkage map of tetraploid potato and used it to identify regions of double reduction in a biparental mapping population. The frequency of multivalents required to produce this degree of double reduction was determined through simulation. We also determined the effect that multivalents or preferential pairing between homologous chromosomes has on linkage mapping. Low levels of multivalents or preferential pairing do not adversely affect map construction when highly informative marker types and phases are used. We reveal the double-reduction landscape in tetraploid potato, clearly showing that this phenomenon increases with distance from the centromeres.

  13. The application of high-density genetic maps of rye for the detection of QTLs controlling morphological traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myśków, Beata; Hanek, Monika; Banek-Tabor, Aneta; Maciorowski, Robert; Stojałowski, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    The development of genetic maps is, nowadays, one of the most intensive research activities of plant geneticists. One of the major goals of genome mapping is the localisation of quantitative trait loci (QTLs). This study was aimed at the identification of QTLs controlling morphological traits of rye and comparison of their localisation on genetic maps constructed with the use of genetically different germplasms. For QTL analyses, two high-density consensus maps of two populations (RIL-S and RIL-M) of recombinant inbred lines (RIL) were applied. Plant height (Ph), length of spikes (Sl) and the number of spikelets per spike (Sps) were studied in both populations. Additionally, the number of kernels per spike under isolation (Kps), the weight of kernels per spike (Kw) and thousand kernel weight (Tkw) were assessed in the RIL-M population. Except for Tkw, the majority of the traits were correlated to each other. The non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis (K-W) test and composite interval mapping (CIM) revealed 18/48 and 24/18 regions of rye chromosomes engaged in the determination of Ph, Sl and Sps in the RIL-S and RIL-M populations, respectively. An additional 18/15 QTLs controlling Kps, Kw and Tkw were detected on a map of the RIL-M population. A numerous group of QTLs detected via CIM remained in agreement with the genomic regions found when the K-W test was applied. Frequently, the intervals indicated by CIM were narrower.

  14. Development of a large SNP genotyping array and generation of high-density genetic maps in tomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Chur Sim

    Full Text Available The concurrent development of high-throughput genotyping platforms and next generation sequencing (NGS has increased the number and density of genetic markers, the efficiency of constructing detailed linkage maps, and our ability to overlay recombination and physical maps of the genome. We developed an array for tomato with 8,784 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs mainly discovered based on NGS-derived transcriptome sequences. Of the SNPs, 7,720 (88% passed manufacturing quality control and could be scored in tomato germplasm. The array was used to generate high-density linkage maps for three interspecific F(2 populations: EXPEN 2000 (Solanum lycopersicum LA0925 x S. pennellii LA0716, 79 individuals, EXPEN 2012 (S. lycopersicum Moneymaker x S. pennellii LA0716, 160 individuals, and EXPIM 2012 (S. lycopersicum Moneymaker x S. pimpinellifolium LA0121, 183 individuals. The EXPEN 2000-SNP and EXPEN 2012 maps consisted of 3,503 and 3,687 markers representing 1,076 and 1,229 unique map positions (genetic bins, respectively. The EXPEN 2000-SNP map had an average marker bin interval of 1.6 cM, while the EXPEN 2012 map had an average bin interval of 0.9 cM. The EXPIM 2012 map was constructed with 4,491 markers (1,358 bins and an average bin interval of 0.8 cM. All three linkage maps revealed an uneven distribution of markers across the genome. The dense EXPEN 2012 and EXPIM 2012 maps showed high levels of colinearity across all 12 chromosomes, and also revealed evidence of small inversions between LA0716 and LA0121. Physical positions of 7,666 SNPs were identified relative to the tomato genome sequence. The genetic and physical positions were mostly consistent. Exceptions were observed for chromosomes 3, 10 and 12. Comparing genetic positions relative to physical positions revealed that genomic regions with high recombination rates were consistent with the known distribution of euchromatin across the 12 chromosomes, while very low recombination rates

  15. Rapidly calculated density functional theory (DFT) relaxed Iso-potential Phi Si Maps: Beta-cellobiose

    Science.gov (United States)

    New cellobiose Phi-H/Si-H maps are rapidly generated using a mixed basis set DFT method, found to achieve a high level of confidence while reducing computer resources dramatically. Relaxed iso-potential maps are made for different conformational states of cellobiose, showing how glycosidic bond dihe...

  16. Quantitative T1 and proton density mapping with direct calculation of radiofrequency coil transmit and receive profiles from two-point variable flip angle data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudrexel, Simon; Reitz, Sarah C; Hof, Stephanie; Gracien, René-Maxime; Fleischer, Vinzenz; Zimmermann, Hilga; Droby, Amgad; Klein, Johannes C; Deichmann, Ralf

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative T1 mapping of brain tissue is frequently based on the variable flip angle (VFA) method, acquiring spoiled gradient echo (GE) datasets at different excitation angles. However, accurate T1 calculation requires a knowledge of the sensitivity profile B1 of the radiofrequency (RF) transmit coil. For an additional derivation of proton density (PD) maps, the receive coil sensitivity profile (RP) must also be known. Mapping of B1 and RP increases the experiment duration, which may be critical when investigating patients. In this work, a method is presented for the direct calculation of B1 and RP from VFA data. Thus, quantitative maps of T1 , PD, B1 and RP can be obtained from only two spoiled GE datasets. The method is based on: (1) the exploitation of the linear relationship between 1/PD and 1/T1 in brain tissue and (2) the assumption of smoothly varying B1 and RP, so that a large number of data points can be fitted across small volume elements where B1 and RP are approximately constant. The method is tested and optimized on healthy subjects. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Snakebite Envenoming – A Combined Density Equalizing Mapping and Scientometric Analysis of the Publication History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groneberg, David A.; Geier, Victoria; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Gerber, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Estimates suggest that more than 25,000 to 125,000 people die annually from snakebite envenomation worldwide. In contrast to this major disease burden, thorough bibliometric studies do not exist so far that illustrate the overall research activity over a long time span. Therefore, the NewQIS-platform conducted an analysis on snakebite envenoming using the Thomson Reuters database Web of Science. To determine and assess changes regarding the scientific activities and to specifically address the more recent situation we analyzed two time intervals (t). During the first time interval from 1900 to 2007 (t1) 13,015 publications (p) were identified. In the following period (2008–2016 = t2) 4,982 publications were identified by the same search strategy. They originate from 114 (t1) respectively 121 countries (t2), with the USA (p = 3518), Brazil (p = 1100) and Japan (p = 961) being most productive in the first period, and the USA (p = 1087), Brazil (p = 991) and China (p = 378) in the second period, respectively. Setting the publication numbers in relation to GDP/capita, Brazil leads with 92 publications per 10,000 Int$GDP/capita, followed by India with 79 publications per 10000 Int$GDP/capita (t1). Comparing the country’s publication activity with the Human Development Index level indicates that the majority of the publications is published by highly developed countries. When calculating the average citation rates (citations per published item = CR) mainly European countries show the highest ranks: From 1900–2007 Sweden ranks first with a CR = 27, followed by the Netherlands (CR = 24.8), Switzerland (CR = 23), Spain, Austria and the USA (CR = 22). From 2008 to 2016 the highest rate achieves Switzerland with a value of 24.6, followed by Belgium (CR = 18.1), Spain (CR = 16.7), Costa Rica (CR = 14.9) and Netherlands (CR = 14). Compared with this, the USA was placed at rank 13 (CR = 9,5). In summary, the present study represents the first density-equalizing map

  18. Snakebite Envenoming - A Combined Density Equalizing Mapping and Scientometric Analysis of the Publication History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groneberg, David A; Geier, Victoria; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Gerber, Alexander; Kuch, Ulrich; Kloft, Beatrix

    2016-11-01

    Estimates suggest that more than 25,000 to 125,000 people die annually from snakebite envenomation worldwide. In contrast to this major disease burden, thorough bibliometric studies do not exist so far that illustrate the overall research activity over a long time span. Therefore, the NewQIS-platform conducted an analysis on snakebite envenoming using the Thomson Reuters database Web of Science. To determine and assess changes regarding the scientific activities and to specifically address the more recent situation we analyzed two time intervals (t). During the first time interval from 1900 to 2007 (t1) 13,015 publications (p) were identified. In the following period (2008-2016 = t2) 4,982 publications were identified by the same search strategy. They originate from 114 (t1) respectively 121 countries (t2), with the USA (p = 3518), Brazil (p = 1100) and Japan (p = 961) being most productive in the first period, and the USA (p = 1087), Brazil (p = 991) and China (p = 378) in the second period, respectively. Setting the publication numbers in relation to GDP/capita, Brazil leads with 92 publications per 10,000 Int$GDP/capita, followed by India with 79 publications per 10000 Int$GDP/capita (t1). Comparing the country's publication activity with the Human Development Index level indicates that the majority of the publications is published by highly developed countries. When calculating the average citation rates (citations per published item = CR) mainly European countries show the highest ranks: From 1900-2007 Sweden ranks first with a CR = 27, followed by the Netherlands (CR = 24.8), Switzerland (CR = 23), Spain, Austria and the USA (CR = 22). From 2008 to 2016 the highest rate achieves Switzerland with a value of 24.6, followed by Belgium (CR = 18.1), Spain (CR = 16.7), Costa Rica (CR = 14.9) and Netherlands (CR = 14). Compared with this, the USA was placed at rank 13 (CR = 9,5). In summary, the present study represents the first density-equalizing map projection

  19. Snakebite Envenoming - A Combined Density Equalizing Mapping and Scientometric Analysis of the Publication History.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Groneberg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Estimates suggest that more than 25,000 to 125,000 people die annually from snakebite envenomation worldwide. In contrast to this major disease burden, thorough bibliometric studies do not exist so far that illustrate the overall research activity over a long time span. Therefore, the NewQIS-platform conducted an analysis on snakebite envenoming using the Thomson Reuters database Web of Science. To determine and assess changes regarding the scientific activities and to specifically address the more recent situation we analyzed two time intervals (t. During the first time interval from 1900 to 2007 (t1 13,015 publications (p were identified. In the following period (2008-2016 = t2 4,982 publications were identified by the same search strategy. They originate from 114 (t1 respectively 121 countries (t2, with the USA (p = 3518, Brazil (p = 1100 and Japan (p = 961 being most productive in the first period, and the USA (p = 1087, Brazil (p = 991 and China (p = 378 in the second period, respectively. Setting the publication numbers in relation to GDP/capita, Brazil leads with 92 publications per 10,000 Int$GDP/capita, followed by India with 79 publications per 10000 Int$GDP/capita (t1. Comparing the country's publication activity with the Human Development Index level indicates that the majority of the publications is published by highly developed countries. When calculating the average citation rates (citations per published item = CR mainly European countries show the highest ranks: From 1900-2007 Sweden ranks first with a CR = 27, followed by the Netherlands (CR = 24.8, Switzerland (CR = 23, Spain, Austria and the USA (CR = 22. From 2008 to 2016 the highest rate achieves Switzerland with a value of 24.6, followed by Belgium (CR = 18.1, Spain (CR = 16.7, Costa Rica (CR = 14.9 and Netherlands (CR = 14. Compared with this, the USA was placed at rank 13 (CR = 9,5. In summary, the present study represents the first density-equalizing map projection and

  20. Global architecture of gestational diabetes research: density-equalizing mapping studies and gender analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggmann, Dörthe; Richter, Theresa; Klingelhöfer, Doris; Gerber, Alexander; Bundschuh, Matthias; Jaque, Jenny; Groneberg, David A

    2016-04-04

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is associated with substantial morbidity for mothers and their offspring. While clinical and basic research activities on this important disease grow constantly, there is no concise analysis of global architecture of GDM research. Hence, it was the objective of this study to assess the global scientific performance chronologically, geographically and in relation to existing research networks and gender distribution of publishing authors. On the basis of the New Quality and Quantity Indices in Science (NewQIS) platform, scientometric methods were combined with modern visualizing techniques such as density equalizing mapping, and the Web of Science database was used to assess GDM-related entries from 1900 to 2012. Twelve thousand five hundred four GDM-related publications were identified and analyzed. The USA (4295 publications) and the UK (1354 publications) dominated the field concerning research activity, overall citations and country-specific Hirsch-Index, which quantified the impact of a country's published research on the scientific community. Semi-qualitative indices such as country-specific citation rates ranked New Zealand and the UK at top positions. Annual collaborative publications increased steeply between the years 1990 and 2012 (71 to 1157 respectively). Subject category analysis pointed to a minor interest of public health issues in GDM research. Gender analysis in terms of publication authorship revealed a clear dominance of the male gender until 2005; then a trend towards gender equity started and the activity of female scientists grew visibly in many countries. The country-specific gender analysis revealed large differences, i.e. female scientists dominated the scientific output in the USA, whereas the majority of research was published by male authors in countries such as Japan. This study provides the first global sketch of GDM research architecture. While North-American and Western-European countries were

  1. Traveling wave solutions of density-dependent nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation via the extended generalized Riccati equation mapping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kengne, Emmanuel; Saydé, Michel; Ben Hamouda, Fathi; Lakhssassi, Ahmed

    2013-11-01

    Analytical entire traveling wave solutions to the 1+1 density-dependent nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation via the extended generalized Riccati equation mapping method are presented in this paper. This equation can be regarded as an extension case of the Fisher-Kolmogoroff equation, which is used for studying insect and animal dispersal with growth dynamics. The analytical solutions are then used to investigate the effect of equation parameters on the population distribution.

  2. A High-Density Genetic Map of Tetraploid Salix matsudana Using Specific Length Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available As a salt-tolerant arbor tree species, Salix matsudana plays an important role in afforestation and greening in the coastal areas of China. To select superior Salix varieties that adapt to wide saline areas, it is of paramount importance to understand and identify the mechanisms of salt-tolerance at the level of the whole genome. Here, we describe a high-density genetic linkage map of S. matsudana that represents a good coverage of the Salix genome. An intraspecific F1 hybrid population was established by crossing the salt-sensitive "Yanjiang" variety as the female parent with the salt-tolerant "9901" variety as the male parent. This population, along with its parents, was genotyped by specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq, leading to 277,333 high-quality SLAF markers. By marker analysis, we found that both the parents and offspring were tetraploid. The mean sequencing depth was 53.20-fold for "Yanjiang", 47.41-fold for "9901", and 11.02-fold for the offspring. Of the SLAF markers detected, 42,321 are polymorphic with sufficient quality for map construction. The final genetic map was constructed using 6,737 SLAF markers, covering 38 linkage groups (LGs. The genetic map spanned 5,497.45 cM in length, with an average distance of 0.82 cM. As a first high-density genetic map of S. matsudana constructed from salt tolerance-varying varieties, this study will provide a foundation for mapping quantitative trait loci that modulate salt tolerance and resistance in Salix and provide important references for molecular breeding of this important forest tree.

  3. A High-Density Genetic Map of Tetraploid Salix matsudana Using Specific Length Amplified Fragment Sequencing (SLAF-seq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Huwei; Li, Min; Li, Yujuan; Wang, Ying; Ma, Xiangjian; Zhang, Yuan; Tan, Feng; Wu, Rongling

    2016-01-01

    As a salt-tolerant arbor tree species, Salix matsudana plays an important role in afforestation and greening in the coastal areas of China. To select superior Salix varieties that adapt to wide saline areas, it is of paramount importance to understand and identify the mechanisms of salt-tolerance at the level of the whole genome. Here, we describe a high-density genetic linkage map of S. matsudana that represents a good coverage of the Salix genome. An intraspecific F1 hybrid population was established by crossing the salt-sensitive "Yanjiang" variety as the female parent with the salt-tolerant "9901" variety as the male parent. This population, along with its parents, was genotyped by specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq), leading to 277,333 high-quality SLAF markers. By marker analysis, we found that both the parents and offspring were tetraploid. The mean sequencing depth was 53.20-fold for "Yanjiang", 47.41-fold for "9901", and 11.02-fold for the offspring. Of the SLAF markers detected, 42,321 are polymorphic with sufficient quality for map construction. The final genetic map was constructed using 6,737 SLAF markers, covering 38 linkage groups (LGs). The genetic map spanned 5,497.45 cM in length, with an average distance of 0.82 cM. As a first high-density genetic map of S. matsudana constructed from salt tolerance-varying varieties, this study will provide a foundation for mapping quantitative trait loci that modulate salt tolerance and resistance in Salix and provide important references for molecular breeding of this important forest tree.

  4. A high-density linkage map of the RN region in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looft, C; Milan, D; Jeon, J T; Paul, S; Reinsch, N; Rogel-Gaillard, C; Rey, V; Amarger, V; Robic, A; Kalm, E; Chardon, P; Andersson, L

    2000-01-01

    The porcine RN locus affects muscle glycogen content and meat quality. We previously mapped the RN locus to chromosome 15. This study describes the identification of polymorphisms for four class I and four class II markers located in the RN region. Resource families were genotyped with F-SSCP markers (fluorescent single strand conformation polymorphism) and microsatellite markers. Subsequent multipoint linkage analysis revealed the order FN1-IGFBP5-S1000-S1001-IL8RB-VIL1-RN-Sw936-Sw906. The gene order is identical to the previously reported porcine RH map of the same region. The described map will facilitate positional cloning of the RN gene.

  5. Mapping the ECG in the live rabbit heart using Ultrasound Current Source Density Imaging with coded excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yexian; Li, Qian; Ingram, Pier; Witte, Russell S

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI) is a noninvasive technique for mapping electric current fields in 4D (space + time) with the resolution of ultrasound imaging. This approach can potentially overcome limitations of conventional electrical mapping procedures often used during treatment of cardiac arrhythmia or epilepsy. However, at physiologic currents, the detected acoustoelectric (AE) interaction signal in tissue is very weak. In this work, we evaluated coded ultrasound excitation (chirps) for improving the sensitivity of UCSDI for mapping the electrocardiogram (ECG) in a live rabbit heart preparation. Results confirmed that chirps improved detection of the AE signal by as much as 6.1 dB compared to a square pulse. We further demonstrated mapping the ECG using a clinical intracardiac catheter, 1 MHz ultrasound transducer and coded excitation. B-mode pulse echo and UCSDI revealed regions of high current flow in the heart wall during the peak of the ECG. These improvements to UCSDI are important steps towards translation of this new technology to the clinic for rapidly mapping the cardiac activation wave.

  6. Effect of Selenium-Enriched Agaricus bisporus (Higher Basidiomycetes) Extracts, Obtained by Pressurized Water Extraction, on the Expression of Cholesterol Homeostasis Related Genes by Low-Density Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Soler-Rivas, Cristina; Rodriguez-Casado, Arantxa; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Reglero, Guillermo; Marín, Francisco Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Culinary-medicinal mushrooms are able to lower blood cholesterol levels in animal models by different mechanisms. They might impair the endogenous cholesterol synthesis and exogenous cholesterol absorption during digestion. Mushroom extracts, obtained using pressurized water extractions (PWE) from Agaricus bisporus basidiomes, supplemented or not supplemented with selenium, were applied to HepG2 cell cultures to study the expression of 19 genes related to cholesterol homeostasis by low-density arrays (LDA). Only the PWE fractions obtained at 25°C showed 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) inhibitory activity. Besides the enzymatic inhibition, PWE extracts may downregulate some of the key genes involved in the cholesterol homeostasis, such as the squalene synthase gene (FDFT1), since its mRNA expression falls by one third of its initial value. In summary, A. bisporus extracts may also modulate biological cholesterol levels by molecular mechanisms further than the enzymatic way previously reported.

  7. Construction of a high-density genetic map using specific length amplified fragment markers and identification of a quantitative trait locus for anthracnose resistance in walnut (Juglans regia L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yufeng; Yin, Yanfei; Yang, Keqiang; Li, Jihong; Sang, Yalin; Huang, Long; Fan, Shu

    2015-08-18

    Walnut (Juglans regia, 2n = 32, approximately 606 Mb per 1C genome) is an economically important tree crop. Resistance to anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, is a major objective of walnut genetic improvement in China. The recently developed specific length amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) is an efficient strategy that can obtain large numbers of markers with sufficient sequence information to construct high-density genetic maps and permits detection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for molecular breeding. SLAF-seq generated 161.64 M paired-end reads. 153,820 SLAF markers were obtained, of which 49,174 were polymorphic. 13,635 polymorphic markers were sorted into five segregation types and 2,577 markers of them were used to construct genetic linkage maps: 2,395 of these fell into 16 linkage groups (LGs) for the female map, 448 markers for the male map, and 2,577 markers for the integrated map. Taking into account the size of all LGs, the marker coverage was 2,664.36 cM for the female map, 1,305.58 cM for the male map, and 2,457.82 cM for the integrated map. The average intervals between two adjacent mapped markers were 1.11 cM, 2.91 cM and 0.95 cM for three maps, respectively. 'SNP_only' markers accounted for 89.25% of the markers on the integrated map. Mapping markers contained 5,043 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) loci, which corresponded to two SNP loci per SLAF marker. According to the integrated map, we used interval mapping (Logarithm of odds, LOD > 3.0) to detect our quantitative trait. One QTL was detected for anthracnose resistance. The interval of this QTL ranged from 165.51 cM to 176.33 cM on LG14, and ten markers in this interval that were above the threshold value were considered to be linked markers to the anthracnose resistance trait. The phenotypic variance explained by each marker ranged from 16.2 to 19.9%, and their LOD scores varied from 3.22 to 4.04. High-density genetic maps for walnut containing 16

  8. Size and CT density of iodine-containing ethosomal vesicles obtained by membrane extrusion: potential for use as CT contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Bomin; Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Bumsang

    2013-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the primary non-invasive imaging technique used for most patients with suspected liver disease. In order to improve liver-specific imaging properties and prevent toxic effects in patients with compromised renal function, we investigated the encapsulation of iodine within ethosomal vesicles. As a first step in the development of novel contrast agents using ethosomes for CT imaging applications, iodine was entrapped within ethosomes and iodine-containing ethosomes of the desired size were obtained by extrusion using a polycarbonate membrane with a defined pore size. Ethosomes containing iodine showed a relatively high CT density, which decreased when they were extruded, due to the rupture and re-formation of the lipid bilayer of the ethosome. However, when a solution with a high iodine concentration was used as a dispersion media during the extrusion process, the decrease in CT density could be prevented. In addition, ethosomes containing iodine were taken up efficiently by macrophages, which are abundant in the liver, and these ethosomes exhibited no cellular toxicity. These results demonstrate that iodine could be entrapped within ethosomal vesicles, giving the ethosomes a relatively high CT density, and that the extrusion technique used in this study could conveniently and reproducibly produce ethosomal vesicles with a desired size. Therefore, ethosomes containing iodine, as prepared in this study, have potential as contrast agents with applications in CT imaging.

  9. MODELING THE ANOMALY OF SURFACE NUMBER DENSITIES OF GALAXIES ON THE GALACTIC EXTINCTION MAP DUE TO THEIR FIR EMISSION CONTAMINATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwagi, Toshiya; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi; Yahata, Kazuhiro [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kayo, Issha [Department of Physics, Toho University, Funabashi, Chiba 274-8510 (Japan); Nishimichi, Takahiro, E-mail: kashiwagi@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8568 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    The most widely used Galactic extinction map is constructed assuming that the observed far-infrared (FIR) fluxes come entirely from Galactic dust. According to the earlier suggestion by Yahata et al., we consider how FIR emission of galaxies affects the SFD map. We first compute the surface number density of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 galaxies as a function of the r-band extinction, A {sub r,} {sub SFD}. We confirm that the surface densities of those galaxies positively correlate with A {sub r,} {sub SFD} for A {sub r,} {sub SFD} < 0.1, as first discovered by Yahata et al. for SDSS DR4 galaxies. Next we construct an analytical model to compute the surface density of galaxies, taking into account the contamination of their FIR emission. We adopt a log-normal probability distribution for the ratio of 100 μm and r-band luminosities of each galaxy, y ≡ (νL){sub 100} {sub μm}/(νL) {sub r}. Then we search for the mean and rms values of y that fit the observed anomaly, using the analytical model. The required values to reproduce the anomaly are roughly consistent with those measured from the stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies. Due to the limitation of our statistical modeling, we are not yet able to remove the FIR contamination of galaxies from the extinction map. Nevertheless, the agreement with the model prediction suggests that the FIR emission of galaxies is mainly responsible for the observed anomaly. Whereas the corresponding systematic error in the Galactic extinction map is 0.1-1 mmag, it is directly correlated with galaxy clustering and thus needs to be carefully examined in precision cosmology.

  10. Coupling amplified DNA from flow-sorted chromosomes to high-density SNP mapping in barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartoš Jan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flow cytometry facilitates sorting of single chromosomes and chromosome arms which can be used for targeted genome analysis. However, the recovery of microgram amounts of DNA needed for some assays requires sorting of millions of chromosomes which is laborious and time consuming. Yet, many genomic applications such as development of genetic maps or physical mapping do not require large DNA fragments. In such cases time-consuming de novo sorting can be minimized by utilizing whole-genome amplification. Results Here we report a protocol optimized in barley including amplification of DNA from only ten thousand chromosomes, which can be isolated in less than one hour. Flow-sorted chromosomes were treated with proteinase K and amplified using Phi29 multiple displacement amplification (MDA. Overnight amplification in a 20-microlitre reaction produced 3.7 – 5.7 micrograms DNA with a majority of products between 5 and 30 kb. To determine the purity of sorted fractions and potential amplification bias we used quantitative PCR for specific genes on each chromosome. To extend the analysis to a whole genome level we performed an oligonucleotide pool assay (OPA for interrogation of 1524 loci, of which 1153 loci had known genetic map positions. Analysis of unamplified genomic DNA of barley cv. Akcent using this OPA resulted in 1426 markers with present calls. Comparison with three replicates of amplified genomic DNA revealed >99% concordance. DNA samples from amplified chromosome 1H and a fraction containing chromosomes 2H – 7H were examined. In addition to loci with known map positions, 349 loci with unknown map positions were included. Based on this analysis 40 new loci were mapped to 1H. Conclusion The results indicate a significant potential of using this approach for physical mapping. Moreover, the study showed that multiple displacement amplification of flow-sorted chromosomes is highly efficient and representative which

  11. Central auditory processing during chronic tinnitus as indexed by topographical maps of the mismatch negativity obtained with the multi-feature paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Saeid; Farhadi, Mohammad; Najafi-Koopaie, Mojtaba; Darestani-Farahani, Ehsan; Mohebbi, Mehrnaz; Dengler, Reinhard; Esser, Karl-Heinz; Sadjedi, Hamed; Salamat, Behrouz; Danesh, Ali A; Lenarz, Thomas

    2013-08-21

    This study aimed to compare the neural correlates of acoustic stimulus representation in the auditory sensory memory on an automatic basis between tinnitus subjects and normal hearing (NH) controls, using topographical maps of the MMNs obtained with the multi-feature paradigm. A new and faster paradigm was adopted to look for differences between 2 groups of subjects. Twenty-eight subjects with chronic subjective idiopathic tinnitus and 33 matched healthy controls were included in the study. Brain electrical activity mapping of multi-feature MMN paradigm was recorded from 32 surface scalp electrodes. Three MMN parameters for five deviants consisting frequency, intensity, duration, location and silent gap were compared between the two groups. The MMN amplitude, latency and area under the curve over a region of interest comprising: F3, F4, Fz, FC3, FC4, FCz, and Cz were computed to provide better signal to noise ratio. These three measures could differentiate the cognitive processing disturbances in tinnitus sufferers. The MMN topographic maps revealed significant differences in amplitude and area under the curve for frequency, duration and silent gap deviants in tinnitus subjects compared to NH controls. The current study provides electrophysiological evidence supporting the theory that the pre-attentive and automatic central auditory processing is impaired in individuals with chronic tinnitus. Considering the advantages offered by the MMN paradigm used here, these data might be a useful reference point for the assessment of sensory memory in tinnitus patients and it can be applied with reliability and success in treatment monitoring.

  12. Model to estimate the sampling density for establishment of yield mapping Estimativa de densidade amostral para elaboração de mapas de produtividade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciele R. Spezia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Yield mapping represents the spatial variability concerning the features of a productive area and allows intervening on the next year production, for example, on a site-specific input application. The trial aimed at verifying the influence of a sampling density and the type of interpolator on yield mapping precision to be produced by a manual sampling of grains. This solution is usually adopted when a combine with yield monitor can not be used. An yield map was developed using data obtained from a combine equipped with yield monitor during corn harvesting. From this map, 84 sample grids were established and through three interpolators: inverse of square distance, inverse of distance and ordinary kriging, 252 yield maps were created. Then they were compared with the original one using the coefficient of relative deviation (CRD and the kappa index. The loss regarding yield mapping information increased as the sampling density decreased. Besides, it was also dependent on the interpolation method used. A multiple regression model was adjusted to the variable CRD, according to the following variables: spatial variability index and sampling density. This model aimed at aiding the farmer to define the sampling density, thus, allowing to obtain the manual yield mapping, during eventual problems in the yield monitor.O mapa de produtividade representa a variabilidade espacial das características de uma área cultivada e permite intervir na produção dos anos posteriores, na aplicação diferenciada de insumos. Este trabalho teve por objetivo verificar a influência da densidade amostral e do tipo de interpolação na exatidão dos mapas de produtividade, gerados a partir da amostragem manual de grãos, solução que pode ser adotada quando um monitor não pode ser utilizado. Um mapa de produtividade foi obtido com monitor de colheita comercial em lavoura de milho, a partir do qual foram estabelecidas 84 grades e, por meio de três interpoladores, o

  13. A high-density linkage map of the RN region in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chardon Patrick

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The porcine RN locus affects muscle glycogen content and meat quality. We previously mapped the RN locus to chromosome 15. This study describes the identification of polymorphisms for four class I and four class II markers located in the RN region. Resource families were genotyped with F-SSCP markers (fluorescent single strand conformation polymorphism and microsatellite markers. Subsequent multipoint linkage analysis revealed the order FN1-IGFBP5-S1000-S1001-IL8RB-VIL1-RN-Sw936-Sw906. The gene order is identical to the previously reported porcine RH map of the same region. The described map will facilitate positional cloning of the RN gene.

  14. Quantifying volcanic hazard at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) with uncertainty assessment: 2. Pyroclastic density current invasion maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Augusto; Bevilacqua, Andrea; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Isaia, Roberto; Aspinall, Willy P.; Bisson, Marina; Flandoli, Franco; Baxter, Peter J.; Bertagnini, Antonella; Iannuzzi, Enrico; Orsucci, Simone; Pistolesi, Marco; Rosi, Mauro; Vitale, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Campi Flegrei (CF) is an example of an active caldera containing densely populated settlements at very high risk of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). We present here an innovative method for assessing background spatial PDC hazard in a caldera setting with probabilistic invasion maps conditional on the occurrence of an explosive event. The method encompasses the probabilistic assessment of potential vent opening positions, derived in the companion paper, combined with inferences about the spatial density distribution of PDC invasion areas from a simplified flow model, informed by reconstruction of deposits from eruptions in the last 15 ka. The flow model describes the PDC kinematics and accounts for main effects of topography on flow propagation. Structured expert elicitation is used to incorporate certain sources of epistemic uncertainty, and a Monte Carlo approach is adopted to produce a set of probabilistic hazard maps for the whole CF area. Our findings show that, in case of eruption, almost the entire caldera is exposed to invasion with a mean probability of at least 5%, with peaks greater than 50% in some central areas. Some areas outside the caldera are also exposed to this danger, with mean probabilities of invasion of the order of 5-10%. Our analysis suggests that these probability estimates have location-specific uncertainties which can be substantial. The results prove to be robust with respect to alternative elicitation models and allow the influence on hazard mapping of different sources of uncertainty, and of theoretical and numerical assumptions, to be quantified.

  15. Development of admixture mapping panels for African Americans from commercial high-density SNP arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dunston Georgia M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Admixture mapping is a powerful approach for identifying genetic variants involved in human disease that exploits the unique genomic structure in recently admixed populations. To use existing published panels of ancestry-informative markers (AIMs for admixture mapping, markers have to be genotyped de novo for each admixed study sample and samples representing the ancestral parental populations. The increased availability of dense marker data on commercial chips has made it feasible to develop panels wherein the markers need not be predetermined. Results We developed two panels of AIMs (~2,000 markers each based on the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 for admixture mapping with African American samples. These two AIM panels had good map power that was higher than that of a denser panel of ~20,000 random markers as well as other published panels of AIMs. As a test case, we applied the panels in an admixture mapping study of hypertension in African Americans in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Conclusions Developing marker panels for admixture mapping from existing genome-wide genotype data offers two major advantages: (1 no de novo genotyping needs to be done, thereby saving costs, and (2 markers can be filtered for various quality measures and replacement markers (to minimize gaps can be selected at no additional cost. Panels of carefully selected AIMs have two major advantages over panels of random markers: (1 the map power from sparser panels of AIMs is higher than that of ~10-fold denser panels of random markers, and (2 clusters can be labeled based on information from the parental populations. With current technology, chip-based genome-wide genotyping is less expensive than genotyping ~20,000 random markers. The major advantage of using random markers is the absence of ascertainment effects resulting from the process of selecting markers. The ability to develop marker panels informative for ancestry from

  16. Pyroclastic density current hazard maps at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy): the effects of event scale, vent location and time forecasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Andrea; Neri, Augusto; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Isaia, Roberto; Flandoli, Franco; Bisson, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Today hundreds of thousands people live inside the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) and in the adjacent part of the city of Naples making a future eruption of such volcano an event with huge consequences. Very high risks are associated with the occurrence of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs). Mapping of background or long-term PDC hazard in the area is a great challenge due to the unknown eruption time, scale and vent location of the next event as well as the complex dynamics of the flow over the caldera topography. This is additionally complicated by the remarkable epistemic uncertainty on the eruptive record, affecting the time of past events, the location of vents as well as the PDCs areal extent estimates. First probability maps of PDC invasion were produced combining a vent-opening probability map, statistical estimates concerning the eruptive scales and a Cox-type temporal model including self-excitement effects, based on the eruptive record of the last 15 kyr. Maps were produced by using a Monte Carlo approach and adopting a simplified inundation model based on the "box model" integral approximation tested with 2D transient numerical simulations of flow dynamics. In this presentation we illustrate the independent effects of eruption scale, vent location and time of forecast of the next event. Specific focus was given to the remarkable differences between the eastern and western sectors of the caldera and their effects on the hazard maps. The analysis allowed to identify areas with elevated probabilities of flow invasion as a function of the diverse assumptions made. With the quantification of some sources of uncertainty in relation to the system, we were also able to provide mean and percentile maps of PDC hazard levels.

  17. High density SNP and SSR-based genetic maps of two independent oil palm hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ting, N.C.; Jansen, J.; Mayes, S.; Massawe, F.; Sambanthamurthi, R.; Cheng-Li Ooi, L.; Chin, C.W.; Arulandoo, X.; Seng, T.Y.; Alwee, S.S.R.S.; Ithnin, M.; Singh, R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oil palm is an important perennial oil crop with an extremely long selection cycle of 10 to 12 years. As such, any tool that speeds up its genetic improvement process, such as marker-assisted breeding is invaluable. Previously, genetic linkage maps based on AFLP, RFLP and SSR markers

  18. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-04: Tissue Segmentation-Based MR Electron Density Mapping Method for MR-Only Radiation Treatment Planning of Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, H [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lee, Y [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ruschin, M [Odette Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Karam, I [Sunnybrook Odette Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, A [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Automatically derive electron density of tissues using MR images and generate a pseudo-CT for MR-only treatment planning of brain tumours. Methods: 20 stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) patients’ T1-weighted MR images and CT images were retrospectively acquired. First, a semi-automated tissue segmentation algorithm was developed to differentiate tissues with similar MR intensities and large differences in electron densities. The method started with approximately 12 slices of manually contoured spatial regions containing sinuses and airways, then air, bone, brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and eyes were automatically segmented using edge detection and anatomical information including location, shape, tissue uniformity and relative intensity distribution. Next, soft tissues - muscle and fat were segmented based on their relative intensity histogram. Finally, intensities of voxels in each segmented tissue were mapped into their electron density range to generate pseudo-CT by linearly fitting their relative intensity histograms. Co-registered CT was used as a ground truth. The bone segmentations of pseudo-CT were compared with those of co-registered CT obtained by using a 300HU threshold. The average distances between voxels on external edges of the skull of pseudo-CT and CT in three axial, coronal and sagittal slices with the largest width of skull were calculated. The mean absolute electron density (in Hounsfield unit) difference of voxels in each segmented tissues was calculated. Results: The average of distances between voxels on external skull from pseudo-CT and CT were 0.6±1.1mm (mean±1SD). The mean absolute electron density differences for bone, brain, CSF, muscle and fat are 78±114 HU, and 21±8 HU, 14±29 HU, 57±37 HU, and 31±63 HU, respectively. Conclusion: The semi-automated MR electron density mapping technique was developed using T1-weighted MR images. The generated pseudo-CT is comparable to that of CT in terms of anatomical position of

  19. Modelling risk of tick exposure in southern Scandinavia using machine learning techniques, satellite imagery, and human population density maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Lene Jung; Korslund, L.; Kjelland, V.

    Vector-borne diseases such as Lyme disease and tick-borne encephalitis have become more common in recent decades and present a real health problem in many parts of Europe. Risk assessment, control, and prevention of these diseases require a better understanding of vector abundance as well as risk...... factors determining human exposure to ticks. There is a great need for analyses and models that can predict how vectors and their associated diseases are distributed and how this relates to high risk areas for human exposure.As a part of the ScandTick Innovation project, we surveyed ticks at approximately...... distribution (probability of presence) in southern Scandinavia. Together with the predicted distribution maps, we used human density maps to determine areas with high risk of exposure to ticks. For nymphs, the predicted distribution found corresponded well with known distributions of ticks in Scandinavia...

