WorldWideScience

Sample records for density hydrogen target

  1. Hydrogen slush density reference system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, D. H.; Lowe, L. T.; Ellerbruch, D. A.; Cruz, J. E.; Sindt, C. F.

    1971-01-01

    A hydrogen slush density reference system was designed for calibration of field-type instruments and/or transfer standards. The device is based on the buoyancy principle of Archimedes. The solids are weighed in a low-mass container so arranged that solids and container are buoyed by triple-point liquid hydrogen during the weighing process. Several types of hydrogen slush density transducers were developed and tested for possible use as transfer standards. The most successful transducers found were those which depend on change in dielectric constant, after which the Clausius-Mossotti function is used to relate dielectric constant and density.

  2. Liquid Hydrogen Target Experience at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisend, J. G. II; Boyce, R.; Candia, A.; Kaminskas, W.; Mark, J.; Racine, M.; St Lorant, S.; Weber, T.; Arnold, R.; Bosted, P.; Carr, R.; Gao, J.; Jones, C. E.; McKeown, R.

    2006-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen targets have played a vital role in the physics program at SLAC for the past 40 years. These targets have ranged from small 'beer can' targets to the 1.5 m long E158 target that was capable of absorbing up to 800 W without any significant density changes. Successful use of these targets has required the development of thin-wall designs, liquid hydrogen pumps, remote positioning and alignment systems, safety systems, control and data acquisition systems, cryogenic cooling circuits and heat exchangers. Detailed operating procedures have been created to ensure safety and operational reliability.This paper surveys the evolution of liquid hydrogen targets at SLAC and discusses advances in several of the enabling technologies that made these targets possible

  3. Super liquid density target designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.L.; Bailey, D.S.

    1976-01-01

    The success of laser fusion depends on obtaining near isentropic compression of fuel to very high densities and igniting this fuel. To date, the results of laser fusion experiments have been based mainly on the exploding pusher implosion of fusion capsules consisting of thin glass microballoons (wall thickness of less than 1 micron) filled with low density DT gas (initial density of a few mg/cc). Maximum DT densities of a few tenths of g/cc and temperatures of a few keV have been achieved in these experiments. We will discuss the results of LASNEX target design calculations for targets which: (a) can compress fuel to much higher densities using the capabilities of existing Nd-glass systems at LLL; (b) allow experimental measurement of the peak fuel density achieved

  4. Capacitive density measurement for supercritical hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, Th; Haberstroh, Ch; Szoucsek, K.; Schott, S.; Kunze, K.

    2017-12-01

    A new approach for automotive hydrogen storage systems is the so-called cryo-compressed hydrogen storage (CcH2). It has a potential for increased energy densities and thus bigger hydrogen amounts onboard, which is the main attractiveness for car manufacturers such as BMW. This system has further advantages in terms of safety, refueling and cooling potential. The current filling level measurement by means of pressure and temperature measurement and subsequent density calculation faces challenges especially in terms of precision. A promising alternative is the capacitive gauge. This measuring principle can determine the filling level of the CcH2 tank with significantly smaller tolerances. The measuring principle is based on different dielectric constants of gaseous and liquid hydrogen. These differences are successfully leveraged in liquid hydrogen storage systems (LH2). The present theoretical analysis shows that the dielectric values of CcH2 in the relevant operating range are comparable to LH2, thus achieving similarly good accuracy. The present work discusses embodiments and implementations for such a sensor in the CcH2 tank.

  5. Moeller polarimetry with atomic hydrogen targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chudakov, E.; Luppov, V.

    2005-01-01

    A novel proposal of using polarized atomic hydrogen gas, stored in an ultra-cold magnetic trap, as the target for electron beam polarimetry based on Moeller scattering is discussed. Such a target of practically 100% polarized electrons could provide a superb systematic accuracy of about 0.5% for beam polarization measurements. Feasibility studies for the CEBAF electron beam have been performed. (orig.)

  6. A windowless frozen hydrogen target system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, P.E.; Beer, G.A.; Beveridge, J.L.

    1995-06-01

    A cryogenic target system has been constructed in which gaseous mixtures of all three hydrogen isotopes have been frozen onto a thin, 65 mm diameter gold foil. The foil is cooled to 3 K while inside a 70 K radiation shield, all of which is mounted in a vacuum system maintained at 10 -9 torr. Stable multi-layer hydrogen targets of known uniformity and thickness have been maintained for required measurement times of up to several days. To date, hundreds of targets have been successfully used in muon-catalyzed fusion experiments at TRIUMF. (author). 12 refs., 6 figs

  7. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-01-01

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1x10 18 atoms/s, where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells

  8. 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target for use in a high intensity electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.

    1983-07-01

    This paper describes a 650 mm long liquid hydrogen target constructed for use in the high intensity electron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The main design problem was to construct a target that would permit the heat deposited by the electron beam to be removed rapidly without boiling the hydrogen so as to maintain constant target density for optimum data taking. Design requirements, construction details and operating experience are discussed

  9. Enhancing atom densities in solid hydrogen by isotopic substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, G.W.; Souers, P.C.; Mapoles, E.R.; Magnotta, F.

    1991-01-01

    Atomic hydrogen inside solid H 2 increases the energy density by 200 MegaJoules/m 3 , for each percent mole fraction stored. How many atoms can be stored in solid hydrogen? To answer this, we need to know: (1) how to produce and trap hydrogen atoms in solid hydrogen, (2) how to keep the atoms from recombining into the ground molecular state, and (3) how to measure the atom density in solid hydrogen. Each of these topics will be addressed in this paper. Hydrogen atoms can be trapped in solid hydrogen by co-condensing atoms and molecules, external irradiation of solid H 2 , or introducing a radioactive impurity inside the hydrogen lattice. Tritium, a heavy isotope of hydrogen, is easily condensed as a radioactive isotopic impurity in solid H 2 . Although tritium will probably not be used in future rockets, it provides a way of applying a large, homogenious dose to solid hydrogen. In all of the data presented here, the atoms are produced by the decay of tritium and thus knowing how many atoms are produced from the tritium decay in the solid phase is important. 6 refs., 6 figs

  10. Silicon surface barrier detectors used for liquid hydrogen density measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, D. T.; Milam, J. K.; Winslett, H. B.

    1968-01-01

    Multichannel system employing a radioisotope radiation source, strontium-90, radiation detector, and a silicon surface barrier detector, measures the local density of liquid hydrogen at various levels in a storage tank. The instrument contains electronic equipment for collecting the density information, and a data handling system for processing this information.

  11. Hydrogenated Microstructure and Its Hydrogenation Properties: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdus Salam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between microstructure and hydrogenation properties of the mixed metals has been investigated via different spectroscopic techniques and the density functional theory (DFT. FESEM and TEM analyses demonstrated the nano-grains of Mg2NiH4 and MgH2 on the hydrogenated microstructure of the adsorbents that were confirmed by using XPS analysis technique. SAED pattern of hydrogenated metals attributed the polycrystalline nature of mixed metals and ensured the hydrogenation to Mg2NiH4 and MgH2 compounds. Flower-like rough surface of mixed metals showed high hydrogenation capacity. The density functional theory (DFT predicted hydrogenation properties; enthalpy and entropy changes of hydrogenated microstructure of MgH2 and Mg2NiH4 are −62.90 kJ/mol, −158 J/mol·K and −52.78 kJ/mol, −166 J/mol·K, respectively. The investigation corresponds to the hydrogen adsorption feasibility, reversible range hydrogenation thermodynamics, and hydrogen desorption energy of 54.72 kJ/mol. DFT predicted IR band for MgH2 and Mg2NiH4 attributed hydrogen saturation on metal surfaces.

  12. Using NEG-pumping near a high density internal target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Alexander; Marton, Johann; Widmann, Eberhard; Zmeskal, Johann [Stefan Meyer Institut fuer Subatomare Physik, OeAW (Germany); Orth, Herbert [GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The universal detector PANDA will be constructed at the future high-energy antiproton storage ring HESR at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, GSI/Darmstadt). It will use antiproton beams (1.5 to 15 GeV/c) for hadron physics in the charmonium region. The Stefan Meyer Institut (SMI) contributes to major parts of the PANDA detector like the hydrogen cluster-jet target and the vacuum system of the antiproton - target interaction zone. To ensure low background, the residual gas load in the interaction zone and in the antiproton beam-pipe has to be minimised. Most of the gas load will come from the high density internal hydrogen target. As the detector will cover almost the full solid angle, the installation of pumps near the interaction zone is impossible. Therefore the use of NEG (non-evaporative-getter) coated beam pipes has been considered as an alternative. Two setups with NEG coated tubes have been installed at SMI as prototypes of the PANDA interaction zone. General parameters of the NEG-film, its outgassing behaviour, the pumping speed and the pumping capacity for hydrogen have been tested. The results of the studies on the PANDA-interaction region are presented.

  13. Using NEG-pumping near a high density internal target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, A.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Orth, H.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Stefan Meyer Institut (SMI) is part of the international PANDA collaboration. The universal detector will be constructed at the future high-energy antiproton storage ring HESR at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, GSI/Darmstadt). PANDA will use antiproton beams (1.5 to 15 GeV/c) for hadron physics in the charmonium region. SMI contributes to major parts of the PANDA detector like the hydrogen cluster-jet target and the vacuum system of the antiproton - target interaction zone. To ensure low background, the residual gas load in the interaction zone and in the antiproton beam-pipe has to be minimized. Most of the gas load, of course will come from the high density internal hydrogen target. Since the PANDA detector will cover almost the full solid angle, the installation of pumps near the interaction zone is impossible. Therefore, the use of NEG (non-evaporative-getter) coated beam pipes has been considered as an alternative. Two setups with NEG coated tubes have been installed at SMI as prototypes of the PANDA interaction zone. The outgassing behavior, the pumping speed and the pumping capacity for hydrogen have been tested. The status of the studies of the interaction region will be presented. (author)

  14. Determination of Hydrogen Density by Swift Heavy Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ge; Barriga-Carrasco, M D; Blazevic, A; Borovkov, B; Casas, D; Cistakov, K; Gavrilin, R; Iberler, M; Jacoby, J; Loisch, G; Morales, R; Mäder, R; Qin, S-X; Rienecker, T; Rosmej, O; Savin, S; Schönlein, A; Weyrich, K; Wiechula, J; Wieser, J; Xiao, G Q; Zhao, Y T

    2017-11-17

    A novel method to determine the total hydrogen density and, accordingly, a precise plasma temperature in a lowly ionized hydrogen plasma is described. The key to the method is to analyze the energy loss of swift heavy ions interacting with the respective bound and free electrons of the plasma. A slowly developing and lowly ionized hydrogen theta-pinch plasma is prepared. A Boltzmann plot of the hydrogen Balmer series and the Stark broadening of the H_{β} line preliminarily defines the plasma with a free electron density of (1.9±0.1)×10^{16}  cm^{-3} and a free electron temperature of 0.8-1.3 eV. The temperature uncertainty results in a wide hydrogen density, ranging from 2.3×10^{16} to 7.8×10^{18}  cm^{-3}. A 108 MHz pulsed beam of ^{48}Ca^{10+} with a velocity of 3.652  MeV/u is used as a probe to measure the total energy loss of the beam ions. Subtracting the calculated energy loss due to free electrons, the energy loss due to bound electrons is obtained, which linearly depends on the bound electron density. The total hydrogen density is thus determined as (1.9±0.7)×10^{17}  cm^{-3}, and the free electron temperature can be precisely derived as 1.01±0.04  eV. This method should prove useful in many studies, e.g., inertial confinement fusion or warm dense matter.

  15. Sputtering of solid hydrogenic targets by keV hydrogen ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenum, B.; Schou, Jørgen; Ellegaard, O.

    1991-01-01

    The first sputtering measurements of the most volatile solid hydrogenic targets are reported. Bombardment of these targets by hydrogen and deuterium ions leads to erosion predominantly via electronic transitions. The magnitude of the yield depends strongly on the particular isotope. No existing...... theory for this electronic sputtering can explain the large yields that range from about 100 D2/H for solid deuterium up to 800 H-2/H for solid hydrogen....

  16. A density functional study on the adsorption of hydrogen molecule ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An all-electron scalar relativistic calculation on the adsorption of hydrogen molecule onto small copper clusters has been performed by using density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) at PW91 level. Our results reveal that after adsorption of H2 molecule, the Cu-Cu interaction is ...

  17. A density functional study on the adsorption of hydrogen molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An all-electron scalar relativistic calculation on the adsorption of hydrogen molecule onto small copper clusters has been performed by using density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) at PW91 level. Our results reveal that after adsorption of H2 molecule, the Cu-Cu interaction is ...

  18. A density functional study on the adsorption of hydrogen molecule ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An all-electron scalar relativistic calculation on the adsorption of hydrogen molecule onto small copper clusters has been performed by using density functional theory with the generalized gradient approxi- mation (GGA) at PW91 level. Our results reveal that after adsorption of H2 molecule, the Cu–Cu interaction.

  19. Charge density wave in hydrogen at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdău, Ioan B.; Ackland, Graeme J.

    2017-10-01

    We present extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations investigating numerous candidate crystal structures for hydrogen in conditions around the present experimental frontier (400 GPa). Spontaneous phase transitions in the simulations reveal a new structure candidate comprising twofold coordinated chains of hydrogen atoms. We explain the electronic structure of this phase in terms of a charge density wave and calculate its experimental signature. In detailed tests of the accuracy of our calculation, we find that k-point sampling is far more important in MD than in static calculations, because of the freedom it give the atoms to rearrange themselves optimally for the given sampling.

  20. Gutzwiller density functional theory for solid hydrogen calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Yao, Yongxin; Liu, Chen; Lu, Wencai; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-03-01

    We have recently proposed a Gutzwiller density functional theory (G-DFT) by innovatively replacing the noninteracting trial wavefunction in Kohn-Sham DFT with the Gutzwiller projected trial wavefunction to explicitly account for correlation effects, which renders a renormalized correlation matrix in the calculation as the key ingredient in our theory. Our approach does not require adjustable Coulomb interaction parameters, nor need of double counting terms present in LDA +U and LDA +DMFT. Our method has been demonstrated to work well in hydrogen and nitrogen molecule systems. In the presentation we will show its performance on the Hydrogen solid by specifically work out the total energy curves for different phases discussed in the literature, and compare them against the benchmark Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations.

  1. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of High-Density Atomic Hydrogen in Solid Mixtures of Molecular Hydrogen Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheludiakov, S.; Ahokas, J.; Järvinen, J.; Zvezdov, D.; Vainio, O.; Lehtonen, L.; Vasiliev, S.; Mao, S.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Lee, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    We report on magnetic resonance studies of high-density atomic hydrogen and deuterium in solid hydrogen matrices at temperatures below 1 K. Average concentrations of H atoms ≈3 ×1019 cm-3 are obtained in chemical tunneling reactions of isotope exchange with D atoms. The products of these reactions are closely located pairs of H atoms near D2 molecules with strong exchange interactions. We discovered a dynamic nuclear polarization effect on H atoms created by pumping the center of the H electron spin resonance spectrum, similar to the Overhauser effect in metals. Our results indicate that H atoms may be arranged inside molecular matrices at separations equivalent to local concentrations of 2.6 ×1021 cm-3 . This opens up a way to build a metallic state of atomic hydrogen at zero pressure.

  2. Microcomputer-aided monitor for liquid hydrogen target system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitami, T.; Watanabe, K.

    1983-03-01

    A microcomputer-aided monitor for a liquid hydrogen target system has been designed and tested. Various kinds of input data such as temperature, pressure, vacuum, etc. are scanned in a given time interval. Variation with time in any four items can be displayed on CRT and, if neccessary, printed out on a sheet of recording paper. (author)

  3. Density functional study of hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Blair R.

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon is a relatively new material with device applications including photovoltaics. Intrinsic and light-induced electronic defects reduce the efficiency of a-Si:H solar cells. Although hydrogen is implicated in these defects, microscopic understanding of the structure and energetics of hydrogen in a-Si:H has been limited. The current limits are in part due to the lack of reliable theoretical calculations. Here we apply density functional methods to study H in a-Si:H. First, we develop a new atomistic model for a-Si:H. Then, using molecular dynamics simulations, we compare several currently available atomistic models. Finally, we calculate the properties of hydrogen in these models, including the geometric environments, the energetics, the electronic structure and the vibrational properties. Our most important conclusions are presented below. Our calculations are consistent with the following microscopic picture for long range diffusion of H in a-Si:H. Clustered Si-H bonds constitute the dominant trapping species. Upon the dissociation of 2 H atoms, a Si-Si bond forms leaving a nominally 4-fold coordinated weak bond complex. The 2 H atoms move away separately along Si-Si bond center sites until trapped at another weak bond complex. The calculated activation energy is found in agreement with established experimental results. Also, our calculations are successfully applied to observations of H evolution, hydrogen-deuterium exchange and long range diffusion in p-type amorphous silicon. Our calculations clarify the role of H during electronic defect formation. We calculate the energetics for H to move from a variety of Si-H bonds to the bulk chemical potential. For isolated Si-H bonds (i.e. in micro-cavities without any bond reconstruction) the energetics are not consistent with observations. However, if the remaining Si reconstructs with a nearby silicon creating a 5-fold coordinated defect then the energetics are in agreement with

  4. Modelling high density phenomena in hydrogen fibre Z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chittenden, J.P.

    1990-09-01

    The application of hydrogen fibre Z-pinches to the study of the radiative collapse phenomenon is studied computationally. Two areas of difficulty, the formation of a fully ionized pinch from a cryogenic fibre and the processes leading to collapse termination, are addressed in detail. A zero-D model based on the energy equation highlights the importance of particle end losses and changes in the Coulomb logarithm upon collapse initiation and termination. A 1-D Lagrangian resistive MHD code shows the importance of the changing radial profile shapes, particularly in delaying collapse termination. A 1-D, three fluid MHD code is developed to model the ionization of the fibre by thermal conduction from a high temperature surface corona to the cold core. Rate equations for collisional ionization, 3-body recombination and equilibration are solved in tandem with fluid equations for the electrons, ions and neutrals. Continuum lowering is found to assist ionization at the corona-core interface. The high density plasma phenomena responsible for radiative collapse termination are identified as the self-trapping of radiation and free electron degeneracy. A radiation transport model and computational analogues for the effects of degeneracy upon the equation of state, transport coefficients and opacity are implemented in the 1-D, single fluid model. As opacity increases the emergent spectrum is observed to become increasingly Planckian and a fall off in radiative cooling at small radii and low frequencies occurs giving rise to collapse termination. Electron degeneracy terminates radiative collapse by supplementing the radial pressure gradient until the electromagnetic pinch force is balanced. Collapse termination is found to be a hybrid process of opacity and degeneracy effects across a wide range of line densities with opacity dominant at large line densities but with electron degeneracy becoming increasingly important at lower line densities. (author)

  5. Density Functional Theory Study of the Interaction of Hydrogen with Li6C60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Jena, Puru

    2012-05-03

    Hydrogen storage properties of Li-coated C60 fullerene have been studied using density functional theory within the local density as well as generalized gradient approximation. Hydrogen atoms are found to bind to Li6C60 in two distinct forms, with the first set attaching to C atoms, not linked to Li, in atomic form. Once all such C atoms are saturated with hydrogen, the second set of hydrogen atoms bind quasi-molecularly to the Li atoms, five of which remain in the exohedral and the sixth in the endohedral position. The corresponding hydrogen gravimetric density in Li6C60H40 is 5 wt %. Desorption of hydrogen takes place in succession, the ones bound quasi-molecularly desorbing at a temperature lower than the ones bound atomically. The results are compared with the recent experiment on hydrogen adsorption in Li6C60.

  6. Plasma Density Measurements on Refuelling by Solid Hydrogen Pellets in a Rotating Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma.......The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma....

  7. Targets for bulk hydrogen analysis using thermal neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Csikai, J; Buczko, C M

    2002-01-01

    The reflection property of substances can be characterized by the reflection cross-section of thermal neutrons, sigma subbeta. A combination of the targets with thin polyethylene foils allowed an estimation of the flux depression of thermal neutrons caused by a bulk sample containing highly absorbing elements or compounds. Some new and more accurate sigma subbeta values were determined by using the combined target arrangement. For the ratio, R of the reflection and the elastic scattering cross-sections of thermal neutrons, R=sigma subbeta/sigma sub E sub L a value of 0.60+-0.02 was found on the basis of the data obtained for a number of elements from H to Pb. Using this correlation factor, and the sigma sub E sub L values, the unknown sigma subbeta data can be deduced. The equivalent thicknesses, to polyethylene or hydrogen, of the different target materials were determined from the sigma subbeta values.

  8. Heavy density liquid metal spallation target studies for Indian ADS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Considering the neutron yield, thermal-hydraulics and radiation damage issues, we are proposing to develop spallation target based on heavy density liquid metals like lead and lead-bismuth-eutectic (LBE). Both window and windowless target configurations are presently being studied. In view of the various advantages ...

  9. Process of iodine ion slowing down in a hydrogen target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardes, D.; Chabot, M.; Nectoux, M.; Mabong, S.; Maynard, G.; Roudskoi, I.

    1999-01-01

    The stopping power of iodine ions traversing a windowless hydrogen target has been measured varying the gas in a large pressure range (0 to 120 torr). Experimental measurements present the energy losses and the charge distributions of emerging ions. Those results enable us to test stopping power theories at high velocity and large perturbation parameter Z/v. Higher order correction terms for the stopping calculated with point like approximation for the charge or with more realistic atomic potential are compared with experimental energy losses. (authors)

  10. Polarimetry of the polarized hydrogen deuteride HDice target under an electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laine, Vivien E. [Blaise Pascal Univ., Aubiere (France)

    2013-10-01

    The study of the nucleon structure has been a major research focus in fundamental physics in the past decades and still is the main research line of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). For this purpose and to obtain statistically meaningful results, having both a polarized beam and a highly efficient polarized target is essential. For the target, this means high polarization and high relative density of polarized material. A Hydrogen Deuteride (HD) target that presents both such characteristics has been developed first at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and brought to the Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2008. The HD target has been shown to work successfully under a high intensity photon beam (BNL and Jefferson Lab). However, it remained to be seen if the target could stand an electron beam of reasonably high current (nA). In this perspective, the target was tested for the first time in its frozen spin mode under an electron beam at Jefferson Lab in 2012 during the g14 experiment. This dissertation presents the principles and usage procedures of this HD target. The polarimetry of this target with Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) during the electron beam tests is also discussed. In addition, this dissertation also describes another way to perform target polarimetry with the elastic scattering of electrons off a polarized target by using data taken on helium-3 during the E97-110 experiment that occurred in Jefferson Lab's Hall A in 2003.

  11. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dependent density; density functional theory; quantum fluid dynamics. ... (HHG) is also examined. The present approach goes beyond the linear response formalism and, in principle, calculates the TD electron density to all orders of change.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Study of the Micromix Combustion Principle Applied for Hydrogen and Hydrogen-Rich Syngas as Fuel with Increased Energy Density for Industrial Gas Turbine Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Funke, Harald H.-W.; Dickhoff, Jens; Keinz, Jan; Anis, Haj Ayed; Parente, Alessandro; Hendrick, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The Dry Low NOx (DLN) Micromix combustion principle with increased energy density is adapted for the industrial gas turbine APU GTCP 36-300 using hydrogen and hydrogen-rich syngas with a composition of 90 %-Vol. hydrogen (H2) and 10 %-Vol. carbon-monoxide (CO). Experimental and numerical studies of several combustor geometries for hydrogen and syngas show the successful advance of the DLN Micromix combustion from pure hydrogen to hydrogen-rich syngas. The impact of the different fuel properti...

  13. The use of infrared absorption to determine density of liquid hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unland, H. D.; Timmerhaus, K. D.; Kropschot, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of the use of infrared absorption for determining the density of liquid hydrogen, and discussion of the feasibility of an airborne densitometer based on this concept. The results indicate that infrared absorption of liquid hydrogen is highly sensitive to the density of hydrogen, and, under the operating limitations of the equipment and experimental techniques used, the determined values proved to be repeatable to an accuracy of 2.7%. The desiderata and limitations of an in-flight density-determining device are outlined, and some of the feasibility problems are defined.

  14. High Density Hydrogen Storage in Metal Hydride Composites with Air Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Dieterich, Mila; Bürger, Inga; Linder, Marc

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In order to combine fluctuating renewable energy sources with the actual demand of electrical energy, storages are essential. The surplus energy can be stored as hydrogen to be used either for mobile use, chemical synthesis or reconversion when needed. One possibility to store the hydrogen gas at high volumetric densities, moderate temperatures and low pressures is based on a chemical reaction with metal hydrides. Such storages must be able to absorb and desorb the hydrogen qu...

  15. Residual gas entering high density hydrogen plasma: rarefaction due to rapid heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. den Harder,; D.C. Schram,; W. J. Goedheer,; de Blank, H. J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; van Rooij, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of background molecular hydrogen with magnetized (0.4 T) high density (1–5 × 10 20  m −3 ) low temperature (∼3 eV) hydrogen plasma was inferred from the Fulcher band emission in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI. In the plasma center,

  16. Prediction of hydrogen storage on Y-decorated graphene: A density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wenbo; Liu, Yang; Wang, Rongguo

    2014-01-01

    Highlight: • Rare earth metal Y has an excellent performance on hydrogen storage. • After decoration, each Y can attach six hydrogen molecules without dissociation. • The Y atoms disperse uniformly and stably on B/graphene. • The enhancement of H binding is caused by hybridization and electrostatic attraction. - Abstract: Yttrium decorated graphene has been investigated as a potential carrier for high density hydrogen storage. The adsorption energy and optimized geometry for yttrium on pristine and boron doped graphene have been studied by DFT calculations. The clustering and stability of isolated yttrium atoms on graphene has also been considered. For yttrium decorated boron doped graphene, each yttrium can attach six hydrogen molecules with average adsorption energy of −0.568 eV per hydrogen molecule and the hydrogen storage capacity of this material is 5.78 wt.%, indicating yttrium decorated boron doped graphene as a promising hydrogen storage candidate

  17. Estimated refractive index and solid density of DT, with application to hollow-microsphere laser targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, C.K.; Tsugawa, R.T.; Hendricks, C.D.; Souers, P.C.

    1975-01-01

    The literature values for the 0.55-μm refractive index N of liquid and gaseous H 2 and D 2 are combined to yield the equation (N - 1) = [(3.15 +- 0.12) x 10 -6 ]rho, where rho is the density in moles per cubic meter. This equation can be extrapolated to 300 0 K for use on DT in solid, liquid, and gas phases. The equation is based on a review of solid-hydrogen densities measured in bulk and also by diffraction methods. By extrapolation, the estimated densities and 0.55-μm refractive indices for DT are given. Radiation-induced point defects could possibly cause optical absorption and a resulting increased refractive index in solid DT and T 2 . The effect of the DT refractive index in measuring glass and cryogenic DT laser targets is also described

  18. Electronic structures and large spectrum shifts in hydrogenated fullerenes: Density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Iyama, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    Electronic structures and band gaps of hydrogenated fullerenes have been investigated by means of density functional theory method. The mechanism of hydrogen addition reaction to the fullerene (C 60 ) surface was also investigated. Addition of one and two hydrogen atoms was examined in the calculations. The binding energies of the second hydrogen atom to C 60 H were widely distributed in the range 1.5–3.6 eV. It was found that the bonding energy is strongly dependent on the spin density of carbon atom of C 60 H. The second hydrogen atom preferentially binds to the neighbor site of the first addition site. The electronic states and excitation energies of C 60 -H were discussed on the basis of theoretical results. - Highlights: • Hydrogen atom addition to C60 was investigated. • First hydrogen atom addition proceeded with very low activation barrier. • Second hydrogen addition was dependent on the binding site. • Addition site of second atom was correlated with spin density

  19. Upgrade to the Cryogenic Hydrogen Gas Target Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Michael; Tribble, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The cryogenic hydrogen gas target at Texas A&M is a vital component for creating a secondary radioactive beam that is then used in experiments in the Momentum Achromat Recoil Spectrometer (MARS). A stable beam from the K500 superconducting cyclotron enters the gas cell and some incident particles are transmuted by a nuclear reaction into a radioactive beam, which are separated from the primary beam and used in MARS experiments. The pressure in the target chamber is monitored so that a predictable isotope production rate can be assured. A ``black box'' received the analog pressure data and sent RS232 serial data through an outdated serial connection to an outdated Visual Basic 6 (VB6) program, which plotted the chamber pressure continuously. The black box has been upgraded to an Arduino UNO microcontroller [Atmel Inc.], which can receive the pressure data and output via USB to a computer. It has been programmed to also accept temperature data for future upgrade. A new computer program, with updated capabilities, has been written in Python. The software can send email alerts, create audible alarms through the Arduino, and plot pressure and temperature. The program has been designed to better fit the needs of the users. Funded by DOE and NSF-REU Program.

  20. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The reaction pathway of the hydrogen addition to graphene surface was determined by the DFT method. • Binding energies of atomic hydrogen to graphene surface were determined. • Absorption spectrum of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. • Hyperfine coupling constant of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4–37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2–7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8–28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  1. Hydrogen atom addition to the surface of graphene nanoflakes: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto, E-mail: hiroto@eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • The reaction pathway of the hydrogen addition to graphene surface was determined by the DFT method. • Binding energies of atomic hydrogen to graphene surface were determined. • Absorption spectrum of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. • Hyperfine coupling constant of hydrogenated graphene was theoretically predicted. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) provide a 2-dimensional (2D) reaction surface in 3-dimensional (3D) interstellar space and have been utilized as a model of graphene surfaces. In the present study, the reaction of PAHs with atomic hydrogen was investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) to systematically elucidate the binding nature of atomic hydrogen to graphene nanoflakes. PAHs with n = 4–37 were chosen, where n indicates the number of benzene rings. Activation energies of hydrogen addition to the graphene surface were calculated to be 5.2–7.0 kcal/mol at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level, which is almost constant for all PAHs. The binding energies of hydrogen atom were slightly dependent on the size (n): 14.8–28.5 kcal/mol. The absorption spectra showed that a long tail is generated at the low-energy region after hydrogen addition to the graphene surface. The electronic states of hydrogenated graphenes were discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  2. Variational density matrix method for warm, condensed matter: Application to dense hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Militzer, Burkhard; Pollock, E. L.

    2000-01-01

    A variational principle for optimizing thermal density matrices is introduced. As a first application, the variational many-body density matrix is written as a determinant of one-body density matrices, which are approximated by Gaussians with the mean, width, and amplitude as variational parameters. The method is illustrated for the particle in an external field problem, the hydrogen molecule and dense hydrogen where the molecular, the dissociated, and the plasma regime are described. Structural and thermodynamic properties (energy, equation of state, and shock Hugoniot) are presented. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  3. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    GNLSE) of motion was earlier derived in our laboratory by combining density functional theory and quantum fluid dynamics in three- dimensional space. In continuation of the work reported previously, the GNLSE is applied to provide addi-.

  4. A density functional theory study on the hydrogen bonding interactions between luteolin and ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan-Zhen; Xu, Jing; Liang, Qin; Chen, Da-Fu; Guo, Rui; Fu, Zhong-Min

    2017-08-01

    Ethanol is one of the most commonly used solvents to extract flavonoids from propolis. Hydrogen bonding interactions play an important role in the properties of liquid system. The main objective of the work is to study the hydrogen bonding interactions between flavonoid and ethanol. Luteolin is a very common flavonoid that has been found in different geographical and botanical propolis. In this work, it was selected as the representative flavonoid to do detailed research. The study was performed from a theoretical perspective using density functional theory (DFT) method. After careful optimization, there exist nine optimized geometries for the luteolin - CH 3 CH 2 OH complex. The binding distance of X - H···O, and the bond length, vibrational frequency, and electron density changes of X - H all indicate the formation of the hydrogen bond in the optimized geometries. In the optimized geometries, it is found that: (1) except for the H2', H5', and H6', CH 3 CH 2 OH has formed hydrogen bonds with all the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in luteolin. The hydrogen atoms in the hydroxyl groups of luteolin form the strongest hydrogen bonds with CH 3 CH 2 OH; (2) all of the hydrogen bonds are closed-shell interactions; (3) the strongest hydrogen bond is the O3' - H3'···O in structure A, while the weakest one is the C3 - H3···O in structure E; (4) the hydrogen bonds of O3' - H3'···O, O - H···O4, O - H···O3' and O - H···O7 are medium strength and covalent dominant in nature. While the other hydrogen bonds are weak strength and possess a dominant character of the electrostatic interactions in nature.

  5. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    derived in our laboratory by combining density functional theory and quantum fluid dynamics in three- dimensional space. In continuation of the .... repulsion, electron-nuclear Coulomb attraction, ex- change and correlation interactions, ..... Eberly J H, Grobe R, Law C K and Su Q 1992 Adv. At. Mol. Opt. Phys. Suppl. 1 301. 8.

  6. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A time-dependent generalized non-linear Schrödinger equation (GNLSE) of motion was earlier derived in our laboratory by combining density functional theory and quantum fluid dynamics in threedimensional space. In continuation of the work reported previously, the GNLSE is applied to provide additional knowledge on ...

  7. Helicon wave propagation and plasma equilibrium in high-density hydrogen plasma in converging magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneses Marin, Juan Francisco

    In this thesis, we investigate wave propagation and plasma equilibrium in MAGPIE, a helicon based linear plasma device constructed at the Australian National University, to study plasma-material interactions under divertor-relevant plasma conditions. We show that MAGPIE is capable of producing low temperature (1–8 eV) high density hydrogen plasma (2–3x10. 19 m-3) with 20 kW of RF power when the confining magnetic field is converging. The original research herein described comprises: (1) Characterization of hydrogen plasma in MAGPIE, (2) Analysis of the RF compensation of double Langmuir probes, (3) Excitation, propagation and damping of helicon waves in uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields and (4) Steady-state force balance and equilibrium profiles in MAGPIE. We develop an analytical model of the physics of floating probes to describe and quantify the RF compensation of the DLP technique. Experimental validation for the model is provided. We show that (1) whenever finite sheath effects are important, overestimation of the ion density is proportional to the level of RF rectification and suggest that (2) electron temperature measurements are weakly affected. We develop a uniform plasma full wave code to describe wave propagation in MAGPIE. We show that under typical MAGPIE operating conditions, the helical antenna is not optimized to couple waves in the plasma; instead, the antenna’s azimuthal current rings excites helicon waves which propagate approximately along the whistler wave ray direction, constructively interfere on-axis and lead to the formation of an axial interference pattern. We show that helicon wave attenuation can be explained entirely through electron-ion and electron-neutral collisions. Results from a two-dimensional full wave code reveal that RF power deposition is axially non-uniform with both edge and on-axis components associated with the TG and helicon wave respectively. Finally, force balance analysis in MAGPIE using a two-fluid

  8. Low density lipoproteins mediated nanoplatforms for cancer targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Anupriya; Jain, Keerti; Kesharwani, Prashant; Jain, Narendra K.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a foremost remedial approach for the treatment of localized and metastasized tumors. In order to explore new treatment modalities for cancer, it is important to identify qualitative or quantitative differences in metabolic processes between normal and malignant cells. One such difference may be that of increased receptor-mediated cellular uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDLs) by cancer cells. Lipoproteins in general and specifically LDL are ideal candidates for loading and delivering cancer therapeutic and diagnostic agents due to their biocompatibility. By mimicking the endogenous shape and structure of lipoproteins, the reconstituted lipoproteins can remain in circulation for an extended period of time, while largely evading the reticuloendothelial cells in the body’s defenses. In this account, we review the field of low density inspired nanoparticles in relation to the delivery of cancer imaging and therapeutic agents. LDL has instinctive cancer targeting potential and has been used to incorporate various lipophillic molecules to transport them to tumors. Nature’s method of rerouting LDL provides a strategy to extend the cancer targeting potential of lipoproteins far off its constricted purview. In this review, we have discussed the various aspects of LDL including its role in cancer imaging and chemotherapy in retrospect and prospect and current efforts aimed to further improve the delivery efficacy of LDL–drug complexes with reduced chances of drug resistance leading to optimal drug delivery. This review provides a strong support for the concept of using LDL as a drug carrier

  9. Stretched hydrogen molecule from a constrained-search density-functional perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valone, Steven M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Levy, Mel [DIKE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Constrained-search density functional theory gives valuable insights into the fundamentals of density functional theory. It provides exact results and bounds on the ground- and excited-state density functionals. An important advantage of the theory is that it gives guidance in the construction of functionals. Here they engage constrained search theory to explore issues associated with the functional behavior of 'stretched bonds' in molecular hydrogen. A constrained search is performed with familiar valence bond wavefunctions ordinarily used to describe molecular hydrogen. The effective, one-electron hamiltonian is computed and compared to the corresponding uncorrelated, Hartree-Fock effective hamiltonian. Analysis of the functional suggests the need to construct different functionals for the same density and to allow a competition among these functions. As a result the correlation energy functional is composed explicitly of energy gaps from the different functionals.

  10. Acetylene chain reaction on hydrogenated boron nitride monolayers: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce-Pérez, R; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2017-11-28

    Spin-polarized first-principles total-energy calculations have been performed to investigate the possible chain reaction of acetylene molecules mediated by hydrogen abstraction on hydrogenated hexagonal boron nitride monolayers. Calculations have been done within the periodic density functional theory (DFT), employing the PBE exchange correlation potential, with van der Waals corrections (vdW-DF). Reactions at two different sites have been considered: hydrogen vacancies on top of boron and on top of nitrogen atoms. As previously calculated, at the intermediate state of the reaction, when the acetylene molecule is attached to the surface, the adsorption energy is of the order of -0.82 eV and -0.20 eV (measured with respect to the energy of the non interacting molecule-substrate system) for adsorption on top of boron and nitrogen atoms, respectively. After the hydrogen abstraction takes place, the system gains additional energy, resulting in adsorption energies of -1.52 eV and -1.30 eV, respectively. These results suggest that the chain reaction is energetically favorable. The calculated minimum energy path (MEP) for hydrogen abstraction shows very small energy barriers of the order of 5 meV and 22 meV for the reaction on top of boron and nitrogen atoms, respectively. Finally, the density of states (DOS) evolution study helps to understand the chain reaction mechanism. Graphical abstract Acetylene chain reaction on hydrogenated boron nitride monolayers.

  11. High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

    2007-07-27

    This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

  12. The hydrogen bond in ice probed by soft x-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, A.; Ogasawara, H.; Cavalleri, M.; Nordlund, D.; Nyberg, M.; Wernet, Ph.; Pettersson, L.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    We combine photoelectron and x-ray absorption spectroscopy with density functional theory to derive a molecular orbital picture of the hydrogen bond in ice. We find that the hydrogen bond involves donation and back-donation of charge between the oxygen lone pair and the O-H antibonding orbitals on neighboring molecules. Together with internal s-p rehybridization this minimizes the repulsive charge overlap of the connecting oxygen and hydrogen atoms, which is essential for a strong attractive electrostatic interaction. Our joint experimental and theoretical results demonstrate that an electrostatic model based on only charge induction from the surrounding medium fails to properly describe the internal charge redistributions upon hydrogen bonding

  13. Hydrogen consumption and power density in a co-flow planar SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Moussa, Hocine; Zitouni, Bariza [Laboratoire d' etude des systemes energetiques industriels (LESEI), Universite de Batna, Batna (Algeria); Oulmi, Kafia [Laboratoire de chimie et de chimie de l' environnement, Universite de Batna, Batna (Algeria); Mahmah, Bouziane; Belhamel, Maiouf [CDER, BP. 62 Route de l' Observatoire. Bouzareah. Alger (Algeria); Mandin, Philippe [Centre de Developpement des Energies Renouvelables (CDER), LECA, UMR 7575 CNRS-ENSCP Paris 6 (France)

    2009-06-15

    In the present work, power density and hydrogen consumption in a co-flow planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) are studied according to the inlet functional parameters; such as the operational temperature, the operational pressure, the flow rates and the mass fractions of the species. Furthermore, the effect of the cell size is investigated. The results of a zero and a one-dimensional numerical electro-dynamic model predict the remaining quantity of the fed hydrogen at the output of the anode flow channel. The remaining hydrogen quantities and the SOFC's power density obtained are discussed as a function of the inlet functional parameters, the geometrical configuration of the cell and several operating cell voltages values. (author)

  14. Hydrogen content and density in nanocrystalline carbon films of a predominant diamond character

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, A.; Heiman, A.; Akhvlediani, R.; Lakin, E.; Zolotoyabko, E.; Cyterman, C.

    2003-01-01

    Nanocrystalline carbon films possessing a prevailing diamond or graphite character, depending on substrate temperature, can be deposited from a methane hydrogen mixture by the direct current glow discharge plasma chemical vapor deposition method. While at a temperature of ∼880 deg. C, following the formation of a thin precursor graphitic film, diamond nucleation occurs and a nanodiamond film grows, at higher and lower deposition temperatures the films maintain their graphitic character. In this study the hydrogen content, density and nanocrystalline phase composition of films deposited at various temperatures are investigated. We aim to elucidate the role of hydrogen in nanocrystalline films with a predominant diamond character. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy revealed a considerable increase of the hydrogen concentration in the films that accompanies the growth of nanodiamond. It correlates with near edge x-ray adsorption spectroscopy measurements, that showed an appearance of spectroscopic features associated with the diamond structure, and with a substantial increase of the film density detected by x-ray reflectivity. Electron energy loss spectroscopy showed that nanocrystalline diamond films can be deposited from a CH 4 /H 2 mixture with hydrogen concentration in the 80%-95% range. For a deposition temperature of 880 deg. C, the highest diamond character of the films was found for a hydrogen concentration of 91% of H 2 . The deposition temperature plays an important role in diamond formation, strongly influencing the content of adsorbed hydrogen with an optimum at 880 deg. C. It is suggested that diamond nucleation and growth of the nanodiamond phase is driven by densification of the deposited graphitic films which results in high local compressive stresses. Nanodiamond formation is accompanied by an increase of hydrogen concentration in the films. It is suggested that hydrogen retention is critical for stabilization of nanodiamond crystallites. At lower

  15. Modeling the Electrochemical Hydrogen Oxidation and Evolution Reactions on the Basis of Density Functional Theory Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skulason, Egill; Tripkovic, Vladimir; Björketun, Mårten

    2010-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed for the three elementary steps―Tafel, Heyrovsky, and Volmer―involved in the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and its reverse, the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). For the Pt(111) surface a detailed model consisting of a negatively...... charged Pt(111) slab and solvated protons in up to three water bilayers is considered and reaction energies and activation barriers are determined by using a newly developed computational scheme where the potential can be kept constant during a charge transfer reaction. We determine the rate limiting...

  16. Comparative study on hydrogenation of propanal on Ni(111) and Cu(111) from density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Wei, E-mail: weian@sues.edu.cn; Men, Yong; Wang, Jinguo

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogenation of propanal is kinetically much faster on Ni(111) than Cu(111). • Hydroxyl route is prefered over alkoxy route on Ni(111). • Alkoxy route is prefered over hydroxyl route on Cu(111). • Activation barrier for hydrogenation of carbonyl is lowered by H-tunneling effect. • η{sup 2}(C,O)-adsorption mode is beneficial for hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of aldehyde. - Abstract: Using propanal as a probe molecule, we have comparatively investigated hydrogenation of carbonyl (C=O) in short carbon-chain aldehyde on Ni(111) and Cu(111) by means of periodic density functional theory. Our focus is in particular on the differentiation of reaction route in sequential hydrogenation on Ni(111) and Cu(111) following Langmuir–Hinshelwood mechanism. Strong binding with alkoxy intermediates has great impact on altering reaction pathways on the two surfaces, where hydroxyl route via 1-hydroxyl propyl intermediate is dominant on Ni(111), but alkoxy route via propoxyl intermediate is more likely on Cu(111) due to a higher activiation barrier of initial hydrogenation in hydroxyl route. In comparison, hydrogenation of carbonyl on Ni(111) is kinetically much faster than that on Cu(111) as a result of much lower activation barrier in rate-determining step (i.e., 13.2 vs 26.8 kcal/mol) of most favorable reaction pathways. Furthermore, the discrepancy in calculated and experimental barriers can be well explained by using the concept of H-tunneling effect on bond forming with H atoms during sequential hydrogenation. The different features of electronic structure exhibited by the two metal surfaces provide insight into their catalytic behaviors.

  17. Plasma density characterization at SPARC-LAB through Stark broadening of Hydrogen spectral lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, F., E-mail: francesco.filippi@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria (SBAI), ‘Sapienza’ Università di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INFN-Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2 00161 Roma (Italy); Anania, M.P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria (SBAI), ‘Sapienza’ Università di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INFN-Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2 00161 Roma (Italy); Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Zigler, A. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2016-09-01

    Plasma-based acceleration techniques are of great interest for future, compact accelerators due to their high accelerating gradient. Both particle-driven and laser-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiments are foreseen at the SPARC-LAB Test Facility (INFN National Laboratories of Frascati, Italy), with the aim to accelerate high-brightness electron beams. In order to optimize the efficiency of the acceleration in the plasma and preserve the quality of the accelerated beam, the knowledge of the plasma electron density is mandatory. The Stark broadening of the Hydrogen spectral lines is one of the candidates used to characterize plasma density. The implementation of this diagnostic for plasma-based experiments at SPARC-LAB is presented. - Highlights: • Stark broadening of Hydrogen lines has been measured to determine plasma density. • Plasma density diagnostic tool for plasma-based experiments at SPARC-LAB is presented. • Plasma density in tapered laser triggered ablative capillary discharge was measured. • Results of plasma density measurements in ablative capillaries are shown.

  18. Toward accurate prediction of potential energy surfaces and the spectral density of hydrogen bonded systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekik, Najeh

    2014-01-01

    Despite the considerable progress made in quantum theory and computational methods, detailed descriptions of the potential energy surfaces of hydrogen-bonded systems have not yet been achieved. In addition, the hydrogen bond (H-bond) itself is still so poorly understood at the fundamental level that it remains unclear exactly what geometry constitutes a “real” H-bond. Therefore, in order to investigate features essential for hydrogen bonded complexes, a simple, efficient, and general method for calculating matrix elements of vibrational operators capable of describing the stretching modes and the H-bond bridges of hydrogen-bonded systems is proposed. The derived matrix elements are simple and computationally easy to evaluate, which makes the method suitable for vibrational studies of multiple-well potentials. The method is illustrated by obtaining potential energy surfaces for a number of two-dimensional systems with repulsive potentials chosen to be in Gaussian form for the stretching mode and of the Morse-type for the H-bond bridge dynamics. The forms of potential energy surfaces of weak and strong hydrogen bonds are analyzed by varying the asymmetry of the Gaussian potential. Moreover, the choice and applicability of the selected potential for the stretching mode and comparison with other potentials used in the area of hydrogen bond research are discussed. The approach for the determination of spectral density has been constructed in the framework of the linear response theory for which spectral density is obtained by Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the dipole moment operator of the fast mode. The approach involves anharmonic coupling between the high frequency stretching vibration (double well potential) and low-frequency donor-acceptor stretching mode (Morse potential) as well as the electrical anharmonicity of the dipole moment operator of the fast mode. A direct relaxation mechanism is incorporated through a time decaying exponential

  19. High Density Lipoprotein: A Therapeutic Target in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Barter

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available High density lipoproteins (HDLs have a number of properties that have the potential to inhibit the development of atherosclerosis and thus reduce the risk of having a cardiovascular event. These protective effects of HDLs may be reduced in patients with type 2 diabetes, a condition in which the concentration of HDL cholesterol is frequently low. In addition to their potential cardioprotective properties, HDLs also increase the uptake of glucose by skeletal muscle and stimulate the synthesis and secretion of insulin from pancreatic β cells and may thus have a beneficial effect on glycemic control. This raises the possibility that a low HDL concentration in type 2 diabetes may contribute to a worsening of diabetic control. Thus, there is a double case for targeting HDLs in patients with type 2 diabetes: to reduce cardiovascular risk and also to improve glycemic control. Approaches to raising HDL levels include lifestyle factors such as weight reduction, increased physical activity and stopping smoking. There is an ongoing search for HDL-raising drugs as agents to use in patients with type 2 diabetes in whom the HDL level remains low despite lifestyle interventions.

  20. A liquid hydrogen target for the calibration of the MEG and MEG II liquid xenon calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signorelli, G., E-mail: giovanni.signorelli@pi.infn.it [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Baldini, A.M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Bemporad, C.; Cei, F.; Nicolò, D. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Università di Pisa, Dipartimento di Fisica, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Galli, L.; Gallucci, G.; Grassi, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Papa, A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Sergiampietri, F. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Venturini, M. [INFN Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    We designed, built and operated a liquid hydrogen target for the calibration of the liquid xenon calorimeter of the MEG experiment. The target was used throughout the entire data taking period, from 2008 to 2013 and it is being refurbished and partly re-designed to be integrated and used in the MEG-II experiment.

  1. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects of stomatal density in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejung; Feakins, Sarah J.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomata are key gateways mediating carbon uptake and water loss from plants. Varied stomatal densities in fossil leaves raise the possibility that isotope effects associated with the openness of exchange may have mediated plant wax biomarker isotopic proxies for paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the geological record. Here we use Arabidopsis thaliana, a widely used model organism, to provide the first controlled tests of stomatal density on carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of cuticular waxes. Laboratory grown wildtype and mutants with suppressed and overexpressed stomatal densities allow us to directly test the isotope effects of stomatal densities independent of most other environmental or biological variables. Hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of both plant waters and plant wax n-alkanes allow us to directly constrain the isotopic effects of leaf water isotopic enrichment via transpiration and biosynthetic fractionations, which together determine the net fractionation between irrigation water and n-alkane hydrogen isotopic composition. We also measure carbon isotopic fractionations of n-alkanes and bulk leaf tissue associated with different stomatal densities. We find offsets of +15‰ for δD and -3‰ for δ13C for the overexpressed mutant compared to the suppressed mutant. Since the range of stomatal densities expressed is comparable to that found in extant plants and the Cenozoic fossil record, the results allow us to consider the magnitude of isotope effects that may be incurred by these plant adaptive responses. This study highlights the potential of genetic mutants to isolate individual isotope effects and add to our fundamental understanding of how genetics and physiology influence plant biochemicals including plant wax biomarkers.

  2. Stark broadening of the Hα line of hydrogen at low densities: quantal and semiclassical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, C.; Feautrier, N.

    1984-01-01

    Stark profiles of the Hα lines of hydrogen are computed at low densities in the 'impact' theory. By a comparison with quantal results, it is shown that a simple semiclassical perturbational approach with appropriate cutoffs is sufficient to give accurate profiles in the line centre. Neglecting the natural broadening and the fine-structure effects, the authors prove that the electronic broadening is negligible and that the profile has a Lorentzian shape. An analytical expression of the half width is given. (author)

  3. Rapid Fabrication of Low-Density Porous Tin Monolith via Hydrogen Bulb Dynamics Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongbo; Zhu, Jiayi; Bi, Yutie; Xu, Yewei; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Ni

    Low-density porous tin monolith with the pteridophyta leaf-like structure was fast fabricated by a facile route via the electrochemical deposition process via hydrogen bulb dynamics templates within less than 1min. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and so on. The results indicated that the deposited tin porous structure could be easily controlled to form film or monolith by adjusting the tin precursor concentration and surfactant content.

  4. CH spectroscopy for carbon chemical erosion analysis in high density low temperature hydrogen plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Rapp, J.; van Rooij, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    The CH A-X molecular band is measured upon seeding the hydrogen plasma in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI [electron temperature T-e=0.1-2.5 eV and electron density n(e)=(0.5-5) X 10(20) m(-3)] with methane. Calculated inverse photon efficiencies for these conditions range from 3 up to

  5. A dynamically polarized hydrogen and deuterium target at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polarized electron beams have been successfully used at Jefferson Lab for over a year. The authors now report the successful achievement of polarized targets for nuclear and particle physics experiments using the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)technique. The technique involves initial irradiation of frozen ammonia crystals (NH 3 and ND 3 ) using the electron beam from the new Free Electron Laser (FEL) facility at Jefferson Lab, and transferring the crystals to a special target holder for use in Experimental Halls. By subjecting the still ionized and frozen ammonia crystals to a strong magnetic field and suitably tuned RF, the high electron polarization is transmitted to the nucleus thus achieving target polarization. Details of the irradiation facility, the target holder, irradiation times, ionized crystal shelf life, and achieved polarization are discussed

  6. Reduction in Recombination Current Density in Boron Doped Silicon Using Atomic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Matthew Garett

    The solar industry has grown immensely in recent years and has reached a point where solar energy has now become inexpensive enough that it is starting to emerge as a mainstream electrical generation source. However, recent economic analysis has suggested that for solar to become a truly wide spread source of electricity, the costs still need to plummet by a factor of 8x. This demands new and innovative concepts to help lower such cost. In pursuit of this goal, this dissertation examines the use of atomic hydrogen to lessen the recombination current density in the boron doped region of n-type silicon solar cells. This required the development of a boron diffusion process that maintained the bulk lifetime of n-type silicon such that the recombination current density could be extracted by photoconductance spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that by hydrogenating boron diffusions, the majority carrier concentration can be controlled. By using symmetrically diffused test structures with quinhydrone-methanol surface passivation the recombination current density of a hydrogenated boron profile is shown to be less than that of a standard boron profile, by as much as 30%. This is then applied to a modified industrial silicon solar cell process to demonstrate an efficiency enhancement of 0.4%.

  7. Density functional calculations of hydrogen adsorption on boron nanotubes and boron sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabria, I.; López, M. J.; Alonso, J. A.

    2006-02-01

    Hydrogen adsorption on the recently discovered boron nanotubes, BNTs, and on boron sheets is investigated by density functional calculations. Both molecular physisorption and dissociative atomic chemisorption are considered. The geometric and electronic structures of BNTs and boron sheets have been elucidated. These two novel boron structures present buckled surfaces with alternating up and down rows of B atoms, with a large buckling height of about 0.8 Å. The buckled structures are about 0.20 eV/atom more stable than the corresponding flat ones. However, the helicity of some BNTs does not allow for the formation of alternating up and down B rows in the surface and, therefore, these nanotubes have flat surfaces. The buckled and flat nanostructures have different geometric and bonding characteristics, but both are metallic. Molecular hydrogen physisorption energies are about 30-60 meV/molecule on boron sheets and nanotubes, actually lower than in graphene and in carbon nanotubes and far from the energies of 300-400 meV/molecule necessary for efficient hydrogen storage at room temperature and moderate pressures for onboard automotive applications. Chemisorption binding energies on BNTs are about 2.4-2.9 eV/H atom, similar to the ones obtained in CNTs. Finally, the energy barrier from molecular physisorption to dissociative chemisorption of hydrogen is about 1.0 eV /molecule. Therefore, the calculations predict physisorption as the leading adsorption mechanism of hydrogen at moderate temperatures and pressures. The expected hydrogen adsorption capacity of these novel B materials is even smaller than that of CNTs.

  8. Indirect, reversible high-density hydrogen storage in compact metal ammine salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Hummelshøj, Jens Strabo; Klerke, Asbjørn

    2008-01-01

    structures develop, which facilitates desorption from the interior of large, compact tablets. Density functional theory calculations reproduce trends in desorption enthalpies for the systems studied, and a mechanism in which individual chains of the ammines are released from the surface of the crystal......The indirect hydrogen storage capabilities of Mg(NH3)(6)Cl-2, Ca(NH3)(6)Cl-2, Mn(NH3)(6)Cl-2, and Ni(NH3)(6)Cl-2 are investigated. All four metal ammine chlorides can be compacted to solid tablets with densities of at least 95% of the crystal density. This gives very high indirect hydrogen...... densities both gravimetrically and volumetrically. Upon heating, NH3 is released from the salts, and by employing an appropriate catalyst, H-2 can be released corresponding to up to 9.78 wt % H and 0.116 kg H/L for the Ca(NH3)(8)Cl-2 salt. The NH3 release from all four salts is investigated using...

  9. Optimization of a liquid hydrogen/deuterium target with extremely thin foil windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nake, C.J.

    1993-09-01

    For external experiments at COSY a target of liquid hydrogen or deuterium has been developed, which is very small in order to take advantage of the excellent beam quality of COSY. Targets with thicknesses down to only mm's have been built and operate without bubbles. In order to make the effects of reactions in the windows much smaller than the target reactions, windows with a thickness of about 1.5 μm have been achieved. A novel system which stabilizes the pressure difference between the inside and the outside of the target cell to a small constant value under all target conditions is used. (orig.)

  10. 3-D-geocoronal hydrogen density derived from TWINS Ly-α-data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Zoennchen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on Ly-α-line-of-sight measurements taken with two Ly-α detectors onboard of the satellite TWINS1 (Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers density profiles of the exospheric, neutral geocoronal hydrogen were derived for the time period between summer solstice and fall equinox 2008. With the help of specifically developed inversion programs from Ly-α line of sight intensities the three-dimensional density structure of the geocoronal hydrogen at geocentric distances r>3 RE could be derived for the period mentioned characterized by very low solar 10.7 cm radiofluxes of ≈65–70 [10−22 W m−2 Hz−1]. The time-variable, solar "line-centered"-Ly-α-flux was extracted on the basis of daily (terrestrial NGDC 10.7 cm radioflux data using the models from Barth et al. (1990 and Vidal-Madjar (1975. The results for the geocoronal H-densities are compared here both with theoretical calculations based on a Monte-Carlo model by Hodges (1994 and with density profiles obtained with the Geocoronal Imager (GEO by Østgaard and Mende (2003. In our results we find a remarkably more pronounced day-/night-side asymmetry which clearly hints to the existence of a hydrogen geotail (i.e. a tail structure with comparatively higher hydrogen densities on the night side of the earth for geocenctric distances >4 RE, and a only weakly pronounced polar depletion. These unexpected features we try to explain by new models in the near future. The derived 3-D-H-density structures are able to explain the line-of-sight (LOS dependent Ly-α intensity variations for all LOS seen up to now with TWINS-LAD. The presented results are valid for the region with geocentric distances 3 RE

  11. Effect of graphite target power density on tribological properties of graphite-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dan; Jiang, Bailing; Li, Hongtao; Du, Yuzhou; Yang, Chao

    2018-05-01

    In order to improve the tribological performance, a series of graphite-like carbon (GLC) films with different graphite target power densities were prepared by magnetron sputtering. The valence bond and microstructure of films were characterized by AFM, TEM, XPS and Raman spectra. The variation of mechanical and tribological properties with graphite target power density was analyzed. The results showed that with the increase of graphite target power density, the deposition rate and the ratio of sp2 bond increased obviously. The hardness firstly increased and then decreased with the increase of graphite target power density, whilst the friction coefficient and the specific wear rate increased slightly after a decrease with the increasing graphite target power density. The friction coefficient and the specific wear rate were the lowest when the graphite target power density was 23.3 W/cm2.

