WorldWideScience

Sample records for density gradient measurements

  1. Energy in density gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Vranjes, J

    2015-01-01

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindric configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and in particular in its application in models dealing with the heating of solar corona because the instability is accompanied with stochastic heating, so the energy contained in inhomogeneity is effectively transformed into heat. It is shown that even for a rather moderate increase of the density at the axis in magnetic structures in the corona by a factor 1.5 or 3, the amount of excess energy per unit volume stored in such a density gradient becomes several orders of magnitude greater than the amount of total energy losses per unit ...

  2. Energy in density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vranjes, J., E-mail: jvranjes@yahoo.com [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Kono, M., E-mail: kono@fps.chuo-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Policy Studies, Chuo University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work, the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindrical configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and, in particular, in its application in models dealing with the heating of solar corona because the instability is accompanied with stochastic heating, so the energy contained in inhomogeneity is effectively transformed into heat. It is shown that even for a rather moderate increase of the density at the axis in magnetic structures in the corona by a factor 1.5 or 3, the amount of excess energy per unit volume stored in such a density gradient becomes several orders of magnitude greater than the amount of total energy losses per unit volume (per second) in quiet regions in the corona. Consequently, within the life-time of a magnetic structure such energy losses can easily be compensated by the stochastic drift wave heating.

  3. Regularized Multitask Learning for Multidimensional Log-Density Gradient Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Ikko; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    Log-density gradient estimation is a fundamental statistical problem and possesses various practical applications such as clustering and measuring nongaussianity. A naive two-step approach of first estimating the density and then taking its log gradient is unreliable because an accurate density estimate does not necessarily lead to an accurate log-density gradient estimate. To cope with this problem, a method to directly estimate the log-density gradient without density estimation has been explored and demonstrated to work much better than the two-step method. The objective of this letter is to improve the performance of this direct method in multidimensional cases. Our idea is to regard the problem of log-density gradient estimation in each dimension as a task and apply regularized multitask learning to the direct log-density gradient estimator. We experimentally demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed multitask method in log-density gradient estimation and mode-seeking clustering.

  4. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, J; Knappe-Grüneberg, S; Gutkelch, D; Haueisen, J; Neuber, S; Schnabel, A; Burghoff, M

    2015-05-01

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23 pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.

  5. Measurement of deuterium density profiles in the H-mode steep gradient region using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskey, S. R.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, D. H.; Pablant, N. A.; Stagner, L.

    2016-11-01

    Recent completion of a thirty two channel main-ion (deuterium) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] enables detailed comparisons between impurity and main-ion temperature, density, and toroidal rotation. In a H-mode DIII-D discharge, these new measurement capabilities are used to provide the deuterium density profile, demonstrate the importance of profile alignment between Thomson scattering and CER diagnostics, and aid in determining the electron temperature at the separatrix. Sixteen sightlines cover the core of the plasma and another sixteen are densely packed towards the plasma edge, providing high resolution measurements across the pedestal and steep gradient region in H-mode plasmas. Extracting useful physical quantities such as deuterium density is challenging due to multiple photoemission processes. These challenges are overcome using a detailed fitting model and by forward modeling the photoemission using the FIDASIM code, which implements a comprehensive collisional radiative model.

  6. Effects of Density Gradients on Braneworld Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, Jorge

    During the last few years the braneworld consequences on general relativity have been studied with great interest. The implications in both, cosmological and astrophysics scenarios, have been considered for many authors. However there are some aspects of braneworld consequences which have not been clearly elucidated yet. For instance, the role played for density gradients in the astrophysics scenario is not clear so far, leaving thus the study of braneworld stars as one of the most difficult scenarios. Here it is shown an approach which allows the study of density gradients and their consequences through the Weyl fluid produced inside a stellar distributions. Some general aspects are discussed in detail.

  7. Interplay between transport barriers and density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.

    2006-09-01

    The present paper addresses two critical issues of zonal flows: the evidence of control parameters of their driving term, namely the Reynolds stress, and how they back-react on turbulence and transport. Kinetic nonlinear simulations are performed with the GYSELA code [V. Grandgirard et al., J. Comput. Phys. (to be published)], which models the slab branch of the ion temperature gradient driven instability in the four-dimensional drift-kinetic regime. First, the numerical results show that the gradient of the guiding center density, related to the general potential vorticity, is stabilizing both linearly, by increasing the instability threshold, and nonlinearly, by activating zonal flows. Accordingly, the Reynolds stress is found to scale like LΩ-2 in the quasilinear regime, LΩ being the gradient length of the guiding center density. Second, the local temperature gradient appears to increase linearly with the curvature of the zonal flows, regardless of its sign. Such behavior agrees qualitatively with a perturbative theory. Indeed, while linear eigenmodes are localized at the maximum of the temperature gradient in the absence of zonal flows, they tend to be expelled if both exhibit a maximum at the same location. In this case, the reduction mechanism of the turbulent transport results from the ability of large zonal flow curvatures to render strong temperature gradients stable with respect to perturbations.