  20. Tools for Model Building and Optimization into Near-Atomic Resolution Electron Cryo-Microscopy Density Maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaio, F; Chiu, W

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM) has advanced dramatically to become a viable tool for high-resolution structural biology research. The ultimate outcome of a cryoEM study is an atomic model of a macromolecule or its complex with interacting partners. This chapter describes a variety of algorithms and software to build a de novo model based on the cryoEM 3D density map, to optimize the model with the best stereochemistry restraints and finally to validate the model with proper protocols. The full process of atomic structure determination from a cryoEM map is described. The tools outlined in this chapter should prove extremely valuable in revealing atomic interactions guided by cryoEM data.

  1. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation: obtaining efficiency and accuracy with in situ optimised local orbitals

    CERN Document Server

    Zuehlsdorff, Tim J; Payne, Mike C; Haynes, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    We present a solution of the full TDDFT eigenvalue equation in the linear response formalism exhibiting a linear-scaling computational complexity with system size, without relying on the simplifying Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The implementation relies on representing the occupied and unoccupied subspace with two different sets of in situ optimised localised functions, yielding a very compact and efficient representation of the transition density matrix of the excitation with the accuracy associated with a systematic basis set. The TDDFT eigenvalue equation is solved using a preconditioned conjugate-gradients algorithm that is very memory-efficient. The algorithm is validated on a test molecule and a good agreement with results obtained from standard quantum chemistry packages is found, with the preconditioner yielding a significant improvement in convergence rates. The method developed in this work is then used to reproduce experimental results of the absorption spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) i...

  2. Image of Fomalhaut Dust Ring at 350 Microns: The Relative Column Density Map Shows Pericenter-Apocenter Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, K. A.; Velusamy, T.; Dowell, C. D.; Grogan, K.; Beichman, C. A.

    2005-01-01

    We have imaged the circumstellar disk of Fomalhaut at 350 mm wavelength, using SHARC II (Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II) at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The spatial resolution of the raw images (9") has been enhanced by a factor of 3 using the HiRes deconvolution procedure. We find that at this wavelength and signal-to-noise ratio (approx.12), the observed morphology is that of a simple inclined ring (i approx. 70 deg), with little or no other apparent structure--this is the first observation that shows clearly the ring morphology of the disk. We have combined our 350 mm data with Spitzer Space Telescope images at 24, 70, and 160 mm in order to estimate the two-dimensional spatial variation of relative column density ("tau map") using our DISKFIT procedure. The tau map is based on the following physical assumptions: (1) the wavelength variation of opacity is the same throughout the disk, (2) the radial variation of dust temperature is dictated by the energy balance of individual grains in the stellar radiation field, and (3) the vertical scale height of the disk follows a power-law radial variation. The results confirm the ringlike morphology but also show that the geometric center is displaced from the star by about 8 AU and that the ring has an apocentric enhancement of approximately 14% in integrated column density. If we interpret the displacement in terms of elliptical orbital motion due to gravitational perturbation by an unseen planet, then the implied forced eccentricity is 0.06; dynamical modeling then predicts an apocentric density enhancement consistent with that inferred from the tau map.

  3. High-density linkage mapping and evolution of paralogs and orthologs in Salix and Populus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öst Torbjörn

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salix (willow and Populus (poplar are members of the Salicaceae family and they share many ecological as well as genetic and genomic characteristics. The interest of using willow for biomass production is growing, which has resulted in increased pressure on breeding of high yielding and resistant clones adapted to different environments. The main purpose of this work was to develop dense genetic linkage maps for mapping of traits related to yield and resistance in willow. We used the Populus trichocarpa genome to extract evenly spaced markers and mapped the orthologous loci in the willow genome. The marker positions in the two genomes were used to study genome evolution since the divergence of the two lineages some 45 mya. Results We constructed two linkage maps covering the 19 linkage groups in willow. The most detailed consensus map, S1, contains 495 markers with a total genetic distance of 2477 cM and an average distance of 5.0 cM between the markers. The S3 consensus map contains 221 markers and has a total genetic distance of 1793 cM and an average distance of 8.1 cM between the markers. We found high degree of synteny and gene order conservation between willow and poplar. There is however evidence for two major interchromosomal rearrangements involving poplar LG I and XVI and willow LG Ib, suggesting a fission or a fusion in one of the lineages, as well as five intrachromosomal inversions. The number of silent substitutions were three times lower (median: 0.12 between orthologs than between paralogs (median: 0.37 - 0.41. Conclusions The relatively slow rates of genomic change between willow and poplar mean that the genomic resources in poplar will be most useful in genomic research in willow, such as identifying genes underlying QTLs of important traits. Our data suggest that the whole-genome duplication occurred long before the divergence of the two genera, events which have until now been regarded as contemporary

  4. Mapping axonal density and average diameter using non-monotonic time-dependent gradient-echo MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Daniel; Cruz, Tomás L.; Jespersen, Sune N.; Shemesh, Noam

    2017-04-01

    White Matter (WM) microstructures, such as axonal density and average diameter, are crucial to the normal function of the Central Nervous System (CNS) as they are closely related with axonal conduction velocities. Conversely, disruptions of these microstructural features may result in severe neurological deficits, suggesting that their noninvasive mapping could be an important step towards diagnosing and following pathophysiology. Whereas diffusion based MRI methods have been proposed to map these features, they typically entail the application of powerful gradients, which are rarely available in the clinic, or extremely long acquisition schemes to extract information from parameter-intensive models. In this study, we suggest that simple and time-efficient multi-gradient-echo (MGE) MRI can be used to extract the axon density from susceptibility-driven non-monotonic decay in the time-dependent signal. We show, both theoretically and with simulations, that a non-monotonic signal decay will occur for multi-compartmental microstructures - such as axons and extra-axonal spaces, which were here used as a simple model for the microstructure - and that, for axons parallel to the main magnetic field, the axonal density can be extracted. We then experimentally demonstrate in ex-vivo rat spinal cords that its different tracts - characterized by different microstructures - can be clearly contrasted using the MGE-derived maps. When the quantitative results are compared against ground-truth histology, they reflect the axonal fraction (though with a bias, as evident from Bland-Altman analysis). As well, the extra-axonal fraction can be estimated. The results suggest that our model is oversimplified, yet at the same time evidencing a potential and usefulness of the approach to map underlying microstructures using a simple and time-efficient MRI sequence. We further show that a simple general-linear-model can predict the average axonal diameters from the four model parameters, and

  5. The detection of "hot regions" in the geography of science: A visualization approach by using density maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bornmann, Lutz

    2011-01-01

    Spatial scientometrics has attracted a lot of attention in the very recent past. The visualization methods (density maps) presented in this paper allow for an analysis revealing regions of excellence around the world using computer programs that are freely available. Based on Scopus and Web of Science data, field-specific and field-overlapping scientific excellence can be identified in broader regions (worldwide or for a specific continent) where high quality papers (highly cited papers or papers published in Nature or Science) were published.

  6. Fast and accurate conversion of atomic models into electron density maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos O.S. Sorzano

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available New image processing methodologies and algorithms have greatly contributed to the signi cant progress in three-dimensional electron microscopy (3DEM of biological complexes we have seen over the last decades. Naturally, the availability of accurate procedures for the objective testing of new algorithms is a crucial requirement for the further advancement of the eld. A good and accepted testing work ow involves the generation of realistic 3DEM-like maps of biological macromolecules from which some measure of ground truth can be derived, ideally because their 3D atomic structure is already known. In this work we propose a very accurate generation of maps using atomic form factors for electron scattering. We thoroughly review current approaches in the eld, quantitatively demonstrating the bene ts of the new methodology. Additionally, we study a concrete example of the use of this approach for hypothesis testing in 3D Electron Microscopy.

  7. 基于传统土壤图的土壤—环境关系获取及推理制图研究%Knowledge of Soil-landscape Model Obtain from a Soil Map and Mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄魏; 罗云; 汪善勤; 陈家赢; 韩宗伟; 祁大成

    2016-01-01

    conventional soil maps and terrain data extracted were data of soil type and environment factors,based on which,a soil environment relationship model was established using the spatial data mining method,and finally,reliability and accuracy of the mapping was validated by field sampling. The Nieshui river basin in Huajiahe Town,Hongan County, Huanggang City,Hubei Province was selected for case study. The conventional soil maps of the study area plotted during the Second National Soil Survey were used to demonstrate processes of the research. The proposed method consists of five major steps. 1)Select seven environmental factors that were closely related to the process of pedogenesis and establish a geographic information system(GIS)database,which should contain a modified soil parent material map and data of terrain factors(elevation,slope,aspect,plan curvature,profile curvature and topographic wetness index)extracted from 10 m resolution Digital Elevation Model(DEM). 2)Extract 1410 typical sample data of soil types and environment factors by following the principle of frequency distribution,so as to reduce noises and abnormal data that would often occur in traditional soil mapping,because traditional soil mapping used to be done manually and contain some hard-to-reflect knowledge( or noise)of the experts' about proper relationship models. It is,therefore,essential to have the data properly pretreated. 3)Retrieve detailed expertise implied in the soil map product,using the spatial data mining techniques. Compared with the other algorithms,the decision tree algorithm is the most suitable one for extracting and expressing knowledge of the soil-environment model. So,the See5.0 decision tree algorithm is selected to perform spatial data mining and hence,obtain knowledge of soil and environment relationships. 4)Predict soil spatial distribution through inferring and mapping in Soil-Land Inference Model (SoLIM)based on the soil-environment knowledge and environment data obtained. So

  8. A comparison of Spectral Angle Mapper and Artificial Neural Network classifiers combined with Landsat TM imagery analysis for obtaining burnt area mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petropoulos, George P; Vadrevu, Krishna Prasad; Xanthopoulos, Gavriil; Karantounias, George; Scholze, Marko

    2010-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing, with its unique synoptic coverage capabilities, can provide accurate and immediately valuable information on fire analysis and post-fire assessment, including estimation of burnt areas. In this study the potential for burnt area mapping of the combined use of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) classifiers with Landsat TM satellite imagery was evaluated in a Mediterranean setting. As a case study one of the most catastrophic forest fires, which occurred near the capital of Greece during the summer of 2007, was used. The accuracy of the two algorithms in delineating the burnt area from the Landsat TM imagery, acquired shortly after the fire suppression, was determined by the classification accuracy results of the produced thematic maps. In addition, the derived burnt area estimates from the two classifiers were compared with independent estimates available for the study region, obtained from the analysis of higher spatial resolution satellite data. In terms of the overall classification accuracy, ANN outperformed (overall accuracy 90.29%, Kappa coefficient 0.878) the SAM classifier (overall accuracy 83.82%, Kappa coefficient 0.795). Total burnt area estimates from the two classifiers were found also to be in close agreement with the other available estimates for the study region, with a mean absolute percentage difference of ≈ 1% for ANN and ≈ 6.5% for SAM. The study demonstrates the potential of the examined here algorithms in detecting burnt areas in a typical Mediterranean setting.

  9. A Comparison of Spectral Angle Mapper and Artificial Neural Network Classifiers Combined with Landsat TM Imagery Analysis for Obtaining Burnt Area Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Scholze

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Satellite remote sensing, with its unique synoptic coverage capabilities, can provide accurate and immediately valuable information on fire analysis and post-fire assessment, including estimation of burnt areas. In this study the potential for burnt area mapping of the combined use of Artificial Neural Network (ANN and Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM classifiers with Landsat TM satellite imagery was evaluated in a Mediterranean setting. As a case study one of the most catastrophic forest fires, which occurred near the capital of Greece during the summer of 2007, was used. The accuracy of the two algorithms in delineating the burnt area from the Landsat TM imagery, acquired shortly after the fire suppression, was determined by the classification accuracy results of the produced thematic maps. In addition, the derived burnt area estimates from the two classifiers were compared with independent estimates available for the study region, obtained from the analysis of higher spatial resolution satellite data. In terms of the overall classification accuracy, ANN outperformed (overall accuracy 90.29%, Kappa coefficient 0.878 the SAM classifier (overall accuracy 83.82%, Kappa coefficient 0.795. Total burnt area estimates from the two classifiers were found also to be in close agreement with the other available estimates for the study region, with a mean absolute percentage difference of ~1% for ANN and ~6.5% for SAM. The study demonstrates the potential of the examined here algorithms in detecting burnt areas in a typical Mediterranean setting.

  10. A high-density, SNP-based consensus map of tetraploid wheat as a bridge to integrate durum and bread wheat genomics and breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consensus linkage maps are important tools in crop genomics. We have assembled a high-density tetraploid wheat consensus map by integrating 13 datasets from independent biparental populations involving durum wheat cultivars (Triticum turgidum ssp. durum), cultivated emmer (T. turgidum ssp. dicoccum...

  11. A high density linkage map of the ancestral diploid strawberry F. iinumae using SNP markers from the ISTRAW90 array and GBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragaria iinumae is recognized as an ancestor of the octoploid strawberry species, including the cultivated strawberry, Fragaria ×ananassa. Here we report the construction of the first high density linkage map for F. iinumae. The map is based on two high-throughput techniques of single nucleotide p...

  12. Mapping brucellosis increases relative to elk density using hierarchical Bayesian models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Paul C.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Scurlock, Brandon M.; Edwards, William H.; Brennan, Angela; Ebinger, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between host density and parasite transmission is central to the effectiveness of many disease management strategies. Few studies, however, have empirically estimated this relationship particularly in large mammals. We applied hierarchical Bayesian methods to a 19-year dataset of over 6400 brucellosis tests of adult female elk (Cervus elaphus) in northwestern Wyoming. Management captures that occurred from January to March were over two times more likely to be seropositive than hunted elk that were killed in September to December, while accounting for site and year effects. Areas with supplemental feeding grounds for elk had higher seroprevalence in 1991 than other regions, but by 2009 many areas distant from the feeding grounds were of comparable seroprevalence. The increases in brucellosis seroprevalence were correlated with elk densities at the elk management unit, or hunt area, scale (mean 2070 km2; range = [95–10237]). The data, however, could not differentiate among linear and non-linear effects of host density. Therefore, control efforts that focus on reducing elk densities at a broad spatial scale were only weakly supported. Additional research on how a few, large groups within a region may be driving disease dynamics is needed for more targeted and effective management interventions. Brucellosis appears to be expanding its range into new regions and elk populations, which is likely to further complicate the United States brucellosis eradication program. This study is an example of how the dynamics of host populations can affect their ability to serve as disease reservoirs.

  13. Mapping brucellosis increases relative to elk density using hierarchical Bayesian models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Cross

    Full Text Available The relationship between host density and parasite transmission is central to the effectiveness of many disease management strategies. Few studies, however, have empirically estimated this relationship particularly in large mammals. We applied hierarchical Bayesian methods to a 19-year dataset of over 6400 brucellosis tests of adult female elk (Cervus elaphus in northwestern Wyoming. Management captures that occurred from January to March were over two times more likely to be seropositive than hunted elk that were killed in September to December, while accounting for site and year effects. Areas with supplemental feeding grounds for elk had higher seroprevalence in 1991 than other regions, but by 2009 many areas distant from the feeding grounds were of comparable seroprevalence. The increases in brucellosis seroprevalence were correlated with elk densities at the elk management unit, or hunt area, scale (mean 2070 km(2; range = [95-10237]. The data, however, could not differentiate among linear and non-linear effects of host density. Therefore, control efforts that focus on reducing elk densities at a broad spatial scale were only weakly supported. Additional research on how a few, large groups within a region may be driving disease dynamics is needed for more targeted and effective management interventions. Brucellosis appears to be expanding its range into new regions and elk populations, which is likely to further complicate the United States brucellosis eradication program. This study is an example of how the dynamics of host populations can affect their ability to serve as disease reservoirs.

  14. Whole brain analysis of postmortem density changes of grey and white matter on computed tomography by statistical parametric mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Yuichi; Mori, Hiroshi; Katsube, Takashi; Kitagaki, Hajime [Shimane University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Izumo-shi, Shimane (Japan); Kanayama, Hidekazu; Tada, Keiji; Yamamoto, Yasushi [Shimane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Izumo-shi, Shimane (Japan); Takeshita, Haruo [Shimane University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Legal Medicine, Izumo-shi, Shimane (Japan); Kawakami, Kazunori [Fujifilm RI Pharma, Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    This study examined the usefulness of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for investigating postmortem changes on brain computed tomography (CT). This retrospective study included 128 patients (23 - 100 years old) without cerebral abnormalities who underwent unenhanced brain CT before and after death. The antemortem CT (AMCT) scans and postmortem CT (PMCT) scans were spatially normalized using our original brain CT template, and postmortem changes of CT values (in Hounsfield units; HU) were analysed by the SPM technique. Compared with AMCT scans, 58.6 % and 98.4 % of PMCT scans showed loss of the cerebral sulci and an unclear grey matter (GM)-white matter (WM) interface, respectively. SPM analysis revealed a significant decrease in cortical GM density within 70 min after death on PMCT scans, suggesting cytotoxic brain oedema. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in the density of the WM, lenticular nucleus and thalamus more than 120 min after death. The SPM technique demonstrated typical postmortem changes on brain CT scans, and revealed that the unclear GM-WM interface on early PMCT scans is caused by a rapid decrease in cortical GM density combined with a delayed increase in WM density. SPM may be useful for assessment of whole brain postmortem changes. (orig.)

  15. Processing of A New Digital Orthoimage Map of The Martian Western Hemisphere Using Data Obtained From The Mars Orbiter Camera At A Resolution of 256 Pixel/deg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wählisch, M.; Niedermaier, G.; van Gasselt, S.; Scholten, F.; Wewel, F.; Roatsch, T.; Matz, K.-D.; Jaumann, R.

    We present a new digital orthoimage map of Mars using data obtained from the CCD line scanner Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) of the Mars Global Surveyor Mis- sion (MGS) [1,2]. The map covers the Mars surface from 0 to 180 West and from 60 South to 60 North with the MDIM2 resolution of 256 pixel/degree and size. Image data processing has been performed using multiple programs, developed by DLR, Technical University of Berlin [3], JPL, and the USGS. 4,339 Context and 183 Geodesy images [2] were included. After radiometric corrections, the images were Mars referenced [4], geometrically corrected [5] and orthoprojected using a global Martian Digital Terrain Model (DTM) with a resolution of 64 pixel/degree, developed at DLR and based on MGS Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data [6]. To elim- inate major differences in brightness between the individual images of the mosaics, high- and low-pass filter processing techniques were applied for each image. After filtering, the images were mosaicked without registering or using block adjustment techniques in order to improve the geometric quality. It turns out that the accuracy of the navigation data has such a good quality that the orthoimages fit very well to each other. When merging the MOC mosaic with the MOLA data using IHS- trans- formation, we recognized very good correspondence between these two datasets. We create a topographic image map of the Coprates region (MC­18) adding contour lines derived from the global DTM to the mosaic. These maps are used for geological and morphological interpretations in order to review and improve our current Viking-based knowledge about the Martian surface. References: [1] www.mssss.com, [2] Caplinger, M. and M. Malin, "The Mars Or- biter Camera Geodesy Campaign, JGR, in press, [3] Scholten, F., Vol XXXI, Part B2, Wien 1996, p.351-356, [4] naïf.jpl.nasa.gov, [5] R.L.Kirk. et al. (2001), "Geometric Calibration of the Mars Orbiter Cameras and Coalignment with Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter

  16. Vertical density contrast and mapping of basement, Conrad and Moho morphologies through 2D spectral analysis of gravity data in and around Odisha, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arbind; S. Roy, P. N.; Das, L. K.

    2016-07-01

    Power spectrum analysis of Complete Bouguer Anomaly (CBA) map of Eastern Ghat Mobile Belt (EGMB) and its surroundings in India through Two Dimensional (2D) spectral analysis has provided estimates of the ensemble average depths for the density discontinuities which represent crustal inhomogeneities. The spectral analysis method has helped to estimate the depths of a perturbing body sources which are obtained from the negative slopes of the linear relationship between the logarithmic power spectrum and the wave-numbers of the gravity field. The detailed analysis reveals three horizontal discontinuities (i) Phanerozoic sediment thickness (ii) Basement depth and (iii) Conrad discontinuity. The average thickness of Phanerozoic sediments is estimated to be 3 km whereas depth of basement and Conrad discontinuity are at 7 km and 14.5 km respectively. Additionally Mohorovicic discontinuity also estimated at a depth of 32.8 km in the study region.

  17. Computer controlled performance mapping of thermionic converters: effect of collector, guard-ring potential imbalances on the observed collector current-density, voltage characteristics and limited range performance map of an etched-rhenium, niobium planar converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manista, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of collector, guard-ring potential imbalance on the observed collector-current-density J, collector-to-emitter voltage V characteristic was evaluated in a planar, fixed-space, guard-ringed thermionic converter. The J,V characteristic was swept in a period of 15 msec by a variable load. A computerized data acquisition system recorded test parameters. The results indicate minimal distortion of the J,V curve in the power output quadrant for the nominal guard-ring circuit configuration. Considerable distortion, along with a lowering of the ignited-mode striking voltage, was observed for the configuration with the emitter shorted to the guard ring. A limited-range performance map of an etched-rhenium, niobium, planar converter was obtained by using an improved computer program for the data acquisition system.

  18. First Volcanological-Probabilistic Pyroclastic Density Current and Fallout Hazard Map for Campi Flegrei and Somma Vesuvius Volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrolorenzo, G.; Pappalardo, L.; Troise, C.; Panizza, A.; de Natale, G.

    2005-05-01

    Integrated volcanological-probabilistic approaches has been used in order to simulate pyroclastic density currents and fallout and produce hazard maps for Campi Flegrei and Somma Vesuvius areas. On the basis of the analyses of all types of pyroclastic flows, surges, secondary pyroclastic density currents and fallout events occurred in the volcanological history of the two volcanic areas and the evaluation of probability for each type of events, matrixs of input parameters for a numerical simulation have been performed. The multi-dimensional input matrixs include the main controlling parameters of the pyroclasts transport and deposition dispersion, as well as the set of possible eruptive vents used in the simulation program. Probabilistic hazard maps provide of each points of campanian area, the yearly probability to be interested by a given event with a given intensity and resulting demage. Probability of a few events in one thousand years are typical of most areas around the volcanoes whitin a range of ca 10 km, including Neaples. Results provide constrains for the emergency plans in Neapolitan area.

  19. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation: Obtaining efficiency and accuracy with in situ optimised local orbitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuehlsdorff, T. J., E-mail: tjz21@cam.ac.uk; Payne, M. C. [Cavendish Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Hine, N. D. M. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Haynes, P. D. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Thomas Young Centre for Theory and Simulation of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-28

    We present a solution of the full time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) eigenvalue equation in the linear response formalism exhibiting a linear-scaling computational complexity with system size, without relying on the simplifying Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The implementation relies on representing the occupied and unoccupied subspaces with two different sets of in situ optimised localised functions, yielding a very compact and efficient representation of the transition density matrix of the excitation with the accuracy associated with a systematic basis set. The TDDFT eigenvalue equation is solved using a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm that is very memory-efficient. The algorithm is validated on a small test molecule and a good agreement with results obtained from standard quantum chemistry packages is found, with the preconditioner yielding a significant improvement in convergence rates. The method developed in this work is then used to reproduce experimental results of the absorption spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll in an organic solvent, where it is demonstrated that the TDA fails to reproduce the main features of the low energy spectrum, while the full TDDFT equation yields results in good qualitative agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the need for explicitly including parts of the solvent into the TDDFT calculations is highlighted, making the treatment of large system sizes necessary that are well within reach of the capabilities of the algorithm introduced here. Finally, the linear-scaling properties of the algorithm are demonstrated by computing the lowest excitation energy of bacteriochlorophyll in solution. The largest systems considered in this work are of the same order of magnitude as a variety of widely studied pigment-protein complexes, opening up the possibility of studying their properties without having to resort to any semiclassical approximations to parts of the protein environment.

  20. Linear-scaling time-dependent density-functional theory beyond the Tamm-Dancoff approximation: Obtaining efficiency and accuracy with in situ optimised local orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuehlsdorff, T. J.; Hine, N. D. M.; Payne, M. C.; Haynes, P. D.

    2015-11-01

    We present a solution of the full time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) eigenvalue equation in the linear response formalism exhibiting a linear-scaling computational complexity with system size, without relying on the simplifying Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The implementation relies on representing the occupied and unoccupied subspaces with two different sets of in situ optimised localised functions, yielding a very compact and efficient representation of the transition density matrix of the excitation with the accuracy associated with a systematic basis set. The TDDFT eigenvalue equation is solved using a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm that is very memory-efficient. The algorithm is validated on a small test molecule and a good agreement with results obtained from standard quantum chemistry packages is found, with the preconditioner yielding a significant improvement in convergence rates. The method developed in this work is then used to reproduce experimental results of the absorption spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll in an organic solvent, where it is demonstrated that the TDA fails to reproduce the main features of the low energy spectrum, while the full TDDFT equation yields results in good qualitative agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the need for explicitly including parts of the solvent into the TDDFT calculations is highlighted, making the treatment of large system sizes necessary that are well within reach of the capabilities of the algorithm introduced here. Finally, the linear-scaling properties of the algorithm are demonstrated by computing the lowest excitation energy of bacteriochlorophyll in solution. The largest systems considered in this work are of the same order of magnitude as a variety of widely studied pigment-protein complexes, opening up the possibility of studying their properties without having to resort to any semiclassical approximations to parts of the protein environment.

  1. Results of Current Density Distribution Mapping in PEM Fuel Cells Dependent on Operation Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew A. Styczynski

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents in situ measurements of a newly developed current density measurement system for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC. While the functional principle and technical evaluation of the measurement system were presented in a previous paper, this paper analyzes the influence of various operation parameters, including multiple start-stop operation, at the anode, cathode and cooling locations on the distribution and long-term development of the current density. The system was operated for 500 h over two years with long periods of inactivity between measurements. The measurement results are evaluated and provide additional information on how to optimize the operation modes of fuel cells, including the start and stop of such systems as well as the water balance.

  2. High-density three-dimensional mapping of internal strain by tracking microstructural features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Masakazu [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)], E-mail: m-kobayashi@pse.tut.ac.jp; Toda, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Yuji; Ohgaki, Tomomi [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Uesugi, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Wilkinson, David S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Kobayashi, Toshiro [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Aoki, Yoshimitsu; Nakazawa, Mitsuru [Department of Information Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology, Koto-Ku, Tokyo 135-8548 (Japan)

    2008-06-15

    The three-dimensional (3-D) strain map is useful to elucidate the relationships between microstructures and locally caused deformation and fracture. However, a robust tracking method, which enables error-free tracking in synchrotron radiation computed tomography (SR-CT) images with >10 000 microstructural features, is not currently available. In this study, a model sample was subjected to a tensile test and scanned by the SR-CT technique in order to develop a new tracking method. The developed tracking methods indicated a high tracking ratio and tracking success ratio of nearly 100% in a wide strain range, which included the assumed strain in a practical experiment. It was confirmed that tracking errors produce an incorrect strain distribution in 3-D strain mapping. This study verified the validity of the developed tracking method. The application of this method to high-resolution SR-CT images will make measurement and visualization of the strain distribution possible in three dimensions in bulk materials.

  3. Collinearity Analysis and High-Density Genetic Mapping of the Wheat Powdery Mildew Resistance Gene Pm40 in PI 672538.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shengfu; Ma, Lixia; Fatima, Syeda Akash; Yang, Jiezhi; Chen, Wanquan; Liu, Taiguo; Hu, Yuting; Li, Qing; Guo, Jingwei; Zhang, Min; Lei, Li; Li, Xin; Tang, Shengwen; Luo, Peigao

    2016-01-01

    The wheat powdery mildew resistance gene Pm40, which is located on chromosomal arm 7BS, is effective against nearly all prevalent races of Blumeria graminis f. sp tritici (Bgt) in China and is carried by the common wheat germplasm PI 672538. A set of the F1, F2 and F2:3 populations from the cross of the resistant PI 672538 with the susceptible line L1034 were used to conduct genetic analysis of powdery mildew resistance and construct a high-density linkage map of the Pm40 gene. We constructed a high-density linkage genetic map with a total length of 6.18 cM and average spacing between markers of 0.48 cM.Pm40 is flanked by Xwmc335 and BF291338 at genetic distances of 0.58 cM and 0.26 cM, respectively, in deletion bin C-7BS-1-0.27. Comparative genomic analysis based on EST-STS markers established a high level of collinearity of the Pm40 genomic region with a 1.09-Mbp genomic region on Brachypodium chromosome 3, a 1.16-Mbp genomic region on rice chromosome 8, and a 1.62-Mbp genomic region on sorghum chromosome 7. We further anchored the Pm40 target intervals to the wheat genome sequence. A putative linear index of 85 wheat contigs containing 97 genes on 7BS was constructed. In total, 9 genes could be considered as candidates for the resistances to powdery mildew in the target genomic regions, which encoded proteins that were involved in the plant defense and response to pathogen attack. These results will facilitate the development of new markers for map-based cloning and marker-assisted selection of Pm40 in wheat breeding programs.

  4. Collinearity Analysis and High-Density Genetic Mapping of the Wheat Powdery Mildew Resistance Gene Pm40 in PI 672538

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Syeda Akash; Yang, Jiezhi; Chen, Wanquan; Liu, Taiguo; Hu, Yuting; Li, Qing; Guo, Jingwei; Zhang, Min; Lei, Li; Li, Xin; Tang, Shengwen; Luo, Peigao

    2016-01-01

    The wheat powdery mildew resistance gene Pm40, which is located on chromosomal arm 7BS, is effective against nearly all prevalent races of Blumeria graminis f. sp tritici (Bgt) in China and is carried by the common wheat germplasm PI 672538. A set of the F1, F2 and F2:3 populations from the cross of the resistant PI 672538 with the susceptible line L1034 were used to conduct genetic analysis of powdery mildew resistance and construct a high-density linkage map of the Pm40 gene. We constructed a high-density linkage genetic map with a total length of 6.18 cM and average spacing between markers of 0.48 cM.Pm40 is flanked by Xwmc335 and BF291338 at genetic distances of 0.58 cM and 0.26 cM, respectively, in deletion bin C-7BS-1-0.27. Comparative genomic analysis based on EST-STS markers established a high level of collinearity of the Pm40 genomic region with a 1.09-Mbp genomic region on Brachypodium chromosome 3, a 1.16-Mbp genomic region on rice chromosome 8, and a 1.62-Mbp genomic region on sorghum chromosome 7. We further anchored the Pm40 target intervals to the wheat genome sequence. A putative linear index of 85 wheat contigs containing 97 genes on 7BS was constructed. In total, 9 genes could be considered as candidates for the resistances to powdery mildew in the target genomic regions, which encoded proteins that were involved in the plant defense and response to pathogen attack. These results will facilitate the development of new markers for map-based cloning and marker-assisted selection of Pm40 in wheat breeding programs. PMID:27755575

  5. Updated sesame genome assembly and fine mapping of plant height and seed coat color QTLs using a new high-density genetic map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linhai; Xia, Qiuju; Zhang, Yanxin; Zhu, Xiaodong; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Li, Donghua; Ni, Xuemei; Gao, Yuan; Xiang, Haitao; Wei, Xin; Yu, Jingyin; Quan, Zhiwu; Zhang, Xiurong

    2016-01-05

    Sesame is an important high-quality oil seed crop. The sesame genome was de novo sequenced and assembled in 2014 (version 1.0); however, the number of anchored pseudomolecules was higher than the chromosome number (2n = 2x = 26) due to the lack of a high-density genetic map with 13 linkage groups. We resequenced a permanent population consisting of 430 recombinant inbred lines and constructed a genetic map to improve the sesame genome assembly. We successfully anchored 327 scaffolds onto 13 pseudomolecules. The new genome assembly (version 2.0) included 97.5 % of the scaffolds greater than 150 kb in size present in assembly version 1.0 and increased the total pseudomolecule length from 233.7 to 258.4 Mb with 94.3 % of the genome assembled and 97.2 % of the predicted gene models anchored. Based on the new genome assembly, a bin map including 1,522 bins spanning 1090.99 cM was generated and used to identified 41 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for sesame plant height and 9 for seed coat color. The plant height-related QTLs explained 3-24 % the phenotypic variation (mean value, 8 %), and 29 of them were detected in at least two field trials. Two major loci (qPH-8.2 and qPH-3.3) that contributed 23 and 18 % of the plant height were located in 350 and 928-kb spaces on Chr8 and Chr3, respectively. qPH-3.3, is predicted to be responsible for the semi-dwarf sesame plant phenotype and contains 102 candidate genes. This is the first report of a sesame semi-dwarf locus and provides an interesting opportunity for a plant architecture study of the sesame. For the sesame seed coat color, the QTLs of the color spaces L*, a*, and b* were detected with contribution rates of 3-46 %. qSCb-4.1 contributed approximately 39 % of the b* value and was located on Chr4 in a 199.9-kb space. A list of 32 candidate genes for the locus, including a predicted black seed coat-related gene, was determined by screening the newly anchored genome. This study offers a high-density

  6. Utilization of α-olefins obtained by pyrolysis of waste high density polyethylene to synthesize α-olefin-succinic-anhydride based cold flow improvers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Norbert MISKOLCZI; Richard SAGI; László BARTHA; Lívia FORCEK

    2009-01-01

    A new route of utilization of α-olefin rich hydrocarbon fractions obtained by waste polymer pyrolysis was investigated. α-olefin-succinic-anhydride intermediate-based pour point depressant additives for diesel fuel were synthesized, in which reactions needed α-olefins were obtained by pyrolysis of waste high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Fraction of α-olefins was produced by the de-polymerization of plastic waste in a tube reactor at 500℃ in the absence of catalysts and air. C17~22 range of mixtures of olefins and paraffins were separated for synthesis and then, these hydrocarbons were reacted with maleic-anhydride (MA) for formation of α-olefin-succinic-anhydride intermediates. The olefin-rich hydrocarbon fraction contained approximately 60% of olefins, including 90%~95% α-olefins. Other intermediates were produced in the same way by using commercial C20 α-olefin instead of C17~22 olefin mixture. The two different experimental intermediates with number average molecular weights of 1850g/mol and 1760g/mol were reacted with different alcohols: 1-butanol, 1-hexanol, 1-octanol, i-butanol, and c-hexanol to produce their ester derivatives. The synthesized ten experimental pour point depressants were added in different concentrations to conventional diesel fuel, which had no other additive content before. The structure and efficiency of experimental additives were followed by different standardized and non-standardized methods. Results showed that the experimental additives on the basis of the product of waste pyrolysis were able to decrease not only the pour but also the cloud point and cold filter plugging point (CFPP) of diesel fuel, whose effects could be observed even if the concentration of additives was low. Furthermore, all additives had anti-wear and anti-friction effects in diesel fuel.

  7. Genome survey and high-density genetic map construction provide genomic and genetic resources for the Pacific White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Yuan, Jianbo; Li, Fuhua; Chen, Xiaohan; Zhao, Yongzhen; Huang, Long; Zheng, Hongkun; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-10-27

    The Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei is the dominant crustacean species in global seafood mariculture. Understanding the genome and genetic architecture is useful for deciphering complex traits and accelerating the breeding program in shrimp. In this study, a genome survey was conducted and a high-density linkage map was constructed using a next-generation sequencing approach. The genome survey was used to identify preliminary genome characteristics and to generate a rough reference for linkage map construction. De novo SNP discovery resulted in 25,140 polymorphic markers. A total of 6,359 high-quality markers were selected for linkage map construction based on marker coverage among individuals and read depths. For the linkage map, a total of 6,146 markers spanning 4,271.43 cM were mapped to 44 sex-averaged linkage groups, with an average marker distance of 0.7 cM. An integration analysis linked 5,885 genome scaffolds and 1,504 BAC clones to the linkage map. Based on the high-density linkage map, several QTLs for body weight and body length were detected. This high-density genetic linkage map reveals basic genomic architecture and will be useful for comparative genomics research, genome assembly and genetic improvement of L. vannamei and other penaeid shrimp species.

  8. Park Facilities, Boundaries were determined from parcel mapping lines & site specific items, such as shelter locations, were obtained by field GPS observation, Published in 2010, Not Applicable scale, Chippewa County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Park Facilities dataset current as of 2010. Boundaries were determined from parcel mapping lines & site specific items, such as shelter locations, were obtained...

  9. Scalp current density mapping in the analysis of mismatch negativity paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giard, Marie-Hélène; Besle, Julien; Aguera, Pierre-Emmanuel; Gomot, Marie; Bertrand, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    MMN oddball paradigms are frequently used to assess auditory (dys)functions in clinical populations, or the influence of various factors (such as drugs and alcohol) on auditory processing. A widely used procedure is to compare the MMN responses between two groups of subjects (e.g. patients vs controls), or between experimental conditions in the same group. To correctly interpret these comparisons, it is important to take into account the multiple brain generators that produce the MMN response. To disentangle the different components of the MMN, we describe the advantages of scalp current density (SCD)-or surface Laplacian-computation for ERP analysis. We provide a short conceptual and mathematical description of SCDs, describe their properties, and illustrate with examples from published studies how they can benefit MMN analysis. We conclude with practical tips on how to correctly use and interpret SCDs in this context.

  10. Photoemission and density functional theory study of Ir(111); energy band gap mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletikosić, I; Kralj, M; Sokčević, D; Brako, R; Lazić, P; Pervan, P

    2010-04-07

    We have performed combined angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the electronic structure of the Ir(111) surface, with the focus on the existence of energy band gaps. The investigation was motivated by the experimental results suggesting Ir(111) as an ideal support for the growth of weakly bonded graphene. Therefore, our prime interest was electronic structure around the [Formula: see text] symmetry point. In accordance with DFT calculations, ARPES has shown a wide energy band gap with the shape of a parallelogram centred around the [Formula: see text] point. Within the gap three surface states were identified; one just below the Fermi level and two spin-orbit split surface states at the bottom of the gap.