  12. A 2.5m long liquid hydrogen target for COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Bielert, E; Doshita, N; Geyer, R; Hashimoto, R; Horikawa, N; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kondo, K; Mallot, G K; Matsuda, H; Matsuda, T; Miyachi, Y; Nukazuka, G; Pirotte, O; Suzuki, H; Suzuki, S; Vullierme, B

    2014-01-01

    A 2.5 m long liquid hydrogen target has been developed for the COMPASS experiment at CERN to investigate the nucleon spin structure via the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) process. To recognize exclusive DVCS events, produced photons and slow protons need to be detected. In order to do so, the material budget around the target has to be minimal. A 0.125 mm thick Kapton s target cell and a 1 mm thick carbon fi ber vacuum chamber with a Mylar s window have been constructed and tested. Finally, the target system was successfully employed during the DVCS pilot run in COMPASS at the end of 2012. The objective of this paper is to give a detailed description of this newly developed liquid hydrogen target apparatus

  13. Development of a high-density gas-jet target for nuclear astrophysics and reaction studies with rare isotope beams. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwe, Greife [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-08-12

    The purpose of this project was to develop a high-density gas jet target that will enable a new program of transfer reaction studies with rare isotope beams and targets of hydrogen and helium that is not currently possible and will have an important impact on our understanding of stellar explosions and of the evolution of nuclear shell structure away from stability. This is the final closeout report for the project.

  14. Development of a high-density gas-jet target for nuclear astrophysics and reaction studies with rare isotope beams. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwe, Greife

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a high-density gas jet target that will enable a new program of transfer reaction studies with rare isotope beams and targets of hydrogen and helium that is not currently possible and will have an important impact on our understanding of stellar explosions and of the evolution of nuclear shell structure away from stability. This is the final closeout report for the project.

  15. Suitability of III-V [XH4][YH4] materials for hydrogen storage: A density functional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuliani, F.; Gotz, A.W.; Fonseca Guerra, C.; Baerends, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    In the search for novel hydrogen storage media, the III-V hydridic material [NH4] [BH4] is a natural candidate. It can store a high wt% of hydrogen and has a favorable volumetric density. Unfortunately it was found to decompose slowly at room temperature. It is of interest to consider chemically

  16. Hydrogen dynamics in Na3AlH6: A combined density functional theory and quasielastic neutron scattering study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Johannes; Shi, Qing; Jacobsen, Hjalte Sylvest

    2007-01-01

    alanate with TiCl3, and here we study hydrogen dynamics in doped and undoped Na3AlH6 using a combination of density functional theory calculations and quasielastic neutron scattering. The hydrogen dynamics is found to be vacancy mediated and dominated by localized jump events, whereas long-range bulk...

  17. Density functional theory study on the formation of reactive benzoquinone imines by hydrogen abstraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Rasmus; Rydberg, Patrik; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2015-01-01

    Many drug compounds are oxidized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes to form reactive metabolites. This study presents density functional theory calculations of the CYP-mediated metabolism of acetaminophen and a series of related compounds that can form reactive metabolites by hydrogen abstraction....... The substitution pattern affects the activation barrier for hydrogen abstraction by up to 30 kJ/mol. A correlation (R(2) = 0.72) between the transition-state energies and the corresponding substrate radical energies has been established. Using this correlation is significantly less time-demanding than using...... the porphyrin model to determine the activation energies. We have used this correlation on monosubstituted phenols to rationalize the effect of the various substituents in the drug compounds. In addition to facilitating a chemical interpretation, the approach is sufficiently fast and reliable to be used...

  18. Li4FeH6: Iron-containing complex hydride with high gravimetric hydrogen density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Saitoh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Li4FeH6, which has the highest gravimetric hydrogen density of iron-containing complex hydrides reported so far, is synthesized by hydrogenation of a powder mixture of iron and LiH above 6.1 GPa at 900 °C. In situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that while kinetics require high temperature and thus high pressure for the synthesis, Li4FeH6 is expected to be thermodynamically stable slightly below room temperature at ambient pressure; further synthetic studies to suppress the kinetic effects may enable us to synthesize Li4FeH6 at moderate pressures. Li4FeH6 can be recovered at ambient conditions where Li4FeH6 is metastable.

  19. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberli, W.

    1992-02-01

    Polarized gas targets of atomic hydrogen and deuterium have significant advantages over conventional polarized targets, e.g. chemical and isotopic purity, large polarization including deuteron tensor polarization, absence of strong magnetic fields, rapid polarization reversal. While in principle the beam of polarized atoms from an atomic beam source (Stern-Gerlach spin separation) can be used as a polarized target, the target thickness achieved is too small for most applications. We propose to increase the target thickness by injecting the polarized atoms into a storage cell. Provided the atoms survive several hundred wall collisions without losing their polarization, it will be possible to achieve a target thickness of 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} by injection of polarized atoms from an atomic-beam source into suitable cells. Such targets are very attractive as internal targets in storage rings.

  20. Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeberli, W.

    1992-02-01

    Polarized gas targets of atomic hydrogen and deuterium have significant advantages over conventional polarized targets, e.g. chemical and isotopic purity, large polarization including deuteron tensor polarization, absence of strong magnetic fields, rapid polarization reversal. While in principle the beam of polarized atoms from an atomic beam source (Stern-Gerlach spin separation) can be used as a polarized target, the target thickness achieved is too small for most applications. We propose to increase the target thickness by injecting the polarized atoms into a storage cell. Provided the atoms survive several hundred wall collisions without losing their polarization, it will be possible to achieve a target thickness of 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} by injection of polarized atoms from an atomic-beam source into suitable cells. Such targets are very attractive as internal targets in storage rings.

  1. Micron-size hydrogen cluster target for laser-driven proton acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, S.; Kanasaki, M.; Uno, M.; Matsui, R.; Uesaka, M.; Kishimoto, Y.; Fukuda, Y.

    2018-04-01

    As a new laser-driven ion acceleration technique, we proposed a way to produce impurity-free, highly reproducible, and robust proton beams exceeding 100 MeV using a Coulomb explosion of micron-size hydrogen clusters. In this study, micron-size hydrogen clusters were generated by expanding the cooled high-pressure hydrogen gas into a vacuum via a conical nozzle connected to a solenoid valve cooled by a mechanical cryostat. The size distributions of the hydrogen clusters were evaluated by measuring the angular distribution of laser light scattered from the clusters. The data were analyzed mathematically based on the Mie scattering theory combined with the Tikhonov regularization method. The maximum size of the hydrogen cluster at 25 K and 6 MPa in the stagnation state was recognized to be 2.15 ± 0.10 μm. The mean cluster size decreased with increasing temperature, and was found to be much larger than that given by Hagena’s formula. This discrepancy suggests that the micron-size hydrogen clusters were formed by the atomization (spallation) of the liquid or supercritical fluid phase of hydrogen. In addition, the density profiles of the gas phase were evaluated for 25 to 80 K at 6 MPa using a Nomarski interferometer. Based on the measurement results and the equation of state for hydrogen, the cluster mass fraction was obtained. 3D particles-in-cell (PIC) simulations concerning the interaction processes of micron-size hydrogen clusters with high power laser pulses predicted the generation of protons exceeding 100 MeV and accelerating in a laser propagation direction via an anisotropic Coulomb explosion mechanism, thus demonstrating a future candidate in laser-driven proton sources for upcoming multi-petawatt lasers.

  2. Heavy density liquid metal spallation target studies for Indian ADS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to tens of mA) interacts with the target, which is located in the core and produces spallation neutrons (~1019/s) that diffuse into the reactor and drive the reactor. The spallation target module is the most innovative component of the ADS. It constitutes the physical interface between the accelerator and the sub-critical reactor.

  3. A three-cell liquid hydrogen target for an extended focal plane polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovanov, L.B.; Chesny, P.; Gheller, J.M.; Guillier, G.; Ladygin, V.P.; Theure, Ph.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.

    1996-01-01

    This article describes the design and working principle of a three-cell liquid hydrogen target produced for the high-energy deuteron polarimeter HYPOM. This target uses liquid helium as a cooling agent. After a general description of the apparatus, tests and operating modes are thoroughly explained. In particular the air controlled self-regulation of helium flow in the cryostat to stabilize the liquid hydrogen level is presented. The main feature of this target is the simplicity of the design as well as its safeness towards any incident. Results of cooling down, filling up of the target and stabilization regime were processed during one experiment of physics at synchrotron Saturne II. (orig.)

  4. Standard hydrogen electrode and potential of zero charge in density functional calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Björketun, Mårten; Skúlason, Egill

    2011-01-01

    Methods to explicitly account for half-cell electrode potentials have recently appeared within the framework of density functional theory. The potential of the electrode relative to the standard hydrogen electrode is typically determined by subtracting the experimental value of the absolute...... possess in order for its computed ASHEP to closely match the experimental benchmark. We capture and quantify these three effects by calculating trends in the ASHEP and PZC on eight close-packed transition metals, considering the four most simple and representative water models. Finally, it is also...

  5. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen defect pairs in SrTiO3 from density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Nicolai Christian; Bonanos, Nikolaos; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    V compared to two non-interacting H defects. The main cause of the net attractive potential is elastic defect interactions through lattice deformation. Two possible diffusion paths for the hydrogen defect pair are investigated and are both determined to be faster than the corresponding diffusion path...... for single hydrogen atoms. Finally, we set up a simple model to determine the contribution from the double hydrogen defect to the total hydrogen flux, and find the double defect to be the main diffusing species at temperatures below ca. 400 °C. Post submission infrared absorption experiments show excellent......A density functional theory investigation of the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of hydrogen–hydrogen defect interactions in the cubic SrTiO3 perovskite is presented. We find a net attraction between two hydrogen atoms with an optimal separation of ∼2.3 Å. The energy gain is ca. 0.33 e...

  6. Density functional theory (DFT) studies of hydrogen rich solids and boron carbide under extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamp, Andrew James

    Since the first prediction that compressed hydrogen would metallize in 1935 and the further prediction that the metallic allotrope would be a superconductor at high temperatures, metallic hydrogen has been termed the "holy grail" of high-pressure science. A tremendous amount of theoretical and experimental research has been carried out, with the ultimate goal of metallizing hydrogen via the application of external pressure. It has been previously proposed that doping hydrogen with another element can lower the pressure at which metallization occurs. A number of experimental and theoretical studies have investigated doping hydrogen by either a group XIII or XIV element. Experiments in diamond anvil cells have illustrated that it is indeed possible to synthesize hydrogen-rich phases under conditions of extreme pressures, and SiH4 (H2)2, GeH4(H2) n, and Xe(H2)n have been shown to behave as true compounds. The focus herein is on the theoretical exploration of hydrogen-rich phases with novel stoichiometries, which contain a dopant element up to pressures of 350 GPa. In particular, the alkali-metal and alkaline Earth metal polyhydrides (MHn where n > 1) have been considered. Within this thesis the XtalOpt evolutionary algorithm was employed in order to complete this work, and predict the most stable structures of cesium and beryllium polyhydrides under pressure. In addition, we explore the possibility of mixing excess hydrogen with an electronegative element, iodine and phosphorus. The phases found are examined via detailed first principles calculations. In addition, because of its outstanding hardness, thermodynamic stability, low density, electronic properties, thermal stability, and high melting point boron carbide has many uses: i.e. as a refractory material, in abrasive powders and ballistics, as a neutron radiation absorbent, and in electronic applications. However, little is known about the behavior of boron carbide when under the external stress of pressure. The

  7. Large-Scale Liquid Hydrogen Testing of Variable Density Multilayer Insulation with a Foam Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J. J.; Hastings, L.

    2001-01-01

    The multipurpose hydrogen test bed (MHTB), with an 18-cu m liquid hydrogen tank, was used to evaluate a combination foam/multilayer combination insulation (MLI) concept. The foam element (Isofoam SS-1171) insulates during ground hold/ascent flight, and allowed a dry nitrogen purge as opposed to the more complex/heavy helium purge subsystem normally required. The 45-layer MLI was designed for an on-orbit storage period of 45 days. Unique WI features include a variable layer density, larger but fewer double-aluminized Mylar perforations for ascent to orbit venting, and a commercially established roll-wrap installation process that reduced assembly man-hours and resulted in a roust, virtually seamless MLI. Insulation performance was measured during three test series. The spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) successfully prevented purge gas liquefaction within the MLI and resulted in the expected ground hold heat leak of 63 W/sq m. The orbit hold tests resulted in heat leaks of 0.085 and 0.22 W/sq m with warm boundary temperatures of 164 and 305 K, respectively. Compared to the best previously measured performance with a traditional MLI system, a 41-percent heat leak reduction with 25 fewer MLI layers was achieved. The MHTB MLI heat leak is half that calculated for a constant layer density MLI.

  8. Build-up of a liquid hydrogen target with extremely thin windows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeckle, V.G.

    1992-06-01

    Small hydrogen targets with only a few cubic millimeters of liquid have many advantages in experiments on accelerators with phase-space cooled particle beams. In order to achieve good suppression of systematic errors by secondary reactions in the target and in the target windows, the thickness of the foil window for a 1 mm target may only be 0.3 μm. A pressure difference of 200 mbar permits the use of such thin foils (with a diameter of 6 mm). A purely mechanical pressure control unit was built, which consists of soft bellows and a loading weight. The pressure difference from a vacuum, which is in the bellows, is set by the weight on the bellows. The working parameters were chosen so that deuterium, nitrogen and oxygen can be used. The pressure variations in the cell are only ± 2.5 mbar. A mixing of gaseous and liquid hydrogen in the target cell and the formation of bubbles due to free convection can be prevented. A quiet volume of liquid hydrogen free of bubbles was obtained. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Heavy density liquid metal spallation target studies for Indian ADS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mercury and LBE experimental facilities are presently being set up. Along with these facilities, computational tools related to spallation physics (FLUKA) and CFD are being developed, and the existing ones are utilized to design the entire target loop as well as sub-systems. In this presentation the details of these activities ...

  10. Heavy density liquid metal spallation target studies for Indian ADS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An R&D programme has been initiated to address various physics and technology issues of ADS target. Under this programme, mercury and LBE experimental facilities are presently being set up. Along with these facilities, computational tools related to spallation physics (FLUKA) and CFD are being developed, and the ...

  11. Efficient plasma production by intense laser irradiation of low density foam targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, S.; Chaurasia, S.; Munda, D. S.; Gupta, N. K.; Dhareshwar, L. J.; Nataliya, B.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental investigations conducted on low density structured materials, such as foams have been presented in this paper. These low density foam targets having a density greater than the critical density of the laser produced plasma (ρ cr ≅3 mg·cm -3 at laser wavelength 1.06 μm) have been envisaged to have enhanced laser absorption. Experiments were done with an indigenously developed, focused 15 Joule/500 ps Nd: Glass laser at λ = 1064 nm. The focused laser intensity on the target was in the range of I≅10 13 -2x10 14 W/cm 2 . Laser absorption was determined by energy balance experiments. Laser energy absorption was observed to be higher than 85%. In another set of experiments, low density carbon foam targets of density 150 mg/cc were compared with the solid carbon targets. The x-ray emission in the soft x-ray region was observed to increase in foam target by about 1.8 times and 2.3 times in carbon foam and Pt doped foam as compared to solid carbon. Further, investigations were also carried out to measure the energy transmitted through the sub-critical density TAC foam targets having a density less than 3 mg/cc. Such targets have been proposed to be used for smoothening of intensity ripples in a high power laser beam profile. Transmission exceeding 1.87% has been observed and consistent with results from other laboratories.

  12. Analyses and hydrogen-isotope-transport calculations of current and future designs of the LLL rotating-target neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steward, S.A.; Nickerson, R.; Booth, R.

    1975-01-01

    Analyses of the present titanium-tritide RTNS targets are presented. These results include the hydrogen-isotope content of new and used targets, metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and hydrogen-isotope-diffusion calculations using a heat-flow finite-difference computer code. These latter calculations indicate that a combination of long target life and high neutron output is optimized when the rate of hydrogen isotope evolution from the target balances the deposition rate from the beam. Auger spectra show that carbon and oxygen species are present in the bulk and on the surface

  13. Numerical study of overpopulation density for laser oscillation in recombining hydrogen plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, T.; Furukane, U.

    1983-06-01

    The dependence of overpopulation density (OD) on ground-level population density (n1) and electron temperature (Te) in a recombining hydrogen plasma is evaluated for line pairs with the principal quantum numbers (2,3), (3,4), and (4,5). The approach is based on the simultaneouss solution of the quasi-steady-state rate equation (including interatomic-collision terms) and the optical-escape-factor equation for the Lyman series with Doppler profile. Calculations are performed for optically thin and thick plasmas at a fixed atomic temperature of 0.15 eV, over a Te range from 0.1 to 1 eV and an electron-density (ne) range from 10 to the 11th to 10 to the 17th per cu cm. It is shown that peak OD occurs at an ne slightly below that at which population inversion is destroyed, that peak OD is inversely sensitive to Te, and that peak OD(2,3) is the highest of the three peak OD. Laser oscillation is determined to be possible for (2,3) at Te higher than for (3,4) and (4,5), if self-absorption is negligible. The OD remains constant as n1 increases, up to the point at which significant self-absorption occurs. No laser oscillation is expected at level (4,5), nor in optically thick plasma at any level, for the realistic cavity parameters and temperatures used in the calculations. 21 references.

  14. Cryogenic hydrogen fuel for controlled inertial confinement fusion (formation of reactor-scale cryogenic targets)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R.; Krokhin, O. N.; Osipov, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    In inertial fusion energy research, considerable attention has recently been focused on low-cost fabrication of a large number of targets by developing a specialized layering module of repeatable operation. The targets must be free-standing, or unmounted. Therefore, the development of a target factory for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is based on methods that can ensure a cost-effective target production with high repeatability. Minimization of the amount of tritium (i.e., minimization of time and space at all production stages) is a necessary condition as well. Additionally, the cryogenic hydrogen fuel inside the targets must have a structure (ultrafine layers—the grain size should be scaled back to the nanometer range) that supports the fuel layer survivability under target injection and transport through the reactor chamber. To meet the above requirements, significant progress has been made at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI) in the technology developed on the basis of rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets (FST), also referred to as the FST layering method. Owing to the research carried out at LPI, unique experience has been gained in the development of the FST-layering module for target fabrication with an ultrafine fuel layer, including a reactor- scale target design. This experience can be used for the development of the next-generation FST-layering module for construction of a prototype of a target factory for power laser facilities and inertial fusion power plants.

  15. Model Insensitive and Calibration Independent Method for Determination of the Downstream Neutral Hydrogen Density Through Ly-alpha Glow Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, P.; Judge, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    Our knowledge of the various heliospheric phenomena (location of the solar wind termination shock, heliopause configuration and very local interstellar medium parameters) is limited by uncertainties in the available heliospheric plasma models and by calibration uncertainties in the observing instruments. There is, thus, a strong motivation to develop model insensitive and calibration independent methods to reduce the uncertainties in the relevant heliospheric parameters. We have developed such a method to constrain the downstream neutral hydrogen density inside the heliospheric tail. In our approach we have taken advantage of the relative insensitivity of the downstream neutral hydrogen density profile to the specific plasma model adopted. We have also used the fact that the presence of an asymmetric neutral hydrogen cavity surrounding the sun, characteristic of all neutral densities models, results in a higher multiple scattering contribution to the observed glow in the downstream region than in the upstream region. This allows us to approximate the actual density profile with one which is spatially uniform for the purpose of calculating the downstream backscattered glow. Using different spatially constant density profiles, radiative transfer calculations are performed, and the radial dependence of the predicted glow is compared with the observed I/R dependence of Pioneer 10 UV data. Such a comparison bounds the large distance heliospheric neutral hydrogen density in the downstream direction to a value between 0.05 and 0.1/cc.

  16. Hydrogen Adsorption on Nearly Zigzag-Edged Nanoribbons: A Density Functional Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananghaya, Michael Rivera; Santos, Gil Nonato; Yu, Dennis; Stampfl, Catherine

    2017-11-16

    The realistic shapes of N doped graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) can be realized by considering nearly zigzag-edged (NZE) imperfections and pyridine defects (3NV). The paper focuses on NZE-GNRs with 3NV that is populated by Scandium abbreviated as Sc/NZE-3NVGNRs. Systematic calculations have clarified roles of the nano-shapes of NZE-3NVGNRs in its formation, energetics, stability and electron states functionalized with Sc using density functional theory (DFT) formalisms. According to DFT calculations, the magnitude of the spin that is attributed to the rise of magnetic order is closely linked to the altered shape of the ribbon edges. Also, calculations show that the stability of Sc functionalization at the 3NV and NZE site is thermodynamically stable and is dictated by a strong binding energy (BE). The magnitude of the BE is enhanced when the zigzag edge is short or the ribbon width is narrow, suggesting a reduced clustering of Sc atoms over the Sc-doped NZE-3NVGNRs. Results also show that as the length of the zigzag edge in Sc/NZE-3NVGNRs increases it creates considerable distortion on the appearance of the structure. Finally, the Sc/NZE-3NVGNRs as a potential candidate for hydrogen storage was evaluated and it was found that it could adsorb multiple hydrogen molecules.

  17. Time Ordering Effects on Hydrogen Zeeman-Stark Line Profiles in Low-Density Magnetized Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rosato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stark broadening of hydrogen lines is investigated in low-density magnetized plasmas, at typical conditions of magnetic fusion experiments. The role of time ordering is assessed numerically, by using a simulation code accounting for the evolution of the microscopic electric field generated by the charged particles moving at the vicinity of the atom. The Zeeman effect due to the magnetic field is also retained. Lyman lines with a low principal quantum number n are first investigated, for an application to opacity calculations; next Balmer lines with successively low and high principal quantum numbers are considered for diagnostic purposes. It is shown that neglecting time ordering results in a dramatic underestimation of the Stark effect on the low-n lines. Another conclusion is that time ordering becomes negligible only when ion dynamics effects vanish, as shown in the case of high-n lines.

  18. Line profiles of hydrogenic ions from high-temperature and high-density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Qing; Li Jianming

    1991-01-01

    Applying the Hooper's first-order theory, the authors calculate the static micro-electric field distributions in plasmas containing various multiply-charged ions. The influences of the impurity concentrations on the micro electric field distributions and on the Lyman profiles (n→1) from hydrogenic ions are analysed. Based on the optical-thin line profiles, the radiation transfer equation in sphere plasmas with various optical depths is solved. The results confirm that the opacity-broadening of the line profiles has almost no effect on the separation of Lyman β splitted peaks. Such separation is determined by electric field at which the static micro-electric field distribution has a maximum. The separation can be utilized for spatially resolved and temporally resolved density diagnostic of fusion plasmas

  19. Spin density matrix elements in exclusive ρ 0 electroproduction on 1H and 2H targets at 27.5 GeV beam energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Andrus, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetissian, E.; Belostotski, S.; Bianchi, N.; Blok, H. P.; Böttcher, H.; Bonomo, C.; Borissov, A.; Brüll, A.; Bryzgalov, V.; Capiluppi, M.; Capitani, G. P.; Cisbani, E.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; Deconinck, W.; de Leo, R.; Demey, M.; de Nardo, L.; de Sanctis, E.; Diefenthaler, M.; di Nezza, P.; Dreschler, J.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Elalaoui-Moulay, A.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elschenbroich, U.; Fabbri, R.; Fantoni, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Funel, A.; Gabbert, D.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garibaldi, F.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Giordano, F.; Gliske, S.; Grebeniouk, O.; Gregor, I. M.; Guler, H.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hesselink, W. H. A.; Hill, G.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hommez, B.; Hristova, I.; Iarygin, G.; Imazu, Y.; Ivanilov, A.; Izotov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Jgoun, A.; Kaiser, R.; Keri, T.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kopytin, M.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Kravchenko, P.; Krivokhijine, V. G.; Lagamba, L.; Lamb, R.; Lapikás, L.; Lehmann, I.; Lenisa, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden-Levy, L. A.; Lorenzon, W.; Lu, S.; Lu, X.-R.; Ma, B.-Q.; Maiheu, B.; Makins, N. C. R.; Manaenkov, S. I.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; Marukyan, H.; Mexner, V.; Miller, C. A.; Miyachi, Y.; Muccifora, V.; Murray, M.; Mussgiller, A.; Nagaitsev, A.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Nass, A.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Osborne, A.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Perez-Benito, R.; Pickert, N.; Raithel, M.; Reggiani, D.; Reimer, P. E.; Reischl, A.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rock, S. E.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubacek, L.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Sanjiev, I.; Schäfer, A.; Schnell, G.; Schüler, K. P.; Seitz, B.; Shearer, C.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shutov, V.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steffens, J. E.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Streit, J.; Tait, P.; Taroian, S.; Tchuiko, B.; Terkulov, A.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; van der Nat, P. B.; van der Steenhoven, G.; van Haarlem, Y.; van Hulse, C.; Varanda, M.; Veretennikov, D.; Vikhrov, V.; Vilardi, I.; Vogel, C.; Wang, S.; Yaschenko, S.; Ye, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yen, S.; Yu, W.; Zeiler, D.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.

    2009-08-01

    Spin Density Matrix Elements (SDMEs) describing the angular distribution of exclusive ρ 0 electroproduction and decay are determined in the HERMES experiment with 27.6 GeV beam energy and unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium targets. Eight (fifteen) SDMEs that are related (unrelated) to the longitudinal polarization of the beam are extracted in the kinematic region 1exchange amplitudes; these amplitudes are naturally generated with a quark-exchange mechanism.

  20. Low-enriched uranium high-density target project. Compendium report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, George; Brown, M. Alex; Jerden, James L.; Gelis, Artem V.; Stepinski, Dominique C.; Wiedmeyer, Stanley; Youker, Amanda; Hebden, Andrew; Solbrekken, G; Allen, C; Robertson., D; El-Gizawy, Sherif; Govindarajan, Srisharan; Hoyer, Annemarie; Makarewicz, Philip; Harris, Jacob; Graybill, Brian; Gunn, Andy; Berlin, James; Bryan, Chris; Sherman, Steven; Hobbs, Randy; Griffin, F. P.; Chandler, David; Hurt, C. J.; Williams, Paul; Creasy, John; Tjader, Barak; McFall, Danielle; Longmire, Hollie

    2016-09-01

    At present, most 99Mo is produced in research, test, or isotope production reactors by irradiation of highly enriched uranium targets. To achieve the denser form of uranium needed for switching from high to low enriched uranium (LEU), targets in the form of a metal foil (~125-150 µm thick) are being developed. The LEU High Density Target Project successfully demonstrated several iterations of an LEU-fission-based Mo-99 technology that has the potential to provide the world’s supply of Mo-99, should major producers choose to utilize the technology. Over 50 annular high density targets have been successfully tested, and the assembly and disassembly of targets have been improved and optimized. Two target front-end processes (acidic and electrochemical) have been scaled up and demonstrated to allow for the high-density target technology to mate up to the existing producer technology for target processing. In the event that a new target processing line is started, the chemical processing of the targets is greatly simplified. Extensive modeling and safety analysis has been conducted, and the target has been qualified to be inserted into the High Flux Isotope Reactor, which is considered above and beyond the requirements for the typical use of this target due to high fluence and irradiation duration.

  1. First demonstration of multi-MeV proton acceleration from a cryogenic hydrogen ribbon target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Stephan D.; Obst, Lieselotte; Metzkes-Ng, Josefine; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Zeil, Karl; Michaux, Sylvain; Chatain, Denis; Perin, Jean-Paul; Chen, Sophia N.; Fuchs, Julien; Gauthier, Maxence; Cowan, Thomas E.; Schramm, Ulrich

    2018-04-01

    We show efficient laser driven proton acceleration up to 14 MeV from a 62 μm thick cryogenic hydrogen ribbon. Pulses of the short pulse laser ELFIE at LULI with a pulse length of ≈350 fs at an energy of 8 J per pulse are directed onto the target. The results are compared to proton spectra from metal and plastic foils with different thicknesses and show a similarly good performance both in maximum energy as well as in proton number. Thus, this target type is a promising candidate for experiments with high repetition rate laser systems.

  2. Hydrogen concentration and mass density of diamondlike carbon films obtained by x-ray and neutron reflectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Findeisen, E.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Vigild, Martin Etchells

    1994-01-01

    the mass density, but also the concentration of hydrogen, which varies in our case between 0 and 30 at.%. This method is a new and nondestructive way to determine the concentration of hydrogen within an error of less than 2 at.% in samples with sharp interfaces. It is especially suited for diamondlike......Specular reflectivity of neutrons and x rays can be used to determine the scattering length density profile of a material perpendicular to its surface. We have applied these techniques to study amorphous, diamondlike, hydrocarbon films. By the combination of these two techniques we obtain not only...

  3. Control of laser-accelerated proton beams by modifying the target density with ASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yogo, A.; Kiriyama, H.; Mori, M.; Esirkepov, T.Zh.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Orimo, S.; Nishiuchi, M.; Pirozhkov, A.S.; Nakai, Y.; Shimomura, T.; Tanoue, M.; Akutsu, A.; Okada, H.; Motomura, T.; Kondo, S.; Kanazawa, S.; Bulanov, S.V.; Bolton, P.R.; Daido, H. [Photo-Medical Research Center and Advanced Photon Research Center, JAEA, Kyoto (Japan); Nagatomo, H. [Osaka Univ., Institute of Laser Engineering (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    We demonstrate laser-ion acceleration from a near-critical density plasma, using amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) to convert a solid foil target into a lower-density target. In order to investigate the target density dependence of the laser-ion acceleration, two cases were investigated for which the ASE intensity differed by three orders of magnitude. In the low contrast case the beam centre for higher energy protons is shifted closer to the laser-propagation direction of 45 degrees, while the centre of lower-energy beam remains near the target normal direction. We show that a near-critical density plasma can be used to control proton beam direction based on its energy. (authors)

  4. Fuel cell and hydrogen R and D targets and funding : a comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, K.A.; Jollie, D.; Baker, A.

    2005-01-01

    Substantial research and development is needed if fuel cells and hydrogen are to become a mass market reality. Setting research and development targets are central to the long term development of the market. An overview of fuel cell research in the United States, the European Union, and parts of Asia was presented. Research and development targets were analyzed, as well as funding levels for fuel cells and hydrogen. The time frames of targets were considered, as well as the levels of ambition and overall program goals of various countries. Funding barriers and challenges were also considered. It was noted that some governments, such as Japan and Korea, have set a number of very ambitious, highly focused long term targets with substantial funding. The European Union has taken a more integrated approach, wrapping fundamental research and development into large integrated projects which run in combination with a number of other market aspects, such as public acceptance and roadmapping. The United States has a number of long term programmes and targets, but levels of funding are set annually with the passing of each year's Fiscal Budget. The overall goal of the paper was to provide a clearer picture of regional fuel cell research in order to discover areas for potential international collaboration

  5. The HERMES polarized hydrogen and deuterium gas target in the HERA electron storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Amarian, M.; Andrus, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetissian, E.; Bailey, P.; Balin, D.; Baumgarten, C.; Beckmann, M.; Belostotski, S.; Bianchi, N.; Blok, H. P.; Böttcher, H.; Borissov, A.; Borysenko, A.; Bouwhuis, M.; Braun, B.; Brüll, A.; Bryzgalov, V.; Capitani, G. P.; Capiluppi, M.; Chen, T.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Court, G.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; De Leo, R.; Demey, M.; De Nardo, L.; De Sanctis, E.; Devitsin, E.; Di Nezza, P.; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Elalaoui-Moulay, A.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elschenbroich, U.; Fabbri, R.; Fantoni, A.; Fechtchenko, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garibaldi, F.; Garrow, K.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Graw, G.; Grebeniouk, O.; Gregor, I. M.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haeberli, W.; Hafidi, K.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Heesbeen, D.; Henoch, M.; Hertenberger, R.; Hesselink, W. H. A.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hommez, B.; Hristova, I.; Iarygin, G.; Ivanilov, A.; Izotov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Jgoun, A.; Kaiser, R.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Koch, N.; Kolster, H.; Kopytin, M.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Krauss, B.; Krivokhijine, V. G.; Lagamba, L.; Lapikás, L.; Laziev, A.; Lenisa, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden-Levy, L. A.; Lorenzon, W.; Lu, H.; Lu, J.; Lu, S.; Ma, B.-Q.; Maiheu, B.; Makins, N. C. R.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; Marukyan, H.; Mexner, V.; Meyners, N.; Mussa, R.; Mikloukho, O.; Miller, C. A.; Miyachi, Y.; Muccifora, V.; Nagaitsev, A.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Nass, A.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Oganessyan, K.; Ohsuga, H.; Osborne, A.; Pickert, N.; Potterveld, D. H.; Raithel, M.; Reggiani, D.; Reimer, P. E.; Reischl, A.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubacek, L.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Sanjiev, I.; Savin, I.; Schill, C.; Schnell, G.; Schüler, K. P.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seitz, B.; Shanidze, R.; Shearer, C.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shutov, V.; Sinram, K.; Sommer, W.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steffens, E.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Tait, P.; Tanaka, H.; Taroian, S.; Tchuiko, B.; Terkulov, A.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; van der Nat, P.; van der Steenhoven, G.; van Haarlem, Y.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vikhrov, V.; Vincter, M. G.; Vogel, C.; Volmer, J.; Wang, S.; Wendland, J.; Wilbert, J.; Wise, T.; Ybeles Smit, G.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yen, S.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.

    2005-03-01

    The HERMES hydrogen and deuterium nuclear-polarized gas targets have been in use since 1996 with the polarized electron beam of HERA at DESY to study the spin structure of the nucleon. Polarized atoms from a Stern-Gerlach Atomic Beam Source are injected into a storage cell internal to the HERA electron ring. Atoms diffusing from the center of the storage cell into a side tube are analyzed to determine the atomic fraction and the atomic polarizations. The atoms have a nuclear polarization, the axis of which is defined by an external magnetic holding field. The holding field was longitudinal during 1996-2000, and was changed to transverse in 2001. The design of the target is described, the method for analyzing the target polarization is outlined, and the performance of the target in the various running periods is presented.

  6. Density functional study of manganese atom adsorption on hydrogen-terminated armchair boron nitride nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullahi, Yusuf Zuntu; Rahman, Md. Mahmudur; Shuaibu, Alhassan; Abubakar, Shamsu; Zainuddin, Hishamuddin; Muhida, Rifki; Setiyanto, Henry

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated stable structural, electric and magnetic properties of manganese (Mn) atom adsorption on armchair hydrogen edge-terminated boron nitride nanoribbon (A-BNNRs) using first principles method based on density-functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation. Calculation shows that Mn atom situated on the ribbons of A-BNNRs is the most stable configuration, where the bonding is more pronounced. The projected density of states (PDOS) of the favored configuration has also been computed. It has been found that the covalent bonding of boron (B), nitrogen (N) and Mn is mainly contributed by s, d like-orbitals of Mn and partially occupied by the 2p like-orbital of N. The difference in energy between the inner and the edge adsorption sites of A-BNNRs shows that Mn atoms prefer to concentrate at the edge sites. The electronic structures of the various configurations are wide, narrow-gap semiconducting and half-metallic, and the magnetic moment of Mn atoms are well preserved in all considered configurations. This has shown that the boron nitride (BN) sheet covered with Mn atoms demonstrates additional information on its usefulness in future spintronics, molecular magnet and nanoelectronics devices.

  7. Pulsed laser ablation of borax target in vacuum and hydrogen DC glow discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, A. N.; Miotello, A.; Mosaner, P.

    2006-09-01

    The aim of our experiment was to produce a material with B sbnd H bonds for applications in hydrogen storage and generation. By using KrF excimer laser ( λ = 248 nm) ablation of borax (Na 2B 4O 7) target, thin films were deposited on KBr and silicon substrates. Ablation was performed both in vacuum and in hydrogen atmosphere. DC glow discharge technique was utilized to enhance hydrogen gas ionization. Experiments were performed using laser fluence from 5 to 20 J/cm 2. Films were deposited under gas pressure of 1 × 10 -5 to 5 × 10 -2 mbar and substrate temperatures of 130-450 °C. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of films showed presence of circular particulates. Film thickness, roughness and particulates number increased with increase in laser fluence. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis shows that sodium content in the particulates is higher than in the target. This effect is discussed in terms of atomic arrangements (both at surface and bulk) in systems where ionic and covalent bonds are present and by looking at the increased surface/bulk ratio of the particulates with respect to the deposited films. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements showed presence of B sbnd O stretching and B sbnd O sbnd B bending bonds. Possible reasons for absence of B sbnd H bonds are attributed to binding enthalpy of the competing molecules.

  8. CO2-free hydrogen as a substitute to fossil fuels: What are the targets? Prospective assessment of the hydrogen market attractiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansilla, C.; Avril, S.; Imbach, J.; Le Duigou, A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen is usually presented as a promising energy carrier that has a major role to play in low carbon mobility, through the use of fuel cells. However, such a market is not expected in the short term. In the meantime, hydrogen may also contribute to reduce carbon emissions in diverse sectors: oil refining, low carbon mobility through the industrial deployment of advanced bio-fuels, natural gas consumption, and methanol production. According to the targeted market, objective costs are rather different; and so is the reachable mitigated CO 2 amount. This paper assesses the dynamics of these markets' attractiveness, in order to provide target costs for CO 2 -free hydrogen production. The potential of the markets of hydrogen as a fuel and hydrogen for the biomass-to-liquid production is highlighted, as they could represent significant volumes by 2050, as well as interesting perspectives for CO 2 emission reduction. However the targets are very sensitive to the CO 2 price, thus highlighting the requirement for economic instruments in order to facilitate the penetration of such technologies. Hydrogen is then highlighted as a key player of the energy system in the years to come, as the connection of the energy and mobility sectors. (authors)

  9. Coupled cluster and density functional theory calculations of atomic hydrogen chemisorption on pyrene and coronene as model systems for graphene hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Qian, Hu-Jun; Morokuma, Keiji; Irle, Stephan

    2012-07-05

    Ab initio coupled cluster and density functional theory studies of atomic hydrogen addition to the central region of pyrene and coronene as molecular models for graphene hydrogenation were performed. Fully relaxed potential energy curves (PECs) were computed at the spin-unrestricted B3LYP/cc-pVDZ level of theory for the atomic hydrogen attack of a center carbon atom (site A), the midpoint of a neighboring carbon bond (site B), and the center of a central hexagon (site C). Using the B3LYP/cc-pVDZ PEC geometries, we evaluated energies at the PBE density functional, as well as ab initio restricted open-shell ROMP2, ROCCSD, and ROCCSD(T) levels of theory, employing cc-pVDZ and cc-pVTZ basis sets, and performed a G2MS extrapolation to the ROCCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory. In agreement with earlier studies, we find that only site A attack leads to chemisorption. The G2MS entrance channel barrier heights, binding energies, and PEC profiles are found to agree well with a recent ab initio multireference wave function theory study (Bonfanti et al. J. Chem. Phys.2011, 135, 164701), indicating that single-reference open-shell methods including B3LYP are sufficient for the theoretical treatment of the interaction of graphene with a single hydrogen atom.

  10. Critical Density Target Design for Ion Acceleration on the T-Cubed Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordell, Peter; Campbell, Paul; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Willingale, Louise; Krushelnick, Karl

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of an intense laser pulse with a critical density target can form a high Mach number electrostatic shock. Recent experiments on CO2 lasers have demonstrated that such shocks can be used to produce directional, quasi-monoenergetic proton beams. PIC simulations indicate that the our single pulse system, the T-Cubed laser (1.053 μm, 6J in 400fs), is both capable of both producing these shocks and accelerating protons to MeV energies. Shock formation and propagation with our system has challenging target peak density and density gradient requirements. We present our target design, an interferometric characterization of its density profile and preliminary experiments on T-Cubed.

  11. Isochoric heating and strong blast wave formation driven by fast electrons in solid-density targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J. J.; Vauzour, B.; Touati, M.; Gremillet, L.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Ceccotti, T.; Bouillaud, R.; Deneuville, F.; Floquet, V.; Fourment, C.; Hadj-Bachir, M.; Hulin, S.; Morace, A.; Nicolaï, Ph; d'Oliveira, P.; Reau, F.; Samaké, A.; Tcherbakoff, O.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Veltcheva, M.; Batani, D.

    2017-10-01

    We experimentally investigate the fast (metallic foils and subsequent high-pressure hydrodynamics induced by energetic electrons driven by high-intensity, high-contrast laser pulses. The early-time temperature profile inside the target is measured from the streaked optical pyrometry of the target rear side. This is further characterized from benchmarked simulations of the laser-target interaction and the fast electron transport. Despite a modest laser energy (laser-based platform dedicated to high-energy-density physics studies.

  12. Concentration, temperature, and density in a hydrogen-air flame by excimer-induced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Bowling, John M.; Pitz, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    Single-pulse, vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) is an attractive laser diagnostic for the study of supersonic hydrogen-air combustion. The VRS technique gives a complete thermodynamic description of the gas mixture at a point in the reacting flow. Single-pulse, vibrational Raman scattering can simultaneously provide independent measurements of density, temperature, and concentration of each major species (H2, H2O, O2 and N2) in a hydrogen/air turbulent combustor. Also the pressure can be calculated using the ideal gas law. However, single-pulse VRS systems in current use for measurement of turbulent combustion have a number of shortcomings when applied to supersonic flows: (1) slow repetition rate (1 to 5 Hz), (2) poor spatial resolution (0.5x0.3x0.3 cu mm), and (3) marginal time resolution. Most of these shortcomings are due to the use of visible wavelength flash-lamp pumped dye lasers. The advent of UV excimer laser allows the possibility of dramatic improvements in the single-pulse, vibrational Raman scattering. The excimer based VRS probe will greatly improve repetition rate (100 to 500 Hz), spatial resolution (0.1x0.1x0.1 cu mm) and time resolution (30ns). These improvements result from the lower divergence of the UV excimer, higher repetition rate, and the increased Raman cross-sections (15 to 20 times higher) at ultra-violet (UV) wavelengths. With this increased capability, single-pulse vibrational Raman scattering promises to be an ideal non-intrusive probe for the study of hypersonic propulsion flows.

  13. Proton driven acceleration by intense laser pulses irradiating thin hydrogenated targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L., E-mail: lorenzo.torrisi@unime.it [Dip.to di Fisica, Università di Messina, V.le F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cutroneo, M.; Cavallaro, S.; Giuffrida, L.; Andò, L.; Cirrone, P. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Bertuccio, G.; Puglisi, D. [Dip.to di Ing. Elettronica e Sci. dell’Informaz., Pol. di Milano,V. Ponzio34, 20133 Milano (Italy); Calcagno, L. [Dip.to di Fisica, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Verona, C. [Dip.to di Ing. Meccanica, Univ. Roma “Tor Vergata”, V. del Politecnico 1, Roma (Italy); Picciotto, A. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler–IRST, Via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Krousky, E.; Pfeiffer, M.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, IPPLM,23 Hery Str. 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); and others

    2013-05-01

    The Asterix iodine laser of the PALS laboratory in Prague, operating at 1315 nm fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, 600 J maximum pulse energy and 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} intensity, is employed to irradiate thin hydrogenated targets placed in high vacuum. Different metallic and polymeric targets allow to generate multi-energetic and multi-specie ion beams showing peculiar properties. The plasma obtained by the laser irradiation is monitored, in terms of properties of the emitted charge particles, by using time-of-flight techniques and Thomson parabola spectrometer (TPS). A particular attention is given to the proton beam production in terms of the maximum energy, emission yield and angular distribution as a function of the laser energy, focal position (FP), target thickness and composition.

  14. Methane formation from the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide on Ni(110) surface--a density functional theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothra, Pallavi; Periyasamy, Ganga; Pati, Swapan K

    2013-04-21

    The complete hydrogenation mechanisms of CO2 are explored on Ni(110) surface catalyst using density functional theory. We have studied the possible hydrogenation mechanism to form product methane from the stable adsorption-co-adsorption intermediates of CO2 and H2 on Ni(110) surface. Our computations clearly elucidate that the mechanism for the formation of methyl, methoxy and methane moieties from carbon dioxide on the nickel catalyst. Moreover, our studies clearly show that the methane formation via hydroxyl carbonyl intermediate requires a lower energy barrier than via carbon monoxide and formate intermediates on the Ni(110) surface.

  15. Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-02-19

    A transcript is presented of a speech on the history of the development of hydrogenation of coal and tar. Apparently the talk had been accompanied by the showing of photographic slides, but none of the pictures were included with the report. In giving the history, Dr. Pier mentioned the dependence of much of the development of hydrogenation upon previous development in the related areas of ammonia and methanol syntheses, but he also pointed out several ways in which equipment appropriate for hydrogenation differed considerably from that used for ammonia and methanol. Dr. Pier discussed the difficulties encountered with residue processing, design of the reaction ovens, manufacture of ovens and preheaters, heating of reaction mixtures, development of steels, and development of compressor pumps. He described in some detail his own involvement in the development of the process. In addition, he discussed the development of methods of testing gasolines and other fuels. Also he listed some important byproducts of hydrogenation, such as phenols and polycyclic aromatics, and he discussed the formation of iso-octane fuel from the butanes arising from hydrogenation. In connection with several kinds of equipment used in hydrogenation (whose pictures were being shown), Dr. Pier gave some of the design and operating data.

  16. Catalyzed Nano-Framework Stablized High Density Reversible Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Xia [value too long for type character varying(50); Opalka, Susanne M.; Mosher, Daniel A; Laube, Bruce L; Brown, Ronald J; Vanderspurt, Thomas H; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Ronnebro, Ewa; Boyle, Tim; Cordaro, Joseph

    2010-06-30

    A wide range of high capacity on-board rechargeable material candidates have exhibited non-ideal behavior related to irreversible hydrogen discharge / recharge behavior, and kinetic instability or retardation. This project addresses these issues by incorporating solvated and other forms of complex metal hydrides, with an emphasis on borohydrides, into nano-scale frameworks of low density, high surface area skeleton materials to stabilize, catalyze, and control desorption product formation associated with such complex metal hydrides. A variety of framework chemistries and hydride / framework combinations were investigated to make a relatively broad assessment of the method's potential. In this project, the hydride / framework interactions were tuned to decrease desorption temperatures for highly stable compounds or increase desorption temperatures for unstable high capacity compounds, and to influence desorption product formation for improved reversibility. First principle modeling was used to explore heterogeneous catalysis of hydride reversibility by modeling H2 dissociation, hydrogen migration, and rehydrogenation. Atomic modeling also demonstrated enhanced NaTi(BH4)4 stabilization at nano-framework surfaces modified with multi-functional agents. Amine multi-functional agents were found to have more balanced interactions with nano-framework and hydride clusters than other functional groups investigated. Experimentation demonstrated that incorporation of Ca(BH4)2 and Mg(BH4)2 in aerogels enhanced hydride desorption kinetics. Carbon aerogels were identified as the most suitable nano-frameworks for hydride kinetic enhancement and high hydride loading. High loading of NaTi(BH4)4 ligand complex in SiO2 aerogel was achieved and hydride stability was improved with the aerogel. Although improvements of desorption kinetics was observed, the incorporation of

  17. Incorporation of Hydrogen Bond Angle Dependency into the Generalized Solvation Free Energy Density Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Songling; Hwang, Sungbo; Lee, Sehan; Acree, William E; No, Kyoung Tai

    2018-03-30

    To describe the physically realistic solvation free energy surface of a molecule in a solvent, a generalized version of the solvation free energy density (G-SFED) calculation method has been developed. In the G-SFED model, the contribution from the hydrogen bond (HB) between a solute and a solvent to the solvation free energy was calculated as the product of the acidity of the donor and the basicity of the acceptor of an HB pair. The acidity and basicity parameters of a solute were derived using the summation of acidities and basicities of the respective acidic and basic functional groups of the solute, and that of the solvent was experimentally determined. Although the contribution of HBs to the solvation free energy could be evenly distributed to grid points on the surface of a molecule, the G-SFED model was still inadequate to describe the angle dependency of the HB of a solute with a polarizable continuum solvent. To overcome this shortcoming of the G-SFED model, the contribution of HBs was formulated using the geometric parameters of the grid points described in the HB coordinate system of the solute. We propose an HB angle dependency incorporated into the G-SFED model, i.e., the G-SFED-HB model, where the angular-dependent acidity and basicity densities are defined and parametrized with experimental data. The G-SFED-HB model was then applied to calculate the solvation free energies of organic molecules in water, various alcohols and ethers, and the log P values of diverse organic molecules, including peptides and a protein. Both the G-SFED model and the G-SFED-HB model reproduced the experimental solvation free energies with similar accuracy, whereas the distributions of the SFED on the molecular surface calculated by the G-SFED and G-SFED-HB models were quite different, especially for molecules having HB donors or acceptors. Since the angle dependency of HBs was included in the G-SFED-HB model, the SFED distribution of the G-SFED-HB model is well described

  18. Converging shock generation with cone target filled with low density foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemori, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Hironaka, Y.; Kawashima, T.; Hattori, S.; Nagatomo, H.; Kato, H.; Sato, N.; Watari, T.; Takagi, M.

    2016-05-01

    We have been developing an alternative scheme of fast ignition of inertial confinement targets with converging shock. Experiments were carried out on GEKKO-XII laser facility at ILE, Osaka University. We employed Au cone targets filled with low- density RF foam (2 mg/cm3). The foam-filled cone targets were irradiated by three beams of the GEKKO-XII, with pulse duration of 1.3 ns, intensity of ∼ 1014 W/cm2 in 2 :λ(ω0.527μm). Self-emission at the tip of cone was observed by one-dimensional streaked optical pyrometer (SOP) and two-dimensional images.

  19. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  20. Vibrational signatures of cation-anion hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids: a periodic density functional theory and molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Anirban; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2015-02-05

    Hydrogen bonding in alkylammonium based protic ionic liquids was studied using density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. Normal-mode analysis within the harmonic approximation and power spectra of velocity autocorrelation functions were used as tools to obtain the vibrational spectra in both the gas phase and the crystalline phases of these protic ionic liquids. The hydrogen bond vibrational modes were identified in the 150-240 cm(-1) region of the far-infrared (far-IR) spectra. A blue shift in the far-IR mode was observed with an increasing number of hydrogen-bonding sites on the cation; the exact peak position is modulated by the cation-anion hydrogen bond strength. Sub-100 cm(-1) bands in the far-IR spectrum are assigned to the rattling motion of the anions. Calculated NMR chemical shifts of the acidic protons in the crystalline phase of these salts also exhibit the signature of cation-anion hydrogen bonding.

  1. Electromagnetic-energy-density distribution around a ground-state hydrogen atom and connection with van der Waals forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passante, R.; Power, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    A spinless hydrogen atom coupled to the electromagnetic field is considered within the context of nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics. The atom-field interaction is taken in the minimal-coupling form and the Coulomb gauge is used. When the coupled system is in its ground state the electromagnetic field fluctuates away from the vacuum state and the atom has virtual admixtures from its uncoupled lowest eigenstate. The electric- and magnetic-field-energy densities that arise from the fluctuations are determined as functions of the distance from the atom. The relationship between these field-energy densities and the retarded long-range van der Waals forces is also discussed

  2. Electro-magnetically driven shock and dissociated hydrogen target for stopping power measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Moriyama, T.; Hasegawa, J.; Horioka, K.; Oguri, Y.

    2014-01-01

    A design study of electro-magnetic shock tube for dissociated gas targets is presented. Behind the shock front, there is a dissociated gas region without ionization. That is suitable target for the stopping power measurement when we have an appropriate shock velocity. The previous experiments showed that the dissociated target duration with uniform density and temperature profiles as long as microsecond was required for synchronization with projectile. A new shock tube with long drift section is proposed. The duration of shock heated region can be estimated to be 2μs in this design. This configuration enables us to measure the difference of the stopping power between molecules and dissociated atoms for heavy ion beams more reliably

  3. A polarized hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source for internal target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczerba, D.; Buuren, L.D. van; Brand, J.F.J. van den; Bulten, H.J.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Klous, S.; Kolster, H.; Lang, J.; Mul, F.; Poolman, H.R.; Simani, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    A high-brightness hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source is presented. The apparatus, previously used in electron scattering experiments with tensor-polarized deuterium (Ferro-Luzzi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 2630; van den Brand et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 (1997) 1235; Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1998) 687; Bouwhuis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 3755), was configured as a source for internal target experiments to measure single- and double-polarization observables, with either polarized hydrogen or vector/tensor polarized deuterium. The atomic beam intensity was enhanced by a factor of ∼2.5 by optimizing the Stern-Gerlach focusing system using high tip-field (∼1.5 T) rare-earth permanent magnets, and by increasing the pumping speed in the beam-formation chamber. Fluxes of (5.9±0.2)x10 16 1 H/s were measured in a diameter 12 mmx122 mm compression tube with its entrance at a distance of 27 cm from the last focusing element. The total output flux amounted to (7.6±0.2)x10 16 1 H/s

  4. Exclusive {rho}{sup 0} meson cross section ratios on deuterium and hydrogen targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, A.G.S.

    2006-08-15

    The HERMES experiment is a large forward angle spectrometer located at the HERA accelerator ring at DESY, Hamburg. This thesis presents the analysis of the kinematic dependencies of {rho}{sup 0} vector meson production on hydrogen and deuterium targets. The relative gluon and quark contribution to the {rho}{sup 0} production amplitude is expected to depend on the kinematical variable x{sub Bj}, and by measuring the ratio of {rho}{sup 0} electroproduction cross sections on deuterium and hydrogen from HERMES data this dependence is confirmed. This thesis describes the methods used to extract the cross section ratio from the HERMES data taken between the years 1996 and 2000 and compares the results with the theoretical predictions. Until 2005 the missing mass resolution of the HERMES spectrometer was only sufficient to allow exclusivity at the level of a data sample. The HERMES Recoil Detector, installed in early 2006, is an upgrade which will augment the HERMES spectrometer by establishing exclusivity at the event level and therefore improving the resolution to which various kinematical variables may be reconstructed. Additionally, the Recoil Detector will contribute to the overall background suppression capability of the HERMES spectrometer. These improvements will provide a strong reduction in the statistical uncertainties present in the {rho}{sup 0}-analysis and other analyses at HERMES. The Recoil Detector critically relies on its track reconstruction software to enable its capability to provide event level exclusive measurements. This tracking code is presented in detail. (orig.)

  5. Exclusive ρ0 meson cross section ratios on deuterium and hydrogen targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, A.G.S.

    2006-06-01

    The HERMES experiment is a large forward angle spectrometer located at the HERA accelerator ring at DESY, Hamburg. This thesis presents the analysis of the kinematic dependencies of ρ 0 vector meson production on hydrogen and deuterium targets. The relative gluon and quark contribution to the ρ 0 production amplitude is expected to depend on the kinematical variable x Bj , and by measuring the ratio of ρ 0 electroproduction cross sections on deuterium and hydrogen from HERMES data this dependence is confirmed. This thesis describes the methods used to extract the cross section ratio from the HERMES data taken between the years 1996 and 2000 and compares the results with the theoretical predictions. Until 2005 the missing mass resolution of the HERMES spectrometer was only sufficient to allow exclusivity at the level of a data sample. The HERMES Recoil Detector, installed in early 2006, is an upgrade which will augment the HERMES spectrometer by establishing exclusivity at the event level and therefore improving the resolution to which various kinematical variables may be reconstructed. Additionally, the Recoil Detector will contribute to the overall background suppression capability of the HERMES spectrometer. These improvements will provide a strong reduction in the statistical uncertainties present in the ρ 0 -analysis and other analyses at HERMES. The Recoil Detector critically relies on its track reconstruction software to enable its capability to provide event level exclusive measurements. This tracking code is presented in detail. (orig.)