  8. GPS, GNSS, and Ionospheric Density Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, P. M.; O'Hanlon, B.; Humphreys, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    Ionospheric density and density gradients affect GNSS signals in two ways. They can introduce ranging errors or irregularities that form on the density gradients producing scintillation. Here we focus on the issue of ranging errors. There are two approaches to mitigating ranging errors produced by ionospheric density gradients which can be 20-30 m during major magnetic storms. The first approach is to use a reference receiver(s) to determine the ionospheric contribution to ranging errors. The ranging error is then transmitted to the user for correction within the mobile receiver. This approach is frequently referred to as differential GPS and, when multiple reference receivers are used, the system is referred to as an augmentation system. This approach is vulnerable to ionospheric gradients depending on the reference receiver spacing(s) and latency in applying the correction within the mobile receiver. The second approach is to transmit navigation signals at two frequencies and then use the relative delay between the two signals to both estimate the ranging error and calculate the correct range. Currently the dual frequency technique is used by US military receivers with an encryption key and some civilian receivers which must be stationary and average over times long compared to those required for navigation. However, the technology of space based radio navigation is changing. GPS will soon be a system with three frequencies and multiple codes. Furthermore Europe, Russia, and China are developing independent systems to complement and compete with GPS while India and Japan are developing local systems to enhance GPS performance in their regions. In this talk we address two questions. How do density gradients affect augmentation systems including the social consequences and will the new GPS/GNSS systems with multiple civilian frequencies be able to remove ionospheric errors. The answers are not at all clear.

  9. Fabrication and evaluation of uniform and gradient density epoxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domeier, L.A.; Skala, D.M.; Goods, S.H. [and others

    1997-11-01

    Filled epoxy materials which vary in density in a designed manner have been fabricated and their mechanical properties evaluated. Density variations were produced by incorporating different volume fractions of either glass microballoons (GMB) or alumina. Several different sample types were evaluated including uniform density (0.8 g/cm{sup 3} < {rho} < 2.0 g/cm{sup 3}) samples and gradient density samples (GMB only, 0.8 g/cm{sup 3} < {rho} < 1.2 g/cm{sup 3}). The uniform density specimens were evaluated for the effects of filler type and concentration on modulus and toughness. Results indicated that addition of alumina filler significantly increased the resulting modulus while addition of GMB had little measurable effect. These differences could be understood in terms of the differing moduli of the additives relative to that of the epoxy matrix. In the former case the alumina particulates had a modulus much greater than that of the epoxy while in the latter case, the modulus of the GMB additive was only slightly greater than that of the matrix. Addition of either filler significantly degraded the toughness of the composite specimens and precluded the use of gradients to enhance toughness performance. Discontinuous {open_quotes}block{close_quotes} gradients used for testing were fabricated by simple sequential pours of formulations with different GMB loadings and were evaluated for modulus, strength and ductility. Continuous gradients were fabricated in process studies by programmed shifts in the peristaltic pumping/mixing ratio of epoxies filled with either alumina or GMB. None of the continuous gradient materials were mechanically tested. These results suggest that applications utilizing gradient materials containing alumina and similar high modulus fillers to provide designed stiffness rather than improved toughness are the most appropriate targets for future investigation.

  10. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  11. Particle transport in density gradient driven TE mode turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Skyman, Andreas; Strand, P I

    2011-01-01

    The turbulent transport of main ion and trace impurities in a tokamak device in the presence of steep electron density gradients has been studied. The parameters are chosen for trapped electron (TE) mode turbulence, driven primarily by steep electron density gradients relevant to H-mode physics, but with a transition to temperature gradient driven turbulence as the density gradient flattens. Results obtained through non-linear (NL) and quasilinear (QL) gyrokinetic simulations using the GENE code are compared with results obtained from a fluid model. Main ion and impurity transport is studied by examining the balance of convective and diffusive transport, as quantified by the density gradient corresponding to zero particle flux (peaking factor). Scalings are obtained for the impurity peaking with the background electron density gradient and the impurity charge number. It is shown that the impurity peaking factor is weakly dependent on impurity charge and significantly smaller than the driving electron density ...