  11. Mapping Metal-Enriched High Velocity Clouds to Very Low HI Column Densities

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, C W; Masiero, J R; Churchill, Chris; Charlton, Jane

    2001-01-01

    Our galaxy is the nearest known quasar absorption line system, and it uniquely provides us with an opportunity to probe multiple lines of sight through the same galaxy. This is essential for our interpretations of the complex kinematic profiles seen in the MgII absorption due to lines of sight through intermediate redshift galaxies. The Milky Way halo has never been probed for high velocity clouds below the 21-cm detection threshold of N(HI)~10^18 cm-2. Through a survey of MgII absorption looking toward the brightest AGNs and quasars, it will be possible to reach down a few orders of magnitude in HI column density. The analogs to the high velocity components of the MgII absorption profiles due to intermediate redshift galaxies should be seen. We describe a program we are undertaking, and present some preliminary findings.

  12. High density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I.; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E.M.; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Summary Using the Immunochip custom single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, designed for dense genotyping of 186 genome wide association study (GWAS) confirmed loci we analysed 11,475 rheumatoid arthritis cases of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. The data were combined in meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n=2,363) and controls (n=17,872). We identified fourteen novel loci; nine were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and 5 specifically in anti-citrillunated peptide antibody positive disease, bringing the number of confirmed European ancestry rheumatoid arthritis loci to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at six loci and association to low frequency variants (minor allele frequency <0.05) at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analysis of the data generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations. PMID:23143596

  13. Abnormal pain processing in chronic tension-type headache: a high-density EEG brain mapping study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchgreitz, L.; Egsgaard, L.L.; Jensen, R.

    2008-01-01

    Central sensitization caused by prolonged nociceptive input from muscles is considered to play an important role for chronification of tension-type headache. In the present study we used a new high-density EEG brain mapping technique to investigate spatiotemporal aspects of brain activity...... in response to muscle pain in 19 patients with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) and 19 healthy, age- and sex-matched controls. Intramuscular electrical stimuli (single and train of five pulses delivered at 2 Hz) were applied to the trapezius muscle and somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded...... versus tonic muscle pain: P = 0.001; baseline versus post-tonic muscle pain: P = 0.002) and fifth (baseline versus tonic muscle pain: P = 0.04; baseline versus post-tonic muscle pain: P = 0.04) stimulus in the train. In contrast, there were no differences between the conditions in patients. No consistent...

  14. The chronoarchitecture of human sexual desire: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigue, Stephanie; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco

    2008-11-01

    Recent neuroimaging research suggests that human sexual desire (SD) recruits both the limbic system and higher-order cognitive brain areas. Because of the temporal limitation of this technique, the chronoarchitecture of SD remains however unresolved. Here, we investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of SD by combining a behavioral desire decision task with high-density visual event-related potential (VEP) recordings and brain source estimations. VEPs were recorded from thirteen healthy participants when presented with pictures from two different stimulus categories (i.e., high and low desirability). In agreement with the literature, behavioral results showed that participants were faster to rate non-desired stimuli than desired stimuli (p=0.028). Electrophysiological results extended these behavioral data. Group-averaged VEPs peaked at 90 to 140 ms (P100), at 142 to 220 ms (N200), and at 222 to 360 ms (P300). Desired stimuli (DS) were distinguished from non-desired stimuli (NDS) over the N200 period, notably from 142 to 187 ms. Over this time period, DS processing was characterized by a significant scalp potential field. Although both conditions (DS and NDS) showed the recruitment of the occipito-temporal region (including the extrastriate body area, EBA), LAURA source estimation of the DS scalp potential field revealed a more right-lateralized current source density maximum in the posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) extending to the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). The recruitment of STS and TPJ for desired stimuli indicates that these brain areas, known to be respectively involved in social cognition, attention, integration of body-related information and self-processing, play a crucial role for the coding of desirability of visual sexual human stimuli within the first 200 ms after stimulus onset. These findings support the hypothesis that complex cognitive processing for desire occurs much faster than previously thought and open new perspectives with

  15. A high-density SNP Map of sunflower derived from RAD-sequencing facilitating fine-mapping of the rust resistance gene R12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Zahirul I; Gong, Li; Hulke, Brent S; Pegadaraju, Venkatramana; Song, Qijian; Schultz, Quentin; Qi, Lili

    2014-01-01

    A high-resolution genetic map of sunflower was constructed by integrating SNP data from three F2 mapping populations (HA 89/RHA 464, B-line/RHA 464, and CR 29/RHA 468). The consensus map spanned a total length of 1443.84 cM, and consisted of 5,019 SNP markers derived from RAD tag sequencing and 118 publicly available SSR markers distributed in 17 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number of sunflower. The maximum interval between markers in the consensus map is 12.37 cM and the average distance is 0.28 cM between adjacent markers. Despite a few short-distance inversions in marker order, the consensus map showed high levels of collinearity among individual maps with an average Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of 0.972 across the genome. The order of the SSR markers on the consensus map was also in agreement with the order of the individual map and with previously published sunflower maps. Three individual and one consensus maps revealed the uneven distribution of markers across the genome. Additionally, we performed fine mapping and marker validation of the rust resistance gene R12, providing closely linked SNP markers for marker-assisted selection of this gene in sunflower breeding programs. This high resolution consensus map will serve as a valuable tool to the sunflower community for studying marker-trait association of important agronomic traits, marker assisted breeding, map-based gene cloning, and comparative mapping.

  16. The Effects of Vent Location, Event Scale, and Time Forecasts on Pyroclastic Density Current Hazard Maps at Campi Flegrei Caldera (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bevilacqua

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new method for producing long-term hazard maps for pyroclastic density currents (PDC originating at Campi Flegrei caldera. Such method is based on a doubly stochastic approach and is able to combine the uncertainty assessments on the spatial location of the volcanic vent, the size of the flow and the expected time of such an event. The results are obtained by using a Monte Carlo approach and adopting a simplified invasion model based on the box model integral approximation. Temporal assessments are modeled through a Cox-type process including self-excitement effects, based on the eruptive record of the last 15 kyr. Mean and percentile maps of PDC invasion probability are produced, exploring their sensitivity to some sources of uncertainty and to the effects of the dependence between PDC scales and the caldera sector where they originated. Conditional maps representative of PDC originating inside limited zones of the caldera, or of PDC with a limited range of scales are also produced. Finally, the effect of assuming different time windows for the hazard estimates is explored, also including the potential occurrence of a sequence of multiple events. Assuming that the last eruption of Monte Nuovo (A.D. 1538 marked the beginning of a new epoch of activity similar to the previous ones, results of the statistical analysis indicate a mean probability of PDC invasion above 5% in the next 50 years on almost the entire caldera (with a probability peak of ~25% in the central part of the caldera. In contrast, probability values reduce by a factor of about 3 if the entire eruptive record is considered over the last 15 kyr, i.e., including both eruptive epochs and quiescent periods.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HI4PI spectra and column density maps (HI4PI team+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hi4PI Collaboration; Ben Bekhti, N.; Floeer, L.; Keller, R.; Kerp, J.; Lenz, D.; Winkel, B.; Bailin, J.; Calabretta, M. R.; Dedes, L.; Ford, H. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Haud, U.; Janowiecki, S.; Kalberla, P. M. W.; Lockman, F. J.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Murphy, T.; Nakanishi, H.; Pisano, D. J.; Staveley-Smith, L.

    2016-09-01

    The HI4PI data release comprises 21-cm neutral atomic hydrogen data of the Milky Way (-600km/s0°; -470km/sHI4PI covers the full 4-pi sky. Spectral data is provided in three forms: (1) Standard FITS data cubes, for the full sky in both, Equatorial (J2000) and Galactic coordinates, each in four different map projections, AIT, CAR, MOL, and SFL; see world-coordinate-system, WCS, references: Greisen & Calabretta, 2002A&A...395.1061G, Calabretta & Greisen, 2002A&A...395.1077C, Greisen et al., 2006A&A...446..747G (2) Smaller FITS data cubes, each having a size of about 20x20 sq.deg. For convenience, we provide four different map projections, CAR, SFL, SIN, and TAN (again see WCS references). Note, size in longitude is 20° in absolute coordinates for CAR projection, and 20° true-angular size for SFL, SIN, and TAN projections. Again, Equatorial and Galactic coordinate systems are provided. (3) FITS binary tables containing lists of spectra sampled on a HealPIX grid (nside=1024, Galactic coordinates, Ring indexing scheme, Gorski et al., 2005ApJ...622..759G). To make handling of the data easier, the table is split into smaller files. Each of these contains spectra belonging to one of the 192 base/parent pixels of the nside=4 pixelization. For convenience, the binary tables also contain EQ2000 and Galactic coordinate positions for each individual spectrum, as well as the associated HealPIX index. Furthermore, we provide the full-sky HI column density distribution, both, in a (1) HealPIX-grid binary table (nside=1024, Galactic coordinates, Ring indexing scheme), and (2) Standard FITS 2D images in four map projections, AIT, CAR, MOL, and SFL. Various velocity intervals were applied to calculate NHI. Equatorial and Galactic coordinate systems are provided. (16 data files).

  18. High-density interspecific genetic linkage mapping provides insights into genomic incompatibility between channel catfish and blue catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S; Li, Y; Qin, Z; Geng, X; Bao, L; Kaltenboeck, L; Kucuktas, H; Dunham, R; Liu, Z

    2016-02-01

    Catfish is the leading aquaculture species in the United States. The interspecific hybrid catfish produced by mating female channel catfish with male blue catfish outperform both of their parent species in a number of traits. However, mass production of the hybrids has been difficult because of reproductive isolation. Investigations of genome structure and organization of the hybrids provide insights into the genetic basis for maintenance of species divergence in the face of gene flow, thereby helping develop strategies for introgression and efficient production of the hybrids for aquaculture. In this study, we constructed a high-density genetic linkage map using the hybrid catfish system with the catfish 250K SNP array. A total of 26,238 SNPs were mapped to 29 linkage groups, with 12,776 unique marker positions. The linkage map spans approximately 3240 cM with an average intermarker distance of 0.25 cM. A fraction of markers (986 of 12,776) exhibited significant deviation from the expected Mendelian ratio of segregation, and they were clustered in major genomic blocks across 15 LGs, most notably LG9 and LG15. The distorted markers exhibited significant bias for maternal alleles among the backcross progenies, suggesting strong selection against the blue catfish alleles. The clustering of distorted markers within genomic blocks should lend insights into speciation as marked by incompatibilities between the two species. Such findings should also have profound implications for understanding the genomic evolution of closely related species as well as the introgression of hybrid production programs in aquaculture.

  19. Visual sensory processing deficits in patients with bipolar disorder revealed through high-density electrical mapping.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yeap, Sherlyn

    2009-11-01

    BACKGROUND: Etiological commonalities are apparent between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. For example, it is becoming clear that both populations show similar electrophysiological deficits in the auditory domain. Recent studies have also shown robust visual sensory processing deficits in patients with schizophrenia using the event-related potential technique, but this has not been formally tested in those with bipolar disorder. Our goal here was to assess whether early visual sensory processing in patients with bipolar disorder, as indexed by decreased amplitude of the P1 component of the visual evoked potential (VEP), would show a similar deficit to that seen in those with schizophrenia. Since the P1 deficit has already been established as an endophenotype in schizophrenia, a finding of commonality between disorders would raise the possibility that it represents a measure of common genetic liability. METHODS: We visually presented isolated-check stimuli to euthymic patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and age-matched healthy controls within a simple go\\/no-go task and recorded VEPs using high-density (72-channel) electroencephalography. RESULTS: The P1 VEP amplitude was substantially reduced in patients with bipolar disorder, with an effect size of f = 0.56 (large according to Cohen\\'s criteria). LIMITATIONS: Our sample size was relatively small and as such, did not allow for an examination of potential relations between the physiologic measures and clinical measures. CONCLUSION: This reduction in P1 amplitude among patients with bipolar disorder represents a dysfunction in early visual processing that is highly similar to that found repeatedly in patients with schizophrenia and their healthy first-degree relatives. Since the P1 deficit has been related to susceptibility genes for schizophrenia, our results raise the possibility that the deficit may in fact be more broadly related to the development of psychosis and that it merits further

  20. Depression and suicide publication analysis, using density equalizing mapping and output benchmarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B H Vogelzang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depression is a major cause of suicide worldwide. This association has been reflected by numerous scientific publications reporting about studies to this theme. There is currently no overall evaluation of the global research activities in this field. Aim: The aim of the current study was to analyze long-term developments and recent research trends in this area. Material and Methods: We searched the Web of Science databases developed by the Thompson Institute of Scientific Information for items concerning depression and suicide published between 1900 and 2007 and analyzed the results using scientometric methods and density-equalizing calculations. Results: We found that publications on this topic increased dramatically in the time period 1990 to 2007. The comparison of the different Journals showed that the Archives of General Psychiatry had the highest average citation rate (more than twice that of any other Journal. When comparing authors, we found that not all the authors who had high h-indexes cooperated much with other authors. The analysis of countries who published papers on this topic showed that they published papers in relation to their Gross Domestic Product and Purchasing Power Parity. Among the G8 countries, Russia had the highest male suicide rate in 1999 (more than twice that of any of the other G8 countries, despite having published least papers and cooperating least with other countries among the G8. Conclusion: We conclude that, although there has been an increase in publications on this topic from 1990 to 2006, this increase is of a lower gradient than that of psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Brickworx builds recurrent RNA and DNA structural motifs into medium- and low-resolution electron-density maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojnowski, Grzegorz, E-mail: gchojnowski@genesilico.pl [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Waleń, Tomasz [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); University of Warsaw, Banacha 2, 02-097 Warsaw (Poland); Piątkowski, Paweł; Potrzebowski, Wojciech [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Bujnicki, Janusz M. [International Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Trojdena 4, 02-109 Warsaw (Poland); Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2015-03-01

    A computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules is presented. Brickworx is a computer program that builds crystal structure models of nucleic acid molecules using recurrent motifs including double-stranded helices. In a first step, the program searches for electron-density peaks that may correspond to phosphate groups; it may also take into account phosphate-group positions provided by the user. Subsequently, comparing the three-dimensional patterns of the P atoms with a database of nucleic acid fragments, it finds the matching positions of the double-stranded helical motifs (A-RNA or B-DNA) in the unit cell. If the target structure is RNA, the helical fragments are further extended with recurrent RNA motifs from a fragment library that contains single-stranded segments. Finally, the matched motifs are merged and refined in real space to find the most likely conformations, including a fit of the sequence to the electron-density map. The Brickworx program is available for download and as a web server at http://iimcb.genesilico.pl/brickworx.

  2. DNA conformational transitions inferred from re-evaluation of m|Fo| - D|Fc| electron-density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunami, Tomoko; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2017-07-01

    Conformational flexibility of DNA plays important roles in biological processes such as transcriptional regulation and DNA packaging etc. To understand the mechanisms of these processes, it is important to analyse when, where and how DNA shows conformational variations. Recent analyses have indicated that conventional refinement methods do not always provide accurate models of crystallographic heterogeneities and that some information on polymorphism has been overlooked in previous crystallographic studies. In the present study, the m|Fo| - D|Fc| electron-density maps of double-helical DNA crystal structures were calculated at a resolution equal to or better than 1.5 Å and potential conformational transitions were found in 27% of DNA phosphates. Detailed analyses of the m|Fo| - D|Fc| peaks indicated that some of these unassigned densities correspond to ZI ↔ ZII or A/B → BI conformational transitions. A relationship was also found between ZI/ZII transitions and metal coordination in Z-DNA from the detected peaks. The present study highlights that frequent transitions of phosphate backbones occur even in crystals and that some of these transitions are affected by the local molecular environment.

  3. A high-density SNP Map of sunflower derived from RAD-sequencing facilitating fine-mapping of the rust resistance gene R12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahirul I Talukder

    Full Text Available A high-resolution genetic map of sunflower was constructed by integrating SNP data from three F2 mapping populations (HA 89/RHA 464, B-line/RHA 464, and CR 29/RHA 468. The consensus map spanned a total length of 1443.84 cM, and consisted of 5,019 SNP markers derived from RAD tag sequencing and 118 publicly available SSR markers distributed in 17 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number of sunflower. The maximum interval between markers in the consensus map is 12.37 cM and the average distance is 0.28 cM between adjacent markers. Despite a few short-distance inversions in marker order, the consensus map showed high levels of collinearity among individual maps with an average Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of 0.972 across the genome. The order of the SSR markers on the consensus map was also in agreement with the order of the individual map and with previously published sunflower maps. Three individual and one consensus maps revealed the uneven distribution of markers across the genome. Additionally, we performed fine mapping and marker validation of the rust resistance gene R12, providing closely linked SNP markers for marker-assisted selection of this gene in sunflower breeding programs. This high resolution consensus map will serve as a valuable tool to the sunflower community for studying marker-trait association of important agronomic traits, marker assisted breeding, map-based gene cloning, and comparative mapping.

  4. Is It Possible To Obtain Coupled Cluster Quality Energies at near Density Functional Theory Cost? Domain-Based Local Pair Natural Orbital Coupled Cluster vs Modern Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Dimitrios G; Neese, Frank

    2015-09-08

    The recently developed domain-based local pair natural orbital coupled cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) delivers results that are closely approaching those of the parent canonical coupled cluster method at a small fraction of the computational cost. A recent extended benchmark study established that, depending on the three main truncation thresholds, it is possible to approach the canonical CCSD(T) results within 1 kJ (default setting, TightPNO), 1 kcal/mol (default setting, NormalPNO), and 2-3 kcal (default setting, LoosePNO). Although thresholds for calculations with TightPNO are 2-4 times slower than those based on NormalPNO thresholds, they are still many orders of magnitude faster than canonical CCSD(T) calculations, even for small and medium sized molecules where there is little locality. The computational effort for the coupled cluster step scales nearly linearly with system size. Since, in many instances, the coupled cluster step in DLPNO-CCSD(T) is cheaper or at least not much more expensive than the preceding Hartree-Fock calculation, it is useful to compare the method against modern density functional theory (DFT), which requires an effort comparable to that of Hartree-Fock theory (at least if Hartree-Fock exchange is part of the functional definition). Double hybrid density functionals (DHDF's) even require a MP2-like step. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the cost vs accuracy ratio of DLPNO-CCSD(T) against modern DFT (including the PBE, B3LYP, M06-2X, B2PLYP, and B2GP-PLYP functionals and, where applicable, their van der Waals corrected counterparts). To eliminate any possible bias in favor of DLPNO-CCSD(T), we have chosen established benchmark sets that were specifically proposed for evaluating DFT functionals. It is demonstrated that DLPNO-CCSD(T) with any of the three default thresholds is more accurate than any of the DFT functionals. Furthermore, using the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set and

  5. Electron-boson spectral density function of correlated multiband systems obtained from optical data: Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and LiFeAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jungseek

    2016-03-31

    We introduce an approximate method which can be used to simulate the optical conductivity data of correlated multiband systems for normal and superconducting cases by taking advantage of a reversed process in comparison to a usual optical data analysis, which has been used to extract the electron-boson spectral density function from measured optical spectra of single-band systems, like cuprates. We applied this method to optical conductivity data of two multiband pnictide systems (Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 and LiFeAs) and obtained the electron-boson spectral density functions. The obtained electron-boson spectral density consists of a sharp mode and a broad background. The obtained spectral density functions of the multiband systems show similar properties as those of cuprates in several aspects. We expect that our method helps to reveal the nature of strong correlations in the multiband pnictide superconductors.

  6. Recurrence quantification analysis applied to spatiotemporal pattern analysis in high-density mapping of human atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeemering, Stef; Bonizzi, Pietro; Maesen, Bart; Peeters, Ralf; Schotten, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Spatiotemporal complexity of atrial fibrillation (AF) patterns is often quantified by annotated intracardiac contact mapping. We introduce a new approach that applies recurrence plot (RP) construction followed by recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) to epicardial atrial electrograms, recorded with a high-density grid of electrodes. In 32 patients with no history of AF (aAF, n=11), paroxysmal AF (PAF, n=12) and persistent AF (persAF, n=9), RPs were constructed using a phase space electrogram embedding dimension equal to the estimated AF cycle length. Spatial information was incorporated by 1) averaging the recurrence over all electrodes, and 2) by applying principal component analysis (PCA) to the matrix of embedded electrograms and selecting the first principal component as a representation of spatial diversity. Standard RQA parameters were computed on the constructed RPs and correlated to the number of fibrillation waves per AF cycle (NW). Averaged RP RQA parameters showed no correlation with NW. Correlations improved when applying PCA, with maximum correlation achieved between RP threshold and NW (RR1%, r=0.68, p <; 0.001) and RP determinism (DET, r=-0.64, p <; 0.001). All studied RQA parameters based on the PCA RP were able to discriminate between persAF and aAF/PAF (DET persAF 0.40 ± 0.11 vs. 0.59 ± 0.14/0.62 ± 0.16, p <; 0.01). RP construction and RQA combined with PCA provide a quick and reliable tool to visualize dynamical behaviour and to assess the complexity of contact mapping patterns in AF.

  7. The development of audiovisual multisensory integration across childhood and early adolescence: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandwein, Alice B; Foxe, John J; Russo, Natalie N; Altschuler, Ted S; Gomes, Hilary; Molholm, Sophie

    2011-05-01

    The integration of multisensory information is essential to forming meaningful representations of the environment. Adults benefit from related multisensory stimuli but the extent to which the ability to optimally integrate multisensory inputs for functional purposes is present in children has not been extensively examined. Using a cross-sectional approach, high-density electrical mapping of event-related potentials (ERPs) was combined with behavioral measures to characterize neurodevelopmental changes in basic audiovisual (AV) integration from middle childhood through early adulthood. The data indicated a gradual fine-tuning of multisensory facilitation of performance on an AV simple reaction time task (as indexed by race model violation), which reaches mature levels by about 14 years of age. They also revealed a systematic relationship between age and the brain processes underlying multisensory integration (MSI) in the time frame of the auditory N1 ERP component (∼ 120 ms). A significant positive correlation between behavioral and neurophysiological measures of MSI suggested that the underlying brain processes contributed to the fine-tuning of multisensory facilitation of behavior that was observed over middle childhood. These findings are consistent with protracted plasticity in a dynamic system and provide a starting point from which future studies can begin to examine the developmental course of multisensory processing in clinical populations.

  8. Genetic dissection of yield and its component traits using high-density composite map of wheat chromosome 3A: bridging gaps between QTLs and underlying genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earlier we identified wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) chromosome 3A as a major determinant of grain yield and its component traits. In the present study, a high-density genetic linkage map of 81 chromosome 3A-specific markers was developed to increase the precision of previously identified yield compon...

  9. Emission considering self-absorption of OH to simultaneously obtain the OH density and gas temperature: validation, non-equilibrium effects and limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yanjun; Nayak, Gaurav; Oinuma, Gaku; Ding, Yanjun; Peng, Zhimin; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2017-09-01

    The measurement of absolute densities of ubiquitous OH radicals and gas temperatures in water containing plasmas has recently drawn a lot of attention. In this paper, we extend the self-absorption model introduced in Du et al 2016 Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 25 04LT02 with a description of the excited state by a superposition of two Boltzmann distributions to take the non-thermal rotational distribution of the excited state into account. This technique is applied to a diffuse He + H2O RF discharge and it is shown that in addition to the determination of the ground state OH density and rotational temperature, the properties of the excited state OH(A) can also be simultaneously determined. A model of the steady-state distribution of the hot and cold group density of OH(A) is able to describe the dependence of the rotational population distributions of the excited state as a function of the water concentration. The method is also applied to a filamentary Ar + H2O DBD. While the non-homogeneous nature of the DBD leads to complications, the production of OH(A) by multiple production mechanisms leading to a complex nascent rotational population distribution causes the fitting procedure of the emission spectrum (with self-absorption) to break down.

  10. Mobile brain/body imaging (MoBI): High-density electrical mapping of inhibitory processes during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Pierfilippo; Butler, John S; Green, Jason M; Snyder, Adam C; Foxe, John J

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of acquiring high-density event-related brain potential (ERP) recordings during treadmill walking in human subjects. The work builds upon recent studies testing the applicability of real-world tasks while obtaining electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. Participants performed a response inhibition GO/NOGO task - designed to evoke a P3 component for correct response inhibitions and an error-related negativity (ERN) for incorrect commission errors - while speed of walking was experimentally manipulated. Robust P3 and ERN components were obtained under all experimental conditions - while participants were sitting, walking at moderate speed (2.4 km/hour), or walking rapidly (5 km/hour). Signal-to-noise ratios were remarkably similar across conditions, pointing to the feasibility of high-fidelity ERP recordings under relatively vigorous activity regimens. There is considerable research and clinical motivation to obtain high quality neurophysiological measures under more naturalistic environmental settings such as these. Strong links between cognitive load and gait abnormalities are seen in a number of clinical populations and these MoBI technologies provide highly promising methods for gaining insights into the underlying pathophysiology.

  11. A high-density SNP-based linkage map of the chicken genome reveals sequence features correlated with recombination rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenen, M.A.M.; Wahlberg, O.; Foglio, M.; Cheng, H.H.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Besnier, F.; Lathrop, A.; Muir, W.M.; Wong, G.K.; Gut, I.; Andersson, L.

    2009-01-01

    The resolution of the chicken consensus linkage map has been dramatically improved in this study by genotyping 12,945 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on three existing mapping populations in chicken: the Wageningen (WU), East Lansing (EL), and Uppsala (UPP) mapping populations. As many as 859

  12. High-density genetic map construction and QTLs analysis of grain yield-related traits in sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) based on RAD-Seq techonology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kun; Liu, Hongyan; Yang, Minmin; Tao, Ye; Ma, Huihui; Wu, Wenxiong; Zuo, Yang; Zhao, Yingzhong

    2014-10-10

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum L., 2n = 26) is an important oilseed crop with an estimated genome size of 369 Mb. The genetic basis, including the number and locations of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of sesame grain yield and quality remain poorly understood, due in part to the lack of reliable markers and genetic maps. Here we report on the construction of a hitherto most high-density genetic map of sesame using the restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (RAD-seq) combined with 89 PCR markers, and the identification of grain yield-related QTLs using a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. In total, 3,769 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers were identified from RAD-seq, and 89 polymorphic PCR markers were identified including 44 expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs), 10 genomic-SSRs and 35 Insertion-Deletion markers (InDels). The final map included 1,230 markers distributed on 14 linkage groups (LGs) and was 844.46 cM in length with an average of 0.69 cM between adjacent markers. Using this map and RIL population, we detected 13 QTLs on 7 LGs and 17 QTLs on 10 LGs for seven grain yield-related traits by the multiple interval mapping (MIM) and the mixed linear composite interval mapping (MCIM), respectively. Three major QTLs had been identified using MIM with R2 > 10.0% or MCIM with ha 2 > 5.0%. Two co-localized QTL groups were identified that partially explained the correlations among five yield-related traits. Three thousand eight hundred and four pairs of new DNA markers including SNPs and InDels were developed by RAD-seq, and a so far most high-density genetic map was constructed based on these markers in combination with SSR markers. Several grain yield-related QTLs had been identified using this population and genetic map. We report here the first QTL mapping of yield-related traits with a high-density genetic map using a RIL population in sesame. Results of this study solidified the basis for studying important agricultural

  13. Dynamical Mapping of Anopheles darlingi Densities in a Residual Malaria Transmission Area of French Guiana by Using Remote Sensing and Meteorological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adde, Antoine; Roux, Emmanuel; Mangeas, Morgan; Dessay, Nadine; Nacher, Mathieu; Dusfour, Isabelle; Girod, Romain; Briolant, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Local variation in the density of Anopheles mosquitoes and the risk of exposure to bites are essential to explain the spatial and temporal heterogeneities in the transmission of malaria. Vector distribution is driven by environmental factors. Based on variables derived from satellite imagery and meteorological observations, this study aimed to dynamically model and map the densities of Anopheles darlingi in the municipality of Saint-Georges de l’Oyapock (French Guiana). Longitudinal sampling sessions of An. darlingi densities were conducted between September 2012 and October 2014. Landscape and meteorological data were collected and processed to extract a panel of variables that were potentially related to An. darlingi ecology. Based on these data, a robust methodology was formed to estimate a statistical predictive model of the spatial-temporal variations in the densities of An. darlingi in Saint-Georges de l’Oyapock. The final cross-validated model integrated two landscape variables—dense forest surface and built surface—together with four meteorological variables related to rainfall, evapotranspiration, and the minimal and maximal temperatures. Extrapolation of the model allowed the generation of predictive weekly maps of An. darlingi densities at a resolution of 10-m. Our results supported the use of satellite imagery and meteorological data to predict malaria vector densities. Such fine-scale modeling approach might be a useful tool for health authorities to plan control strategies and social communication in a cost-effective, targeted, and timely manner. PMID:27749938

  14. Genetic dissection of yield and its component traits using high-density composite map of wheat chromosome 3A: bridging gaps between QTLs and underlying genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Rustgi

    Full Text Available Earlier we identified wheat (Triticum aestivum L. chromosome 3A as a major determinant of grain yield and its component traits. In the present study, a high-density genetic linkage map of 81 chromosome 3A-specific markers was developed to increase the precision of previously identified yield component QTLs, and to map QTLs for biomass-related traits. Many of the previously identified QTLs for yield and its component traits were confirmed and were localized to narrower intervals. Four novel QTLs one each for shoot biomass (Xcfa2262-Xbcd366, total biomass (wPt2740-Xcfa2076, kernels/spike (KPS (Xwmc664-Xbarc67, and Pseudocercosporella induced lodging (PsIL were also detected. The major QTLs identified for grain yield (GY, KPS, grain volume weight (GVWT and spikes per square meter (SPSM respectively explained 23.2%, 24.2%, 20.5% and 20.2% of the phenotypic variation. Comparison of the genetic map with the integrated physical map allowed estimation of recombination frequency in the regions of interest and suggested that QTLs for grain yield detected in the marker intervals Xcdo549-Xbarc310 and Xpsp3047-Xbarc356 reside in the high-recombination regions, thus should be amenable to map-based cloning. On the other hand, QTLs for KPS and SPSM flanked by markers Xwmc664 and Xwmc489 mapped in the low-recombination region thus are not suitable for map-based cloning. Comparisons with the rice (Oryza sativa L. genomic DNA sequence identified 11 candidate genes (CGs for yield and yield related QTLs of which chromosomal location of two (CKX2 and GID2-like was confirmed using wheat aneuploids. This study provides necessary information to perform high-resolution mapping for map-based cloning and for CG-based cloning of yield QTLs.

  15. High-density genetic maps for loci involved in nuclear male sterility (NMS1) and sporophytic self-incompatibility (S-locus) in chicory (Cichorium intybus L., Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Lucy; Blassiau, Christelle; Mörchen, Monika; Cadalen, Thierry; Poiret, Matthieu; Hendriks, Theo; Quillet, Marie-Christine

    2013-08-01

    High-density genetic maps were constructed for loci involved in nuclear male sterility (NMS1-locus) and sporophytic self-incompatibility (S-locus) in chicory (Cichorium intybus L.). The mapping population consisted of 389 F1' individuals derived from a cross between two plants, K28 (male-sterile) and K59 (pollen-fertile), both heterozygous at the S-locus. This F1' mapping population segregated for both male sterility (MS) and strong self-incompatibility (SI) phenotypes. Phenotyping F1' individuals for MS allowed us to map the NMS1-locus to linkage group (LG) 5, while controlled diallel and factorial crosses to identify compatible/incompatible phenotypes mapped the S-locus to LG2. To increase the density of markers around these loci, bulked segregant analysis was used. Bulks and parental plants K28 and K59 were screened using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, with a complete set of 256 primer combinations of EcoRI-ANN and MseI-CNN. A total of 31,000 fragments were generated, of which 2,350 showed polymorphism between K59 and K28. Thirteen AFLP markers were identified close to the NMS1-locus and six in the vicinity of the S-locus. From these AFLP markers, eight were transformed into sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers and of these five showed co-dominant polymorphism. The chromosomal regions containing the NMS1-locus and the S-locus were each confined to a region of 0.8 cM. In addition, we mapped genes encoding proteins similar to S-receptor kinase, the female determinant of sporophytic SI in the Brasicaceae, and also markers in the vicinity of the putative S-locus of sunflower, but none of these genes or markers mapped close to the chicory S-locus.

  16. High-density linkage map construction and mapping of seed trait QTLs in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) using Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Subodh; Gupta, Shefali; Bandhiwal, Nitesh; Kumar, Tapan; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-12-03

    This study reports the use of Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) for large-scale SNP discovery and simultaneous genotyping of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of an intra-specific mapping population of chickpea contrasting for seed traits. A total of 119,672 raw SNPs were discovered, which after stringent filtering revealed 3,977 high quality SNPs of which 39.5% were present in genic regions. Comparative analysis using physically mapped marker loci revealed a higher degree of synteny with Medicago in comparison to soybean. The SNP genotyping data was utilized to construct one of the most saturated intra-specific genetic linkage maps of chickpea having 3,363 mapped positions including 3,228 SNPs on 8 linkage groups spanning 1006.98 cM at an average inter marker distance of 0.33 cM. The map was utilized to identify 20 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) associated with seed traits accounting for phenotypic variations ranging from 9.97% to 29.71%. Analysis of the genomic sequence corresponding to five robust QTLs led to the identification of 684 putative candidate genes whose expression profiling revealed that 101 genes exhibited seed specific expression. The integrated approach utilizing the identified QTLs along with the available genome and transcriptome could serve as a platform for candidate gene identification for molecular breeding of chickpea.

  17. Morphology and gas sensing characteristics of density-controlled CuO nanostructures obtained by varying the oxygen partial pressure during growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongjin; Jin, Changhyun; Noh, Youngwook; Park, Seokhyun; Choi, Sun-Woo

    2016-07-01

    By exerting different O2 partial pressures (0, 20, 40, and 60 sccm) onto copper substrates, we discovered that the growth parameter, namely, the O2 flow rate, affects the degree of nucleation, diameter, length, and crystalline quality of CuO nanowires (NWs). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to analyze the evolution of the morphological and the microstructural changes in the CuO nanostructures. The formation of a Cu2O interlayer between the Cu and the CuO layers could be adjusted by controlling more precisely the O2 flow rate. In addition, the reducing (H2S) and the oxidizing (O2, NO2, and SO2) gas sensing performances of these O2-assisted CuO NWs were compared with those of CuO NWs grown in static air. The response to the reducing H2S of the sensors based on CuO NWs grown using O2 at 40 sccm showed a higher electrical change and faster response and recovery times than the sensors based on CuO NWs grown using lower O2 flow rates, including the ones grown in static air and/or used for sensing oxidizing gases (O2, NO2, and SO2) did. On the basis of their growth and their gas-sensing applications, the possible mechanisms characteristic of the density-controlled CuO NWs grown using various O2 partial pressures are discussed.

  18. Performance potential of low-defect density silicon thin-film solar cells obtained by electron beam evaporation and laser crystallisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim K. H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A few microns thick silicon films on glass coated with a dielectric intermediate layer can be crystallised by a single pass of a line-focused diode laser beam. Under favorable process conditions relatively large linear grains with low defect density are formed. Most grain boundaries are defect-free low-energy twin-boundaries. Boron-doped laser crystallised films are processed into solar cells by diffusing an emitter from a phosphorous spin-on-dopant source, measuring up to 539 mV open-circuit voltage prior to metallisation. After applying a point-contact metallisation the best cell achieves 7.8% energy conversion efficiency, open-circuit voltage of 526 mV and short-circuit current of 26 mA/cm2. The efficiency is significantly limited by a low fill-factor of 56% due to the simplified metallisation approach. The internal quantum efficiency of laser crystallised cells is consistent with low front surface recombination. By improving cell metallisation and enhancing light-trapping the efficiencies of above 13% can be achieved.

  19. Superior critical current density obtained in MgB2 bulks via employing carbon-coated boron and minor Cu addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Junming; Liu, Yongchang; Ma, Zongqing; Shahriar Al Hossain, M.; Xin, Ying; Jin, Jianxun

    2016-09-01

    High performance Cu doped MgB2 bulks were prepared by an in-situ method with carbon-coated amorphous boron as precursor. It was found that the usage of carbon-coated boron in present work leads to the formation of uniformly refined MgB2 grains, as well as a high level of homogeneous carbon doping in the MgB2 samples, which significantly enhance the Jc in both Cu doped and undoped bulks compared to MgB2 bulks with normal amorphous boron precursor. Moreover, minor Cu can service as activator, and thus facilitates the growth of MgB2 grains and improves crystallinity and grain connectivity, which can bring about the excellent critical current density (Jc) at self fields and low fields (the best values are 7 × 105 A/cm2 at self fields, and 1 × 105 A/cm2 at 2 T, 20 K, respectively). Simultaneously, minor Cu addition can reduce the amount of MgO impurity significantly, also contributing to the improvement of Jc at low fields. Our work suggests that Cu-activated sintering combined with employment of carbon-coated amorphous boron as precursor could be a promising technique to produce practical MgB2 bulks or wires with excellent Jc on an industrial scale.

  20. Scanning micro-Hall probe mapping of magnetic flux distributions and current densities in YBa2Cu3O7 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, W.; Heinrich, B.; Zhou, HU; Fife, A. A.; Cragg, A. R.; Grant, P. D.

    1995-01-01

    Mapping of the magnetic flux density B(sub z) (perpendicular to the film plane) for a YBa2Cu3O7 thin-film sample was carried out using a scanning micro-Hall probe. The sheet magnetization and sheet current densities were calculated from the B(sub z) distributions. From the known sheet magnetization, the tangential (B(sub x,y)) and normal components of the flux density B were calculated in the vicinity of the film. It was found that the sheet current density was mostly determined by 2B(sub x,y)/d, where d is the film thickness. The evolution of flux penetration as a function of applied field will be shown.