  6. Proton driven acceleration by intense laser pulses irradiating thin hydrogenated targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Cavallaro, S.; Giuffrida, L.; Andò, L.; Cirrone, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Puglisi, D.; Calcagno, L.; Verona, C.; Picciotto, A.; Krása, Josef; Margarone, Daniele; Velyhan, Andriy; Láska, Leoš; Krouský, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skála, Jiří; Ullschmied, Jiří; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Rosinski, M.; Ryc, L.; Szydlowski, A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 272, May (2013), s. 2-5 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0087; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; OPVK 3 Laser Zdroj(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279; OP VK 2 LaserGen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087; 7FP LASERLAB-EUROPE(XE) 228334 Program:EE; FP7 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-matter-interaction * plasma * proton-acceleration * hydrogenated-target Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.538, year: 2013

  7. The reaction mechanism and selectivity of acetylene hydrogenation over Ni-Ga intermetallic compound catalysts: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, De-Ming; Zhang, Shi-Tong; Li, Chang-Ming; Chen, Yu-Di; Pu, Min; Yan, Hong; Wei, Min

    2018-03-28

    Intermetallic compounds (IMCs) have shown excellent catalytic performance toward the selective hydrogenation of acetylene, but the theoretical understanding on this reaction over Ni-based IMCs is rather limited. In this work, the adsorptions of the C 2 species, Bader charge, projected density of states (PDOS) and the reaction pathways were calculated by the density functional theory (DFT) method to investigate the mechanism and selectivity for the acetylene hydrogenation on the (111) surface of Ni n Ga (n = 1, 3) IMCs, with a comparative study on the pristine Ni(111) surface. The results indicate that the adsorption energy of acetylene increased along with the Ni/Ga ratio, therefore a feasible acetylene adsorption on the Ga-rich surface guaranteed a low effective barrier, leading to the best activity for the NiGa(111) surface among three surfaces. Bader charge analysis shows that electrons transferred from Ga atoms to Ni atoms and further delivered to C 2 species, decreasing the adsorption capacity of C 2 species on NiGa(111) in comparison with those on Ni(111) and Ni 3 Ga(111). The reaction pathway of acetylene hydrogenation to ethylene via vinyl or even over-hydrogenation to ethane via ethyl is more favorable than the pathway involving the ethylidene intermediate on all surfaces. Moreover, the ethylene selectivity has a positive correlation with the gallium content by comparing the desorption barrier with the hydrogenation barrier of ethylene, thus the NiGa(111) surface also exhibits the best selectivity. Therefore, the NiGa(111) surface demonstrates to be an excellent reaction facet for the semihydrogenation of acetylene, which agreed with the experimental findings, and would provide helpful instructions for designing and preparing highly-selective and noble-substitute catalysts of alkyne semihydrogenation.

  8. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  9. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  10. High-density automotive hydrogen storage with cryogenic capable pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceves, Salvador M.; Espinosa-Loza, Francisco; Ledesma-Orozco, Elias; Ross, Timothy O.; Weisberg, Andrew H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-792, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Brunner, Tobias C.; Kircher, Oliver [BMW Group, Knorrstr. 147, 80788 Munich (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    LLNL is developing cryogenic capable pressure vessels with thermal endurance 5-10 times greater than conventional liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) tanks that can eliminate evaporative losses in routine usage of (L)H{sub 2} automobiles. In a joint effort BMW is working on a proof of concept for a first automotive cryo-compressed hydrogen storage system that can fulfill automotive requirements on system performance, life cycle, safety and cost. Cryogenic pressure vessels can be fueled with ambient temperature compressed gaseous hydrogen (CGH{sub 2}), LH{sub 2} or cryogenic hydrogen at elevated supercritical pressure (cryo-compressed hydrogen, CcH{sub 2}). When filled with LH{sub 2} or CcH{sub 2}, these vessels contain 2-3 times more fuel than conventional ambient temperature compressed H{sub 2} vessels. LLNL has demonstrated fueling with LH{sub 2} onboard two vehicles. The generation 2 vessel, installed onboard an H{sub 2}-powered Toyota Prius and fueled with LH{sub 2} demonstrated the longest unrefueled driving distance and the longest cryogenic H{sub 2} hold time without evaporative losses. A third generation vessel will be installed, reducing weight and volume by minimizing insulation thickness while still providing acceptable thermal endurance. Based on its long experience with cryogenic hydrogen storage, BMW has developed its cryo-compressed hydrogen storage concept, which is now undergoing a thorough system and component validation to prove compliance with automotive requirements before it can be demonstrated in a BMW test vehicle. (author)

  11. Density functional theory calculations of point defects and hydrogen isotopes in Li4SiO4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Li4SiO4 is a promising breeder material for future fusion reactors. Radiation induced vacancies and hydrogen isotope related impurities are the major types of point defects in this breeder material. In present study, various kinds of vacancies and hydrogen isotopes related point defects in Li4SiO4 are investigated through density functional theory (DFT calculations. The band gap of Li4SiO4 is determined by UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy experiments. Formation energies of all possible charge states of Li, Si and O vacancies are calculated using DFT methods. Formation energies of possible charge states of hydrogen isotopes substitution for Li and O are also calculated. We found that Li-vacancies will dominate among all vacancies in neutral charge state under radiation conditions and the O, Li, and Si vacancies (VO,VLi,VSi are stable in charge states +2, -1, -4 for most of the range of Fermi level, respectively. The interstitial hydrogen isotopes (Hi and substitutional HLi are stable in the charge states +1, 0 for most of the range of Fermi level, respectively. Moreover, substitutional HO are stable in +1 charge states. We also investigated the process of tritium recovery by discussing the interaction between interstitial H and Li-vacancy, O-vacancy, and found that H O + and H Li 0 are the most common H related defects during radiation process.

  12. INFLUENCE OF SOLVENT ON INTRAMOLECULAR PROTON-TRANSFER IN HYDROGEN MALONATE - MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATION STUDY OF TUNNELING BY DENSITY-MATRIX EVOLUTION AND NONEQUILIBRIUM SOLVATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAVRI, J; BERENDSEN, HJC; VANGUNSTEREN, WF

    1993-01-01

    A density matrix evolution (DME) method (Berendsen, H. J. C.; Mavri, J. J. Phys. Chem. the preceding paper in this issue) in combination with classical molecular dynamics simulation was applied to calculate the rate of proton tunneling in the intramolecular double-well hydrogen bond of hydrogen

  13. Highly collimated monoenergetic target-surface electron acceleration in near-critical-density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, J. Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Chen, L. M., E-mail: lmchen@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Huang, K.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Wei, Z. Y. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, D. Z. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing 100049 (China); Aeschlimann, M. [Department of Physics and Research Center OPTIMAS, University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern 67663 (Germany); Zhang, J. [Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Optimized-quality monoenergetic target surface electron beams at MeV level with low normalized emittance (0.03π mm mrad) and high charge (30 pC) per shot have been obtained from 3 TW laser-solid interactions at a grazing incidence. The 2-Dimension particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons are wake-field accelerated in a large-scale, near-critical-density preplasma. It reveals that a bubble-like structure as an accelerating cavity appears in the near-critical-density plasma region and travels along the target surface. A bunch of electrons are pinched transversely and accelerated longitudinally by the wake field in the bubble. The outstanding normalized emittance and monochromaticity of such highly collimated surface electron beams could make it an ideal beam for fast ignition or may serve as an injector in traditional accelerators.

  14. On the mode-coupling treatment of collective density fluctuations for quantum liquids: para-hydrogen and normal liquid helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletenik-Edelman, Orly; Reichman, David R; Rabani, Eran

    2011-01-28

    A novel quantum mode coupling theory combined with a kinetic approach is developed for the description of collective density fluctuations in quantum liquids characterized by Boltzmann statistics. Three mode-coupling approximations are presented and applied to study the dynamic response of para-hydrogen near the triple point and normal liquid helium above the λ-transition. The theory is compared with experimental results and to the exact imaginary time data generated by path integral Monte Carlo simulations. While for liquid para-hydrogen the combination of kinetic and quantum mode-coupling theory provides semi-quantitative results for both short and long time dynamics, it fails for normal liquid helium. A discussion of this failure based on the ideal gas limit is presented.

  15. Technology of preparation for low density 6Li(H,D) solid micro-target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xisheng; Zeng Jiaquan; Li Qiang

    2002-01-01

    Low density 6 Li(H,D) micro-targets are prepared by loose sintering 6 LiH or 6 LiD powder in a tiny gold cylinder and soaking for 30 min up to 430 degree C at the rate of 10 degree C/h in argon. The dimension of the micro-targets is as tiny as 0.6-1.0 mm for diameter and 1-2 mm for length. Densities of 6 LiH and 6 LiD without Parylene C is (0.283 +- 0.009) g/cm 3 and (0.369 +- 0.009) g/cm 3 , respectively while 6 LiD targets with Parylene C is only (0.301 +- 0.010) g/cm 3 . The Parylene C has no effect on purity, deuterium abundance and 6 Li abundance of the sintered micro-targets. It's effective to keep 6 Li(H,D) purity by strict control of argon atmosphere

  16. Plasma density measurements on refuelling by solid hydrogen pellets in a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joergensen, L.W.; Sillesen, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    The refuelling of a plasma by solid hydrogen pellets situated in the plasma is investigated. Nearly half of the pellet material is evaporated and seems to be completely ionized, resulting in an increase of the amount of plasma equivalent to one third of the total amount of plasma without refuelling. The gross behaviour of the plasma is not changed. (author)

  17. A time-dependent density functional theory study on the effect of electronic excited-state hydrogen bonding on luminescent MOFs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Min; Hao, Ce; Wang, Dandan; Li, Hongjiang; Qiu, Jieshan

    2013-03-14

    We have investigated a new silver-based luminescent metal-organic framework (MOF) using density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory methods. We theoretically demonstrated that the H...O hydrogen bond is strengthened and the Ag-O coordination bond is shortened significantly due to strengthening of the hydrogen bond in the S(1) state. When the hydrogen bond is formed, the mechanism of luminescence changes from a ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) coupled with intraligand charge transfer (LLCT) to LMCT, and the luminescence is found to be enhanced.

  18. Density functional for van der Waals forces accounts for hydrogen bond in benchmark set of water hexamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelkkanen, Kari André; Lundqvist, Bengt; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2009-01-01

    A recent extensive study has investigated how various exchange-correlation (XC) functionals treat hydrogen bonds in water hexamers and has shown traditional generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functionals used in density-functional (DF) theory to give the wrong dissociation-energy trend...... of low-lying isomers and van der Waals (vdW) dispersion forces to give key contributions to the dissociation energy. The question raised whether functionals that incorporate vdW forces implicitly into the XC functional predict the correct lowest-energy structure for the water hexamer and yield accurate...

  19. Calculation of emission from hydrogenic ions in super liquid density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, D.S.; Valeo, E.J.

    1976-01-01

    Previous calculations of line emission were extended to higher density, lower temperature plasmas, typical of those expected in early ablative compression experiments. Emission from Ne-seeded fuel was analyzed in order to diagnose the density and temperature of the compressed core. The Stark/Doppler broadened emission profile is calculated for the H-like Ne resonance line. The observable lineshape is then obtained by time-averaging over expected density and temperature profiles and by including the effects of radiative transfer

  20. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off an unpolarised hydrogen target at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Jonathan R.T.

    2010-08-15

    Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) i.e. ep {yields} ep{gamma} is the simplest interaction that allows access to Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs), a theoretical framework describing nucleon structure. The strong interest in GPDs results from the fact that they can be used to determine the total angular momentum of quarks inside the nucleon and provide a 3-dimensional picture of nucleon structure. The measurement of the DVCS process is facilitated by the interference with a competing interaction known as the Bethe-Heitler process which has the same nal state. DVCS information is obtained from the asymmetrical in distribution of the real photon around the azimuthal angle {phi} at HERMES. Beam charge and beam helicity asymmetries, extracted from DVCS events with an unpolarised hydrogen target recorded during the 2006-2007 and 1996-2007 data taking periods, are presented in this thesis. The asymmetry amplitudes are presented over the range of HERMES kinematic acceptance, with their dependence on kinematic variables t, x{sub B} and Q{sup 2} also shown and compared to a phenomenological model. (orig.)

  1. Target continuum distorted-wave theory for collisions of fast protons with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crothers, D.S.F.; Dunseath, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    By considering the target continuum distorted-wave (TCDW) theory as the high-energy limit of the half-way house variational continuum distorted-wave theory, it is shown not only that there is no intermediate elastic divergence but also that the second-order amplitude based on a purely elastic intermediate state is of order υ -6 and is thus negligible. The residual inelastic TCDW theory is developed to second-order at high velocities. It is used to describe charge exchange during collisions of fast protons with atomic hydrogen. Using an on-shell peaking approximation and considering 1s-1s capture it is shown that the residual purely second-order transition amplitude comprises two terms, one real term of order υ -6 and one purely imaginary term of order υ -7 ln υ. At 5 MeV laboratory energy, it is shown that these are negligible. It is also shown that the υ -5 first-order term gives a differential cross section in very good agreement with an experiment at all angles including forward, interference minimum, Thomas maximum and large angles, particularly having folded our theory over experimental resolution. (author)

  2. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-06-14

    This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

  3. Is the decrease of the total electron energy density a covalence indicator in hydrogen and halogen bonds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelina, Emilio L; Duarte, Darío J R; Peruchena, Nélida M

    2013-05-01

    In this work, halogen bonding (XB) and hydrogen bonding (HB) complexes were studied with the aim of analyzing the variation of the total electronic energy density H(r b ) with the interaction strengthening. The calculations were performed at the MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) level of approximation. To explain the nature of such interactions, the atoms in molecules theory (AIM) in conjunction with reduced variational space self-consistent field (RVS) energy decomposition analysis were carried out. Based on the local virial theorem, an equation to decompose the total electronic energy density H(r b ) in two energy densities, (-G(r b )) and 1/4∇(2)ρ(r b ), was derived. These energy densities were linked with the RVS interaction energy components. Through the connection between both decomposition schemes, it was possible to conclude that the decrease in H(r b ) with the interaction strengthening observed in the HB as well as the XB complexes, is mainly due to the increase in the attractive electrostatic part of the interaction energy and in lesser extent to the increase in its covalent character, as is commonly considered.

  4. Mature Epitope Density - A strategy for target selection based on immunoinformatics and exported prokaryotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Anderson R; Pereira, Vanessa Bastos; Barbosa, Eudes

    2013-01-01

    . However, currently available tools do not account for the concentration of epitope products in the mature protein product and its relation to the reliability of target selection. RESULTS: We developed a computational strategy based on measuring the epitope's concentration in the mature protein, called...... Mature Epitope Density (MED). Our method, though simple, is capable of identifying promising vaccine targets. Our online software implementation provides a computationally light and reliable analysis of bacterial exoproteins and their potential for vaccines or diagnosis projects against pathogenic....... Half of the 60 proteins were classified as highest scored by the MED statistic, while the other half were classified as lowest scored. Among the lowest scored proteins, ~13% were confirmed as not related to antigenicity or not contributing to the bacterial pathogenicity, and 70% of the highest scored...

  5. Reactivity of palladium nano-particles supported in hydrogenation: role of particles surface density; Reactivite des nanoparticules de palladium supportees en hydrogenation: role de la densite surfacique de particules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkhaled, M.

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate the influence of the particle surface density on the hydrogenation of polyunsaturated compounds (buta-1,3-diene, ortho-xylene). Highly dispersed Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ({gamma} and {delta}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) catalysts were prepared from Pd(nitrite) complexes (size < 7 angstrom, controlled by TEM, HAADF, EXAFS and CO chemisorption). Increasing the particle surface density from 2240 to 12880 particles/{mu}m{sup 2} leads to a modification of the electronic properties as evidenced by CO-FTIR, XPS and XANES. By contrast, the comparison of the supports at iso-density showed no significant difference of the physico-chemical properties of the supported metal particles. In parallel, the catalytic performances in hydrogenation of butadiene and butenes are very sensitive both to the nature of the support for the same density and to the surface density for the same support. It was shown that the reactions of hydrogenation could be controlled at the same time by the electronic properties of the metal nano-particles but also by the phenomenon of hydrogen diffusion around the particles on a zone of support. In this case, the support can play the part of hydrogen tank. (author)

  6. Terrestrial exospheric hydrogen density distributions under solar minimum and solar maximum conditions observed by the TWINS stereo mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Zoennchen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Circumterrestrial Lyman-α column brightness observations above 3 Earth radii (Re have been used to derive separate 3-D neutral hydrogen density models of the Earth's exosphere for solar minimum (2008, 2010 and near-solar-maximum (2012 conditions. The data used were measured by Lyman-α detectors (LAD1/2 onboard each of the TWINS satellites from very different orbital positions with respect to the exosphere. Exospheric H atoms resonantly scatter the near-line-center solar Lyman-α flux at 121.6 nm. Assuming optically thin conditions above 3Re along a line of sight (LOS, the scattered LOS-column intensity is proportional to the LOS H-column density. We found significant differences in the density distribution of the terrestrial exosphere under different solar conditions. Under solar maximum conditions we found higher H densities and a larger spatial extension compared to solar minimum. After a continuous, 2-month decrease in (27 day averaged solar activity, significantly lower densities were found. Differences in shape and orientation of the exosphere under different solar conditions exist. Above 3 Re, independent of solar activity, increased H densities appear on the Earth's nightside shifted towards dawn. With increasing distance (as measured at 8Re this feature is shifted westward/duskward by between −4 and −5° with respect to midnight. Thus, at larger geocentric distance the exosphere seems to be aligned with the aberrated Earth–solar-wind line, defined by the solar wind velocity and the orbital velocity of the Earth. The results presented in this paper are valid for geocentric distances between 3 and 8Re.

  7. Influence of pulse width and target density on pulsed laser deposition of thin YBaCuO film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikram, S.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the effects of temporal pulse width and target density on the deposition of thin films of YBaCuO. A 248nm excimer laser and an 825nm Ti-sapphire laser were used to conduct the experiments with pulse widths of 27 ns, 16 ns, and 150 fs, and target densities of 80% and 90%. Scanning electron microscope photomicrographs and profilometer traces show a striking difference between nanosecond and femtosecond laser irradiation. Shortening the pulse width reduced particulate formation, provided stoichiometry, and improved the film properties. Decreasing the target density raised the ablation rate, produced thicker but nonuniform films, and reduced particulate formation

  8. Influence of pulse width and target density on pulsed laser deposition of thin YBaCuO film.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikram, S.

    1999-01-20

    We have studied the effects of temporal pulse width and target density on the deposition of thin films of YBaCuO. A 248nm excimer laser and an 825nm Ti-sapphire laser were used to conduct the experiments with pulse widths of 27 ns, 16 ns, and 150 fs, and target densities of 80% and 90%. Scanning electron microscope photomicrographs and profilometer traces show a striking difference between nanosecond and femtosecond laser irradiation. Shortening the pulse width reduced particulate formation, provided stoichiometry, and improved the film properties. Decreasing the target density raised the ablation rate, produced thicker but nonuniform films, and reduced particulate formation.

  9. Novel modeling of combinatorial miRNA targeting identifies SNP with potential role in bone density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Coronnello

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators that bind to their target mRNAs through base complementarity. Predicting miRNA targets is a challenging task and various studies showed that existing algorithms suffer from high number of false predictions and low to moderate overlap in their predictions. Until recently, very few algorithms considered the dynamic nature of the interactions, including the effect of less specific interactions, the miRNA expression level, and the effect of combinatorial miRNA binding. Addressing these issues can result in a more accurate miRNA:mRNA modeling with many applications, including efficient miRNA-related SNP evaluation. We present a novel thermodynamic model based on the Fermi-Dirac equation that incorporates miRNA expression in the prediction of target occupancy and we show that it improves the performance of two popular single miRNA target finders. Modeling combinatorial miRNA targeting is a natural extension of this model. Two other algorithms show improved prediction efficiency when combinatorial binding models were considered. ComiR (Combinatorial miRNA targeting, a novel algorithm we developed, incorporates the improved predictions of the four target finders into a single probabilistic score using ensemble learning. Combining target scores of multiple miRNAs using ComiR improves predictions over the naïve method for target combination. ComiR scoring scheme can be used for identification of SNPs affecting miRNA binding. As proof of principle, ComiR identified rs17737058 as disruptive to the miR-488-5p:NCOA1 interaction, which we confirmed in vitro. We also found rs17737058 to be significantly associated with decreased bone mineral density (BMD in two independent cohorts indicating that the miR-488-5p/NCOA1 regulatory axis is likely critical in maintaining BMD in women. With increasing availability of comprehensive high-throughput datasets from patients ComiR is expected to become an essential

  10. On the determination of plasma electron number density from Stark broadened hydrogen Balmer series lines in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardini, L., E-mail: loren.pard@gmail.com [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Area della Ricerca del CNR di Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Palleschi, V. [Istituto di Chimica dei Composti Organometallici del CNR, Area della Ricerca del CNR di Pisa, Via G. Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Gaudiuso, R.; De Giacomo, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Diaz Pace, D.M. [Instituto de Física ‘Arroyo Seco’, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Paraje Arroyo Seco, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Anabitarte Garcia, F. [Photonic Engineering Group, Universidad de Cantabria, Edificio I+D+iTelecomunicación, Dpto. TEISA, 39005 Santander (Spain); Holanda Cavalcanti, G. de [Institute of Physics, Universidade Federal Fluminense, UFF, Campus da Praia Vermelha, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, Gragoatá, 24310 240 Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Parigger, C. [University of Tennessee Space Institute, 411 B. H. Goethert Parkway, Tullahoma, TN 37388-9700 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    In this work, different theories for the determination of the electron density in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) utilizing the emission lines belonging to the hydrogen Balmer series have been investigated. The plasmas were generated by a Nd:Yag laser (1064 nm) pulsed irradiation of pure hydrogen gas at a pressure of 2 · 10{sup 4} Pa. H{sub α}, Η{sub β}, Η{sub γ}, Η{sub δ}, and H{sub ε} Balmer lines were recorded at different delay times after the laser pulse. The plasma electron density was evaluated through the measurement of the Stark broadenings and the experimental results were compared with the predictions of three theories (the Standard Theory as developed by Kepple and Griem, the Advanced Generalized Theory by Oks et al., and the method discussed by Gigosos et al.) that are commonly employed for plasma diagnostics and that describe LIBS plasmas at different levels of approximations. A simple formula for pure hydrogen plasma in thermal equilibrium was also proposed to infer plasma electron density using the H{sub α} line. The results obtained showed that at high hydrogen concentration, the H{sub α} line is affected by considerable self-absorption. In this case, it is preferable to use the H{sub β} line for a reliable calculation of the electron density. - Highlights: • We evaluated the electron density in LIPs utilizing the hydrogen Balmer series. • Plasmas were generated by a Nd:Yag laser (1064 nm) on pure hydrogen gas. • We show that at high hydrogen concentration, H{sub b}eta line is preferable than H{sub a}lpha. • We propose a formula to derive the plasma electron density using the H{sub a}lpha line.

  11. Studies of Ion Acceleration from Thin Solid-Density Targets on High-Intensity Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Christopher R.

    Over the past two decades, a number of experiments have been performed demonstrating the acceleration of ions from the interaction of an intense laser pulse with a thin, solid density target. These ions are accelerated by quasi-static electric fields generated by energetic electrons produced at the front of the target, resulting in ion energies up to tens of MeV. These ions have been widely studied for a variety of potential applications ranging from treatment of cancer to the production of neutrons for advanced radiography techniques. However, realization of these applications will require further optimization of the maximum energy, spectrum, or species of the accelerated ions, which has been a primary focus of research to date. This thesis presents two experiments designed to optimize several characteristics of the accelerated ion beam. The first of these experiments took place on the GHOST laser system at the University of Texas at Austin, and was designed to demonstrate reliable acceleration of deuterium ions, as needed for the most efficient methods of neutron generation from accelerated ions. This experiment leveraged cryogenically cooled targets coated in D2 O ice to suppress the protons which typically dominate the accelerated ions, producing as many as 2 x 1010 deuterium ions per 1 J laser shot, exceeding the proton yield by an average ratio of 5:1. The second major experiment in this work was performed on the Scarlet laser system at The Ohio State University, and studied the accelerated ion energy, yield, and spatial distribution as a function of the target thickness. In principle, the peak energy increases with decreasing target thickness, with the thinnest targets accessing additional acceleration mechanisms which provide favorable scaling with the laser intensity. However, laser prepulse characteristics provide a lower bound for the target thickness, yielding an optimum target thickness for ion acceleration which is dependent on the laser system. This

  12. Determination of density of band-gap states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon suboxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacioglu, A.

    2005-01-01

    Variation of density of gap states of PECVD silicon suboxide films with different oxygen concentrations was evaluated through electrical and optical measurements. Optical transmission and constant photocurrent method (CPM) were used to determine absorption coefficient as a function of photon energy. From these measurements the localized density of states between the valance band mobility edge and Fermi level has been determined. To determine the variation of conduction band edge, steady state photoconductivity (SSPC), photoconductivity response time (PCRT) and transient photoconductivity (TPC) measurements were utilized. Results indicate that the conduction and valance band edges, both, widen monotonically with oxygen content

  13. Charge density study of hydrogen-[(2,4-diaminopyrimidin-1-io)methyl]phosphonate monohydrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, Miroslav; Holý, Antonín; Petříček, Václav; Císařová, I.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2002), s. 519-529 ISSN 0108-7681 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/99/M037; GA AV ČR KSK4050111 Keywords : X-ray diffraction * charge density study * multipole refinement Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.026, year: 2002

  14. Targeting low-density lipoprotein receptors with protein-only nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhikun; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Unzueta, Ugutz; Álamo, Patricia; Pesarrodona, Mireia; Mangues, Ramón; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus

    2015-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR) are appealing cell surface targets in drug delivery, as they are expressed in the blood–brain barrier (BBB) endothelium and are able to mediate transcytosis of functionalized drugs for molecular therapies of the central nervous system (CNS). On the other hand, brain-targeted drug delivery is currently limited, among others, by the poor availability of biocompatible vehicles, as most of the nanoparticles under development as drug carriers pose severe toxicity issues. In this context, protein nanoparticles offer functional versatility, easy and cost-effective bioproduction, and full biocompatibility. In this study, we have designed and characterized several chimerical proteins containing different LDLR ligands, regarding their ability to bind and internalize target cells and to self-organize as viral mimetic nanoparticles of about 18 nm in diameter. While the self-assembling of LDLR-binding proteins as nanoparticles positively influences cell penetration in vitro, the nanoparticulate architecture might be not favoring BBB crossing in vivo. These findings are discussed in the context of the use of nanostructured materials as vehicles for the systemic treatment of CNS diseases

  15. Targeting low-density lipoprotein receptors with protein-only nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhikun [Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (Spain); Céspedes, María Virtudes [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Unzueta, Ugutz [Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (Spain); Álamo, Patricia [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Pesarrodona, Mireia [Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (Spain); Mangues, Ramón [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio, E-mail: antoni.villaverde@uab.cat; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus, E-mail: neus.ferrer@uab.cat [Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Institut de Biotecnologia i de Biomedicina (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    Low-density lipoprotein receptors (LDLR) are appealing cell surface targets in drug delivery, as they are expressed in the blood–brain barrier (BBB) endothelium and are able to mediate transcytosis of functionalized drugs for molecular therapies of the central nervous system (CNS). On the other hand, brain-targeted drug delivery is currently limited, among others, by the poor availability of biocompatible vehicles, as most of the nanoparticles under development as drug carriers pose severe toxicity issues. In this context, protein nanoparticles offer functional versatility, easy and cost-effective bioproduction, and full biocompatibility. In this study, we have designed and characterized several chimerical proteins containing different LDLR ligands, regarding their ability to bind and internalize target cells and to self-organize as viral mimetic nanoparticles of about 18 nm in diameter. While the self-assembling of LDLR-binding proteins as nanoparticles positively influences cell penetration in vitro, the nanoparticulate architecture might be not favoring BBB crossing in vivo. These findings are discussed in the context of the use of nanostructured materials as vehicles for the systemic treatment of CNS diseases.

  16. Total projectile electron loss cross sections of U^{28+} ions in collisions with gaseous targets ranging from hydrogen to krypton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Weber

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Beam lifetimes of stored U^{28+} ions with kinetic energies of 30 and 50  MeV/u, respectively, were measured in the experimental storage ring of the GSI accelerator facility. By using the internal gas target station of the experimental storage ring, it was possible to obtain total projectile electron loss cross sections for collisions with several gaseous targets ranging from hydrogen to krypton from the beam lifetime data. The resulting experimental cross sections are compared to predictions by two theoretical approaches, namely the CTMC method and a combination of the DEPOSIT code and the RICODE program.

  17. Ab initio LCAO-MO cluster-type calculation of the self-consistent electronic screening charge density around a single hydrogen impurity in a nickel crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, R.W.; Lane, N.F.; Chaney, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    The electronic structure for a Ni atom cluster embedded in bulk Ni by use of a spin-averaged local exchange SCF Ni crystal potential is calculated with an ab initio LCAO-Mo variational method. A single hydrogen impurity is added at the cluster center (fcc octahedral interstitial site) and the electronic structure computed iteratively until the change in electron density from the pure Ni cluster density is self-consistent. The H-Ni 6 self-consistent density change is compared to the charge density around a free hydrogen atom and to the initial-response density change in H-Ni 14 and H-Ni 38 clusters. 14 references

  18. Electronic and Optical Properties of Small Hydrogenated Silicon Quantum Dots Using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mus-’ab Anas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a systematic study of the absorption spectrum of various sizes of small hydrogenated silicon quantum dots of quasi-spherical symmetry using the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT. In this study, real-time and real-space implementation of TDDFT involving full propagation of the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations were used. The experimental results for SiH4 and Si5H12 showed good agreement with other earlier calculations and experimental data. Then these calculations were extended to study larger hydrogenated silicon quantum dots with diameter up to 1.6 nm. It was found that, for small quantum dots, the absorption spectrum is atomic-like while, for relatively larger (1.6 nm structure, it shows bulk-like behavior with continuous plateau with noticeable peak. This paper also studied the absorption coefficient of silicon quantum dots as a function of their size. Precisely, the dependence of dot size on the absorption threshold is elucidated. It was found that the silicon quantum dots exhibit direct transition of electron from HOMO to LUMO states; hence this theoretical contribution can be very valuable in discerning the microscopic processes for the future realization of optoelectronic devices.

  19. Measurement of double-spin asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on a transversely polarized hydrogen target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Giessen, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States); Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute, 375036 Yerevan (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Aschenauer, E.C. [DESY, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Augustyniak, W. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 00-689 Warsaw (Poland); Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A. [Yerevan Physics Institute, 375036 Yerevan (Armenia); Avetisyan, E. [DESY, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Belostotski, S. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Leningrad region 188300 (Russian Federation); Bianchi, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Blok, H.P. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef), 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics and Astronomy, VU University, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Borissov, A. [DESY, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Bowles, J. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Brodski, I. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Giessen, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Bryzgalov, V. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino, Moscow region 142281 (Russian Federation); Burns, J. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Capiluppi, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Capitani, G.P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cisbani, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, gruppo Sanita and Istituto Superiore di Sanita, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ciullo, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2011-10-05

    Double-spin asymmetries in exclusive electroproduction of real photons from a transversely polarized hydrogen target are measured with respect to the product of target polarization with beam helicity and beam charge, and with respect to the product of target polarization with beam helicity alone. The asymmetries arise from the deeply virtual Compton scattering process and its interference with the Bethe-Heitler process. They are related to the real part of the same combination of Compton form factors as that determining the previously published transverse target single-spin asymmetries through the imaginary part. The results for the double-spin asymmetries are found to be compatible with zero within the uncertainties of the measurement, and are not incompatible with the predictions of the only available GPD-based calculation.

  20. Interaction between a high density-low temperature plasma and a frozen hydrogen pellet in a railgun injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grapperhaus, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    A model has been developed which describes the ablation process of frozen hydrogen pellets in an electromagnetic railgun. The model incorporates the neutral gas shielding model in which the pellet surface is heated by incident electrons from the plasma arc. The heated surface then ablates, forming a neutral cloud which attenuates the incoming electrons. The energy lost in the cloud by the electrons heats the ablatant material as it flows into the plasma arc. Under steady-state conditions, a scaling law for the ablation rate was derived as a function of plasma-arc temperature and density. In addition, flow conditions and the criteria for the existence of a steady-state solution were formulated and subsequently examined under simplifying assumptions. Comparison with experimentally observed ablation rates shows good qualitative agreement

  1. Development of low enrichment technologies for high density fuels and for isotope production targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboada, Horacio; Gonzalez, Alfredo G.

    2005-01-01

    Since more than twenty years ago, CNEA has carried out RERTR activities. Main goals are to convert the RA 6 reactor core from HEU to LEU, to get a comprehensive understanding of U-Mo/Al compounds phase formation in dispersed and monolithic fuels, to develop possible solutions to VHD dispersed and monolithic fuels technical problems, and to optimize techniques to recover U from silicide scrap samples. The future plans include: 1) Completion the RA 6 reactor conversion to LEU; 2) Qualification by irradiation of the promising solutions found for the high density fuels; 3) Irradiation of mini plates and full scale fuel assemblies at the RA 3 reactor and at higher flux and temperature reactors; 4) Optimization of LEU target and radiochemical techniques for radioisotope production. (author) [es

  2. Improved continuum lowering calculations in screened hydrogenic model with l-splitting for high energy density systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amjad; Shabbir Naz, G.; Saleem Shahzad, M.; Kouser, R.; Aman-ur-Rehman; Nasim, M. H.

    2018-03-01

    The energy states of the bound electrons in high energy density systems (HEDS) are significantly affected due to the electric field of the neighboring ions. Due to this effect bound electrons require less energy to get themselves free and move into the continuum. This phenomenon of reduction in potential is termed as ionization potential depression (IPD) or the continuum lowering (CL). The foremost parameter to depict this change is the average charge state, therefore accurate modeling for CL is imperative in modeling atomic data for computation of radiative and thermodynamic properties of HEDS. In this paper, we present an improved model of CL in the screened hydrogenic model with l-splitting (SHML) proposed by G. Faussurier and C. Blancard, P. Renaudin [High Energy Density Physics 4 (2008) 114] and its effect on average charge state. We propose the level charge dependent calculation of CL potential energy and inclusion of exchange and correlation energy in SHML. By doing this, we made our model more relevant to HEDS and free from CL empirical parameter to the plasma environment. We have implemented both original and modified model of SHML in our code named OPASH and benchmark our results with experiments and other state-of-the-art simulation codes. We compared our results of average charge state for Carbon, Beryllium, Aluminum, Iron and Germanium against published literature and found a very reasonable agreement between them.

  3. Hydrogen bonding in malonaldehyde: a density functional and reparametrized semiempirical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacevic, Goran; Hrenar, Tomica; Doslic, Nadja

    2003-01-01

    Intramolecular proton transfer in malonaldehyde (MA) has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT). The DFT results were used for the construction of a high quality semiempirical potential energy surface with a reparametrized PM3 Hamiltonian. A two-step reparameterization procedure is proposed in which (i) the PM3-MAIS core-core functions for the O-H and H-H interactions were used and a new functional form for the O-O correction function was proposed and (ii) a set of specific reaction parameters (SRP) has been obtained via genetic algorithm optimization. The quality of the reparametrized semiempirical potential energy surfaces was tested by calculating the tunneling splitting of vibrational levels and the anharmonic vibrational frequencies of the system. The applicability to multi-dimensional dynamics in large molecular systems is discussed

  4. Improvement of memory window and retention with low trap density in hydrogenated-amorphous-silicon-germanium nonvolatile memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woojin; Jang, Kyungsoo; Raja, Jayapal; Cho, Jaehyun; Nguyen, Hong Hanh; Kim, Jiwoong; Lee, YounJung; Nagarajan, Balaji; Yi, Junsin; Kim, Minbum

    2013-01-01

    We report the SiO 2 /SiO X /SiO X N Y (OO X O N ) stacked nonvolatile memory (NVM) using hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium (a-Si X Ge 1–X :H) as an active channel layer. In NVMs, the reduction of interface trap density is one of the key issues to improve device performance including memory window and retention. The NVMs using a-SiGe:H as the active channel overcame the limitation of small memory window size and poor retention characteristics by controlling the interface trap density using different Ge contents in the surface SiGe layer. For a-Si:H NVM that does not contain Ge, the memory size is about 5.15 V, which is quite large, with a programming voltage of −7 V and an erasing voltage of +15 V. However, the retention time of over 10 years is almost impossible. For a-SiGe:H NVM with 20% Ge, the memory size is as large as 7.38 V and the retention data of ∼58% is possible even after 10 years due to the reduced trap density in OO X O N and channel layers. When the Ge content is more than 20%, the memory size and retention property after 10 years decrease rapidly. When the contents of Ge in SiGe films reach a certain point, they act as defects lowering the properties. The results of NVM devices using a-SiGe:H (Ge 20%) as an active channel layer demonstrate that they have switching characteristics suitable for data storage such as a threshold voltage window. (paper)

  5. Stable atomic hydrogen: Polarized atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinikoski, T.O.; Penttilae, S.; Rieubland, J.M.; Rijllart, A.

    1984-01-01

    We have carried out experiments with stable atomic hydrogen with a view to possible applications in polarized targets or polarized atomic beam sources. Recent results from the stabilization apparatus are described. The first stable atomic hydrogen beam source based on the microwave extraction method (which is being tested ) is presented. The effect of the stabilized hydrogen gas density on the properties of the source is discussed. (orig.)

  6. [Development of a hydrogen and deuterium polarized gas target for application in storage rings]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeberli, W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the following topics: the Wisconsin test facility for storage cells; results of target tests; the new UHV target test system; funding request for a new atomic beam system; and planning of storage ring experiments

  7. Saturation Ion Current Densities in Inductively Coupled Hydrogen Plasma Produced by Large-Power Radio Frequency Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songbai; Lei, Guangjiu; Bi, Zhenhua; Ghomi, H.; Yang, Size; Liu, Dongping

    2016-09-01

    An experimental investigation of the saturation ion current densities (Jions) in hydrogen inductively coupled plasma (ICP) produced by a large-power (2-32 kW) radio frequency (RF) generator is reported, then some reasonable explanations are given out. With the increase of RF power, the experimental results show three stages: in the first stage (2-14 kW), the electron temperature will rise with the increase of RF power in the ICP, thus, the Jions increases continually as the electron temperature rises in the ICP. In the second stage (14-20 kW), as some H- ions lead to the mutual neutralization (MN), the slope of Jions variation firstly decreases then increases. In the third stage (20-32 kW), both the electronic detachment (ED) and the associative detachment (AD) in the ICP result in the destruction of H- ions, therefore, the increased amplitude of the Jions in the third stage is weaker than the one in the first stage. In addition, with the equivalent transformer model, we successfully explain that the Jions at different radial locations in ICP has the same rule. Finally, it is found that the Jions has nothing to do with the outer/inner puffing gas pressure ratio, which is attributed to the high-speed movement of hydrogen molecules. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2011GB108011 and 2010GB103001), the Major International (Regional) Project Cooperation and Exchanges of China (No. 11320101005) and the Startup Fund from Fuzhou University (No. 510071)

  8. Effect of an external electric field on the dissociation energy and the electron density properties: The case of the hydrogen bonded dimer HF...HF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Ignasi; Molins, Elies; Alkorta, Ibon; Espinosa, Enrique

    2009-01-28

    The effect of a homogeneous external electric field parallel to the hydrogen bond in the FH...FH dimer has been studied by theoretical methods. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules methodology has been used for analyzing the electron distribution of the dimer, calculated with different hydrogen bond distances and external field magnitudes. It is shown that an electric field in the opposite direction to the dipole moment of the system strengthens the interaction due to a larger mutual polarization between both molecules and increases the covalent character of the hydrogen bond, while an external field in the opposite direction has the inverse effect. The properties of the complex at its equilibrium geometry with applied field have been calculated, showing that dependencies between hydrogen bond distance, dissociation energy, and properties derived from the topological analysis of the electron distribution are analogous to those observed in families of XDH...AY complexes. The application of an external field appears as a useful tool for studying the effect of the atomic environment on the hydrogen bond interaction. In the case of FH...FH, both the kinetic energy density and the curvature of the electron density along the hydrogen bond at the bond critical point present a surprisingly good linear dependence on the dissociation energy. The interaction energy can be modeled by the sum of two exponential terms that depend on both the hydrogen bond distance and the applied electric field. Moreover, as indicated by the resulting interaction energy observed upon application of different external fields, the equilibrium distance varies linearly with the external field, and the dependence of the dissociation energy on either the hydrogen bond distance or the external electric field is demonstrated to be exponential.

  9. Cryogenic Hydrogen Fuel for Controlled Inertial Confinement Fusion (Cryogenic Target Factory Concept Based on FST-Layering Method)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Koresheva, E. R.; Koshelev, I. E.; Krokhin, O. N.; Nikitenko, A. I.; Osipov, I. E.

    2017-12-01

    A central element of a power plant based on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is a target with cryogenic hydrogen fuel that should be delivered to the center of a reactor chamber with a high accuracy and repetition rate. Therefore, a cryogenic target factory (CTF) is an integral part of any ICF reactor. A promising way to solve this problem consists in the FST layering method developed at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI). This method (rapid fuel layering inside moving free-standing targets) is unique, having no analogs in the world. The further development of FST-layering technologies is implemented in the scope of the LPI program for the creation of a modular CTF and commercialization of the obtained results. In this report, we discuss our concept of CTF (CTF-LPI) that exhibits the following distinctive features: using a FST-layering technology for the elaboration of an in-line production of cryogenic targets, using an effect of quantum levitation of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) in magnetic field for noncontacting manipulation, transport, and positioning of the free-standing cryogenic targets, as well as in using a Fourier holography technique for an on-line characterization and tracking of the targets flying into the reactor chamber. The results of original experimental and theoretical investigations performed at LPI indicate that the existing and developing target fabrication capabilities and technologies can be applied to ICF target production. The unique scientific, engineering, and technological base developed in Russia at LPI allows one to make a CTFLPI prototype for mass production of targets and delivery thereof at the required velocity into the ICF reactor chamber.

  10. Expression profiling on high-density DNA grids to detect novel targets in dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissmann, M.

    2000-10-01

    Gene expression analyzes on a large scale using DNA microarrays is a novel approach to study transcription of thousands of genes in parallel. By comparing gene expression profiles of different cell-types and of cells in different activation, novel regulatory networks will be identified that are unique to a cell-type and hence, important in its biological function. Among the differentially expressed genes many novel drug targets will be found. The Genetic department of the Novartis Research Institute was following this approach to identify novel genes, which are critical in the antigen presenting function of DCs and could become promising drug targets. Drugs that modulate effector functions of DCs towards induction of energy or tolerance in T-cells could be useful in the treatment of chronic inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. By using specific robotics equipment high-density cDNA grids on nylon membranes have been produced for hybridizations with various radioactive labeled DNA probes. By our format, based on 384 well plates and limited by the resolution power of our current image analysis software, 27.648 cDNA clones, bacterial colonies or pure DNA, were spotted on one filter. For RNA profiling, we generated filters containing a collection of genes expressed in peripheral blood DCs or monocytes and characterized by oligonucleotide fingerprinting (ONF) as being differentially expressed. The gene collection contained many unknown genes. Sequence analysis of to date 18.000 cDNA clones led to an estimate of 5.000 non-redundant genes being represented in the collection. 10 % of them are either completely unknown or homologous to rare ESTs (expressed sequence tags) in the public EST database. These clones occurred predominantly in small fingerprint clusters and were therefore assumed to be rarely expressed in DCs or monocytes. Some of those genes may become novel drug targets if their expression is DC specific or induced by external stimuli driving DCs into

  11. CO2 Laser acceleration of forward directed MeV proton beams in a gas target at critical plasma density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, F.; Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Haberberger, D. J.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.

    2012-08-01

    The generation of 1-5 MeV protons from the interaction of a 3 ps TW CO2 laser pulse with a gas target with a peak density around the critical plasma density has been studied by 2D particle-in-cell simulations. The proton acceleration in the preformed plasma with a symmetric, linearly ramped density distribution occurs via formation of sheath of the hot electrons on the back surface of the target. The maximum energy of the hot electrons and, hence, net acceleration of protons is mainly defined by Forward Raman scattering instability in the underdense part of the plasma. Forward directed ion beams from a debris free gaseous target can find an application as a high-brightness ion source-injector to a conventional accelerator operating up to kHz pulse repetition frequency.

  12. Synthetic high-density lipoprotein nanodisks for targeted withalongolide delivery to adrenocortical carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuai R

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rui Kuai,1,2,* Chitra Subramanian,3,* Peter T White,3,* Barbara N Timmermann,4 James J Moon,1,2,5 Mark S Cohen,3,6 Anna Schwendeman1,2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 2Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, 3Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, 4Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, 5Department of Biomedical Engineering, 6Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC is a rare endocrine malignancy and has a 5-year survival rate of <35%. ACC cells require cholesterol for steroid hormone production, and this requirement is met via expression on the cell surface of a high level of SRB1, responsible for the uptake of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs, which carry and transport cholesterol in vivo. Here, we describe how this natural lipid carrier function of SRB1 can be utilized to improve the tumor-targeted delivery of a novel natural product derivative – withalongolide A 4,19,27-triacetate (WGA-TA – which has shown potent antitumor efficacy, but poor aqueous solubility. Our strategy was to use synthetic HDL (sHDL nanodisks, which are effective in tumor-targeted delivery due to their smallness, long circulation half-life, documented safety, and ability to bind to SRB1. In this study, we prepared sHDL nanodisks using an optimized phospholipid composition combined with ApoA1 mimetic peptide (22A, which has previously been tested in clinical trials, to load WGA-TA. Following optimization, WGA-TA nanodisks showed drug encapsulation efficiency of 78%, a narrow particle size distribution (9.81±0.41 nm, discoid shape, and sustained drug release in phosphate buffered saline. WGA-TA-sHDL nanodisks exhibited higher cytotoxicity in the ACC cell line H295R half maximal inhibitory concentration ([IC50] 0.26±0.045 µM than free WGA-TA (IC50 0.492±0

  13. Nuclear and perinuclear targeting efficiency of quantum dots depends on density of peptidic targeting residues on their surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2017-07-10

    Targeted delivery to the cell nucleus can enhance the efficiency of drugs with nuclear site of action (some anti-cancer agents, DNA drugs, etc.), and can reduce their toxicity. Such targeting can be attained using nano-drug delivery systems (nano-DDSs) decorated with nuclear targeting sequences (such as nuclear localization sequence peptides, NLS). Several types of nano-DDSs decorated with NLS peptides were designed, but their investigation usually did not include quantitate analysis of the decoration efficiency and its correlation with the nano-DDSs intracellular localization. Thus, the major mechanisms and limiting factors of the nano-DDSs nuclear targeting are largely unknown yet. In this study, we report quantitative data for specific nano-formulation (CdSe-ZnS quantum dots) that include the efficiencies of its decoration with NLS residues and of its nuclear and perinuclear targeting, and demonstrate correlation between these parameters. For instance, QDs decorated with 83, 246, and 265 NLS peptides accumulated efficiently in the nucleus of HeLa cells or its vicinity (an average of 30.4%, 43.3%, and 49.0% of the intracellular QDs, respectively). On the other hand, QDs decorated with 63, 231, and 308 scrambled peptides accumulated in the nucleus of HeLa cells or its vicinity to a much lower extent (an average of 17.3%, 21.1%, and 25.5% of the intracellular QDs, respectively). Thus, results of our study provide important insights into the structure-activity correlations (i.e., the relationships between the formulation properties and the intracellular fate of nano-DDSs) of nuclear-targeted drug delivery. We plan to apply the research tools that were developed in the course of this and our previous studies to investigate the nuclear and perinuclear targeting activities of different NLS sequences, and to investigate the effects of nano-DDSs size, charge, shape, decoration efficiency with nuclear targeting sequences, and other structural factors on nuclear and

  14. Probing the structure, stability and hydrogen adsorption of lithium functionalized isoreticular MOF-5 (Fe, Cu, Co, Ni and Zn) by density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramanan, Natarajan Sathiyamoorthy; Sahara, Ryoji; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2009-04-14

    Li adsorption on isoreticular MOFs with metal Fe, Cu, Co, Ni and Zn was studied using density function theory. Li functionalization shows a considerable structural change associated with a volume change in isoreticular MOF-5 except for the Zn metal center. Hydrogen binding energies on Li functionalized MOFs are seen to be in the range of 0.2 eV, which is the desired value for an ideal reversible storage system. This study has clearly shown that Li doping is possible only in Zn-based MOF-5, which would be better candidate to reversibly store hydrogen.

  15. Probing the Structure, Stability and Hydrogen Adsorption of Lithium Functionalized Isoreticular MOF-5 (Fe, Cu, Co, Ni and Zn by Density Functional Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Kawazoe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Li adsorption on isoreticular MOFs with metal Fe, Cu, Co, Ni and Zn was studied using density function theory. Li functionalization shows a considerable structural change associated with a volume change in isoreticular MOF-5 except for the Zn metal center. Hydrogen binding energies on Li functionalized MOFs are seen to be in the range of 0.2 eV, which is the desired value for an ideal reversible storage system. This study has clearly shown that Li doping is possible only in Zn-based MOF-5, which would be better candidate to reversibly store hydrogen.

  16. Retention of hydrogen in fcc metals irradiated at temperatures leading to high densities of bubbles or voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, F. A.; Simonen, E. P.; Oliver, B. M.; Greenwood, L. R.; Grossbeck, M. L.; Wolfer, W. G.; Scott, P. M.

    2006-09-01

    Large amounts of hydrogen and helium are generated in structural metals in accelerator-driven systems. It is shown that under certain conditions, hydrogen can be stored in irradiated nickel and stainless steels at levels strongly in excess of that predicted by Sieverts' law. These conditions are first, the availability of hydrogen from various radiolytic and environmental sources and second, the formation of radiation-induced cavities to store hydrogen. These cavities can be highly pressurized bubbles or under-pressurized voids, with concurrent helium in the cavities at either low or very high levels. Transmutant sources of hydrogen are often insufficient to pressurize these cavities, and therefore environmental sources are required. The stored hydrogen appears to be stable for many years at room temperature. A conceptual model to describe such behavior requires the continuous generation of hydrogen from (n,p) reactions and possibly other radiolytic sources which can create a supersaturation of hydrogen in the metal, leading to the pressurization of voids and helium bubbles. Once captured in a bubble, the hydrogen is assumed to be in molecular form. Dissolution back into the metal requires chemisorption and dissociation on the bubble surface. Both of these processes have large activation barriers, particularly when oxygen, carbon, and other impurities poison the bubble surface. However, these chemisorbed poisons may reduce but not entirely restrict the ingress or egress of atomic hydrogen.

  17. Surface Ligand Density of Antibiotic-Nanoparticle Conjugates Enhances Target Avidity and Membrane Permeabilization of Vancomycin-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Marwa M; Ranzoni, Andrea; Phetsang, Wanida; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Cooper, Matthew A

    2017-02-15

    Many bacterial pathogens have now acquired resistance toward commonly used antibiotics, such as the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin. In this study, we show that immobilization of vancomycin onto a nanometer-scale solid surface with controlled local density can potentiate antibiotic action and increase target affinity of the drug. Magnetic nanoparticles were conjugated with vancomycin and used as a model system to investigate the relationship between surface density and drug potency. We showed remarkable improvement in minimum inhibitory concentration against vancomycin-resistant strains with values of 13-28 μg/mL for conjugated vancomycin compared to 250-4000 μg/mL for unconjugated vancomycin. Higher surface densities resulted in enhanced affinity toward the bacterial target compared to that of unconjugated vancomycin, as measured by a competition experiment using a surrogate ligand for bacterial Lipid II, N-Acetyl-l-Lys-d-Ala-d-Ala. High density vancomycin nanoparticles required >64 times molar excess of ligand (relative to the vancomycin surface density) to abrogate antibacterial activity compared to only 2 molar excess for unconjugated vancomycin. Further, the drug-nanoparticle conjugates caused rapid permeabilization of the bacterial cell wall within 2 h, whereas no effect was seen with unconjugated vancomycin, suggesting additional modes of action for the nanoparticle-conjugated drug. Hence, immobilization of readily available antibiotics on nanocarriers may present a general strategy for repotentiating drugs that act on bacterial membranes or membrane-bound targets but have lost effectiveness against resistant bacterial strains.

  18. CFD based exploration of the dry-low-NOx hydrogen micromix combustion technology at increased energy densities

    OpenAIRE

    A. Haj Ayed; K. Kusterer; H.H.-W. Funke; J. Keinz; D. Bohn

    2017-01-01

    Combined with the use of renewable energy sources for its production, hydrogen represents a possible alternative gas turbine fuel within future low emission power generation. Due to the large difference in the physical properties of hydrogen compared to other fuels such as natural gas, well established gas turbine combustion systems cannot be directly applied for dry-low-NOx (DLN) hydrogen combustion. Thus, the development of DLN combustion technologies is an essential and challenging task fo...

  19. Measurement of cell wall depolarization of polarized hydrogen gas targets in a weak magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.S.; Haeberli, W.

    1994-01-01

    Polarized gas targets using windowless storage cells are being developed for use as internal targets in medium and high energy particle storage rings. Tests were conducted to evaluate wall depolarization for different cell wall materials. Measurements of the target polarization were made on polarized vector H 0 gas targets in a weak magnetic field. Fifteen materials were tested in geometries corresponding to different average number of wall collisions, N 0 , from 40 to 380 collisions, for wall temperatures, T, from 20 K to 300 K. A method was developed to measure the polarization of a vector H 0 target in a 0.5 mT field: a beam of 50 keV D + picks up electrons from the target gas and the vector D 0 acquires a tensor polarization, p zz , which is measured by means of the 3 H( vector d, n) 4 He reaction. A simple model for depolarization at surfaces is proposed. Comparison to the data shows fair agreement, but the model is unrealistic in that it does not include the effects of the recombination of atoms on the surface to form molecules. ((orig.))

  20. Charmonium Spectroscopy at the ISR using an Antiproton Beam and a Hydrogen Jet Target

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment studies the formation of charmonium states not directly accessible in e|+e|- annihilation. The good momentum definition of the cooled @* beam allows a precise measurement of the width of these states. A hydrogen gas jet has been used, yielding a luminosity of 3.10|3|0 cm|-|2sec|-|1 with 10|1|1~@*. Three types of exclusive events are selected: e|+e|-~(J/@Y) for calibration of the energy of the machine, e|+e|-@g~(@c states) and @g@g~(@h^c, @h'^c). The experiment uses MWPC, scintillator hodoscopes, Freon Cerenkov counters for the e|+e|- determination and electromagnetic calorimeters (@g detection and energies of the electrons).

  1. First observation of density profile in directly laser-driven polystyrene targets for ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Nishikino, Masaharu; Shigemori, Keisuke; Sunahara, Atsushi; Nakai, Mitsuo; Azechi, Hiroshi; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko

    2003-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the density profile of a directly laser-driven polystyrene target was observed for the first time using an x-ray penumbral imaging technique coupled with side-on x-ray backlighting at the GEKKO XII [C. Yamanaka et al., IEEE J. Quantum Electron. QE-17, 1639 (1981)]-High Intensity Plasma Experimental Research laser facility (I L =0.7x10 14 W/cm 2 , λ L =0.35 μm). This density measurement makes it possible to experimentally confirm all physical parameters [γ(k),k,g,m,ρ a ,L m ] appearing in the modified Takabe formula for the growth rate of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The measured density profiles were well reproduced by a one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation code. The density measurement contributes toward fully understanding the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  2. The solid molecular hydrogens in the ordered state as function of density and ortho-para concentration: a far infrared study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jochemsen, R.

    1978-01-01

    In this thesis, the results of far infrared absorption experiments on solid molecular hydrogen and deuterium are presented. In Chapter I an introduction to the properties of solid molecular hydrogens in given. The experimental system used for the high pressure infrared measurements and the data handling procedures are discussed in Chapter II. The theory of infrared absorption and the averaging of the dipole moment over the motion of the molecules is contained in Chapter III. In this chapter a general sum rule for the integrated absorption is derived. The remaining chapters present the results of the measurements and the discussion. In Chapter IV the author concentrates on the phonon frequencies as a function of ortho-para concentration and density, while in Chapter V measuremtns of phonon lineshape and integrated absorption intensities are presented. Finally, in Chapter VI, a study is given of the phase transition in solid hydrogen and deuterium. This study provides accurate values for the transition temperature as a function of density (in deuterium) and as a function of ortho-para concentration (in hydrogen) as well as the dependence of the order parameter on the temperature and the ortho-para concentration. (Auth.)

  3. New investigations of organic compounds for targets with polarized hydrogen nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyatova, E. I.

    1995-02-01

    Pentanol C 5H 12O, polyethylene (CH 2) n and their deuterated analogues C 5D 12O and (CD 2) n are proposed as target materials. Particular attention is paid to the production of materials in a glass-like (amorphous) state.

  4. New investigations of organic compounds for targets with polarized hydrogen nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunyatova, E.I. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    Pentanol C{sub 5}H{sub 12}O, polyethylene (CH{sub 2}){sub n} and their deuterated analogues C{sub 5}D{sub 12}O and (CD{sub 2}){sub n} are proposed as target materials. Particular attention is paid to the production of materials in a glass-like (amorphous) state. ((orig.))

  5. A liposomal drug platform overrides peptide ligand targeting to a cancer biomarker, irrespective of ligand affinity or density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany Powell Gray

    Full Text Available One method for improving cancer treatment is the use of nanoparticle drugs functionalized with targeting ligands that recognize receptors expressed selectively by tumor cells. In theory such targeting ligands should specifically deliver the nanoparticle drug to the tumor, increasing drug concentration in the tumor and delivering the drug to its site of action within the tumor tissue. However, the leaky vasculature of tumors combined with a poor lymphatic system allows the passive accumulation, and subsequent retention, of nanosized materials in tumors. Furthermore, a large nanoparticle size may impede tumor penetration. As such, the role of active targeting in nanoparticle delivery is controversial, and it is difficult to predict how a targeted nanoparticle drug will behave in vivo. Here we report in vivo studies for αvβ6-specific H2009.1 peptide targeted liposomal doxorubicin, which increased liposomal delivery and toxicity to lung cancer cells in vitro. We systematically varied ligand affinity, ligand density, ligand stability, liposome dosage, and tumor models to assess the role of active targeting of liposomes to αvβ6. In direct contrast to the in vitro results, we demonstrate no difference in in vivo targeting or efficacy for H2009.1 tetrameric peptide liposomal doxorubicin, compared to control peptide and no peptide liposomes. Examining liposome accumulation and distribution within the tumor demonstrates that the liposome, and not the H2009.1 peptide, drives tumor accumulation, and that both targeted H2009.1 and untargeted liposomes remain in perivascular regions, with little tumor penetration. Thus H2009.1 targeted liposomes fail to improve drug efficacy because the liposome drug platform prevents the H2009.1 peptide from both actively targeting the tumor and binding to tumor cells throughout the tumor tissue. Therefore, using a high affinity and high specificity ligand targeting an over-expressed tumor biomarker does not guarantee

  6. Investigations of charge-changing processes for light proton-rich nuclei on carbon and solid-hydrogen targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawahata, K. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ozawa, A., E-mail: ozawa@tac.tsukuba.ac.jp [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Saito, Y.; Abe, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Inaba, N.; Ishibashi, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Matsunaga, S. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Moriguchi, T.; Nagae, D.; Okada, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Sato, S. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Suzuki, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Zenihiro, J. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    We investigated charge-changing processes (total charge-changing cross sections and partial charge-changing cross sections) for light proton-rich nuclei ({sup 34–36}Ar, {sup 33}Cl, {sup 25–28}Si) at around 300A MeV on carbon and solid-hydrogen targets. We estimated the nuclear proton point radii of {sup 33}Cl and {sup 25,26,27}Si from the observed total charge-changing cross sections by using Glauber-model calculations with a phenomenological correction factor. Furthermore, we estimated the proton skin thickness for {sup 33}Cl coupled with its previously observed matter radius. From investigations of the partial charge-changing cross sections, clear zigzag pattern was observed for all isotopes. The present studies suggest that the pattern may be common in the proton-rich side, and depends on the odd–even nature of the fragment charge.