  12. A density gradient theory based method for surface tension calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Xiaodong; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    The density gradient theory has been becoming a widely used framework for calculating surface tension, within which the same equation of state is used for the interface and bulk phases, because it is a theoretically sound, consistent and computationally affordable approach. Based on the observation...... that the optimal density path from the geometric mean density gradient theory passes the saddle point of the tangent plane distance to the bulk phases, we propose to estimate surface tension with an approximate density path profile that goes through this saddle point. The linear density gradient theory, which...... assumes linearly distributed densities between the two bulk phases, has also been investigated. Numerical problems do not occur with these density path profiles. These two approximation methods together with the full density gradient theory have been used to calculate the surface tension of various...

  13. An ensemble average method to estimate absolute TEC using radio beacon-based differential phase measurements: Applicability to regions of large latitudinal gradients in plasma density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thampi, Smitha V.; Bagiya, Mala S.; Chakrabarty, D.; Acharya, Y. B.; Yamamoto, M.

    2014-12-01

    A GNU Radio Beacon Receiver (GRBR) system for total electron content (TEC) measurements using 150 and 400 MHz transmissions from Low-Earth Orbiting Satellites (LEOS) is fabricated in house and made operational at Ahmedabad (23.04°N, 72.54°E geographic, dip latitude 17°N) since May 2013. This system receives the 150 and 400 MHz transmissions from high-inclination LEOS. The first few days of observations are presented in this work to bring out the efficacy of an ensemble average method to convert the relative TECs to absolute TECs. This method is a modified version of the differential Doppler-based method proposed by de Mendonca (1962) and suitable even for ionospheric regions with large spatial gradients. Comparison of TECs derived from a collocated GPS receiver shows that the absolute TECs estimated by this method are reliable estimates over regions with large spatial gradient. This method is useful even when only one receiving station is available. The differences between these observations are discussed to bring out the importance of the spatial differences between the ionospheric pierce points of these satellites. A few examples of the latitudinal variation of TEC during different local times using GRBR measurements are also presented, which demonstrates the potential of radio beacon measurements in capturing the large-scale plasma transport processes in the low-latitude ionosphere.

  14. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabra I Djomehri

    Full Text Available Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca to phosphorus (P and Ca to zinc (Zn elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095 mg/cc, bone: 570-1415 mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340 mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590 mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220 mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450 mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740 mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770 mg/cc. A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49, hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46, cementum (1.51, and bone (1.68 were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765 and in cementum (595-990, highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.

  15. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; White, A. E. [MIT-Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lee, K. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub e} ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  16. MEASUREMENT OF WHEAT DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯跟胜; 党金春; 等

    1995-01-01

    A method used for on line determining the change of wheat density with a automatic watering machine in a lqarge flour mill has been studied.The results show that the higher distinguishing ability is obtained when using 241Am as a γ-ray source for measuring the wheat density than using 137Cs.

  17. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer and Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the _ crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The _ gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  18. Separation of colloidal two dimensional materials by density gradient ultracentrifugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Yun; Song, Sha [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Huang, Jinyang, E-mail: huangjy@mail.buct.edu.cn [Department of Mathematics, College of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Sun, Xiaoming, E-mail: sunxm@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have been made through various approaches but obtaining monodispersed simply by synthesis optimization gained little success, which highlighted the need for introducing nanoseparation methods. Density gradient ultracentrifugation method has emerged as a versatile and scalable method for sorting colloidal 2D nanomaterials. Isopycnic separation was applied on thickness-dependent separation of graphene nanosheets. And rate-zonal separation, as a more versatile separation method, demonstrated its capability in sorting nanosheets of chemically modified single layered graphene, layered double hydroxide, and even metallic Ag. Establishing such density gradient ultracentrifugation method not only achieves monodispersed nanosheets and provides new opportunities for investigation on size dependent properties of 2D materials, but also makes the surface modification possible by introducing “reaction zones” during sedimentation of the colloids. - Graphical abstract: Two-dimensional (2D) materials have been made through various approaches but obtaining monodispersed simply by synthesis optimization gained little success, which highlighted the need for introducing nanoseparation methods. Density gradient ultracentrifugation method has emerged as a versatile and scalable method for sorting colloidal 2D nanomaterials according to their size of thickness difference. Establishing such density gradient ultracentrifugation method not only achieves monodispersed nanosheets and provides new opportunities for investigation on size dependent properties of 2D materials, but also makes the surface modification possible by introducing “reaction zones” during sedimentation of the colloids. - Highlights: • Density gradient ultracentrifugation was applied on size separation of 2D material. • Isopycnic separation was applied on separation of low density materials. • Rate-zonal separation was applied on separation of large density materials. • Size