  1. Scanning micro-Hall probe mapping of magnetic flux distributions and current densities in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, W.; Heinrich, B. [Simon Fraser Univ., British Columbia (Canada); Zhou, H. [CTF Systems, Inc., British Columbia (Canada)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Mapping of the magnetic flux density B{sub z} (perpendicular to the film plane) for a YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} thin-film sample was carried out using a scanning micro-Hall probe. The sheet magnetization and sheet current densities were calculated from the B{sub z} distributions. From the known sheet magnetization, the tangential (B{sub x,y}) and normal components of the flux density B were calculated in the vicinity of the film. It was found that the sheet current density was mostly determined by 2B{sub x,y}/d, where d is the film thickness. The evolution of flux penetration as a function of applied field will be shown.

  2. An ultra-high-density map as a community resource for discerning the genetic basis of quantitative traits in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we generated a linkage map containing 1,151,856 high quality SNPs between Mo17 and B73, which were verified in the maize intermated B73'×'Mo17 (IBM) Syn10 population. This resource is an excellent complement to existing maize genetic maps available in an online database (iPlant, http:...

  3. High-dynamic-range extinction mapping of infrared dark clouds: Dependence of density variance with sonic Mach number in molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kainulainen, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    Measuring the mass distribution of infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) over the wide dynamic range of their column densities is a fundamental obstacle in determining the initial conditions of high-mass star formation and star cluster formation. We present a new technique to derive high-dynamic-range, arcsecond-scale resolution column density data for IRDCs and demonstrate the potential of such data in measuring the density variance - sonic Mach number relation in molecular clouds. We combine near-infrared data from the UKIDSS/Galactic Plane Survey with mid-infrared data from the Spitzer/GLIMPSE survey to derive dust extinction maps for a sample of ten IRDCs. We then examine the linewidths of the IRDCs using 13CO line emission data from the FCRAO/Galactic Ring Survey and derive a column density - sonic Mach number relation for them. For comparison, we also examine the relation in a sample of nearby molecular clouds. The presented column density mapping technique provides a very capable, temperature independent tool f...

  4. A comparison of conventional maximum intensity projection with a new depth-specific topographic mapping technique in the CT analysis of proximal tibial subchondral bone density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, James D. [University of Saskatchewan, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); University of British Columbia, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kontulainen, Saija A. [University of Saskatchewan, College of Kinesiology, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Masri, Bassam A.; Wilson, David R. [University of British Columbia, Department of Orthopaedics, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2010-09-15

    The objective was to identify subchondral bone density differences between normal and osteoarthritic (OA) proximal tibiae using computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry (CT-OAM) and computed tomography topographic mapping of subchondral density (CT-TOMASD). Sixteen intact cadaver knees from ten donors (8 male:2 female; mean age:77.8, SD:7.4 years) were categorized as normal (n = 10) or OA (n = 6) based upon CT reconstructions. CT-OAM assessed maximum subchondral bone mineral density (BMD). CT-TOMASD assessed average subchondral BMD across three layers (0-2.5, 2.5-5 and 5-10 mm) measured in relation to depth from the subchondral surface. Regional analyses of CT-OAM and CT-TOMASD included: medial BMD, lateral BMD, and average BMD of a 10-mm diameter area that searched each medial and lateral plateau for the highest ''focal'' density present within each knee. Compared with normal knees, both CT-OAM and CT-TOMASD demonstrated an average of 17% greater whole medial compartment density in OA knees (p < 0.016). CT-OAM did not distinguish focal density differences between OA and normal knees (p > 0.05). CT-TOMASD focal region analyses revealed an average of 24% greater density in the 0- to 2.5-mm layer (p = 0.003) and 36% greater density in the 2.5- to 5-mm layer (p = 0.034) in OA knees. Both CT-OAM and TOMASD identified higher medial compartment density in OA tibiae compared with normal tibiae. In addition, CT-TOMASD indicated greater focal density differences between normal and OA knees with increased depth from the subchondral surface. Depth-specific density analyses may help identify and quantify small changes in subchondral BMD associated with OA disease onset and progression. (orig.)

  5. High-density physical mapping of a 3-Mb region in Xp22.3 and refined localization of the gene for X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, I.; Levilliers, J.; Petit, C. [Institut Pasteur, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-03-20

    The study of patients with chromosomal rearrangements has led to the mapping of the gene responsible for X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX1; MIM 302950) to the distal part of the Xp22.3 region, between the loci PABX and DXS31. To refine this mapping, a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig map spanning this region has been constructed. Together with the YAC contig of the pseudo-autosomal region that we previously established, this map covers the terminal 6 Mb of Xp, with an average density of 1 probe every 100 kb. Newly isolated probes that detect segmental X-Y homologies on Yp and Yq suggest multiple complex rearrangements of the ancestral pseudoautosomal region during evolution. Compilation of the data obtained from the study of individuals carrying various Xp22.3 deletions led us to conclude that the CDPX disease displays incomplete penetrance and, consequently, to refine the localization of CDPX1 to a 600-kb interval immediately adjacent to the pseudoautosomal boundary. This interval, in which 12 probes are ordered, provides the starting point for the isolation of CDPX1. 67 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Combined effect of pulse density and grid cell size on predicting and mapping aboveground carbon in fast‑growing Eucalyptus forest plantation using airborne LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos Alberto Silva; Andrew Thomas Hudak; Carine Klauberg; Lee Alexandre Vierling; Carlos Gonzalez‑Benecke; Samuel de Padua Chaves Carvalho; Luiz Carlos Estraviz Rodriguez; Adrian Cardil

    2017-01-01

    LiDAR measurements can be used to predict and map AGC across variable-age Eucalyptus plantations with adequate levels of precision and accuracy using 5 pulses m− 2 and a grid cell size of 5 m. The promising results for AGC modeling in this study will allow for greater confidence in comparing AGC estimates with varying LiDAR sampling densities for Eucalyptus plantations...

  7. A high-density consensus map of barley linking DArT markers to SSR, RFLP and STS loci and agricultural traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Junping

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular marker technologies are undergoing a transition from largely serial assays measuring DNA fragment sizes to hybridization-based technologies with high multiplexing levels. Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT is a hybridization-based technology that is increasingly being adopted by barley researchers. There is a need to integrate the information generated by DArT with previous data produced with gel-based marker technologies. The goal of this study was to build a high-density consensus linkage map from the combined datasets of ten populations, most of which were simultaneously typed with DArT and Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR, Restriction Enzyme Fragment Polymorphism (RFLP and/or Sequence Tagged Site (STS markers. Results The consensus map, built using a combination of JoinMap 3.0 software and several purpose-built perl scripts, comprised 2,935 loci (2,085 DArT, 850 other loci and spanned 1,161 cM. It contained a total of 1,629 'bins' (unique loci, with an average inter-bin distance of 0.7 ± 1.0 cM (median = 0.3 cM. More than 98% of the map could be covered with a single DArT assay. The arrangement of loci was very similar to, and almost as optimal as, the arrangement of loci in component maps built for individual populations. The locus order of a synthetic map derived from merging the component maps without considering the segregation data was only slightly inferior. The distribution of loci along chromosomes indicated centromeric suppression of recombination in all chromosomes except 5H. DArT markers appeared to have a moderate tendency toward hypomethylated, gene-rich regions in distal chromosome areas. On the average, 14 ± 9 DArT loci were identified within 5 cM on either side of SSR, RFLP or STS loci previously identified as linked to agricultural traits. Conclusion Our barley consensus map provides a framework for transferring genetic information between different marker systems and for deploying DArT markers in

  8. Recurrence quantification analysis applied to spatiotemporal pattern analysis in high-density mapping of human atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeemering, Stef; Bonizzi, Pietro; Maesen, Bart; Peeters, Ralf; Schotten, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Spatiotemporal complexity of atrial fibrillation (AF) patterns is often quantified by annotated intracardiac contact mapping. We introduce a new approach that applies recurrence plot (RP) construction followed by recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) to epicardial atrial electrograms, recorded wi

  9. Construction of an integrated high density simple sequence repeat linkage map in cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) and its applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Sachiko N; Hirakawa, Hideki; Sato, Shusei; Maeda, Fumi; Ishikawa, Masami; Mori, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Shirasawa, Kenta; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Fukami, Masanobu; Hashizume, Fujio; Tsuji, Tomoko; Sasamoto, Shigemi; Kato, Midori; Nanri, Keiko; Tsuruoka, Hisano; Minami, Chiharu; Takahashi, Chika; Wada, Tsuyuko; Ono, Akiko; Kawashima, Kumiko; Nakazaki, Naomi; Kishida, Yoshie; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Nakayama, Shinobu; Yamada, Manabu; Fujishiro, Tsunakazu; Watanabe, Akiko; Tabata, Satoshi

    2013-02-01

    The cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) is an octoploid (2n = 8x = 56) of the Rosaceae family whose genomic architecture is still controversial. Several recent studies support the AAA'A'BBB'B' model, but its complexity has hindered genetic and genomic analysis of this important crop. To overcome this difficulty and to assist genome-wide analysis of F. × ananassa, we constructed an integrated linkage map by organizing a total of 4474 of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers collected from published Fragaria sequences, including 3746 SSR markers [Fragaria vesca expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived SSR markers] derived from F. vesca ESTs, 603 markers (F. × ananassa EST-derived SSR markers) from F. × ananassa ESTs, and 125 markers (F. × ananassa transcriptome-derived SSR markers) from F. × ananassa transcripts. Along with the previously published SSR markers, these markers were mapped onto five parent-specific linkage maps derived from three mapping populations, which were then assembled into an integrated linkage map. The constructed map consists of 1856 loci in 28 linkage groups (LGs) that total 2364.1 cM in length. Macrosynteny at the chromosome level was observed between the LGs of F. × ananassa and the genome of F. vesca. Variety distinction on 129 F. × ananassa lines was demonstrated using 45 selected SSR markers.

  10. High density linkage mapping of genomic and transcriptomic SNPs for synteny analysis and anchoring the genome sequence of chickpea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Rashmi; Jeena, Ganga; Shah, Niraj; Gupta, Shefali; Pradhan, Seema; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Jain, Mukesh; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2015-01-01

    This study presents genome-wide discovery of SNPs through next generation sequencing of the genome of Cicer reticulatum. Mapping of the C. reticulatum sequenced reads onto the draft genome assembly of C. arietinum (desi chickpea) resulted in identification of 842,104 genomic SNPs which were utilized along with an additional 36,446 genic SNPs identified from transcriptome sequences of the aforementioned varieties. Two new chickpea Oligo Pool All (OPAs) each having 3,072 SNPs were designed and utilized for SNP genotyping of 129 Recombinant Inbred Lines (RILs). Using Illumina GoldenGate Technology genotyping data of 5,041 SNPs were generated and combined with the 1,673 marker data from previously published studies, to generate a high resolution linkage map. The map comprised of 6698 markers distributed on eight linkage groups spanning 1083.93 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 0.16 cM. Utility of the present map was demonstrated for improving the anchoring of the earlier reported draft genome sequence of desi chickpea by ~30% and that of kabuli chickpea by 18%. The genetic map reported in this study represents the most dense linkage map of chickpea , with the potential to facilitate efficient anchoring of the draft genome sequences of desi as well as kabuli chickpea varieties. PMID:26303721

  11. Development of high-density genetic maps for barley and wheat using a novel two-enzyme genotyping-by-sequencing approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse A Poland

    Full Text Available Advancements in next-generation sequencing technology have enabled whole genome re-sequencing in many species providing unprecedented discovery and characterization of molecular polymorphisms. There are limitations, however, to next-generation sequencing approaches for species with large complex genomes such as barley and wheat. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS has been developed as a tool for association studies and genomics-assisted breeding in a range of species including those with complex genomes. GBS uses restriction enzymes for targeted complexity reduction followed by multiplex sequencing to produce high-quality polymorphism data at a relatively low per sample cost. Here we present a GBS approach for species that currently lack a reference genome sequence. We developed a novel two-enzyme GBS protocol and genotyped bi-parental barley and wheat populations to develop a genetically anchored reference map of identified SNPs and tags. We were able to map over 34,000 SNPs and 240,000 tags onto the Oregon Wolfe Barley reference map, and 20,000 SNPs and 367,000 tags on the Synthetic W9784 × Opata85 (SynOpDH wheat reference map. To further evaluate GBS in wheat, we also constructed a de novo genetic map using only SNP markers from the GBS data. The GBS approach presented here provides a powerful method of developing high-density markers in species without a sequenced genome while providing valuable tools for anchoring and ordering physical maps and whole-genome shotgun sequence. Development of the sequenced reference genome(s will in turn increase the utility of GBS data enabling physical mapping of genes and haplotype imputation of missing data. Finally, as a result of low per-sample costs, GBS will have broad application in genomics-assisted plant breeding programs.

  12. Acute and long-term results of PVI at antrum using a novel high-density mapping catheter without help of 3D electro-anatomic mapping in patients with paroxysmal and chronic atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Thomas; Kuniss, Malte; Erkapic, Damir; Zaltsberg, Sergey; Berkowitsch, Alexander; Pajitnev, Dimitri; Wojcik, Maciej; Janin, Sebastien; Hamm, Christian W; Pitschner, Heinz F

    2010-03-01

    Multi-electrode circumferential mapping catheters have been developed by several manufacturers to facilitate catheter ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF). We tested the effectiveness and safety of a conventional, fully endocardial electrogram-guided circumferential antrum isolation (PVI) with a novel mapping device. The study enrolled 250 consecutive patients with paroxysmal or chronic AF. High-density (HD) mapping of the pulmonary veins was performed with the HD Mesh Mapper (HDMM; Bard Electrophysiology, Lowell, MA, USA). The device was not constructed for radiofrequency energy delivery. Antral PVI was performed by irrigated radiofrequency application around the HDMM. Entry and exit conduction block, as well as decreased local electrode amplitude, were endpoints for acute successful ablation. Primary endpoint of the study was the AF free event probability during follow-up. As secondary endpoints, the acute results and related complications were determined. In 984 of 1,002 pulmonary vein (PV, 98.2%), signals were characterized as PV potentials by mapping the proximal part of the PV and the antrum. We achieved a complete antrum ablation in front of the 25-mm ring of the MESH Mapper in 95% of the PV in all patients. In difficult anatomic relationships, the repositioning of the mapping catheter could be necessary. The median follow-up time was 20.8 and 15.6 months in patients with paroxysmal and chronic AF, respectively. Log Rang test revealed a probability to be free from AF episodes of 71.2% and 49.4% after one ablation procedure and improved in chronic AF after a second procedure (71.1%). Our study demonstrates satisfactory success rate regarding the safety and long-term results in patients both with paroxysmal and persistent AF when a 3D mapping system is not being implemented. The study underlines the importance of a continuous signal analysis during the ablation procedure even with a conventional mapping system.

  13. Spatio-temporal dynamics of adaptation in the human visual system: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Gizely N; Butler, John S; Mercier, Manuel R; Molholm, Sophie; Foxe, John J

    2015-04-01

    When sensory inputs are presented serially, response amplitudes to stimulus repetitions generally decrease as a function of presentation rate, diminishing rapidly as inter-stimulus intervals (ISIs) fall below 1 s. This 'adaptation' is believed to represent mechanisms by which sensory systems reduce responsivity to consistent environmental inputs, freeing resources to respond to potentially more relevant inputs. While auditory adaptation functions have been relatively well characterized, considerably less is known about visual adaptation in humans. Here, high-density visual-evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded while two paradigms were used to interrogate visual adaptation. The first presented stimulus pairs with varying ISIs, comparing VEP amplitude to the second stimulus with that of the first (paired-presentation). The second involved blocks of stimulation (N = 100) at various ISIs and comparison of VEP amplitude between blocks of differing ISIs (block-presentation). Robust VEP modulations were evident as a function of presentation rate in the block-paradigm, with strongest modulations in the 130-150 ms and 160-180 ms visual processing phases. In paired-presentations, with ISIs of just 200-300 ms, an enhancement of VEP was evident when comparing S2 with S1, with no significant effect of presentation rate. Importantly, in block-presentations, adaptation effects were statistically robust at the individual participant level. These data suggest that a more taxing block-presentation paradigm is better suited to engage visual adaptation mechanisms than a paired-presentation design. The increased sensitivity of the visual processing metric obtained in the block-paradigm has implications for the examination of visual processing deficits in clinical populations.

  14. Mapping quantitative trait loci controlling high Fe and Zn density in self and open pollinated grains of pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L. R. Br.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Kumar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pearl millet is a multipurpose grain/fodder crop of the semi-arid tropics, feeding many of the world’s poorest and most undernourished people. Genetic variation among adapted pearl millet inbreds and hybrids suggests it will be possible to improve grain micronutrient concentrations by selective breeding. Using 305 loci, a linkage map was constructed to map QTLs for grain [Fe] and [Zn] using replicated samples of 106 pearl millet RILs (F6 derived from ICMB 841-P3 × 863B-P2. The grains of the RIL population were evaluated for Fe and Zn concentration using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Grain mineral concentrations ranged from 28.4-124.0 ppm for Fe and 28.7-119.8 ppm for Zn. Similarly,grain Fe and Zn in open pollinated seeds ranged between 22.4-77.4 and 21.9-73.7 ppm, respectively. Mapping with 305 (96 SSRs; 208 DArT markers detected seven linkage groups covering 1749 cM (Haldane with an average intermarker distance of 5.73 cM. On the basis of two environment phenotypic data, two co-localized QTLs for Fe and Zn density on LG 3 were identified by composite interval mapping (CIM. Fe QTL explained 19% phenotypic variation, whereas the Zn QTL explained 36% phenotypic variation. Likewise for open pollinated seeds, the QTL analysis led to identification of two QTLs for grain Fe density on LG 3 and 5, and two QTLs for grain Zn density on LG 3 and 7. The total phenotypic variance for Fe and Zn QTLs in open pollinated seeds was 16% and 42%, respectively. Analysis of QTL × QTL and QTL × QTL× environment interactions indicated no major epistasis.

  15. CLUMPING AND THE INTERPRETATION OF kpc-SCALE MAPS OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: SMOOTH H I AND CLUMPY, VARIABLE H{sub 2} SURFACE DENSITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observtory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Lee, Cheoljong [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Schruba, Andreas [California Institute for Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bolatto, Alberto [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Hughes, Annie; Sandstrom, Karin; Schinnerer, Eva; Walter, Fabian [Max Planck Institute fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Pety, Jerome [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique, 300 Rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2013-05-20

    Many recent models consider the structure of individual interstellar medium (ISM) clouds as a way to explain observations of large parts of galaxies. To compare such models to observations, one must understand how to translate between surface densities observed averaging over large ({approx}kpc) scales and surface densities on the scale of individual clouds ({approx}pc scale), which are treated by models. We define a ''clumping factor'' that captures this translation as the ratio of the mass-weighted surface density, which is often the quantity of physical interest, to the area-weighted surface density, which is observed. We use high spatial resolution (sub-kpc) maps of CO and H I emission from nearby galaxies to measure the clumping factor of both atomic and molecular gas. The molecular and atomic ISM exhibit dramatically different degrees of clumping. As a result, the ratio H{sub 2}/H I measured at {approx}kpc resolution cannot be trivially interpreted as a cloud-scale ratio of surface densities. H I emission appears very smooth, with a clumping factor of only {approx}1.3. Based on the scarce and heterogeneous high-resolution data available, CO emission is far more clumped with a widely variable clumping factor, median {approx}7 for our heterogeneous data. Our measurements do not provide evidence for a universal mass-weighted surface density of molecular gas, but also cannot conclusively rule out such a scenario. We suggest that a more sophisticated treatment of molecular ISM structure, one informed by high spatial resolution CO maps, is needed to link cloud-scale models to kpc-scale observations of galaxies.

  16. Mapping and Evaluation of NDVI Trends from Synthetic Time Series Obtained by Blending Landsat and MODIS Data around a Coalfield on the Loess Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasingly intensive and extensive coal mining activities on the Loess Plateau pose a threat to the fragile local ecosystems. Quantifying the effects of coal mining activities on environmental conditions is of great interest for restoring and managing the local ecosystems and resources. This paper generates dense NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index time series between 2000 and 2011 at a spatial resolution of 30 m by blending Landsat and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data using the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM and further evaluates its capability for mapping vegetation trends around a typical coalfield on the Loss Plateau. Synthetic NDVI images were generated using (1 STARFM-generated NIR (near infrared and red band reflectance data (scheme 1 and (2 Landsat and MODIS NDVI images directly as inputs for STARFM (scheme 2. By comparing the synthetic NDVI images with the corresponding Landsat NDVI, we found that scheme 2 consistently generated better results (0.70 < R2 < 0.76 than scheme 1 (0.56 < R2 < 0.70 in this study area. Trend analysis was then performed with the synthetic dense NDVI time series and the annual maximum NDVI (NDVImax time series. The accuracy of these trends was evaluated by comparing to those from the corresponding MODIS time series, and it was concluded that both the trends from synthetic/MODIS NDVI dense time series and synthetic/MODIS NDVImax time series (2000–2011 were highly consistent. Compared to trends from MODIS time series, trends from synthetic time series are better able to capture fine scale vegetation changes. STARFM-generated synthetic NDVI time series could be used to quantify the effects of mining activities on vegetation, but the test areas should be selected with caution, as the trends derived from synthetic and MODIS time series may be significantly different in some areas.

  17. High-Temperature Deformation Processing Map Approach for Obtaining the Desired Microstructure in a Multi-component (Ni-Ti-Cu-Fe) Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayan, Niraj; Singh, Gaurav; Narayana Murty, S. V. S.; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu; George, Koshy M.

    2015-05-01

    An equiatomic NiTiCuFe multi-component alloy with simple body-centered cubic (bcc) and face-centered cubic solid-solution phases in the microstructure was processed by vacuum induction melting furnace under dynamic Ar atmosphere. High-temperature uniaxial compression experiments were conducted on it in the temperature range of 1073 K to 1303 K (800 °C to 1030 °C) and strain rate range of 10-3 to 10-1 s-1. The data generated were analyzed with the aid of the dynamic materials model through which power dissipation efficiency and instability maps were generated so as to identify the governing deformation mechanisms that are operative in different temperature-strain rate regimes with the aid of complementary microstructural analysis of the deformed specimens. Results indicate that the stable domain for the high temperature deformation of the multi-component alloy occurs in the temperature range of 1173 K to 1303 K (900 °C to 1030 °C) and range of 10-3 to 10-1.2 s-1, and the deformation is unstable at T = 1073 K to 1153 K (800 °C to 880 °C) and = 10-3 to 10-1.4 s-1 as well as T = 1223 K to 1293 K (950 °C to 1020 °C) and = 10-1.4 to 10-1 s-1, with adiabatic shear banding, localized plastic flow, or cracking being the unstable mechanisms. A constitutive equation that describes the flow stress of NiTiCuFe multi-component alloy as a function of strain rate and deformation temperature was also determined.

  18. Identification of QTLs associated with oil content in a high-oil Brassica napus cultivar and construction of a high-density consensus map for QTLs comparison in B. napus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Wang

    Full Text Available Increasing seed oil content is one of the most important goals in breeding of rapeseed (B. napus L.. To dissect the genetic basis of oil content in B. napus, a large and new double haploid (DH population containing 348 lines was obtained from a cross between 'KenC-8' and 'N53-2', two varieties with >10% difference in seed oil content, and this population was named the KN DH population. A genetic linkage map consisting of 403 markers was constructed, which covered a total length of 1783.9 cM with an average marker interval of 4.4 cM. The KN DH population was phenotyped in eight natural environments and subjected to quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis for oil content. A total of 63 identified QTLs explaining 2.64-17.88% of the phenotypic variation were identified, and these QTLs were further integrated into 24 consensus QTLs located on 11 chromosomes using meta-analysis. A high-density consensus map with 1335 marker loci was constructed by combining the KN DH map with seven other published maps based on the common markers. Of the 24 consensus QTLs in the KN DH population, 14 were new QTLs including five new QTLs in A genome and nine in C genome. The analysis revealed that a larger population with significant differences in oil content gave a higher power detecting new QTLs for oil content, and the construction of the consensus map provided a new clue for comparing the QTLs detected in different populations. These findings enriched our knowledge of QTLs for oil content and should be a potential in marker-assisted breeding of B. napus.

  19. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy Mapping of Porous Coatings Obtained on Titanium by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation in a Solution Containing Concentrated Phosphoric Acid with Copper Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokosz K.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The SEM and EDS study results of coatings obtained on titanium by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO in the electrolytes containing of 600 g copper nitrate in 1 liter of concentrated phosphoric acid at 450 V for 1 and 3 minutes, are presented. The obtained coatings are porous and consist mainly of phosphorus within titanium and copper. It was found that the time of PEO oxidation has impact on the chemical composition of the coatings. The longer time of PEO treatment, the higher amount of copper inside coating. The PEO oxidation of titanium for 1 minute has resulted in the creation of coating, on which 3 phases where found, which contained up to 13.4 wt% (9 at% of copper inside the phosphate structure. In case of 1 minute PEO treatment of titanium, the 2 phases were found, which contained up to 13 wt% (8 at% of copper inside the phosphate structure. The copper-to-phosphorus ratios after 1 minute processing belong to the range from 0.28 by wt% (0.14 by at% to 0.47 by wt% (0.23 by at%, while after 3 minutes the same ratios belong to the range from 0.27 by wt% (0.13 by at% to 0.35 by wt% (0.17 by at%. In summary, it should be stated that the higher amounts of phosphorus and copper were recorded on titanium after PEO oxidation for 3 minutes than these after 1 minute.

  20. Detection of Traumatic Bone Marrow Lesions after Knee Trauma: Comparison of ADC Maps Derived from Diffusion-weighted Imaging with Standard Fat-saturated Proton Density-weighted Turbo Spin-Echo Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klengel, Alexis; Stumpp, Patrick; Klengel, Steffen; Böttger, Ina; Rönisch, Nadja; Kahn, Thomas

    2016-10-24

    Purpose To compare single-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging-derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps with fat-saturated (FS) proton density (PD)-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) imaging in the detection of bone marrow lesions (BMLs) after knee trauma. Materials and Methods Institutional review board approval was obtained from Leipzig University. Written informed consent was waived. Three radiologists retrospectively re-examined 97 consecutive patients with reported knee trauma who underwent 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging within 90 days of knee trauma. The following sequences were used: (a) sagittal T1-weighted TSE and FS PD-weighted TSE and (b) sagittal T1-weighted TSE and single-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging-derived ADC mapping. BMLs on the lateral and medial femoral condyle, lateral and medial aspect of the tibial plateau, and patella were documented. Volumetry was performed on BMLs with a thickness of at least 15 mm (major BMLs). ADC values were measured in intact bone marrow and major BMLs. A McNemar test and t tests were used as appropriate to test for significant differences between BML number and volume at an α level of .05. Results Significantly more patients showed at least one BML on ADC maps (98%, 95 of 97 patients) than on FS PD-weighted TSE images (86%, 84 of 97 patients) (P saturation, such as the patella. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  1. Clumping and the Interpretation of kpc-Scale Maps of the Interstellar Medium: Smooth HI and Clumpy, Variable H2 Surface Density

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, Adam K; Schruba, Andreas; Bolatto, Alberto; Hughes, Annie; Pety, Jerome; Sandstrom, Karin; Schinnerer, Eva; Walter, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Many recent models consider the structure of individual interstellar medium (ISM) clouds as a way to explain observations of large parts of galaxies. To compare such models to observations, one must understand how to translate between surface densities observed averaging over large (~kpc) scales and surface densities on the scale of individual clouds (~pc scale), which are treated by models. We define a "clumping factor" that captures this translation as the ratio of the mass-weighted surface density, which is often the quantity of physical interest, to the area-weighted surface density, which is observed. We use high spatial resolution (sub-kpc) maps of CO and HI emission from nearby galaxies to measure the clumping factor of both atomic and molecular gas. The molecular and atomic ISM exhibit dramatically different degrees of clumping. As a result, the ratio H2/HI measured at ~kpc resolution cannot be trivially interpreted as a cloud-scale ratio of surface densities. HI emission appears very smooth, with a c...

  2. The development of a high density linkage map for black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon based on cSNPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Baranski

    Full Text Available Transcriptome sequencing using Illumina RNA-seq was performed on populations of black tiger shrimp from India. Samples were collected from (i four landing centres around the east coastline (EC of India, (ii survivors of a severe WSSV infection during pond culture (SUR and (iii the Andaman Islands (AI in the Bay of Bengal. Equal quantities of purified total RNA from homogenates of hepatopancreas, muscle, nervous tissue, intestinal tract, heart, gonad, gills, pleopod and lymphoid organs were combined to create AI, EC and SUR pools for RNA sequencing. De novo transcriptome assembly resulted in 136,223 contigs (minimum size 100 base pairs, bp with a total length 61 Mb, an average length of 446 bp and an average coverage of 163× across all pools. Approximately 16% of contigs were annotated with BLAST hit information and gene ontology annotations. A total of 473,620 putative SNPs/indels were identified. An Illumina iSelect genotyping array containing 6,000 SNPs was developed and used to genotype 1024 offspring belonging to seven full-sibling families. A total of 3959 SNPs were mapped to 44 linkage groups. The linkage groups consisted of between 16-129 and 13-130 markers, of length between 139-10.8 and 109.1-10.5 cM and with intervals averaging between 1.2 and 0.9 cM for the female and male maps respectively. The female map was 28% longer than the male map (4060 and 2917 cM respectively with a 1.6 higher recombination rate observed for female compared to male meioses. This approach has substantially increased expressed sequence and DNA marker resources for tiger shrimp and is a useful resource for QTL mapping and association studies for evolutionarily and commercially important traits.

  3. NORMA: a tool for flexible fitting of high-resolution protein structures into low-resolution electron-microscopy-derived density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhre, Karsten; Navaza, Jorge; Sanejouand, Yves Henri

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes a freely available software suite that allows the modelling of large conformational changes of high-resolution three-dimensional protein structures under the constraint of a low-resolution electron-density map. Typical applications are the interpretation of electron-microscopy data using atomic scale X-ray structural models. The software package provided should enable the interested user to perform flexible fitting on new cases without encountering major technical difficulties. The NORMA software suite including three fully executable reference cases and extensive user instructions are available at http://www.elnemo.org/NORMA/.

  4. Discovery and Fine-Mapping of Glycaemic and Obesity-Related Trait Loci Using High-Density Imputation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoko Horikoshi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Reference panels from the 1000 Genomes (1000G Project Consortium provide near complete coverage of common and low-frequency genetic variation with minor allele frequency ≥0.5% across European ancestry populations. Within the European Network for Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE Consortium, we have undertaken the first large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS, supplemented by 1000G imputation, for four quantitative glycaemic and obesity-related traits, in up to 87,048 individuals of European ancestry. We identified two loci for body mass index (BMI at genome-wide significance, and two for fasting glucose (FG, none of which has been previously reported in larger meta-analysis efforts to combine GWAS of European ancestry. Through conditional analysis, we also detected multiple distinct signals of association mapping to established loci for waist-hip ratio adjusted for BMI (RSPO3 and FG (GCK and G6PC2. The index variant for one association signal at the G6PC2 locus is a low-frequency coding allele, H177Y, which has recently been demonstrated to have a functional role in glucose regulation. Fine-mapping analyses revealed that the non-coding variants most likely to drive association signals at established and novel loci were enriched for overlap with enhancer elements, which for FG mapped to promoter and transcription factor binding sites in pancreatic islets, in particular. Our study demonstrates that 1000G imputation and genetic fine-mapping of common and low-frequency variant association signals at GWAS loci, integrated with genomic annotation in relevant tissues, can provide insight into the functional and regulatory mechanisms through which their effects on glycaemic and obesity-related traits are mediated.

  5. Combined effect of pulse density and grid cell size on predicting and mapping aboveground carbon in fast-growing Eucalyptus forest plantation using airborne LiDAR data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos Alberto; Hudak, Andrew Thomas; Klauberg, Carine; Vierling, Lee Alexandre; Gonzalez-Benecke, Carlos; de Padua Chaves Carvalho, Samuel; Rodriguez, Luiz Carlos Estraviz; Cardil, Adrián

    2017-12-01

    LiDAR remote sensing is a rapidly evolving technology for quantifying a variety of forest attributes, including aboveground carbon (AGC). Pulse density influences the acquisition cost of LiDAR, and grid cell size influences AGC prediction using plot-based methods; however, little work has evaluated the effects of LiDAR pulse density and cell size for predicting and mapping AGC in fast-growing Eucalyptus forest plantations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of LiDAR pulse density and grid cell size on AGC prediction accuracy at plot and stand-levels using airborne LiDAR and field data. We used the Random Forest (RF) machine learning algorithm to model AGC using LiDAR-derived metrics from LiDAR collections of 5 and 10 pulses m(-2) (RF5 and RF10) and grid cell sizes of 5, 10, 15 and 20 m. The results show that LiDAR pulse density of 5 pulses m(-2) provides metrics with similar prediction accuracy for AGC as when using a dataset with 10 pulses m(-2) in these fast-growing plantations. Relative root mean square errors (RMSEs) for the RF5 and RF10 were 6.14 and 6.01%, respectively. Equivalence tests showed that the predicted AGC from the training and validation models were equivalent to the observed AGC measurements. The grid cell sizes for mapping ranging from 5 to 20 also did not significantly affect the prediction accuracy of AGC at stand level in this system. LiDAR measurements can be used to predict and map AGC across variable-age Eucalyptus plantations with adequate levels of precision and accuracy using 5 pulses m(-2) and a grid cell size of 5 m. The promising results for AGC modeling in this study will allow for greater confidence in comparing AGC estimates with varying LiDAR sampling densities for Eucalyptus plantations and assist in decision making towards more cost effective and efficient forest inventory.

  6. Mapping Charge Carrier Density in Organic Thin-Film Transistors by Time-Resolved Photoluminescence Lifetime Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Jensen, Per Baunegaard With; Liu, Yiming

    2017-01-01

    /organic interface or at grain boundaries. In our comprehensive experimental and analytical work we demonstrate a method to characterize the charge carrier density in organic thin-film transistors using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. We developed a numerical model that describes the electrical...

  7. Mapping the genome of meta-generalized gradient approximation density functionals: The search for B97M-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardirossian, Narbe [Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Head-Gordon, Martin, E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu [Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-02-21

    A meta-generalized gradient approximation density functional paired with the VV10 nonlocal correlation functional is presented. The functional form is selected from more than 10{sup 10} choices carved out of a functional space of almost 10{sup 40} possibilities. Raw data come from training a vast number of candidate functional forms on a comprehensive training set of 1095 data points and testing the resulting fits on a comprehensive primary test set of 1153 data points. Functional forms are ranked based on their ability to reproduce the data in both the training and primary test sets with minimum empiricism, and filtered based on a set of physical constraints and an often-overlooked condition of satisfactory numerical precision with medium-sized integration grids. The resulting optimal functional form has 4 linear exchange parameters, 4 linear same-spin correlation parameters, and 4 linear opposite-spin correlation parameters, for a total of 12 fitted parameters. The final density functional, B97M-V, is further assessed on a secondary test set of 212 data points, applied to several large systems including the coronene dimer and water clusters, tested for the accurate prediction of intramolecular and intermolecular geometries, verified to have a readily attainable basis set limit, and checked for grid sensitivity. Compared to existing density functionals, B97M-V is remarkably accurate for non-bonded interactions and very satisfactory for thermochemical quantities such as atomization energies, but inherits the demonstrable limitations of existing local density functionals for barrier heights.

  8. Determinación de la densidad de entrecruzamiento de poliuretanos obtenidos a partir de aceite de ricino modificado por transesterificación Determination of crosslink density of polyurethanes obtained from castor oil modified by transesterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel F. Valero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Se obtuvo una gama de polioles a partir del aceite de ricino modificado por transesterificación con pentaeritriol y glicerina. Los productos resultantes fueron caracterizados físico-químicamente. Se sintetizaron elastómeros de poliuretano a partir de los polioles derivados del aceite de ricino modificado. La densidad de entrecruzamiento se determinó por ensayos de hinchamiento a partir de la ecuación de Flory-Rehner apoyada en la espectroscopia MALDI TOF MS para determinar la estructura química de la unidad repetitiva promedio del poliuretano. Se estudió la variación de la densidad de entrecruzamiento de los poliuretanos con base en el índice de hidroxilo del poliol utilizado en la síntesis. Los resultados muestran que los PU obtenidos a través de la modificación del aceite con pentaeritriol tienen una mayor densidad de entrecruzamiento que los PU obtenidos a partir del aceite original y de los polioles derivados de la reacción de transesterificación del aceite con glicerina, debido a que estos polioles poseen una mayor funcionalidad hidroxílica.Two series of polyols were obtained from castor oil modified by transesterification with various amounts of pentaerythritol and glycerol. The resultant polyol properties were characterized as a function of the hydroxyl functionality. Polyurethane elastomers (PU were synthesized from the two series of polyols obtained. The crosslink density of those polyurethanes was determined by swelling tests data adjusted to the Flory-Rehner's equation and according to the elasticity theory. The variation of the crosslink density of polyurethanes was studied by following the hydroxyl value of the modified polyol utilized in the synthesis and based on the average structure of each polyurethane repeating unit, as determined by the method of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MALDI TOF MS. The results show that the PU obtained through castor oil modified with

  9. Genetic control of the leaf angle and leaf orientation value as revealed by ultra-high density maps in three connected maize populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui Li

    Full Text Available Plant architecture is a key factor for high productivity maize because ideal plant architecture with an erect leaf angle and optimum leaf orientation value allow for more efficient light capture during photosynthesis and better wind circulation under dense planting conditions. To extend our understanding of the genetic mechanisms involved in leaf-related traits, three connected recombination inbred line (RIL populations including 538 RILs were genotyped by genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS method and phenotyped for the leaf angle and related traits in six environments. We conducted single population quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping and joint linkage analysis based on high-density recombination bin maps constructed from GBS genotype data. A total of 45 QTLs with phenotypic effects ranging from 1.2% to 29.2% were detected for four leaf architecture traits by using joint linkage mapping across the three populations. All the QTLs identified for each trait could explain approximately 60% of the phenotypic variance. Four QTLs were located on small genomic regions where candidate genes were found. Genomic predictions from a genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP model explained 45±9% to 68±8% of the variation in the remaining RILs for the four traits. These results extend our understanding of the genetics of leaf traits and can be used in genomic prediction to accelerate plant architecture improvement.