  7. Study of Hadronic Jets Produced by Charged Pion and Proton Beams Incident on Hydrogen and Aluminum Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yung, Kar Woo [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1979-09-19

    High transverse momentum ($P_T$) particles are thought to reflect the underlying parton (quark or gluon) mechanisms of hadron interactions. A particularly simple model by Feynman, Field and Fox (or FFF>, involves hard scattering of a pair of partons via gluon exchange (Quantum Chromodynamics or GCD) with subsequent fragmentation or the partons into hadrons. We present results from an experiment (E260 at Fermilab) on the production of Jets (groups of particles) and single charged particles, at both low and high $P_T$, in 200 Gev interactions. The experiment used a calorimeter triggered multiparticle spectrometer. Results are presented on the comparisons of cross sections and associated charged particle distributions for pion and proton beams and aluminium and hydrogen targets.

  8. Measuring the electron density in plasmas from the difference of Lorentzian part of the widths of two Balmer series hydrogen lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yubero, C. [Grupo de Física de Plasmas: Diagnosis, Modelos y Aplicaciones (FQM-136), Edificio A. Einstein (C-2), Campus de Rabanales, Universidad de Córdoba, 14071 Córdoba (Spain); García, M.C., E-mail: fa1gamam@uco.es [Grupo de Física de Plasmas: Diagnosis, Modelos y Aplicaciones (FQM-136), Edificio A. Einstein (C-2), Campus de Rabanales, Universidad de Córdoba, 14071 Córdoba (Spain); Dimitrijevic, M.S. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia); Sola, A.; Gamero, A. [Grupo de Física de Plasmas: Diagnosis, Modelos y Aplicaciones (FQM-136), Edificio A. Einstein (C-2), Campus de Rabanales, Universidad de Córdoba, 14071 Córdoba (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    We present an alternative optical emission spectroscopy method to measure the plasma electron density from the difference of widths of two Balmer series hydrogen lines (H{sub α} and H{sub β}), especially convenient for non-thermal plasmas since with this method, there is no need to know either the gas temperature or the van der Waals contribution to the Lorentzian part of the line. In this paper it has been assumed that the part of full width at half maximum due to Stark broadening can be determined with the approximation of Lorentzian line shape. The method has been applied to the determination of the electron density in an argon microwave-induced plasma maintained at atmospheric pressure, and comparison with the results obtained using other diagnostic methods has been done. - Highlights: • An alternative method to measure the electron density in plasmas from two Balmer series hydrogen lines (H{sub α} and H{sub β}) is presented. • The method is very convenient for plasmas with electron densities of the order of 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3} and above, at low gas temperatures. • It has been applied to the determination of the electron density of an argon microwave plasma at atmospheric pressure. • Results from it are in good agreement with previous ones obtained using other diagnostic methods.

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide in the Adipose Tissue—Physiology, Pathology and a Target for Pharmacotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Bełtowski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is synthesized in the adipose tissue mainly by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE. Several studies have demonstrated that H2S is involved in adipogenesis, that is the differentiation of preadipocytes to adipocytes, most likely by inhibiting phosphodiesterases and increasing cyclic AMP concentration. The effect of H2S on adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake is controversial. Some studies suggest that H2S inhibits insulin-induced glucose uptake and that excess of H2S contributes to adipose tissue insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome. In contrast, other studies have demonstrated that H2S stimulates glucose uptake and its deficiency contributes to insulin resistance. Similarly, the effect of H2S on adipose tissue lipolysis is controversial. H2S produced by perivascular adipose tissue decreases vascular tone by activating ATP-sensitive and/or voltage-gated potassium channels in smooth muscle cells. Experimental obesity induced by high calorie diet has a time dependent effect on H2S in perivascular adipose tissue; short and long-term obesity increase and decrease H2S production, respectively. Hyperglycemia has been consistently demonstrated to suppress CSE-H2S pathway in various adipose tissue depots. Finally, H2S deficiency may contribute to adipose tissue inflammation associated with obesity/metabolic syndrome.

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling Axis as a Target for Prostate Cancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhe Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S was originally considered toxic at elevated levels; however just in the past decade H2S has been proposed to be an important gasotransmitter with various physiological and pathophysiological roles in the body. H2S can be generated endogenously from L-cysteine by multiple enzymes, including cystathionine gamma-lyase, cystathionine beta-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase in combination with cysteine aminotransferase. Prostate cancer is a major health concern and no effective treatment for prostate cancers is available. H2S has been shown to inhibit cell survival of androgen-independent, androgen-dependent, and antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer cells through different mechanisms. Various H2S-releasing compounds, including sulfide salts, diallyl disulfide, diallyl trisulfide, sulforaphane, and other polysulfides, also have been shown to inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis. The expression of H2S-producing enzyme was reduced in both human prostate cancer tissues and prostate cancer cells. Androgen receptor (AR signaling is indispensable for the development of castration resistant prostate cancer, and H2S was shown to inhibit AR transactivation and contributes to antiandrogen-resistant status. In this review, we summarized the current knowledge of H2S signaling in prostate cancer and described the molecular alterations, which may bring this gasotransmitter into the clinic in the near future for developing novel pharmacological and therapeutic interventions for prostate cancer.

  11. Interaction of 14 MeV neutrons with hydrogenated target proton emission calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Perez, N.; Desdin.

    1996-01-01

    Using neutron emission data of a 14 MeV neutron generator, a paraffin target, and based on the n + H 1 → n '+ p reaction, have been obtained the characteristics of the proton emission in a proton-neutron mixed field. It was used Monte Carlo simulation and it was obtained the proton output as function of the converter width and the energy spectrum of protons corresponding to different converter thickness. Among 0.07 and 0.2 cm there is a maximum zone for the proton emission. The energy spectrum agrees with obtained on previous papers. Figures showing these results are provided

  12. Hydrogen Bonding, (1)H NMR, and Molecular Electron Density Topographical Characteristics of Ionic Liquids Based on Amino Acid Cations and Their Ester Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Soniya S; Bejoy, Namitha Brijit; Gejji, Shridhar P

    2015-08-13

    Amino acid ionic liquids (AAILs) have attracted significant attention in the recent literature owing to their ubiquitous applications in diversifying areas of modern chemistry, materials science, and biosciences. The present work focuses on unraveling the molecular interactions underlying AAILs. Electronic structures of ion pairs consisting of amino acid cations ([AA(+)], AA = Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Pro, Ser, Thr) and their ester substituted derivatives [AAE(+)] interacting with nitrate anion [NO3(-)] have been obtained from the dispersion corrected M06-2x density functional theory. The formation of ion pair is accompanied by the transfer of proton from quaternary nitrogen to anion facilitated via hydrogen bonding. The [Ile], [Pro], [Ser], and [Thr] and their esters reveal relatively strong inter- as well as intramolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions. Consequently, the hierarchy in binding energies of [AA][NO3] ion pairs and their ester analogues turns out to be [Gly] > [Ala] > [Ser] ∼ [Val] ∼ [Ile] > [Leu] ∼ [Thr] > [Pro]. The work underlines how the interplay of intra- as well as intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions in [AA]- and [AAE]-based ILs manifest in their infrared and (1)H NMR spectra. Substitution of -OCH3 functional group in [AA][NO3] ILs lowers the melting point attributed to weaker hydrogen-bonding interactions, making them suitable for room temperature applications. As opposed to gas phase structures, the presence of solvent (DMSO) does not bring about any proton transfer in the ion pairs or their ester analogues. Calculated (1)H NMR chemical shifts of the solvated structures agree well with those from experiment. Correlations of decomposition temperatures in [AA]- and [AAE]-based ILs with binding energies and electron densities at the bond critical point(s) in molecular electron density topography, have been established.

  13. Double ionization of the hydrogen sulfide molecule by electron impact: Influence of the target orientation on multiple differential cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imadouchene, N.; Aouchiche, H.; Champion, C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The double ionization of the H 2 S molecule is here theoretically studied. • The orientation dependence of the differential cross sections is scrutinized. • The specific double ionizing mechanisms are clearly identified. - Abstract: Multiple differential cross sections of double ionization of hydrogen sulfide molecule impacted by electrons are here investigated within the first Born approximation. In the initial state, the incident electron is represented by a plane wave function whereas the target is described by means of a single-center molecular wave function. In the final state, the two ejected electrons are described by Coulomb wave functions coupled by the Gamow factor, whereas the scattered electron is described by a plane wave. In this work, we analyze the role played by the molecular target orientation in the double ionization of the four outermost orbitals, namely 2b 1 , 5a 1 , 2b 2 and 4a 1 in considering the particular case of two electrons ejected from the same orbital. The contribution of each final state to the double ionization process is studied in terms of shape and magnitude for specific molecular orientations and for each molecular orbital we identified the mechanisms involved in the double ionization process, namely, the Shake-Off and the Two-Step 1.

  14. Low-density hydrocarbon foams for laser fusion targets: Progress report, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.; Cook, R.C.; Haendler, B.L.; Hair, L.M.; Kong, F.M.; Letts, S.A.

    1987-06-01

    We describe progress made during 1986 in the development of direct-drive hydrocarbon foam targets for laser fusion. The foam materials are polystyrene and resorcinolformaldehyde. The processes for making the foams, their properties, characterization techniques, and the relationships of their properties to target specifications are presented. In the final section, we discuss statistical experimental design techniques that are being used to optimize the foams. 12 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Photoinduced hydrogen-atom eliminations of 6-hydroxyquinoline and 7-hydroxyquinoline studied by low-temperature matrix-isolation infrared spectroscopy and density-functional-theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Masahiko; Nagai, Yuko; Sekiya, Hiroshi; Nakata, Munetaka

    2009-07-23

    Photoreaction mechanisms of 6-hydroxyquinoline (6-HQ) and 7-hydroxyquinoline (7-HQ) in low-temperature argon matrixes have been investigated by Fourier transform infrared (IR) spectroscopy and density-functional-theory (DFT) calculations. A comparison of the observed IR spectra of reactants with the corresponding calculated spectral patterns obtained by the DFT method led to the conclusion that the hydrogen atoms in the O-H group of 6-HQ and in that of 7-HQ are selectively located at the outer position against the quinoline ring. When the matrix samples were irradiated upon UV light around 300 nm, IR spectra of unknown chemical species were observed; they were assigned to the photoreaction intermediates, quinolinoxyl radicals and ketene compounds, produced by eliminations of a hydrogen atom and a hydrogen molecule, respectively. In the photoreaction of 7-HQ, a small amount of keto form was also produced by intramolecular hydrogen-atom transfer from oxygen to nitrogen in an argon cage. Kinetic analyses were made by assuming that 5-ketene and 6-ketene were produced from 6-HQ, while 6-ketene and 7-ketene were produced from 7-HQ. The effective rate constants estimated from the absorbance changes of IR bands against irradiation time revealed that the reaction pathway to produce 6-ketene was minor in both HQs, leading to the conclusion that the conformation of reactants, HQs, plays an important role in the photoproduction of ketenes through biradicals in the Wolff rearrangement.

  16. Low-density lipoprotein-lowering strategies: target versus maximalist versus population percentile.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sniderman, A.D.; Graaf, J. de; Couture, P.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Maximalist low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-lowering strategies such as lowering LDL as much as possible or, alternatively, using the most potent LDL-lowering regimens have become increasingly popular. Almost all attention has focused on the potential advantages of these approaches

  17. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurs, Ulrike; Lohse, Brian; Ming, Shonoi A

    2014-01-01

    of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to characterize interactions of low affinity peptides with their cognate protein targets. The HDX-MS workflow was optimized to accurately detect low-affinity peptide-protein interactions by use of ion mobility, electron transfer dissociation, non...

  18. Ion Channel Trafficking: Control of Ion Channel Density as a Target for Arrhythmias?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Balse

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The shape of the cardiac action potential (AP is determined by the contributions of numerous ion channels. Any dysfunction in the proper function or expression of these ion channels can result in a change in effective refractory period (ERP and lead to arrhythmia. The processes underlying the correct targeting of ion channels to the plasma membrane are complex, and have not been fully characterized in cardiac myocytes. Emerging evidence highlights ion channel trafficking as a potential causative factor in certain acquired and inherited arrhythmias, and therapies which target trafficking as opposed to pore block are starting to receive attention. In this review we present the current evidence for the mechanisms which underlie precise control of cardiac ion channel trafficking and targeting.

  19. Mature Epitope Density - A strategy for target selection based on immunoinformatics and exported prokaryotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Anderson R; Pereira, Vanessa Bastos; Barbosa, Eudes

    2013-01-01

    . However, currently available tools do not account for the concentration of epitope products in the mature protein product and its relation to the reliability of target selection. RESULTS: We developed a computational strategy based on measuring the epitope's concentration in the mature protein, called...

  20. Measurement of radial profiles of density ratio of helium to hydrogen ion using charge exchange spectroscopy with two-wavelength spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K; Yoshinuma, M; Wieland, B; Goto, M; Nakamura, Y; Kobayashi, M; Murakami, I; Moon, C

    2015-12-01

    Radial profiles of density ratio of helium to hydrogen ions are measured using the charge exchange spectroscopy technique with the two-wavelength spectrometer system in the large helical device. The two-wavelength spectrometer system consists of a dichroic mirror box, a spectrometer with two grating and two camera lenses, and one CCD detector. The dichroic mirror box is used to divide the light of one fiber from the plasma to two fibers, one for HeII (λ = 468.6 nm) and the other for H(α) (λ = 656.3 nm), that are connected to the entrance slit of the spectrometer to eliminate the interference between the HeII and the H(α) spectra on the CCD. This system provides a simultaneous measurement of helium and hydrogen ion density ratio at 8 exact same locations (8 spatial channels) with a time resolution of >40 ms in the wide range of the density ratio of 0.05-5.

  1. Measurement of the charged pion mass using a low-density target of light atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trassinelli, M.; Anagnostopoulos, D.F.; Borchert, G.; Dax, A.; Egger, J.-P.; Gotta, D.; Hennebach, M.; Indelicato, P.; Liu, Y.-W.; Manil, B.; Nelms, N.; Simons, L.M.; Wells, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a new evaluation of the negatively charged pion mass based on the simultaneous spectroscopy of pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen transitions using a gaseous target composed by a N 2 /O 2 mixture at 1.4 bar. We present the experimental set-up and the methods for deriving the pion mass value from the spatial separation from the 5g − 4f πN transition line and the 5g − 4f μO transition line used as reference. Moreover, we discuss the importance to use dilute targets in order to minimize the influence of additional spectral lines from the presence of remaining electrons during the radiative emission. The occurrence of possible satellite lines is investigated via hypothesis testing methods using the Bayes factor.

  2. Measurement of the charged pion mass using a low-density target of light atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trassinelli, M.; Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Borchert, G.; Dax, A.; Egger, J.-P.; Gotta, D.; Hennebach, M.; Indelicato, P.; Liu, Y.-W.; Manil, B.; Nelms, N.; Simons, L. M.; Wells, A.

    2016-11-01

    We present a new evaluation of the negatively charged pion mass based on the simultaneous spectroscopy of pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen transitions using a gaseous target composed by a N2/O2 mixture at 1.4 bar. We present the experimental set-up and the methods for deriving the pion mass value from the spatial separation from the 5g - 4f πN transition line and the 5g - 4f μO transition line used as reference. Moreover, we discuss the importance to use dilute targets in order to minimize the influence of additional spectral lines from the presence of remaining electrons during the radiative emission. The occurrence of possible satellite lines is investigated via hypothesis testing methods using the Bayes factor.

  3. Experimental investigation of the formation of negative hydrogen ions in collisions between positive ions and atomic or molecular targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattouf, Elie

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the negative hydrogen ion (H - ) in collisions between a positive ion and a neutral atomic or molecular target is studied experimentally at impact energies of a few keV. The doubly-differential cross sections for H - formation are measured as a function of the kinetic energy and emission angle for the collision systems OH + + Ar and O + + H 2 O at 412 eV/a.m.u. These H - ions can be emitted at high energies (keV) in hard quasi-elastic two-body collisions involving a large momentum transfer to the H center. However, H - anions are preferentially emitted at low energy (eV) due to soft many-body (≥ 2) collisions resulting in a low momentum transfer. The formation of H - ions by electron capture follows excitation or ionization of the molecule. The molecular fragmentation dynamics is modeled to simulate the emission of H - ions. The overall good agreement between the simulation and the experiment leads to the understanding of most of the experimental observations. (author) [fr

  4. Determination of semi-empirical relationship between the manganese and hydrogen atoms ratio, physical density and concentration in an aqueous solution of manganese sulphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues Bittencourt, Guilherme, E-mail: bittencourt@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria LNMRI/IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende, s/n Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Souza Patrao, Karla Cristina de, E-mail: karla@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria LNMRI/IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende, s/n Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Passos Leite, Sandro, E-mail: sandro@ird.gov.b [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Caixa Postal 68509, 21945-970, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wagner Pereira, Walsan, E-mail: walsan@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria LNMRI/IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende, s/n Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Simoes da Fonseca, Evaldo, E-mail: evaldo@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria LNMRI/IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende, s/n Recreio dos Bandeirantes, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    The Manganese sulphate solution has been used for neutron metrology through the method of Manganese Bath. This method uses physical parameters of manganese sulphate solution to obtain its corrections. This work established a functional relationship, using the gravimetric method, between those physical parameters: density, concentration and hydrogen to manganese ratio. Comparisons were done between manganese sulphate solution concentration from the Manganese Bath system of Laboratory of Metrology of Ionising Radiation and estimated values from the functional relationship obtained, showing percentage difference of less than 0.1%. This result demonstrates the usefulness in the correlation of the physical values of the solution to the MB.

  5. Density function theoretical investigation on the Ni3PP structure and the hydrogen adsorption property of the Ni2P(0001) surface

    OpenAIRE

    Ariga, Hiroko; Kawashima, Mayumi; Takakusagi, Satoru; Asakura, Kiyotaka

    2013-01-01

    The electronic and structural properties of a phosphorus-terminated structure of Ni2P(0001) surface (Ni3PP) are investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Phosphorus adsorption largely stabilizes the Ni2P(0001) surface by creating Ni-P bonds on the Ni trimer. Atomic hydrogen can adsorb on the topmost P site although its adsorption energy is much lower than its adsorption energy on the Ni trimer site of the Ni3P2 surface. Our results suggest that the Ni trimer is the key fac...

  6. High-density lipoproteins: a novel therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TS Mohamed Saleem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available TS Mohamed Saleem1, PV Sandhya Rani1, K Gauthaman21Department of Pharmacology, Annamacharya College of Pharmacy, New Boyanapalli, Andhrapradesh, India; 2Department of Drug Technology, Faculty of Medical Technology, Derna, LibyaAbstract: Cardiovascular disease has a high rate of mortality in both Western and developing countries. Atherosclerosis and generation of reactive oxygen species through oxidative stress is the major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Atherothrombosis with low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL and high levels of low-density lipoprotein is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis-induced cardiovascular disease. Lipid-lowering drugs like statins, niacin, fibrates, and some newer agents, ie, the apolipoprotein A-I mimetics and the cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors, not only increase HDL levels but are also effective in reducing key atherogenic lipid components, including triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. The aim of this review is to discuss the accumulating evidence suggesting that HDL possesses a diverse range of biological actions, and that increasing HDL levels by drug treatment may be beneficial in the prevention of cardiovascular disease.Keywords: cardiovascular disease, lipoproteins, statins, apolipoprotein, atherosclerosis

  7. Laser-driven proton acceleration from a near-critical density target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yogo, A; Daido, H; Bulanov, S V; Esirkepov, T Z; Ogura, K; Orimo, S; Sagisaka, A; Ma, J L; Mori, M; Nishiuchi, M; Pirozhkov, A S [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Kyoto (Japan); Nemoto, K; Oishi, Y; Nayuki, T; Fujii, T [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Kanagawa (Japan); Nakamura, S; Noda, A [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nagatomo, H [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2008-05-01

    The duration-controlled amplified spontaneous emission with intensity of 10{sup 13}W/cm{sup 2} is used to convert a 7.5 {mu}m thick polyimide foil into a near-critical plasma, in which the p-polarized, 45 fs, 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulse generates 3.8 MeV protons, emitted at some angle between the target normal and the laser propagation direction of 45 deg. The mechanism which explains the proton generation from the near-critical plasma cloud is discussed using the two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation.

  8. Lactosaminated Fab fragments specific for low density lipoproteins/hepatocyte targeting and hypolipoproteinemic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, F; Via, D P; Bocan, T M; Gotto, A M; Smith, L C

    1988-01-01

    We have previously reported that Fab fragments of IgGs modified by lactosamination (lac-Fab) can direct macromolecules, including low density lipoproteins (LDL), to the liver. In the present paper we demonstrate that lac-Fab that is specific for LDL is an effective and selective hypolipoprotein agent. A plasma pool of about 60 mg/dl of apoprotein B (apo B) was induced in rats by bolus injection of human LDL (hLDL), which increased the cholesterol value to about 150 mg/dl. Three hours after injection of the highest dose of lac-Fab, the total cholesterol decreased to 80 mg/dl, compared to 120 mg/dl in control animals. Studies conducted with 131I-tyramine-cellobiose-labeled LDL indicated that the liver was the only organ in which lac-Fab increased LDL uptake and degradation. The effect of lac-Fab was dose-dependent. With amounts of lac-Fab between 13 to 42 mg/kg body weight, the amount of hLDL cleared through the lac-Fab mechanism ranged from 30% to 70% of the initial pool. Analysis of the plasma lipoprotein subfractions revealed that high density lipoprotein levels were not affected. Histologic examination of liver sections after sequential injection of fluorescently labeled hLDL and lac-Fab indicated specific uptake in the hepatocytes when compared to control sections obtained from animals injected with Dil-LDL alone. The uptake of fluorescent LDL induced by lac-Fab was completely prevented by a co-injection of an excess of asialofetuin. We conclude that lac-Fab that is specific for LDL is a selective hypolipoproteinemic agent and a specific carrier to the hepatocytes.

  9. Three-dimensional printing and deformation behavior of low-density target structures by two-photon polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Stein, Ori; Campbell, John H.; Jiang, Lijia; Petta, Nicole; Lu, Yongfeng

    2017-08-01

    Two-photon polymerization (2PP), a 3D nano to microscale additive manufacturing process, is being used for the first time to fabricate small custom experimental packages ("targets") to support laser-driven high-energy-density (HED) physics research. Of particular interest is the use of 2PP to deterministically print low-density, low atomic-number (CHO) polymer matrices ("foams") at millimeter scale with sub-micrometer resolution. Deformation during development and drying of the foam structures remains a challenge when using certain commercial photo-resins; here we compare use of acrylic resins IP-S and IP-Dip. The mechanical strength of polymeric beam and foam structures is examined particularly the degree of deformation that occurs during the development and drying processes. The magnitude of the shrinkage in the two resins in quantified by printing sample structures and by use of FEA to simulate the deformation. Capillary drying forces are shown to be small and likely below the elastic limit of the core foam structure. In contrast the substantial shrinkage in IP-Dip ( 5-10%) cause large shear stresses and associated plastic deformation particularly near constrained boundaries such as the substrate and locations with sharp density variation. The inherent weakness of stitching boundaries is also evident and in certain cases can lead to delamination. Use of IP-S shows marked reduction in deformation with a minor loss of print resolution

  10. Production of dissociated hydrogen gas by electro-magnetically driven shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Kotaro; Moriyama, Takao; Hasegawa, Jun; Horioka, Kazuhiko; Oguri, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of ion stopping power which has a dependence on target temperature and density is an essential issue for heavy-ion-driven high energy density experiment. We focus on experimentally unknown dissociated hydrogen atoms as target for stopping power measurement. The precise measurement of shock wave velocity is required because the dissociated gas is produced by electro-magnetically driven shock. For beam-dissociated hydrogen gas interaction experiment, shock velocity measurement using laser refraction is proposed. (author)

  11. Catalysis mechanism of Pd-promoted γ-alumina in the thermal decomposition of methane to hydrogen: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salam, M. Abdus; Abdullah, Bawadi, E-mail: bawadi_abdullah@utp.edu.my

    2017-02-15

    Thermo-catalytic methane decomposition to elemental hydrogen mechanism in transitional metals (Pd, Ni & Mo) promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalyst have been studied using the density functional theory (DFT). Decomposition reactions are spontaneous and favourable above 775 K for all promoter. Pd-promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalyst demonstrates a breakthrough decomposition activity in hydrogen production as compared to Ni− and Mo-promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalysts. The activation energy (E{sub a}) range of the catalysis for Pd promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalysts is 0.003–0.34 eV. Whereas, Ni and Mo promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalysts display activation energy E{sub a} in the range of 0.63–1.15 eV and 0.04–5.98 eV, respectively. Pd-promoted catalyst also shows a higher adsorption energy (−0.68 eV) and reactivity than that of Ni and Mo promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalysts. The rates of successive decomposition of methane are found to be 16.15 × 10{sup 12}, 15.95 × 10{sup 12} and 16.09 × 10{sup 12} s{sup −1} for the promoter of Pd, Ni and Mo, respectively. Pd promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalyst reduces the methane decomposition temperature (775 K) and deactivation rate significantly. The catalytic conditions and catalyst is promising in producing hydrogen to support hydrogen economy. - Highlights: • Transition metals (Pd, Ni & Mo) promoted γ-alumina catalysts are designed successfully. • Pd-promoted catalyst showed breakthrough activity in methane decomposition to hydrogen. • DFT study explored the catalysis mechanism of methane decomposition at atomic level. • Pd-promoted catalyst reduced temperature and activation barrier of methane decomposition reaction significantly.

  12. CFD based exploration of the dry-low-NOx hydrogen micromix combustion technology at increased energy densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Haj Ayed

    2017-03-01

    The study reveals great optimization potential of the micromix combustion technology with respect to the DLN characteristics and gives insight into the impact of geometry modifications on flame structure and NOx emission. This allows to further increase the energy density of the micromix burners and to integrate this technology in industrial gas turbines.

  13. Direct alcohol fuel cells: toward the power densities of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanxin; Bellini, Marco; Bevilacqua, Manuela; Fornasiero, Paolo; Lavacchi, Alessandro; Miller, Hamish A; Wang, Lianqin; Vizza, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    A 2 μm thick layer of TiO2 nanotube arrays was prepared on the surface of the Ti fibers of a nonwoven web electrode. After it was doped with Pd nanoparticles (1.5 mgPd  cm(-2) ), this anode was employed in a direct alcohol fuel cell. Peak power densities of 210, 170, and 160 mW cm(-2) at 80 °C were produced if the cell was fed with 10 wt % aqueous solutions of ethanol, ethylene glycol, and glycerol, respectively, in 2 M aqueous KOH. The Pd loading of the anode was increased to 6 mg cm(-2) by combining four single electrodes to produce a maximum peak power density with ethanol at 80 °C of 335 mW cm(-2) . Such high power densities result from a combination of the open 3 D structure of the anode electrode and the high electrochemically active surface area of the Pd catalyst, which promote very fast kinetics for alcohol electro-oxidation. The peak power and current densities obtained with ethanol at 80 °C approach the output of H2 -fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Low-Density and High Porosity Hydrogen Storage Materials Built from Ultra-Light Elements. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Pingyun [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2014-01-10

    A number of significant advances have been achieved, opening up new opportunities for the synthetic development of novel porous materials and their energy-related applications including gas storage and separation and catalysis. These include lithium-based metal-organic frameworks, magnesium-based metal-organic frameworks, and high gas uptake in porous frameworks with high density of open donor sites.

  15. Room temperature photoluminescence spectrum modeling of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide thin films by a joint density of tail states approach and its application to plasma deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sel, Kıvanç; Güneş, İbrahim

    2012-01-01

    Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC x :H) thin films was modeled by a joint density of tail states approach. In the frame of these analyses, the density of tail states was defined in terms of empirical Gaussian functions for conduction and valance bands. The PL spectrum was represented in terms of an integral of joint density of states functions and Fermi distribution function. The analyses were performed for various values of energy band gap, Fermi energy and disorder parameter, which is a parameter that represents the width of the energy band tails. Finally, the model was applied to the measured room temperature PL spectra of a-SiC x :H thin films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, with various carbon contents, which were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The energy band gap and disorder parameters of the conduction and valance band tails were determined and compared with the optical energies and Urbach energies, obtained by UV–Visible transmittance measurements. As a result of the analyses, it was observed that the proposed model sufficiently represents the room temperature PL spectra of a-SiC x :H thin films. - Highlights: ► Photoluminescence spectra (PL) of the films were modeled. ► In the model, joint density of tail states and Fermi distribution function are used. ► Various values of energy band gap, Fermi energy and disorder parameter are applied. ► The model was applied to the measured PL of the films. ► The proposed model represented the room temperature PL spectrum of the films.

  16. Evaluation of hydrogen bond networks in cellulose Iβ and II crystals using density functional theory and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Daichi; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Mazeau, Karim; Ueda, Kazuyoshi

    2017-09-08

    Crystal models of cellulose Iβ and II, which contain various hydrogen bonding (HB) networks, were analyzed using density functional theory and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations. From the CPMD trajectories, the power spectra of the velocity correlation functions of hydroxyl groups involved in hydrogen bonds were calculated. For the Iβ allomorph, HB network A, which is dominant according to the neutron diffraction data, was stable, and the power spectrum represented the essential features of the experimental IR spectra. In contrast, network B, which is a minor structure, was unstable because its hydroxymethyl groups reoriented during the CPMD simulation, yielding a different crystal structure to that determined by experiments. For the II allomorph, a HB network A is proposed based on diffraction data, whereas molecular modeling identifies an alternative network B. Our simulations showed that the interaction energies of the cellulose II (B) model are slightly more favorable than model II(A). However, the evaluation of the free energy should be waited for the accurate determination from the energy point of view. For the IR calculation, cellulose II (B) model reproduces the spectra better than model II (A). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ASRDI oxygen technology survey. Volume 5: Density and liquid level measurement instrumentation for the cryogenic fluids oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, H. M.

    1974-01-01

    Information is presented on instrumentation for density measurement, liquid level measurement, quantity gauging, and phase measurement. Coverage of existing information directly concerned with oxygen was given primary emphasis. A description of the physical principle of measurement for each instrumentation type is included. The basic materials of construction are listed if available from the source document for each instrument discussed. Cleaning requirements, procedures, and verification techniques are included.

  18. Dropouts and Compliance in Exercise Interventions Targeting Bone Mineral Density in Adults: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Kelley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dropouts and compliance to exercise interventions targeting bone mineral density (BMD in adults are not well established. The purpose of this study was to address that gap. Methods. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled exercise intervention trials in adults ≥18 years of age. The primary outcomes were dropouts in the exercise and control groups as well as compliance to the exercise interventions. A random-effects model was used to pool results. Moderator analyses were conducted using mixed-effects ANOVA-like models and metaregression. Statistical significance was set at . Results. Thirty-six studies representing 3,297 participants (1,855 exercise, 1,442 control were included. Dropout rates in the exercise and control groups averaged 20.9% (95% CI 16.7%–25.9% and 15.9% (11.8%–21.1% while compliance to exercise was 76.3% (71.7%–80.3%. For both exercise and control groups, greater dropout rates were associated with studies conducted in the USA versus other countries, females versus males, premenopausal versus postmenopausal women, younger versus older participants, longer studies (controls only, and high- versus moderate-intensity training (exercisers only. Greater compliance to exercise was associated with being female, home- or facility-based exercise versus both, and shorter studies. Conclusion. These findings provide important information for researchers and practitioners with respect to exercise programs targeting BMD in adults.

  19. MiR-130a regulates neurite outgrowth and dendritic spine density by targeting MeCP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjia Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT MicroRNAs (miRNAs are critical for both development and function of the central nervous system. Significant evidence suggests that abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. MeCP2 protein is an epigenetic regulator repressing or activating gene transcription by binding to methylated DNA. Both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations in the MECP2 gene lead to neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome, autism and MECP2 duplication syndrome. In this study, we demonstrate that miR-130a inhibits neurite outgrowth and reduces dendritic spine density as well as dendritic complexity. Bioinformatics analyses, cell cultures and biochemical experiments indicate that miR-130a targets MECP2 and down-regulates MeCP2 protein expression. Furthermore, expression of the wild-type MeCP2, but not a loss-of-function mutant, rescues the miR-130a-induced phenotype. Our study uncovers the MECP2 gene as a previous unknown target for miR-130a, supporting that miR-130a may play a role in neurodevelopment by regulating MeCP2. Together with data from other groups, our work suggests that a feedback regulatory mechanism involving both miR-130a and MeCP2 may serve to ensure their appropriate expression and function in neural development.

  20. IDOL, inducible degrader of low-density lipoprotein receptor, serves as a potential therapeutic target for dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cai-ping; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Min; Tuo, Qin-hui; Chen, Jian-xiong; Liao, Duan-fang

    2016-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is the hall marker for the atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). It has been shown that over 70% of circulating LDL-C is metabolized through binding and activation of hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR). Genetic LDLR mutations cause hypercholesterolemia in the patients. Therefore, elevation of LDLR levels is beneficial for the treatment of dyslipidemia. LDLR expression is regulated by the SREBP2/PCSK9 pathways. Targeting SREBP2/PCSK9 pathways by statins and human monoclonal PCSK9 antibody has been shown to reduce the progression of ASVCD. Recent studies identified that inducible degrader of LDLR (IDOL) is a novel regulator of LDLR. IDOL is an E3-ubiquitin ligase regulated via liver X receptors (LXRs) binding to the upstream of translation start site of IDOL. IDOL modulates LDLR distribution through ubiquitination and degradation of LDLR in lysosomes. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed that the nonsynonymous substitution rs9370867 of IDOL probably contributes to the variability of circulating LDL levels. Recently studies also demonstrated that IDOL influences PCSK9 expression in a LDLR/SREBP2-dependent manner. Based upon these novel findings, we hypothesize that IDOL and PCSK9 would have a synergistic effect on LDLR distribution. Specifically, loss of IDOL increases LDLR distribution in the hepatic cell, and subsequently reduces serum LDL-C levels in dyslipidemic patients. IDOL might be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of ASCVD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Laser imprint reduction for the critical-density foam buffered target driven by a relatively strong foot pulse at early stage of laser implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J. W., E-mail: li-jiwei@iapcm.ac.cn; He, X. T. [Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P. O. Box 8009, Beijing 100094 (China); Kang, W. [Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, J. H.; Zheng, W. D. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P. O. Box 8009, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2015-12-15

    In order to reduce the effect of laser imprint in direct-drive ignition scheme a low-density foam buffered target has been proposed. This target is driven by a laser pulse with a low-intensity foot at the early stage of implosion, which heats the foam and elongates the thermal conduction zone between the laser absorption region and ablation front, increasing the thermal smoothing effect. In this paper, a relatively strong foot pulse is adopted to irradiate the critical-density foam buffered target. The stronger foot, near 1 × 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, is able to drive a radiative shock in the low-density foam, which helps smooth the shock and further reduce the effect of laser imprint. The radiative shock also forms a double ablation front structure between the two ablation fronts to further stabilize the hydrodynamics, achieving the similar results to a target with a high-Z dopant in the ablator. 2D analysis shows that for the critical-density foam buffered target irradiated by the strong foot pulse, the laser imprint can be reduced due to the radiative shock in the foam and an increased thermal smoothing effect. It seems viable for the critical-density foam buffered target to be driven by a relatively strong foot pulse with the goal of reducing the laser imprint and achieving better implosion symmetry in the direct-drive laser fusion.

  2. Laser imprint reduction for the critical-density foam buffered target driven by a relatively strong foot pulse at early stage of laser implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J. W.; He, X. T.; Kang, W.; Li, J. H.; Zheng, W. D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce the effect of laser imprint in direct-drive ignition scheme a low-density foam buffered target has been proposed. This target is driven by a laser pulse with a low-intensity foot at the early stage of implosion, which heats the foam and elongates the thermal conduction zone between the laser absorption region and ablation front, increasing the thermal smoothing effect. In this paper, a relatively strong foot pulse is adopted to irradiate the critical-density foam buffered target. The stronger foot, near 1 × 10 14  W/cm 2 , is able to drive a radiative shock in the low-density foam, which helps smooth the shock and further reduce the effect of laser imprint. The radiative shock also forms a double ablation front structure between the two ablation fronts to further stabilize the hydrodynamics, achieving the similar results to a target with a high-Z dopant in the ablator. 2D analysis shows that for the critical-density foam buffered target irradiated by the strong foot pulse, the laser imprint can be reduced due to the radiative shock in the foam and an increased thermal smoothing effect. It seems viable for the critical-density foam buffered target to be driven by a relatively strong foot pulse with the goal of reducing the laser imprint and achieving better implosion symmetry in the direct-drive laser fusion

  3. Secretome Prediction of Two M. tuberculosis Clinical Isolates Reveals Their High Antigenic Density and Potential Drug Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo-Granados, Fernanda; Zatarain-Barrón, Zyanya L.; Cantu-Robles, Vito A.; Mendoza-Vargas, Alfredo; Molina-Romero, Camilo; Sánchez, Filiberto; Del Pozo-Yauner, Luis; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2017-01-01

    The Excreted/Secreted (ES) proteins play important roles during Mycobacterium tuberculosis invasion, virulence, and survival inside the host and they are a major source of immunogenic proteins. However, the molecular complexity of the bacillus cell wall has made difficult the experimental isolation of the total bacterial ES proteins. Here, we reported the genomes of two Beijing genotype M. tuberculosis clinical isolates obtained from patients from Vietnam (isolate 46) and South Africa (isolate 48). We developed a bioinformatics pipeline to predict their secretomes and observed that ~12% of the genome-encoded proteins are ES, being PE, PE-PGRS, and PPE the most abundant protein domains. Additionally, the Gene Ontology, KEGG pathways and Enzyme Classes annotations supported the expected functions for the secretomes. The ~70% of an experimental secretome compiled from literature was contained in our predicted secretomes, while only the 34–41% of the experimental secretome was contained in the two previously reported secretomes for H37Rv. These results suggest that our bioinformatics pipeline is better to predict a more complete set of ES proteins in M. tuberculosis genomes. The predicted ES proteins showed a significant higher antigenic density measured by Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value than the non-ES proteins and also compared to random constructed secretomes. Additionally, we predicted the secretomes for H37Rv, H37Ra, and two M. bovis BCG genomes. The antigenic density for BGG and for isolates 46 and 48 was higher than the observed for H37Rv and H37Ra secretomes. In addition, two sets of immunogenic proteins previously reported in patients with tuberculosis also showed a high antigenic density. Interestingly, mice infected with isolate 46 showed a significant lower survival rate than the ones infected with isolate 48 and both survival rates were lower than the one previously reported for the H37Rv in the same murine model. Finally, after a

  4. Electron density characteristics in bond critical point (QTAIM) versus interaction energy components (SAPT): the case of charge-assisted hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankiewicz, Barbara; Matczak, Piotr; Palusiak, Marcin

    2012-01-12

    Charge-assisted hydrogen bonds (CAHBs) of N-H···Cl, N-H···Br, and P-H···Cl type were investigated using advanced computational approach (MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory). The properties of electron density function defined in the framework of Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) were estimated as a function of distance in H-bridges. Additionally, the interaction energy decomposition was performed for H-bonded complexes with different H-bond lengths using the Symmetry-Adapted Perturbation Theory (SAPT). In this way both QTAIM parameters and SAPT energy components could be expressed as a function of the same variable, that is, the distance in H-bridge. A detailed analysis of the changes in QTAIM and SAPT parameters due to the changes in H···A distance revealed that, over some ranges of H···A distances, electrostatic, inductive and dispersive components of the SAPT interaction energy show a linear correlation with the value of the electron density at H-BCP ρ(BCP). The linear relation between the induction component, E(ind), and ρ(BCP) confirms numerically the intuitive expectation that the ρ(BCP) reflects directly the effects connected with the sharing of electron density between interacting centers. These conclusions are important in view of charge density studies performed for crystals in which the distance between atoms results not only from effects connected with the interaction between atomic centers directly involved in bonding, but also from packing effects which may strongly influence the length of the H-bond.

  5. Multi-unit inertial fusion plants based on HYLIFE-II, with shared heavy-ion RIA driver and target factory, producing electricity and hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, G.; Moir, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffman, M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-05-05

    Following is a modification of the IFEFUEL systems code, called IFEFUEL2, to treat specifically the HYLIFE-II target chamber concept. The same improved Recirculating Induction Accelerator (RIA) energy scaling model developed recently by Bieri is used in this survey of the economics of multi-unit IFE plants producing both electricity and hydrogen fuel. Reference cases will assume conventional HI-indirect target gains for a 2 mm spot, and improved HYLIFE-II BoP models as per Hoffman. Credits for improved plant availability and lower operating costs due to HYLIFE-II`s 30-yr target chamber lifetime are included, as well as unit cost reductions suggested by Delene to credit greater {open_quotes}learning curve{close_quotes} benefits for the duplicated portions of a multi-unit plant. To illustrate the potential impact of more advanced assumptions, additional {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} cases will consider the possible benefits of an MHD + Steam BoP, where direct MHD conversion of plasma from baseball-size LiH target blanket shells is assumed to be possible in a new (as yet undesigned) liquid Flibe-walled target chamber, together and separately, with advanced, higher-gain heavy-ion targets with Fast Ignitors. These runs may help decide the course of a possible future {open_quotes}HYLIFE-III{close_quotes} IFE study. Beam switchyard and final focusing system costs per target chamber are assumed to be consistent with single-sided illumination, for either {open_quotes}conventional{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}advanced{close_quotes} indirect target gain assumptions. Target costs are scaled according to the model by Woodworth. In all cases, the driver energy and rep rate for each chosen number of target chambers and total plant output will be optimized to minimize the cost of electricity (CoE) and the associated cost of hydrogen (CoH), using a relationship between CoE and CoH to be presented in the next section.

  6. Simulation of density fluctuations before the L-H transition for Hydrogen and Deuterium plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak using the BOUT++ code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. M.; Xu, X. Q.; Yan, Z.; Mckee, G. R.; Grierson, B. A.; Xia, T. Y.; Gao, X.

    2018-02-01

    A six-field two-fluid model has been used to simulate density fluctuations. The equilibrium is generated by experimental measurements for both Deuterium (D) and Hydrogen (H) plasmas at the lowest densities of DIII-D low to high confinement (L-H) transition experiments. In linear simulations, the unstable modes are found to be resistive ballooning modes with the most unstable mode number n  =  30 or k_θρ_i˜0.12 . The ion diamagnetic drift and E× B convection flow are balanced when the radial electric field (E r ) is calculated from the pressure profile without net flow. The curvature drift plays an important role in this stage. Two poloidally counter propagating modes are found in the nonlinear simulation of the D plasma at electron density n_e˜1.5×1019 m-3 near the separatrix while a single ion mode is found in the H plasma at the similar lower density, which are consistent with the experimental results measured by the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak. The frequency of the electron modes and the ion modes are about 40 kHz and 10 kHz respectively. The poloidal wave number k_θ is about 0.2 cm -1 (k_θρ_i˜0.05 ) for both ion and electron modes. The particle flux, ion and electron heat fluxes are  ˜3.5-6 times larger for the H plasma than the D plasma, which makes it harder to achieve H-mode for the same heating power. The change of the atomic mass number A from 2 to 1 using D plasma equilibrium make little difference on the flux. Increase the electric field will suppress the density fluctuation. The electric field scan and ion mass scan results show that the dual-mode results primarily from differences in the profiles rather than the ion mass.

  7. High energy density physics effects predicted in simulations of the CERN HiRadMat beam-target interaction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, N. A.; Burkart, F.; Schmidt, R.; Shutov, A.; Wollmann, D.; Piriz, A. R.

    2016-12-01

    Experiments have been done at the CERN HiRadMat (High Radiation to Materials) facility in which large cylindrical copper targets were irradiated with 440 GeV proton beam generated by the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). The primary purpose of these experiments was to confirm the existence of hydrodynamic tunneling of ultra-relativistic protons and their hadronic shower in solid materials, that was predicted by previous numerical simulations. The experimental measurements have shown very good agreement with the simulation results. This provides confidence in our simulations of the interaction of the 7 TeV LHC (Large Hadron Collider) protons and the 50 TeV Future Circular Collider (FCC) protons with solid materials, respectively. This work is important from the machine protection point of view. The numerical simulations have also shown that in the HiRadMat experiments, a significant part of thetarget material is be converted into different phases of High Energy Density (HED) matter, including two-phase solid-liquid mixture, expanded as well as compressed hot liquid phases, two-phase liquid-gas mixture and gaseous state. The HiRadMat facility is therefore a unique ion beam facility worldwide that is currently available for studying the thermophysical properties of HED matter. In the present paper we discuss the numerical simulation results and present a comparison with the experimental measurements.

  8. Study of high gain spherical shell ICF targets containing uniform layers of liquid deuterium tritium fuel. A numericial model for analyzing thermal layering of liquid mixtures of hydrogen isotopes inside a spherical inertial confinement fusion target: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, E.M.; Kim, Kyekyoon

    1994-05-01

    A numerical model has been developed to describe the thermally induced behavior of a liquid layer of hydrogen isotopes inside a spherical Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target and to calculate the far-field temperature gradient which will sustain a uniform liquid layer. This method is much faster than the trial-and-error method previously employed. The governing equations are the equations of continuity, momentum, energy, mass diffusion-convection, and conservation of the individual isotopic species. Ordinary and thermal diffusion equations for the diffusion of fluxes of the species are included. These coupled equations are solved by a finite-difference method using upwind schemes, variable mesh, and rigorous boundary conditions. The solution methodology unique to the present problem is discussed in detail. in particular, the significance of the surface tension gradient driven flows (also called Marangoni flows) in forming uniform liquid layers inside ICF targets is demonstrated. Using the theoretical model, the values of the externally applied thermal gradients that give rise to uniform liquid layers of hydrogen inside a cryogenic spherical-shell ICF target are calculated, and the results compared with the existing experimental data

  9. Modeling of stimulated Brillouin scattering near the critical-density surface in the plasmas of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximov, A.V.; Myatt, J.; Seka, W.; Short, R.W.; Craxton, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    OAK-B135 The nonlinear propagation of laser beams, smoothed by spatial and temporal bandwidth, near the critical density surface of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been modeled. The interplay between filamentation and forward and backward stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) is described in the presence of light reflected from the critical density surface and high absorption of light near the critical density. The spectrum of backscattered light develops a red shift due to SBS, which can be seeded by the reflection of light from the critical surface. The intensity of backscattered light decreases moderately as the bandwidth of smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) is increased

  10. A model of hydrogen impact induced chemical erosion of carbon based on elementary reaction steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittmann, M.; Kueppers, J.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the elementary reaction steps for chemical erosion of carbon by hydrogen a model is developed which allows to calculate the amount of carbon erosion at a hydrogenated carbon surface under the impact of hydrogen ions and neutrals. Hydrogen ion and neutral flux energy distributions prevailing at target plates in the ASDEX upgrade experiment are chosen in the present calculation. The range of hydrogen particles in the target plates is calculated using TRIDYN code. Based upon the TRIDYN results the extent of the erosion reaction as a function of depth is estimated. The results show that both, target temperature and impinging particle flux energy distribution, determine the hydrogen flux density dependent erosion yield and the location of the erosion below the surface. (orig.)

  11. Direct sputtering- and electro-deposition of gold coating onto the closed surface of ultralow-density carbon-hydrogen foam cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Jiaqiu; Yin, Jialing; Zhang, Hao; Yao, Mengqi; Hu, Wencheng, E-mail: huwc@uestc.edu.cn

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The surface pores of P(DVB/St) foam cylinder are sealed by CVD method. • Gold film was deposited on the surface of foam cylinder by magnetron sputtering. • Electroless plating was excluded in the present experiments. • The gold coatings were thickened through the electrodeposition process. - Abstract: This work aimed to fabricate a gold coating on the surface of ultralow-density carbon-hydrogen foam cylinder without electroless plating. Poly (divinylbenzene/styrene) foam cylinder was synthetized by high internal phase emulsion, and chemical vapor deposition polymerization approach was used to form a compact poly-p-xylylene film on the foam cylinder. Conducting gold thin films were directly deposited onto the poly-p-xylylene-modified foam cylinder by magnetron sputtering, and electrochemical deposition was adopted to thicken the gold coatings. The micro-structures and morphologies of poly (divinylbenzene/styrene) foam cylinder and gold coating were observed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The gold coating content was investigated by energy-dispersive X-ray. The thicknesses of poly-p-xylylene coating and sputtered gold thin-film were approximately 500 and 100 nm, respectively. After electrochemical deposition, the thickness of gold coating increased to 522 nm, and the gold coating achieved a compact and uniform structure.

  12. Contribution of Pentose Catabolism to Molecular Hydrogen Formation by Targeted Disruption of Arabinose Isomerase (araA) in the Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga maritima

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Derrick; Singh, Raghuveer; Rudrappa, Deepak; Mateo, Jackie; Kramer, Levi; Freese, Laura

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thermotoga maritima ferments a broad range of sugars to form acetate, carbon dioxide, traces of lactate, and near theoretic yields of molecular hydrogen (H2). In this organism, the catabolism of pentose sugars such as arabinose depends on the interaction of the pentose phosphate pathway with the Embden-Myerhoff and Entner-Doudoroff pathways. Although the values for H2 yield have been determined using pentose-supplemented complex medium and predicted by metabolic pathway reconstruction, the actual effect of pathway elimination on hydrogen production has not been reported due to the lack of a genetic method for the creation of targeted mutations. Here, a spontaneous and genetically stable pyrE deletion mutant was isolated and used as a recipient to refine transformation methods for its repair by homologous recombination. To verify the occurrence of recombination and to assess the frequency of crossover events flanking the deleted region, a synthetic pyrE allele, encoding synonymous nucleotide substitutions, was used. Targeted inactivation of araA (encoding arabinose isomerase) in the pyrE mutant was accomplished using a divergent, codon-optimized Thermosipho africanus pyrE allele fused to the T. maritima groES promoter as a genetic marker. Mutants lacking araA were unable to catabolize arabinose in a defined medium. The araA mutation was then repaired using targeted recombination. Levels of synthesis of H2 using arabinose-supplemented complex medium by wild-type and araA mutant cell lines were compared. The difference between strains provided a direct measurement of H2 production that was dependent on arabinose consumption. Development of a targeted recombination system for genetic manipulation of T. maritima provides a new strategy to explore H2 formation and life at an extremely high temperature in the bacterial domain. IMPORTANCE We describe here the development of a genetic system for manipulation of Thermotoga maritima. T. maritima is a

  13. Study of Hydrogen As An Aircraft Fuel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ciaravino, J

    2003-01-01

    .... The biggest obstacle to using hydrogen is its very low density, a property that even combined with hydrogen's high heat of combustion still results in very large fuel tanks. Liquid hydrogen (LH2...

  14. Single-Spin Asymmetries in Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized Hydrogen Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z.; Amarian, M.; Andrus, A.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Augustyniak, W.; Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A.; Avetissian, E.; Bacchetta, A.; Bailey, P.; Balin, D.; Beckmann, M.; Belostotski, S.; Bianchi, N.; Blok, H. P.; Böttcher, H.; Borissov, A.; Borysenko, A.; Bouwhuis, M.; Brüll, A.; Bryzgalov, V.; Capitani, G. P.; Cappiluppi, M.; Chen, T.; Ciullo, G.; Contalbrigo, M.; Dalpiaz, P. F.; Leo, R. De; Demey, M.; Nardo, L. De; Sanctis, E. De; Devitsin, E.; Nezza, P. Di; Düren, M.; Ehrenfried, M.; Elalaoui-Moulay, A.; Elbakian, G.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elschenbroich, U.; Fabbri, R.; Fantoni, A.; Fechtchenko, A.; Felawka, L.; Frullani, S.; Gapienko, G.; Gapienko, V.; Garibaldi, F.; Garrow, K.; Gavrilov, G.; Gharibyan, V.; Grebeniouk, O.; Gregor, I. M.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hafidi, K.; Hartig, M.; Hasch, D.; Henoch, M.; Hesselink, W. H.; Hillenbrand, A.; Hoek, M.; Holler, Y.; Hommez, B.; Hristova, I.; Iarygin, G.; Ilyichev, A.; Ivanilov, A.; Izotov, A.; Jackson, H. E.; Jgoun, A.; Kaiser, R.; Kinney, E.; Kisselev, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kopytin, M.; Korotkov, V.; Kozlov, V.; Krauss, B.; Krivokhijine, V. G.; Lagamba, L.; Lapikás, L.; Laziev, A.; Lenisa, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden-Levy, L. A.; Lorenzon, W.; Lu, H.; Lu, J.; Lu, S.; Ma, B.-Q.; Maiheu, B.; Makins, N. C.; Mao, Y.; Marianski, B.; Marukyan, H.; Masoli, F.; Mexner, V.; Meyners, N.; Michler, T.; Mikloukho, O.; Miller, C. A.; Miyachi, Y.; Muccifora, V.; Nagaitsev, A.; Nappi, E.; Naryshkin, Y.; Nass, A.; Negodaev, M.; Nowak, W.-D.; Oganessyan, K.; Ohsuga, H.; Osborne, A.; Pickert, N.; Potterveld, D. H.; Raithel, M.; Reggiani, D.; Reimer, P. E.; Reischl, A.; Reolon, A. R.; Riedl, C.; Rith, K.; Rosner, G.; Rostomyan, A.; Rubacek, L.; Rubin, J.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salomatin, Y.; Sanjiev, I.; Savin, I.; Schäfer, A.; Schill, C.; Schnell, G.; Schüler, K. P.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seitz, B.; Shanidze, R.; Shearer, C.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shutov, V.; Sinram, K.; Sommer, W.; Stancari, M.; Statera, M.; Steffens, E.; Steijger, J. J.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, J.; Stinzing, F.; Tait, P.; Tanaka, H.; Taroian, S.; Tchuiko, B.; Terkulov, A.; Trzcinski, A.; Tytgat, M.; Vandenbroucke, A.; van der Nat, P. B.; van der Steenhoven, G.; van Haarlem, Y.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vikhrov, V.; Vincter, M. G.; Vogel, C.; Volmer, J.; Wang, S.; Wendland, J.; Wilbert, J.; Smit, G. Ybeles; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yen, S.; Zihlmann, B.; Zupranski, P.

    2005-01-01

    Single-spin asymmetries for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering of positrons are measured for the first time with transverse target polarization. The asymmetry depends on the azimuthal angles of both the pion (ϕ) and the target spin axis (ϕS) about the virtual-photon direction and relative to the lepton scattering plane. The extracted Fourier component πUT is a signal of the previously unmeasured quark transversity distribution, in conjunction with the Collins fragmentation function, also unknown. The component πUT arises from a correlation between the transverse polarization of the target nucleon and the intrinsic transverse momentum of quarks, as represented by the previously unmeasured Sivers distribution function. Evidence for both signals is observed, but the Sivers asymmetry may be affected by exclusive vector meson production.

  15. Development of an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer for fast density profile measurements of dense plasmas generated by beam-target interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dan [National Security Technol., LLC, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berninger, M; Meidinger, A; Stutman, Dan; Valdivia, Maria Pia

    2015-05-01

    For the first time an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer is being developed that will use a flash tube source and fast detector for dynamic density gradient measurements. In Talbot-Lau moire deflectometry, an x-ray grating makes an image of itself on a second grating (the Talbot effect) to produce a moire pattern on a detector. The test object is placed between these gratings, with variations in index of refraction changing the pattern. A third grating in front of an incoherent x-ray source produces an array of coherent sources. With a 150 kV x-ray flash tube as the source, the gratings are placed in a glancing angle setup for performance at ~60 keV. The detector is a gated CCD with a fast scintillator for x-ray conversion. This diagnostic, designed for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, measures the density profile of dense plasma plumes ejected from beam-target interactions. DARHT has two high-current, pulsed, inductive linear electron accelerators with bremsstrahlung targets at the end of each beam line to create 2-D radiographic images of hydrodynamic tests. One multi-pulse accelerator has up to four beam pulses striking the same target within 2 μs. Computer simulations that model target evolution and ejected material between pulses are used to design these targets for optimal radiographic performance; the x-ray deflectometer will directly measure density gradients in the ejected plumes and provide the first experimental constraints to these models. During the first year, currently underway, the diagnostic systems are being designed. In year two, the flash tube and fast detector will be deployed at DARHT for radiographic imaging while the deflectometer is built and tested on the bench with a continuous source. Finally, in year three, the fast deflectometer will be installed on DARHT and density measurements will be performed.