  19. Analytical gradients for excitation energies from frozen-density embedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovyrshin, Arseny; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2016-08-21

    The formulation of analytical excitation-energy gradients from time-dependent density functional theory within the frozen-density embedding framework is presented. In addition to a comprehensive mathematical derivation, we discuss details of the numerical implementation in the Slater-function based Amsterdam Density Functional (ADF) program. Particular emphasis is put on the consistency in the use of approximations for the evaluation of second- and third-order non-additive kinetic-energy and exchange-correlation functional derivatives appearing in the final expression for the excitation-energy gradient. We test the implementation for different chemical systems in which molecular excited-state potential-energy curves are affected by another subsystem. It is demonstrated that the analytical implementation for the evaluation of excitation-energy gradients yields results in close agreement with data from numerical differentiation. In addition, we show that our analytical results are numerically more stable and thus preferable over the numerical ones.

  20. Enhancement of electric and magnetic wave fields at density gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Reiniusson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We use Freja satellite data to investigate irregular small-scale density variations. The observations are made in the auroral region at about 1000-1700 km. The density variations are a few percent, and the structures are found to be spatial down to a scale length of a few ion gyroradii. Irregular density variations are often found in an environment of whistler mode/lower hybrid waves and we show that at the density gradients both the electric and magnetic wave fields are enhanced.

  1. Bull Fertility and Its Relation with Density Gradient Selected Sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allouche Lynda ,

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Sperm selection method is usually used to collect these cells for in vitro-assisted reproduction. Few studies reported the relationship of in vivo fertility and semen parameters after sperm selection; hence, the present study attempted to assess different semen parameters after post-thaw or sperm selection, using density gradient separation BoviPure®, to predict in vivo fertility. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, frozen semen quality of four Montbeliarde bulls were assessed after post-thaw (PT or after sperm selection (SSp, using density gradient separation BoviPure®, to predict the fertility rate in vivo. In addition to PT or SSp, semen was examined for concentration, motility, morphology abnormalities, viability, acrosome and plasma membrane integrities. Fertility was measured as non-return rates within 56 days after the first insemination (NRR or as corrected NRR, expressed as CNRR, to the factors influencing fertility using linear mixed model. Non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to compare semen parameter variables. Fertility rates were compared using Chi-square test. Pearson correlation analysis was used to test the relationship between CNRR and semen parameters. Data was analysed using SPSS package program, version 21.0. Results Most of the examined bulls exhibited a high fertility rate (3/4 bulls, 62.1- 81.8% for NRR or 67.2-98.5% for CNRR. Fertility rate, expressed as CNRR, was significantly related to semen parameters after SSp, but not after PT. Thus, CNRR was increased with decrease of total motility, progressive spermatozoa and abaxial implantation frequencies after SSp (r=-0.999, P=0.001; r=-0.990, P=0.010; r=-0.988, P= 0.012, respectively; while, CNRR was decreased with decrease of SSp immotile spermatozoa (r=+0.995, P=0.005, underlying that maximal limit of determined immotile spermatozoa is 47%. Conclusion High frequencies of total and progressive motility spermatozoa, and abaxial

  2. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the Earth¡¦s crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The Earth¡¦s gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  3. Space charge profiles in low density polyethylene samples containing a permittivity/conductivity gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambery, K.R.; Fleming, R.J.; Holbøll, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    .5×107 V m-1. Current density was also measured as a function of temperature and field. Space charge due exclusively to the temperature gradient was detected, with density of order 0.01 C m-3. The activation energy associated with the transport of electrons through the bulk was calculated as 0.09 e...

  4. Density measures and additive property

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisada, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    We deal with finitely additive measures defined on all subsets of natural numbers which extend the asymptotic density (density measures). We consider a class of density measures which are constructed from free ultrafilters on natural numbers and study a certain additivity property of such density measures.

  5. Density measures and additive property

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisada, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    We deal with finitely additive measures defined on all subsets of natural numbers which extend the asymptotic density (density measures). We consider a class of density measures which are constructed from free ultrafilters on natural numbers and study a certain additivity property of such density measures.