  10. Urban-scale mapping of PM2.5 distribution via data fusion between high-density sensor network and MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Yu Tao; xian Liu, Bao; Sun, Feng; Wang, Li hua; Tang, Yu jia; Zhang, Da wei

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution mapping of PM2.5 is the prerequisite for precise analytics and subsequent anti-pollution interventions. Considering the large variances of particulate distribution, urban-scale mapping is challenging either with ground-based fixed stations, with satellites or via models. In this study, a dynamic fusion method between high-density sensor network and MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) was introduced. The sensor network was deployed in Beijing ( > 1000 fixed monitors across 16000 km2 area) to provide raw observations with high temporal resolution (sampling interval 5 km). The MODIS AOD was calibrated to provide distribution map with low temporal resolution (daily) and moderate spatial resolution ( = 3 km). By encoding the data quality and defects (e.g. could, reflectance, abnormal), a hybrid interpolation procedure with cross-validation generated PM2.5 distribution with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Several no-pollutant and high-pollution periods were tested to validate the proposed fusion method for capturing the instantaneous patterns of PM2.5 emission.

  11. Geostatistical analysis of disease data: accounting for spatial support and population density in the isopleth mapping of cancer mortality risk using area-to-point Poisson kriging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goovaerts Pierre

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geostatistical techniques that account for spatially varying population sizes and spatial patterns in the filtering of choropleth maps of cancer mortality were recently developed. Their implementation was facilitated by the initial assumption that all geographical units are the same size and shape, which allowed the use of geographic centroids in semivariogram estimation and kriging. Another implicit assumption was that the population at risk is uniformly distributed within each unit. This paper presents a generalization of Poisson kriging whereby the size and shape of administrative units, as well as the population density, is incorporated into the filtering of noisy mortality rates and the creation of isopleth risk maps. An innovative procedure to infer the point-support semivariogram of the risk from aggregated rates (i.e. areal data is also proposed. Results The novel methodology is applied to age-adjusted lung and cervix cancer mortality rates recorded for white females in two contrasted county geographies: 1 state of Indiana that consists of 92 counties of fairly similar size and shape, and 2 four states in the Western US (Arizona, California, Nevada and Utah forming a set of 118 counties that are vastly different geographical units. Area-to-point (ATP Poisson kriging produces risk surfaces that are less smooth than the maps created by a naïve point kriging of empirical Bayesian smoothed rates. The coherence constraint of ATP kriging also ensures that the population-weighted average of risk estimates within each geographical unit equals the areal data for this unit. Simulation studies showed that the new approach yields more accurate predictions and confidence intervals than point kriging of areal data where all counties are simply collapsed into their respective polygon centroids. Its benefit over point kriging increases as the county geography becomes more heterogeneous. Conclusion A major limitation of choropleth

  12. Quantitative trait loci mapping of pubescence density and flowering time of insect-resistant soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiko Komatsu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of antibiosis resistance to common cutworm (Spodoptera litura Fabricius in soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr. has progressed significantly, but the immediate cause remains unknown. We performed quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis of pubescence density and plant development stage because these factors are assumed to be the immediate cause of resistance to cutworm. The QTLs for pubescence appeared to be identical to the previously detected the Pd1 and Ps loci controlling pubescence density. We found no candidate loci for flowering time QTLs, although one could be identical to the gene governing the long-juvenile trait or to the E6 loci controlling maturity. None of the QTLs overlapped with the QTLs for antibiosis resistance.

  13. Application of Inverse Path Distance Weighting for high-density spatial mapping of coastal water quality patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Stachelek, Joseph; Madden, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    One of the primary goals of coastal water quality monitoring is to characterize spatial variation. Generally, this monitoring takes place at a limited number of fixed sampling points. The alternative sampling methodology explored in this paper involves high density sampling from an onboard flow-through water analysis system (Dataflow). Dataflow has the potential to provide better spatial resolution of water quality features because it generates many closely spaced (< 10 m) measurements. Regar...

  14. Spatial Variability of Geriatric Depression Risk in a High-Density City: A Data-Driven Socio-Environmental Vulnerability Mapping Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung Chak Ho

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies found a relationship between geriatric depression and social deprivation. However, most studies did not include environmental factors in the statistical models, introducing a bias to estimate geriatric depression risk because the urban environment was found to have significant associations with mental health. We developed a cross-sectional study with a binomial logistic regression to examine the geriatric depression risk of a high-density city based on five social vulnerability factors and four environmental measures. We constructed a socio-environmental vulnerability index by including the significant variables to map the geriatric depression risk in Hong Kong, a high-density city characterized by compact urban environment and high-rise buildings. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs of the variables were significantly different, indicating that both social and environmental variables should be included as confounding factors. For the comprehensive model controlled by all confounding factors, older adults who were of lower education had the highest geriatric depression risks (OR: 1.60 (1.21, 2.12. Higher percentage of residential area and greater variation in building height within the neighborhood also contributed to geriatric depression risk in Hong Kong, while average building height had negative association with geriatric depression risk. In addition, the socio-environmental vulnerability index showed that higher scores were associated with higher geriatric depression risk at neighborhood scale. The results of mapping and cross-section model suggested that geriatric depression risk was associated with a compact living environment with low socio-economic conditions in historical urban areas in Hong Kong. In conclusion, our study found a significant difference in geriatric depression risk between unadjusted and adjusted models, suggesting the importance of including environmental factors in estimating geriatric depression risk

  15. Diffusion-Based Density-Equalizing Maps: an Interdisciplinary Approach to Visualizing Homicide Rates and Other Georeferenced Statistical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzitello, Karina I.; Candia, Julián

    2012-12-01

    In every country, public and private agencies allocate extensive funding to collect large-scale statistical data, which in turn are studied and analyzed in order to determine local, regional, national, and international policies regarding all aspects relevant to the welfare of society. One important aspect of that process is the visualization of statistical data with embedded geographical information, which most often relies on archaic methods such as maps colored according to graded scales. In this work, we apply nonstandard visualization techniques based on physical principles. We illustrate the method with recent statistics on homicide rates in Brazil and their correlation to other publicly available data. This physics-based approach provides a novel tool that can be used by interdisciplinary teams investigating statistics and model projections in a variety of fields such as economics and gross domestic product research, public health and epidemiology, sociodemographics, political science, business and marketing, and many others.

  16. Diffusion-Based Density-Equalizing Maps: an Interdisciplinary Approach to Visualizing Homicide Rates and Other Georeferenced Statistical Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzitello, Karina I

    2012-01-01

    In every country, public and private agencies allocate extensive funding to collect large-scale statistical data, which in turn are studied and analyzed in order to determine local, regional, national, and international policies regarding all aspects relevant to the welfare of society. One important aspect of that process is the visualization of statistical data with embedded geographical information, which most often relies on archaic methods such as maps colored according to graded scales. In this work, we apply non-standard visualization techniques based on physical principles. We illustrate the method with recent statistics on homicide rates in Brazil and their correlation to other publicly available data. This physics-based approach provides a novel tool that can be used by interdisciplinary teams investigating statistics and model projections in a variety of fields such as economics and gross domestic product research, public health and epidemiology, socio-demographics, political science, business and m...

  17. Precision mapping of laser-driven magnetic fields and their evolution in high-energy-density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, L. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Nilson, P. M. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Igumenshchev, I. V. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Haines, M. G. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Froula, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Betti, R. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2015-05-29

    The magnetic fields generated at the surface of a laser-irradiated planar solid target are mapped using ultrafast proton radiography. Thick (50 μm) plastic foils are irradiated with 4-kJ, 2.5-ns laser pulses focused to an intensity of 4 x 10¹⁴ W/cm². The data show magnetic fields concentrated at the edge of the laser-focal region, well within the expanding coronal plasma. The magnetic-field spatial distribution is tracked and shows good agreement with 2D resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations using the code DRACO when the Biermann battery source, fluid and Nernst advection, resistive magnetic diffusion, and Righi-Leduc heat flow are included.

  18. Map Projection

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaderpour, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce some known map projections from a model of the Earth to a flat sheet of paper or map and derive the plotting equations for these projections. The first fundamental form and the Gaussian fundamental quantities are defined and applied to obtain the plotting equations and distortions in length, shape and size for some of these map projections.

  19. Cross-recognition of a pit viper (Crotalinae) polyspecific antivenom explored through high-density peptide microarray epitope mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engmark, Mikael; Lomonte, Bruno; Gutiérrez, José María

    2017-01-01

    -throughput methodology based on custom designed high-density peptide microarrays. By combining data on antibody-peptide interactions with multiple sequence alignments of homologous toxin sequences and protein modelling, we have determined linear elements of antibody binding sites for snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs...... at the catalytic active site responsible for toxicity, but instead at other sites, of which some are known for allosteric inhibition or for interaction with the tissue target. Antibody recognition was found to be preserved for several minor variations in the protein sequences, although the antibody...

  20. Mapping axonal density and average diameter using non-monotonic time-dependent gradient-echo MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Daniel; Cruz, Tomás L; Jespersen, Sune N

    2017-01-01

    Abstract White Matter (WM) microstructures, such as axonal density and average diameter, are crucial to the normal function of the Central Nervous System (CNS) as they are closely related with axonal conduction velocities. Conversely, disruptions of these microstructural features may result....... While clearly further modelling and theoretical developments are necessary, we conclude that salient WM microstructural features can be extracted from these simple, SNR-efficient multi-gradient echo MRI, and that this paves the way towards easier estimation of WM microstructure in vivo....

  1. An Atlas-Based Electron Density Mapping Method for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-Alone Treatment Planning and Adaptive MRI-Based Prostate Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, Jason A., E-mail: jason.dowling@csiro.au [Australian e-Health Research Center, CSIRO ICT Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Information and Communication Technologies Centre, Queensland (Australia); Lambert, Jonathan [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Parker, Joel [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); Salvado, Olivier; Fripp, Jurgen [Australian e-Health Research Center, CSIRO ICT Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Information and Communication Technologies Centre, Queensland (Australia); Capp, Anne; Wratten, Chris; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B. [Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales (Australia); University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Prostate radiation therapy dose planning directly on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans would reduce costs and uncertainties due to multimodality image registration. Adaptive planning using a combined MRI-linear accelerator approach will also require dose calculations to be performed using MRI data. The aim of this work was to develop an atlas-based method to map realistic electron densities to MRI scans for dose calculations and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Methods and Materials: Whole-pelvis MRI and CT scan data were collected from 39 prostate patients. Scans from 2 patients showed significantly different anatomy from that of the remaining patient population, and these patients were excluded. A whole-pelvis MRI atlas was generated based on the manually delineated MRI scans. In addition, a conjugate electron-density atlas was generated from the coregistered computed tomography (CT)-MRI scans. Pseudo-CT scans for each patient were automatically generated by global and nonrigid registration of the MRI atlas to the patient MRI scan, followed by application of the same transformations to the electron-density atlas. Comparisons were made between organ segmentations by using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and point dose calculations for 26 patients on planning CT and pseudo-CT scans. Results: The agreement between pseudo-CT and planning CT was quantified by differences in the point dose at isocenter and distance to agreement in corresponding voxels. Dose differences were found to be less than 2%. Chi-squared values indicated that the planning CT and pseudo-CT dose distributions were equivalent. No significant differences (p > 0.9) were found between CT and pseudo-CT Hounsfield units for organs of interest. Mean {+-} standard deviation DSC scores for the atlas-based segmentation of the pelvic bones were 0.79 {+-} 0.12, 0.70 {+-} 0.14 for the prostate, 0.64 {+-} 0.16 for the bladder, and 0.63 {+-} 0.16 for the rectum

  2. Dynamic drag force based on iterative density mapping: A new numerical tool for three-dimensional analysis of particle trajectories in a dielectrophoretic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoerzer, Markus; Szydzik, Crispin; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco Javier; Tang, Xinke; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2016-02-01

    Dielectrophoresis is a widely used means of manipulating suspended particles within microfluidic systems. In order to efficiently design such systems for a desired application, various numerical methods exist that enable particle trajectory plotting in two or three dimensions based on the interplay of hydrodynamic and dielectrophoretic forces. While various models are described in the literature, few are capable of modeling interactions between particles as well as their surrounding environment as these interactions are complex, multifaceted, and computationally expensive to the point of being prohibitive when considering a large number of particles. In this paper, we present a numerical model designed to enable spatial analysis of the physical effects exerted upon particles within microfluidic systems employing dielectrophoresis. The model presents a means of approximating the effects of the presence of large numbers of particles through dynamically adjusting hydrodynamic drag force based on particle density, thereby introducing a measure of emulated particle-particle and particle-liquid interactions. This model is referred to as "dynamic drag force based on iterative density mapping." The resultant numerical model is used to simulate and predict particle trajectory and velocity profiles within a microfluidic system incorporating curved dielectrophoretic microelectrodes. The simulated data are compared favorably with experimental data gathered using microparticle image velocimetry, and is contrasted against simulated data generated using traditional "effective moment Stokes-drag method," showing more accurate particle velocity profiles for areas of high particle density.

  3. Application of Inverse Path Distance Weighting for high-density spatial mapping of coastal water quality patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Stachelek, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    One of the primary goals of coastal water quality monitoring is to characterize spatial variation. Generally, this monitoring takes place at a limited number of fixed sampling points. The alternative sampling methodology explored in this paper involves high density sampling from an onboard flow-through water analysis system (Dataflow). Dataflow has the potential to provide better spatial resolution of water quality features because it generates many closely spaced (< 10 m) measurements. Regardless of the measurement technique, parameter values at unsampled locations must be interpolated from nearby measurement points in order to generate a comprehensive picture of spatial variations. Standard Euclidean interpolations in coastal settings tend to yield inaccurate results because they extend through barriers in the landscape such as peninsulas, islands, and submerged banks. We recently developed a method for non-Euclidean interpolation by inverse path distance weighting (IPDW) in order to account for these ba...

  4. High-density linkage maps fail to detect any genetic component to sex determination in a Rana temporaria family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brelsford, A; Rodrigues, N; Perrin, N

    2016-01-01

    Sex chromosome differentiation in Rana temporaria varies strikingly among populations or families: whereas some males display well-differentiated Y haplotypes at microsatellite markers on linkage group 2 (LG2), others are genetically undistinguishable from females. We analysed with RADseq markers one family from a Swiss lowland population with no differentiated sex chromosomes, and where sibship analyses had failed to detect any association between the phenotypic sex of progeny and parental haplotypes. Offspring were reared in a common tank in outdoor conditions and sexed at the froglet stage. We could map a total of 2177 SNPs (1123 in the mother, 1054 in the father), recovering in both adults 13 linkage groups (= chromosome pairs) that were strongly syntenic to Xenopus tropicalis despite > 200 My divergence. Sexes differed strikingly in the localization of crossovers, which were uniformly distributed in the female but limited to chromosome ends in the male. None of the 2177 markers showed significant association with offspring sex. Considering the very high power of our analysis, we conclude that sex determination was not genetic in this family; which factors determined sex remain to be investigated.

  5. Computational neuroanatomy: mapping cell-type densities in the mouse brain, simulations from the Allen Brain Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas of the adult mouse (ABA) consists of digitized expression profiles of thousands of genes in the mouse brain, co-registered to a common three-dimensional template (the Allen Reference Atlas).This brain-wide, genome-wide data set has triggered a renaissance in neuroanatomy. Its voxelized version (with cubic voxels of side 200 microns) is available for desktop computation in MATLAB. On the other hand, brain cells exhibit a great phenotypic diversity (in terms of size, shape and electrophysiological activity), which has inspired the names of some well-studied cell types, such as granule cells and medium spiny neurons. However, no exhaustive taxonomy of brain cell is available. A genetic classification of brain cells is being undertaken, and some cell types have been chraracterized by their transcriptome profiles. However, given a cell type characterized by its transcriptome, it is not clear where else in the brain similar cells can be found. The ABA can been used to solve this region-specificity problem in a data-driven way: rewriting the brain-wide expression profiles of all genes in the atlas as a sum of cell-type-specific transcriptome profiles is equivalent to solving a quadratic optimization problem at each voxel in the brain. However, the estimated brain-wide densities of 64 cell types published recently were based on one series of co-registered coronal in situ hybridization (ISH) images per gene, whereas the online ABA contains several image series per gene, including sagittal ones. In the presented work, we simulate the variability of cell-type densities in a Monte Carlo way by repeatedly drawing a random image series for each gene and solving the optimization problem. This yields error bars on the region-specificity of cell types.

  6. Structural evolution in $A\\approx 100$ nuclei within the mapped interacting boson model based on the Gogny energy density functional

    CERN Document Server

    Nomura, K; Robledo, L M

    2016-01-01

    The structure of even-even neutron-rich Ru, Mo, Zr and Sr nuclei in the $A\\approx 100$ mass region is studied within the interacting boson model (IBM) with microscopic input from the self-consistent mean-field approximation based on the Gogny-D1M energy density functional. The deformation energy surface in the quadrupole deformation space $(\\beta,\\gamma)$, computed within the constrained Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov framework, is mapped onto the expectation value of the appropriately chosen IBM Hamiltonian with configuration mixing in the boson condensate state. The mapped IBM Hamiltonian is used to study the spectroscopic properties of $^{98-114}$Ru, $^{96-112}$Mo, $^{94-110}$Zr and $^{92-108}$Sr. Several cases of $\\gamma$-soft behavior are predicted in Ru and Mo nuclei while a pronounced coexistence between strongly-prolate and weakly-oblate deformed shapes is found for Zr and Sr nuclei. The method describes well the evolution of experimental yrast and non-yrast states as well as selected $B$(E2) transition prob...

  7. Detailed deposition density maps constructed by large-scale soil sampling for gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kimiaki; Tanihata, Isao; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Saito, Takashi; Shimoura, Susumu; Otsuka, Takaharu; Onda, Yuichi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Ikeuchi, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Kinouchi, Nobuyuki; Saegusa, Jun; Seki, Akiyuki; Takemiya, Hiroshi; Shibata, Tokushi

    2015-01-01

    Soil deposition density maps of gamma-ray emitting radioactive nuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident were constructed on the basis of results from large-scale soil sampling. In total 10,915 soil samples were collected at 2168 locations. Gamma rays emitted from the samples were measured by Ge detectors and analyzed using a reliable unified method. The determined radioactivity was corrected to that of June 14, 2011 by considering the intrinsic decay constant of each nuclide. Finally the deposition maps were created for (134)Cs, (137)Cs, (131)I, (129m)Te and (110m)Ag. The radioactivity ratio of (134)Cs-(137)Cs was almost constant at 0.91 regardless of the locations of soil sampling. The radioactivity ratios of (131)I and (129m)Te-(137)Cs were relatively high in the regions south of the Fukushima NPP site. Effective doses for 50 y after the accident were evaluated for external and inhalation exposures due to the observed radioactive nuclides. The radiation doses from radioactive cesium were found to be much higher than those from the other radioactive nuclides.

  8. Synthetic observations of molecular clouds in a galactic center environment: I. Studying maps of column density and integrated intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Bertram, Erik; Clark, Paul C; Ragan, Sarah E; Klessen, Ralf S

    2015-01-01

    We run numerical simulations of molecular clouds (MCs), adopting properties similar to those found in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of the Milky Way. For this, we employ the moving mesh code Arepo and perform simulations which account for a simplified treatment of time-dependent chemistry and the non-isothermal nature of gas and dust. We perform simulations using an initial density of n_0 = 10^3 cm^{-3} and a mass of 1.3x10^5 M_sun. Furthermore, we vary the virial parameter, defined as the ratio of kinetic and potential energy, alpha = E_{kin} / |E_{pot}|. We set it to alpha = 0.5, 2.0 and 8.0, in order to analyze the impact of the kinetic energy on our results. We account for the extreme conditions in the CMZ and increase both the interstellar radiation field (ISRF) and the cosmic-ray flux (CRF) by a factor of 1000 compared to the values found in the solar neighbourhood. We use the radiative transfer code RADMC-3D to compute synthetic images in various diagnostic lines. These are [CII] at 158 micron, [OI]...

  9. Temperature as a third dimension in column-density mapping of dusty astrophysical structures associated with star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, K A; Lomax, O

    2015-01-01

    We present PPMAP, a Bayesian procedure that uses images of dust continuum emission at multiple wavelengths to produce resolution-enhanced image cubes of differential column-density as a function of dust temperature and position. PPMAP is based on the generic 'point process' formalism, whereby the system of interest (in this case, a dusty astrophysical structure such as a filament or prestellar core) is represented by a collection of points in a suitably defined state space. It can be applied to a variety of observational data, such as Herschel images, provided only that the image intensity is delivered by optically thin dust in thermal equilibrium. PPMAP takes full account of the instrumental point spread functions and does not require all images to be degraded to the same resolution. We present the results of testing using simulated data for a prestellar core and a fractal turbulent cloud, and demonstrate its performance with real data from the Hi-GAL survey. Specifically, we analyse observations of a large ...

  10. Reward contingencies and the recalibration of task monitoring and reward systems: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morie, K P; De Sanctis, P; Foxe, J J

    2014-07-25

    Task execution almost always occurs in the context of reward-seeking or punishment-avoiding behavior. As such, ongoing task-monitoring systems are influenced by reward anticipation systems. In turn, when a task has been executed either successfully or unsuccessfully, future iterations of that task will be re-titrated on the basis of the task outcome. Here, we examined the neural underpinnings of the task-monitoring and reward-evaluation systems to better understand how they govern reward-seeking behavior. Twenty-three healthy adult participants performed a task where they accrued points that equated to real world value (gift cards) by responding as rapidly as possible within an allotted timeframe, while success rate was titrated online by changing the duration of the timeframe dependent on participant performance. Informative cues initiated each trial, indicating the probability of potential reward or loss (four levels from very low to very high). We manipulated feedback by first informing participants of task success/failure, after which a second feedback signal indicated actual magnitude of reward/loss. High-density electroencephalography (EEG) recordings allowed for examination of event-related potentials (ERPs) to the informative cues and in turn, to both feedback signals. Distinct ERP components associated with reward cues, task-preparatory and task-monitoring processes, and reward feedback processes were identified. Unsurprisingly, participants displayed increased ERP amplitudes associated with task-preparatory processes following cues that predicted higher chances of reward. They also rapidly updated reward and loss prediction information dependent on task performance after the first feedback signal. Finally, upon reward receipt, initial reward probability was no longer taken into account. Rather, ERP measures suggested that only the magnitude of actual reward or loss was now processed. Reward and task-monitoring processes are clearly dissociable, but

  11. Mapping of earthquakes vulnerability area in Papua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad Fawzy Ismullah, M.; Massinai, Muh. Altin

    2016-05-01

    Geohazard is a geological occurrence which may lead to a huge loss for human. A mitigation of these natural disasters is one important thing to be done properly in order to reduce the risks. One of the natural disasters that frequently occurs in the Papua Province is the earthquake. This study applies the principle of Geospatial and its application for mapping the earthquake-prone area in the Papua region. It uses earthquake data, which is recorded for 36 years (1973-2009), fault location map, and ground acceleration map of the area. The earthquakes and fault map are rearranged into an earthquake density map, as well as an earthquake depth density map and fault density map. The overlaid data of these three maps onto ground acceleration map are then (compiled) to obtain an earthquake unit map. Some districts area, such as Sarmi, Nabire, and Dogiyai, are identified by a high vulnerability index. In the other hand, Waropen, Puncak, Merauke, Asmat, Mappi, and Bouven Digoel area shows lower index. Finally, the vulnerability index in other places is detected as moderate.

  12. Motor area localization using fMRI-constrained cortical current density reconstruction of movement-related cortical potentials, a comparison with fMRI and TMS mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inuggi, Alberto; Filippi, Massimo; Chieffo, Raffaella; Agosta, Federica; Rocca, Maria A; González-Rosa, Javier J; Cursi, Marco; Comi, Giancarlo; Leocani, Letizia

    2010-01-13

    The localization of human hand primary motor area (M1) has been the object of several studies during the last decades. EEG source analysis, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and focal transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are non-invasive methods for localizing M1 with good accuracy compared to direct electrocorticography (ECoG) results. EEG sources were reconstructed with Cortical Current Density (CCD) method, allowing to evaluate simultaneous and distributed patterns of activation and to increase accuracy by constraining on information derived from fMRI (fMRI-CCD). The aim of this study was to compare the M1 contribution of movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP) with TMS and fMRI results and to test the effect of constraints strength, algorithm norm and localization methods over CCD reconstruction. Seven right-handed healthy subjects underwent 64-channel EEG recording of MRCP to right thumb movement, focal TMS mapping of the right abductor pollicis brevis muscle and fMRI during right hand movement. We found fMRI activations, EEG sources and TMS mapping corresponding to the anatomical landmark of the hand area in all subjects with fMRI and TMS center-of-gravity and in almost all subjects using fMRI-CCD with moderate constraint. A significant improvement was found using fMRI-CCD compared to CCD alone. This study confirms the usefulness of multimodal integration of fMRI, EEG and TMS in localizing M1 and the possibility to increase EEG spatial resolution using fMRI information.

  13. QTL Mapping of Adult-Plant Resistance to Leaf Rust in the Wheat Cross Zhou 8425B/Chinese Spring Using High-Density SNP Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peipei Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Wheat leaf rust is an important disease worldwide. Growing resistant cultivars is an effective means to control the disease. In the present study, 244 recombinant inbred lines from Zhou 8425B/Chinese Spring cross were phenotyped for leaf rust severities during the 2011–2012, 2012–2013, 2013–2014, and 2014–2015 cropping seasons at Baoding, Hebei province, and 2012–2013 and 2013–2014 cropping seasons in Zhoukou, Henan province. The population was genotyped using the high-density Illumina iSelect 90K SNP assay and SSR markers. Inclusive composite interval mapping identified eight QTL, designated as QLr.hebau-2AL, QLr.hebau-2BS, QLr.hebau-3A, QLr.hebau-3BS, QLr.hebau-4AL, QLr.hebau-4B, QLr.hebau-5BL, and QLr.hebau-7DS, respectively. QLr.hebau-2BS, QLr.hebau-3A, QLr.hebau-3BS, and QLr.hebau-5BL were derived from Zhou 8425B, whereas the other four were from Chinese Spring. Three stable QTL on chromosomes 2BS, 4B and 7DS explained 7.5–10.6%, 5.5–24.4%, and 11.2–20.9% of the phenotypic variance, respectively. QLr.hebau-2BS in Zhou 8425B might be the same as LrZH22 in Zhoumai 22; QLr.hebau-4B might be the residual resistance of Lr12, and QLr.hebau-7DS is Lr34. QLr.hebau-2AL, QLr.hebau-3BS, QLr.hebau-4AL, and QLr.hebau-5BL are likely to be novel QTL for leaf rust. These QTL and their closely linked SNP and SSR markers can be used for fine mapping, candidate gene discovery, and marker-assisted selection in wheat breeding.

  14. Effect of current density and pH in obtaining the Ni-Fe alloy by electrodeposition; Efeito da densidade de corrente e pH na obtencao da liga Ni-Fe por eletrodeposicao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Jose Anderson Machado; Raulino, Anamelia de Medeiros Dantas; Raulino, Jose Leonardo Costa; Campos, Ana Regina Nascimento; Prasad, Shiva; Santana, Renato Alexandre Costa de, E-mail: jmo.anderson@gmail.com, E-mail: anameliadantas@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: leonardo.jcr@hotmail.com, E-mail: arncampos@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: prasad@deq.ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: renatoacs@ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Cuite, PB (Brazil). Lab. de Eletroquimica e Corrosao

    2017-01-15

    Metallic coatings can be applied for different purposes, for example to improve the mechanical, catalytic, anti corrosive properties or simply to improve the decorative appearance. In the work the Fe-Ni alloys have been obtained by electrodeposition process using a simple electrolytic bath containing the reagents, nickel sulfate, iron sulfate and sodium tartrate. A complete experimental design 2{sup 2} , associated with the response surface methodology (RSM) technique was used as optimization tool. Chemical composition, current efficiency, surface morphology and electrochemical corrosion measures were performed. It was observed that a decrease in the pH favored an increase in iron and decrease in nickel contents in the alloy. The iron content influenced the alloy morphology. The best experiment showed an average corrosion resistance 5471.5 Ω.cm² and a corrosion current density 4.814x10{sup -6} A/cm². This experiment presented a composition of 70 wt% Ni and 30 wt% Fe in the alloy and an average deposition current efficiency of 58.7%. (author)

  15. Parcels and Land Ownership, This data set consists of digital map files containing parcel-level cadastral information obtained from property descriptions. Cadastral features contained in the data set include real property boundary lines, rights-of-way boundaries, property dimensions, Published in Not Provided, 1:2400 (1in=200ft) scale, Racine County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Parcels and Land Ownership dataset current as of unknown. This data set consists of digital map files containing parcel-level cadastral information obtained from...

  16. Arterial Transit Time Mapping Obtained by Pulsed Continuous 3D ASL Imaging with Multiple Post-Label Delay Acquisitions: Comparative Study with PET-CBF in Patients with Chronic Occlusive Cerebrovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, Tetsuya; Kimura, Hirohiko; Matsuda, Tsuyoshi; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Isozaki, Makoto; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro; Okazawa, Hidehiko

    2016-01-01

    Arterial transit time (ATT) is most crucial for measuring absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) by arterial spin labeling (ASL), a noninvasive magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion assessment technique, in patients with chronic occlusive cerebrovascular disease. We validated ASL-CBF and ASL-ATT maps calculated by pulsed continuous ASL (pCASL) with multiple post-label delay acquisitions in patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease. Fifteen patients underwent MR scans, including pCASL, and positron emission tomography (PET) scans with 15O-water to obtain PET-CBF. MR acquisitions with different post-label delays (1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 sec) were also obtained for ATT correction. The theoretical framework of 2-compartmental model (2CM) was also used for the delay compensation. ASL-CBF and ASL-ATT were calculated based on the proposed 2CM, and the effect on the CBF values and the ATT correction characteristics were discussed. Linear regression analyses were performed both on pixel-by-pixel and region-of-interest bases in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. There were significant correlations between ASL-CBF and PET-CBF both for voxel values (r = 0.74 ± 0.08, slope: 0.87 ± 0.22, intercept: 6.1 ± 4.9) and for the MCA territorial comparison in both affected (R2 = 0.67, y = 0.83x + 6.3) and contralateral sides (R2 = 0.66, y = 0.74x + 6.3). ASL-ATTs in the affected side were significantly longer than those in the contralateral side (1.51 ± 0.41 sec and 1.12 ± 0.30 sec, respectively, p <0.0005). CBF measurement using pCASL with delay compensation was feasible and fairly accurate even in altered hemodynamic states.

  17. High-density SNP mapping of the HLA region identifies multiple independent susceptibility loci associated with selective IgA deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo C Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective IgA deficiency (IgAD; serum IgA<0.07 g/l is the most common form of human primary immune deficiency, affecting approximately 1∶600 individuals in populations of Northern European ancestry. The polygenic nature of IgAD is underscored by the recent identification of several new risk genes in a genome-wide association study. Among the characterized susceptibility loci, the association with specific HLA haplotypes represents the major genetic risk factor for IgAD. Despite the robust association, the nature and location of the causal variants in the HLA region remains unknown. To better characterize the association signal in this region, we performed a high-density SNP mapping of the HLA locus and imputed the genotypes of common HLA-B, -DRB1, and -DQB1 alleles in a combined sample of 772 IgAD patients and 1,976 matched controls from 3 independent European populations. We confirmed the complex nature of the association with the HLA locus, which is the result of multiple effects spanning the entire HLA region. The primary association signal mapped to the HLA-DQB1*02 allele in the HLA Class II region (combined P = 7.69×10(-57; OR = 2.80 resulting from the combined independent effects of the HLA-B*0801-DRB1*0301-DQB1*02 and -DRB1*0701-DQB1*02 haplotypes, while additional secondary signals were associated with the DRB1*0102 (combined P = 5.86×10(-17; OR = 4.28 and the DRB1*1501 (combined P = 2.24×10(-35; OR = 0.13 alleles. Despite the strong population-specific frequencies of HLA alleles, we found a remarkable conservation of these effects regardless of the ethnic background, which supports the use of large multi-ethnic populations to characterize shared genetic association signals in the HLA region. We also provide evidence for the location of association signals within the specific extended haplotypes, which will guide future sequencing studies aimed at characterizing the precise functional variants contributing to

  18. Seeing voices: High-density electrical mapping and source-analysis of the multisensory mismatch negativity evoked during the McGurk illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Amour, Dave; De Sanctis, Pierfilippo; Molholm, Sophie; Ritter, Walter; Foxe, John J

    2007-02-01

    Seeing a speaker's facial articulatory gestures powerfully affects speech perception, helping us overcome noisy acoustical environments. One particularly dramatic illustration of visual influences on speech perception is the "McGurk illusion", where dubbing an auditory phoneme onto video of an incongruent articulatory movement can often lead to illusory auditory percepts. This illusion is so strong that even in the absence of any real change in auditory stimulation, it activates the automatic auditory change-detection system, as indexed by the mismatch negativity (MMN) component of the auditory event-related potential (ERP). We investigated the putative left hemispheric dominance of McGurk-MMN using high-density ERPs in an oddball paradigm. Topographic mapping of the initial McGurk-MMN response showed a highly lateralized left hemisphere distribution, beginning at 175 ms. Subsequently, scalp activity was also observed over bilateral fronto-central scalp with a maximal amplitude at approximately 290 ms, suggesting later recruitment of right temporal cortices. Strong left hemisphere dominance was again observed during the last phase of the McGurk-MMN waveform (350-400 ms). Source analysis indicated bilateral sources in the temporal lobe just posterior to primary auditory cortex. While a single source in the right superior temporal gyrus (STG) accounted for the right hemisphere activity, two separate sources were required, one in the left transverse gyrus and the other in STG, to account for left hemisphere activity. These findings support the notion that visually driven multisensory illusory phonetic percepts produce an auditory-MMN cortical response and that left hemisphere temporal cortex plays a crucial role in this process.

  19. What and Where in auditory sensory processing: A high-density electrical mapping study of distinct neural processes underlying sound object recognition and sound localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria M Leavitt

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Functionally distinct dorsal and ventral auditory pathways for sound localization (where and sound object recognition (what have been described in non-human primates. A handful of studies have explored differential processing within these streams in humans, with highly inconsistent findings. Stimuli employed have included simple tones, noise bursts and speech sounds, with simulated left-right spatial manipulations, and in some cases participants were not required to actively discriminate the stimuli. Our contention is that these paradigms were not well suited to dissociating processing within the two streams. Our aim here was to determine how early in processing we could find evidence for dissociable pathways using better titrated what and where task conditions. The use of more compelling tasks should allow us to amplify differential processing within the dorsal and ventral pathways. We employed high-density electrical mapping using a relatively large and environmentally realistic stimulus set (seven animal calls delivered from seven free-field spatial locations; with stimulus configuration identical across the where and what tasks. Topographic analysis revealed distinct dorsal and ventral auditory processing networks during the where and what tasks with the earliest point of divergence seen during the N1 component of the auditory evoked response, beginning at approximately 100 ms. While this difference occurred during the N1 timeframe, it was not a simple modulation of N1 amplitude as it displayed a wholly different topographic distribution to that of the N1. Global dissimilarity measures using topographic modulation analysis confirmed that this difference between tasks was driven by a shift in the underlying generator configuration. Minimum norm source reconstruction revealed distinct activations that corresponded well with activity within putative dorsal and ventral auditory structures.

  20. Merging field mapping and numerical simulation to interpret the lithofacies variations from unsteady pyroclastic density currents on uneven terrain: The case of La Fossa di Vulcano (Aeolian Islands, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronzo, Domenico M.; Dellino, Pierfrancesco; Sulpizio, Roberto; Lucchi, Federico

    2017-01-01

    In order to obtain results from computer simulations of explosive volcanic eruptions, one either needs a statistical approach to test a wide range of initial and boundary conditions, or needs using a well-constrained field case study via stratigraphy. Here we followed the second approach, using data obtained from field mapping of the Grotta dei Palizzi 2 pyroclastic deposits (Vulcano Island, Italy) as input for numerical modeling. This case study deals with impulsive phreatomagmatic explosions of La Fossa Cone that generated ash-rich pyroclastic density currents, interacting with the topographic high of the La Fossa Caldera rim. One of the simplifications in dealing with well-sorted ash (one particle size in the model) is to highlight the topographic effects on the same pyroclastic material in an unsteady current. We demonstrate that by merging field data with 3D numerical simulation results it is possible to see key details of the dynamical current-terrain interaction, and to interpret the lithofacies variations of the associated deposits as a function of topography-induced sedimentation (settling) rate. Results suggest that a value of the sedimentation rate lower than 5 kg/m2 s at the bed load can still be sheared by the overlying current, producing tractional structures (laminae) in the deposits. Instead, a sedimentation rate higher than that threshold can preclude the formation of tractional structures, producing thicker massive deposits. We think that the approach used in this study could be applied to other case studies (both for active and ancient volcanoes) to confirm or refine such threshold value of the sedimentation rate, which is to be considered as an upper value as for the limitations of the numerical model.