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF DOPED NANOPOROUS CARBONS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueking, Angela D.; Li, Qixiu; Badding, John V.; Fonseca, Dania; Gutierrez, Humerto; Sakti, Apurba; Adu, Kofi; Schimmel, Michael

    2010-03-31

    Hydrogen storage materials based on the hydrogen spillover mechanism onto metal-doped nanoporous carbons are studied, in an effort to develop materials that store appreciable hydrogen at ambient temperatures and moderate pressures. We demonstrate that oxidation of the carbon surface can significantly increase the hydrogen uptake of these materials, primarily at low pressure. Trace water present in the system plays a role in the development of active sites, and may further be used as a strategy to increase uptake. Increased surface density of oxygen groups led to a significant enhancement of hydrogen spillover at pressures less than 100 milibar. At 300K, the hydrogen uptake was up to 1.1 wt. % at 100 mbar and increased to 1.4 wt. % at 20 bar. However, only 0.4 wt% of this was desorbable via a pressure reduction at room temperature, and the high lowpressure hydrogen uptake was found only when trace water was present during pretreatment. Although far from DOE hydrogen storage targets, storage at ambient temperature has significant practical advantages oner cryogenic physical adsorbents. The role of trace water in surface modification has significant implications for reproducibility in the field. High-pressure in situ characterization of ideal carbon surfaces in hydrogen suggests re-hybridization is not likely under conditions of practical interest. Advanced characterization is used to probe carbon-hydrogen-metal interactions in a number of systems and new carbon materials have been developed.

  17. Design of immuno-enzymosomes with maximum enzyme targeting capability : effect of the enzyme density on the enzyme targeting capability and cell binding properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca, MJ; Haisma, HJ; Klaasen, S; Vingerhoeds, MH; Storm, G

    1999-01-01

    Immuno-enzymosomes have been proposed for the targeting of enzymes to cancer cells to achieve site specific activation of anticancer prodrugs. Previously, we reported that the enzyme beta-glucuronidase (GUS), capable of activating anthracycline-glucuronide prodrugs, can be coupled to the surface of

  18. Hydrogen dissociation and incorporation on Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12}(100) surface: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, Hua [Guangxi Key Laboratory for Relativistic Astrophysics, Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Novel Energy Materials and Related Technology, College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Guangxi Collaborative Innovation Center of Structure and Property for New Energy and Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Zhou, Zhiyan; Zhang, Ziyan [Guangxi Key Laboratory for Relativistic Astrophysics, Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Novel Energy Materials and Related Technology, College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Zhou, Wenzheng; Li, Guangxu [Guangxi Key Laboratory for Relativistic Astrophysics, Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Novel Energy Materials and Related Technology, College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Guangxi Collaborative Innovation Center of Structure and Property for New Energy and Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Guo, Jin, E-mail: guojin@gxu.edu.cn [Guangxi Key Laboratory for Relativistic Astrophysics, Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Novel Energy Materials and Related Technology, College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Guangxi Collaborative Innovation Center of Structure and Property for New Energy and Materials, School of Material Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Hydrogen adsorption, dissociation, and penetration on (in) Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} (100) surface are studied. • Hydrogen molecules are dissociated on the surface with barrier of 0.63 eV. • The maximum barrier energy for atomic hydrogen penetration into the subsurface is ∼0.7 eV. • The hybridization between the s orbital of H and the s orbitals of Mg is major. - Abstract: Hydrogen adsorption, dissociation, and penetration on (in) Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} (100) surface are studied extensively by DFT total-energy calculations. The adsorption geometries, dissociation barriers, various diffusion pathways, penetrative processes, and electronic structures were investigated. Results show that the atomic and molecular hydrogen forms prefer to be adsorbed on the Mg3-Mg3 bridge sites (C sites). Hydrogen molecules are dissociated on the surface with the minimum barrier energy of 0.63 eV. There are two stages in the process of hydrogen incorporation, which are hydrogen diffusion on the surface and the penetration from the surface into the subsurface. Two possible pathways of atomic hydrogen penetration from surface into subsurface are found. The calculations of electronic structures show that the hybridization between the s orbital of H and the s orbitals of Mg is major. The Mg-Mg bond on the outmost surface is shortened from 4.48 Å to 3.30 Å after the hydrogen adsorption on C sites, showing the strong interaction between Mg and H atoms.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detection of Tumor Cells by Targeting Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptors with Gd-Loaded Low-Density Lipoprotein Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Geninatti Crich

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17 are lipophilic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI agents that display high affinity for low-density lipoprotein (LDL particles. However, on binding to LDL, Gd-DO3A-diph shows a decreased hydration that results in a lower enhancement of water proton relaxation rate. Conversely, GdAAZTAC17 displays a strong relaxation enhancement at the imaging fields. Each LDL particle can load up to 100 and 400 UNITS of Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17, respectively. Their LDL adducts are taken up by human hepatoblastoma G2 (HepG2 and melanoma B16 tumor cells when added to the incubation medium. T, measurements of the labeled cells indicate that Gd-AAZTAC17 is significantly more efficient than Gd-DO3A-diph. Furthermore, it has been found that HepG2 hepatoma cells can internalize higher amounts of Gd-AAZTAC17 than B16 cells and the involvement of LDL receptors (LDLRs has been demonstrated in competition assays with free LDL. Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct proved to be an efficient probe in the magnetic resonance (MR visualization of subcutaneous tumors in animal models obtained by injecting B16 melanoma cells into the right flank of mice. Finally, confocal microscopy validation of the distribution of LDL-based probes in the tumor has been obtained by doping the Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct with a fluorescent phospholipid moiety.

  20. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  1. Preparation of MoSex>3/Mo-NPs catalytic films for enhanced hydrogen evolution by pulsed laser ablation of MoSe2 target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fominski, V. Yu.; Romanov, R. I.; Fominski, D. V.; Shelyakov, A. V.

    2018-02-01

    The peculiarities of pulsed laser ablation of MoSe2 targets which caused the formation of a complex plume containing atoms (Mo and Se) and Mo nanoparticles (Mo-NPs) have been studied. Investigations of the composition, structure, and catalytic activity toward the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) for MoSex/Mo-NPs films prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in a vacuum and in a buffer He gas were carried out. For He pressure of 30 Pa, a shock wave could be the dominant mechanism of material transport, resulting in the deposition of an Se-enriched flux of chemically active atoms and leading to the growth of amorphous films with an increased Se content. Mo nanoparticles allowed for a larger surface area of the MoSex∼3.1/Mo-NPs catalyst deposited 5 cm from the target. However, for deposition in He at 10 cm, the amount of Mo NPs in the film appreciably decreased. Factors that could impact on the transport of nanoparticles through a buffer gas were considered. The amorphous MoSex∼3.1/Mo-NPs films prepared by PLD in He gas exhibited excellent HER performance. Quasicrystal MoSex<2/Mo-NPs films obtained by vacuum PLD were obviously inferior to amorphous films. Despite the formation of edge-oriented MoSe2 nanocrystals, the vacuum-deposited films had a large majority of metallic Mo and a deficiency of Se, which could adversely affect their HER performance.

  2. DETERMINATION OF THE ABSOLUTE EXCITED-STATE DENSITY OF A SODIUM TARGET BY MEANS OF BEAM DEFLECTION MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERSEMA, WP; SCHLATMANN, AR; MORGENSTERN, R

    1994-01-01

    The average deflection of a laser excited, divergent sodium beam with a broad velocity distribution is measured by means of a Langmuir-Taylor detector and exploited for determining the absolute density of the excited state in the interaction area. Simulations of the excitation and deflection process

  3. Advanced Approaches to Greatly Reduce Hydrogen Gas Crossover Losses in PEM Electrolyzers Operating at High Pressures and Low Current Densities, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ElectroChem proposes a Phase II program to advance its very successful SBIR Phase I technology effort to the point of minimum hydrogen loss through the electrolyzer...

  4. Impact of hydrogenated fat consumption on endogenous cholesterol synthesis and susceptibility of low-density lipoprotein to oxidation in moderately hypercholesterolemic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuchel, M; Schwab, U S; Jones, P J; Vogel, S; Lammi-Keefe, C; Li, Z; Ordovas, J; McNamara, J R; Schaefer, E J; Lichtenstein, A H

    1996-02-01

    The effects of replacing corn oil with corn oil margarine in stick form on endogenous cholesterol synthesis and susceptibility of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidation were assessed in 14 middle-aged and elderly men and women aged 63 +/- 12 years (mean +/- SD) with moderate hypercholesterolemia (mean LDL-cholesterol [LDL-C], 4.24 +/- 0.59 mmol/L at the time of recruitment). Subjects consumed each of two diets for 32-day periods, one enriched in corn oil, which contained 30% of energy as fat (7% saturated fatty acid [SFA], 9% monounsaturated fatty acid [MUFA] [0.4% 18:1n9 trans], and 11% polyunsaturated fatty acid [PUFA]) and 85 mg cholesterol/4.2 MJ, and one enriched in stick corn oil margarine, which contained 30% fat (8% SFA, 12% MUFA [4.2% 18:1n9trans], and 8% PUFA) and 77 mg cholesterol/4.2 MJ. Both diets were isocaloric and supplied by a metabolic research kitchen. Mean total cholesterol levels were lowest (P = .039) when subjects consumed the corn oil-enriched diet (5.01 +/- 0.51 mmol/L) as compared with the margarine-enriched diet (5.30 +/- 0.58 mmol/L). LDL-C levels were 3.24 +/- 0.51 and 3.50 +/- 0.54 mmol/L when subjects consumed corn oil-and margarine-enriched diets, respectively (P = .058). There were no significant differences in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) or triglyceride concentrations between the two experimental periods. Consumption of the margarine-enriched diet versus the corn oil-enriched diet tended to result in lower cholesterol fractional synthetic rates ([C-FSRs] 0.0466 +/- 0.0175 and 0.0668 +/- 0.0298, respectively, P = .080) and cholesterol absolute synthetic rates ([C-ASRs] 1.1761 +/- 0.5375 and 1.6954 +/- 0.8685, respectively, P = .092); however, differences did not reach statistical significance. Consumption of the margarine-enriched diet versus the corn oil-enriched diet resulted in a significantly higher concentration of alpha-tocopherol in both plasma and LDL(P = .004 and P = .011, respectively). LDL particle

  5. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) irreversibly inactivates creatine kinase from Pelodiscus sinensis by targeting the active site cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Lee, Jinhyuk; Hao, Hao; Park, Yong-Doo; Qian, Guo-Ying

    2017-12-01

    Creatine kinase (EC 2.7.3.2, CK) plays an important role in cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis by catalysing the transfer of phosphate between ATP and creatine phosphate. In this study, we investigated the effects of H 2 O 2 on PSCKM (muscle type creatine kinase from Pelodiscus sinensis) by the integrating method between enzyme kinetics and docking simulations. We found that H 2 O 2 strongly inactivated PSCKM (IC 50 =0.25mM) in a first-order kinetic process, and targeted the active site cysteine directly. A conformational study showed that H 2 O 2 did not induce the tertiary structural changes in PSCKM with no extensive exposure of hydrophobic surfaces. Sequential docking simulations between PSCKM and H 2 O 2 indicated that H 2 O 2 interacts with the ADP binding region of the active site, consistent with experimental results that demonstrated H 2 O 2 -induced inactivation. Our study demonstrates the effect of H 2 O 2 on PSCKM enzymatic function and unfolding, and provides important insight into the changes undergone by this central metabolic enzyme in ectothermic animals in response to the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipp, Ludwig [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Torrington, CT (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Conventional compressors have not been able to meet DOE targets for hydrogen refueling stations. They suffer from high capital cost, poor reliability and pose a risk of fuel contamination from lubricant oils. This project has significantly advanced the development of solid state hydrogen compressor technology for multiple applications. The project has achieved all of its major objectives. It has demonstrated capability of Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) technology to potentially meet the DOE targets for small compressors for refueling sites. It has quantified EHC cell performance and durability, including single stage hydrogen compression from near-atmospheric pressure to 12,800 psi and operation of EHC for more than 22,000 hours. Capital cost of EHC was reduced by 60%, enabling a path to meeting the DOE cost targets for hydrogen compression, storage and delivery ($2.00-2.15/gge by 2020).

  7. Prediction of hot electron production by ultraintense KrF laser-plasma interactions on solid-density targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Susumu; Takahashi, Eiichi; Miura, Eisuke; Owadano, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Kato, Tomokazu

    2002-01-01

    The scaling of hot electron temperature and the spectrum of electron energy by intense laser plasma interactions are reexamined from a viewpoint of the difference in laser wavelength. Laser plasma interaction such as parametric instabilities is usually determined by the Iλ2 scaling, where I and λ is the laser intensity and wavelength, respectively. However, the hot electron temperature is proportional to (ncr/ne0)1/2 [(1 + a 0 2 ) 1/2 - 1] rather than [(1 + a 0 2 ) 1/2 - 1] at the interaction with overdense plasmas, where ne0 is a electron density of overdense plasmas and a0 is a normalized laser intensity

  8. Cost-based optimizations of power density and target-blanket modularity for 232Th/233U-based ADEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    A cost-based parametric systems model is developed for an Accelerator-Driven Energy Production (ADEP) system based on a 232 Th/ 233 U fuel cycle and a molten-salt (LiF/BeF 2 /ThF 3 ) fluid-fuel primary system. Simplified neutron-balance, accelerator, reactor-core, chemical-processing, and balance-of-plant models are combined parametrically with a simplified costing model. The main focus of this model is to examine trade offs related to fission power density, reactor-core modularity, 233 U breeding rate, and fission product transmutation capacity

  9. Locating the rate-limiting step for the interaction of hydrogen with Mg(0001) using density-functional theory calculations and rate theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Tejs

    2004-01-01

    the nudged elastic band method, and rates of the activated processes are calculated within the harmonic approximation to transition state rate theory, using both classical and quantum partition functions based atomic vibrational frequencies calculated by DFT. The dissociation/recombination of H2 is found...... to be rate-limiting for the ab- and desorption of hydrogen, respectively. Zero-point energy contributions are found to be substantial for the diffusion of atomic hydrogen, but classical rates are still found to be within an order of magnitude at room temperature....

  10. Analysis of diffractive dissociation of K- into K-π+π- on a liquid hydrogen target at the compass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasinski, Prometeusz Kryspin

    2012-01-01

    The systematic exploration of excited meson and baryon states was the central topic of the COmmon Muon Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) physics program in the years 2008 and 2009 at the CERN facility. Particularly states non fitting a constituent quark model were searched for, identified by their exotic quantum numbers which are forbidden by a simple q anti q scheme. A high energetic hadron-beam on a fixed target yielded in resonances decaying into a large variety of final states. The diffractive and central production mechanisms allowed for a clean exclusive selection of channels such as π - p → π + π - π + p recoil , which then were analysed with a high precision and a huge number of events. Apart from the main pion component in the negative hadron beam a small fraction of kaons of about 2.5% allowed the study of light strange resonances in the K - π + π - decay channel. The best measurement in this channel was quoted to be so far the measurement of the WA03 experiment at CERN. The ACCMOR-collaboration has the data recorded and analysed with an experimental set-up very similar to the COMPASS-spectrometer. COMPASS had therefore not only the ability to remeasure this channel with a significantly higher number of events and better precision to cross-check those over 30 years old results. Moreover, improved analysis methods together with new evidences from other experiments, are expected to enlighten our present picture of the hadron spectrum. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of meson spectroscopy. The formation of bound quark anti-quark systems allows to interpret our measurements in terms of coupled quantum numbers, with properties as spin, charge conjugation and parity. Particularly kaonic isospin I=(1)/(2) resonances are classified as proposed by group theory and differences to I=1 and I=0 states, formed mainly by u and d quarks and their anti-quarks, are pointed out. That chapter introduces also the production mechanisms used to

  11. Application of a high-density gas laser target to the physics of x-ray lasers and coronal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronko, J.G.; Kohler, D.

    1996-01-01

    An experiment has been proposed to investigate a photopumped x-ray laser approach using a novel, high-density, laser heated supersonic gas jet plasma to prepare the lasant plasma. The scheme uses the He- like sodium 1.10027 nm line to pump the He-like neon 1s-4p transition at 1.10003 nm with the lasing transitions between the n=4 to n=2,3 states and the n=3 to n=2 state at 5.8 nm, 23.0 nm, and 8.2 nm, respectively. The experiment had been proposed in 1990 and funding began Jan. 1991; however circumstances made it impossible to pursue the research over the past 5 years, and it was decided not to pursue the research any further

  12. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor–Related Protein-1 Is a Therapeutic Target in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Toldo, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein-1 (LRP1 is a ubiquitous membrane receptor functioning as a scavenger and regulatory receptor, inducing anti-inflammatory and prosurvival signals. Based on the known structure–activity of the LRP1 receptor binding site, the authors synthesized a small peptide (SP16. SP16 induced a >50% reduction in infarct size (p < 0.001 and preservation of left ventricular systolic function (p < 0.001, and treatment with an LRP1 blocking antibody eliminated the protective effects of SP16. In conclusion, LRP1 activation with SP16 given within 30 min of reperfusion during experimental acute myocardial infarction leads to a cardioprotective signal reducing infarct size and preservation of cardiac systolic function.

  13. Influence of density on radiation-chemical yield of molecular hydrogen formed at radiolysis of aqueous solution of NaOH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarov, Y.D.; Hajiyeva, S.R.; Ramazanova, N.K.; Aliyev, S.M.; Alasgarov, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : In atom and nuclear energy the specialists knowledge about radiation-chemical yield of the initial products formed under the influence of ionizing rays on water is of great importance from the point of security. The radiation-chemical yields of molecular hydrogen have been defined according to the graph and the obtained results

  14. Profiles of plasma parameters and density of negative hydrogen ions by laser detachment measurements in RF-driven ion sources; Profile der Plasmaparameter und Dichte negativer Wasserstoffionen mittels Laserdetachmentmessungen in HF-angeregten Ionenquellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ-Koch, Sina

    2007-12-20

    This work shows the application of the Laserdetachment method for spatially resolved measurements of negative Hydrogen/Deuterium ion density. It was applied on a high power low pressure RF-driven ion source. The Laser detachment method is based on the measurement of electron currents on a positively biased Langmuir probe before and during/after a laser pulse. The density ratio of negative ions to electrons can be derived from the ratio of currents to the probe. The absolute density of negative ions can be obtained when the electron density is measured with the standard Langmuir probe setup. Measurements with the Langmuir probe additionally yield information about the floating and plasma potential, the electron temperature and the density of positive ions. The Laser detachment setup had to be adapted to the special conditions of the RF-driven source. In particular the existence of RF fields (1 MHz), high source potential (-20 kV), magnetic fields ({proportional_to} 7 mT) and caesium inside the source had to be considered. The density of negative ions could be identified in the range of n(H{sup -})=1.10{sup 17} 1/m{sup 3}, which is in the same order of magnitude as the electron density. Only the application of the Laser detachment method with the Langmuir probe measurements will yield spatially resolved plasma parameters and H- density profiles. The influence of diverse external parameters, such as pressure, RF-power, magnetic fields on the plasma parameters and their profiles were studied and explained. Hence, the measurements lead to a detailed understanding of the processes inside the source. (orig.)

  15. Experimental characterization of a strongly coupled solid density plasma generated in a short-pulse laser target interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregori, G.; Hansen, S.B.; Key, M.H.; King, J.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Park, H.; Patel, P.K.; Shepard, R.; Snavely, R.A.; Wilks, S.C.; Glenzer, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    We have measured high resolution copper Kα spectra from a picosecond high intensity laser produced plasma. By fitting the shape of the experimental spectra with a self-consistent-field model which includes all the relevant line shifts from multiply ionized atoms, we are able to infer time and spatially averaged electron temperatures (T e ) and ionization state (Z) in the foil. Our results show increasing values for T e and Z when the overall mass of the target is reduced. In particular, we measure temperatures in excess of 200 eV with Z ∼ 13-14. For these conditions the ion-ion coupling constant is Λ ii ∼ 8-9, thus suggesting the achievement of a strongly coupled plasma regime

  16. Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 6 (LRP6 Is a Novel Nutritional Therapeutic Target for Hyperlipidemia, Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, and Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwang-woong Go

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6 is a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family and has a unique structure, which facilitates its multiple functions as a co-receptor for Wnt/β-catenin signaling and as a ligand receptor for endocytosis. The role LRP6 plays in metabolic regulation, specifically in the nutrient-sensing pathway, has recently garnered considerable interest. Patients carrying an LRP6 mutation exhibit elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose, which cooperatively constitute the risk factors of metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Since the discovery of this mutation, the general role of LRP6 in lipid homeostasis, glucose metabolism, and atherosclerosis has been thoroughly researched. These studies have demonstrated that LRP6 plays a role in LDL receptor-mediated LDL uptake. In addition, when the LRP6 mutant impaired Wnt-LRP6 signaling, hyperlipidemia, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and atherosclerosis developed. LRP6 regulates lipid homeostasis and body fat mass via the nutrient-sensing mechanistic target of the rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Furthermore, the mutant LRP6 triggers atherosclerosis by activating platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-dependent vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation. This review highlights the exceptional opportunities to study the pathophysiologic contributions of LRP6 to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases, which implicate LRP6 as a latent regulator of lipid metabolism and a novel therapeutic target for nutritional intervention.

  17. Storing Renewable Energy in the Hydrogen Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züttel, Andreas; Callini, Elsa; Kato, Shunsuke; Atakli, Züleyha Özlem Kocabas

    2015-01-01

    An energy economy based on renewable energy requires massive energy storage, approx. half of the annual energy consumption. Therefore, the production of a synthetic energy carrier, e.g. hydrogen, is necessary. The hydrogen cycle, i.e. production of hydrogen from water by renewable energy, storage and use of hydrogen in fuel cells, combustion engines or turbines is a closed cycle. Electrolysis splits water into hydrogen and oxygen and represents a mature technology in the power range up to 100 kW. However, the major technological challenge is to build electrolyzers in the power range of several MW producing high purity hydrogen with a high efficiency. After the production of hydrogen, large scale and safe hydrogen storage is required. Hydrogen is stored either as a molecule or as an atom in the case of hydrides. The maximum volumetric hydrogen density of a molecular hydrogen storage is limited to the density of liquid hydrogen. In a complex hydride the hydrogen density is limited to 20 mass% and 150 kg/m(3) which corresponds to twice the density of liquid hydrogen. Current research focuses on the investigation of new storage materials based on combinations of complex hydrides with amides and the understanding of the hydrogen sorption mechanism in order to better control the reaction for the hydrogen storage applications.

  18. Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Storage Technology: Fundamental Research for Optimization of Hydrogen Storage and Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Nadavalath, Balakrishnan; Cornelius, Andrew; Hatchett, David; Bae, Chusung; Pang, Tao; Kim, Eunja; Hemmers, Oliver

    2011-03-28

    Design and development of improved low-cost hydrogen fuel cell catalytic materials and high-capacity hydrogenn storage media are paramount to enabling the hydrogen economy. Presently, effective and durable catalysts are mostly precious metals in pure or alloyed form and their high cost inhibits fuel cell applications. Similarly, materials that meet on-board hydrogen storage targets within total mass and volumetric constraints are yet to be found. Both hydrogen storage performance and cost-effective fuel cell designs are intimately linked to the electronic structure, morphology and cost of the chosen materials. The FCAST Project combined theoretical and experimental studies of electronic structure, chemical bonding, and hydrogen adsorption/desorption characteristics of a number of different nanomaterials and metal clusters to develop better fundamental understanding of hydrogen storage in solid state matrices. Additional experimental studies quantified the hydrogen storage properties of synthesized polyaniline(PANI)/Pd composites. Such conducting polymers are especially interesting because of their high intrinsic electron density and the ability to dope the materials with protons, anions, and metal species. Earlier work produced contradictory results: one study reported 7% to 8% hydrogen uptake while a second study reported zero hydrogen uptake. Cost and durability of fuel cell systems are crucial factors in their affordability. Limits on operating temperature, loss of catalytic reactivity and degradation of proton exchange membranes are factors that affect system durability and contribute to operational costs. More cost effective fuel cell components were sought through studies of the physical and chemical nature of catalyst performance, characterization of oxidation and reduction processes on system surfaces. Additional development effort resulted in a new hydrocarbon-based high-performance sulfonated proton exchange membrane (PEM) that can be manufactured at low

  19. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for lung tumors: the potential value of target immobilization and reduced lung density in dose escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, J.; Debois, M.M.; Raben, A.; Mageras, G.S.; Lutz, W.R.; Mychalczak, B.; Schwartz, L.H.; Gloeggler, P.J.; Leibel, S.A.; Fuks, Z.; Kutcher, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Lung tumors are subject to movement due to respiratory motion. Conventionally, a margin is applied to the clinical target volume (CTV) to account for this and other treatment uncertainties. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric benefits of a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique which has two distinct features - deep inspiration which reduces lung density and breath-hold which immobilizes lung tumors. Both properties can potentially reduce the mass of normal lung tissue in the high dose region, thus improving the possibility of dose escalation. Methods and Materials: To study the efficacy of the DIBH technique, CT scans are acquired for each patient under 4 respiration conditions: free-breathing; DIBH; shallow inspiration breath-hold; shallow expiration breath-hold. The free-breathing and DIBH scans are used to generate treatment plans for comparison of standard and DIBH techniques, while the shallow inspiration and expiration scans provide information on the maximum extent of tumor motion under free-breathing conditions. To acquire the breath-hold scans, the patients are brought to reproducible respiration levels using spirometry and slow vital capacity maneuvers. For the treatment plan comparison free-breathing and DIBH planning target volumes (PTVs) are constructed consisting of the CTV plus a margin for setup error and lung tumor motion. For both plans the margin for setup error is the same while the margin for lung tumor motion differs. The margin for organ motion in free-breathing is determined by the maximum tumor excursions in the shallow inspiration and expiration CT scans. For the DIBH, tumor motion is reduced to the extent to which DIBH can be maintained and the margin for any residual tumor motion is determined from repeat fluoroscopic movies, acquired with the patient monitored using spirometry. Three-dimensional treatment plans, generated using apertures based on the free-breathing and DIBH PTVs, are

  20. An In-situ materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) diagnostic to study particle density control and hydrogenic fuel retention in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allain, Jean-Paul [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2014-09-05

    A new materials analysis particle probe (MAPP) was designed, constructed and tested to develop understanding of particle control and hydrogenic fuel retention in lithium-based plasma-facing surfaces in NSTX. The novel feature of MAPP is an in-situ tool to probe the divertor NSTX floor during LLD and lithium-coating shots with subsequent transport to a post-exposure in-vacuo surface analysis chamber to measure D retention. In addition, the implications of a lithiated graphite-dominated plasma-surface environment in NSTX on LLD performance, operation and ultimately hydrogenic pumping and particle control capability are investigated in this proposal. MAPP will be an invaluable tool for erosion/redeposition simulation code validation.

  1. Basic Research in Electric Propulsion. Part I: Pulsed Plasma Thruster Propellant Efficiency and Contamination. Part II: Arcjet Remote Plume Measurement and Hydrogen Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-02-01

    equipment, ground observatories, and other space platforms. Low power arcjet technology provided definitive work on atomic species plume concentrations...in low power hydrogen arcjet plumes. This work applied a flame diagnostic, Multiphoton Laser Induced Fluorescence, to the excited-state plasma... Low power arcjet technology has been the primary focus of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research’s electric propulsion research program for

  2. Epitope mapping of inhibitory antibodies targeting the C2 domain of coagulation factor VIII by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevy, Alexander M.; Healey, John F.; Deng, Wei; Spiegel, P. Clint; Meeks, Shannon L.; Li, Renhao

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The development of anti-factor VIII (fVIII) antibodies (inhibitors) is a significant complication in the management of patients with hemophilia A, leading to significant increases in morbidity and treatment cost. Using a panel of anti-fVIII monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to different epitopes on fVIII, we recently have shown that epitope specificity, inhibitor kinetics, and time to maximum inhibition are more important than inhibitor titer in predicting response to fVIII and the combination of fVIII and recombinant factor VIIa. In particular, a subset of high-titer inhibitors responded to high dose fVIII, which would not be predicted based on their inhibitor titer alone. Thus the ability to quickly map the epitope spectrum of patient plasma using a clinically feasible assay may fundamentally change how clinicians approach the treatment of high-titer inhibitor patients. Objectives To map the epitopes of anti-fVIII MAbs, of which 3 are classical inhibitors and one non-classical, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Methods Binding epitopes of 4 MAbs targeting fVIII C2 domain were mapped using HDX-MS. Results The epitopes determined by HDX-MS are consistent with those obtained earlier through structural characterization and antibody competition assays. In addition classical and non-classical inhibitor epitopes could be distinguished using a limited subset of C2-derived peptic fragments. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the HDX-MS method for epitope mapping and suggest a potential role of rapid mapping of fVIII inhibitor epitopes in facilitating individualized treatment of inhibitor patients. PMID:24152306

  3. Epitope mapping of inhibitory antibodies targeting the C2 domain of coagulation factor VIII by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevy, A M; Healey, J F; Deng, W; Spiegel, P C; Meeks, S L; Li, R

    2013-12-01

    The development of anti-factor VIII antibodies (inhibitors) is a significant complication in the management of patients with hemophilia A, leading to significant increases in morbidity and treatment cost. Using a panel of mAbs against different epitopes on FVIII, we have recently shown that epitope specificity, inhibitor kinetics and time to maximum inhibition are more important than inhibitor titer in predicting responses to FVIII and the combination of FVIII and recombinant FVIIa. In particular, a subset of high-titer inhibitors responded to high-dose FVIII, which would not be predicted on the basis of their inhibitor titer alone. Thus, the ability to quickly map the epitope spectrum of patient plasma with a clinically feasible assay may fundamentally change how clinicians approach the treatment of high-titer inhibitor patients. To map the epitopes of anti-FVIII mAbs, three of which are classic inhibitors and one of which is a non-classic inhibitor, by the use of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled with mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). The binding epitopes of four mAbs targeting the FVIII C2 domain were mapped with HDX-MS. The epitopes determined with HDX-MS are consistent with those obtained earlier through structural characterization and antibody competition assays. In addition, classic and non-classic inhibitor epitopes could be distinguished by the use of a limited subset of C2 domain-derived peptic fragments. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the HDX-MS method for epitope mapping, and suggest a potential role of rapid mapping of FVIII inhibitor epitopes in facilitating individualized treatment of inhibitor patients. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  5. In situ flash X-ray observation of projectile penetration processes and crater cavity growth in porous gypsum target analogous to low-density asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Minami; Arakawa, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Fujita, Yukihiro; Kadono, Toshihiko

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies of impact craters formed on low-density asteroids led to the proposal of a new crater formation mechanism dominated by pore collapse and compaction. Thus, it is important to study the crater formation process associated with the projectile penetration on porous cohesive targets. Laboratory impact experiments were conducted for a porous gypsum target with porosity of 50%, and flash X-rays were used to visualize the interior of the target for in situ observation of crater formation and projectile penetration. Spherical projectiles made of three different materials, stainless steel, aluminum, and nylon were impacted at 1.9-2.4 km/s (low-velocity impact) and 5.6-6.4 km/s (high-velocity impact) by using a two-stage light-gas gun. Two imaging plates were used to take two X-ray images at a different delay time from the impact moment for one shot. Two types of crater cavity shape were found on the porous gypsum target, that is, penetration holes or hemispherical cavities, depending on the projectile size and density, and the impact velocity. The drag coefficient of a projectile was determined by measuring the penetration depth changing with time, and we found that it was closely related to the crater cavity shape: it was about 0.9 for a penetration hole, while it was 2.3-3.9 for a hemispherical cavity. This large value for a hemispherical cavity could have been caused by the deformation or the disruption of the projectile. The cratering efficiency, ρtVcr(t)/mp, was found to have a power law relationship to the scaling time for crater growth, πt = vit/rp, where vi is the impact velocity, rp is the projectile radius, and t is the time after the impact, and all data for stainless steel and aluminum projectiles merged completely and could be fitted by a power-law equation of ρtVcr(t)/mp=2.69×10-1πt1.10. Furthermore, the scaled crater volume, πV = Vcr_finalρt/mp, where Vcr_final is the final crater cavity volume, ρt is the target density, and mp is the

  6. Hydrogenation apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Joseph [Encino, CA; Oberg, Carl L [Canoga Park, CA; Russell, Larry H [Agoura, CA

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation reaction apparatus comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1100.degree. to 1900.degree. C., while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products.

  7. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  8. Liquid hydrogen properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Woon; Kim, Y. J.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H. I.; Han, K. Y.; Park, J.H.

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the input data, whose characteristic is thermodynamic and transport, in the form of equation for the thermo-hydraulic calculations using hydrogen as a working substance. The considered data in this report are particularly focused on the properties of para-hydrogen and of equilibrium-hydrogen around the working temperature range of the HANARO-CNS. The discussed properties of hydrogen are, in turn, the pressure of saturated vapors, the density, the heat of vaporization, thermal conductivity, viscosity, and heat capacity. Several equations to fit the above-mentioned experimental data allow calculating the various properties of liquid hydrogen with high accuracy at all considered temperatures

  9. Safety and efficacy of atorvastatin-induced very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with coronary heart disease (a post hoc analysis of the treating to new targets [TNT] study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LaRosa, John C.; Grundy, Scott M.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Kostis, John B.; Greten, Heiner

    2007-01-01

    High-dose statin therapy has been demonstrated to provide incremental benefit when low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations are lowered well below recommended target levels. This secondary analysis of the Treating to New Targets (TNT) study was conducted to investigate whether the

  10. Increasing Hydrogen Density with the Cation-Anion Pair BH4−-NH4+ in Perovskite-Type NH4Ca(BH43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Schouwink

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel metal borohydride ammonia-borane complex Ca(BH42·NH3BH3 is characterized as the decomposition product of the recently reported perovskite-type metal borohydride NH4Ca(BH43, suggesting that ammonium-based metal borohydrides release hydrogen gas via ammonia-borane-complexes. For the first time the concept of proton-hydride interactions to promote hydrogen release is applied to a cation-anion pair in a complex metal hydride. NH4Ca(BH43 is prepared mechanochemically from Ca(BH42 and NH4Cl as well as NH4BH4 following two different protocols, where the synthesis procedures are modified in the latter to solvent-based ball-milling using diethyl ether to maximize the phase yield in chlorine-free samples. During decomposition of NH4Ca(BH43 pure H2 is released, prior to the decomposition of the complex to its constituents. As opposed to a previously reported adduct between Ca(BH42 and NH3BH3, the present complex is described as NH3BH3-stuffed α-Ca(BH42.

  11. Hail hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairston, D.

    1996-01-01

    After years of being scorned and maligned, hydrogen is finding favor in environmental and process applications. There is enormous demand for the industrial gas from petroleum refiners, who need in creasing amounts of hydrogen to remove sulfur and other contaminants from crude oil. In pulp and paper mills, hydrogen is turning up as hydrogen peroxide, displacing bleaching agents based on chlorine. Now, new technologies for making hydrogen have the industry abuzz. With better capabilities of being generated onsite at higher purity levels, recycled and reused, hydrogen is being prepped for a range of applications, from waste reduction to purification of Nylon 6 and hydrogenation of specialty chemicals. The paper discusses the strong market demand for hydrogen, easier routes being developed for hydrogen production, and the use of hydrogen in the future

  12. Deep inspiration breath-hold technique for lung tumors: the potential value of target immobilization and reduced lung density in dose escalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanley, Joseph; Debois, Marc M.; Mah, Dennis; Mageras, Gikas S.; Raben, Adam; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Mychalczak, Borys; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Gloeggler, Paul J.; Lutz, Wendell; Ling, C. Clifton; Leibel, Steven A.; Fuks, Zvi; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This study evaluates the dosimetric benefits and feasibility of a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique in the treatment of lung tumors. The technique has two distinct features--deep inspiration, which reduces lung density, and breath-hold, which immobilizes lung tumors, thereby allowing for reduced margins. Both of these properties can potentially reduce the amount of normal lung tissue in the high-dose region, thus reducing morbidity and improving the possibility of dose escalation. Methods and Materials: Five patients treated for non-small cell lung carcinoma (Stage IIA-IIIB) received computed tomography (CT) scans under 4 respiration conditions: free-breathing, DIBH, shallow inspiration breath-hold, and shallow expiration breath-hold. The free-breathing and DIBH scans were used to generate 3-dimensional conformal treatment plans for comparison, while the shallow inspiration and expiration scans determined the extent of tumor motion under free-breathing conditions. To acquire the breath-hold scans, the patients are brought to reproducible respiration levels using spirometry, and for DIBH, modified slow vital capacity maneuvers. Planning target volumes (PTVs) for free-breathing plans included a margin for setup error (0.75 cm) plus a margin equal to the extent of tumor motion due to respiration (1-2 cm). Planning target volumes for DIBH plans included the same margin for setup error, with a reduced margin for residual uncertainty in tumor position (0.2-0.5 cm) as determined from repeat fluoroscopic movies. To simulate the effects of respiration-gated treatments and estimate the role of target immobilization alone (i.e., without the benefit of reduced lung density), a third plan is generated from the free-breathing scan using a PTV with the same margins as for DIBH plans. Results: The treatment plan comparison suggests that, on average, the DIBH technique can reduce the volume of lung receiving more than 25 Gy by 30% compared to free

  13. A density functional study of inhibition of the HDS hydrogenation pathway by pyridine, benzene, and H2S on MoS2-based catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logadottir, A.; Moses, Poul Georg; Hinnemann, Berit

    2006-01-01

    on the interaction of pyridine with the two types of edges of MoS2 catalyst nanoparticles, Particular attention is given to Studies of the hydrogenation (HYD) pathway in HDS since this is the favored pathway for refractory sulfur compounds and it is the pathway, which is most severely poisoned by basic nitrogen...... compounds. In order to understand the observed inhibitor trends. DFT studies oil (lie adsorption of benzene which is a weaker poison than pyridine, and H2S, which has no or only a very minor influence on the HYD pathway. have also been made, We find that the adsorption of pyridine is quite strong....... Furthermore, H2S is observed not to interact strongly with these sites. The present results have also provided insight into the nitrogen compound inhibition of the direct desulturization DDS pathway. The difference in the poisoning by benzene and pyridine is observed to be related to the ease with which...

  14. Hydrogen vacancies facilitate hydrogen transport kinetics in sodium hydride nanocrystallites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.; Eijt, S.W.H.

    2008-01-01

    We report ab initio calculations based on density-functional theory, of the vacancy-mediated hydrogen migration energy in bulk NaH and near the NaH(001) surface. The estimated rate of the vacancy mediated hydrogen transport, obtained within a hopping diffusion model, is consistent with the reaction

  15. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-03-01

    This plan details the goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks and schedule for EERE's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen Program. Similar detailed plans exist for the other DOE offices that make up the Hydrogen Program.

  16. Development of hydrogen storage technologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Langmi, Henrietta W

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available -how” The hydrogen storage challenge Hydrogen: • Lightest element, lowest density • Strong covalent bond • Low polarisation ability → Weak interaction between H2 molecules • At room temp and atm pressure: 5 kg H2 occupies vessel of ≈ 5 m diameter (5 kg... and manufacturing methods to improve the characteristics of hydrogen storage tanks • Composite = Carbon fibre + resin + fillers • Resin modification (improve mechanical properties) • Finite element modelling (design capabilities) http...

  17. Supramolecular network through Nsbnd H…O, Osbnd H…O and Csbnd H…O hydrogen bonding interaction and density functional theory studies of 4-methylanilinium-3-carboxy-4-hydroxybenzenesulphonate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, M.; Muthuraja, P.; Dhandapani, M.; Chandramohan, A.

    2018-02-01

    By utilizing the hydrogen bonding strategy, 4-methylanilinium-3-hydroxy-4-corboxy-benzenesulphonate (4MABS), an organic proton transfer molecular salt was synthesized and single crystals of it were successfully grown by slow solvent evaporation solution growth technique at ambient temperature. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra were recorded to establish the molecular structure of the title salt. The single crystal XRD analysis reveals that the title salt crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system with centrosymmetric space group, P21/n. Further, the title salt involves extensive intermolecular Nsbnd H…O, Osbnd H…O and Csbnd H…O as well as intramolecular Osbnd H…O hydrogen bonding interactions to construct supramolecular architecture. All quantum chemical calculations were performed at the level of density functional theory (DFT) with B3LYP functional using 6-311G (d,p) basis atomic set. The photoluminescence spectrum was recorded to explore the emission property of the title crystal. The presence of the various vibrational modes and functional groups in the synthesized salt was confirmed by FT-IR studies. The thermal behaviour of title crystal was established employing TG/DTA analyses. The mechanical properties of the grown crystal were determined by Vicker's microhardness studies. Dielectric measurements were carried out on the grown crystal at a different temperature to evaluate electrical properties.

  18. Density limits in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendler, M.

    1984-06-01

    The energy loss from a tokamak plasma due to neutral hydrogen radiation and recycling is of great importance for the energy balance at the periphery. It is shown that the requirement for thermal equilibrium implies a constraint on the maximum attainable edge density. The relation to other density limits is discussed. The average plasma density is shown to be a strong function of the refuelling deposition profile. (author)

  19. The hydrogen laminar jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Sanz, M. [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidomecanica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rosales, M. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain); Instituto de Innovacion en Mineria y Metalurgia, Avenida del Valle 738, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, A.L. [Department Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911, Leganes (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    Numerical and asymptotic methods are used to investigate the structure of the hydrogen jet discharging into a quiescent air atmosphere. The analysis accounts in particular for the variation of the density and transport properties with composition. The Reynolds number of the flow R{sub j}, based on the initial jet radius a, the density {rho}{sub j} and viscosity {mu}{sub j} of the jet and the characteristic jet velocity u{sub j}, is assumed to take moderately large values, so that the jet remains slender and stable, and can be correspondingly described by numerical integration of the continuity, momentum and species conservation equations written in the boundary-layer approximation. The solution for the velocity and composition in the jet development region of planar and round jets, corresponding to streamwise distances of order R{sub j}a, is computed numerically, along with the solutions that emerge both in the near field and in the far field. The small value of the hydrogen-to-air molecular weight ratio is used to simplify the solution by considering the asymptotic limit of vanishing jet density. The development provides at leading-order explicit analytical expressions for the far-field velocity and hydrogen mass fraction that describe accurately the hydrogen jet near the axis. The information provided can be useful in particular to characterize hydrogen discharge processes from holes and cracks. (author)

  20. Determination of hydrogen cluster velocities and comparison with numerical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Täschner, A.; Köhler, E.; Ortjohann, H.-W.; Khoukaz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The use of powerful hydrogen cluster jet targets in storage ring experiments led to the need of precise data on the mean cluster velocity as function of the stagnation temperature and pressure for the determination of the volume density of the target beams. For this purpose a large data set of hydrogen cluster velocity distributions and mean velocities was measured at a high density hydrogen cluster jet target using a trumpet shaped nozzle. The measurements have been performed at pressures above and below the critical pressure and for a broad range of temperatures relevant for target operation, e.g., at storage ring experiments. The used experimental method is described which allows for the velocity measurement of single clusters using a time-of-flight technique. Since this method is rather time-consuming and these measurements are typically interfering negatively with storage ring experiments, a method for a precise calculation of these mean velocities was needed. For this, the determined mean cluster velocities are compared with model calculations based on an isentropic one-dimensional van der Waals gas. Based on the obtained data and the presented numerical calculations, a new method has been developed which allows to predict the mean cluster velocities with an accuracy of about 5%. For this two cut-off parameters defining positions inside the nozzle are introduced, which can be determined for a given nozzle by only two velocity measurements

  1. High pressure deuterium-tritium gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffrey, A.J.; Spaletta, H.W.; Ware, A.G.; Zabriskie, J.M.; Hardwick, D.A.; Maltrud, H.R.; Paciotti, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    In experimental studies of muon-catalyzed fusion, the density of the hydrogen gas mixture is an important parameter. Catalysis of up to 150 fusions per muon has been observed in deuterium-tritium gas mixtures at liquid hydrogen density; at room temperature, such densities require a target gas pressure of the order of 1000 atmospheres (100 MPa, 15,000 psi). We report here the design considerations for hydrogen gas target vessels for muon-catalyzed fusion experiments that operate at 1000 and 10,000 atmospheres. The 1000 atmosphere high pressure target vessels are fabricated of Type A-286 stainless steel and lined with oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OFHC) copper to provide a barrier to hydrogen permeation of the stainless steel. The 10,000 atmosphere ultrahigh pressure target vessels are made from 18Ni (200 grade) maraging steel and are lined with OFHC copper, again to prevent hydrogen permeation of the steel. In addition to target design features, operating requirements, fabrication procedures, and secondary containment are discussed. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Hydrogen converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, Angel V.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina developed a process of 99 Mo production from fission, based on irradiation of uranium aluminide targets with thermal neutrons in the RA-3 reactor of the Ezeiza Atomic Centre. These targets are afterwards dissolved in an alkaline solution, with the consequent liberation of hydrogen as the main gaseous residue. This work deals with the use of a first model of metallic converter and a later prototype of glass converter at laboratory scale, adjusted to the requirements and conditions of the specific redox process. Oxidized copper wires were used, which were reduced to elementary copper at 400 C degrees and then regenerated by oxidation with hot air. Details of the bed structure and the operation conditions are also provided. The equipment required for the assembling in cells is minimal and, taking into account the operation final temperature and the purge with nitrogen, the procedure is totally safe. Finally, the results are extrapolated for the design of a converter to be used in a hot cell. (author)

  3. First detection of hydrogen in the β Pictoris gas disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, P. A.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Bourrier, V.; Hébrard, G.; Kiefer, F.; Beust, H.; Ferlet, R.; Lagrange, A.-M.

    2017-03-01

    The young and nearby star β Pictoris (β Pic) is surrounded by a debris disk composed of dust and gas known to host a myriad evaporating exocomets, planetesimals and at least one planet. At an edge-on inclination, as seen from Earth, this system is ideal for debris disk studies providing an excellent opportunity to use absorption spectroscopy to study the planet forming environment. Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) we observe the most abundant element in the disk, hydrogen, through the H I Lyman α (Ly-α) line. We present a new technique to decrease the contamination of the Ly-α line by geocoronal airglow in COS spectra. This Airglow Virtual Motion (AVM) technique allows us to shift the Ly-α line of the astrophysical target away from the contaminating airglow emission revealing more of the astrophysical line profile. This new AVM technique, together with subtraction of an airglow emission map, allows us to analyse the shape of the β Pic Ly-α emission line profile and from it, calculate the column density of neutral hydrogen surrounding β Pic. The column density of hydrogen in the β Pic stable gas disk at the stellar radial velocity is measured to be log (NH/ 1 cm2) ≪ 18.5. The Ly-α emission line profile is found to be asymmetric and we propose that this is caused by H I falling in towards the star with a bulk radial velocity of 41 ± 6 km s-1 relative to β Pic and a column density of log (NH/ 1 cm2) = 18.6 ± 0.1. The high column density of hydrogen relative to the hydrogen content of CI chondrite meteorites indicates that the bulk of the hydrogen gas does not come from the dust in the disk. This column density reveals a hydrogen abundance much lower than solar, which excludes the possibility that the detected hydrogen could be a remnant of the protoplanetary disk or gas expelled by the star. We hypothesise that the hydrogen gas observed falling towards the star arises from the dissociation of

  4. Hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2008-01-01

    The USA Administration would like to consider the US power generating industry as a basis ensuring both the full-scale production of hydrogen and the widespread use of the hydrogen related technological processes into the economy [ru

  5. Detection of early stage atherosclerotic plaques using PET and CT fusion imaging targeting P-selectin in low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Ikuko, E-mail: nakamuri@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Hasegawa, Koki [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Department of Pathology and Experimental Medicine, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Wada, Yasuhiro [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan); Hirase, Tetsuaki; Node, Koichi [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Watanabe, Yasuyoshi, E-mail: yywata@riken.jp [RIKEN Center for Molecular Imaging Science, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► P-selectin regulates leukocyte recruitment as an early stage event of atherogenesis. ► We developed an antibody-based molecular imaging probe targeting P-selectin for PET. ► This is the first report on successful PET imaging for delineation of P-selectin. ► P-selectin is a candidate target for atherosclerotic plaque imaging by clinical PET. -- Abstract: Background: Sensitive detection and qualitative analysis of atherosclerotic plaques are in high demand in cardiovascular clinical settings. The leukocyte–endothelial interaction mediated by an adhesion molecule P-selectin participates in arterial wall inflammation and atherosclerosis. Methods and results: A {sup 64}Cu-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid conjugated anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody ({sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb) probe was prepared by conjugating an anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody with DOTA followed by {sup 64}Cu labeling. Thirty-six hours prior to PET and CT fusion imaging, 3 MBq of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin mAb was intravenously injected into low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient Ldlr-/- mice. After a 180 min PET scan, autoradiography and biodistribution of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody was examined using excised aortas. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet for promotion of atherosclerotic plaque development, PET and CT fusion imaging revealed selective and prominent accumulation of the probe in the aortic root. Autoradiography of aortas that demonstrated probe uptake into atherosclerotic plaques was confirmed by Oil red O staining for lipid droplets. In Ldlr-/- mice fed with a chow diet to develop mild atherosclerotic plaques, probe accumulation was barely detectable in the aortic root on PET and CT fusion imaging. Probe biodistribution in aortas was 6.6-fold higher in Ldlr-/- mice fed with a high cholesterol diet than in those fed with a normal chow diet. {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-anti-P-selectin m

  6. Targeted Measurements of O- and N-Glycopeptides Show That Proteins in High Density Lipoprotein Particles Are Enriched with Specific Glycosylation Compared to Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kailemia, Muchena J; Wei, Wanghui; Nguyen, Khoa; Beals, Elizabeth; Sawrey-Kubicek, Lisa; Rhodes, Christopher; Zhu, Chenghao; Sacchi, Romina; Zivkovic, Angela M; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2018-02-02

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) particles are believed to be protective due to their inverse correlation with the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases. However, recent studies show that in some conditions such as heart disease and diabetes, HDL particles can become dysfunctional. Great attention has been directed toward HDL particle composition because the relative abundances of HDL constituents determine HDL's functional properties. A key factor to consider when studying the structure and composition of plasma particles is the protein glycosylation. Here, we profile the O- and N-linked glycosylation of HDL associated-proteins including the truncated form of Apo CIII and their glycan heterogeneity in a site-specific manner. Apolipoprotein CIII, fetuin A, and alpha 1 antitrypsin are glycoproteins associated with lipoproteins and are implicated in many cardiovascular and other disease conditions. A targeted method (UHPLC-QQQ) was used to measure the glycoprotein concentrations and site-specific glycovariations of the proteins in human plasma and compared with HDL particles isolated from the same plasma samples. The proteins found in the plasma are differentially glycosylated compared to those isolated in HDL. The results of this study suggest that glycosylation may play a role in protein partitioning in the blood, with possible functional implications.

  7. Versatile Hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H m . Some of these compounds have fascinating structures (1,2,3). However the most interesting interaction of hydrogen, is the hydrogen bond. When a hydrogen atom is bound to an electronegative element it acquires a slight positive charge. As a result, it is attracted to other atoms such as nitrogen or oxygen in the ...

  8. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  9. A measurement of the A-dependence of the J/PSI cross section by comparing data on hydrogen and tungsten targets at 39.5 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corden, M.J.; Dowell, J.D.; Garvey, J.; Homer, R.J.; Jobes, M.; Kenyon, I.R.; McMahon, T.J.; Owen, R.C.; Sumorok, K.C.T.; Vallance, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    J/PSI production on hydrogen and tungsten targets has been compared at 39.5 GeV/c and the variation of the A-dependence of the J/PSI cross section as a function of psub(t) 2 and xsub(F) has been measured. The A-dependence parameter, α, rises with increasing p 2 2 and falls with increasing xsub(F). Both effects are shown not to be due to the Fermi motion of nucleons in the tungsten nucleus. (orig.)

  10. Relation between Hydrogen Evolution and Hydrodesulfurization Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Šaric, Manuel; Moses, Poul Georg; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A relation between hydrogen evolution and hydrodesulfurization catalysis was found by density functional theory calculations. The hydrogen evolution reaction and the hydrogenation reaction in hydrodesulfurization share hydrogen as a surface intermediate and, thus, have a common elementary step......, which indicates that the same catalyst should perform well for both hydrogen evolution and hydrogenation. If that catalyst also fulfills additional criteria for breaking carbon–sulfur bonds and releasing hydrogen sulfide, it will be a good hydrodesulfurization catalyst. The hydrogen evolution reaction...... is normally performed at room temperature and standard pressure, whereas the hydrodesulfurization reaction is driven by high temperature and pressure. Owing to the very different operating conditions, the adsorption free energy of hydrogen differs between hydrodesulfurization and the hydrogen evolution...

  11. Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Leavitt

    2010-03-31

    A technical and design evaluation was carried out to meet DOE hydrogen fuel targets for 2010. These targets consisted of a system gravimetric capacity of 2.0 kWh/kg, a system volumetric capacity of 1.5 kWh/L and a system cost of $4/kWh. In compressed hydrogen storage systems, the vast majority of the weight and volume is associated with the hydrogen storage tank. In order to meet gravimetric targets for compressed hydrogen tanks, 10,000 psi carbon resin composites were used to provide the high strength required as well as low weight. For the 10,000 psi tanks, carbon fiber is the largest portion of their cost. Quantum Technologies is a tier one hydrogen system supplier for automotive companies around the world. Over the course of the program Quantum focused on development of technology to allow the compressed hydrogen storage tank to meet DOE goals. At the start of the program in 2004 Quantum was supplying systems with a specific energy of 1.1-1.6 kWh/kg, a volumetric capacity of 1.3 kWh/L and a cost of $73/kWh. Based on the inequities between DOE targets and Quantum’s then current capabilities, focus was placed first on cost reduction and second on weight reduction. Both of these were to be accomplished without reduction of the fuel system’s performance or reliability. Three distinct areas were investigated; optimization of composite structures, development of “smart tanks” that could monitor health of tank thus allowing for lower design safety factor, and the development of “Cool Fuel” technology to allow higher density gas to be stored, thus allowing smaller/lower pressure tanks that would hold the required fuel supply. The second phase of the project deals with three additional distinct tasks focusing on composite structure optimization, liner optimization, and metal.

  12. Implosion of multilayered cylindrical targets driven by intense heavy ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, A R; Portugues, R F; Tahir, N A; Hoffmann, D H H

    2002-11-01

    An analytical model for the implosion of a multilayered cylindrical target driven by an intense heavy ion beam has been developed. The target is composed of a cylinder of frozen hydrogen or deuterium, which is enclosed in a thick shell of solid lead. This target has been designed for future high-energy-density matter experiments to be carried out at the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. The model describes the implosion dynamics including the motion of the incident shock and the first reflected shock and allows for calculation of the physical conditions of the hydrogen at stagnation. The model predicts that the conditions of the compressed hydrogen are not sensitive to significant variations in target and beam parameters. These predictions are confirmed by one-dimensional numerical simulations and thus allow for a robust target design.

  13. Microstructure and Critical Current Density of YBa2Cu3O7-x + BaSnO3 Thick Films Grown with Pre-Mixed Pulsed Laser Ablation Target (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2012-0149 MICROSTRUCTURE AND CRITICAL CURRENT DENSITY OF YBa2Cu3O7-x + BaSnO3 THICK FILMS GROWN WITH PRE-MIXED PULSED LASER...CURRENT DENSITY OF YBa2Cu3O7-x + BaSnO3 THICK FILMS GROWN WITH PRE-MIXED PULSED LASER ABLATION TARGET (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b...YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) + BaSnO3 (BSO) thin films with BSO nanocolumns have been shown to have improved critical current density (Jc) in applied magnetic fields

  14. A proposal to study Lambda0 polarization in the inclusive reaction p + p --> Lambda0 + anything with a liquid hydrogen target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunce, G.; Pondrom, L.; March, R.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Devlin, T.; Edwards, R.; /Rutgers U.; Heller, K.; Overseth, O.; /Michigan U.

    1975-09-01

    It is proposed that the {Lambda}{sup 0} polarization recently observed in inclusive production of {Lambda}{sup 0} by 300 GeV protons on beryllium be studied with 400 GeV protons in liquid hydrogen. A range of scaling variables 0 {le} p{sub +} {le} 2.3 GeV/c and .1 {le} X {le} 1 will be covered with good statistics. A total run of 150 hours is requested.

  15. Hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahwa, P.K.; Pahwa, Gulshan Kumar

    2013-10-01

    In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The availability of a reliable and cost-effective supply, safe and efficient storage, and convenient end use of hydrogen will be essential for a transition to a hydrogen economy. Research is being conducted throughout the world for the development of safe, cost-effective hydrogen production, storage, and end-use technologies that support and foster this transition. This book discusses hydrogen economy vis-a-vis sustainable development. It examines the link between development and energy, prospects of sustainable development, significance of hydrogen energy economy, and provides an authoritative and up-to-date scientific account of hydrogen generation, storage, transportation, and safety.

  16. Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-12-01

    This document outlines activities for educating key target audiences, as suggested by workshop participants. Held December 4-5, 2002, the Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop kicked off a new education effort coordinated by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  17. Fragmentation of the gastrodermis and detachment of zooxanthellae in symbiotic cnidarians: a role for hydrogen peroxide and Ca2+ in coral bleaching and algal density control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M Sandeman

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching involves the detachment of zooxanthellae and the simultaneous fragmentation of the gastrodermis. Results obtained with a cell permeant fluorescent probe for calcium ions (Ca2+ indicates that "thermal" bleaching is the result of a temperature related breakdown of the Ca2+ exclusion system. "Solar" bleaching, which takes place at lower temperatures and is driven by light, is the result of a build-up of photo-synthetically produced hydrogen peroxide in the tissues. Gastrodermal tissue with its symbionts, scraped from between septa of corals, was observed under controlled conditions of high light and temperature. Pieces of gastrodermis round off, zooxanthellae move to the surface, protrude from the surface and after a delay, detach, surrounded by a thin layer of host cytoplasm, inclusions and plasma membrane. The higher the temperature and light level the shorter the delay and higher the rate of algal detachment. Fragmentation by the ballooning-out and detachment of small spheres of cytoplasm (bleb formation takes place simultaneously. This is likely to be due to oxidation, by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, of -SH groups on the cytoskeleton and its attachment to the plasma membrane. Ground, polished and stained thin acrylic resin sections reveal similar processes taking place in artificially bleached corals. Isolated zooxanthellae and whole corals are shown to release H2O2 in the light. This process of algal detachment and fragmentation that takes place at normal sea temperatures may underlie the mechanism limiting algal populations in the gastrodermis and may be localized to areas with a concentration of algae near the membrane. At above-normal temperatures under the synergistic effect of light and temperature, the rate of production of H2O2 exceeds the rate at which can it be lost by diffusion or destroyed and H2O2 accumulates. This results in damage to the calcium exclusion system, detachment of zooxanthellae into the coelenteron and

  18. Determination of the semi-empiric relationship among the physical density, the concentration and rate between hydrogen and manganese atoms, and a manganese sulfate solution; Determinacao da relacao semi-empirica entre a densidade fisica, concentracao e razao entre atomos de hidrogenio e manganes em uma solucao de sulfato de manganes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittencourt, Guilherme Rodrigues [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). PIBIC; Castro, Leonardo Curvello de; Pereira, Walsan W.; Patrao, Karla C. de Souza; Fonseca, Evaldo S. da; Dantas, Maria Leticia [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI). Lab. de Neutrons

    2009-07-01

    The bath of a manganese sulfate (BMS) is a system for absolute standardization of the neutron sources. This work establishes a functional relationship based on semi-empirical methods for the theoretical prediction of physical density values, concentration and rate between the hydrogen and manganese atoms presents in the solution of the BMS

  19. Hydrogen safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA experience with hydrogen began in the 1950s when the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) research on rocket fuels was inherited by the newly formed National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Initial emphasis on the use of hydrogen as a fuel for high-altitude probes, satellites, and aircraft limited the available data on hydrogen hazards to small quantities of hydrogen. NASA began to use hydrogen as the principal liquid propellant for launch vehicles and quickly determined the need for hydrogen safety documentation to support design and operational requirements. The resulting NASA approach to hydrogen safety requires a joint effort by design and safety engineering to address hydrogen hazards and develop procedures for safe operation of equipment and facilities. NASA also determined the need for rigorous training and certification programs for personnel involved with hydrogen use. NASA's current use of hydrogen is mainly for large heavy-lift vehicle propulsion, which necessitates storage of large quantities for fueling space shots and for testing. Future use will involve new applications such as thermal imaging

  20. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  1. Proton emission from thin hydrogenated targets irradiated by laser pulses at 10.sup.16./sup. W/cm.sup.2./sup

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Torrisi, L.; Giuffrida, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Cirrone, P.; Picciotto, A.; Krása, Josef; Margarone, Daniele; Velyhan, Andriy; Láska, Leoš; Ullschmied, Jiří; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Rosinski, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 2 (2012), "02B315-1"-"02B315-4" ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : harmonics * hydrogenation * iodine * ion emission * laser beam effects * plasma materials processing * proton production * semiconductor counters Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.602, year: 2012

  2. Why hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  3. Why are Hydrogen Bonds Directional?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    for an interaction to be characterized as a hydro- gen bond but does not provide any rationale for the same. This article reports a rationale for limiting the angle, based on the electron density topology using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Electron density topol- ogy for common hydrogen bond donors HF, HCl, ...

  4. Hydrogen Village : creating hydrogen and fuel cell communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Hydrogen Village (H2V) is a collaborative public-private partnership administered through Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Canada and funded by the Governments of Canada and Ontario. This end user-driven, market development program accelerates the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell (FC) technologies throughout the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). The program targets 3 specific aspects of market development, notably deployment of near market technologies in community based stationary and mobile applications; development of a coordinated hydrogen delivery and equipment service infrastructure; and societal factors involving corporate policy and public education. This presentation focused on lessons learned through outreach programs and the deployment of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) heat and power generation; indoor and outdoor fuel cell back up power systems; fuel cell-powered forklifts, delivery vehicles, and utility vehicles; hydrogen internal combustion engine powered shuttle buses, sedans, parade float; hydrogen production/refueling stations in the downtown core; and temporary fuel cell power systems

  5. Hydrogen-powered flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy D.

    2005-01-01

    As the Nation moves towards a hydrogen economy the shape of aviation will change dramatically. To accommodate a switch to hydrogen the aircraft designs, propulsion, and power systems will look much different than the systems of today. Hydrogen will enable a number of new aircraft capabilities from high altitude long endurance remotely operated aircraft (HALE ROA) that will fly weeks to months without refueling to clean, zero emissions transport aircraft. Design and development of new hydrogen powered aircraft have a number of challenges which must be addressed before an operational system can become a reality. While the switch to hydrogen will be most outwardly noticeable in the aircraft designs of the future, other significant changes will be occurring in the environment. A switch to hydrogen for aircraft will completely eliminate harmful greenhouse gases such as carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), sulfur oxides (SOx), unburnt hydrocarbons and smoke. While these aircraft emissions are a small percentage of the amount produced on a daily basis, their placement in the upper atmosphere make them particularly harmful. Another troublesome gaseous emission from aircraft is nitrogen oxides (NOx) which contribute to ozone depletion in the upper atmosphere. Nitrogen oxide emissions are produced during the combustion process and are primarily a function of combustion temperature and residence time. The introduction of hydrogen to a gas turbine propulsion system will not eliminate NOx emissions; however the wide flammability range will make low NOx producing, lean burning systems feasible. A revolutionary approach to completely eliminating NOx would be to fly all electric aircraft powered by hydrogen air fuel cells. The fuel cells systems would only produce water, which could be captured on board or released in the lower altitudes. Currently fuel cell systems do not have sufficient energy densities for use in large aircraft, but the long term potential of eliminating

  6. Hydrogen millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Benard, P.

    2000-05-01

    The 10th Canadian Hydrogen Conference was held at the Hilton Hotel in Quebec City from May 28 to May 31, 2000. The topics discussed included current drivers for the hydrogen economy, the international response to these drivers, new initiatives, sustainable as well as biological and hydrocarbon-derived production of hydrogen, defense applications of fuel cells, hydrogen storage on metal hydrides and carbon nanostructures, stationary power and remote application, micro-fuel cells and portable applications, marketing aspects, fuel cell modeling, materials, safety, fuel cell vehicles and residential applications. (author)

  7. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Studies of [(H3buea)FeIII-X]n1 (X= S2-, O2-,OH-): Comparison of Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding in Oxo and Sulfido Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Abhishek; Hocking, Rosalie K.; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept.; Larsen, Peter; Borovik, Andrew S.; /Kansas U.; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC,

    2006-09-27

    Iron L-edge, iron K-edge, and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed on a series of compounds [Fe{sup III}H{sub 3}buea(X)]{sup n-} (X = S{sup 2-}, O{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}). The experimentally determined electronic structures were used to correlate to density functional theory calculations. Calculations supported by the data were then used to compare the metal-ligand bonding and to evaluate the effects of H-bonding in Fe{sup III}-O vs Fe{sup III-}S complexes. It was found that the Fe{sup III-}O bond, while less covalent, is stronger than the FeIII-S bond. This dominantly reflects the larger ionic contribution to the Fe{sup III-}O bond. The H-bonding energy (for three H-bonds) was estimated to be -25 kcal/mol for the oxo as compared to -12 kcal/mol for the sulfide ligand. This difference is attributed to the larger charge density on the oxo ligand resulting from the lower covalency of the Fe-O bond. These results were extended to consider an Fe{sup IV-}O complex with the same ligand environment. It was found that hydrogen bonding to Fe{sup IV-}O is less energetically favorable than that to Fe{sup III-}O, which reflects the highly covalent nature of the Fe{sup IV-}O bond.

  8. Hydrogen storage performance of functionalized hexagonal boron nitride for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, R. Naresh; Rajashabala, S.; Kannan, R.

    2017-05-01

    Developing light weight, safe, efficient and compact hydrogen storage medium are still the major concerns for the blooming of hydrogen based energy economy. In the present article, activated hexagonal boron nitride (ABN) and ABN functionalized with lithium borohydride (ABN-LiBH4) nanocomposite based hydrogen storage medium are synthesized. where a facile solvent-assistant technique was adopted for the preparation of ABN-LiBH4 nanocomposite. The prepared hydrogen storage medium was subjected to various characterization techniques such as XRD, FTIR, SEM, EDX, CHNS - elemental analysis and TGA. Sievert's-like hydrogenation setup has been utilized for hydrogenation studies. It is noticed that the ABN-LiBH4 nanocomposite exhibits an attractive high gravimetric density of 1.67 wt% at 100 °C than pristine ABN. Moreover the stored hydrogen is released in the temperature range of 115 - 150 °C and possesses an average binding energy of 0.31 eV. These results indicate that the prepared ABN-LiBH4 nanocomposite paves a way to potential solid state hydrogen storage medium towards fuel cell technology as per the targets set by US Department of Energy (DOE).

  9. Hypervelocity impacts into ice-topped layered targets: Investigating the effects of ice crust thickness and subsurface density on crater morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriss, Kathryn H.; Burchell, Mark J.

    2017-07-01

    Many bodies in the outer solar system are theorized to have an ice shell with a different subsurface material below, be it chondritic, regolith, or a subsurface ocean. This layering can have a significant influence on the morphology of impact craters. Accordingly, we have undertaken laboratory hypervelocity impact experiments on a range of multilayered targets, with interiors of water, sand, and basalt. Impact experiments were undertaken using impact speeds in the range of 0.8-5.3 km s-1, a 1.5 mm Al ball bearing projectile, and an impact incidence of 45°. The surface ice crust had a thickness between 5 and 50 mm, i.e., some 3-30 times the projectile diameter. The thickness of the ice crust as well as the nature of the subsurface layer (liquid, well consolidated, etc.) have a marked effect on the morphology of the resulting impact crater, with thicker ice producing a larger crater diameter (at a given impact velocity), and the crater diameter scaling with impact speed to the power 0.72 for semi-infinite ice, but with 0.37 for thin ice. The density of the subsurface material changes the structure of the crater, with flat crater floors if there is a dense, well-consolidated subsurface layer (basalt) or steep, narrow craters if there is a less cohesive subsurface (sand). The associated faulting in the ice surface is also dependent on ice thickness and the substrate material. We find that the ice layer (in impacts at 5 km s-1) is effectively semi-infinite if its thickness is more than 15.5 times the projectile diameter. Below this, the crater diameter is reduced by 4% for each reduction in ice layer thickness equal to the impactor diameter. Crater depth is also affected. In the ice thickness region, 7-15.5 times the projectile diameter, the crater shape in the ice is modified even when the subsurface layer is not penetrated. For ice thicknesses, <7 times the projectile diameter, the ice layer is breached, but the nature of the resulting crater depends heavily on the

  10. Biofuel combustion. Energetics and kinetics of hydrogen abstraction from carbon-1 in n-butanol by the hydroperoxyl radical calculated by coupled cluster and density functional theories and multistructural variational transition-state theory with multidimensional tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alecu, I M; Zheng, Jingjing; Papajak, Ewa; Yu, Tao; Truhlar, Donald G

    2012-12-20

    Multistructural canonical variational transition-state theory with small-curvature multidimensional tunneling (MS-CVT/SCT) is employed to calculate thermal rate constants for hydrogen-atom abstraction from carbon-1 of n-butanol by the hydroperoxyl radical over the temperature range 250-2000 K. The M08-SO hybrid meta-GGA density functional was validated against CCSD(T)-F12a explicitly correlated wave function calculations with the jul-cc-pVTZ basis set. It was then used to compute the properties of all stationary points and the energies and Hessians of a few nonstationary points along the reaction path, which were then used to generate a potential energy surface by the multiconfiguration Shepard interpolation (MCSI) method. The internal rotations in the transition state for this reaction (like those in the reactant alcohol) are strongly coupled to each other and generate multiple stable conformations, which make important contributions to the partition functions. It is shown that neglecting to account for the multiple-structure effects and torsional potential anharmonicity effects that arise from the torsional modes would lead to order-of-magnitude errors in the calculated rate constants at temperatures of interest in combustion.

  11. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  12. Ford/BASF/UM Activities in Support of the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veenstra, Mike [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Purewal, Justin [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Xu, Chunchuan [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Yang, Jun [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Blaser, Rachel [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Sudik, Andrea [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Siegel, Don [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ming, Yang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Liu, Dong' an [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Chi, Hang [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gaab, Manuela [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Arnold, Lena [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Muller, Ulrich [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2015-06-30

    Widespread adoption of hydrogen as a vehicular fuel depends critically on the development of low-cost, on-board hydrogen storage technologies capable of achieving high energy densities and fast kinetics for hydrogen uptake and release. As present-day technologies -- which rely on physical storage methods such as compressed hydrogen -- are incapable of attaining established Department of Energy (DOE) targets, development of materials-based approaches for storing hydrogen have garnered increasing attention. Material-based storage technologies have potential to store hydrogen beyond twice the density of liquid hydrogen. To hasten development of these ‘hydride’ materials, the DOE previously established three centers of excellence for materials storage R&D associated with the key classes of materials: metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen, and adsorbents. While these centers made progress in identifying new storage materials, the challenges associated with the engineering of the system around a candidate storage material are in need of further advancement. In 2009 the DOE established the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence with the objective of developing innovative engineering concepts for materials-based hydrogen storage systems. As a partner in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence, the Ford-UM-BASF team conducted a multi-faceted research program that addresses key engineering challenges associated with the development of materials-based hydrogen storage systems. First, we developed a novel framework that allowed for a material-based hydrogen storage system to be modeled and operated within a virtual fuel cell vehicle. This effort resulted in the ability to assess dynamic operating parameters and interactions between the storage system and fuel cell power plant, including the evaluation of performance throughout various drive cycles. Second, we engaged in cost modeling of various incarnations of the storage systems. This analysis

  13. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  14. Hydrogen energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, P P; Kuznetsov, V L; David, W I F

    2007-04-15

    The problem of anthropogenically driven climate change and its inextricable link to our global society's present and future energy needs are arguably the greatest challenge facing our planet. Hydrogen is now widely regarded as one key element of a potential energy solution for the twenty-first century, capable of assisting in issues of environmental emissions, sustainability and energy security. Hydrogen has the potential to provide for energy in transportation, distributed heat and power generation and energy storage systems with little or no impact on the environment, both locally and globally. However, any transition from a carbon-based (fossil fuel) energy system to a hydrogen-based economy involves significant scientific, technological and socio-economic barriers. This brief report aims to outline the basis of the growing worldwide interest in hydrogen energy and examines some of the important issues relating to the future development of hydrogen as an energy vector.

  15. Hydrogen energy stations: along the roadside to the hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, W.W.; Rifkin, J.; O'Connor, T.; Swisher, J.; Lipman, T.; Rambach, G.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen has become more than an international topic of discussion within government and among industry. With the public announcements from the European Union and American governments and an Executive Order from the Governor of California, hydrogen has become a ''paradigm change'' targeted toward changing decades of economic and societal behaviours. The public demand for clean and green energy as well as being ''independent'' or not located in political or societal conflict areas, has become paramount. The key issues are the commitment of governments through public policies along with corporations. Above all, secondly, the advancement of hydrogen is regional as it depends upon infrastructure and fuel resources. Hence, the hydrogen economy, to which the hydrogen highway is the main component, will be regional and creative. New jobs, businesses and opportunities are already emerging. And finally, the costs for the hydrogen economy are critical. The debate as to hydrogen being 5 years away from being commercial and available in the marketplace versus needing more research and development contradicts the historical development and deployment of any new technology be it bio-science, flat panel displays, computers or mobile phones. The market drivers are government regulations and standards soon thereafter matched by market forces and mass production. Hydrogen is no different. What this paper does is describes is how the hydrogen highway is the backbone to the hydrogen economy by becoming, with the next five years, both regional and commercial through supplying stationary power to communities. Soon thereafter, within five to ten years, these same hydrogen stations will be serving hundreds and then thousands of hydrogen fuel powered vehicles. Hydrogen is the fuel for distributed energy generation and hence positively impacts the future of public and private power generators. The paradigm has already changed. (author)

  16. Production of Hydrogen from Bio-ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrice Giroudiere; Christophe Boyer; Stephane His; Robert Sanger; Kishore Doshi; Jijun Xu

    2006-01-01

    IFP and HyRadix are collaborating in the development of a new hydrogen production system from liquid feedstock such as bio-ethanol. Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions along with high hydrogen yield are the key objectives. Market application of the system will be hydrogen refueling stations as well as medium scale hydrogen consumers including the electronics, metals processing, and oils hydrogenation industries. The conversion of bio-ethanol to hydrogen will be performed within a co-developed process including an auto-thermal reformer working under pressure. The technology will produce high-purity hydrogen with ultralow CO content. The catalytic auto-thermal reforming technology combines the exothermic and endothermic reaction and leads to a highly efficient heat integration. The development strategy to reach a high hydrogen yield target with the bio-ethanol hydrogen generator is presented. (authors)

  17. A study of the electrochemical hydrogenation of o-xylene in a PEM hydrogenation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonocho, R.; Gardner, C.L.; Ternan, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the electrochemical hydrogenation of o-xylene in a proton exchange membrane hydrogenation reactor (PEMHR). The reactor was operated isothermally over the temperature range 20–68 °C and at a pressure of 1 atm in a semi-batch mode. Hydrogen was fed into the anode compartment and o-xylene into the cathode. The hydrogenation efficiency was investigated at different current densities and temperatures. Results obtained show that the hydrogenation efficiency increases with temperature but decreases with current density. At low current densities the hydrogenation efficiency approaches 100%. A zero dimensional model was used to fit the data and extract a rate constant for the hydrogenation reaction. The activation energy for this reaction was found to be 28 kJ/mole.

  18. Hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donath, E.

    1942-10-16

    This report mentioned that not very severe demands for purity were made on the hydrogen used in hydrogenation of coal or similar raw materials, because the catalysts were not very sensitive to poisoning. However, the hydrogenation plants tried to remove most impurities anyway by means of oil washes. The report included a table giving the amount of wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil in order to remove 1% of various impurities from 1000 m/sup 3/ of the circulating gas. The amounts of wash oil used up were 1.1 m/sup 3/ for removing 1% nitrogen, 0.3 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide, 0.03 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane. The amount of hydrogen lost was 28 m/sup 3/ for 1% nitrogen, 9 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane and ranged from 9 m/sup 3/ to 39 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide and 1 m/sup 3/ to 41 m/sup 3/ for carbon dioxide depending on whether the removal was done in liquid phase or vapor phase and with or without reduction of the oxide to methane. Next the report listed and described the major processes used in German hydrogenation plants to produce hydrogen. Most of them produced water gas, which then had its carbon monoxide changed to carbon dioxide, and the carbon oxides washed out with water under pressure and copper hydroxide solution. The methods included the Winkler, Pintsch-Hillebrand, and Schmalfeldt-Wintershall processes, as well as roasting of coke in a rotating generator, splitting of gases formed during hydrogenation, and separation of cokery gas into its components by the Linde process.

  19. Dominance of hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration regime with thin ribbon of ionized solid hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psikal, J.; Matys, M.

    2018-04-01

    Laser-driven proton acceleration from novel cryogenic hydrogen target of the thickness of tens of microns irradiated by multiPW laser pulse is investigated here for relevant laser parameters accessible in near future. It is demonstrated that the efficiency of proton acceleration from relatively thick hydrogen solid ribbon largely exceeds the acceleration efficiency for a thinner ionized plastic foil, which can be explained by enhanced hole boring (HB) driven by laser ponderomotive force in the case of light ions and lower target density. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of laser pulse interaction with relatively thick hydrogen target show larger energies of protons accelerated in the target interior during the HB phase and reduced energies of protons accelerated from the rear side of the target by quasistatic electric field compared with the results obtained from two-dimensional PIC calculations. Linearly and circularly polarized multiPW laser pulses of duration exceeding 100 fs show similar performance in terms of proton acceleration from both the target interior as well as from the rear side of the target. When ultrashort pulse (∼30 fs) is assumed, the number of accelerated protons from the target interior is substantially reduced.

  20. The methods of hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, J.M.; Cuevas, F.; Latroche, M.; Percheron-Guegan, A.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen may be an excellent energy vector owing to its high specific energy. Its low density is however a serious drawback for its storage. Three techniques exist to store hydrogen. Storage under pressure is now performed in composite tanks under pressures around 700 bar. Liquid storage is achieved at cryogenic temperatures. Solid storage is possible in reversible metal hydrides or on high surface area materials. The three storage means are compared in terms of performance, energetic losses and risk. (authors)

  1. Plasma hydrogenated cationic detonation nanodiamonds efficiently deliver to human cells in culture functional siRNA targeting the Ewing sarcoma junction oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Ayala, Juan; Petit, Tristan; Girard, Hugues A; Malvy, Claude P; Le Cam, Eric; Treussart, François; Arnault, Jean-Charles

    2015-03-01

    The expression of a defective gene can lead to major cell dysfunctions among which cell proliferation and tumor formation. One promising therapeutic strategy consists in silencing the defective gene using small interfering RNA (siRNA). In previous publications we showed that diamond nanocrystals (ND) of primary size 35 nm, rendered cationic by polyethyleneimine-coating, can efficiently deliver siRNA into cell, which further block the expression of EWS/FLI-1 oncogene in a Ewing sarcoma disease model. However, a therapeutic application of such nanodiamonds requires their elimination by the organism, particularly in urine, which is impossible for 35 nm particles. Here, we report that hydrogenated cationic nanodiamonds of primary size 7 nm (ND-H) have also a high affinity for siRNA and are capable of delivering them in cells. With siRNA/ND-H complexes, we measured a high inhibition efficacy of EWS/FLI-1 gene expression in Ewing sarcoma cell line. Electron microscopy investigations showed ND-H in endocytosis compartments, and especially in macropinosomes from which they can escape before siRNA degradation occurred. In addition, the association of EWS/FLI-1 silencing by the siRNA/ND-H complex with a vincristine treatment yielded a potentiation of the toxic effect of this chemotherapeutic drug. Therefore ND-H appears as a promising delivery agent in anti-tumoral gene therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative analysis of the efficiencies of hydrogen storage systems utilising solid state H storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lototskyy, M., E-mail: mlototskyy@uwc.ac.za [South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Yartys, V.A., E-mail: volodymyr.yartys@ife.no [Institute for Energy Technology, P.O. Box 40, Kjeller NO-2027 (Norway); Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim NO-7491 (Norway)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Performance evaluation of H stores with various solid H storage materials was done. • Volumetric and gravimetric H storage densities and energy consumption were evaluated. • Effects of H storage containment and heat exchanger were estimated. • Pressure–temperature conditions of H storage strongly affect the overall performance. • Material’s packing density influences safety of operation and efficiency of H stores. - Abstract: Evaluation of the performances of hydrogen storage systems accommodating solid H storage materials should include characteristics on their reversible hydrogen storage capacity, operating pressures and temperatures, packing densities, and heat effects of hydrogen uptake and release. We have conducted a performance evaluation of the systems accumulating 5 kg of hydrogen in a containment of cylindrical geometry filled with a solid H storage material including such hydrides and reactive hydride composites as AlH{sub 3}, MgH{sub 2}, “low-temperature” (inter)metallic hydrides, NaAlH{sub 4}, Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6}, LiBH{sub 4} + MgH{sub 2}, and MOFs. The analysis yielded gravimetric and volumetric H storage capacities, and energy efficiencies of hydrogen stores. We conclude that the weight efficiency of hydrogen stores, apart from the gravimetric H storage capacity of the material, is greatly affected by its packing density, and by the pressure–temperature conditions which determine type and dimensions of the containment. The materials with low heat effects of H exchange, operating close to the ambient conditions, should be targeted in the course of the development of new hydrogen stores as offering the best energy efficiency of their operation.

  3. Concept for lowest emissions of a hydrogen internal combustion engine; Niedrigstemissionskonzept fuer einen wasserstoffbetriebenen Verbrennungsmotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouquet, Marcel Christian Thomas

    2012-03-15

    This paper describes a concept with lowest emissions for a hydrogen internal combustion engine for passenger cars. With optimisation of the combustion concept the level of nitrogen oxide is below 90%, hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide below 99% of the SULEV target (CARB). This concept enables a potential in power density that is comparable to current supercharged combustion engines at lowest emission level without catalytic aftertreatment. Additionally with a catalytic aftertreatment system, the emission level of a current hydrogen combustion engine (mono-fuel) is lowered to a level, that this car can be labeled as air cleaning vehicle for hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide.

  4. "TOF2H": A precision toolbox for rapid, high density/high coverage hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry via an LC-MALDI approach, covering the data pipeline from spectral acquisition to HDX rate analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koter Marek D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-amide proton hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX is used to investigate protein conformation, conformational changes and surface binding sites for other molecules. To our knowledge, software tools to automate data processing and analysis from sample fractionating (LC-MALDI mass-spectrometry-based HDX workflows are not publicly available. Results An integrated data pipeline (Solvent Explorer/TOF2H has been developed for the processing of LC-MALDI-derived HDX data. Based on an experiment-wide template, and taking an ab initio approach to chromatographic and spectral peak finding, initial data processing is based on accurate mass-matching to fully deisotoped peaklists accommodating, in MS/MS-confirmed peptide library searches, ambiguous mass-hits to non-target proteins. Isotope-shift re-interrogation of library search results allows quick assessment of the extent of deuteration from peaklist data alone. During raw spectrum editing, each spectral segment is validated in real time, consistent with the manageable spectral numbers resulting from LC-MALDI experiments. A semi-automated spectral-segment editor includes a semi-automated or automated assessment of the quality of all spectral segments as they are pooled across an XIC peak for summing, centroid mass determination, building of rates plots on-the-fly, and automated back exchange correction. The resulting deuterium uptake rates plots from various experiments can be averaged, subtracted, re-scaled, error-barred, and/or scatter-plotted from individual spectral segment centroids, compared to solvent exposure and hydrogen bonding predictions and receive a color suggestion for 3D visualization. This software lends itself to a "divorced" HDX approach in which MS/MS-confirmed peptide libraries are built via nano or standard ESI without source modification, and HDX is performed via LC-MALDI using a standard MALDI-TOF. The complete TOF2H package includes additional (eg LC

  5. Correlation of H- production and the work function of a surface in a hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, M.

    1983-01-01

    Surface-plasma negative hydrogen ion sources are being developed as possible parts for future netural beam systems. In these ion sources, negative hydrogen ions (H - ) are produced at low work function metal surfaces immersed in hydrogen plasmas. To investigate the correlation between the work function and the H-production at the surface with a condition similar to the one in the actual plasma ion source, these two parameters were simultaneously measured in the hydrogen plasma environment. The photoelectron emission currents from Mo and Cu surfaces in a cesiated hydrogen discharge were measured in the photon energy range from 1.45 to 4.14 eV, to determine the work function based on Fowler's theory. A small magnetic line cusp plasma container was specially designed to minimize the plasma noise and to realize the efficient collection of incident light onto the target. The photelectron current was detected phase sensitively and could be measured with reasonable accuracy up to about 5 x 10 11 cm -3 of the plasma electron density. As Cs density was increased in the hydrogen discharge, the work function decreased until it reached a minimum value. This value of the lowest work function was approximately 1.4 eV for both Mo and Cu surfaces, and the detected total H - current was a maximum at this condition

  6. Diagnostics for hot plasmas using hydrogen neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1982-12-01

    Beams of neutral hydrogen atoms have found a number of uses in the diagnosis of hot plasmas. In the most straightforward application, neutral beams have been used to determine plasma line density, based on simple attenuation measurements. This technique has been applied most intensively recently to the study of beam-injected mirror plasmas. Neutral beams have also now been used in a number of tokamaks to supply a local increase of the neutral atom target density for charge exchange. By directing a time-modulated neutral beam across the sight-line of a charge-exchange analyzer, and measuring the modulated neutral particle efflux from the plasma, local measurements of the ion energy distribution function can be made. If a modulated diagnostic neutral beam is directed across the sight-line of an ultra-violet spectrometer, one can also make measurements of the local densities and possibly velocity distributions of fully stripped impurities. The fast hydrogen neutrals charge exchange with fully stripped impurities in the plasma, leaving the impurities in excited hydrogen-like states. In their prompt radiative decay the impurity ions emit characteristic uv lines, which can be detected easily

  7. Reinforcing thermoplastics with hydrogen bonding bridged inorganics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Mingliang, E-mail: du@zstu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Ministry of Education, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Guo Baochun, E-mail: psbcguo@scut.edu.c [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Liu Mingxian; Cai Xiaojia; Jia Demin [Department of Polymer Materials and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2010-01-15

    A new reinforcing strategy for thermoplastics via hydrogen bonding bridged inorganics in the matrix was proposed. The hydrogen bonds could be formed in thermoplastics matrices with the incorporation of a little organics containing hydrogen bonding functionalities. Isotactic polypropylene (PP), polyamide 6 (PA 6), and high density polyethylene (HDPE), together with specific inorganics and organics were utilized to verify the effectiveness of the strategy. The investigations suggest that the hydrogen bonding bridged inorganics led to substantially increased flexural properties. The results of attenuated total refraction Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) indicate the formation of hydrogen bonding among the inorganics and organics in the composites.

  8. Metal ammine complexes for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Johannessen, Tue

    2005-01-01

    The hopes of using hydrogen as an energy carrier are severely dampened by the fact that there is still no safe, high-density method available for storing hydrogen. We investigate the possibility of using metal ammine complexes as a solid form of hydrogen storage. Using Mg(NH3)(6)Cl-2 as the example......, we show that it can store 9.1% hydrogen by weight in the form of ammonia. The storage is completely reversible, and by combining it with an ammonia decomposition catalyst, hydrogen can be delivered at temperatures below 620 K....

  9. Progress of Nuclear Hydrogen Program in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jae

    2009-01-01

    To cope with dwindling fossil fuels and climate change, it is clear that a clean alternative energy that can replace fossil fuels is required. Hydrogen is considered a promising future energy solution because it is clean, abundant and storable and has a high energy density. As other advanced countries, the Korean government had established a long-term vision for transition to the hydrogen economy in 2005. One of the major challenges in establishing a hydrogen economy is how to produce massive quantities of hydrogen in a clean, safe and economical way. Among various hydrogen production methods, the massive, safe and economic production of hydrogen by water splitting using a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) can provide a success path to the hydrogen economy. Particularly in Korea, where usable land is limited, the nuclear production of hydrogen is deemed a practical solution due to its high energy density. To meet the expected demand for hydrogen, the Korea Atomic Energy Institute (KAERI) launched a nuclear hydrogen program in 2004 together with Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER) and Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST). Then, the nuclear hydrogen key technologies development program was launched in 2006, which aims at the development and validation of key and challenging technologies required for the realization of the nuclear hydrogen production demonstration system. In 2008, Korean Atomic Energy Commission officially approved a long-term development plan of the nuclear hydrogen system technologies as in the figure below and now the nuclear hydrogen program became the national agenda. This presentation introduces the current status of nuclear hydrogen projects in Korea and the progress of the nuclear hydrogen key technologies development. Perspectives of nuclear process heat applications are also addressed

  10. Questioning hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerschlag, Roel; Mazza, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    As an energy carrier, hydrogen is to be compared to electricity, the only widespread and viable alternative. When hydrogen is used to transmit renewable electricity, only 51% can reach the end user due to losses in electrolysis, hydrogen compression, and the fuel cell. In contrast, conventional electric storage technologies allow between 75% and 85% of the original electricity to be delivered. Even when hydrogen is extracted from gasified coal (with carbon sequestration) or from water cracked in high-temperature nuclear reactors, more of the primary energy reaches the end user if a conventional electric process is used instead. Hydrogen performs no better in mobile applications, where electric vehicles that are far closer to commercialization exceed fuel cell vehicles in efficiency, cost and performance. New, carbon-neutral energy can prevent twice the quantity of GHG's by displacing fossil electricity than it can by powering fuel cell vehicles. The same is true for new, natural gas energy. New energy resources should be used to displace high-GHG electric generation, not to manufacture hydrogen

  11. Separation of contributions from deeply virtual Compton scattering and its interference with the Bethe-Heitler process in measurements on a hydrogen target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetian, A.; Akopov, Z.

    2009-09-01

    Hard exclusive leptoproduction of real photons from an unpolarized proton target is studied in an effort to elucidate generalized parton distributions. The data accumulated during the years 1996-2005 with the HERMES spectrometer are analyzed to yield asymmetries with respect to the combined dependence of the cross section on beam helicity and charge, thereby revealing previously unseparated contributions from deeply virtual Compton scattering and its interference with the Bethe-Heitler process. The integrated luminosity is sufficient to show correlated dependences on two kinematic variables, and provides the most precise determination of the dependence on only the beam charge. (orig.)

  12. Effects of breed and dietary nutrient density on the growth performance, blood metabolite, and genes expression of target of rapamycin (TOR) signalling pathway of female broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X-q; Jiang, W; Tan, H-z; Zhang, D-x; Zhang, H-j; Wei, S; Yan, H-c

    2013-08-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effects of exchanged diets with identical energy level on characteristics of slow-growing (WENs Yellow-Feathered Chicken, WYFC) and fast-growing (White Recessive Rock Chicken, WRRC) female chickens. A total of 1450 WYFC and 1150 WRRC 1-day-old female hatchlings were used. A high-nutrient-density (HND) diet and a low-nutrient-density (LND) diet were formulated for three phases. A completely randomized experimental design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement (diet and breed), each with five replicates of 145 and 115 birds, was applied. The results showed that WRRC had a higher body weight (BW), average daily feed intake and average daily gain than WYFC throughout the experiment (palkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentrations than WYFC (peffect was observed on organ indices, muscle yields or blood responses. The gene expressions of Rheb, TOR, S6K1 and 4E-BP1 in gastrocnemius muscle were the highest in the WYFC-LND groups at 63 and 105 days (pdietary nutrient density and that lower-nutrient-density diets are optimal for the long-term housing of broiler chickens. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. The creation of strongly coupled plasmas using an intense heavy ion beam: low-entropy compression of hydrogen and the problem of hydrogen metallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, N A [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Frankfurt, Postfach 11 19 32, 60054 Frankfurt (Germany); Piriz, A R [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Shutov, A [Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics Research, Chernogolovka, Russia (Russian Federation); Varentsov, D [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgarten Str. 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Udrea, S [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgarten Str. 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Hoffmann, D H H [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgarten Str. 9, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Juranek, H [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Redmer, R [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Portugues, R F [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Lomonosov, I [Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics Research, Chernogolovka, Russia (Russian Federation); Fortov, V E [Institute for Problems in Chemical Physics Research, Chernogolovka, Russia (Russian Federation)

    2003-06-06

    Intense heavy ion beams deposit energy very efficiently over extended volumes of solid density targets, thereby creating large samples of strongly coupled plasmas. Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are therefore an ideal tool to research this interesting field. It is also possible to design experiments using special beam-target geometries to achieve low-entropy compression of samples of matter. This type of experiments is of particular interest for studying the problem of hydrogen metallization. In this paper we present a design study of such a proposed experiment that will be carried out at the future heavy ion synchrotron facility SIS100, at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. This study has been done using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code. The target consists of a solid hydrogen cylinder that is enclosed in a thick shell of lead whose one face is irradiated with an ion beam which has an annular (ring shaped) focal spot. The beam intensity and other parameters are considered to be the same as expected at the future SIS100 facility. The simulations show that due to multiple shock reflection between the cylinder axis and the lead-hydrogen boundary, one can achieve up to 20 times solid density in hydrogen while keeping the temperature as low as a few thousand K. The corresponding pressure is of the order of 10 Mbar. These values of the physical parameters lie within the range of theoretically predicted values for hydrogen metallization. We have also carried out a parameter study of this problem by varying the target and beam parameters over a wide range. It has been found that the results are very insensitive to such changes in the input parameters.

  14. Ammonia for hydrogen storage: challenges and opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klerke, Asbjørn; Christensen, Claus H.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of using ammonia as a hydrogen carrier is discussed. Compared to other hydrogen storage materials, ammonia has the advantages of a high hydrogen density, a well-developed technology for synthesis and distribution, and easy catalytic decomposition. Compared to hydrocarbons...... and alcohols, it has the advantage that there is no CO2 emission at the end user. The drawbacks are mainly the toxicity of liquid ammonia and the problems related to trace amounts of ammonia in the hydrogen after decomposition. Storage of ammonia in metal ammine salts is discussed, and it is shown...... that this maintains the high volumetric hydrogen density while alleviating the problems of handling the ammonia. Some of the remaining challenges for research in ammonia as a hydrogen carrier are outlined....

  15. Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes - May 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, Kevin C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Linehan, Sue [Rohm and Haas, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lipiecki, Frank [Rohm and Haas, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Christopher, Aardahl L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-05-12

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence FY2008 Second Quarter Milestone Report: Technical report describing assessment of hydrogen storage materials and progress towards meeting DOE’s hydrogen storage targets.

  16. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  17. Targeted Disruption of the Idol Gene Alters Cellular Regulation of the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor by Sterols and Liver X Receptor Agonists ▿ §

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, Elena; Hong, Cynthia; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Tu, Yiping; Hu, Yan; Zelcer, Noam; Boyadjian, Rima; de Jong, Pieter J.; Young, Stephen G.; Fong, Loren G.; Tontonoz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase Idol (inducible degrader of the low-density lipoprotein [LDL] receptor [LDLR]) as a posttranscriptional regulator of the LDLR pathway. Idol stimulates LDLR degradation through ubiquitination of its C-terminal domain, thereby limiting cholesterol uptake. Here we report the generation and characterization of mouse embryonic stem cells homozygous for a null mutation in the Idol gene. Cells lacking Idol exhibit markedly elevated levels of the LDLR...

  18. Identification of a novel FGFRL1 MicroRNA target site polymorphism for bone mineral density in meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Niu (Tianhua); N. Liu (Ning); M. Zhao (Ming); G. Xie (Guie); L. Zhang (Lei); J. Li (Jian); Y.-F. Pei (Yu-Fang); H. Shen (Hui); X. Fu (Xiaoying); H. He (Hao); S. Lu (Shan); X. Chen (Xiangding); L. Tan (Lijun); T.-L. Yang (Tie-Lin); Y. Guo (Yan); P.J. Leo (Paul); E.L. Duncan (Emma); J. Shen (Jie); Y.-F. Guo (Yan-fang); G.C. Nicholson (Geoffrey); R.L. Prince (Richard L.); J.A. Eisman (John); G. Jones (Graeme); P.N. Sambrook (Philip); X. Hu (Xiang); P.M. Das (Partha M.); Q. Tian (Qing); X.-Z. Zhu (Xue-Zhen); C.J. Papasian (Christopher J.); M.A. Brown (Matthew); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Y.-P. Wang (Yu-Ping); S. Xiang (Shuanglin); H.-W. Deng

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical post-transcriptional regulators. Based on a previous genome-wide association (GWA) scan, we conducted a polymorphism in microRNAs' Target Sites (poly-miRTS)-centric multistage meta-analysis for lumbar spine (LS)-, total hip (HIP)-, and femoral neck

  19. Hydrogen absorption/desorption characteristics of room temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    . cSolid State Chemistry Section, Babha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India ... As per the. USDOE's referred technical target, for the success of hydrogen economy, it is essential to develop a hydrogen storage material which can ...

  20. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Joseph; Gilbert, Matthew; Naab, Fabian; Savage, Lauren; Holland, Wayne; Duggan, Jerome; McDaniel, Floyd

    2004-10-01

    Hydrogen as a fuel source is an attractive, relatively clean alternative to fossil fuels. However, a major limitation in its use for the application of automobiles has been the requirement for an efficient hydrogen storage medium. Current hydrogen storage systems are: physical storage in high pressure tanks, metal hydride, and gas-on-solid absorption. However, these methods do not fulfill the Department of Energy's targeted requirements for a usable hydrogen storage capacity of 6.5 wt.%, operation near ambient temperature and pressure, quick extraction and refueling, reliability and reusability.Reports showing high capacity hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotubes originally prompted great excitement in the field, but further research has shown conflicting results. Results for carbon nanostructures have ranged from less than 1 wt.% to 70 wt.%. The wide range of adsorption found in previous experiments results from the difficulty in measuring hydrogen in objects just nanometers in size. Most previous experiments relied on weight analysis and residual gas analysis to determine the amount of hydrogen being adsorbed by the CNTs. These differing results encouraged us to perform our own analysis on single-walled (SWNTs), double-walled (DWNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), as well as carbon fiber. We chose to utilize direct measurement of hydrogen in the materials using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA). This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's Research Experience for Undergraduates and the University of North Texas.

  1. Hydrogen usage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1942-10-22

    This short tabular report listed the number of m/sup 3/ of hydrogen required for a (metric) ton of product for various combinations of raw material and product in a hydrogenation procedure. In producing auto gasoline, bituminous coal required 2800 m/sup 3/, brown coal required 2400 m/sup 3/, high-temperature-carbonization tar required 2100 m/sup 3/, bituminous coal distillation tar required 1300 m/sup 3/, brown-coal low-temperature-carbonization tar required 850 m/sup 3/, petroleum residues required 900 m/sup 3/, and gas oil required 500 m/sup 3/. In producing diesel oil, brown coal required 1900 m/sup 3/, whereas petroleum residues required 500 m/sup 3/. In producing diesel oil, lubricants, and paraffin by the TTH (low-temperature-hydrogenation) process, brown-coal low-temperature-carbonization tar required 550 m/sup 3/. 1 table.

  2. Analysis of diffractive dissociation of K– into K–π+π– on a liquid hydrogen target at the COMPASS spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Jasinski, P

    The systematic exploration of excited meson and baryon states was the central topic of the COmmon Muon Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) physics program in the years 2008 and 2009 at the CERN facility. Particularly states non fitting a constituent quark model were searched for, identified by their exotic quantum numbers which are forbidden by a simple q¯q scheme. A high energetic hadron-beam on a fixed target yielded in resonances decaying into a large variety of final states. The diffractive and central production mechanisms allowed for a clean exclusive selection of channels such as -p ! +-+precoil, which then were analysed with a high precision and a huge number of events. Apart from the main pion component in the negative hadron beam a small fraction of kaons of about 2.5% allowed the study of light strange resonances in the K-+- decay channel. The best measurement in this channel was quoted to be so far the measurement of theWA03 experiment at CERN. The ACCMOR-collaboration has t...

  3. Hydrogen: the future energy carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züttel, Andreas; Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas; Friedrichs, Oliver

    2010-07-28

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century the limitations of the fossil age with regard to the continuing growth of energy demand, the peaking mining rate of oil, the growing impact of CO2 emissions on the environment and the dependency of the economy in the industrialized world on the availability of fossil fuels became very obvious. A major change in the energy economy from fossil energy carriers to renewable energy fluxes is necessary. The main challenge is to efficiently convert renewable energy into electricity and the storage of electricity or the production of a synthetic fuel. Hydrogen is produced from water by electricity through an electrolyser. The storage of hydrogen in its molecular or atomic form is a materials challenge. Some hydrides are known to exhibit a hydrogen density comparable to oil; however, these hydrides require a sophisticated storage system. The system energy density is significantly smaller than the energy density of fossil fuels. An interesting alternative to the direct storage of hydrogen are synthetic hydrocarbons produced from hydrogen and CO2 extracted from the atmosphere. They are CO2 neutral and stored like fossil fuels. Conventional combustion engines and turbines can be used in order to convert the stored energy into work and heat.

  4. Hydrogen storage by polylithiated molecules and nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Er, S.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Brocks, G.

    2009-01-01

    We study polylithiated molecules as building blocks for hydrogen storage materials, using first-principles calculations. CLi4 and OLi2 bind 12 and 10 hydrogen molecules, respectively, with an average binding energy of 0.10 and 0.13 eV, leading to gravimetric densities of 37.8 and 40.3 wt % of H2.

  5. Effects of Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) on Z. marina seedlings, seed germination and shoot density from 2013-01-16 to 2015-09-11 (NCEI Accession 0156588)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Multiple experiments were conducted to determine the effects hydrogen sulfide had on seedlings and seed germination in the seagrass Zostera marina. One study...

  6. Hydrogen Stark Broadened Brackett lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stehlé

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stark-broadened lines of the hydrogen Brackett series are computed for the conditions of stellar atmospheres and circumstellar envelopes. The computation is performed within the Model Microfield Method, which includes the ion dynamic effects and makes the bridge between the impact limit at low density and the static limit at high density and in the line wings. The computation gives the area normalized line shape, from the line core up to the static line wings.

  7. PET Imaging of CRF1 with [11C]R121920 and [11C]DMP696: is the target of sufficient density?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Gregory M.; Parsey, Ramin V.; Kumar, J.S. Dileep; Arango, Victoria; Kassir, Suham A.; Huang, Yung-yu; Simpson, Norman R.; Van Heertum, Ronald L.; Mann, J. John

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Overstimulation of the CRF type 1 receptor (CRF1) is implicated in anxiety and depressive disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo binding characteristics of [ 11 C]R121920 and [ 11 C]DMP696 in the nonhuman primate for application in positron emission tomography (PET) studies of CRF1. Methods: PET imaging with the two novel CRF1 radioligands was performed in baboon. In vitro binding studies for CRF1 were performed in postmortem brain tissue of baboon and human to assess sufficiency of receptor density for PET. Results: Both [ 11 C]R121920 and [ 11 C]DMP696 distributed rapidly and uniformly throughout the brain. Washout was comparable across brain regions, without differences in volume of distribution between regions reported to have high and low in vitro CRF1 binding. Membrane-enriched tissue homogenate assay using [ 125 I]Tyr 0 -sauvagine and specific CRF1 antagonists CP154,526 and SN003 in human occipital cortex yielded maximal binding (B max ) of 63.3 and 147.3 fmol/mg protein, respectively, and in human cerebellar cortex yielded B max of 103.6 and 64.6 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Dissociation constants (K D ) were subnanomolar. In baboon, specific binding was not detectable in the same regions; therefore, B max and K D were not measurable. Autoradiographic results were consistent except there was also detectable CRF1-specific binding in baboon cerebellum. Conclusion: Neither [ 11 C]R121920 nor [ 11 C]DMP696 demonstrated quantifiable regional binding in vivo in baboon. In vitro results suggest CRF1 density in baboon may be insufficient for PET. Studies in man may generate more promising results due to the higher CRF1 density compared with baboon in cerebral cortex and cerebellum

  8. PET Imaging of CRF1 with [{sup 11}C]R121920 and [{sup 11}C]DMP696: is the target of sufficient density?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Gregory M. [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States)]. E-mail: gms11@columbia.edu; Parsey, Ramin V. [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Kumar, J.S. Dileep [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Arango, Victoria [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Kassir, Suham A. [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Huang, Yung-yu [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Simpson, Norman R. [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Van Heertum, Ronald L. [Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Mann, J. John [Division of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032 (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Aim: Overstimulation of the CRF type 1 receptor (CRF1) is implicated in anxiety and depressive disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo binding characteristics of [{sup 11}C]R121920 and [{sup 11}C]DMP696 in the nonhuman primate for application in positron emission tomography (PET) studies of CRF1. Methods: PET imaging with the two novel CRF1 radioligands was performed in baboon. In vitro binding studies for CRF1 were performed in postmortem brain tissue of baboon and human to assess sufficiency of receptor density for PET. Results: Both [{sup 11}C]R121920 and [{sup 11}C]DMP696 distributed rapidly and uniformly throughout the brain. Washout was comparable across brain regions, without differences in volume of distribution between regions reported to have high and low in vitro CRF1 binding. Membrane-enriched tissue homogenate assay using [{sup 125}I]Tyr{sup 0}-sauvagine and specific CRF1 antagonists CP154,526 and SN003 in human occipital cortex yielded maximal binding (B {sub max}) of 63.3 and 147.3 fmol/mg protein, respectively, and in human cerebellar cortex yielded B {sub max} of 103.6 and 64.6 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Dissociation constants (K {sub D}) were subnanomolar. In baboon, specific binding was not detectable in the same regions; therefore, B {sub max} and K {sub D} were not measurable. Autoradiographic results were consistent except there was also detectable CRF1-specific binding in baboon cerebellum. Conclusion: Neither [{sup 11}C]R121920 nor [{sup 11}C]DMP696 demonstrated quantifiable regional binding in vivo in baboon. In vitro results suggest CRF1 density in baboon may be insufficient for PET. Studies in man may generate more promising results due to the higher CRF1 density compared with baboon in cerebral cortex and cerebellum.

  9. Versatile Hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogen is probably the most intriguing ele- ment in the periodic table. Although it is only the seventh most abundant element on earth, it is the most abundant element in the uni- verse. It combines with almost all the ele- ments of the periodic table, except for a few transition elements, to form binary compounds of the type E.

  10. Metastable hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose, V.

    1982-01-01

    This paper deals with the basic physical properties of the metastable 2 2 sub(1/2) state of atomic hydrogen. Applications relying on its special properties, including measurement of the Lamb shift, production of spin-polarized protons and the measurement of molecular electric moments, are discussed. (author)

  11. Hydrogen combustion in aqueous foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.R.; Griffiths, S.K.; Shepherd, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Water fogs are recognized as an effective means to mitigate the effects of large-scale hydrogen combustion that might accompany some loss of coolant nuclear reactor accidents. Fogs of sufficiently high density to produce large beneficial effects may, however, be difficult to generate and maintain. An alternate method of suspending the desired mass of water is via high expansion-ratio aqueous foams. Because, in practice, the foam would be generated using the combustible gaseous contents of the containment vessel, combustion occurs inside the foam cells. Although foams generated with inert gas have been well studied for use in fire fighting, little is known about combustion in foams generated with flammable mixtures. To help assess the usefulness of aqueous foams in a mitigation plan, several open-tube tests and more than 100 closed-vessel tests of hydrogen/air combustion, with and without foam were conducted. At low and intermediate hydrogen concentrations, the foam has little effect on the ultimate isochoric pressure rise. Above 15% hydrogen concentration, the foam causes a significant reduction in the pressure rise. The maximum effect occurs at about 28% hydrogen (the stoichiometric limit is 29.6% hydrogen) where the peak overpressure is reduced by 2 1/2. Despite this overall pressure reduction, the flame speed is increased by up to an order of magnitude for combustion in the foam, and strong pressure fluctuations are observed near a hydrogen concentration of 23%

  12. Hydrogen combustion in aqueous foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.; Griffiths, S.; Shepherd, J.

    1983-01-01

    Water fogs are recognized as an effective means to mitigate the effects of large-scale hydrogen combustion that might accompany some loss-of-coolant nuclear reactor accidents. Fogs of sufficiently high density to produce large beneficial effects may, however, be difficult to generate and maintain. An alternate method of suspending the desired mass of water is via high expansion-ratio aqueous foams. Because, in practice, the foam would be generated using the combustible gaseous contents of the containment vessel, combustion occurs inside the foam cells. Although foams generated with inert gas have been well studied for use in fire fighting, little is known about combustion in foams generated with flammable mixtures. To help assess the usefulness of aqueous foams in a mitigation plan, we have conducted several open tube tests and over one hundred closed vessel tests of hydrogen/air combustion with and without foam. At low and intermediate hydrogen concentrations, the foam has little effect on the ultimate isochoric pressure rise. Above 15% hydrogen concentration, the foam causes a significant reduction in the pressure rise. The maximum effect occurs at about 28% hydrogen (the stoichiometric limit is 29.6% hydrogen) where the peak overpressure is reduced by a factor of two and one-half. Despite this overall pressure reduction, the flame speed is increase by up to an order of magnitude for combustion in the foam and strong pressure fluctuations are observed near a hydrogen concentration of 23%

  13. Critical determinants of the interactions of capsule-expressing Neisseria meningitidis with host cells: the role of receptor density in increased cellular targeting via the outer membrane Opa proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Christopher J; Griffiths, Natalie J; Rowe, Helen A; Heyderman, Robert S; Virji, Mumtaz

    2005-10-01

    Neisseria meningitidis capsule is an important virulence determinant required for survival in the blood but is reportedly involved in inhibiting cellular interactions mediated by meningococcal outer membrane adhesins. However, evidence from our previous studies suggested that target receptor density on host cells may determine whether or not capsulate bacteria can adhere via outer membrane proteins such as Opa. To confirm this and evaluate the impact of capsulation on bacterial interactions, we used Opa(+) and Opa(-) derivatives of capsulate and acapsulate meningococcal isolates and transfected cell lines expressing CEACAM1, a receptor targeted by Opa proteins. To assess the extent and rate of cell association, subpopulations of stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells with different receptor levels were derived. A quantitative correlation of CEACAM1 levels and Opa-dependent binding of both capsulate and acapsulate bacteria was demonstrated, which was accelerated at high receptor densities. However, it appears that invasion by Opa(+) capsulate bacteria only occurs when a threshold level of CEACAM density has been reached. Target cells expressing high levels of CEACAM1 (MFI c. 400) bound threefold more, but internalized 20-fold more Opa(+) capsulate bacteria than those with intermediate expression (MFI c. 100). No overall selection of acapsulate phenotype was observed in the internalized population. These observations confirm that capsule may not be an adequate barrier for cellular interactions and demonstrate the role of a host factor that may determine capsulate bacterial invasion potential. Upregulation of CEACAMs, which can occur in response to inflammatory cytokines, could lead to translocation of a small number of fully capsulate bacteria across mucosal epithelium into the bloodstream sufficient to cause a rapid onset of disseminated disease. Thus the data also suggest a novel rationale for the epidemiological observations that individuals with prior

  14. Industrial implications of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressouyre, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Two major industrial implications of hydrogen are examined: problems related to the effect of hydrogen on materials properties (hydrogen embrittlement), and problems related to the use and production of hydrogen as a future energy vector [fr

  15. Study of secondary electron emission from thin carbon targets with swift charged particles: heavy ions, hydrogen ions; Etude experimentale de l`emission electronique secondaire de cibles minces de carbone sous l`impact de projectiles rapides: ions lourds, ions hydrogene (atomiques, moleculaires ou sous forme d`agregats)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billebaud, A.

    1995-07-12

    The main subject of this work is the study of electron emission from the two surfaces of thin solid targets bombarded with swift charged particles. The slowing down of swift ions in matter is mainly due to inelastic interaction with target electrons (ionization, excitation): the energy transfer to target electrons is responsible for the secondary electron emission process. The phenomenological and theoretical descriptions of this phenomena are the subject of the first chapter. We focused on secondary electron emission induced by different kind of projectiles on thin carbon foils. In chapter two we describe hydrogen cluster induced electron emission measurement between 40 and 120 keV/proton. These projectiles, composed of several atoms, allowed us to study and highlight collective effects of the electron emission process. We extended our study of electron emission to molecular (H{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 3}{sup +}) and composite (H{sup -}, H{sup 0}) projectiles at higher energies (<= 2 MeV): we have designed an experimental set-up devoted to electron emission statistics measurements which allowed us to study, among others things, the role of projectile electrons in secondary electron emission. This experiment is described in the third chapter. Finally, the fourth chapter describes new measurements of electron emission induced by energetic (13 MeV/u) and highly charged argon ion provided by the medium energy beam line (SME) of GANIL (Caen), which have been analyzed in the framework of a semi-empirical model of secondary electron emission. This set of experiments brings new results on composite projectile interaction with matter, and on the consequences of high energy deposition in solids. (author).

  16. Analysis of Hybrid Hydrogen Systems: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, J.; Braun, R.; Munoz, D.; Penev, M.; Kinchin, C.

    2010-01-01

    Report on biomass pathways for hydrogen production and how they can be hybridized to support renewable electricity generation. Two hybrid systems were studied in detail for process feasibility and economic performance. The best-performing system was estimated to produce hydrogen at costs ($1.67/kg) within Department of Energy targets ($2.10/kg) for central biomass-derived hydrogen production while also providing value-added energy services to the electric grid.