  1. Physical mapping of the restriction fragments obtained from bacteriophage T4 dC-DNA with the restriction endonucleases SmaI, KpnI and BglII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, H; Niggemann, E; Rüger, W

    1979-01-01

    The cytosine-containing DNA of a mutant of bacteriophage T4 was digested with restriction endonucleases SmaI, KpnI and BglII producing 5, 7 and 13 fragments respectively. Complete physical maps of the T4 genome were constructed with the enzymes SmaI and KpnI and an almost complete map with the enzyme BglII.

  2. Mapping of the spectral density function of a C alpha-H alpha bond vector from NMR relaxation rates of a 13C-labelled alpha-carbon in motilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, P; Jarvet, J; Ehrenberg, A; Gräslund, A

    1995-02-01

    The peptide hormone motilin was synthesised with a 13C-enriched alpha-carbon in the leucine at position 10. In aqueous solution, six different relaxation rates were measured for the 13C alpha-H alpha fragment as a function of temperature and with and without the addition of 30% (v/v) of the cosolvent d2-1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFP). The relaxation rates were analysed employing the spectral density mapping technique introduced by Peng and Wagner [(1992) J. Magn. Reson., 98, 308-332] and using the model-free approach by Lipari and Szabo [(1982) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 104, 4546-4570]. The fit to various models of dynamics was also considered. Different procedures to evaluate the overall rotational correlation time were compared. A single exponential time correlation function was found to give a good fit to the measured spectral densities only for motilin in 30% (v/v) HFP at low temperatures, whereas at high temperatures in this solvent, and in D2O at all temperatures, none of the considered models gave an acceptable fit. A new empirical spectral density function was tested and found to accurately fit the experimental spectral density mapping points. The application of spectral density mapping based on NMR relaxation data for a specific 13C-1H vector is shown to be a highly useful method to study biomolecular dynamics. Advantages are high sensitivity, high precision and uniform sampling of the spectral density function over the frequency range.

  3. Estudo da densidade de ligações Cruzadas em géis superabsorventes obtidos do acetato de celulose Study of the crosslinking density in superabsorbent gels obtained from cellulose acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André M. Senna

    2013-01-01

    :3] and [3:1] PMDA mol/mol of free OH, respectively. A gel was synthesized in excess of 200% of PMDA in relation to free OH groups of the AC. The basis of the Flory-Rehner theory was used for determining crosslinking in the gels. Briefly, the main results showed that the crosslinking density increased proportionally to the amount of PMDA added to the reaction medium. Distinct AFM topographies were obtained for distinct gels, which were also different from the polymer cellulose acetate. This work was motivated by the technological importance of polymers from renewable sources such as cellulose, in which a cellulose derivative was developed with promising application in drug delivery and in adsorption of heavy metals in aqueous systems. The advantage of this cellulose acetate derivative is the use of fewer steps in its synthesis.

  4. From hot rocks to glowing avalanches: Numerical modelling of gravity-induced pyroclastic density currents and hazard maps at the Stromboli volcano (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatici, Teresa; Di Roberto, Alessio; Di Traglia, Federico; Bisson, Marina; Morelli, Stefano; Fidolini, Francesco; Bertagnini, Antonella; Pompilio, Massimo; Hungr, Oldrich; Casagli, Nicola

    2016-11-01

    Gravity-induced pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) can be produced by the collapse of volcanic crater rims or due to the gravitational instability of materials deposited in proximal areas during explosive activity. These types of PDCs, which are also known as "glowing avalanches", have been directly observed, and their deposits have been widely identified on the flanks of several volcanoes that are fed by mafic to intermediate magmas. In this research, the suitability of landslide numerical models for simulating gravity-induced PDCs to provide hazard assessments was tested. This work also presents the results of a back-analysis of three events that occurred in 1906, 1930 and 1944 at the Stromboli volcano by applying a depth-averaged 3D numerical code named DAN-3D. The model assumes a frictional internal rheology and a variable basal rheology (i.e., frictional, Voellmy and plastic). The numerical modelling was able to reproduce the gravity-induced PDCs' extension and deposit thicknesses to an order of magnitude of that reported in the literature. The best results when compared with field data were obtained using a Voellmy model with a frictional coefficient of f = 0.19 and a turbulence parameter ξ = 1000 m s- 1. The results highlight the suitability of this numerical code, which is generally used for landslides, to reproduce the destructive potential of these events in volcanic environments and to obtain information on hazards connected with explosive-related, mass-wasting phenomena in Stromboli Island and at volcanic systems characterized by similar phenomena.

  5. Dynamic conduction and repolarisation changes in early arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy versus benign outflow tract ectopy demonstrated by high density mapping & paced surface ECG analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm C Finlay

    Full Text Available AIMS: The concealed phase of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC may initially manifest electrophysiologically. No studies have examined dynamic conduction/repolarization kinetics to distinguish benign right ventricular outflow tract ectopy (RVOT ectopy from ARVC's early phase. We investigated dynamic endocardial electrophysiological changes that differentiate early ARVC disease expression from RVOT ectopy. METHODS: 22 ARVC (12 definite based upon family history and mutation carrier status, 10 probable patients without right ventricular structural anomalies underwent high-density non-contact mapping of the right ventricle. These were compared to data from 14 RVOT ectopy and 12 patients with supraventricular tachycardias and normal hearts. Endocardial & surface ECG conduction and repolarization parameters were assessed during a standard S1-S2 restitution protocol. RESULTS: Definite ARVC without RV structural disease could not be clearly distinguished from RVOT ectopy during sinus rhythm or during steady state pacing. Delay in Activation Times at coupling intervals just above the ventricular effective refractory period (VERP increased in definite ARVC (43 ± 20 ms more than RVOT ectopy patients (36 ± 14 ms, p = 0.03 or Normals (25 ± 16 ms, p = 0.008 and a progressive separation of the repolarisation time curves between groups existed. Repolarization time increases in the RVOT were also greatest in ARVC (definite ARVC: 18 ± 20 ms; RVOT ectopy: 5 ± 14, Normal: 1 ± 18, p<0.05. Surface ECG correlates of these intracardiac measurements demonstrated an increase of greater than 48 ms in stimulus to surface ECG J-point pre-ERP versus steady state, with an 88% specificity and 68% sensitivity in distinguishing definite ARVC from the other groups. This technique could not distinguish patients with genetic predisposition to ARVC only (probable ARVC from controls. CONCLUSIONS: Significant changes in dynamic conduction and repolarization

  6. Systematic secretome analyses of rice leaf and seed callus suspension-cultured cells: workflow development and establishment of high-density two-dimensional gel reference maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Ho; Jeong, Seung-Hee; Kim, So Hee; Singh, Raksha; Lee, Jae-Eun; Cho, Yoon-Seong; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Jwa, Nam-Soo

    2008-12-01

    Secreted proteins control a multitude of biological and physiological processes in multicellular organisms such as plants. Identification of secreted proteins in reference plants like Arabidopsis and rice under normal growth conditions and adverse environmental conditions will help better understand the secretory pathways. Here, we have performed a systematic in planta and in vitro analyses of proteins secreted by rice leaves (in planta) and seed callus suspension-cultured cells (SCCs; in vitro), respectively, using a combination of biochemical and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) coupled with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analyses. Secreted proteins prepared from either leaves or SCCs medium were essentially free from contamination of intracellular proteins as judged by biochemical and Western blot analyses. 2-DGE analyses of secreted proteins collectively identified 222 protein spots with only 6 protein spots common to both in planta and in vitro derived data sets. Data were used to establish high-resolution and high-density 2-D gel reference maps for both in planta and in vitro secreted proteins. Identified proteins belonged to 11 (in planta) and 6 (in vitro) functional classes. Proteins involved in carbon metabolism (33%) and cell wall metabolism having plant defense mechanism (18%) were highly represented in the in planta secreted proteins accounting for 51% of total identified proteins, whereas proteins of cell wall metabolism having plant defense mechanism (64%) were predominant in the in vitro secreted proteins. Interestingly, secreted proteins possessing signal peptides were significantly lower in an in planta (27%) prepared secreted protein population than in vitro (76%) as predicted by SignalP prediction tool, implying the notion that plant might possess yet unidentified secretory pathway(s) in addition to the classical endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi pathway. Taken together, this systematic study provides evidence for (i) significant

  7. Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorizadeh, Siamak

    2016-05-01

    Molecular partitioning based on the kinetic energy density is performed to a number of chemical species, which show non-nuclear attractors (NNA) in their gradient maps of the electron density. It is found that NNAs are removed using this molecular partitioning and although the virial theorem is not valid for all of the basins obtained in the being used AIM, all of the atoms obtained using the new approach obey this theorem. A comparison is also made between some atomic topological parameters which are obtained from the new partitioning approach and those calculated based on the electron density partitioning.

  8. Smartphones Based Mobile Mapping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamad, A.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2014-06-01

    The past 20 years have witnessed an explosive growth in the demand for geo-spatial data. This demand has numerous sources and takes many forms; however, the net effect is an ever-increasing thirst for data that is more accurate, has higher density, is produced more rapidly, and is acquired less expensively. For mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) projects, this has been achieved through the major development of Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS). MMS integrate various navigation and remote sensing technologies which allow mapping from moving platforms (e.g. cars, airplanes, boats, etc.) to obtain the 3D coordinates of the points of interest. Such systems obtain accuracies that are suitable for all but the most demanding mapping and engineering applications. However, this accuracy doesn't come cheaply. As a consequence of the platform and navigation and mapping technologies used, even an "inexpensive" system costs well over 200 000 USD. Today's mobile phones are getting ever more sophisticated. Phone makers are determined to reduce the gap between computers and mobile phones. Smartphones, in addition to becoming status symbols, are increasingly being equipped with extended Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities, Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) inertial sensors, extremely powerful computing power and very high resolution cameras. Using all of these components, smartphones have the potential to replace the traditional land MMS and portable GPS/GIS equipment. This paper introduces an innovative application of smartphones as a very low cost portable MMS for mapping and GIS applications.

  9. Comparison of different gravity field implied density models of the topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Morteza; Tabatabaee, Seied; Najafi-Alamdari, Mehdi

    2009-06-01

    Density within the Earth crust varies between 1.0 and 3.0 g/cm3. The Bouguer gravity field measured in south Iran is analyzed using four different regional-residual separation techniques to obtain a residual map of the gravity field suitable for density modeling of topography. A density model of topography with radial and lateral distribution of density is required for an accurate determination of the geoid, e.g., in the Stokes-Helmert approach. The apparent density mapping technique is used to convert the four residual Bouguer anomaly fields into the corresponding four gravity im-plied subsurface density (GRADEN) models. Although all four density models showed good correlation with the geological density (GEODEN) model of the region, the GRADEN models obtained by high-pass filter-ing and GGM high-pass filtering show better numerical correlation with GEODEN model than the other models.

  10. 基于改进区间数密度集结算子指标群赋权方法%Research on Obtaining the Weights of Index Group Based on Modified Interval Number Density Aggregation Operator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺芳

    2013-01-01

    A decision-making method with a modified interval number density aggregation operator is proposed to solve the group weights problems with index data known and weights unknown .First, the several concepts of in-terval number and interval number density aggregation operator are introduced , the method of interval number clustering is improved , the direct algorithm is applied to cluster the one-dimensional data , and fuzzy statistics variables are defined to make sure which is the best way to clustering .Then based on a modified interval number density aggregation operator the group weights problems with index data known and weights unknown are solved . Finally it is shown that the method is feasible and effective with an example .%针对指标数据已知,而权重数据未知的群组赋权问题,给出了一种基于改进的区间数密度集结算子来进行指标群组赋权的决策方法。首先给出了区间数和区间数密度集结算子( IDM)的定义及性质,改进了以前区间数聚类的方法,应用直接法对一维区间数据组进行聚类,并定义了模糊统计量,以确定最为合理的一种聚类方式。然后基于改进的区间数密度集结算子这种数学模型,来解决指标值数据已知,而权重未知的群组赋权问题。最后举例说明该方法的可行性和实用性。

  11. A 1. 8-Mb YAC contig in Xp11. 23: Identification of Cpg islands and physical mapping of CA repeats in a region of high gene density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, M.P.; Nemeth, A.H.; Campbell, L.; Raut, C.P.; Davies, K.E. (Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Weissenbach, J. (Unite de Genetique Moleculaire Humaine, Paris (France))

    1994-05-15

    The genes ARAF1, SYN1, TIMP, and PFC are clustered within 70 kb of one another, and, as reported in the accompanying paper, at least four more genes map within 400 kb: a cluster of Krueppel-type zinc finger genes (including ZNF21, ZNF41, and ZNF81) and ELK-1, a member of the ets oncogene superfamily. This gene-rich region is of particular interest because of the large number of disease genes mapping to Xp11.23: At least three eye diseases (retinitis pigmentosa type 2, congenital stationary night blindness CSNB1, and Aland Island eye disease), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked nephrolithiasis, and a translocation breakpoint associated with synovial sarcoma. The authors have constructed a 1.8-Mb YAC contig in this region, confirming the link between TIMP and OATL1 reported by Knight et al. (1994) and extending the map in the distal direction. To investigate the likelihood that more genes are located within this region, they have carried out detailed mapping of rare-cutter restriction sites in these YACs and identified seven CpG islands. At least six of these islands are located over 50 kb from any known gene locations, suggesting that the region contains at least this many as yet unidentified genes. They have also mapped the physical locations of six highly polymorphic CA repeats within the contig, thus integrating the physical, genetic, and transcriptional maps of the region and facilitating the mapping and identification of disease genes. Together with the report by Knight et al., these data indicate the following order of loci: Xpter-DXS1264-DXS1055-DXS1003-DXS1146-DXS1266-(ZNF41, ARAF1)-SYN1 CA repeat-SYN1 (3[prime] end)-TIMP-SYN1 (5[prime] end)-PFC CA repeat-PFC-(DXS426, ELK1)-(DXS1265, ZNF81)-ZNF21-DXS1267-OATL1-Xcen. 40 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Silicon distribution on the lunar surface obtained by Kaguya GRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Ja; Kobayashi, Masanori; Elphic, Richard; Karouji, Yuzuru; Hamara, Dave; Kobayashi, Shingo; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Rodriguez, Alexis; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Reedy, Robert; Hasebe, Nobuyuki

    Gamma ray spectrometry (GRS) provides a powerful tool to map and characterize the elemental composition of the upper tens centimeters of solid planetary surfaces. Elemental maps generated by the Kaguya GRS (KGRS) include natural radioactive as well as major elements maps (e.g., Fe, Ca, and Ti). Analysis of the Si gamma ray has been investigated using the 4934 keV Si peak produced by the thermal neutron interaction (28) Si(n,gammag) (29) Si, generated during the interaction of galactic cosmic rays and surface material containing Si. The emission rate of gamma rays is directly proportional to the abundance of Si from the lunar surface; however, it is also affected by the thermal neutron density in the lunar surface. Thus, we corrected the Si GRS data by a low energy neutron data (appear to consist of primarily of mafic rocks. Our elemental map of Si using Kaguya GRS data shows that the highland areas of both near side and far side of the Moon have higher abundance of Si, and the mare regions of the near side of the Moon have the lowest Si abundance on the Moon. Our study clearly shows that there are a number of Si enriched areas compared to that of Apollo 16 site. This result is similar to the mineralogical data obtained by Diviner. The feldspathic highland areas are confirmed through the elemental map of Si by the Kaguya GRS data. When the Si map of Kaguya GRS data is compared with the LRO’s mineralogical map, a reasonable agreement in understanding of the dichotomy between lunar mafic and feldspathic regions of the moon is confirmed. On the other hand, compositional matches between the surface rocks and GRS data may represent the dominant rock composition for a given region.

  13. Correlation of the structural information obtained for europium-chelate ensembles from gas-phase photoluminescence and ion-mobility spectroscopy with density-functional computations and ligand-field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greisch, Jean-François; Chmela, Jiří; Harding, Michael E; Wunderlich, Dirk; Schäfer, Bernhard; Ruben, Mario; Klopper, Wim; Schooss, Detlef; Kappes, Manfred M

    2017-02-22

    We report a combined investigation of europium(iii)9-oxo-phenalen-1-one (PLN) coordination complexes, [Eu(PLN)4AE](+) with AE = Mg, Ca, and Sr, using gas-phase photoluminescence, trapped ion-mobility spectrometry and density-functional computations. In order to sort out the structural impact of the alkali earth dications on the photoluminescence spectra, the experimental data are compared to the predicted ligand-field splittings as well as to the collision cross-sections for different isomers of [Eu(PLN)4AE](+). The best fitting interpretation is that one isomer family predominantly contributes to the recorded luminescence. The present work demonstrates the complexity of the coordination patterns of multicenter lanthanoid chelates involved in dynamical equilibria and the pertinence of using isolation techniques to elucidate their photophysical properties.

  14. Effective electron-density map improvement and structure validation on a Linux multi-CPU web cluster: The TB Structural Genomics Consortium Bias Removal Web Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vinod; Swanson, Stanley M; Segelke, Brent; Kantardjieff, Katherine A; Sacchettini, James C; Rupp, Bernhard

    2003-12-01

    Anticipating a continuing increase in the number of structures solved by molecular replacement in high-throughput crystallography and drug-discovery programs, a user-friendly web service for automated molecular replacement, map improvement, bias removal and real-space correlation structure validation has been implemented. The service is based on an efficient bias-removal protocol, Shake&wARP, and implemented using EPMR and the CCP4 suite of programs, combined with various shell scripts and Fortran90 routines. The service returns improved maps, converted data files and real-space correlation and B-factor plots. User data are uploaded through a web interface and the CPU-intensive iteration cycles are executed on a low-cost Linux multi-CPU cluster using the Condor job-queuing package. Examples of map improvement at various resolutions are provided and include model completion and reconstruction of absent parts, sequence correction, and ligand validation in drug-target structures.

  15. Transformations of maps to investigate clusters of disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvin, S.; Merrill, D.; Sacks, S.; Wong, L.; Bedell, L.; Schulman, J.

    1984-10-01

    A procedure is presented to display and analyze epidemiologic data with the use of density-equalized maps. The algorithm for generating these maps is discussed in terms of several simple examples. Two specific methods for statistically analyzing these maps are given in detail, followed by an application of maps and methods to six sets of age-, race-, sex-, site-specific cancer incidence data. The data were obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) project for San Francisco city/county (1978-1981) and combined with 1980 US Census data. 20 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  16. SU-E-J-122: The CBCT Dose Calculation Using a Patient Specific CBCT Number to Mass Density Conversion Curve Based On a Novel Image Registration and Organ Mapping Method in Head-And-Neck Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, J [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Bel Air, MD (United States); Lasio, G; Chen, S; Zhang, B; Langen, K; Prado, K; D’Souza, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yi, B [Univ. of Maryland School Of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Huang, J [University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a CBCT HU correction method using a patient specific HU to mass density conversion curve based on a novel image registration and organ mapping method for head-and-neck radiation therapy. Methods: There are three steps to generate a patient specific CBCT HU to mass density conversion curve. First, we developed a novel robust image registration method based on sparseness analysis to register the planning CT (PCT) and the CBCT. Second, a novel organ mapping method was developed to transfer the organs at risk (OAR) contours from the PCT to the CBCT and corresponding mean HU values of each OAR were measured in both the PCT and CBCT volumes. Third, a set of PCT and CBCT HU to mass density conversion curves were created based on the mean HU values of OARs and the corresponding mass density of the OAR in the PCT. Then, we compared our proposed conversion curve with the traditional Catphan phantom based CBCT HU to mass density calibration curve. Both curves were input into the treatment planning system (TPS) for dose calculation. Last, the PTV and OAR doses, DVH and dose distributions of CBCT plans are compared to the original treatment plan. Results: One head-and-neck cases which contained a pair of PCT and CBCT was used. The dose differences between the PCT and CBCT plans using the proposed method are −1.33% for the mean PTV, 0.06% for PTV D95%, and −0.56% for the left neck. The dose differences between plans of PCT and CBCT corrected using the CATPhan based method are −4.39% for mean PTV, 4.07% for PTV D95%, and −2.01% for the left neck. Conclusion: The proposed CBCT HU correction method achieves better agreement with the original treatment plan compared to the traditional CATPhan based calibration method.

  17. A high-density consensus map of barley to compare the distribution of QTLs for partial resistance to Puccinia hordei and of defence gene homologues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcel, T.C.; Varshney, R.K.; Barbieri, M.; Jafary, H.; Kock, de M.J.D.; Graner, A.; Niks, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    A consensus map of barley was constructed based on three reference doubled haploid (DH) populations and three recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations. Several sets of microsatellites were used as bridge markers in the integration of those populations previously genotyped with RFLP or with AFLP mar

  18. Replicated high-density genetic maps of two great tit populations reveal fine-scale genomic departures from sex-equal recombination rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oers, K.; Santure, A.W.; de Cauwer, I.; Van Bers, N.E.M.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Sheldon, B.C.; Visser, M.E.; Slate, J.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Linking variation in quantitative traits to variation in the genome is an important, but challenging task in the study of life-history evolution. Linkage maps provide a valuable tool for the unravelling of such trait−gene associations. Moreover, they give insight into recombination landscapes and be

  19. Obtaining the conversion curve of CT numbers to electron density from the effective energy of the CT using the dummy SEFM; Obtencion de la curva de conversion de numeros TC a densidad electronica a partir de la energia efectiva del TC usando el maniqui de la SEFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Viera Cueto, J. A.; Garcia Pareja, S.; Benitez Villegas, E. M.; Moreno Saiz, E. M.; Bodineau Gil, C.; Caudepon Moreno, F.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to obtain the conversion curve of Hounsfield units (A) versus electron densities using a mannequin with different tissue equivalent materials. This provides for the effective energy beam CT and is used to characterize the linear coefficients of absorption of different materials that comprise the dummy.

  20. Electron densities by the maximum entropy method (MEM) for various types of prior densities: a case study on three amino acids and a tripeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathapa, Siriyara Jagannatha; Mondal, Swastik; van Smaalen, Sander

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic model densities according to Mondal et al. [(2012), Acta Cryst. A68, 568-581] are presented for independent atom models (IAM), IAMs after high-order refinements (IAM-HO), invariom (INV) models and multipole (MP) models of α-glycine, DL-serine, L-alanine and Ala-Tyr-Ala at T ≃ 20 K. Each dynamic model density is used as prior in the calculation of electron density according to the maximum entropy method (MEM). We show that at the bond-critical points (BCPs) of covalent C-C and C-N bonds the IAM-HO and INV priors produce reliable MEM density maps, including reliable values for the density and its Laplacian. The agreement between these MEM density maps and dynamic MP density maps is less good for polar C-O bonds, which is explained by the large spread of values of topological descriptors of C-O bonds in static MP densities. The density and Laplacian at BCPs of hydrogen bonds have similar values in MEM density maps obtained with all four kinds of prior densities. This feature is related to the smaller spatial variation of the densities in these regions, as expressed by small magnitudes of the Laplacians and the densities. It is concluded that the use of the IAM-HO prior instead of the IAM prior leads to improved MEM density maps. This observation shows interesting parallels to MP refinements, where the use of the IAM-HO as an initial model is the accepted procedure for solving MP parameters. A deconvolution of thermal motion and static density that is better than the deconvolution of the IAM appears to be necessary in order to arrive at the best MP models as well as at the best MEM densities.

  1. Risk mapping of Anopheles gambiae s.l. densities using remotely-sensed environmental and meteorological data in an urban area: Dakar, Senegal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Machault

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: High malaria transmission heterogeneity in an urban environment is basically due to the complex distribution of Anopheles larval habitats, sources of vectors. Understanding 1 the meteorological and ecological factors associated with differential larvae spatio-temporal distribution and 2 the vectors dynamic, both may lead to improving malaria control measures with remote sensing and high resolution data as key components. In this study a robust operational methodology for entomological malaria predictive risk maps in urban settings is developed. METHODS: The Tele-epidemiology approach, i.e., 1 intensive ground measurements (Anopheles larval habitats and Human Biting Rate, or HBR, 2 selection of the most appropriate satellite data (for mapping and extracting environmental and meteorological information, and 3 use of statistical models taking into account the spatio-temporal data variability has been applied in Dakar, Senegal. RESULTS: First step was to detect all water bodies in Dakar. Secondly, environmental and meteorological conditions in the vicinity of water bodies favoring the presence of Anopheles gambiae s.l. larvae were added. Then relationship between the predicted larval production and the field measured HBR was identified, in order to generate An. gambiae s.l. HBR high resolution maps (daily, 10-m pixel in space. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: A robust operational methodology for dynamic entomological malaria predictive risk maps in an urban setting includes spatio-temporal variability of An. gambiae s.l. larval habitats and An. gambiae s.l. HBR. The resulting risk maps are first examples of high resolution products which can be included in an operational warning and targeting system for the implementation of vector control measures.

  2. Mapping the energy and diffusion landscapes of membrane proteins at the cell surface using high-density single-molecule imaging and Bayesian inference: application to the multi-scale dynamics of glycine receptors in the neuronal membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Salvatico, Charlotte; Renner, Marianne; Specht, Christian G; Triller, Antoine; Dahan, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Protein mobility is conventionally analyzed in terms of an effective diffusion. Yet, this description often fails to properly distinguish and evaluate the physical parameters (such as the membrane friction) and the biochemical interactions governing the motion. Here, we present a method combining high-density single-molecule imaging and statistical inference to separately map the diffusion and energy landscapes of membrane proteins across the cell surface at ~100 nm resolution (with acquisition of a few minutes). When applying these analytical tools to glycine neurotransmitter receptors (GlyRs) at inhibitory synapses, we find that gephyrin scaffolds act as shallow energy traps (~3 kBT) for GlyRs, with a depth modulated by the biochemical properties of the receptor-gephyrin interaction loop. In turn, the inferred maps can be used to simulate the dynamics of proteins in the membrane, from the level of individual receptors to that of the population, and thereby, to model the stochastic fluctuations of physiologi...

  3. Optical Polarimetric Mapping of Ceres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Li, Jian-Yang; Kelley, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    The dwarf planet Ceres, with one quarter of its mass possibly as water, is of particular importance to understanding the origin and the evolution history of water in the inner solar system. It is also a real-life laboratory to study astrobiology. NASA's Dawn is returning detailed geological maps of Ceres until the end of this year. As a complement to the Dawn mission, using SPHERE/ZIMPOL at one of Very Large Telescopes in Chile, we obtained the optical polarimetric maps in the I and V band of the whole surface of Ceres in July and August, 2015. Polarimetric maps of Ceres are sensitive to the physical conditions (such as packing density and particle size distribution) and composition of its surface regolith. The comparative studies between our polarimetric maps and Dawn maps help us to understand the geological evolution and the space weathering processes on Ceres' surface. At the time of the ZIMPOL observations, with the best spatial resolution of about 0.02 arcsecond (equivalent to 30 km), we effectively obtained about 700 independent measurements of the surface in one polarimetric set. I will present the SPHERE observations and discuss our major findings.

  4. Obtaining of inulin acetate

    OpenAIRE

    Khusenov, Arslonnazar; Rakhmanberdiev, Gappar; Rakhimov, Dilshod; Khalikov, Muzaffar

    2014-01-01

    In the article first obtained inulin ester inulin acetate, by etherification of inulin with acetic anhydride has been exposed. Obtained product has been studied using elementary analysis and IR spectroscopy.

  5. A method for developing high-density SNP maps and its application at the type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AGTR1) locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonellis, Anthony; Rogus, John J; Canani, Luis H; Makita, Yuchiro; Pezzolesi, Marcus G; Nam, MoonSuk; Ng, Daniel; Moczulski, Dariusz; Warram, James H; Krolewski, Andrzej S

    2002-03-01

    Evaluating the potential genetic components of complex disease will likely be aided through the use of dense polymorphism maps. Previously, we reported evidence for linkage with diabetic nephropathy on chromosome 3q in a region encompassing the type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AGTR1) gene. To further investigate any role for this gene in disease onset, we set out to design a dense polymorphism map spanning the AGTR1 locus for the purpose of association studies. Toward this goal, we have developed a technique for rapid identification of polymorphisms in long stretches of genomic DNA. This approach uses long-range PCR, DNA pooling, and transposon-based DNA sequencing. Using this technique, we efficiently validated and genotyped 18 polymorphisms spanning the 60.5-kb AGTR1 locus. Our panel of polymorphisms has an average spacing of 3.2 kb and an average minor allele frequency of 24%.

  6. Modeling of plasma density in the earth's dayside inner magnetosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domrachev, VV; Chugunin, DV

    2002-01-01

    The results of comparison of the model profiles of density, obtained by means of the CDPDM model, with the experimental data of the ISEE-1 satellite for the years 1977-1983 are presented. The hypothesis on the validity of the mirror mapping of the convection boundary relative to the dawn-dusk

  7. Improving the accuracy of S02 column densities and emission rates obtained from upward-looking UV-spectroscopic measurements of volcanic plumes by taking realistic radiative transfer into account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Deutschmann, Tim; Werner, Cynthia; Sutton, A. Jeff; Elias, Tamar; Kelly, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is monitored using ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy at numerous volcanoes around the world due to its importance as a measure of volcanic activity and a tracer for other gaseous species. Recent studies have shown that failure to take realistic radiative transfer into account during the spectral retrieval of the collected data often leads to large errors in the calculated emission rates. Here, the framework for a new evaluation method which couples a radiative transfer model to the spectral retrieval is described. In it, absorption spectra are simulated, and atmospheric parameters are iteratively updated in the model until a best match to the measurement data is achieved. The evaluation algorithm is applied to two example Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements conducted at Kilauea volcano (Hawaii). The resulting emission rates were 20 and 90% higher than those obtained with a conventional DOAS retrieval performed between 305 and 315 nm, respectively, depending on the different SO2 and aerosol loads present in the volcanic plume. The internal consistency of the method was validated by measuring and modeling SO2 absorption features in a separate wavelength region around 375 nm and comparing the results. Although additional information about the measurement geometry and atmospheric conditions is needed in addition to the acquired spectral data, this method for the first time provides a means of taking realistic three-dimensional radiative transfer into account when analyzing UV-spectral absorption measurements of volcanic SO2 plumes.

  8. Saturation of an intra-gene pool linkage map: towards a unified consensus linkage map for fine mapping and synteny analysis in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Carlos H; Fernandez, Andrea C; Franco-Herrera, Natalia; Cichy, Karen A; McClean, Phillip E; Vanderleyden, Jos; Blair, Matthew W

    2011-01-01

    Map-based cloning and fine mapping to find genes of interest and marker assisted selection (MAS) requires good genetic maps with reproducible markers. In this study, we saturated the linkage map of the intra-gene pool population of common bean DOR364 × BAT477 (DB) by evaluating 2,706 molecular markers including SSR, SNP, and gene-based markers. On average the polymorphism rate was 7.7% due to the narrow genetic base between the parents. The DB linkage map consisted of 291 markers with a total map length of 1,788 cM. A consensus map was built using the core mapping populations derived from inter-gene pool crosses: DOR364 × G19833 (DG) and BAT93 × JALO EEP558 (BJ). The consensus map consisted of a total of 1,010 markers mapped, with a total map length of 2,041 cM across 11 linkage groups. On average, each linkage group on the consensus map contained 91 markers of which 83% were single copy markers. Finally, a synteny analysis was carried out using our highly saturated consensus maps compared with the soybean pseudo-chromosome assembly. A total of 772 marker sequences were compared with the soybean genome. A total of 44 syntenic blocks were identified. The linkage group Pv6 presented the most diverse pattern of synteny with seven syntenic blocks, and Pv9 showed the most consistent relations with soybean with just two syntenic blocks. Additionally, a co-linear analysis using common bean transcript map information against soybean coding sequences (CDS) revealed the relationship with 787 soybean genes. The common bean consensus map has allowed us to map a larger number of markers, to obtain a more complete coverage of the common bean genome. Our results, combined with synteny relationships provide tools to increase marker density in selected genomic regions to identify closely linked polymorphic markers for indirect selection, fine mapping or for positional cloning.

  9. Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Discovery and the Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map for Melon (Cucumis melo L.) Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Che-Wei; Wang, Yu-Hua; Tung, Chih-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Although genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) enables the efficient and low-cost generation of large numbers of markers, the utility of resultant genotypes are limited, because they are enormously error-prone and contain high proportions of missing data. In this study, we generated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for 109 recombinant inbred lines of melon (Cucumis melo L.) using the GBS approach and ordered them according to their physical position on the draft double haploid line DHL92 genome. Next, by investigating associations between these SNPs, we discovered that some segments on the physical map conflict with linkage relationships. Therefore, to filter out error-prone loci, 4,110 SNPs in which we have a high degree of confidence were selected as anchors to test independence with respect to unselected markers, and the resultant dataset was then analyzed using the Full-Sib Family Haplotype (FSFHap) algorithm in the software TASSEL 5.2. On the basis of this analysis, 22,933 loci that have an average rate of missing data of 0.281% were used to construct a genetic map, which spans 1,088.3 cM across 12 chromosomes and has a maximum spacing of 6.0 cM. Use of this high-quality linkage map enabled the identification of several quantitative trait loci (QTL) known to control traits in fruit and validated our approach. This study highlights the utility of GBS markers for the identification of trait-associated QTLs in melon and facilitates further investigation of genome structure.

  10. Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Discovery and the Construction of a High-Density Genetic Map for Melon (Cucumis melo L.) Using Genotyping-by-Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Che-Wei; Wang, Yu-Hua; Tung, Chih-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Although genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) enables the efficient and low-cost generation of large numbers of markers, the utility of resultant genotypes are limited, because they are enormously error-prone and contain high proportions of missing data. In this study, we generated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for 109 recombinant inbred lines of melon (Cucumis melo L.) using the GBS approach and ordered them according to their physical position on the draft double haploid line DHL92 genome. Next, by investigating associations between these SNPs, we discovered that some segments on the physical map conflict with linkage relationships. Therefore, to filter out error-prone loci, 4,110 SNPs in which we have a high degree of confidence were selected as anchors to test independence with respect to unselected markers, and the resultant dataset was then analyzed using the Full-Sib Family Haplotype (FSFHap) algorithm in the software TASSEL 5.2. On the basis of this analysis, 22,933 loci that have an average rate of missing data of 0.281% were used to construct a genetic map, which spans 1,088.3 cM across 12 chromosomes and has a maximum spacing of 6.0 cM. Use of this high-quality linkage map enabled the identification of several quantitative trait loci (QTL) known to control traits in fruit and validated our approach. This study highlights the utility of GBS markers for the identification of trait-associated QTLs in melon and facilitates further investigation of genome structure. PMID:28220139

  11. High-density Association Mapping and Interaction Analysis of PLA2R1 and HLA Regions with Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy in Japanese

    OpenAIRE

    Thiri, Myo; Honda, Kenjiro; Kashiwase, Koichi; Mabuchi, Akihiko; Suzuki, Hodaka; WATANABE, KIMIO; Nakayama, Masaaki; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Doi, Kent; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Noiri, Eisei

    2016-01-01

    Although recent studies showed anti-PLA2R antibody plays a crucial role in idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN), detailed HLA mapping and interaction between the HLA genes and PLA2R1 have not been investigated in IMN. We genotyped across the PLA2R1 gene and the HLA region, using 183 IMN patients and 811 healthy controls. Five SNPs around the PLA2R1 gene were significantly associated with IMN. In addition to the two SNPs previously reported to be strongly associated with IMN, rs3749119 and ...

  12. Landslide susceptibility map: from research to application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Federica; Reichenbach, Paola; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro; Felicioni, Giulia; Antonini, Guendalina

    2014-05-01

    qualitatively classifying the territory according to slope classes. For the Perugia Municipality the susceptibility map was obtained combining results of statistical multivariate models and landslide density map. In particular, in the first phase a susceptibility zonation was prepared using different single and combined probability statistical multivariate techniques. The zonation was then combined and compared with the landslide density map in order to reclassify the false negative (portion of the territory classified by the model as stable affected by slope failures). The semi-quantitative resulting map was classified in five susceptibility classes. For each class a set of technical regulation was established to manage the territory.

  13. Fine mapping of chromosome 5p15.33 based on a targeted deep sequencing and high density genotyping identifies novel lung cancer susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachuri, Linda; Amos, Christopher I; McKay, James D; Johansson, Mattias; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Johansson, Mikael; Quirós, J Ramón; Sieri, Sabina; Travis, Ruth C; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E; Wilkens, Lynne; Goodman, Gary E; Chen, Chu; Doherty, Jennifer A; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Su, Li; Tworoger, Shelley; Zhang, Xuehong; Kraft, Peter; Zaridze, David; Field, John K; Marcus, Michael W; Davies, Michael P A; Hyde, Russell; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa; Severi, Gianluca; Giles, Graham G; Liu, Geoffrey; McLaughlin, John R; Li, Yafang; Xiao, Xiangjun; Fehringer, Gord; Zong, Xuchen; Denroche, Robert E; Zuzarte, Philip C; McPherson, John D; Brennan, Paul; Hung, Rayjean J

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 5p15.33 has been identified as a lung cancer susceptibility locus, however the underlying causal mechanisms were not fully elucidated. Previous fine-mapping studies of this locus have relied on imputation or investigated a small number of known, common variants. This study represents a significant advance over previous research by investigating a large number of novel, rare variants, as well as their underlying mechanisms through telomere length. Variants for this fine-mapping study were identified through a targeted deep sequencing (average depth of coverage greater than 4000×) of 576 individuals. Subsequently, 4652 SNPs, including 1108 novel SNPs, were genotyped in 5164 cases and 5716 controls of European ancestry. After adjusting for known risk loci, rs2736100 and rs401681, we identified a new, independent lung cancer susceptibility variant in LPCAT1: rs139852726 (OR = 0.46, P = 4.73×10(-9)), and three new adenocarcinoma risk variants in TERT: rs61748181 (OR = 0.53, P = 2.64×10(-6)), rs112290073 (OR = 1.85, P = 1.27×10(-5)), rs138895564 (OR = 2.16, P = 2.06×10(-5); among young cases, OR = 3.77, P = 8.41×10(-4)). In addition, we found that rs139852726 (P = 1.44×10(-3)) was associated with telomere length in a sample of 922 healthy individuals. The gene-based SKAT-O analysis implicated TERT as the most relevant gene in the 5p15.33 region for adenocarcinoma (P = 7.84×10(-7)) and lung cancer (P = 2.37×10(-5)) risk. In this largest fine-mapping study to investigate a large number of rare and novel variants within 5p15.33, we identified novel lung and adenocarcinoma susceptibility loci with large effects and provided support for the role of telomere length as the potential underlying mechanism.

  14. Discovery and fine-mapping of adiposity loci using high density imputation of genome-wide association studies in individuals of African ancestry: African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Maggie C Y; Graff, Mariaelisa; Lu, Yingchang; Justice, Anne E; Mudgal, Poorva; Liu, Ching-Ti; Young, Kristin; Yanek, Lisa R; Feitosa, Mary F; Wojczynski, Mary K; Rand, Kristin; Brody, Jennifer A; Cade, Brian E; Dimitrov, Latchezar; Duan, Qing; Guo, Xiuqing; Lange, Leslie A; Nalls, Michael A; Okut, Hayrettin; Tajuddin, Salman M; Tayo, Bamidele O; Vedantam, Sailaja; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Chen, Guanjie; Chen, Wei-Min; Chesi, Alessandra; Irvin, Marguerite R; Padhukasahasram, Badri; Smith, Jennifer A; Zheng, Wei; Allison, Matthew A; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; Bartz, Traci M; Berndt, Sonja I; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J; Bottinger, Erwin P; Carpten, John; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Conti, David V; Cooper, Richard S; Fornage, Myriam; Freedman, Barry I; Garcia, Melissa; Goodman, Phyllis J; Hsu, Yu-Han H; Hu, Jennifer; Huff, Chad D; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Kittles, Rick; Klein, Eric; Li, Jin; McKnight, Barbara; Nayak, Uma; Nemesure, Barbara; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Olshan, Andrew; Press, Michael F; Rohde, Rebecca; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Salako, Babatunde; Sanderson, Maureen; Shao, Yaming; Siscovick, David S; Stanford, Janet L; Stevens, Victoria L; Stram, Alex; Strom, Sara S; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Witte, John S; Yao, Jie; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ziegler, Regina G; Zonderman, Alan B; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Ambs, Stefan; Cushman, Mary; Faul, Jessica D; Hakonarson, Hakon; Levin, Albert M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Ware, Erin B; Weir, David R; Zhao, Wei; Zhi, Degui; Arnett, Donna K; Grant, Struan F A; Kardia, Sharon L R; Oloapde, Olufunmilayo I; Rao, D C; Rotimi, Charles N; Sale, Michele M; Williams, L Keoki; Zemel, Babette S; Becker, Diane M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Evans, Michele K; Harris, Tamara B; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Li, Yun; Patel, Sanjay R; Psaty, Bruce M; Rotter, Jerome I; Wilson, James G; Bowden, Donald W; Cupples, L Adrienne; Haiman, Christopher A; Loos, Ruth J F; North, Kari E

    2017-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified >300 loci associated with measures of adiposity including body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI), but few have been identified through screening of the African ancestry genomes. We performed large scale meta-analyses and replications in up to 52,895 individuals for BMI and up to 23,095 individuals for WHRadjBMI from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium (AAAGC) using 1000 Genomes phase 1 imputed GWAS to improve coverage of both common and low frequency variants in the low linkage disequilibrium African ancestry genomes. In the sex-combined analyses, we identified one novel locus (TCF7L2/HABP2) for WHRadjBMI and eight previously established loci at P < 5×10-8: seven for BMI, and one for WHRadjBMI in African ancestry individuals. An additional novel locus (SPRYD7/DLEU2) was identified for WHRadjBMI when combined with European GWAS. In the sex-stratified analyses, we identified three novel loci for BMI (INTS10/LPL and MLC1 in men, IRX4/IRX2 in women) and four for WHRadjBMI (SSX2IP, CASC8, PDE3B and ZDHHC1/HSD11B2 in women) in individuals of African ancestry or both African and European ancestry. For four of the novel variants, the minor allele frequency was low (<5%). In the trans-ethnic fine mapping of 47 BMI loci and 27 WHRadjBMI loci that were locus-wide significant (P < 0.05 adjusted for effective number of variants per locus) from the African ancestry sex-combined and sex-stratified analyses, 26 BMI loci and 17 WHRadjBMI loci contained ≤ 20 variants in the credible sets that jointly account for 99% posterior probability of driving the associations. The lead variants in 13 of these loci had a high probability of being causal. As compared to our previous HapMap imputed GWAS for BMI and WHRadjBMI including up to 71,412 and 27,350 African ancestry individuals, respectively, our results suggest that 1000 Genomes imputation showed modest improvement in

  15. Discovery and fine-mapping of adiposity loci using high density imputation of genome-wide association studies in individuals of African ancestry: African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie C Y Ng

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified >300 loci associated with measures of adiposity including body mass index (BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (adjusted for BMI, WHRadjBMI, but few have been identified through screening of the African ancestry genomes. We performed large scale meta-analyses and replications in up to 52,895 individuals for BMI and up to 23,095 individuals for WHRadjBMI from the African Ancestry Anthropometry Genetics Consortium (AAAGC using 1000 Genomes phase 1 imputed GWAS to improve coverage of both common and low frequency variants in the low linkage disequilibrium African ancestry genomes. In the sex-combined analyses, we identified one novel locus (TCF7L2/HABP2 for WHRadjBMI and eight previously established loci at P < 5×10-8: seven for BMI, and one for WHRadjBMI in African ancestry individuals. An additional novel locus (SPRYD7/DLEU2 was identified for WHRadjBMI when combined with European GWAS. In the sex-stratified analyses, we identified three novel loci for BMI (INTS10/LPL and MLC1 in men, IRX4/IRX2 in women and four for WHRadjBMI (SSX2IP, CASC8, PDE3B and ZDHHC1/HSD11B2 in women in individuals of African ancestry or both African and European ancestry. For four of the novel variants, the minor allele frequency was low (<5%. In the trans-ethnic fine mapping of 47 BMI loci and 27 WHRadjBMI loci that were locus-wide significant (P < 0.05 adjusted for effective number of variants per locus from the African ancestry sex-combined and sex-stratified analyses, 26 BMI loci and 17 WHRadjBMI loci contained ≤ 20 variants in the credible sets that jointly account for 99% posterior probability of driving the associations. The lead variants in 13 of these loci had a high probability of being causal. As compared to our previous HapMap imputed GWAS for BMI and WHRadjBMI including up to 71,412 and 27,350 African ancestry individuals, respectively, our results suggest that 1000 Genomes imputation showed modest improvement

  16. Fine mapping of chromosome 5p15.33 based on a targeted deep sequencing and high density genotyping identifies novel lung cancer susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachuri, Linda; Amos, Christopher I.; McKay, James D.; Johansson, Mattias; Vineis, Paolo; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.Bas; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Johansson, Mikael; Quirós, J.Ramón; Sieri, Sabina; Travis, Ruth C.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Le Marchand, Loic; Henderson, Brian E.; Wilkens, Lynne; Goodman, Gary E.; Chen, Chu; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Su, Li; Tworoger, Shelley; Zhang, Xuehong; Kraft, Peter; Zaridze, David; Field, John K.; Marcus, Michael W.; Davies, Michael P.A.; Hyde, Russell; Caporaso, Neil E.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Severi, Gianluca; Giles, Graham G.; Liu, Geoffrey; McLaughlin, John R.; Li, Yafang; Xiao, Xiangjun; Fehringer, Gord; Zong, Xuchen; Denroche, Robert E.; Zuzarte, Philip C.; McPherson, John D.; Brennan, Paul; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome 5p15.33 has been identified as a lung cancer susceptibility locus, however the underlying causal mechanisms were not fully elucidated. Previous fine-mapping studies of this locus have relied on imputation or investigated a small number of known, common variants. This study represents a significant advance over previous research by investigating a large number of novel, rare variants, as well as their underlying mechanisms through telomere length. Variants for this fine-mapping study were identified through a targeted deep sequencing (average depth of coverage greater than 4000×) of 576 individuals. Subsequently, 4652 SNPs, including 1108 novel SNPs, were genotyped in 5164 cases and 5716 controls of European ancestry. After adjusting for known risk loci, rs2736100 and rs401681, we identified a new, independent lung cancer susceptibility variant in LPCAT1: rs139852726 (OR = 0.46, P = 4.73×10–9), and three new adenocarcinoma risk variants in TERT: rs61748181 (OR = 0.53, P = 2.64×10–6), rs112290073 (OR = 1.85, P = 1.27×10–5), rs138895564 (OR = 2.16, P = 2.06×10–5; among young cases, OR = 3.77, P = 8.41×10–4). In addition, we found that rs139852726 (P = 1.44×10–3) was associated with telomere length in a sample of 922 healthy individuals. The gene-based SKAT-O analysis implicated TERT as the most relevant gene in the 5p15.33 region for adenocarcinoma (P = 7.84×10–7) and lung cancer (P = 2.37×10–5) risk. In this largest fine-mapping study to investigate a large number of rare and novel variants within 5p15.33, we identified novel lung and adenocarcinoma susceptibility loci with large effects and provided support for the role of telomere length as the potential underlying mechanism. PMID:26590902

  17. Georeferenced LiDAR 3D Vine Plantation Map Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Meritxell Queraltó; Jordi Llop; Emilio Gil; Jordi Llorens

    2011-01-01

    The use of electronic devices for canopy characterization has recently been widely discussed. Among such devices, LiDAR sensors appear to be the most accurate and precise. Information obtained with LiDAR sensors during reading while driving a tractor along a crop row can be managed and transformed into canopy density maps by evaluating the frequency of LiDAR returns. This paper describes a proposed methodology to obtain a georeferenced canopy map by combining the information obtained with LiD...

  18. Quantum dynamical semigroups and non-decomposable positive maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benatti, Fabio; Floreanini, Roberto; Piani, Marco

    2004-06-07

    We study dynamical semigroups of positive, but not completely positive maps on finite-dimensional bipartite systems and analyze properties of their generators in relation to non-decomposability and bound-entanglement. An example of non-decomposable semigroup leading to a (4x4)-dimensional bound-entangled density matrix is explicitly obtained.

  19. The Preparation of Microzonation Map of the Gulf of Buyukcekmece using results obtain by Vertical Electrical Sounding Measurements with Multi-Channel Analysis of Surface Wave and Microtremor Array Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezel, Okan; Karabulut, Savas; Imre, Nazire; Caglak, Faruk; Yeziz, Hatice; Ozcep, Ferhat

    2013-04-01

    Istanbul is a megacity with 17 million inhabitants. After the 17 August 1999 earthquake, many researchers have focused on the mitigation of earthquake hazards in the Sea of Marmara and its vicinity. If we want to lessen the effects of such an earthquake, we have to learn about three different types of problems which are properties of the earthquake's source, whether of site effect or properties of engineering structures. When İstanbul Metropolitian Municipilaty obtained a World Bank Credit 5 years ago, they had a microzonation report for only a limited area which finished at Har amidere in the western site of Istanbul. Because they will not have any new project, the western side of Haramidere hasn't been studied by any scientist. For this reason, we focused on the Gulf of Buyukcekmece which is located on the western part of Haramidere and suffered in the 1999 earthquake. There are five geological units in the study area such as Bakirkoy formation, Gurpinar formation, Çukurçeşme formation, Güngören formation and Alluvial deposit. We conducted some measurements which are multi-channel analysis of surface wave (MASW), microtremor array method (MAM) and vertical electrical sounding(VES). The aim of using VES data is to determine bedrock depth, learn whether there is a new fault and learn the electrical properties of each layer of bedrock. The MASW method is so attactive, cheap and fast. According to seismic refraction, it has some advantages that are determining the deeper part of sub-surface, lower velocity layers and velocity contrast. Especially, we use natural sources; MAM methods are more useful method in the city. For all of these purposes, we collected MASW and MAM measurements at 80 sites and VES measurements at 20 sites. As primary results for VES measurements, we determined the bedrock depth by evaluating the VES measurements for the central, eastern and western part of Buyukcekmece Gulf. Bedrock depth is 308 meters in the central and eastern part of

  20. Benzene on Cu(111): I. Application of van der Waals-Density Functional Formalism to Determine Binding Sites and Energy Contour Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Kristian; Einstein, T. L.; Hyldgaard, Per

    2010-03-01

    With a recently developed van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF)footnotetextM. Dion et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 (2004) 246401 we study the adsorption of benzene on Cu(111).footnotetextKB, TLE, and PH, Phys. Rev. B 80 (2009) 155431 The vdW-DF inclusion of nonlocal correlations changes the relative stability of 8 high-symmetry binding-position options and increases the adsorption energy by over an order of magnitude, achieving good agreement with experiment. The metallic surface state survives benzene adsorption. From a contour plot of the potential energy, we find that benzene can move almost freely along a honeycomb web of ``corridors" linking fcc and hcp sites via bridge sites, consistent with the low diffusion barrier in experiment.

  1. QTL Analysis of Spike Morphological Traits and Plant Height in Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Using a High-Density SNP and SSR-Based Linkage Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijie Zhai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wheat yield can be enhanced by modifying the spike morphology and the plant height. In this study, a population of 191 F9 recombinant inbred lines (RILs was developed from a cross between two winter cultivars Yumai 8679 and Jing 411. A dense genetic linkage map with 10,816 markers was constructed by incorporating single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and simple sequence repeat (SSR marker information. Five spike morphological traits and plant height were evaluated under nine environments for the RILs and parental lines, and the number of detected environmentally stable QTLs were 18 and 3, respectively. The 1RS/1BL (rye translocation increased both spike length and spikelet number with constant spikelet compactness. The QPht.cau-2D.1 was identical to gene Rht8, which decreased spike length without modifying spikelet number. Notably, four novel QTLs locating on chromosomes 1AS (QSc.cau-1A.1, 2DS (QSc.cau-2D.1 and 7BS (QSl.cau-7B.1 and QSl.cau-7B.2 were firstly identified in this study, which provide further insights into the genetic factors that shaped the spike morphology in wheat. Moreover, SNP markers tightly linked to previously reported QTLs will eventually facilitate future studies including their positional cloning or marker-assisted selection.

  2. High-density genetic map and identification of QTLs for responses to temperature and salinity stresses in the model brown alga Ectocarpus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avia, Komlan; Coelho, Susana M.; Montecinos, Gabriel J.; Cormier, Alexandre; Lerck, Fiona; Mauger, Stéphane; Faugeron, Sylvain; Valero, Myriam; Cock, J. Mark; Boudry, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Deciphering the genetic architecture of adaptation of brown algae to environmental stresses such as temperature and salinity is of evolutionary as well as of practical interest. The filamentous brown alga Ectocarpus sp. is a model for the brown algae and its genome has been sequenced. As sessile organisms, brown algae need to be capable of resisting the various abiotic stressors that act in the intertidal zone (e.g. osmotic pressure, temperature, salinity, UV radiation) and previous studies have shown that an important proportion of the expressed genes is regulated in response to hyposaline, hypersaline or oxidative stress conditions. Using the double digest RAD sequencing method, we constructed a dense genetic map with 3,588 SNP markers and identified 39 QTLs for growth-related traits and their plasticity under different temperature and salinity conditions (tolerance to high temperature and low salinity). GO enrichment tests within QTL intervals highlighted membrane transport processes such as ion transporters. Our study represents a significant step towards deciphering the genetic basis of adaptation of Ectocarpus sp. to stress conditions and provides a substantial resource to the increasing list of tools generated for the species. PMID:28256542

  3. Extensive chromosome homoeology among Brassiceae species were revealed by comparative genetic mapping with high-density EST-based SNP markers in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Hasegawa, Yoichi; Saito, Masako; Shirasawa, Sachiko; Fukushima, Aki; Ito, Toyoaki; Fujii, Hiroshi; Kishitani, Sachie; Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Nishio, Takeshi

    2011-10-01

    A linkage map of expressed sequence tag (EST)-based markers in radish (Raphanus sativus L.) was constructed using a low-cost and high-efficiency single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping method named multiplex polymerase chain reaction-mixed probe dot-blot analysis developed in this study. Seven hundred and forty-six SNP markers derived from EST sequences of R. sativus were assigned to nine linkage groups with a total length of 806.7 cM. By BLASTN, 726 markers were found to have homologous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, and 72 syntenic regions, which have great potential for utilizing genomic information of the model species A. thaliana in basic and applied genetics of R. sativus, were identified. By construction and analysis of the genome structures of R. sativus based on the 24 genomic blocks within the Brassicaceae ancestral karyotype, 23 of the 24 genomic blocks were detected in the genome of R. sativus, and half of them were found to be triplicated. Comparison of the genome structure of R. sativus with those of the A, B, and C genomes of Brassica species and that of Sinapis alba L. revealed extensive chromosome homoeology among Brassiceae species, which would facilitate transfer of the genomic information from one Brassiceae species to another.

  4. Achievement of a short term three dimensional electron density mapping of the ionosphere in the European sector: Comparisons with the IRI model for quiet-moderate geomagnetic-ionospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrella, M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper will be described the procedure followed for the achievement of a short term three dimensional (3-D) electron density mapping of the ionosphere in the European area. It consists of three main steps: (1) foF2 and M(3000)F2 short-term forecasts, (foF2STF) and (M3000F2STF), are calculated at 12 ionospheric observatories scattered in the European area; (2) the values of foF2STF and M3000F2STF on a grid of equi-spaced points, (foF2STF,GP) and (M3000F2STF,GP), are calculated by means of an appropriate interpolation algorithm by using the foF2STF and M3000F2STF data; (3) foF2STF,GP and M3000F2STF,GP data ingestion into the IRI model is employed to produce a short term 3-D electron density mapping (ST-3D-M) of the ionosphere. The electron density profiles provided by the ST-3D-M and IRI models, were compared with the electron density profiles autoscaled by the Automatic Real-Time Ionogram Scaler with True-height (ARTIST) system, which are here considered as the truth profiles. The results of these comparisons, shown for a certain number of epochs during quiet-moderate geomagnetic-ionospheric conditions, in the truth-sites of Athens (38○.0‧N, 23○.5‧E), Chilton (51○.5‧N, -0○.6‧W), Dourbes (50○.1‧ N, 4○.6‧E), Pruhonice (50○.0‧N, 14○.6‧E), Rome (41○.9‧N, 12○.5‧E), and Tortosa (40○.8‧N, 0○.5‧E), indicate that the ST-3D-M as forecasting tool can be considered generally reliable.

  5. [Erythromycin ethylsuccinate obtaining possibilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Cătălina Daniela; Stefanache, Alina; Tântaru, Gladiola; Poiată, Antonia; Dumitrache, M; Diaconu, D E; Profire, Lenuţa

    2008-01-01

    In this study we tried to improve the erythromycin ethylsuccinate obtaining, having in view to separate the erythromycin ester by crystallization in water. The erythromycin acylation and the erythromycin ethylsuccinate crystallization were realized, following the next steps: 1. the acylation of the erythromycin with a methylene chloride solution of monoethylsuccinyl chloride, at 25-28 degrees C for 3 hours in the presence of NaHCO3; 2. the transfer of the erythromycin ethylsuccinate from methylene chloride solution in acetone solution by distillation of mixture methylene chloride: acetone 1:1 at 25-28 degrees C; 3. erythromycin ethylsuccinate separation by crystallization in water at pH = 8-8.5 and 5 degrees C for 90 minutes. The quality control for the erythromycin ester was performed according to the Xth edition of Romanian Pharmacopoeia standards using national standard for erythromycin ethylsuccinate and national standard for erythromycin with an activity of 1: 937 U and 2.02% humidity. The Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341 was used as a test microorganism and a thin layer cromatography was performed for qualitative control. 13.1 g of erythromycin ethylsuccinate were obtained with an output of the process of 82.02%. Using water for the separation of erythromycin ethylsuccinate the output of the process is greater (82.02%) than in case of using petroleum ether (74.14%) or hexane (80.25%). The thin layer cromatography revealed an Rf = 0.56 and the microbiological activity of the erythromycin ethylsuccinate was 98.7% compared with the standard. Using water instead of hexane or petroleum ether is gainful for the separation of erythromycin ethylsuccinate from the reaction medium. The obtained erythromycin ethylsuccinate corresponds to the Xth edition of Romanian Pharmacopoeia standards. So, the raw materials consumption is decreased, the costs are cut down, the obtained product purity is high and the output of the process is greater.

  6. A high density SNP array for the domestic horse and extant Perissodactyla: utility for association mapping, genetic diversity, and phylogeny studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly E McCue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An equine SNP genotyping array was developed and evaluated on a panel of samples representing 14 domestic horse breeds and 18 evolutionarily related species. More than 54,000 polymorphic SNPs provided an average inter-SNP spacing of ∼43 kb. The mean minor allele frequency across domestic horse breeds was 0.23, and the number of polymorphic SNPs within breeds ranged from 43,287 to 52,085. Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD in most breeds declined rapidly over the first 50-100 kb and reached background levels within 1-2 Mb. The extent of LD and the level of inbreeding were highest in the Thoroughbred and lowest in the Mongolian and Quarter Horse. Multidimensional scaling (MDS analyses demonstrated the tight grouping of individuals within most breeds, close proximity of related breeds, and less tight grouping in admixed breeds. The close relationship between the Przewalski's Horse and the domestic horse was demonstrated by pair-wise genetic distance and MDS. Genotyping of other Perissodactyla (zebras, asses, tapirs, and rhinoceros was variably successful, with call rates and the number of polymorphic loci varying across taxa. Parsimony analysis placed the modern horse as sister taxa to Equus przewalski. The utility of the SNP array in genome-wide association was confirmed by mapping the known recessive chestnut coat color locus (MC1R and defining a conserved haplotype of ∼750 kb across all breeds. These results demonstrate the high quality of this SNP genotyping resource, its usefulness in diverse genome analyses of the horse, and potential use in related species.

  7. Confirmation of quantitative trait loci using a low-density single nucleotide polymorphism map for twinning and ovulation rate on bovine chromosome 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, M F; Kuehn, L A; Cushman, R A; Snelling, W M; Echternkamp, S E; Thallman, R M

    2009-01-01

    Traditional genetic selection in cattle for traits with low heritability, such as reproduction, has had very little success. With the addition of DNA technologies to the genetic selection toolbox for livestock, the opportunity may exist to improve reproductive efficiency more rapidly in cattle. The US Meat Animal Research Center Production Efficiency Population has 9,186 twinning and 29,571 ovulation rate records for multiple generations of animals, but a significant number of these animals do not have tissue samples available for DNA genotyping. The objectives of this study were to confirm QTL for twinning and ovulation rate previously found on BTA5 and to evaluate the ability of GenoProb to predict genotypic information in a pedigree containing 16,035 animals when using genotypes for 24 SNP from 3 data sets containing 48, 724, or 2,900 animals. Marker data for 21 microsatellites on BTA5 with 297 to 3,395 animals per marker were used in conjunction with each data set of genotyped animals. Genotypic probabilities for females were used to calculate independent variables for regressions of additive, dominance, and imprinting effects. Genotypic regressions were fitted as fixed effects in a 2-trait mixed model analysis by using multiple-trait derivative-free REML. Each SNP was analyzed individually, followed by backward selection fitting all individually significant SNP simultaneously and then removing the least significant SNP until only significant SNP were left. Five significant SNP associations were detected for twinning rate and 3 were detected for ovulation rate. Two of these SNP, 1 for each trait, were significant for imprinting. Additional modeling of paternal and maternal allelic effects confirmed the initial results of imprinting done by contrasting heterozygotes. These results are supported by comparative mapping of mouse and human imprinted genes to this region of bovine chromosome 5.

  8. A High Density SNP Array for the Domestic Horse and Extant Perissodactyla: Utility for Association Mapping, Genetic Diversity, and Phylogeny Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Molly E.; Bannasch, Danika L.; Petersen, Jessica L.; Gurr, Jessica; Bailey, Ernie; Binns, Matthew M.; Distl, Ottmar; Guérin, Gérard; Hasegawa, Telhisa; Hill, Emmeline W.; Leeb, Tosso; Lindgren, Gabriella; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Røed, Knut H.; Ryder, Oliver A.; Swinburne, June E.; Tozaki, Teruaki; Valberg, Stephanie J.; Vaudin, Mark; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    An equine SNP genotyping array was developed and evaluated on a panel of samples representing 14 domestic horse breeds and 18 evolutionarily related species. More than 54,000 polymorphic SNPs provided an average inter-SNP spacing of ∼43 kb. The mean minor allele frequency across domestic horse breeds was 0.23, and the number of polymorphic SNPs within breeds ranged from 43,287 to 52,085. Genome-wide linkage disequilibrium (LD) in most breeds declined rapidly over the first 50–100 kb and reached background levels within 1–2 Mb. The extent of LD and the level of inbreeding were highest in the Thoroughbred and lowest in the Mongolian and Quarter Horse. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) analyses demonstrated the tight grouping of individuals within most breeds, close proximity of related breeds, and less tight grouping in admixed breeds. The close relationship between the Przewalski's Horse and the domestic horse was demonstrated by pair-wise genetic distance and MDS. Genotyping of other Perissodactyla (zebras, asses, tapirs, and rhinoceros) was variably successful, with call rates and the number of polymorphic loci varying across taxa. Parsimony analysis placed the modern horse as sister taxa to Equus przewalski. The utility of the SNP array in genome-wide association was confirmed by mapping the known recessive chestnut coat color locus (MC1R) and defining a conserved haplotype of ∼750 kb across all breeds. These results demonstrate the high quality of this SNP genotyping resource, its usefulness in diverse genome analyses of the horse, and potential use in related species. PMID:22253606

  9. Visual object processing as a function of stimulus energy, retinal eccentricity and Gestalt configuration: a high-density electrical mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, A C; Shpaner, M; Molholm, S; Foxe, J J

    2012-09-27

    To reveal the fundamental processes underlying the different stages of visual object perception, most studies have manipulated relatively complex images, such as photographs, line drawings of natural objects, or perceptual illusions. Here, rather than starting from complex images and working backward to infer simpler processes, we investigated how the visual system parses and integrates information contained in stimuli of the most basic variety. Simple scatterings of a few points of light were manipulated in terms of their numerosity, spatial extent, and organization, and high-density electrophysiological recordings were made from healthy adults engaged in an unrelated task. We reasoned that this approach permitted an uncontaminated view of the spatio-temporal dynamics of the related neural processes. We were guided in our predictions by the "frame-and-fill" model for object perception, whereby fast inputs to the dorsal stream of the visual "where" system first frame the spatial extent of visual objects, which are subsequently "filled-in" by the slower activation of the ventral stream of the visual "what" system. Our findings were consistent with this view, showing a rapidly-onsetting effect of spatial extent in dorsal stream sources, and later-onsetting effects due to dot number and symmetry, which were deemed to be more closely tied to the details of object identity, from ventral stream sources. This collection of observations provides an important baseline from which to understand the spatio-temporal properties of basic visual object perception, and from which to test dysfunction of this system in clinical populations.

  10. Fine mapping and association studies of a high-density lipoprotein cholesterol linkage region on chromosome 16 in French-Canadian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastani, Zari; Pajukanta, Päivi; Marcil, Michel; Rudzicz, Nicholas; Ruel, Isabelle; Bailey, Swneke D; Lee, Jenny C; Lemire, Mathieu; Faith, Janet; Platko, Jill; Rioux, John; Hudson, Thomas J; Gaudet, Daniel; Engert, James C; Genest, Jacques

    2010-03-01

    Low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To identify novel genetic variants that contribute to HDL-C, we performed genome-wide scans and quantitative association studies in two study samples: a Quebec-wide study consisting of 11 multigenerational families and a study of 61 families from the Saguenay-Lac St-Jean (SLSJ) region of Quebec. The heritability of HDL-C in these study samples was 0.73 and 0.49, respectively. Variance components linkage methods identified a LOD score of 2.61 at 98 cM near the marker D16S515 in Quebec-wide families and an LOD score of 2.96 at 86 cM near the marker D16S2624 in SLSJ families. In the Quebec-wide sample, four families showed segregation over a 25.5-cM (18 Mb) region, which was further reduced to 6.6 Mb with additional markers. The coding regions of all genes within this region were sequenced. A missense variant in CHST6 segregated in four families and, with additional families, we observed a P value of 0.015 for this variant. However, an association study of this single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in unrelated Quebec-wide samples was not significant. We also identified an SNP (rs11646677) in the same region, which was significantly associated with a low HDL-C (P=0.016) in the SLSJ study sample. In addition, RT-PCR results from cultured cells showed a significant difference in the expression of CHST6 and KIAA1576, another gene in the region. Our data constitute additional evidence for a locus on chromosome 16q23-24 that affects HDL-C levels in two independent French-Canadian studies.

  11. 基于高密度肌电电势图的正常吞咽过程可视化研究%Visualization of Muscle Activities of Normal Swallowing Using High-Density Surface Electromyography Maps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱明星; 于滨; 方鹏; 李光林

    2013-01-01

      从体表采集吞咽肌群的肌电信号可以为吞咽功能评估、吞咽障碍诊断及其康复治疗提供重要的电生理信息。目前利用体表肌电信号针对吞咽生理的临床研究通常只采用了少量电极(2~4个),难以从空间分布角度进行分析。为此,本文提出一种高密度肌电技术,通过颈前区域覆盖的电极阵列,同步采集96通道肌电信号进行分析。通过分析连续时间窗口内96通道的均方根值,建立一系列动态二维肌电电势图,实现了吞咽肌电信息的可视化。本研究招募了5名正常受试者参与实验,研究结果表明:正常受试者的动态肌电电势图模型可以反映正常吞咽过程中相关肌群的电生理活动的分布。这些初步结果验证了本方法可以为吞咽肌群活动提供可靠的动态描述信息,也可以作为吞咽障碍临床评估的辅助手段。%This study aims to develop a new approach to visualize the global myoelectric activities related to normal swallowing in human. The high-density surface electromyography (sEMG) signals were recorded by a two-dimensional (2D) 96-electrodes array on the neck region while subjects were performing specified swallowing tasks. The root mean square (RMS) of the sEMG signals was calculated for the 96 channels to construct 2D sEMG maps of the muscle activities. Along the swallowing process, a series of 2D color sEMG maps were concatenated as a dynamic topographical video of swallowing. The dynamic high-density sEMG maps provided the spatial and temporal properties of the electrical muscle activity and presented the muscle contraction coordination which was closely related to the swallowing function. The exeprimental results of this pilot study from five normal subjects show that their sEMG maps represent the consistent patterns in the distribution of muscle activities along with a swallowing process. This might suggest that the dynamic swallowing sEMG maps

  12. Unique Microstructural Changes in the Brain Associated with Urological Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (UCPPS) Revealed by Diffusion Tensor MRI, Super-Resolution Track Density Imaging, and Statistical Parameter Mapping: A MAPP Network Neuroimaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodworth, Davis; Mayer, Emeran; Leu, Kevin; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Naliboff, Bruce D; Labus, Jennifer S; Tillisch, Kirsten; Kutch, Jason J; Farmer, Melissa A; Apkarian, A Vania; Johnson, Kevin A; Mackey, Sean C; Ness, Timothy J; Landis, J Richard; Deutsch, Georg; Harris, Richard E; Clauw, Daniel J; Mullins, Chris; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2015-01-01

    Studies have suggested chronic pain syndromes are associated with neural reorganization in specific regions associated with perception, processing, and integration of pain. Urological chronic pelvic pain syndrome (UCPPS) represents a collection of pain syndromes characterized by pelvic pain, namely Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) and Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome (IC/PBS), that are both poorly understood in their pathophysiology, and treated ineffectively. We hypothesized patients with UCPPS may have microstructural differences in the brain compared with healthy control subjects (HCs), as well as patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a common gastrointestinal pain disorder. In the current study we performed population-based voxel-wise DTI and super-resolution track density imaging (TDI) in a large, two-center sample of phenotyped patients from the multicenter cohort with UCPPS (N = 45), IBS (N = 39), and HCs (N = 56) as part of the MAPP Research Network. Compared with HCs, UCPPS patients had lower fractional anisotropy (FA), lower generalized anisotropy (GA), lower track density, and higher mean diffusivity (MD) in brain regions commonly associated with perception and integration of pain information. Results also showed significant differences in specific anatomical regions in UCPPS patients when compared with IBS patients, consistent with microstructural alterations specific to UCPPS. While IBS patients showed clear sex related differences in FA, MD, GA, and track density consistent with previous reports, few such differences were observed in UCPPS patients. Heat maps illustrating the correlation between specific regions of interest and various pain and urinary symptom scores showed clustering of significant associations along the cortico-basal ganglia-thalamic-cortical loop associated with pain integration, modulation, and perception. Together, results suggest patients with UCPPS have extensive microstructural

  13. Model-based Acceleration of Parameter mapping (MAP) for saturation prepared radially acquired data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Gia, Johannes; Stäb, Daniel; Wech, Tobias; Hahn, Dietbert; Köstler, Herbert

    2013-12-01

    A reconstruction technique called Model-based Acceleration of Parameter mapping (MAP) is presented allowing for quantification of longitudinal relaxation time and proton density from radial single-shot measurements after saturation recovery magnetization preparation. Using a mono-exponential model in image space, an iterative fitting algorithm is used to reconstruct one well resolved and consistent image for each of the projections acquired during the saturation recovery relaxation process. The functionality of the algorithm is examined in numerical simulations, phantom experiments, and in-vivo studies. MAP reconstructions of single-shot acquisitions feature the same image quality and resolution as fully sampled reference images in phantom and in-vivo studies. The longitudinal relaxation times obtained from the MAP reconstructions are in very good agreement with the reference values in numerical simulations as well as phantom and in-vivo measurements. Compared to available contrast manipulation techniques, no averaging of projections acquired at different time points of the relaxation process is required in MAP imaging. The proposed technique offers new ways of extracting quantitative information from single-shot measurements acquired after magnetization preparation. The reconstruction simultaneously yields images with high spatiotemporal resolution fully consistent with the acquired data as well as maps of the effective longitudinal relaxation parameter and the relative proton density. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  14. A quantitative analysis of IRAS maps of molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.; Adams, Fred C.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of IRAS maps of five molecular clouds: Orion, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Taurus, and Lupus. For the classification and description of these astrophysical maps, we use a newly developed technique which considers all maps of a given type to be elements of a pseudometric space. For each physical characteristic of interest, this formal system assigns a distance function (a pseudometric) to the space of all maps: this procedure allows us to measure quantitatively the difference between any two maps and to order the space of all maps. We thus obtain a quantitative classification scheme for molecular clouds. In this present study we use the IRAS continuum maps at 100 and 60 micrometer(s) to produce column density (or optical depth) maps for the five molecular cloud regions given above. For this sample of clouds, we compute the 'output' functions which measure the distribution of density, the distribution of topological components, the self-gravity, and the filamentary nature of the clouds. The results of this work provide a quantitative description of the structure in these molecular cloud regions. We then order the clouds according to the overall environmental 'complexity' of these star-forming regions. Finally, we compare our results with the observed populations of young stellar objects in these clouds and discuss the possible environmental effects on the star-formation process. Our results are consistent with the recently stated conjecture that more massive stars tend to form in more 'complex' environments.

  15. Mapping dust in Orion protostars: from Herschel to APEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Thomas; Stutz, Amelia; Megeath, Thomas; HOPS Team

    2013-07-01

    HOPS (Herschel Orion Protostar Survey) is a 70 and 160mum Herschel PACS survey towards a sample of Spitzer identified protostar candidates in the Orion A and B giant molecular clouds. In this poster we give an overview of our efforts to obtain longer wavelength dust continuum maps, using the Laboca and Saboca cameras (870 and 350mum, respectively) at the APEX telescope, which provide maps at spatial resolutions well matched to the Herschel PACS data. The Laboca maps cover the entire field surveyed also by Herschel, providing a dust continuum measurement for all protostars observed by Herschel. The Saboca maps are restricted to smaller maps, mainly targeting PACS-bright protostar candidates, new protostar candidates not seen previously by Spitzer and identified from the Herschel maps, and also all bright cores found in the Laboca maps which do not have a protostellar association (i.e., starless cores). The data are used to provide long-wavelength submm photometry constraining the protostellar envelope masses. The 350mum Saboca data spatially resolve the emission from the outer envelope and are used to constrain their radial density distribution. Furthermore, combined with the Herschel data, we derive column density and temperature maps of the dense gas surrounding the protostars.

  16. Estimation of neural dynamics from MEG/EEG cortical current density maps: application to the reconstruction of large-scale cortical synchrony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Olivier; Garnero, Line; Cosmelli, Diego; Varela, Francisco J

    2002-09-01

    There is a growing interest in elucidating the role of specific patterns of neural dynamics--such as transient synchronization between distant cell assemblies--in brain functions. Magnetoencephalography (MEG)/electroencephalography (EEG) recordings consist in the spatial integration of the activity from large and multiple remotely located populations of neurons. Massive diffusive effects and poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) preclude the proper estimation of indices related to cortical dynamics from nonaveraged MEG/EEG surface recordings. Source localization from MEG/EEG surface recordings with its excellent time resolution could contribute to a better understanding of the working brain. We propose a robust and original approach to the MEG/EEG distributed inverse problem to better estimate neural dynamics of cortical sources. For this, the surrogate data method is introduced in the MEG/EEG inverse problem framework. We apply this approach on nonaveraged data with poor SNR using the minimum norm estimator and find source localization results weakly sensitive to noise. Surrogates allow the reduction of the source space in order to reconstruct MEG/EEG data with reduced biases in both source localization and time-series dynamics. Monte Carlo simulations and results obtained from real MEG data indicate it is possible to estimate non invasively an important part of cortical source locations and dynamic and, therefore, to reveal brain functional networks.