  17. Analysis of diffractive dissociation of K{sup -} into K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} on a liquid hydrogen target at the compass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasinski, Prometeusz Kryspin

    2012-01-02

    The systematic exploration of excited meson and baryon states was the central topic of the COmmon Muon Proton Apparatus for Structure and Spectroscopy (COMPASS) physics program in the years 2008 and 2009 at the CERN facility. Particularly states non fitting a constituent quark model were searched for, identified by their exotic quantum numbers which are forbidden by a simple q anti q scheme. A high energetic hadron-beam on a fixed target yielded in resonances decaying into a large variety of final states. The diffractive and central production mechanisms allowed for a clean exclusive selection of channels such as {pi}{sup -}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}p{sub recoil}, which then were analysed with a high precision and a huge number of events. Apart from the main pion component in the negative hadron beam a small fraction of kaons of about 2.5% allowed the study of light strange resonances in the K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay channel. The best measurement in this channel was quoted to be so far the measurement of the WA03 experiment at CERN. The ACCMOR-collaboration has the data recorded and analysed with an experimental set-up very similar to the COMPASS-spectrometer. COMPASS had therefore not only the ability to remeasure this channel with a significantly higher number of events and better precision to cross-check those over 30 years old results. Moreover, improved analysis methods together with new evidences from other experiments, are expected to enlighten our present picture of the hadron spectrum. Chapter 1 introduces the concept of meson spectroscopy. The formation of bound quark anti-quark systems allows to interpret our measurements in terms of coupled quantum numbers, with properties as spin, charge conjugation and parity. Particularly kaonic isospin I=(1)/(2) resonances are classified as proposed by group theory and differences to I=1 and I=0 states, formed mainly by u and d quarks and their anti-quarks, are pointed out. That chapter

  18. Drug-like density: a method of quantifying the "bindability" of a protein target based on a very large set of pockets and drug-like ligands from the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Robert P; Maiorov, Vladimir N; Holloway, M Katharine; Cornell, Wendy D; Gao, Ying-Duo

    2010-11-22

    One approach to estimating the "chemical tractability" of a candidate protein target where we know the atomic resolution structure is to examine the physical properties of potential binding sites. A number of other workers have addressed this issue. We characterize ~290,000 "pockets" from ~42,000 protein crystal structures in terms of a three parameter "pocket space": volume, buriedness, and hydrophobicity. A metric DLID (drug-like density) measures how likely a pocket is to bind a drug-like molecule. This is calculated from the count of other pockets in its local neighborhood in pocket space that contain drug-like cocrystallized ligands and the count of total pockets in the neighborhood. Surprisingly, despite being defined locally, a global trend in DLID can be predicted by a simple linear regression on log(volume), buriedness, and hydrophobicity. Two levels of simplification are necessary to relate the DLID of individual pockets to "targets": taking the best DLID per Protein Data Bank (PDB) entry (because any given crystal structure can have many pockets), and taking the median DLID over all PDB entries for the same target (because different crystal structures of the same protein can vary because of artifacts and real conformational changes). We can show that median DLIDs for targets that are detectably homologous in sequence are reasonably similar and that median DLIDs correlate with the "druggability" estimate of Cheng et al. (Nature Biotechnology 2007, 25, 71-75).

  19. Controlling Hydrogenation of Graphene on Ir(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Richard; Andersen, Mie; Jørgensen, Bjarke

    2013-01-01

    Combined fast X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations reveal the presence of two types of hydrogen adsorbate structures at the graphene/ Ir(111) interface, namely, graphane-like islands and hydrogen dimer structures. While the former give rise to a periodic...... pattern, dimers tend to destroy the periodicity. Our data reveal distinctive growth rates and stability of both types of structures, thereby allowing one to obtain well-defined patterns of hydrogen clusters. The ability to control and manipulate the formation and size of hydrogen structures on graphene...... facilitates tailoring of its properties for a wide range of applications by means of covalent functionalization....

  20. Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-08-06

    An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage electrode (130), and an ion conducting membrane (120) positioned between the counter electrode (110) and the storage electrode (130). The counter electrode (110) is formed of one or more materials with an affinity for hydrogen and includes an exchange matrix for elements/materials selected from the non-noble materials that have an affinity for hydrogen. The storage electrode (130) is loaded with hydrogen such as atomic or mono-hydrogen that is adsorbed by a hydrogen storage material such that the hydrogen (132, 134) may be stored with low chemical bonding. The hydrogen storage material is typically formed of a lightweight material such as carbon or boron with a network of passage-ways or intercalants for storing and conducting mono-hydrogen, protons, or the like. The hydrogen storage material may store at least ten percent by weight hydrogen (132, 134) at ambient temperature and pressure.

  1. Targeted disruption of the idol gene alters cellular regulation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor by sterols and liver x receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Elena; Hong, Cynthia; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Tu, Yiping; Hu, Yan; Zelcer, Noam; Boyadjian, Rima; de Jong, Pieter J; Young, Stephen G; Fong, Loren G; Tontonoz, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Previously, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase Idol (inducible degrader of the low-density lipoprotein [LDL] receptor [LDLR]) as a posttranscriptional regulator of the LDLR pathway. Idol stimulates LDLR degradation through ubiquitination of its C-terminal domain, thereby limiting cholesterol uptake. Here we report the generation and characterization of mouse embryonic stem cells homozygous for a null mutation in the Idol gene. Cells lacking Idol exhibit markedly elevated levels of the LDLR protein and increased rates of LDL uptake. Furthermore, despite an intact sterol responsive element-binding protein (SREBP) pathway, Idol-null cells exhibit an altered response to multiple regulators of sterol metabolism, including serum, oxysterols, and synthetic liver X receptor (LXR) agonists. The ability of oxysterols and lipoprotein-containing serum to suppress LDLR protein levels is reduced, and the time course of suppression is delayed, in cells lacking Idol. LXR ligands have no effect on LDLR levels in Idol-null cells, indicating that Idol is required for LXR-dependent inhibition of the LDLR pathway. In line with these results, the half-life of the LDLR protein is prolonged in the absence of Idol. Finally, the ability of statins and PCSK9 to alter LDLR levels is independent of, and additive with, the LXR-Idol pathway. These results demonstrate that the LXR-Idol pathway is an important contributor to feedback inhibition of the LDLR by sterols and a biological determinant of cellular LDL uptake.

  2. Targeted Disruption of the Idol Gene Alters Cellular Regulation of the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor by Sterols and Liver X Receptor Agonists ▿ §

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Elena; Hong, Cynthia; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Tu, Yiping; Hu, Yan; Zelcer, Noam; Boyadjian, Rima; de Jong, Pieter J.; Young, Stephen G.; Fong, Loren G.; Tontonoz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase Idol (inducible degrader of the low-density lipoprotein [LDL] receptor [LDLR]) as a posttranscriptional regulator of the LDLR pathway. Idol stimulates LDLR degradation through ubiquitination of its C-terminal domain, thereby limiting cholesterol uptake. Here we report the generation and characterization of mouse embryonic stem cells homozygous for a null mutation in the Idol gene. Cells lacking Idol exhibit markedly elevated levels of the LDLR protein and increased rates of LDL uptake. Furthermore, despite an intact sterol responsive element-binding protein (SREBP) pathway, Idol-null cells exhibit an altered response to multiple regulators of sterol metabolism, including serum, oxysterols, and synthetic liver X receptor (LXR) agonists. The ability of oxysterols and lipoprotein-containing serum to suppress LDLR protein levels is reduced, and the time course of suppression is delayed, in cells lacking Idol. LXR ligands have no effect on LDLR levels in Idol-null cells, indicating that Idol is required for LXR-dependent inhibition of the LDLR pathway. In line with these results, the half-life of the LDLR protein is prolonged in the absence of Idol. Finally, the ability of statins and PCSK9 to alter LDLR levels is independent of, and additive with, the LXR-Idol pathway. These results demonstrate that the LXR-Idol pathway is an important contributor to feedback inhibition of the LDLR by sterols and a biological determinant of cellular LDL uptake. PMID:21343340

  3. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    weak (strained) Si–Si bond thereby apparently enhancing the hydrogen diffusion and increasing the light-induced dangling bonds. Keywords. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon; metastable electronic states; hydrogen diffusion. PACS Nos 61.43.Dq; 66.30.-h; 71.23.Cq. 1. Introduction. Hydrogen passivation of dangling bonds ...

  4. Storage of hydrogen on carbons; Stockage de l'hydrogene sur les carbones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, J. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, CNRS-CRMD, 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France)

    2000-07-01

    The storage of hydrogen on carbons, with densities above 10% hydrogen weight, can be used in the sector of transport. However, only the physical-sorption of this gas (which is almost perfect and boils at 20 K under atmospheric pressure) cannot explain this performance. A study of the possible sites for one hydrogen, which can take very different forms, is presented, in order to better understand the rational development of this storage mode which could reach about ten weight %. (O.M.)

  5. Recombination dominated hydrogenic emission from the detached plasmas in W7-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramasubramanian, N.; Koenig, R.; Wenzel, U.; Thomsen, H.; McCormick, K.; Grigull, P.; Feng, Y.; Klinger, T.; John, A.

    2003-01-01

    Beyond a certain threshold average density in the High-Density H-Mode the island divertor plasma in the stellarator W7-AS undergoes partial detachment. The tomographic reconstruction of the radiated power density from the detached pulses show that the radiation profile in the triangular plane is also asymmetric. In the detached phase, the spectrometer viewing tangentially to the target tiles in the top divertor region manifests that the impurity radiation layer is close to the X-points. The spectral analysis also demonstrates the presence of a hydrogen radiation zone dominated by recombination emission close to the target tiles. This papers presents the emission from the deeply detached locations including the volume recombination in a stable discharge. (orig.)

  6. MRI Fusion-Targeted Transrectal Prostate Biopsy and the Role of Prostate-Specific Antigen Density and Prostate Health Index for the Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer in Southeast Asian Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Teck Wei; Png, Keng Siang; Lee, Chau Hung; Yuwono, Arianto; Yeow, Yuyi; Chong, Kian Tai; Lee, Yee Mun; Tan, Cher Heng; Tan, Yung Khan

    2017-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that targeted biopsy has a higher detection rate for clinically significant prostate cancer (csPCa) than systematic biopsy. We defined csPCa as any Gleason sum ≥7 cancer. In patients with Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) 3 lesions, to determine if factors, such as prostate-specific antigen density (PSAD) and prostate health index (PHI), can predict csPCa and help select patients for biopsy. We report the first series of targeted biopsies in Southeast Asian men, with comparison against systematic biopsy. Consecutive patients were registered into a prospective institutional review board-approved database in our institution. We reviewed patients who underwent biopsy from May 2016 to June 2017. Inclusion criteria for our study were patients with at least one PI-RADS ≥3, and who underwent both targeted and systematic biopsies in the same sitting. There were 115 patients in the study, of whom 74 (64.3%) had a previous negative systematic biopsy. Targeted biopsies detected significantly less Gleason 6 cancers than systematic biopsies (p < 0.01), and demonstrated significantly higher sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value (NPV) for the detection of csPCa. For patients with PI-RADS 3 lesions, PHI and PSAD were found to be the best predictors for csPCa. PSAD <0.10 ng/mL/mL had an NPV of 93% and sensitivity of 92%, while allowing 20% of patients to avoid biopsy. PHI cutoff of <27 would allow 34% of patients to avoid biopsy, with both sensitivity and NPV of 100%. Targeted prostate biopsies were found to be significantly superior to systematic biopsies for the detection of csPCa, while detecting less Gleason 6 cancer. Usage of PSAD and PHI cutoff levels in patients with PI-RADS 3 lesions may enable a number of patients to avoid unnecessary biopsy.

  7. Towards an ammonia-mediated hydrogen economy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Johannessen, Tue; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink

    2006-01-01

    . Recently, metal ammine salts were proposed as safe, reversible. high-density and low-cost hydrogen carriers. Here, we discuss how this development could provide a platform for using ammonia as a fuel for the hydrogen economy, We do that by comparing various possible hydrogen carriers with respect to energy......Materialization of a hydrogen economy could provide a solution to significant global challenges, In particular. the possibility of improving the efficiency and simultaneously minimizing the environmental impact of energy conversion processes, together with the opportunity to reduce the dependency...... of fossil fuels, are main drivers for the currently increasing research and development efforts. However. significant technological breakthroughs are necessary for making a hydrogen economy feasible. In particular, it is necessary to develop appropriate hydrogen storage and transportation technologies...

  8. Positron Spectroscopy of Nanodiamonds after Hydrogen Sorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Nikitina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure and defects of nanodiamonds influence the hydrogen sorption capacity. Positronium can be used as a sensor for detecting places with the most efficient capture of hydrogen atoms. Hydrogenation of carbon materials was performed from gas atmosphere. The concentration of hydrogen absorbed by the sample depends on the temperature and pressure. The concentration 1.2 wt % is achieved at the temperature of 243 K and the pressure of 0.6 MPa. The hydrogen saturation of nanodiamonds changes the positron lifetime. Increase of sorption cycle numbers effects the positron lifetime, as well as the parameters of the Doppler broadening of annihilation line. The electron-positron annihilation being a sensitive method, it allows detecting the electron density fluctuation of the carbon material after hydrogen saturation.

  9. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  10. Low temperature hydrogenation of iron nanoparticles on graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Wang, Yongming; Chiba, Shotaro; Nakagawa, Yuki; Isobe, Shigehito; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogenation of iron nanoparticles was performed both computationally and experimentally where previously chemically-bonded iron hydride is considered to be unachievable under ordinary conditions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predict that hydrogenated iron nanoparticles are stabilized on a single-layer graphene/Cu substrate. Experimentally, iron nanoparticles were deposited onto a graphene/Cu substrate by vacuum deposition. Hydrogenation was done at 1atm of hydrogen gas and u...

  11. Hydrogen combustion in aqueous foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.R.; Griffiths, S.K.; Shepherd, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Water fogs are recognized as an effective means to mitigate the effects of large-scale hydrogen combustion that might accompany some reactor loss-of-coolant reactor accidents. Fogs of sufficiently high density to produce large beneficial effects may, however, be difficult to generate and maintain. An alternate method of suspending the desired mass of water is via high expansion-ratio aqueous foams. Because the foam would be generated using the combustible gaseous contents of the containment vessel, combustion occurs inside the foam cells. Although foams generated with inert gas have been well studied for use in fire fighting, little is known about combustion in foams generated with flammable mixtures. To help assess the usefulness of aqueous foams in a mitigation plan, the authors have conducted open tube tests and closed vessel tests of hydrogen/air combustion with and without foam. At low and intermediate hydrogen concentrations, the foam has little effect on the ultimate isochoric pressure rise. Above 15% hydrogen concentration, the foam causes a significant reduction in the pressure rise. The maximum effect occurs at about 28% hydrogen where the peak overpressure is reduced by two and one-half. Despite this overall pressure reduction, the flame speed is increased by up to an order of magnitude for combustion in the foam and strong pressure fluctuations are observed near a hydrogen concentration of 23%

  12. Hydrogen combustion in aqueous foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, M.R.; Griffiths, S.K.; Shepherd, J.E.

    1982-09-01

    Water fogs are recognized as an effective means to mitigate the effects of large-scale hydrogen combustion that might accompany some loss-of-coolant nuclear reactor accidents. Fogs of sufficiently high density to produce large beneficial effects may, however, be difficult to generate and maintain. An alternate method of suspending the desired mass of water is via high expansion-ratio aqueous foams. To help assess the usefulness of aqueous foams in a mitigation plan, several open tube tests and over one hundred closed vessel tests of hydrogen/air combustion with and without foam have been conducted. Above 15% hydrogen concentration, the foam causes a significant reduction in the pressure rise. The maximum effect occurs at about 28% hydrogen (the stoichiometric limit is 29.6% hydrogen) where the peak overpressure is reduced by two and one-half. Despite this overall pressure reduction, the flame speed is increased by up to an order of magnitude for combustion in the foam and strong pressure fluctuations are observed near a hydrogen concentration of 23%

  13. Limits for hydrogen production of a solar - hydrogen system in Cuernavaca, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arriaga, H.L.G.; Gutierrez, S.L.; Cano, U.

    2006-01-01

    In this work experimental data are used in order to estimate the production of hydrogen as a function of irradiance of a direct-interconnection of solar panel system with a SPE (Solid Polymer Electrolyte) electrolyzer (also Solar-Hydrogen system). The solar - hydrogen system, consists of a photovoltaic solar array of 36 panels (75 Watts each) of monocrystalline silicon interconnected with an electrolyzer stack of 25 cells (around 100 cm 2 of geometrical area) with a maximum hydrogen production of 1 Nm 3 /h. By the use of voltage, current density, energy consumption values of the whole solar-hydrogen system, an average efficiency up to 5% was estimated and an average of 3,800 NL of hydrogen per day can be expected. Also the maximum hydrogen production for the months of July and December (sunniest and least sunny months in the location) is predicted. (authors)

  14. Hydrogen recycling and transport in the helical divertor of TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clever, Meike

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the hydrogen recycling at the target plates of the helical divertor in TEXTOR and by this the capability of this divertor configuration to access such favourable operational regimes. In order to study the different divertor density regimes in TEXTOR, discharges were performed in which the total plasma density was increased continuously up to the density limit. The recycling was investigated in a fixed helical divertor structure where four helical strike points with a poloidal width of about 8-10 cm are created at the divertor target plates. The experimental investigation of the hydrogen recycling was carried out using mainly spectroscopic methods supplemented by Langmuir probe, interferometric and atomic beam measurements. In the framework of this thesis a spectroscopic multi camera system has been built that facilitates the simultaneous observation of four different spectral lines, recording images of the divertor target plates and the plasma volume close to the target. The system facilitates the simultaneous measurement of the poloidal and toroidal pattern of the recycling flux at the divertor target without the need for sweeping the plasma structure. The simultaneous observation of different spectral lines reduces the uncertainty in the analysis based on several lines, as the contribution from uncertainties in the reproducibility of plasma parameters in different discharges are eliminated and only the uncertainty of the measurement method limits the accuracy. The spatial resolution of the system in poloidal and toroidal direction (0.8 mm{+-}0.01 mm) is small compared to the separation of the helical strike points, the capability of the measurement method to resolve these structures is therefore limited by the line-of-sight integration and the penetration depth of the light emitting species. The measurements showed that the recycling flux increases linearly with increasing plasma density, a high recycling regime is not

  15. Hydrogen recycling and transport in the helical divertor of TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clever, Meike

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the hydrogen recycling at the target plates of the helical divertor in TEXTOR and by this the capability of this divertor configuration to access such favourable operational regimes. In order to study the different divertor density regimes in TEXTOR, discharges were performed in which the total plasma density was increased continuously up to the density limit. The recycling was investigated in a fixed helical divertor structure where four helical strike points with a poloidal width of about 8-10 cm are created at the divertor target plates. The experimental investigation of the hydrogen recycling was carried out using mainly spectroscopic methods supplemented by Langmuir probe, interferometric and atomic beam measurements. In the framework of this thesis a spectroscopic multi camera system has been built that facilitates the simultaneous observation of four different spectral lines, recording images of the divertor target plates and the plasma volume close to the target. The system facilitates the simultaneous measurement of the poloidal and toroidal pattern of the recycling flux at the divertor target without the need for sweeping the plasma structure. The simultaneous observation of different spectral lines reduces the uncertainty in the analysis based on several lines, as the contribution from uncertainties in the reproducibility of plasma parameters in different discharges are eliminated and only the uncertainty of the measurement method limits the accuracy. The spatial resolution of the system in poloidal and toroidal direction (0.8 mm±0.01 mm) is small compared to the separation of the helical strike points, the capability of the measurement method to resolve these structures is therefore limited by the line-of-sight integration and the penetration depth of the light emitting species. The measurements showed that the recycling flux increases linearly with increasing plasma density, a high recycling regime is not

  16. Boron-Based Hydrogen Storage: Ternary Borides and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajo, John J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA (United States)

    2016-04-28

    DOE continues to seek reversible solid-state hydrogen materials with hydrogen densities of ≥11 wt% and ≥80 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at moderate temperatures (≤100 °C) and pressures (≤100 bar) enabling incorporation into hydrogen storage systems suitable for transportation applications. Boron-based hydrogen storage materials have the potential to meet the density requirements given boron’s low atomic weight, high chemical valance, and versatile chemistry. However, the rates of hydrogen exchange in boron-based compounds are thus far much too slow for practical applications. Although contributing to the high hydrogen densities, the high valance of boron also leads to slow rates of hydrogen exchange due to extensive boron-boron atom rearrangements during hydrogen cycling. This rearrangement often leads to multiple solid phases occurring over hydrogen release and recharge cycles. These phases must nucleate and react with each other across solid-solid phase boundaries leading to energy barriers that slow the rates of hydrogen exchange. This project sought to overcome the slow rates of hydrogen exchange in boron-based hydrogen storage materials by minimizing the number of solid phases and the boron atom rearrangement over a hydrogen release and recharge cycle. Two novel approaches were explored: 1) developing matched pairs of ternary borides and mixed-metal borohydrides that could exchange hydrogen with only one hydrogenated phase (the mixed-metal borohydride) and only one dehydrogenated phase (the ternary boride); and 2) developing boranes that could release hydrogen by being lithiated using lithium hydride with no boron-boron atom rearrangement.

  17. Inelastic collision rates of trapped metastable hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landhuis, D; Matos, L; Moss, SC; Steinberger, JK; Vant, K; Willmann, L; Greytak, TJ; Kleppner, D

    We report the first detailed decay studies of trapped metastable (2S) hydrogen. By two-photon excitation of ultracold H samples, we have produced clouds of at least 5x10(7) magnetically trapped 2S atoms at densities greater than 4x10(10) cm(-3) and temperatures below 100 muK. At these densities and

  18. Quantification of Hydrogen Concentrations in Surface and Interface Layers and Bulk Materials through Depth Profiling with Nuclear Reaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Markus; Ohno, Satoshi; Ogura, Shohei; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-29

    Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) via the resonant (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C reaction is a highly effective method of depth profiling that quantitatively and non-destructively reveals the hydrogen density distribution at surfaces, at interfaces, and in the volume of solid materials with high depth resolution. The technique applies a (15)N ion beam of 6.385 MeV provided by an electrostatic accelerator and specifically detects the (1)H isotope in depths up to about 2 μm from the target surface. Surface H coverages are measured with a sensitivity in the order of ~10(13) cm(-2) (~1% of a typical atomic monolayer density) and H volume concentrations with a detection limit of ~10(18) cm(-3) (~100 at. ppm). The near-surface depth resolution is 2-5 nm for surface-normal (15)N ion incidence onto the target and can be enhanced to values below 1 nm for very flat targets by adopting a surface-grazing incidence geometry. The method is versatile and readily applied to any high vacuum compatible homogeneous material with a smooth surface (no pores). Electrically conductive targets usually tolerate the ion beam irradiation with negligible degradation. Hydrogen quantitation and correct depth analysis require knowledge of the elementary composition (besides hydrogen) and mass density of the target material. Especially in combination with ultra-high vacuum methods for in-situ target preparation and characterization, (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C NRA is ideally suited for hydrogen analysis at atomically controlled surfaces and nanostructured interfaces. We exemplarily demonstrate here the application of (15)N NRA at the MALT Tandem accelerator facility of the University of Tokyo to (1) quantitatively measure the surface coverage and the bulk concentration of hydrogen in the near-surface region of a H2 exposed Pd(110) single crystal, and (2) to determine the depth location and layer density of hydrogen near the interfaces of thin SiO2 films on Si(100).

  19. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  20. Cryogenic system for liquid hydrogen polarimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitami, T.; Chiba, M.; Hirabayashi, H.; Ishii, T.; Kato, S.

    1979-01-01

    A cryogenic system has been constructed for a liquid hydrogen polarimeter in order to measure polarization of high energy proton at the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron of Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. The system principally consists of a cryogenerator with a cryogenic transfer line, a liquid hydrogen cryostat, and a 14.5 l target container of thin aluminum alloy where liquid hydrogen is served for the experiment. The refrigeration capacity is about 54 W at 20.4 K without a target container. (author)

  1. Mechanochemical hydrogenation of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T.; Smol, Robert; Farber, Gerald; Naphtali, Leonard M.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation of coal is improved through the use of a mechanical force to reduce the size of the particulate coal simultaneously with the introduction of gaseous hydrogen, or other hydrogen donor composition. Such hydrogen in the presence of elemental tin during this one-step size reduction-hydrogenation further improves the yield of the liquid hydrocarbon product.

  2. Causes of failure to achieve the low density lipoprotein cholesterol therapeutic target in patients with high and very high vascular risk controlled in Lipid and Vascular Risk Units. EROMOT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Clotilde; Plana, Núria; Arnau, Anna; Matas, Laia; Mauri, Marta; Vila, Àlex; Vila, Lluís; Soler, Cristina; Montesinos, Jesús; Masana, Lluís; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    Determination of the level of achievement of the low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) therapeutic target in patients with high and very high vascular risk treated in Lipid Units, as well as the causes of non-achievement. Multicentre retrospective observational study that included patients over 18 years with high and very high vascular risk, according to the criteria of the 2012 European Guidelines on Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, referred consecutively to Lipid Units between January and June 2012 and with follow-up two years after the first visit. The study included a total of 243 patients from 16 lipid units. The mean age was 52.2 years (SD 13.7), of whom 62.6% were males, and 40.3% of them were very high risk. At the first visit, 86.8% (25.1% in combination) and 95.0% (47.3% in combination) in the second visit (P<.001) were treated with lipid-lowering treatment. The therapeutic target was achieved by 28% (95 CI: 22.4-34.1). As regards the causes of non-achievement, 24.6% were related to the medication (10.3% maximum tolerated dose and 10.9% due to the appearance of adverse effects), 43.4% due to the physician (19.4% by inertia, 13.7% considering that target already reached), and 46.9% due to the patient, highlighting the therapeutic non-compliance (31,4%). LDL-C targets were achieved in about one-third of patients. The low adherence of the patient, followed by medical inertia are the most frequent causes that can explain these results. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...

  4. Soft x-ray scattering using FEL radiation for probing near-solid density plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toleikis, S; Faustlin, R R; Cao, L; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Przystawik, A; Radcliffe, P; Redmer, R; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Truong, N X; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

    2009-03-03

    We report on soft x-ray scattering experiments on cryogenic hydrogen and simple metal targets. As a source of intense and ultrashort soft x-ray pulses we have used free-electron laser radiation at 92 eV photon energy from FLASH at DESY, Hamburg. X-ray pulses with energies up to 100 {micro}J and durations below 50 fs provide interaction with the target leading simultaneously to plasma formation and scattering. Experiments exploiting both of these interactions have been carried out, using the same experimental setup. Firstly, recording of soft x-ray inelastic scattering from near-solid density hydrogen plasmas at few electronvolt temperatures confirms the feasibility of this diagnostics technique. Secondly, the soft x-ray excitation of few electronvolt solid-density plasmas in simple metals could be studied by recording soft x-ray line and continuum emission integrated over emission times from fs to ns.

  5. The hydrogen technology assessment, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Addison

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this phase 1 report is to begin to form the information base of the economics and energy uses of hydrogen-related technologies on which the members of the National Hydrogen Association (NHA) can build a hydrogen vision of the future. The secondary goal of this report is the development of NHA positions on national research, development, and demonstration opportunities. The third goal, with the aid of the established hydrogen vision and NHA positions, is to evaluate ongoing federal research goals and activities. The evaluations will be performed in a manner that compares the costs associated with using systems that achieve those goals against the cost of performing those tasks today with fossil fuels. From this ongoing activity should emerge an NHA information base, one or more hydrogen visions of the future, and cost and performance targets for hydrogen applications to complete in the market place.

  6. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available of hydrogen in metals processing and treatment identified, and mechanisms for hydrogen entry into a ferritic surface are discussed. The differences between hydrogen attack of ferritic steels and copper alloys are contrasted, and an unusual case study...

  7. Doped phosphorene for hydrogen capture: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-ping; Hu, Wei; Du, Aijun; Lu, Xiong; Zhang, Ya-ping; Zhou, Jian; Lin, Xiaoyan; Tang, Youhong

    2018-03-01

    Hydrogen capture and storage is the core of hydrogen energy application. With its high specific surface area, direct bandgap, and variety of potential applications, phosphorene has attracted much research interest. In this study, density functional theory (DFT) is utilized to study the interactions between doped phosphorenes and hydrogen molecules. The effects of different dopants and metallic or nonmetallic atoms on phosphorene/hydrogen interactions is systematically studied by adsorption energy, electron density difference, partial density of states analysis, and Hirshfeld population. Our results indicate that the metallic dopants Pt, Co, and Ni can help to improve the hydrogen capture ability of phosphorene, whereas the nonmetallic dopants have no effect on it. Among the various metallic dopants, Pt performs very differently, such that it can help to dissociate H2 on phosphorene. Specified doped phosphorene could be a promising candidate for hydrogen storage, with behaviors superior to those of intrinsic graphene sheet.

  8. Photovoltaic Hydrogen Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daud, Taher; Janesick, James R.; Lambe, John

    1989-01-01

    Photovoltaic device senses hydrogen developed to test degradation of diodes with platinum flash gates on backs. Sensing element is p/n junction rather than conventional Schottky barrier or metal oxide/silicon field-effect transistor. Hydrogen-indicating electrical signal modulated optically rather than electrically. Layered structure of hydrogen detector and principle of operation resemble silicon solar photovoltaic cell. Hydrogen detector responds to hydrogen in atmosphere within minutes and recovers quickly when hydrogen removed.

  9. HySA infrastructure center of competence: A strategic collaboration platform for renewable hydrogen production and storage for fuel cell telecom applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bessarabov, D

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available , the following enablers will be discussed: existing active projects for hydrogen production: solar-to-hydrogen demonstrations based on PEM electrolysis, ammonia-to-hydrogen projects for telecom, advanced PEM electrolysis concepts (high-current density operation...

  10. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Sidney

    1989-01-01

    It was long known that many strong metals can become weakened and brittle as the result of the accumulation of hydrogen within the metal. When the metal is stretched, it does not show normal ductile properties, but fractures prematurely. This problem can occur as the result of a hydrogen evolution reaction such as corrosion or electroplating, or due to hydrogen in the environment at the metal surface. High strength alloys such as steels are especially susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Nickel-hydrogen cells commonly use Inconel 718 alloy for the pressure container, and this also is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Metals differ in their susceptibility to embrittlement. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells is analyzed and the reasons why it may or may not occur are discussed. Although Inconel 718 can display hydrogen embrittlement, experience has not identified any problem with nickel-hydrogen cells. No hydrogen embrittlement problem is expected with the 718 alloy pressure container used in nickel-hydrogen cells.

  11. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    c0, c being the instantaneous concentration at a local point and c0, the average concentration of hydrogen in the hydrogenated amorphous silicon. If the system is both incompressible and isotropic, the change in Helmholtz free energy due to fluctuations in the local concentration of hydrogen is given as. 122. Pramana – J.

  12. Positron simulations of defects in tungsten containing hydrogen and helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troev, T.; Popov, E.; Staikov, P.; Nankov, N.; Yoshiie, T.

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of the behavior of defects containing hydrogen or helium in tungsten is an important issue. Here the properties of defects in tungsten containing hydrogen or helium atoms have been investigated by model positron lifetime quantum-mechanical simulations. The electron and positron wave functions have been obtained in the local density approximation to the two-component density-functional theory. The calculated values of the positron lifetime correlate with the magnitude of the electron density. The vacancy-clusters without hydrogen or helium are active positron traps. The lattice relaxation of atoms around vacancy reduces the effective vacancy volume and decrease the positron lifetime at a vacancy. The hydrogen and helium atoms are trapped in tungsten by lattice vacancies and nano-voids. It was established that positron lifetime depends on the density of gas atoms inside the nano-void. Hydrogen and helium presence in the larger nano-voids considerably decrease the positron lifetime.

  13. Density dependence of SOL power width in ASDEX upgrade L-Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sieglin

    2017-08-01

    A recent study [4] with an open divertor configuration found an asymmetry of the power fall-off length between inner and outer target with a smaller power fall-off length λq,i on the inner divertor target. Measurements with a closed divertor configuration find a similar asymmetry for low recycling divertor conditions. It is found, in the experiment, that the in/out asymmetry λq,i/λq,o is strongly increasing with increasing density. Most notably the heat flux density at the inner divertor target is reducing with increasing λq,i whilst the total power onto each divertor target stays constant. It is found that λq,o exhibits no significant density dependence for hydrogen and deuterium but increases with about the square root of the electron density for helium. The difference between H,D and He could be due to the different recycling behaviour in the divertor. These findings may help current modelling attempts to parametrize the density dependence of the widening of the power channel and thus allow for detailed comparison to both divertor effects like recycling or increased upstream SOL cross field transport.

  14. Modeling hydrogen storage in boron-substituted graphene decorated with potassium metal atoms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tokarev, A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Boron-substituted graphene decorated with potassium metal atoms was considered as a novel material for hydrogen storage. Density functional theory calculations were used to model key properties of the material, such as geometry, hydrogen packing...

  15. Population inversion in recombining hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukane, Utaro; Yokota, Toshiaki; Oda, Toshiatsu.

    1978-11-01

    The collisional-radiative model is applied to a recombining hydrogen plasma in order to investigate the plasma condition in which the population inversion between the energy levels of hydrogen can be generated. The population inversion is expected in a plasma where the three body recombination has a large contribution to the recombining processes and the effective recombination rate is beyond a certain value for a given electron density and temperature. Calculated results are presented in figures and tables. (author)

  16. Modeling leaks from liquid hydrogen storage systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents a series of models for describing intended and unintended discharges from liquid hydrogen storage systems. Typically these systems store hydrogen in the saturated state at approximately five to ten atmospheres. Some of models discussed here are equilibrium-based models that make use of the NIST thermodynamic models to specify the states of multiphase hydrogen and air-hydrogen mixtures. Two types of discharges are considered: slow leaks where hydrogen enters the ambient at atmospheric pressure and fast leaks where the hydrogen flow is usually choked and expands into the ambient through an underexpanded jet. In order to avoid the complexities of supersonic flow, a single Mach disk model is proposed for fast leaks that are choked. The velocity and state of hydrogen downstream of the Mach disk leads to a more tractable subsonic boundary condition. However, the hydrogen temperature exiting all leaks (fast or slow, from saturated liquid or saturated vapor) is approximately 20.4 K. At these temperatures, any entrained air would likely condense or even freeze leading to an air-hydrogen mixture that cannot be characterized by the REFPROP subroutines. For this reason a plug flow entrainment model is proposed to treat a short zone of initial entrainment and heating. The model predicts the quantity of entrained air required to bring the air-hydrogen mixture to a temperature of approximately 65 K at one atmosphere. At this temperature the mixture can be treated as a mixture of ideal gases and is much more amenable to modeling with Gaussian entrainment models and CFD codes. A Gaussian entrainment model is formulated to predict the trajectory and properties of a cold hydrogen jet leaking into ambient air. The model shows that similarity between two jets depends on the densimetric Froude number, density ratio and initial hydrogen concentration.

  17. Hydrogen at the Rooftop: Compact CPV-Hydrogen system to Convert Sunlight to Hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Burhan, Muhammad

    2017-12-27

    Despite being highest potential energy source, solar intermittency and low power density make it difficult for solar energy to compete with the conventional power plants. Highly efficient concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system provides best technology to be paired with the electrolytic hydrogen production, as a sustainable energy source with long term energy storage. However, the conventional gigantic design of CPV system limits its market and application to the open desert fields without any rooftop installation scope, unlike conventional PV. This makes CPV less popular among solar energy customers. This paper discusses the development of compact CPV-Hydrogen system for the rooftop application in the urban region. The in-house built compact CPV system works with hybrid solar tracking of 0.1° accuracy, ensured through proposed double lens collimator based solar tracking sensor. With PEM based electrolyser, the compact CPV-hydrogen system showed 28% CPV efficiency and 18% sunlight to hydrogen (STH) efficiency, for rooftop operation in tropical region of Singapore. For plant designers, the solar to hydrogen production rating of 217 kWh/kg has been presented with 15% STH daily average efficiency, recorded from the long term field operation of the system.

  18. Hydrogenated fullerenes in space: FT-IR spectra analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Barbary, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Fullerenes and hydrogenated fullerenes are found in circumstellar and interstellar environments. But the determination structures for the detected bands in the interstellar and circumstellar space are not completely understood so far. For that purpose, the aim of this article is to provide all possible infrared spectra for C 20 and C 60 fullerenes and their hydrogenated fullerenes. Density Functional theory (DFT) is applied using B3LYP exchange-functional with basis set 6–31G(d, p). The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is found to be capable of distinguishing between fullerenes, mono hydrogenated fullerenes and fully hydrogenated fullerenes. In addition, deposition of one hydrogen atom outside the fully hydrogenated fullerenes is found to be distinguished by forming H 2 molecule at peak around 4440 cm −1 . However, deposition of one hydrogen atom inside the fully hydrogenated fullerenes cannot be distinguished. The obtained spectral structures are analyzed and are compared with available experimental results.

  19. Fast response densitometer for measuring liquid density

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Densitometer was developed which produces linear voltage proportional to changes in density of flowing liquid hydrogen. Unit has fast response time and good system stability, statistical variation, and thermal equilibrium. System accuracy is 2 percent of total density span. Basic design may be altered to include measurement of other flowing materials.

  20. The Cryogenic Target for the G{sup 0} Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silviu Covrig; Elizabeth Beise; Robert Carr; Kenneth Gustafsson; Lars Hannelius; M.-C. Herda; C.E. Jones; Jianglai Liu; Robert McKeown; Retief Neveling; Aamer Rauf; Gregory Smith

    2005-02-01

    A cryogenic horizontal single loop target has been designed, built, tested and operated for the G{sup 0} experiment in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. The target cell is 20 cm long, the loop volume is 6.5 l and the target operates with the cryogenic pump fully immersed in the fluid. The target has been designed to operate at 30 Hz rotational pump speed with either liquid hydrogen or liquid deuterium. The high power heat exchanger is able to remove 1000 W of heat from the liquid hydrogen, while the nominal electron beam with current of 40 {mu}A and energy of 3 GeV deposits about 320 W of heat into the liquid. The increase in the systematic uncertainty due to the liquid hydrogen target is negligible on the scale of a parity violation experiment. The global normalized yield reduction for 40 {mu}A beam is about 1.5 % and the target density fluctuations contribute less than 238 ppm (parts per million) to the total asymmetry width, typically about 1200 ppm, in a Q{sup 2} bin.

  1. Laser controlled magnetism in hydrogenated fullerene films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarova, Tatiana L.; Shelankov, Andrei L.; Kvyatkovskii, Oleg E.; Zakharova, Irina B.; Buga, Sergei G.; Volkov, Aleksandr P.

    2011-01-01

    Room temperature ferromagnetic-like behavior in fullerene photopolymerized films treated with monatomic hydrogen is reported. The hydrogen treatment controllably varies the paramagnetic spin concentration and laser induced polymerization transforms the paramagnetic phase to a ferromagnetic-like one. Excess laser irradiation destroys magnetic ordering, presumably due to structural changes, which was continuously monitored by Raman spectroscopy. We suggest an interpretation of the data based on first-principles density-functional spin-unrestricted calculations which show that the excess spin from mono-atomic hydrogen is delocalized within the host fullerene and the laser-induced polymerization promotes spin exchange interaction and spin alignment in the polymerized phase.

  2. Oil-free centrifugal hydrogen compression technology demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heshmat, Hooshang [Mohawk Innovative Technology Inc., Albany, NY (United States)

    2014-05-31

    One of the key elements in realizing a mature market for hydrogen vehicles is the deployment of a safe and efficient hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure on a scale that can compete economically with current fuels. The challenge, however, is that hydrogen, being the lightest and smallest of gases with a lower viscosity and density than natural gas, readily migrates through small spaces and is difficult to compresses efficiently. While efficient and cost effective compression technology is crucial to effective pipeline delivery of hydrogen, the compression methods used currently rely on oil lubricated positive displacement (PD) machines. PD compression technology is very costly, has poor reliability and durability, especially for components subjected to wear (e.g., valves, rider bands and piston rings) and contaminates hydrogen with lubricating fluid. Even so called “oil-free” machines use oil lubricants that migrate into and contaminate the gas path. Due to the poor reliability of PD compressors, current hydrogen producers often install duplicate units in order to maintain on-line times of 98-99%. Such machine redundancy adds substantially to system capital costs. As such, DOE deemed that low capital cost, reliable, efficient and oil-free advanced compressor technologies are needed. MiTi’s solution is a completely oil-free, multi-stage, high-speed, centrifugal compressor designed for flow capacity of 500,000 kg/day with a discharge pressure of 1200 psig. The design employs oil-free compliant foil bearings and seals to allow for very high operating speeds, totally contamination free operation, long life and reliability. This design meets the DOE’s performance targets and achieves an extremely aggressive, specific power metric of 0.48 kW-hr/kg and provides significant improvements in reliability/durability, energy efficiency, sealing and freedom from contamination. The multi-stage compressor system concept has been validated through full scale

  3. A hydrogen refill for cellular phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosini, Pier Paolo; Gislon, Paola

    A device has been designed to generate hydrogen for a fuel cell powered cellular phone. The device is based on the chemical reaction between NaBH 4 and hydrochloric/water solution to satisfy the hydrogen request at room temperature and pressure. The operation mechanism and controlling method is based on the Kipp's gas generating apparatus. A prototype has been built and tested to evaluate the optimum salt/acid and acid/solution ratios and check the hydrogen mass flow rates upon operation and the pressure variation in stand-by condition. The system works delivering hydrogen flows ranging between 0 and 10 ml min -1. In a typical test the hydrogen flow was set to 5 ml min -1 to match a 1 W power fuel cell. The working pressure was slightly higher than the atmospheric one. The hydrogen capacity was as high as 2.5% (w/w). By converting this amount of hydrogen in electricity by a fuel cell working at 0.8 V it is possible to achieve a system energy density of about 720 Wh kg -1, four times larger than commercial high energy density lithium-ion batteries.

  4. Technology issues associated with using densified hydrogen for space vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.

    1992-01-01

    Slush hydrogen and triple-point hydrogen offer the potential for reducing the size and weight of future space vehicles because these fluids have greater densities than normal-boiling-point liquid hydrogen. In addition, these fluids have greater heat capacities, which make them attractive fuels for such applications as the National Aerospace Plane and cryogenic depots. Some of the benefits of using slush hydrogen and triple-point hydrogen for space missions are quantified. Some of the major issues associated with using these densified cryogenic fuels for space applications are examined, and the technology efforts that have been made to address many of these issues are summarized.

  5. Hydrogenation of chalcones using hydrogen permeating through a Pd and palladized Pd electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, M., E-mail: mcgutier@unse.edu.a [INQUINOA - CONICET, Instituto de Ciencias Quimicas, Facultad de Agronomia Agroindustrias, Universidad Nacional de Santiago del Estero, Avda, Belgrano (S) 1912, 4200, Santiago del Estero (Argentina); Nazareno, M.A. [INQUINOA - CONICET, Instituto de Ciencias Quimicas, Facultad de Agronomia Agroindustrias, Universidad Nacional de Santiago del Estero, Avda, Belgrano (S) 1912, 4200, Santiago del Estero (Argentina); Sosa, V. [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Agencia postal 4, Casilla 61, 5000, Cordoba (Argentina); Lopez de Mishima, B.A., E-mail: bmishima@unse.edu.a [INQUINOA - CONICET, Instituto de Ciencias Quimicas, Facultad de Agronomia Agroindustrias, Universidad Nacional de Santiago del Estero, Avda, Belgrano (S) 1912, 4200, Santiago del Estero (Argentina); Mishima, H.T. [INQUINOA - CONICET, Instituto de Ciencias Quimicas, Facultad de Agronomia Agroindustrias, Universidad Nacional de Santiago del Estero, Avda, Belgrano (S) 1912, 4200, Santiago del Estero (Argentina)

    2010-08-01

    The hydrogenation of benzalacetone and benzalacetophenone was carried out using atomic hydrogen permeating through a palladium membrane. A two-compartment cell separated by a Pd sheet or a palladized Pd (Pd/Pd black) sheet electrode was employed. The reduction products were identified by (GC) gas chromatography, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and NMR spectroscopy. The carbon-carbon double bond was hydrogenated and the benzylacetone and benzylacetophenone were obtained as products using palladium catalyst. The current efficiency for hydrogenation reaction increases when the current density for water electrolysis decreases and depends on the initial chalcone concentration. It is over 90% at the concentration of 10 mmol L{sup -1}. The hydrogen absorption and diffusion into and through a palladium membrane electrode has been studied by using an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method. The impedance results would indicate that the hydrogen permeated through the membrane is consumed by the chalcone during the hydrogenation process keeping as the permeable boundary condition in the outer side of the Pd membrane the hydrogen activity almost zero. The hydrogen entering the metal through an adsorbed state and the rate of hydrogen absorption is diffusion-controlled.

  6. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C.J.; Schoonman, J.; Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept

  7. Experimental investigation of density regimes in the helical divertor at TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clever, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Frerichs, H.; Lehnen, M.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Schmitz, O.; Schweer, B.

    2012-01-01

    Using the capabilities of the dynamic ergodic divertor in the limiter tokamak TEXTOR, we have experimentally investigated the hydrogen recycling in a complex, three-dimensional, helical divertor structure similar to divertor structures found in stellarators. The observations were then compared with results from modelling with the three-dimensional transport code EMC3-EIRENE. The measurements showed that the recycling flux at the divertor target increases linearly with increasing plasma density, a high recycling regime is not observed. At highest plasma densities before the density limit disruption, the formation of a poloidally structured and helically inclined radiating belt, a helical divertor MARFE, is observed. The radial penetration depth of the neutral hydrogen particles (λ n ≈ 3 cm) estimated from spectroscopic measurements was found to be often larger than the varying radial extent of the scrape-off layer of the helical divertor (few mm up to 6 cm) which points to convective heat transport reducing parallel temperature gradients and inhibiting flux amplification. The detailed comparison of the experimental observations and the modelling results showed agreement in this high density behaviour confirming the absence of a high recycling regime. Also agreement in the absolute values of the calculated and measured target particle fluxes was observed. Simulations using different cross-field transport coefficients showed, that this agreement is only found above a certain level of cross-field transport (D ⊥ = 1 m 2 s −1 ). (paper)

  8. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One Li

  9. Materials Down Select Decisions Made Within the Department of Energy Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Lin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2009-11-30

    Technical report describing DOE's Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence investigation into various adsorbent and chemisorption materials and progress towards meeting DOE's hydrogen storage targets. The report presents a review of the material status as related to DOE hydrogen storage targets and explains the basis for the down select decisions.

  10. Method of production of polarized negative hydrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A.S.; Kuzik, V.E.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1990-01-01

    Result of experimental examination of the method of producing negative polarized hydrogen ions are presented. Beams of polarized hydrogen atoms and deuterium plasma are injected towards each other and meet in the region of recharging 1 in 1.3 kGs magnetic field, created by a solenoid. As follows from the measurements performed and the method analysis, a possibility of producing an intense H-vector - ion beam according to the given method is mainly dependent on plasma deuterium target parameters. It is possible to produce ∼500 μA current H-vector - ion beam by the method considered under ∼0.1 relative D - ion density in plasma, ∼1 eV electron temperature, ∼10 2 eV ion temperature (typical of surface - plasma sources) and 2 cm 2 transverse area of recharging volume. The method advantages as well include the absence in a source of targets of alkali metal vapours, the presence of which in other methods limits the time of continuous source operation and makes their operation difficult

  11. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasypin, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  12. Predicted energy densitites for nickel-hydrogen and silver-hydrogen cells embodying metallic hydrides for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified design concepts were used to estimate gravimetric and volumetric energy densities for metal hydrogen battery cells for assessing the characteristics of cells containing metal hydrides as compared to gaseous storage cells, and for comparing nickel cathode and silver cathode systems. The silver cathode was found to yield superior energy densities in all cases considered. The inclusion of hydride forming materials yields cells with very high volumetric energy densities that also retain gravimetric energy densities nearly as high as those of gaseous storage cells.

  13. Catalyst support effects on hydrogen spillover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Waiz; Spreafico, Clelia; Kleibert, Armin; Gobrecht, Jens; Vandevondele, Joost; Ekinci, Yasin; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen spillover is the surface migration of activated hydrogen atoms from a metal catalyst particle, on which they are generated, onto the catalyst support. The phenomenon has been much studied and its occurrence on reducible supports such as titanium oxide is established, yet questions remain about whether hydrogen spillover can take place on nonreducible supports such as aluminium oxide. Here we use the enhanced precision of top-down nanofabrication to prepare controlled and precisely tunable model systems that allow us to quantify the efficiency and spatial extent of hydrogen spillover on both reducible and nonreducible supports. We place multiple pairs of iron oxide and platinum nanoparticles on titanium oxide and aluminium oxide supports, varying the distance between the pairs from zero to 45 nanometres with a precision of one nanometre. We then observe the extent of the reduction of the iron oxide particles by hydrogen atoms generated on the platinum using single-particle in situ X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy applied simultaneously to all particle pairs. The data, in conjunction with density functional theory calculations, reveal fast hydrogen spillover on titanium oxide that reduces remote iron oxide nanoparticles via coupled proton-electron transfer. In contrast, spillover on aluminium oxide is mediated by three-coordinated aluminium centres that also interact with water and that give rise to hydrogen mobility competing with hydrogen desorption; this results in hydrogen spillover about ten orders of magnitude slower than on titanium oxide and restricted to very short distances from the platinum particle. We anticipate that these observations will improve our understanding of hydrogen storage and catalytic reactions involving hydrogen, and that our approach to creating and probing model catalyst systems will provide opportunities for studying the origin of synergistic effects in supported catalysts that combine multiple functionalities.

  14. Containment air circulation for optimal hydrogen recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinks, N.; Krause, M.

    1997-01-01

    An accepted first-line defense for hydrogen mitigation is to design for the hydrogen to be rapidly mixed with the containment atmosphere and diluted to below flammability concentrations. Then, as hydrogen continues to be produced in the longer term, recombiners can be used to remove hydrogen: recombiners can be located in forced-air ducts or passive recombiners can be distributed within containment and the heat of recombination used to promote local air circulation. However, this principle does not eliminate the possibility of high hydrogen concentrations at locations removed from the recombiners. An improvement on this strategy is to arrange for a specific, buoyancy-driven, overall circulation of the containment atmosphere such that the recombiners can be located within the recirculation flow, immediately downstream of the hydrogen source. This would make the mixing process more predictable and solve the mass-transfer problem associated with distributed recombiners. Ideally, the recombiners would be located just above the hydrogen source so that the heat of recombination would assist the overall circulation. In this way, the hydrogen would be removed as close as possible to the source, thereby minimizing the amount of hydrogen immediately downstream of the source and reducing the hydrogen concentration to acceptable levels at other locations. Such a strategy requires the containment volume to be divided into an upflow path, past the hydrogen source and the recombiner, and a downflow path to complete the circuit. The flow could be generated actively using fans or passively using buoyancy forces arising from the difference in density of gases in the upfiow and downflow paths; the gases in the downflow path being cooled at an elevated heat sink. (author)

  15. Positron lifetime calculations of defects in vanadium containing hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troev, T.; Markovski, A.; Petrova, M.; Peneva, S.; Yoshiie, T.

    2006-01-01

    Positron lifetime quantum-mechanical calculations were carried out for the investigation of defects in vanadium containing hydrogen atoms. The convergence of electronic structure calculations for supercell size is studied for vacancies, vacancy-clusters (nano-voids) and vacancy-clusters containing hydrogen. The electron wave functions have been obtained in the local density approximation (LDA) to the density functional theory (DFT). On the basis of the calculated results, the behaviours of empty nano-voids and nano-voids with hydrogen are discussed. It is found that hydrogen in larger three-dimensional vacancy-clusters change the annihilation characteristics drastically. The hydrogen atoms are trapped by lattice vacancies. These results provide physical insight for positron interactions with defects in vanadium and can be used for the prediction of hydrogen generation useful for the design of a fusion reactor

  16. Ballmilling of metal borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    is to hydrogenate simple compounds such as metalborides and hydrides with the intention of forming a new and more hydrogen rich borohydride. In contrast to mainstream research, the method of synthesis has been based on reactants that are expected to be found in the metal borohydride’s dehydrogenated state....... Specifically, the research undertaken targets CaB6 whose boron is in a octahedral network, or AlB2 whose boron is layered. These compounds were then reactive ball milled with alkali and alkaline earth metal under hydrogen pressure, with the intention of forming metal borohydrides. For CaB6, no clear sign...

  17. Hydrogen molecules in the divertor of ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantz, U.; Reiter, D.; Heger, B.; Coster, D.

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the power load onto the target plates detached divertor conditions are often preferred. These are characterized by volume recombination, i.e. three-body and radiative recombination. Due to low T e (few eV) hydrogen molecules can penetrate into the plasma and may play a role in divertor dynamics. In particular, it was suggested, that molecules may assist the volume recombination process. The role of molecules in the divertor is examined here by a combination of experimental results with plasma edge simulations (B2-EIRENE) and a collisional-radiative model for hydrogen molecules. Spectroscopic diagnostics of the Fulcher transition carried out at the divertor of ASDEX Upgrade yield estimates of molecular hydrogen fluxes and the vibrational population in the ground state in detached and attached hydrogen plasmas. Good agreement with B2-EIRENE is achieved only if vibrational levels are treated as distinct (metastable) particles in the model and if the collisional-radiative model is applied to the electronically excited levels. On this basis the contribution of molecules to plasma recombination was determined to be in the order of a few 10%. The dominant molecular process is the dissociation process via H 2 + . As a consequence initially detached divertor plasmas can even re-attach if vibrationally resolved molecules are properly included in plasma edge models. A set of B2-EIRENE calculations carried out for ASDEX Upgrade is discussed. In particular the threshold upstream density for detachment was found to be up to a factor 1.5 higher than that originally expected due to these molecular effects. The transferability of the results to deuterium will be discussed

  18. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  19. Recent Progress in Metal Borohydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig M. Jensen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The prerequisite for widespread use of hydrogen as an energy carrier is the development of new materials that can safely store it at high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal borohydrides M(BH4n (n is the valence of metal M, in particular, have high hydrogen density, and are therefore regarded as one such potential hydrogen storage material. For fuel cell vehicles, the goal for on-board storage systems is to achieve reversible store at high density but moderate temperature and hydrogen pressure. To this end, a large amount of effort has been devoted to improvements in their thermodynamic and kinetic aspects. This review provides an overview of recent research activity on various M(BH4n, with a focus on the fundamental dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation properties and on providing guidance for material design in terms of tailoring thermodynamics and promoting kinetics for hydrogen storage.

  20. Hydrogen fuel. Uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darkrim-Lamari, F.; Malbrunot, P.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very energetic fuel which can be used in combustion to generate heat and mechanical energy or which can be used to generate electricity and heat through an electrochemical reaction with oxygen. This article deals with the energy conversion, the availability and safety problems linked with the use of hydrogen, and with the socio-economical consequences of a generalized use of hydrogen: 1 - hydrogen energy conversion: hydrogen engines, aerospace applications, fuel cells (principle, different types, domains of application); 2 - hydrogen energy availability: transport and storage (gas pipelines, liquid hydrogen, adsorbed and absorbed hydrogen in solid materials), service stations; 3 - hazards and safety: flammability, explosibility, storage and transport safety, standards and regulations; 4 - hydrogen economy; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  1. Interaction between an icosahedron Li(13) cluster and a graphene layer doped with a hydrogen atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Eduardo; Vázquez, Gerardo; Magaña, Fernando; Sansores, Enrique

    2012-12-01

    It is known that graphene reacts with atomic hydrogen to form a hydrogenated sheet of graphene. In order to understand the nature of the interaction between hydrogen and lithium in hydrogenated samples, we have carried out first principle calculations. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics were used to study the interaction between an icosahedron Li(13) cluster, and a graphene layer doped with a hydrogen atom. It was found that a hydrogen atom is levitated from the graphene layer and absorbed into the cluster of Li at 300 K and atmospheric pressure, with a binding energy far exceeding that of the adsorption energy of a hydrogen atom on the graphene layer.

  2. Davisson-Germer Prize Talk: Hydrogen storage in nanoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabal, Yves

    2009-03-01

    To develop a hydrogen-based energy technology, several classes of materials are being considered to achieve the DOE targets for gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities for hydrogen storage, including liquids (e.g. ammonium borohydrides), clathrate structures, complex metal hydrides, nanostructured (e.g. carbon) an nanoporous materials. Fundamental studies are necessary to determine the ultimate hydrogen capacity of each system. Nanoporous Metal-organic Framework (MOF) materials are promising candidates for hydrogen storage because the chemical nature and size of their unit cell can be tailored to weakly attract and incorporate H2 molecules, with good volumetric and mass density. In this talk, we consider the structure M2(BDC)2(TED), where M is a metal atom (Zn, Ni, Cu), BDC is benzenedicarboxylate and TED triethylenediamine, to determine the location and interaction of H2 molecules within the MOF. These compounds are isostructural and crystallize in the tetragonal phase (space group P4/ncc), they construct 3D porous structures with relatively large pore size (˜7-8 A ), pore volume (˜0.63-0.84 cc/g) and BET surface area (˜1500-1900 m^2/g). At high pressures (300-800 psi), the perturbation of the H-H stretching mode can be measured with IR absorption spectroscopy, showing a 35 cm-1 redshift from the unperturbed ortho (4155 cm-1 ) and para (4161 cm-1 ) frequencies. Using a newly developed non empirical van der Waals DFT method vdW-DFT),ootnotetextJ.Y. Lee, D.H. Olson, L. Pan, T.J. Emge, J. Li, Adv. Func. Mater. 17, 1255 (2007) it can be shown that the locus of the deepest H2 binding positions lies within to types of narrow channels. The energies of the most stable binding sites, as well as the number of such binding sites, are consistent with the values obtained from experimental adsorption isotherms, and heat of adsorption) data.ootnotetextM. Dion, H. Ryberg, E. Schroder, D. C. Langreth, B.I. Lundqvist, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 246401 (2004). Importantly, the

  3. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  4. Hydrogen, this hallucinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The author discusses the origin of hydrogen for energetic use (mainly by extraction from water), the possible uses of this cumbersome gas (in vehicles, in electricity storage), and outlines that hydrogen economy consumes a lot of other energies (nuclear, wind, sun, biomass, and so on) for a high cost, and that hydrogen is therefore not a solution for the future. Other elements are given in appendix: production methods and processes, figures of energy production, ways to use and to store hydrogen in vehicles, assessment of possibilities for a vehicle, techniques and figures for hydrogen packaging, transport and distribution, energy cost, energetic assessment of hydrogen production, problems associated with distribution (tank filling)

  5. Hydrogen in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen plays an important role in silicon technology, having a profound effect on a wide range of properties. Thus, the study of hydrogen in semiconductors has received much attention from an interdisciplinary assortment of researchers. This sixteen-chapter volume provides a comprehensive review of the field, including a discussion of hydrogenation methods, the use of hydrogen to passivate defects, the use of hydrogen to neutralize deep levels, shallow acceptors and shallow donors in silicon, vibrational spectroscopy, and hydrogen-induced defects in silicon. In addition to this detailed cove

  6. Large area imaging of hydrogenous materials using fast neutrons from a DD fusion generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, J. T.; Williams, D. L.; Gary, C. K.; Piestrup, M. A.; Faber, D. R.; Fuller, M. J.; Vainionpaa, J. H.; Apodaca, M.; Pantell, R. H.; Feinstein, J.

    2012-05-01

    A small-laboratory fast-neutron generator and a large area detector were used to image hydrogen-bearing materials. The overall image resolution of 2.5 mm was determined by a knife-edge measurement. Contact images of objects were obtained in 5-50 min exposures by placing them close to a plastic scintillator at distances of 1.5 to 3.2 m from the neutron source. The generator produces 109 n/s from the DD fusion reaction at a small target. The combination of the DD-fusion generator and electronic camera permits both small laboratory and field-portable imaging of hydrogen-rich materials embedded in high density materials.

  7. Large area imaging of hydrogenous materials using fast neutrons from a DD fusion generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremer, J.T.; Williams, D.L.; Gary, C.K.; Piestrup, M.A.; Faber, D.R.; Fuller, M.J.; Vainionpaa, J.H.; Apodaca, M.; Pantell, R.H.; Feinstein, J.

    2012-01-01

    A small-laboratory fast-neutron generator and a large area detector were used to image hydrogen-bearing materials. The overall image resolution of 2.5 mm was determined by a knife-edge measurement. Contact images of objects were obtained in 5–50 min exposures by placing them close to a plastic scintillator at distances of 1.5 to 3.2 m from the neutron source. The generator produces 10 9 n/s from the DD fusion reaction at a small target. The combination of the DD-fusion generator and electronic camera permits both small laboratory and field-portable imaging of hydrogen-rich materials embedded in high density materials.

  8. Reflection properties of hydrogen ions at helium irradiated tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, K; Tawada, Y; Kato, S; Sasao, M; Kenmotsu, T; Wada, M; Lee, H T; Ueda, Y; Tanaka, N; Kisaki, M; Nishiura, M; Matsumoto, Y; Yamaoka, H

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured W surfaces prepared by He bombardment exhibit characteristic angular distributions of hydrogen ion reflection upon injection of 1 keV H + beam. A magnetic momentum analyzer that can move in the vacuum chamber has measured the angular dependence of the intensity and the energy of reflected ions. Broader angular distributions were observed for He-irradiated tungsten samples compared with that of the intrinsic polycrystalline W. Both intensity and energy of reflected ions decreased in the following order: the polycrystalline W, the He-bubble containing W, and the fuzz W. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations based on Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target code suggests that lower atom density near the surface can make the reflection coefficients lower due to increasing number of collisions. (paper)

  9. Hydrogen detection by a boron sheet: A theoretical study .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, F. Javier; Novotny, Michal; Krstic, Predrag S.

    A single boron sheet is now considered as a new nanomaterial with promising applications in electronics and as a sensor device. In this study we present quantum-classical molecular dynamic (QCMD) calculation of reflection, adsorption, and transmission processes of hydrogen impacting at energy in range 0.25 to 100 eV on a single boron sheet. Quantum-mechanical component of our QCMD approach is self-consistent charge tight binding density functional theory method (SCC-DFTB,). We consider the corrugated boron sheet as our target, created experimentally, and compare our results with those reported for graphene, showing noticeable differences. Research supported by CONACyT postdoctoral scholarship to FJD and the Fulbright Comission (Grant 15160939) to MN. Results were obtained using the LI-red cluster at IACS.

  10. Hydrogen adsorption on N-decorated single wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel, Eduardo; Ruiz-Chavarria, Gregorio; Magana, L.F.; Arellano, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Using density functional theory and molecular dynamics we found that N-decorated single walled (8,0) carbon nanotubes are potential high capacity hydrogen storage media. This system could store up to 6.0 wt% hydrogen at 300 K and ambient pressure, with average adsorption energy of -80 meV/(H 2 ). Nitrogen coverage was C 8 N.

  11. Atomic hydrogen produced in M33 photodissociation regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiner, J. S.; Allen, R. J.; van der Kruit, P. C.

    We derive total (atomic + molecular) hydrogen densities in giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the nearby spiral galaxy M33 using a method that views the atomic hydrogen near regions of recent star formation as the product of photodissociation. Far-ultraviolet (FUV) photons emanating from a nearby OB

  12. Facile charge transport in nanocomposites for efficient hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KASINATH OJHA

    Abstract. Molybdenum based materials are gaining importance as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction because of their low cost and good electrocatalytic efficiency. Introducing iron nitride with molybdenum nitride as a composite results in efficient hydrogen evolution activity with current density of ∼120 mA/cm2 ...

  13. The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunita Satyapal; Carole Read; Grace Ordaz; John Petrovic; George Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is being considered by many countries as a potential energy carrier for vehicular applications. In the United States, hydrogen-powered vehicles must possess a driving range of greater than 300 miles in order to meet customer requirements and compete effectively with other technologies. For the overall vehicular fleet, this requires that a range of 5-13 kg of hydrogen be stored on-board. The storage of such quantities of hydrogen within vehicular weight, volume, and system cost constraints is a major scientific and technological challenge. The targets for on-board hydrogen storage were established in the U.S. through the FreedomCAR and Fuel partnership, a partnership among the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and major energy companies. In order to achieve these long-term targets, the Department of Energy established a National Hydrogen Storage Project to develop the areas of metal hydrides, chemical hydrogen storage, carbon-based and high-surface-area sorbent materials, and new hydrogen storage materials and concepts. The current status of vehicular hydrogen storage is reviewed and hydrogen storage research associated with the National Hydrogen Storage Project is discussed. (authors)

  14. Hydrogen axion star: metallic hydrogen bound to a QCD axion BEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yang; Barger, Vernon; Berger, Joshua [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison,1150 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-12-23

    As a cold dark matter candidate, the QCD axion may form Bose-Einstein condensates, called axion stars, with masses around 10{sup −11} M{sub ⊙}. In this paper, we point out that a brand new astrophysical object, a Hydrogen Axion Star (HAS), may well be formed by ordinary baryonic matter becoming gravitationally bound to an axion star. We study the properties of the HAS and find that the hydrogen cloud has a high pressure and temperature in the center and is likely in the liquid metallic hydrogen state. Because of the high particle number densities for both the axion star and the hydrogen cloud, the feeble interaction between axion and hydrogen can still generate enough internal power, around 10{sup 13} W×(m{sub a}/5 meV){sup 4}, to make these objects luminous point sources. High resolution ultraviolet, optical and infrared telescopes can discover HAS via black-body radiation.

  15. Hydrogen axion star: metallic hydrogen bound to a QCD axion BEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Yang; Barger, Vernon; Berger, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    As a cold dark matter candidate, the QCD axion may form Bose-Einstein condensates, called axion stars, with masses around 10"−"1"1 M_⊙. In this paper, we point out that a brand new astrophysical object, a Hydrogen Axion Star (HAS), may well be formed by ordinary baryonic matter becoming gravitationally bound to an axion star. We study the properties of the HAS and find that the hydrogen cloud has a high pressure and temperature in the center and is likely in the liquid metallic hydrogen state. Because of the high particle number densities for both the axion star and the hydrogen cloud, the feeble interaction between axion and hydrogen can still generate enough internal power, around 10"1"3 W×(m_a/5 meV)"4, to make these objects luminous point sources. High resolution ultraviolet, optical and infrared telescopes can discover HAS via black-body radiation.

  16. Hydrogenated vacancies and hidden hydrogen in SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, J. B.; Janotti, A.; Van de Walle, C. G.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the stability of O, Ti, and Sr vacancies in SrTiO3 and their interactions with hydrogen impurities. Based on density functional calculations with a hybrid functional, we analyze formation energies, binding energies, and H-related vibrational modes. We find that interstitial hydrogen (Hi+) and substitutional hydrogen on an oxygen site (HO) both act as shallow donors and are likely to contribute to unintentional n-type conductivity. Hydrogen can also bind to Ti vacancies in the form of (VTi-H)-3 and (VTi-2H)-2 complexes. Sr vacancies can form (VSr-H)- or accommodate an H2 molecule in the form of (VSr-H2)-2 complex. The latter provides an explanation for the "hidden" hydrogen recently observed in annealing experiments [M. C. Tarun and M. D. McCluskey, J. Appl. Phys. 109, 063706 (2011), 10.1063/1.3561867].

  17. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone ... to people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether ...

  18. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  19. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  20. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  1. The US Department of Energy hydrogen baseline survey: assessing knowledge and opinions about hydrogen technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christy Cooper; Tykey Truett; R L Schmoyer

    2006-01-01

    To design and maintain its education program, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program conducted a statistically-valid national survey to measure knowledge and opinions of hydrogen among key target audiences. The Hydrogen Baseline Knowledge Survey provides a reference for designing the DOE hydrogen education strategy and will be used in comparisons with future surveys to measure changes in knowledge and opinions over time. The survey sampled four U.S. populations: (1) public; (2) students; (3) state and local government officials; and (4) potential large-scale hydrogen end-users in three business categories. Questions measured technical understanding of hydrogen and opinions about hydrogen safety. Other questions assessed visions of the likelihood of future hydrogen applications and sources of energy information. Several important findings were discovered, including a striking lack of technical understanding across all survey groups, as well as a strong correlation between technical knowledge and opinions about safety: those who demonstrated an understanding of hydrogen technologies expressed the least fear of its safe use. (authors)

  2. Hydrogen adsorption in carbon nanostructures compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmel, H.G.; Nijkamp, G.; Kearley, G.J.; Rivera, A.; Jong, K.P. de; Mulder, F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent reports continue to suggest high hydrogen storage capacities for some carbon nanostructures due to a stronger interaction between hydrogen and carbon. Here the interaction of hydrogen with activated charcoal, carbon nanofibers, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), and electron beam 'opened' SWNT are compared and shown to be similar. The storage capacity below 77 K of these materials correlates with the surface area of the material with the activated charcoal having the largest. SWNT and 'opened' SWNT have a relatively low accessible surface area due to bundling of the tubes. Pressure-temperature curves give the interaction potential, which was found to be ∼580 K or 50 meV in all samples, leading to significant adsorption below ∼50 K. Using the inelastic neutron scattering signal associated with rotation of the hydrogen molecule as a sensitive probe for the surroundings of the molecule, no difference was found between the hydrogen molecules adsorbed in the investigated materials. These combined spectroscopic and macroscopic results show that SWNT, nanofibers and activated carbons store molecular hydrogen due to their graphitic nature and not because they possess special morphologies. Results from a density functional theory computer calculation suggest molecular hydrogen bonding to an aromatic C-C bond of graphite, irrespective of the surface morphology farther away

  3. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  4. Structural, intramolecular hydrogen bonding and vibrational studies ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An extensive theoretical study on the molecular structure and vibrational analysis of 3-amino-4- methoxy benzamide (3A4MBA) was undertaken using density functional theoretical (DFT) method. The possibility of formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonding was identified from structural parameter analysis and confirmed ...

  5. Structural, intramolecular hydrogen bonding and vibrational studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An extensive theoretical study on the molecular structure and vibrational analysis of 3-amino-4- methoxy benzamide (3A4MBA) was undertaken using density functional theoretical (DFT) method. The possibility of formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonding was identified from structural parameter analysis and confirmed ...

  6. Theory of hydrogen chemisorption on metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenig, W.

    1975-01-01

    A theory of hydrogen chemisorption on metals is presented. Green's function is derived taking into account the coupling strength between metal and chemisorbed atom and the strength of the interatomic Coulomb repulsion, allowing the calculation of the local density of states at the adatom, especially for the limiting cases of strong and weak coupling

  7. Mitochondrion-Targeted Peptide SS-31 Inhibited Oxidized Low-Density Lipoproteins-Induced Foam Cell Formation through both ROS Scavenging and Inhibition of Cholesterol Influx in RAW264.7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangying Hao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Foam cell formation as a result of imbalance of modified cholesterol influx and efflux by macrophages is a key to the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis. Oxidative stress is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. SS-31 is a member of the Szeto-Schiller (SS peptides shown to specifically target the inner mitochondrial membrane to scavenge reactive oxygen species. In this study, we investigated whether SS-31 may provide protective effect on macrophage from foam cell formation in RAW264.7 cells. The results showed that SS-31 inhibited oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation and cholesterol accumulation, demonstrated by intracellular oil red O staining and measurement of cholesterol content. The mechanism was revealed that SS-31 did not only significantly attenuated ox-LDL-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and increased the activities of superoxide dismutases, but also dose-dependently inhibited the expression of CD36 and LOX-1, two scavenger receptors of ox-LDL, while the expression of ATP-binding cassette A1 and G1, playing a pivotal role in cholesterol efflux, was not affected. As a result, SS-31 decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha, suggesting the prevention of inflammatory responses. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that SS-31 provides a beneficial effect on macrophages from foam cell formation, likely, through both ROS scavenging and inhibition of cholesterol influx. Therefore, SS-31 may potentially be of therapeutic relevance in prevention of human atherogenesis.

  8. Molecular modeling, dynamics studies and density functional theory approaches to identify potential inhibitors of SIRT4 protein from Homo sapiens : a novel target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sanjay K; Prabhu, Dhamodharan; Nachiappan, Mutharasappan; Biswal, Jayshree; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman

    2017-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes is one of the biggest health challenges in the world and WHO projects it to be the 7th leading cause of death in 2030. It is a chronic condition affecting the way our body metabolizes sugar. Insulin resistance is high risk factor marked by expression of Lipoprotein Lipases and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor that predisposes to type 2 diabetes. AMP-dependent protein kinase in AMPK signaling pathway is a central sensor of energy status. Deregulation of AMPK signaling leads to inflammation, oxidative stress, and deactivation of autophagy which are implicated in pathogenesis of insulin resistance. SIRT4 protein deactivates AMPK as well as directly inhibits insulin secretion. SIRT4 overexpression leads to dyslipidimeia, decreased fatty acid oxidation, and lipogenesis which are the characteristic features of insulin resistance promoting type 2 diabetes. This makes SIRT4 a novel therapeutic target to control type 2 diabetes. Virtual screening and molecular docking studies were performed to obtain potential ligands. To further optimize the geometry of protein-ligand complexes Quantum Polarized Ligand Docking was performed. Binding Free Energy was calculated for the top three ligand molecules. In view of exploring the stereoelectronic features of the ligand, density functional theory approach was implemented at B3LYP/6-31G* level. 30 ns MD simulation studies of the protein-ligand complexes were done. The present research work proposes ZINC12421989 as potential inhibitor of SIRT4 with docking score (-7.54 kcal/mol), docking energy (-51.34 kcal/mol), binding free energy (-70.21 kcal/mol), and comparatively low energy gap (-0.1786 eV) for HOMO and LUMO indicating reactivity of the lead molecule.

  9. Shock-wave proton acceleration from a hydrogen gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nathan; Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Babzien, Marcus; Tresca, Olivier; Maharjan, Chakra; Shkolnikov, Peter; Yakimenko, Vitaly

    2013-04-01

    Typical laser acceleration experiments probe the interaction of intense linearly-polarized solid state laser pulses with dense metal targets. This interaction generates strong electric fields via Transverse Normal Sheath Acceleration and can accelerate protons to high peak energies but with a large thermal spectrum. Recently, the advancement of high pressure amplified CO2 laser technology has allowed for the creation of intense (10^16 Wcm^2) pulses at λ˜10 μm. These pulses may interact with reproducible, high rep. rate gas jet targets and still produce plasmas of critical density (nc˜10^19 cm-3), leading to the transference of laser energy via radiation pressure. This acceleration mode has the advantage of producing narrow energy spectra while scaling well with pulse intensity. We observe the interaction of an intense CO2 laser pulse with an overdense hydrogen gas jet. Using two pulse optical probing in conjunction with interferometry, we are able to obtain density profiles of the plasma. Proton energy spectra are obtained using a magnetic spectrometer and scintillating screen.

  10. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...

  11. Flash hydrogenation of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manowitz, Bernard; Steinberg, Meyer; Sheehan, Thomas V.; Winsche, Warren E.; Raseman, Chad J.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the hydrogenation of coal comprising the contacting of powdered coal with hydrogen in a rotating fluidized bed reactor. A rotating fluidized bed reactor suitable for use in this process is also disclosed. The coal residence time in the reactor is limited to less than 5 seconds while the hydrogen contact time is not in excess of 0.2 seconds.

  12. Hydrogenation of passivated contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemeth, William; Yuan, Hao-Chih; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Stradins, Pauls; Page, Matthew R.

    2018-03-06

    Methods of hydrogenation of passivated contacts using materials having hydrogen impurities are provided. An example method includes applying, to a passivated contact, a layer of a material, the material containing hydrogen impurities. The method further includes subsequently annealing the material and subsequently removing the material from the passivated contact.

  13. Laser shocks on helium, hydrogen and diamond: an experimental study of the warm dense matter zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brygoo, St.

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a new approach of laser shocks on pre-compressed targets in order to collect data concerning the equation of state in the warm dense matter zone of the phase diagram. The accuracy of the measurement has been increased by the use of a new metrology based on quartz. Quartz is considered as a standard for the measurement of both the pressure and the density, a model of an isentropic relaxation based on a Grueneisen type approximation has been developed. By combining laser shocks with diamond anvil cells and by using this new metrology, we have investigated the following systems: diamond, helium, hydrogen, deuterium and hydrogen-helium mixtures. The results for helium agree very well with the predictions of the Saumon-Chabrier model. The results for deuterium are consistent with the latest results found in literature. As for the results concerning hydrogen, they have showed the limits of the quartz-based metrology. In fact, by being so little dense we are at the limit of the application range of the quartz relaxation. A mixture of helium-hydrogen (50 %) has been investigated, no sign of phase separation has been found

  14. Integrated Renewable Hydrogen Utility System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proton Energy Systems

    2003-04-01

    Products based on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) technology offer a unique solution to today's energy conversion storage needs. PEM products have undergone continual development since the late 1950's for many diverse applications. Rooted in rigorous aerospace applications, this technology is now ''breaking away'' to provide commercial solutions to common power, energy, and industrial gas feedstock problems. Important developments in PEM electrolyzers and various energy conversion devices (e.g. engines and fuel cells) can now be combined to form the basis for a revolutionary energy storage system that provides a much needed link to renewable resources, and offers a credible alternative for off-grid power applications. This technology operates by converting electrical energy into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen as part of a water electrolysis process when excess power is available. When the primary source of power is unavailable, chemical energy is converted into electrical energy through an external combustion heat engine or other energy conversion device. The Phase II portion of this program began in May of 2000. The goal of Phase II of the project was to cost reduce the hydrogen generator as a critical link to having a fully sustainable hydrogen energy system. The overall goal is to enable the link to sustainability by converting excess renewable power into hydrogen and having that hydrogen available for conversion back to power, on demand. Furthermore, the cost of the capability must be less the $1,000 per kW (electrical power into the generator) and allow for a variety of renewable technology inputs. This cost target is based on a production volume of 10,000 units per year. To that end, Proton undertook an aggressive approach to cost reduction activities surrounding the 6kW, 40 standard cubic foot per hour (scfh) HOGEN hydrogen generator. The electrical side of the system targeted a number of areas that included approaches

  15. Spin Density Matrix Elements in exclusive production of ω mesons at Hermes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianski B.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Spin density matrix elements have been determined for exclusive ω meson production on hydrogen and deuterium targets, in the kinematic region of 1.0 < Q2 < 10.0 GeV2, 3.0 < W < 6.3 GeV and –t' < 0.2 GeV2. The data, from which SDMEs are determined, were accumulated with the HERMES forward spectrometer during the running period of 1996 to 2007 using the 27.6 GeV electron or positron beam of HERA. A sizable contribution of unnatural parity exchange amplitudes is found for exclusive ω meson production.

  16. Development of a cluster-jet target for PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, A.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Orth, H.; Luehning, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Stefan Meyer Institut (SMI) is part of the international PANDA collaboration. The universal detector will be constructed at the future high-energy antiproton storage ring HESR at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, GSI/Darmstadt). PANDA will use antiproton beams (1.5 to 15 GeV/c) for hadron physics in the charmonium region. The physics program of PANDA will encompass charmonium spectroscopy below and above open charm threshold, search for exotics (glueballs, hybrids), lambda and double-lambda hypernuclei studies and the investigation of in-medium modifications of charmed mesons - an experimentally unexplored field. SMI contributes to major parts of the PANDA detector like the hydrogen cluster-jet target and the vacuum system of the antiproton - target interaction zone. In order to reach the desired target density, an optimization of the cold head, the nozzle and the skimmer arrangement is essential. A density-profile monitor for the cluster-jet was designed and built at SMI. Several nozzle types will be studied using different gases, temperatures and inlet pressures. Additionally we, together with the cluster-jet target group at GSI, are carrying out R and D for improving the jet-density. The Genova/Fermilab cluster-jet target used for these measurements has been in use at Fermilab for the experiments E760 and E835 and has been transferred to GSI for this purpose. The setup of the density-profile monitor at SMI and several measurements at GSI will be presented. (author)

  17. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  18. Hydrogen storage using microporous carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B Buczek; E Wolak

    2005-01-01

    In the present century hydrogen will be the most important source of energy and will replace petroleum and petroleum-derived products in the next future. Hydrogen is an almost ideal fuel, both because of its unlimited accessibility and for ecological reasons; the product of its combustion - water vapour - is neither any gaseous contamination nor a component of greenhouse gases. Nowadays hydrogen is applied in industrial processes, but may be also used as a source of house lighting and heating energy, for production of electricity, and as fuel for car engines. Fuel cells, applying reaction between hydrogen and oxygen for production of electricity have been for a long time used in the space technology. Application of hydrogen as fuel should give a possibility of storage and transfer of the high quality energy, i.e. the energy of a high exo-energetic ratio. Due to its low density, one of the main obstacles to the widespread use of hydrogen in energy sector is an efficient storage technology. At present, the methods of hydrogen storage are to liquefy and store in refrigerated containers, which is very expensive, or to store it in high - pressure gas cylinders at room temperature. Unfortunately, low storage density of hydrogen for the latter technique is a significant drawback. Between alternatives have been considered (chemical storage in irreversible hydrogen carriers like methanol or ammonia, reversible metal and chemical hydrides and adsorption in porous media), the latter one seems to lie the most promising. Physical adsorption is a method by which more gas can be stored at a lower pressure by means of Van der Waals interactions at the gas solid interface. Adsorptive storage is particularly promising for permanent gases, which need to be stored, transported, or used in ambient temperature. Thanks to the high density of adsorbed phase, adsorptive storage system could allow the storage of a high density of hydrogen at much lower pressures than compression and higher

  19. Hydrogen storage using microporous carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buczek, B.; Wolak, E.

    2005-01-01

    In the present century hydrogen will lie the most important source of energy and will replace petroleum and petroleum-derived products in the next future. Hydrogen is an almost ideal fuel, both because of its unlimited accessibility and for ecological reasons; the product of its combustion - water vapour - is neither any gaseous contamination nor a component of greenhouse gases. Nowadays hydrogen is applied in industrial processes, but may be also used as a source of house lighting and heating energy, for production of electricity, and as fuel for car engines. Fuel cells, applying reaction between hydrogen and oxygen for production of electricity have been for a long time used in the space technology. Application of hydrogen as fuel should give a possibility of storage and transfer of the high quality energy, i.e. the energy of a high exo-energetic ratio[l]. Due to its low density, one of the main obstacles to the widespread use of hydrogen in energy sector is an efficient storage technology. At present, the methods of hydrogen storage are to liquefy and store in refrigerated containers, which is very expensive, or to store it in high - pressure gas cylinders at room temperature. Unfortunately, low storage density of hydrogen for the latter technique is a significant drawback. Between alternatives have been considered (chemical storage in irreversible hydrogen carriers like methanol or ammonia, reversible metal and chemical hydrides and adsorption in porous media), the latter one seems to be the most promising [2]. Physical adsorption is a method by which more gas can be stored at a lower pressure by means of Van der Waals interactions at the gas solid interface. Adsorptive storage is particularly promising for permanent gases, which need to be stored, transported, or used in ambient temperature. Thanks to the high density of adsorbed phase, adsorptive storage system could allow the storage of a high density of hydrogen at much lower pressures than compression and

  20. Identification of non-precious metal alloy catalysts for selective hydrogenation of acetylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The removal of trace acetylene from ethylene is performed industrially by palladium hydrogenation catalysts ( often modified with silver) that avoid the hydrogenation of ethylene to ethane. In an effort to identify catalysts based on less expensive and more available metals, density functional...... dispersed on an oxide support were selective for acetylene hydrogenation at low pressures....

  1. Trends in the exchange current for hydrogen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Bligaard, Thomas; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2005-01-01

    A density functional theory database of hydrogen chemisorption energies on close packed surfaces of a number of transition and noble metals is presented. The bond energies are used to understand the trends in the exchange current for hydrogen evolution. A volcano curve is obtained when measured...... exchange currents are plotted as a function of the calculated hydrogen adsorption energies and a simple kinetic model is developed to understand the origin of the volcano. The volcano curve is also consistent with Pt being the most efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution. (c) 2005...... The Electrochemical Society. [DOI: 10.1149/1.1856988] All rights reserved....

  2. Hydrogen fuelled buses: Italian ENEA research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, G.; Ciancia, A.; Pede, G.

    1993-01-01

    Current hydrogen automotive fuels research studies being conducted by ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) are being targeted towards the development of hydrogen fueled vans and buses for use in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicles' air pollution abatement characteristics would justify their high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives. The demonstration vehicle being used in the experimental studies and performance tests is a two liter minibus with a spark ignition engine power rated at 55 kW with gasoline operation and 45 kW with hydrogen. Detailed design notes are given regarding the retrofitting of the minibus chassis to house the aluminium gas storage tanks and the adaptation of the engine to operate with compressed hydrogen. Attention is given to efforts being made to resolve combustion control and fueling problems. Focus is on the progress being made in the development of an efficient and safe electronically controlled fuel injection system

  3. Microwave interaction with nonuniform hydrogen gas in carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaei, S.; Babaei, Sh.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study the reflection, absorption, and transmission of microwave from nonuniform hydrogen gas in carbon nanotubes, grown by iron-catalyzed high-pressure carbon monoxide disproportionate (HiPco) process. A discussion on the effect of various hydrogen gas parameters on the reflected power, absorbed power, and transmitted power is presented. The nonuniform hydrogen gas slab is modeled by a series of subslabs. The overall number density profile across the whole slab follows a parabolic function. The total reflected, absorbed, and transmitted powers are then deduced and their functional dependence on the number density, collision frequency, and angle of propagation is studied

  4. Hydrogen energy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzano, F J; Braun, C [eds.

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to define the near term and long term prospects for the use of hydrogen as an energy delivery medium. Possible applications of hydrogen are defined along with the associated technologies required for implementation. A major focus in the near term is on industrial uses of hydrogen for special applications. The major source of hydrogen in the near term is expected to be from coal, with hydrogen from electric sources supplying a smaller fraction. A number of potential applications for hydrogen in the long term are identified and the level of demand estimated. The results of a cost benefit study for R and D work on coal gasification to hydrogen and electrolytic production of hydrogen are presented in order to aid in defining approximate levels of R and D funding. A considerable amount of data is presented on the cost of producing hydrogen from various energy resources. A key conclusion of the study is that in time hydrogen is likely to play a role in the energy system; however, hydrogen is not yet competitive for most applications when compared to the cost of energy from petroleum and natural gas.

  5. Hydrogen energy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book highlights the outstanding role of hydrogen in energy processes, where it is the most functional element due to its unique peculiarities that are highlighted and emphasized in the book. The first half of the book covers the great natural hydrogen processes in biology, chemistry, and physics, showing that hydrogen is a trend that can unite all natural sciences. The second half of the book is devoted to the technological hydrogen processes that are under research and development with the aim to create the infrastructure for hydrogen energetics. The book describes the main features of hydrogen that make it inalienable player in processes such as fusion, photosynthesis, and metabolism. It also covers the methods of hydrogen production and storage, highlighting at the same time the exclusive importance of nanotechnologies in those processes.

  6. Hirshfeld atom refinement for modelling strong hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woińska, Magdalena; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Spackman, Mark A; Edwards, Alison J; Dominiak, Paulina M; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Grabowsky, Simon

    2014-09-01

    High-resolution low-temperature synchrotron X-ray diffraction data of the salt L-phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate are used to test the new automated iterative Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) procedure for the modelling of strong hydrogen bonds. The HAR models used present the first examples of Z' > 1 treatments in the framework of wavefunction-based refinement methods. L-Phenylalaninium hydrogen maleate exhibits several hydrogen bonds in its crystal structure, of which the shortest and the most challenging to model is the O-H...O intramolecular hydrogen bond present in the hydrogen maleate anion (O...O distance is about 2.41 Å). In particular, the reconstruction of the electron density in the hydrogen maleate moiety and the determination of hydrogen-atom properties [positions, bond distances and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs)] are the focus of the study. For comparison to the HAR results, different spherical (independent atom model, IAM) and aspherical (free multipole model, MM; transferable aspherical atom model, TAAM) X-ray refinement techniques as well as results from a low-temperature neutron-diffraction experiment are employed. Hydrogen-atom ADPs are furthermore compared to those derived from a TLS/rigid-body (SHADE) treatment of the X-ray structures. The reference neutron-diffraction experiment reveals a truly symmetric hydrogen bond in the hydrogen maleate anion. Only with HAR is it possible to freely refine hydrogen-atom positions and ADPs from the X-ray data, which leads to the best electron-density model and the closest agreement with the structural parameters derived from the neutron-diffraction experiment, e.g. the symmetric hydrogen position can be reproduced. The multipole-based refinement techniques (MM and TAAM) yield slightly asymmetric positions, whereas the IAM yields a significantly asymmetric position.

  7. Neutron powder diffraction of metal-organic frameworks for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Craig M.; Liu, Yun; Neumann, Dan A.

    2008-01-01

    We review recent structural studies that we have undertaken aimed at elucidating the fundamental properties of metal-organic framework materials and their interactions with hydrogen. We have shown that exposing coordinatively unsaturated metal centers can greatly enhance the hydrogen binding energy and that they result in a significant increase of the surface packing density of adsorbed hydrogen molecules on materials surface. We will review some of the structural aspects of these materials, especially the adsorbed hydrogen molecule surface packing density in one type of metal-organic framework, MOF-74, which can be packed even denser than that in solid hydrogen. (author)

  8. The creation of strongly coupled plasmas using an intense heavy ion beam: low-entropy compression of hydrogen and the problem of hydrogen metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Tahir, N A; Shutov, A; Varentsov, D; Udrea, S; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Juranek, H; Redmer, R; Portugues, R F; Lomonosov, I V; Fortov, V E

    2003-01-01

    Intense heavy ion beams deposit energy very efficiently over extended volumes of solid density targets, thereby creating large samples of strongly coupled plasmas. Intense beams of energetic heavy ions are therefore an ideal tool to research this interesting field. It is also possible to design experiments using special beam-target geometries to achieve low-entropy compression of samples of matter. This type of experiments is of particular interest for studying the problem of hydrogen metallization. In this paper we present a design study of such a proposed experiment that will be carried out at the future heavy ion synchrotron facility SIS100, at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt. This study has been done using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code. The target consists of a solid hydrogen cylinder that is enclosed in a thick shell of lead whose one face is irradiated with an ion beam which has an annular (ring shaped) focal spot. The beam intensity and other parameters are consider...

  9. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the

  10. A Summary of the Slush Hydrogen Technology Program for the National Aero-Space Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnelis, Nancy B.; Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.; Kudlac, Maureen T.; Moran, Matthew E.; Tomsik, Thomas M.; Haberbusch, Mark S.

    1995-01-01

    Slush hydrogen, a mixture of solid and liquid hydrogen, offers advantages of higher density (16 percent) and higher heat capacity (18 percent) than normal boiling point hydrogen. The combination of increased density and heat capacity of slush hydrogen provided a potential to decrease the gross takeoff weight of the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) and therefore slush hydrogen was selected as the propellant. However, no large-scale data was available on the production, transfer and tank pressure control characteristics required to use slush hydrogen as a fuel. Extensive testing has been performed at the NASA Lewis Research Center K-Site and Small Scale Hydrogen Test Facility between 1990 and the present to provide a database for the use of slush hydrogen. This paper summarizes the results of this testing.

  11. Theory of molecular hydrogen sorption for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengbai

    2011-03-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) sorption has the advantage of fast kinetics and high reversibility. However, the binding strength is often too weak to be operative at near room temperatures. Research into such hydrogen sorption materials has branched into the study of pure van der Waals (vdW) physisorption and that of weak chemisorption (known to exist in the so-called Kubas complexes). In either case, however, theoretical tools to describe such weak interactions are underdeveloped with error bars that often exceed the strength of the interaction itself. We have used quantum-chemistry (QC) based approaches to benchmark the various available DFT methods for four classes of weak chemisorption systems [Sun et al., Phys. Rev. B 82, 073401 (2010)]. These involve complexes containing Li, Ca, Sc, and Ti with increased strength of H2 binding from predominantly vdW to mostly Kubas-like. The study reveals that most of the DFT functionals within the generalized gradient approximation underestimate the binding energy, oppose to overestimating it. The functionals that are easy to use yet yielding results reasonably close to those of accurate QC are the PBE and PW91. I will also discuss the effort of implementing vdW interaction into the currently available density functional methods [Sun, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 154102 (2008)]. The rationale is that while the true vdW is an electron-electron correlation, a DFT plus classical dispersion approach may be too simple and unnecessary within the DFT. A local pseudopotential approach has been developed to account for the core part of the polarizability of the elements. Applications to a number of benchmark systems yield good agreement with QC calculations. The application of this method and the QC methods to vdW hydrogen binding will also be discussed. Work supported by DOE/BES and DOE/EERE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence under RPI subcontracts No. J30546/J90336.

  12. Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian

    2013-12-23

    -circuit photocurrent density of the hybrid device (measured in a 2-electrode configuration) increased significantly without assistance of any external bias, i.e. from ≤1 mA/cm{sup 2} to ~5 mA/cm{sup 2}. With the copper chalcopyrite compounds, we have achieved a STH efficiency of 3.7% in a coplanar configuration with 3 a-Si solar cells and one CuGaSe{sub 2} photocathode. This material class exhibited good durability at a photocurrent density level of -4 mA/cm{sup 2} (“5% STH” equivalent) at a fixed potential (-0.45 VRHE). A poor band-edge alignment with the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) potential was identified as the main limitation for high STH efficiency. Three new pathways have been identified to solve this issue. First, PV driver with bandgap lower than that of amorphous silicon were investigated. Crystalline silicon was identified as possible bottom cell. Mechanical stacks made with one Si solar cell and one CuGaSe{sub 2} photocathode were built. A 400 mV anodic shift was observed with the Si cell, leading to photocurrent density of -5 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0VRHE (compared to 0 mA/cm{sup 2} at the same potential without PV driver). We also investigated the use of p-n junctions to shift CuGaSe{sub 2} flatband potential anodically. Reactively sputtered zinc oxy-sulfide thin films was evaluated as n-type buffer and deposited on CuGaSe{sub 2}. Ruthenium nanoparticles were then added as HER catalyst. A 250 mV anodic shift was observed with the p-n junction, leading to photocurrent density at 0VRHE of -1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. Combining this device with a Si solar cell in a mechanical stack configuration shifted the onset potential further (+400 mV anodically), leading to photocurrent density of -7 mA/cm{sup 2} at 0VRHE. Finally, we developed wide bandgap copper chalcopyrite thin film materials. We demonstrated that Se can be substituted with S using a simple annealing step. Photocurrent densities in the 5-6 mA/cm{sub 2} range were obtained with red 2.0eV CuInGaS{sub 2} photocathodes

  13. Hydrogen - From hydrogen to energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, Gregory

    2005-01-01

    More than a century ago, Jules Verne wrote in 'The Mysterious Island' that water would one day be employed as fuel: 'Hydrogen and oxygen, which constitute it, used singly or together, will furnish an inexhaustible source of heat and light'. Today, the 'water motor' is not entirely the dream of a writer. Fiction is about to become fact thanks to hydrogen, which can be produced from water and when burned in air itself produces water. Hydrogen is now at the heart of international research. So why do we have such great expectations of hydrogen? 'Hydrogen as an energy system is now a major challenge, both scientifically and from an environmental and economic point of view'. Dominated as it is by fossil fuels (oil, gas and coal), our current energy system has left a dual threat hovering over our environment, exposing the planet to the exhaustion of its natural reserves and contributing to the greenhouse effect. If we want sustainable development for future generations, it is becoming necessary to diversify our methods of producing energy. Hydrogen is not, of course, a source of energy, because first it has to be produced. But it has the twofold advantage of being both inexhaustible and non-polluting. So in the future, it should have a very important role to play. (author)

  14. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  15. The energy carrier hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The potential of hydrogen to be used as a clean fuel for the production of heat and power, as well as for the propulsion of aeroplanes and vehicles, is described, in particular for Germany. First, attention is paid to the application of hydrogen as a basic material for the (petro)chemical industry, as an indirect energy source for (petro)chemical processes, and as a direct energy source for several purposes. Than the importance of hydrogen as an energy carrier in a large-scale application of renewable energy sources is discussed. Next an overview is given of new and old hydrogen production techniques from fossil fuels, biomass, or the electrolysis of water. Energetic applications of hydrogen in the transportation sector and the production of electric power and heat are mentioned. Brief descriptions are given of techniques to store hydrogen safely. Finally attention is paid to hydrogen research in Germany. Two hydrogen projects, in which Germany participates, are briefly dealt with: the Euro-Quebec project (production of hydrogen by means of hydropower), and the HYSOLAR project (hydrogen production by means of solar energy). 18 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs

  16. Hydrogen energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okken, P.A.

    1992-10-01

    For the Energy and Material consumption Scenarios (EMS), by which emission reduction of CO 2 and other greenhouse gases can be calculated, calculations are executed by means of the MARKAL model (MARket ALlocation, a process-oriented dynamic linear programming model to minimize the costs of the energy system) for the Netherlands energy economy in the period 2000-2040, using a variable CO 2 emission limit. The results of these calculations are published in a separate report (ECN-C--92-066). The use of hydrogen can play an important part in the above-mentioned period. An overview of several options to produce or use hydrogen is given and added to the MARKAL model. In this report techno-economical data and estimates were compiled for several H 2 -application options, which subsequently also are added to the MARKAL model. After a brief chapter on hydrogen and the impact on the reduction of CO 2 emission attention is paid to stationary and mobile applications. The stationary options concern the mixing of natural gas with 10% hydrogen, a 100% substitution of natural gas by hydrogen, the use of a direct steam generator (combustion of hydrogen by means of pure oxygen, followed by steam injection to produce steam), and the use of fuel cells. The mobile options concern the use of hydrogen in the transportation sector. In brief, attention is paid to a hydrogen passenger car with an Otto engine, and a hydrogen passenger car with a fuel cell, a hybrid (metal)-hydride car, a hydrogen truck, a truck with a methanol fuel cell, a hydrogen bus, an inland canal boat with a hydrogen fuel cell, and finally a hydrogen airplane. 2 figs., 15 tabs., 1 app., 26 refs

  17. Density games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Nowak, Martin A

    2013-10-07

    The basic idea of evolutionary game theory is that payoff determines reproductive rate. Successful individuals have a higher payoff and produce more offspring. But in evolutionary and ecological situations there is not only reproductive rate but also carrying capacity. Individuals may differ in their exposure to density limiting effects. Here we explore an alternative approach to evolutionary game theory by assuming that the payoff from the game determines the carrying capacity of individual phenotypes. Successful strategies are less affected by density limitation (crowding) and reach higher equilibrium abundance. We demonstrate similarities and differences between our framework and the standard replicator equation. Our equation is defined on the positive orthant, instead of the simplex, but has the same equilibrium points as the replicator equation. Linear stability analysis produces the classical conditions for asymptotic stability of pure strategies, but the stability properties of internal equilibria can differ in the two frameworks. For example, in a two-strategy game with an internal equilibrium that is always stable under the replicator equation, the corresponding equilibrium can be unstable in the new framework resulting in a limit cycle. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-thermal hydrogen atoms in the terrestrial upper thermosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jianqi; Waldrop, Lara

    2016-12-06

    Model predictions of the distribution and dynamical transport of hydrogen atoms in the terrestrial atmosphere have long-standing discrepancies with ultraviolet remote sensing measurements, indicating likely deficiencies in conventional theories regarding this crucial atmospheric constituent. Here we report the existence of non-thermal hydrogen atoms that are much hotter than the ambient oxygen atoms in the upper thermosphere. Analysis of satellite measurements indicates that the upper thermospheric hydrogen temperature, more precisely the mean kinetic energy of the atomic hydrogen population, increases significantly with declining solar activity, contrary to contemporary understanding of thermospheric behaviour. The existence of hot hydrogen atoms in the upper thermosphere, which is the key to reconciling model predictions and observations, is likely a consequence of low atomic oxygen density leading to incomplete collisional thermalization of the hydrogen population following its kinetic energization through interactions with hot atomic or ionized constituents in the ionosphere, plasmasphere or magnetosphere.

  19. Hydrogen in anion vacancies of semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Mao-Hua; Singh, David

    2009-03-01

    Hydrogen typically terminates the dangling bonds around vacancies in semiconductors, thereby, partially or completely passivating the vacancies. However, it has been shown recently that hydrogen in anion vacancies of many semiconductors, such as ZnO, MgO, InN, SnO2, and GaN, takes multi-coordinated structures and acts as shallow donors, providing n-type conductivity to the materials. We study the hydrogen in the anion vacancies of a series of II-VI and III-V semiconductors using density functional calculations. The results on these materials show that, in the anion vacancies of polar II-VI semiconductors, the hydrogen is usually anionic and is coordinated with more than one cation atoms as a result of the relatively high ionicity of the host materials. The hydrogen coordination number depends on the host anion size. On the other hand, in more covalent semiconductors such as some III-V semiconductors, the single cation-H bonding configuration may become most stable. In the anion vacancies of ZnX and CdX where X represents anions, hydrogen is typically amphoteric except for oxides, in which the small anion size prohibits the formation of the cation-cation bond that is required for the acceptor configuration.

  20. Hydrogen vibrations in nickel hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckert, J.; Daniels, W.B.; Kitchens, T.A.; Majkrzak, C.F.; Passell, L.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter examines nickel hydride which was prepared in a BeCu high pressure cell at room temperature by applying a hydrogen gas pressure of 7kbar to pellets pressed from fine nickel powder. It explains that the rate and degree of completion of the hydride formation was first checked by neutron diffraction using deuterium gas with the result that a deuterium to metal ratio of approximately 0.75 was reached. It points out that after desorption of the deuterium, the nickel sample was charged with hydrogen for the inelastic incoherent neutron scattering measurements. The chapter notes that measurements were performed with the Be filter technique at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor, and finds that the optic modes appear as a broad band in the phonon density of states from about 70 to 110 MeV with peaks at approximately 88 and 108 MeV. It finally discusses the effect of hydride formation on the acoustic phonon density of states

  1. Hydrogen economy and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, V.

    2004-01-01

    Global energy outlooks based on present trends, such as WETO study, give little optimism about fulfilling Kyoto commitments in controlling CO2 emissions and avoiding unwanted climate consequences. Whilst the problem of radioactive waste has a prominence in public, in spite of already adequate technical solutions of safe storage for future hundreds and thousands of years, there s generally much less concern with influence of fossil fuels on global climate. In addition to electricity production, process heat and transportation are approximately equal contributors to CO2 emission. Fossil fuels in transportation present also a local pollution problem in congested regions. Backed by extensive R and D, hydrogen economy is seen as the solution, however, often without much thought where from the hydrogen in required very large quantities may come. With welcome contributions from alternative sources, nuclear energy is the only source of energy capable of producing hydrogen in very large amounts, without parallel production of CO2. Future high temperature reactors could do this most efficiently. In view of the fact that nuclear weapon proliferation is not under control, extrapolation from the present level of nuclear power to the future level required by serious attempts to reduce global CO2 emission is a matter of justified concern. Finding the sites for many hundreds of new reactors would, alone, be a formidable problem in developed regions with high population density. What is generally less well understood and not validated is that the production of nuclear hydrogen allows the required large increases of nuclear power without the accompanied increase of proliferation risks. Unlike electricity, hydrogen can be economically shipped or transported by pipelines to places very far from the place of production. Thus, nuclear production of hydrogen can be located and concentrated at few remote, controllable sites, far from the population centers and consumption regions. At such

  2. Hydrogenation of carbonaceous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Joseph; Oberg, Carl L.; Russell, Larry H.

    1980-01-01

    A method for reacting pulverized coal with heated hydrogen-rich gas to form hydrocarbon liquids suitable for conversion to fuels wherein the reaction involves injection of pulverized coal entrained in a minimum amount of gas and mixing the entrained coal at ambient temperature with a separate source of heated hydrogen. In accordance with the present invention, the hydrogen is heated by reacting a small portion of the hydrogen-rich gas with oxygen in a first reaction zone to form a gas stream having a temperature in excess of about 1000.degree. C. and comprising a major amount of hydrogen and a minor amount of water vapor. The coal particles then are reacted with the hydrogen in a second reaction zone downstream of the first reaction zone. The products of reaction may be rapidly quenched as they exit the second reaction zone and are subsequently collected.

  3. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  4. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen is an especially attractive transportation fuel. It is the least polluting fuel available, and can be produced anywhere there is water and a clean source of electricity. A fuel cycle in which hydrogen is produced by solar-electrolysis of water, or by gasification of renewably grown biomass, and then used in a fuel-cell powered electric-motor vehicle (FCEV), would produce little or no local, regional, or global pollution. Hydrogen FCEVs would combine the best features of bat...

  5. Hydrogen storage container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Feng, Zhili; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-07

    An apparatus and system is described for storing high-pressure fluids such as hydrogen. An inner tank and pre-stressed concrete pressure vessel share the structural and/or pressure load on the inner tank. The system and apparatus provide a high performance and low cost container while mitigating hydrogen embrittlement of the metal tank. System is useful for distributing hydrogen to a power grid or to a vehicle refueling station.

  6. Understanding hydrogen bonding and determination of in-crystal dipol

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    asparaginium ion and the picrate in the other complex. We have additionally performed theoretical calcu- lations at the density functional theory (DFT) level to understand the origin of enhancement of the dipole moments in the two systems. Keywords. X-ray diffraction; experimental charge density; hydrogen bonding; dipole ...

  7. Hydrogen storage capacity of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minoda, Ai; Oshima, Shinji; Iki, Hideshi; Akiba, Etsuo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The hydrogen adsorption of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons has been studied. • Lithium doping improves their hydrogen adsorption affinity. • Lithium doping is more effective for materials with micropores of 0.8 nm or smaller. • Lithium reagent can alter the pore structure, depending on the raw material. • Optimizing the pore size and functional group is needed for better hydrogen uptake. - Abstract: The authors have studied the hydrogen adsorption performance of several types of lithium-doped KOH activated carbons. In the case of activated cokes, lithium doping improves their hydrogen adsorption affinity from 5.02 kg/m 3 to 5.86 kg/m 3 at 303 K. Hydrogen adsorption density increases by around 17% after lithium doping, likely due to the fact that lithium doping is more effective for materials with micropores of 0.8 nm or smaller. The effects of lithium on hydrogen storage capacity vary depending on the raw material, because the lithium reagent can react with the material and alter the pore structure, indicating that lithium doping has the effect of plugging or filling the micropores and changing the structures of functional groups, resulting in the formation of mesopores. Despite an observed decrease in hydrogen uptake, lithium doping was found to improve hydrogen adsorption affinity. Lithium doping increases hydrogen uptake by optimizing the pore size and functional group composition

  8. Liquid hydrogen in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumi, S. [Iwatani Corp., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Overseas Business Development

    2009-07-01

    Japan's Iwatani Corporation has focused its attention on hydrogen as the ultimate energy source in future. Unlike the United States, hydrogen use and delivery in liquid form is extremely limited in the European Union and in Japan. Iwatani Corporation broke through industry stereotypes by creating and building Hydro Edge Co. Ltd., Japan's largest liquid hydrogen plant. It was established in 2006 as a joint venture between Iwatani and Kansai Electric Power Group in Osaka. Hydro Edge is Japan's first combined liquid hydrogen and ASU plant, and is fully operational. Liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen and liquid argon are separated from air using the cryogenic energy of liquefied natural gas fuel that is used for power generation. Liquid hydrogen is produced efficiently and simultaneously using liquid nitrogen. Approximately 12 times as much hydrogen in liquid form can be transported and supplied as pressurized hydrogen gas. This technology is a significant step forward in the dissemination and expansion of hydrogen in a hydrogen-based economy.

  9. Sustainable hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

  10. Hydrogen as automotive fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, G.; Ciancia, A.; Pede, G.; Brighigna, M.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen fueled vehicles may just be the answer to the air pollution problem in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicle's air pollution abatement characteristics would justify its high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives. This paper examines the feasibility of hydrogen as an automotive fuel by analyzing the following aspects: the chemical-physical properties of hydrogen in relation to its use in internal combustion engines; the modifications necessary to adapt internal combustion engines to hydrogen use; hydrogen fuel injection systems; current production technologies and commercialization status of hydrogen automotive fuels; energy efficiency ratings; environmental impacts; in-vehicle storage systems - involving the use of hydrides, high pressure systems and liquid hydrogen storage systems; performance in terms of pay-load ratio; autonomous operation; and operating costs. With reference to recent trial results being obtained in the USA, an assessment is also made of the feasibility of the use of methane-hydrogen mixtures as automotive fuels. The paper concludes with a review of progress being made by ENEA (the Italian Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) in the development of fuel storage and electronic fuel injection systems for hydrogen powered vehicles

  11. Palladium Nanoparticle Hydrogen Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Pavlovsky

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available An innovative hydrogen sensor based on palladium (Pd nanoparticle networks is described in the article. Made by Applied Nanotech Inc. sensor has a fast response time, in the range of seconds, which is increased at 80 °C due to higher hydrogen diffusion rates into the palladium lattice. The low detection limit of the sensor is 10 ppm of H2, and the high limit is 40,000 ppm. This is 100% of a lowest flammability level of hydrogen. This range of sensitivities complies with the requirements that one would expect for a reliable hydrogen sensor.

  12. Atomic hydrogen reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massip de Turville, C.M.D.

    1982-01-01

    Methods are discussed of generating heat in an atomic hydrogen reactor which involve; the production of atomic hydrogen by an electrical discharge, the capture of nascent neutrons from atomic hydrogen in a number of surrounding steel alloy tubes having a high manganese content to produce 56 Mn, the irradiation of atomic hydrogen by the high energy antineutrinos from the beta decay of 56 Mn to yield nascent neutrons, and the removal of the heat generated by the capture of nascent neutrons by 55 Mn and the beta decay of 56 Mn. (U.K.)

  13. New hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the overall hydrogen system. There are separate sections for production, distribution, transport, storage; and applications of hydrogen. The most important methods for hydrogen production are steam reformation of natural gas and electrolysis of water. Of the renewable energy options, production of hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity from wind turbines or by gasification of biomass were found to be the most economic for Finland. Direct use of this electricity or the production of liquid fuels from biomass will be competing alternatives. When hydrogen is produced in the solar belt or where there is cheap hydropower it must be transported over long distances. The overall energy consumed for the transport is from 25 to 40 % of the initial available energy. Hydrogen storage can be divided into stationary and mobile types. The most economic, stationary, large scale hydrogen storage for both long and short periods is underground storage. When suitable sites are not available, then pressure vessels are the best for short period and liquid H 2 for long period. Vehicle storage of hydrogen is by either metal hydrides or liquid H 2 . Hydrogen is a very versatile energy carrier. It can be used to produce heat directly in catalytic burners without flame, to produce electricity in fuel cells with high efficiency for use in vehicles or for peak power shaving, as a fuel component with conventional fuels to reduce emissions, as a way to store energy and as a chemical reagent in reactions

  14. Hydrogen as automotive fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, D.; Ciancia, A.; Pede, G.; Sglavo, V.; ENEA, Rome

    1992-01-01

    An assessment of the technical/economic feasibility of the use of hydrogen as an automotive fuel is made based on analyses of the following: the chemical- physical properties of hydrogen in relation to its use in internal combustion engines; the modifications necessary to adapt internal combustion engines to hydrogen use; hydrogen fuel injection systems - with water vapour injection, cryogenic injection, and the low or high pressure injection of hydrogen directly into the combustion chamber; the current commercialization status of hydrogen automotive fuels; energy efficiency ratings; environmental impacts; in-vehicle storage systems - involving the use of hydrides, high pressure systems and liquid hydrogen storage systems; performance in terms of pay-load ratio; autonomous operation; and operating costs. The paper concludes that, considering current costs for hydrogen fuel production, distribution and use, at present, the employment of hydrogen fuelled vehicles is feasible only in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicle's air pollution abatement characteristics would justify its high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives

  15. Yeager Airport Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Williams [West Virginia University Research Corporation, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The scope of this project was changed during the course of the project. Phase I of the project was designed to have the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC), together with its partners, manage the Hydrogen Vehicle Test Project at the Yeager Airport in conjunction with the Central West Virginia Regional Airport Authority (CWVRAA) in coordination with the United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S. DOE NETL). This program would allow testing and evaluation of the use of hydrogen vehicles in the state of West Virginia utilizing the hydrogen fueling station at Yeager Airport. The NAFTC and CWVRAA to raise awareness and foster a greater understanding of hydrogen fuel and hydrogen-powered vehicles through a targeted utilization and outreach and education effort. After initial implementation of the project, the project added, determine the source(s) of supply for hydrogen powered vehicles that could be used for the testing. After completion of this, testing was begun at Yeager Airport. During the course of the project, the station at Yeager Airport was closed and moved to Morgantown and the West Virginia University Research Corporation. The vehicles were then moved to Morgantown and a vehicle owned by the CWVRAA was purchased to complete the project at the new location. Because of a number of issues detailed in the report for DE-FE0002994 and in this report, this project did not get to evaluate the effectiveness of the vehicles as planned.

  16. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T [Ann Arbor, MI; Li, Yingwel [Ann Arbor, MI; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  17. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  18. Selectivity control in Pt-catalyzed cinnamaldehyde hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durndell, Lee J.; Parlett, Christopher M. A.; Hondow, Nicole S.; Isaacs, Mark A.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.

    2015-01-01

    Chemoselectivity is a cornerstone of catalysis, permitting the targeted modification of specific functional groups within complex starting materials. Here we elucidate key structural and electronic factors controlling the liquid phase hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde and related benzylic aldehydes over Pt nanoparticles. Mechanistic insight from kinetic mapping reveals cinnamaldehyde hydrogenation is structure-insensitive over metallic platinum, proceeding with a common Turnover Frequency independent of precursor, particle size or support architecture. In contrast, selectivity to the desired cinnamyl alcohol product is highly structure sensitive, with large nanoparticles and high hydrogen pressures favoring C = O over C = C hydrogenation, attributed to molecular surface crowding and suppression of sterically-demanding adsorption modes. In situ vibrational spectroscopies highlight the role of support polarity in enhancing C = O hydrogenation (through cinnamaldehyde reorientation), a general phenomenon extending to alkyl-substituted benzaldehydes. Tuning nanoparticle size and support polarity affords a flexible means to control the chemoselective hydrogenation of aromatic aldehydes. PMID:25800551

  19. Soft X-Ray Thomson Scattering in Warm Dense Hydrogen at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faustlin, R R; Toleikis, S; Bornath, T; Doppner, T; Dusterer, S; Forster, E; Fortmann, C; Glenzer, S H; Gode, S; Gregori, G; Irsig, R; Laarmann, T; Lee, H J; Li, B; Meiwes-Broer, K; Mithen, J; Przystawik, A; Redlin, H; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Tavella, F; Thiele, R; Tiggesbaumker, J; Uschmann, I; Zastrau, U; Tschentscher, T

    2009-07-15

    We present collective Thomson scattering with soft x-ray free electron laser radiation as a method to track the evolution of warm dense matter plasmas with {approx}200 fs time resolution. In a pump-probe scheme an 800 nm laser heats a 20 {micro}m hydrogen droplet to the plasma state. After a variable time delay in the order of ps the plasma is probed by an x-ray ultra violet (XUV) pulse which scatters from the target and is recorded spectrally. Alternatively, in a self-Thomson scattering experiment, a single XUV pulse heats the target while a portion of its photons are being scattered probing the target. From such inelastic x-ray scattering spectra free electron temperature and density can be inferred giving insight on relaxation time scales in plasmas as well as the equation of state. We prove the feasibility of this method in the XUV range utilizing the free electron laser facility in Hamburg, FLASH. We recorded Thomson scattering spectra for hydrogen plasma, both in the self-scattering and in the pump-probe mode using optical laser heating.

  20. Tension-Enhanced Hydrogen Evolution Reaction on Vanadium Disulfide Monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Water electrolysis is an efficient way for hydrogen production. Finding efficient, cheap, and eco-friendly electrocatalysts is essential to the development of this technology. In the work, we present a first-principles study on the effects of tension on the hydrogen evolution reaction of a novel electrocatalyst, vanadium disulfide (VS2) monolayer. Two electrocatalytic processes, individual and collective processes, are investigated. We show that the catalytic ability of VS2 monolayer at higher hydrogen coverage can be efficiently improved by escalating tension. We find that the individual process is easier to occur in a wide range of hydrogen coverage and the collective process is possible at a certain hydrogen coverage under the same tension. The best hydrogen evolution reaction with near-zero Gibbs free energy can be achieved by tuning tension. We further show that the change of catalytic activity with tension and hydrogen coverage is induced by the change of free carrier density around the Fermi level, that is, higher carrier density, better catalytic performance. It is expected that tension can be a simple way to improve the catalytic activity, leading to the design of novel electrocatalysts for efficient hydrogen production from water electrolysis.