  17. Cosmopolitan linkage disequilibrium maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson Jane

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Linkage maps have been invaluable for the positional cloning of many genes involved in severe human diseases. Standard genetic linkage maps have been constructed for this purpose from the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain and other panels, and have been widely used. Now that attention has shifted towards identifying genes predisposing to common disorders using linkage disequilibrium (LD and maps of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, it is of interest to consider a standard LD map which is somewhat analogous to the corresponding map for linkage. We have constructed and evaluated a cosmopolitan LD map by combining samples from a small number of populations using published data from a 10-megabase region on chromosome 20. In support of a pilot study, which examined a number of small genomic regions with a lower density of markers, we have found that a cosmopolitan map, which serves all populations when appropriately scaled, recovers 91 to 95 per cent of the information within population-specific maps. Recombination hot spots appear to have a dominant role in shaping patterns of LD. The success of the cosmopolitan map might be attributed to the co-localisation of hot spots in all populations. Although there must be finer scale differences between populations due to other processes (mutation, drift, selection, the results suggest that a whole-genome standard LD map would indeed be a useful resource for disease gene mapping.

  18. Using gravity data to estimate the density of surface rocks of Taiwan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Y. T.; Horng-Yen, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Surface rock density within terrain correction step is one of the important parameters for obtaining Bouguer anomaly map. In the past study, we obtain the Bouguer anomaly map considering the average density correction of a wide range of the study area. In this study, we will be the better estimate for the correction of the density of each observation point. A correction density that coincides with surface geology is in order to improve the accuracy of the cloth cover anomaly map. The main idea of estimating correction of the density using gravity data statistics are two method, g-H relationship and Nettleton density profile method, respectively. The common advantages of these methods are in the following: First, density estimating is calculated using existing gravity observations data, it may be avoided the trouble of directly measure the rock density. Second, after the establishment the measuring point s of absolute gravity value, latitude, longitude and elevation into the database, you can always apply its database of information and terrain data with the value to calculate the average rock density on any range. In addition, each measuring point and numerical data of each terrain mesh are independent, if found to be more accurate gravity or terrain data, simply update a document data alone, without having to rebuild the entire database. According the results of estimating density distribution map, the trends are broadly distributed close to Taiwan Geology Division. The average density of the backbone mountain region is about 2.5 to 2.6 g/cm^3, the average density of east Central Mountain Range and Hsuehshan Range are about 2.3 to 2.5 g/cm^3, compared with the western foothills of 2.1-2.3 g/cm^3, the western plains is from 1.8 to 2.0 g/cm^3.

  19. Terahertz wafer-scale mobility mapping of graphene on insulating substrates without a gate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buron, Jonas Due; Mackenzie, David M. A.; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth

    2015-01-01

    spectroscopy. sigma(dc) and tau(SC) are directly extracted from Drude model fits to terahertz conductance spectra obtained in each pixel of 10 x 10 cm(2) maps with a 400 mu m step size. sigma(dc)- and tau(SC)-maps are translated into mu(drift) and N-S maps through Boltzmann transport theory for graphene charge......We demonstrate wafer-scale, non-contact mapping of essential carrier transport parameters, carrier mobility (mu(drift)), carrier density (N-S), DC sheet conductance (sigma(dc)), and carrier scattering time (tau(SC)) in CVD graphene, using spatially resolved terahertz time-domain conductance...

  20. Ergodicity of polygonal slap maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Magno, Gianluigi; Lopes Dias, João; Duarte, Pedro; Gaivão, José Pedro

    2014-08-01

    Polygonal slap maps are piecewise affine expanding maps of the interval obtained by projecting the sides of a polygon along their normals onto the perimeter of the polygon. These maps arise in the study of polygonal billiards with non-specular reflection laws. We study the absolutely continuous invariant probabilities (acips) of the slap maps for several polygons, including regular polygons and triangles. We also present a general method for constructing polygons with slap maps with more than one ergodic acip.

  1. Density of organic thin films in organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cindy X.; Xiao, Steven; Xu, Gu

    2015-07-01

    A practical parameter, the volume density of organic thin films, found to affect the electronic properties and in turn the performance of organic photovoltaics (OPVs), is investigated in order to benefit the polymer synthesis and thin film preparation in OPVs. To establish the correlation between film density and device performance, the density of organic thin films with various treatments was obtained, by two-dimensional X-ray diffraction measurement using the density mapping with respect to the crystallinity of thin films. Our results suggest that the OPV of higher performance has a denser photoactive layer, which may hopefully provide a solution to the question of whether the film density matters in organic electronics, and help to benefit the OPV industry in terms of better polymer design, standardized production, and quality control with less expenditure.

  2. Web Mapping Using Logo on Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximing Hou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The newly proposed Logo on Map (LoM system consists of three modules: picture extraction module (PEM, logo matching module (LMM and web mapping module (WMM. Since the first two modules were covered in our previous paper, the third module WMM is described here to present a complete LoM system. Current research is focused on geo-location distribution of brands on Google Maps. Pictures taken by ordinary people are extracted using Picture Extraction Module (PEM. The pictures containing relevant logos are obtained via Logo Matching Module (LMM. Brand distributions are overlaid on Google Maps. In this paper, GPS and brands are briefly described, and the implementation of Web Mapping Module (WMM based on Google Maps API is detailed. Then several experiments are carried out on the selected top brands. Finally the LMM-pictures are mapped on the Google Maps and the geographical distributions of the brands are visualised. Brand uniqueness is discussed and conclusion is drawn that with unique brand names web mapping can visually reflect the real economic activities of a company in the world.

  3. Quaternionic versus complex maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asorey, M [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad de Zaragoza 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Scolarici, G [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita del Salento and INFN, Sezione di Lecce, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Solombrino, L [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita del Salento and INFN, Sezione di Lecce, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2007-11-15

    We discuss the relation between completely positive quaternionic maps and the corresponding complex maps obtained via projection operation. In order to illustrate this formalism, we reobtain the (complex) qubit subdynamics of maximally entangled Bell states, as complex projection of unitary dynamics between quaternionic pure states.

  4. Pore size distribution mapping

    OpenAIRE

    Strange, John H.; J. Beau W. WEBBER; Schmidt, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    Pore size distribution mapping has been demonstrated using NMR cryoporometry\\ud in the presence of a magnetic field gradient, This novel method is extendable to 2D and 3D mapping. It offers a unique nondestructive method of obtaining full pore-size distributions in the range 3 to 100 nm at any point within a bulk sample. \\ud

  5. Irreversible quantum baker map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łoziński, Artur; Pakoński, Prot; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2002-12-01

    We propose a generalization of the model of classical baker map on the torus, in which the images of two parts of the phase space do overlap. This transformation is irreversible and cannot be quantized by means of a unitary Floquet operator. A corresponding quantum system is constructed as a completely positive map acting in the space of density matrices. We investigate spectral properties of this superoperator and their link with the increase of the entropy of initially pure states.

  6. Irreversible Quantum Baker Map

    CERN Document Server

    Lozinski, A; Zyczkowski, K; Lozinski, Artur; Pakonski, Prot; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2002-01-01

    We propose a generalization of the model of classical baker map on the torus, in which the images of two parts of the phase space do overlap. This transformation is irreversible and cannot be quantized by means of a unitary Floquet operator. A corresponding quantum system is constructed as a completely positive map acting in the space of density matrices. We investigate spectral properties of this super-operator and their link with the increase of the entropy of initially pure states.

  7. OMEGA -- OSIRIS Mapping of Emission-line Galaxies in A901/2: I.-- Survey description, data analysis, and star formation and AGN activity in the highest density regions

    CERN Document Server

    Chies-Santos, Ana L; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Bamford, Steven P; Gray, Meghan E; Wolf, Christian; Böhm, Asmus; Maltby, David T; Pintos-Castro, Irene; Sánchez-Portal, Miguel; Weinzirl, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of and first results from the OMEGA survey: the OSIRIS Mapping of Emission-line Galaxies in the multi-cluster system A901/2. The ultimate goal of this project is to study star formation and AGN activity across a broad range of environments at a single redshift. Using the tuneable-filter mode of the OSIRIS instrument on GTC, we target Halpha and [NII] emission lines over a ~0.5 X 0.5 deg2 region containing the z~0.167 multi-cluster system A901/2. In this paper we describe the design of the survey, the observations and the data analysis techniques developed. We then present early results from two OSIRIS pointings centred on the cores of the A901a and A902 clusters. AGN and star-forming (SF) objects are identified using the [NII]/Halpha vs. W_Halpha (WHAN) diagnostic diagram. The AGN hosts are brighter, more massive, and possess earlier-type morphologies than SF galaxies. Both populations tend to be located towards the outskirts of the high density regions we study. The typical Halpha lumi...

  8. MEASUREMENT OF WHEAT DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯跟胜; 党金春; 等

    1995-01-01

    A method used for on line determining the change of wheat density with a automatic watering machine in a lqarge flour mill has been studied.The results show that the higher distinguishing ability is obtained when using 241Am as a γ-ray source for measuring the wheat density than using 137Cs.

  9. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  10. Genetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets Fact Sheets En Español: Mapeo Genético Genetic Mapping What is genetic mapping? How do researchers create ... genetic map? What are genetic markers? What is genetic mapping? Among the main goals of the Human Genome ...

  11. Maximum entropy reconstruction of spin densities involving non uniform prior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweizer, J.; Ressouche, E. [DRFMC/SPSMS/MDN CEA-Grenoble (France); Papoular, R.J. [CEA-Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France). Lab. Leon Brillouin; Tasset, F. [Inst. Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France); Zheludev, A.I. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    1997-09-01

    Diffraction experiments give microscopic information on structures in crystals. A method which uses the concept of maximum of entropy (MaxEnt), appears to be a formidable improvement in the treatment of diffraction data. This method is based on a bayesian approach: among all the maps compatible with the experimental data, it selects that one which has the highest prior (intrinsic) probability. Considering that all the points of the map are equally probable, this probability (flat prior) is expressed via the Boltzman entropy of the distribution. This method has been used for the reconstruction of charge densities from X-ray data, for maps of nuclear densities from unpolarized neutron data as well as for distributions of spin density. The density maps obtained by this method, as compared to those resulting from the usual inverse Fourier transformation, are tremendously improved. In particular, any substantial deviation from the background is really contained in the data, as it costs entropy compared to a map that would ignore such features. However, in most of the cases, before the measurements are performed, some knowledge exists about the distribution which is investigated. It can range from the simple information of the type of scattering electrons to an elaborate theoretical model. In these cases, the uniform prior which considers all the different pixels as equally likely, is too weak a requirement and has to be replaced. In a rigorous bayesian analysis, Skilling has shown that prior knowledge can be encoded into the Maximum Entropy formalism through a model m({rvec r}), via a new definition for the entropy given in this paper. In the absence of any data, the maximum of the entropy functional is reached for {rho}({rvec r}) = m({rvec r}). Any substantial departure from the model, observed in the final map, is really contained in the data as, with the new definition, it costs entropy. This paper presents illustrations of model testing.

  12. Concept Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Schwendimann, Beat Adrian

    2014-01-01

    A concept map is a node-link diagram showing the semantic relationships among concepts. The technique for constructing concept maps is called "concept mapping". A concept map consists of nodes, arrows as linking lines, and linking phrases that describe the relationship between nodes. Two nodes connected with a labeled arrow are called a proposition. Concept maps are versatile graphic organizers that can represent many different forms of relationships between concepts. The relationship between...

  13. Normal family of quasimeromorphic mappings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN; Daochun(孙道椿); YANG; Lo(杨乐)

    2003-01-01

    The more general quasimeromorphic mappings are studied with the geometric method. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the normality of the family of quasimeromorphic mappings are discussed. We proved two inequalities on the covering surface and obtained some normal criteria on quasimeromorphic mappings with them. Obviously, these criteria hold for meromorphic functions.

  14. Hazard Maps in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, John A.

    1988-01-01

    Emphasizes the use of geophysical hazard maps and illustrates how they can be used in the classroom from kindergarten to college level. Depicts ways that hazard maps of floods, landslides, earthquakes, volcanoes, and multi-hazards can be integrated into classroom instruction. Tells how maps may be obtained. (SLM)

  15. Constructing dense genetic linkage maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Jong, de A.G.; Ooijen, van J.W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a novel combination of techniques for the construction of dense genetic linkage maps. The construction of such maps is hampered by the occurrence of even small proportions of typing errors. Simulated annealing is used to obtain the best map according to the optimality criterion:

  16. Influência da densidade amostral e do tipo de interpolador na elaboração de mapas temáticos = The influence of sample density and interpolation type on the elaboration of thematic maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Célia Coelho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a influência da densidade amostral (três grades e do tipo de interpolador (krigagem, inverso da distância, inverso da distância ao quadrado e polinomial na elaboração de mapas temáticos da produtividade da soja em umaárea de LATOSSOLO VERMELHO Distroférrico, no período de 1998 a 2002, conduzida em sistema de agricultura de precisão. As grades selecionadas possuíam 128, 64 e 32 parcelas utilizando amostragem alinhada sistemática estratificada (AASE. A partir de cada gradeamostral e utilizando cada um dos interpoladores, foram gerados os mapas temáticos. O coeficiente de desvio relativo (CDR foi proposto visando expressar a diferença média em módulo dos valores interpolados em cada grade em relação à grade considerada comoreferência, ou seja, a amostragem alinhada sistemática estratificada, com 128 parcelas, e interpolação por krigagem (AASE 128 Krigagem. O CDR mostrou-se eficiente na comparação de mapas e possibilitou concluir que, para utilizar todo o potencial da krigageme esse método ser recomendado, é necessário ter muitos pontos para que um bom semivariograma seja construído. Caso contrário, podem-se usar os outros interpoladores analisados. O método amostragem alinhada sistemática estratificada 128 inverso da distânciafoi o que mais se aproximou do método assumido como referência, AASE 128 Krigagem.The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of the sampling density (three grids and of the type of interpolation (kriging, inverse of the distance, inverse of the square distance, and polynomial in the elaboration of thematic maps of soybean yield in an area of Dystroferric Red Nitosol under precision agriculturefrom 1998 to 2002. The selected grids had 128, 64 and 32 units using stratified systematic aligned sampling (SSAS. The thematic maps was generated from each sampling grid and using each of the interpolators. The relative deviation coefficient (CDR was

  17. Genome-wide identification of QTL for seed yield and yield-related traits and construction of a high-density consensus map for QTL comparison in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo eZhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Seed yield (SY is the most important trait in rapeseed, which was determined by multiple seed yield-related traits (SYRTs and also easily subject to environmental influence. Lots of quantitative trait loci (QTL for SY and SYRTs were reported in Brassica napus. However, no studies have focused on SY and seven agronomic traits affecting SY simultaneous. Genome-wide QTL analysis for SY and seven SYRTs in eight environments was conducted in a doubled haploid population containing 348 lines. Totally, 18 and 208 QTLs for SY and SYRTs were observed, respectively, and then these QTLs were integrated into 144 consensus QTLs by a meta-analysis. Three major QTLs for SY were observed, including cqSY-C6-2 and cqSY-C6-3 that expressed stably in winter cultivation area for three years and cqSY-A2-2 only expressed in spring rapeseed area. Trait-by-trait meta-analysis revealed that the 144 consensus QTLs were integrated into 72 pleiotropic unique QTLs. Among them, all the unique QTLs affected SY, except for uq-A6-1, including uq.A2-3, uq.C1-2, uq.C1-3, uq.C6-1, uq.C6-5 and uq.C6-6 could also affect more than two SYRTs. According to high density consensus map construction and QTL comparison from literature, 36 QTLs from five populations were co-localized with QTLs identified in this study. In addition, 13 orthologs genes were observed, including five each genes for SY and SW, one each gene for BY, BH and PH, respectively. The genomic information of these QTLs would be valuable in hybrid cultivar breeding, and be helpful to analyze QTL expression in different environments.

  18. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...... breathing in the sitting position ranged from 0.25 to 0.37 g.cm-3. Subnormal values were found in patients with emphsema. In patients with pulmonary congestion and edema, lung density values ranged from 0.33 to 0.93 g.cm-3. The lung density measurement correlated well with the findings in chest radiographs...... but the lung density values were more sensitive indices. This was particularly evident in serial observations of individual patients....

  19. Acoustic mapping velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muste, M.; Baranya, S.; Tsubaki, R.; Kim, D.; Ho, H.; Tsai, H.; Law, D.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of sediment dynamics in rivers is of great importance for various practical purposes. Despite its high relevance in riverine environment processes, the monitoring of sediment rates remains a major and challenging task for both suspended and bed load estimation. While the measurement of suspended load is currently an active area of testing with nonintrusive technologies (optical and acoustic), bed load measurement does not mark a similar progress. This paper describes an innovative combination of measurement techniques and analysis protocols that establishes the proof-of-concept for a promising technique, labeled herein Acoustic Mapping Velocimetry (AMV). The technique estimates bed load rates in rivers developing bed forms using a nonintrusive measurements approach. The raw information for AMV is collected with acoustic multibeam technology that in turn provides maps of the bathymetry over longitudinal swaths. As long as the acoustic maps can be acquired relatively quickly and the repetition rate for the mapping is commensurate with the movement of the bed forms, successive acoustic maps capture the progression of the bed form movement. Two-dimensional velocity maps associated with the bed form migration are obtained by implementing algorithms typically used in particle image velocimetry to acoustic maps converted in gray-level images. Furthermore, use of the obtained acoustic and velocity maps in conjunction with analytical formulations (e.g., Exner equation) enables estimation of multidirectional bed load rates over the whole imaged area. This paper presents a validation study of the AMV technique using a set of laboratory experiments.

  20. Detecting density variations and nanovoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M K; Longstreth-Spoor, L; Kelton, K F

    2011-05-01

    A combination of simulated and experimental data has been used to investigate the size range of nanovoids that can be detected in atom probe tomography data. Simulated atom probe tomography data have revealed that nanovoids as small as 1 nm in diameter can be detected in atom probe tomography data with the use of iso-density surfaces. Iso-density surfaces may be used to quantify the size, morphology and number density of nanovoids and other variations in density in atom probe tomography data. Experimental data from an aluminum-yttrium-iron metallic glass ribbon have revealed the effectiveness of this approach. Combining iso-density surfaces with atom maps also permits the segregation of solute to the nanovoids to be investigated. Field ion microscopy and thin section atom maps have also been used to detect pores and larger voids. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Georeferenced LiDAR 3D vine plantation map generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Jordi; Gil, Emilio; Llop, Jordi; Queraltó, Meritxell

    2011-01-01

    The use of electronic devices for canopy characterization has recently been widely discussed. Among such devices, LiDAR sensors appear to be the most accurate and precise. Information obtained with LiDAR sensors during reading while driving a tractor along a crop row can be managed and transformed into canopy density maps by evaluating the frequency of LiDAR returns. This paper describes a proposed methodology to obtain a georeferenced canopy map by combining the information obtained with LiDAR with that generated using a GPS receiver installed on top of a tractor. Data regarding the velocity of LiDAR measurements and UTM coordinates of each measured point on the canopy were obtained by applying the proposed transformation process. The process allows overlap of the canopy density map generated with the image of the intended measured area using Google Earth(®), providing accurate information about the canopy distribution and/or location of damage along the rows. This methodology was applied and tested on different vine varieties and crop stages in two important vine production areas in Spain. The results indicate that the georeferenced information obtained with LiDAR sensors appears to be an interesting tool with the potential to improve crop management processes.

  2. Georeferenced LiDAR 3D Vine Plantation Map Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meritxell Queraltó

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of electronic devices for canopy characterization has recently been widely discussed. Among such devices, LiDAR sensors appear to be the most accurate and precise. Information obtained with LiDAR sensors during reading while driving a tractor along a crop row can be managed and transformed into canopy density maps by evaluating the frequency of LiDAR returns. This paper describes a proposed methodology to obtain a georeferenced canopy map by combining the information obtained with LiDAR with that generated using a GPS receiver installed on top of a tractor. Data regarding the velocity of LiDAR measurements and UTM coordinates of each measured point on the canopy were obtained by applying the proposed transformation process. The process allows overlap of the canopy density map generated with the image of the intended measured area using Google Earth®, providing accurate information about the canopy distribution and/or location of damage along the rows. This methodology was applied and tested on different vine varieties and crop stages in two important vine production areas in Spain. The results indicate that the georeferenced information obtained with LiDAR sensors appears to be an interesting tool with the potential to improve crop management processes.

  3. Antarctic marine gravity field from high-density satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, David T.

    1992-01-01

    High-density (about 2-km profile spacing) Geosat/GM altimetry profiles were obtained for Antarctic waters (6-deg S to 72 deg S) and converted to vertical gravity gradient, using Laplace's equation to directly calculate gravity gradient from vertical deflection grids and Fourier analysis to construct gravity anomalies from two vertical deflection grids. The resultant gravity grids have resolution and accuracy comparable to shipboard gravity profiles. The obtained gravity maps display many interesting and previously uncharted features, such as a propagating rift wake and a large 'leaky transform' along the Pacific-Antarctic Rise.

  4. An algorithm for noise correction of dual-energy computed tomography material density images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Rafael Simon; Jacob, Christian; Hara, Amy K; Silva, Alvin C; Pavlicek, William; Ross, Mitchell J

    2015-01-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) images can undergo a two-material decomposition process which results in two images containing material density information. Material density images obtained by that process result in images with increased pixel noise. Noise reduction in those images is desirable in order to improve image quality. A noise reduction algorithm for material density images was developed and tested. A three-level wavelet approach combined with the application of an anisotropic diffusion filter was used. During each level, the resulting noise maps are further processed, until the original resolution is reached and the final noise maps obtained. Our method works in image space and, therefore, can be applied to any type of material density images obtained from any DECT vendor. A quantitative evaluation of the noise-reduced images using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and 2D noise power spectrum was done to quantify the improvements. The noise reduction algorithm was applied to a set of images resulting in images with higher SNR and CNR than the raw density images obtained by the decomposition process. The average improvement in terms of SNR gain was about 49 % while CNR gain was about 52 %. The difference between the raw and filtered regions of interest mean values was far from reaching statistical significance (minimum [Formula: see text], average [Formula: see text]). We have demonstrated through a series of quantitative analyses that our novel noise reduction algorithm improves the image quality of DECT material density images.

  5. 集值映射空间上的自然映射%Natural Mappings on Set-valued Mapping Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李祖泉; 王久晶

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the continuities of some natural mappings on pointcompact continuous set-valued mapping spaces with compact-open topology and obtain the properties of set-valued injective mappings, set-valued diagonal mappings, induced mappings, set-valued evaluation mappings, set-valued topological sum mappings and set-valued topological product mappings.

  6. Fractional standard map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Mark, E-mail: edelman@cims.nyu.ed [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Stern College at Yeshiva University, 245 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Tarasov, Vasily E. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States)] [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-28

    Properties of the phase space of the standard map with memory are investigated. This map was obtained from a kicked fractional differential equation. Depending on the value of the map parameter and the fractional order of the derivative in the original differential equation, this nonlinear dynamical system demonstrates attractors (fixed points, stable periodic trajectories, slow converging and slow diverging trajectories, ballistic trajectories, and fractal-like structures) and/or chaotic trajectories. At least one type of fractal-like sticky attractors in the chaotic sea was observed.

  7. Topographic mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produced its first topographic map in 1879, the same year it was established. Today, more than 100 years and millions of map copies later, topographic mapping is still a central activity for the USGS. The topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, and leisure. Much has changed since early topographers traveled the unsettled West and carefully plotted the first USGS maps by hand. Advances in survey techniques, instrumentation, and design and printing technologies, as well as the use of aerial photography and satellite data, have dramatically improved mapping coverage, accuracy, and efficiency. Yet cartography, the art and science of mapping, may never before have undergone change more profound than today.

  8. Polder maps: improving OMIT maps by excluding bulk solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebschner, Dorothee; Afonine, Pavel V; Moriarty, Nigel W; Poon, Billy K; Sobolev, Oleg V; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Adams, Paul D

    2017-02-01

    The crystallographic maps that are routinely used during the structure-solution workflow are almost always model-biased because model information is used for their calculation. As these maps are also used to validate the atomic models that result from model building and refinement, this constitutes an immediate problem: anything added to the model will manifest itself in the map and thus hinder the validation. OMIT maps are a common tool to verify the presence of atoms in the model. The simplest way to compute an OMIT map is to exclude the atoms in question from the structure, update the corresponding structure factors and compute a residual map. It is then expected that if these atoms are present in the crystal structure, the electron density for the omitted atoms will be seen as positive features in this map. This, however, is complicated by the flat bulk-solvent model which is almost universally used in modern crystallographic refinement programs. This model postulates constant electron density at any voxel of the unit-cell volume that is not occupied by the atomic model. Consequently, if the density arising from the omitted atoms is weak then the bulk-solvent model may obscure it further. A possible solution to this problem is to prevent bulk solvent from entering the selected OMIT regions, which may improve the interpretative power of residual maps. This approach is called a polder (OMIT) map. Polder OMIT maps can be particularly useful for displaying weak densities of ligands, solvent molecules, side chains, alternative conformations and residues both in terminal regions and in loops. The tools described in this manuscript have been implemented and are available in PHENIX.

  9. Resíduos vegetais na superfície e carbono orgânico do solo e suas relações com a densidade máxima obtida no ensaio proctor Mulch and soil organic carbon content and their relationship with the maximum soil density obtained in the proctor test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Alfredo Braida

    2006-08-01

    ótese de que a palha existente sobre o solo é capaz de absorver parte da energia de compactação produzida pelo trânsito de máquinas e animais.The susceptibility of soils to compaction, measured by the Proctor test, decreases with increasing soil organic matter (SOM content. For a given energy level, with increasing SOM contents the maximum obtained density decreases and the corresponding critical moisture content increases. Due to its low density, elasticity and deformation susceptibility, straw is potentially able to dissipate applied loads. This study was conducted to evaluate the SOM effect on the soil compaction curve and to evaluate the ability that mulch has to absorb compactive energy in the Proctor test. The compaction test was carried out using soil surface samples (0 to 0.05 m of a Hapludalf, with sandy loam texture at its soil surface, and an Oxisol, with clayey texture at its soil surface, both with variations in the SOM content. The maximum density, the critical moisture content, the liquid and plastic limits, and the soil organic carbon content were determined. A second test was performed to evaluate the ability of mulch to absorb compactive energy, by compacting Hapludalf samples with the presence of a straw layer on the soil surface, inside a Proctor cylinder, at amounts corresponding to 2, 4, 8 and 12 Mg ha-1. SOM accumulation reduced the maximum density and increased the critical moisture content, suggesting an increased resistance to soil compaction. In the Proctor test the straw on the soil surface dissipated up to 30 % of the compactive energy and reduced the bulk density, confirming the hypothesis that mulch can absorb part of the compactive energy caused by machine traffic and by animals.

  10. Compositional cokriging for mapping the probability risk of groundwater contamination by nitrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Igúzquiza, Eulogio; Chica-Olmo, Mario; Luque-Espinar, Juan A; Rodríguez-Galiano, Víctor

    2015-11-01

    Contamination by nitrates is an important cause of groundwater pollution and represents a potential risk to human health. Management decisions must be made using probability maps that assess the nitrate concentration potential of exceeding regulatory thresholds. However these maps are obtained with only a small number of sparse monitoring locations where the nitrate concentrations have been measured. It is therefore of great interest to have an efficient methodology for obtaining those probability maps. In this paper, we make use of the fact that the discrete probability density function is a compositional variable. The spatial discrete probability density function is estimated by compositional cokriging. There are several advantages in using this approach: (i) problems of classical indicator cokriging, like estimates outside the interval (0,1) and order relations, are avoided; (ii) secondary variables (e.g. aquifer parameters) can be included in the estimation of the probability maps; (iii) uncertainty maps of the probability maps can be obtained; (iv) finally there are modelling advantages because the variograms and cross-variograms of real variables that do not have the restrictions of indicator variograms and indicator cross-variograms. The methodology was applied to the Vega de Granada aquifer in Southern Spain and the advantages of the compositional cokriging approach were demonstrated.

  11. Ulam's method for Lasota-Yorke maps with holes

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Christopher; González-Tokman, Cecilia; Murray, Rua

    2012-01-01

    Ulam's method is a rigorous numerical scheme for approximating invariant densities of dynamical systems. The phase space is partitioned into connected sets and an inter-set transition matrix is computed from the dynamics; an approximate invariant density is read off as the leading left eigenvector of this matrix. When a hole in phase space is introduced, one instead searches for \\emph{conditional} invariant densities and their associated escape rates. For Lasota-Yorke maps with holes we prove that a simple adaptation of the standard Ulam scheme provides convergent sequences of escape rates (from the leading eigenvalue), conditional invariant densities (from the corresponding left eigenvector), and quasi-conformal measures (from the corresponding right eigenvector). We also immediately obtain a convergent sequence for the invariant measure supported on the survivor set. Our approach is non-perturbative and allows us to consider relatively large holes.

  12. Timed bisimulation and open maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hune, Thomas; Nielsen, Mogens

    1998-01-01

    of timed bisimulation. Thus the abstract results from the theory of open maps apply, e.g. the existence of canonical models and characteristic logics. Here, we provide an alternative proof of decidability of bisimulation for finite timed transition systems in terms of open maps, and illustrate the use......Open maps have been used for defining bisimulations for a range of models, but none of these have modelled real-time. We define a category of timed transition systems, and use the general framework of open maps to obtain a notion of bisimulation. We show this to be equivalent to the standard notion...... of open maps in presenting bisimulations....

  13. The effect of respiratory induced density variations on non-TOF PET quantitation in the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Beverley F.; Cuplov, Vesna; Hutton, Brian F.; Groves, Ashley M.; Thielemans, Kris

    2016-04-01

    Accurate PET quantitation requires a matched attenuation map. Obtaining matched CT attenuation maps in the thorax is difficult due to the respiratory cycle which causes both motion and density changes. Unlike with motion, little attention has been given to the effects of density changes in the lung on PET quantitation. This work aims to explore the extent of the errors caused by pulmonary density attenuation map mismatch on dynamic and static parameter estimates. Dynamic XCAT phantoms were utilised using clinically relevant 18F-FDG and 18F-FMISO time activity curves for all organs within the thorax to estimate the expected parameter errors. The simulations were then validated with PET data from 5 patients suffering from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis who underwent PET/Cine-CT. The PET data were reconstructed with three gates obtained from the Cine-CT and the average Cine-CT. The lung TACs clearly displayed differences between true and measured curves with error depending on global activity distribution at the time of measurement. The density errors from using a mismatched attenuation map were found to have a considerable impact on PET quantitative accuracy. Maximum errors due to density mismatch were found to be as high as 25% in the XCAT simulation. Differences in patient derived kinetic parameter estimates and static concentration between the extreme gates were found to be as high as 31% and 14%, respectively. Overall our results show that respiratory associated density errors in the attenuation map affect quantitation throughout the lung, not just regions near boundaries. The extent of this error is dependent on the activity distribution in the thorax and hence on the tracer and time of acquisition. Consequently there may be a significant impact on estimated kinetic parameters throughout the lung.

  14. Mapping Deeply

    OpenAIRE

    Denis Wood

    2015-01-01

    This is a description of an avant la lettre deep mapping project carried out by a geographer and a number of landscape architecture students in the early 1980s. Although humanists seem to take the “mapping” in deep mapping more metaphorically than cartographically, in this neighborhood mapping project, the mapmaking was taken literally, with the goal of producing an atlas of the neighborhood. In this, the neighborhood was construed as a transformer, turning the stuff of the world (gas, wate...

  15. Regularity of optimal transport maps on multiple products of spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Figalli, Alessio; McCann, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses regularity of optimal transport maps for cost="squared distance" on Riemannian manifolds that are products of arbitrarily many round spheres with arbitrary sizes and dimensions. Such manifolds are known to be non-negatively cross-curved [KM2]. Under boundedness and non-vanishing assumptions on the transfered source and target densities we show that optimal maps stay away from the cut-locus (where the cost exhibits singularity), and obtain injectivity and continuity of optimal maps. This together with the result of Liu, Trudinger and Wang [LTW] also implies higher regularity (C^{1,\\alpha}/C^\\infty) of optimal maps for more smooth (C^\\alpha /C^\\infty)) densities. These are the first global regularity results which we are aware of concerning optimal maps on non-flat Riemannian manifolds which possess some vanishing sectional curvatures. Moreover, such product manifolds have potential relevance in statistics (see [S]) and in statistical mechanics (where the state of a system consisting of m...

  16. Polynomial mappings

    CERN Document Server

    Narkiewicz, Wŀadysŀaw

    1995-01-01

    The book deals with certain algebraic and arithmetical questions concerning polynomial mappings in one or several variables. Algebraic properties of the ring Int(R) of polynomials mapping a given ring R into itself are presented in the first part, starting with classical results of Polya, Ostrowski and Skolem. The second part deals with fully invariant sets of polynomial mappings F in one or several variables, i.e. sets X satisfying F(X)=X . This includes in particular a study of cyclic points of such mappings in the case of rings of algebrai integers. The text contains several exercises and a list of open problems.

  17. Participatory Maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    2016-01-01

    practice. In particular, mapping environmental damage, endangered species, and human-made disasters has become one focal point for environmental knowledge production. This type of digital map has been highlighted as a processual turn in critical cartography, whereas in related computational journalism...... of a geo-visualization within information mapping that enhances embodiment in the experience of the information. InfoAmazonia is defined as a digitally created map-space within which journalistic practice can be seen as dynamic, performative interactions between journalists, ecosystems, space, and species...

  18. Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Vrielmann, S

    2000-01-01

    The tomographic method "Physical Parameter Eclipse Mapping" is a tool to reconstruct spatial distributions of physical parameters (like temperatures and surface densities) in accretion discs of cataclysmic variables. After summarizing the method, we apply it to multi-colour eclipse light curves of various dwarf novae and nova-likes like VZ Scl, IP Peg in outburst, UU Aqr, V2051 Oph and HT Cas in order to derive the temperatures (and surface densities) in the disc, the white dwarf temperature, the disc size, the effective temperatures and the viscosities. The results allows us to establish or refine a physical model for the accretion disc. Our maps of HT Cas and V2051 Oph, for example, indicate that the (quiescent) disc must be structured into a cool, optically thick inner disc sandwiched by hot, optically thin chromospheres. In addition, the disc of HT Cas must be patchy with a covering factor of about 40% caused by magnetic activity in the disc.

  19. Estudio metodológico-comparativo de densidad mineral ósea de restos humanos por Absorciometría Fotónica (DXA Methodological-comparative study of human remains bone mineral density values obtained by Photonic Absorptiometry (DXA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Suby

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available La densidad mineral ósea ha sido identificada como una de las propiedades de los huesos que mediatiza la acción de los agentes y procesos tafonómicos (meteorización, atrición, etc. sobre los conjuntos arqueológicos. En los últimos años se han planteado algunos problemas en torno a las metodologías empleadas para el análisis de densidad mineral ósea y su aplicación en arqueología. En el presente trabajo, se comparan los resultados generados a través de dos métodos diferentes de obtención de valores de densidad mineral ósea mediante la técnica de Absorciometría Fotónica de Rayos X, empleados anteriormente por otros autores. Si bien el estudio de las Propiedades Óseas Intrínsecas (forma, tamaño y densidad mineral ósea, entre otros factores ha sido vinculado anteriormente a la tafonomía de restos faunísticos, son escasos los trabajos que estudian estos aspectos sobre el registro biológico humano. En este sentido se discute la aplicación de información biomecánica a conjuntos arqueológicos humanos, como indicador de la acción de procesos tafonómicos ligados a la densidad mineral ósea.Bone mineral density (BMD has been identified as a one of the bone properties that mediate the action of agents and taphonomic processes (weathering, attrition, etc. on archaeological assemblages. In recent years, several problems have been described for methods of BMD evaluation and their application in archaeology. In this paper, results are compared of two different Photon Abpsortiometric methods (DXA to obtain BMD values. Furthermore, their application is interpreted for two human bone assemblages from Tierra del Fuego. Even though BMD information was interpreted in the past from many faunal assemblages, this kind of information has only been included in a few studies related to human remains that analyze bone structure as a taphonomic indicator. In this sense, the application of biomechanical information to human bone assemblages

  20. Degenerate Density Perturbation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Palenik, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Fractional occupation numbers can be used in density functional theory to create a symmetric Kohn-Sham potential, resulting in orbitals with degenerate eigenvalues. We develop the corresponding perturbation theory and apply it to a system of $N_d$ degenerate electrons in a harmonic oscillator potential. The order-by-order expansions of both the fractional occupation numbers and unitary transformations within the degenerate subspace are determined by the requirement that a differentiable map exists connecting the initial and perturbed states. Using the X$\\alpha$ exchange-correlation (XC) functional, we find an analytic solution for the first-order density and first through third-order energies as a function of $\\alpha$, with and without a self-interaction correction. The fact that the XC Hessian is not positive definite plays an important role in the behavior of the occupation numbers.

  1. Degenerate density perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2016-09-01

    Fractional occupation numbers can be used in density functional theory to create a symmetric Kohn-Sham potential, resulting in orbitals with degenerate eigenvalues. We develop the corresponding perturbation theory and apply it to a system of Nd degenerate electrons in a harmonic oscillator potential. The order-by-order expansions of both the fractional occupation numbers and unitary transformations within the degenerate subspace are determined by the requirement that a differentiable map exists connecting the