  6. Density-Gradient-Driven trapped-electron-modes in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, James

    2016-10-01

    Short wavelength density fluctuations in improved-confinement MST plasmas exhibit multiple features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when transport associated with MHD tearing is reduced. Core transport in the RFP is normally governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from long wavelength tearing modes that arise from current profile peaking. Using inductive control, the tearing modes are reduced and global confinement is increased to values expected for a comparable tokamak plasma. The improved confinement is associated with a large increase in the pressure gradient that can destabilize drift waves. The measured density fluctuations have frequencies >50 kHz, wavenumbers k_phi*rho_sglobal tearing modes. Their amplitude increases with the local density gradient, and they exhibit a density-gradient threshold at R/L_n 15, higher than in tokamak plasmas by R/a. the GENE code, modified for RFP equilibria, predicts the onset of microinstability for these strong-gradient plasma conditions. The density-gradient-driven TEM is the dominant instability in the region where the measured density fluctuations are largest, and the experimental threshold-gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. While nonlinear analysis shows a large Dimits shift associated with predicted strong zonal flows, the inclusion of residual magnetic fluctuations causes a collapse of the zonal flows and an increase in the predicted transport to a level close to the experimentally measured heat flux. Similar circumstances could occur in the edge region of tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied for the control of ELMs. Work supported by US DOE.

  7. Interacting Eigenmodes of a plasma diode with a density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, T.; Gunell, H.

    1997-08-01

    The formation of narrow high frequency electric field spikes in plasma density gradients is investigated using one-dimensional particle in cell simulations. It is found that the shape of the plasma density gradient is very important for the spike formation. The spike appears also in simulations with immobile ions showing that a coupling to the ion motion, as for example in wave interactions, is not necessary for the formation of HF spikes. However, the HF spike influences the ion motion, and ion waves are seen in the simulations. It has been found, in experiments and simulations, that the electron velocity distribution function deviates from the Maxwellian distribution. Dispersion relations are calculated using realistic distribution functions. The spike can be seen as a coupled system of two Eigenmodes of a plasma diode fed by the beam-plasma interaction. Based on a simplified fluid description of such Eigenmodes, explanations for the localization of the spike, spatially and in frequency, are given. The density amplitude is comparable with the DC density level close to the cathode. Space charge limits of waves in this region seem to determine the amplitude of the spike through the Poisson`s equation. 12 refs, 19 figs.

  8. Cosmological constraints from the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski test: galaxy density gradient field

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Forero-Romero, Jaime E; Kim, Juhan

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method based on the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test to measure the expansion history of the Universe. It uses the isotropy of the galaxy density gradient field to constrain cosmological parameters. If the density parameter $\\Omega_m$ or the dark energy equation of state $w$ are incorrectly chosen, the gradient field appears to be anisotropic with the degree of anisotropy varying with redshift. We use this effect to constrain the cosmological parameters governing the expansion history of the Universe. Although redshift-space distortions (RSD) induced by galaxy peculiar velocities also produce anisotropies in the gradient field, these effects are close to uniform in magnitude over a large range of redshift. This makes the redshift variation of the gradient field anisotropy relatively insensitive to the RSD. By testing the method on mock surveys drawn from the Horizon Run 3 cosmological N-body simulations, we demonstrate that the cosmological parameters can be estimated without...

  9. The density gradient effect on quantum Weibel instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdavi, M., E-mail: m.mahdavi@umz.ac.ir; Khodadadi Azadboni, F., E-mail: f.khodadadi@stu.umz.ac.ir [Physics Department, University of Mazandaran, P. O. Box 47415-416, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The Weibel instability plays an important role in stopping the hot electrons and energy deposition mechanism in the fast ignition of inertial fusion process. In this paper, the effects of the density gradient and degeneracy on Weibel instability growth rate are investigated. Calculations show that decreasing the density degenerate in the plasma corona, near the relativistic electron beam emitting region by 8.5% leads to a 92% reduction in the degeneracy parameter and about 90% reduction in Weibel instability growth rate. Also, decreasing the degenerate density near the fuel core by 8.5% leads to 1% reduction in the degeneracy parameter and about 8.5% reduction in Weibel instability growth rate. The Weibel instability growth rate shrinks to zero and the deposition condition of relativistic electron beam energy can be shifted to the fuel core for a suitable ignition by increasing the degeneracy parameter in the first layer of plasma corona.

  10. Gram-scale fractionation of nanodiamonds by density gradient ultracentrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Mahfouz, Remi; Pan, Jun; Hou, Yuanfang; Beaujuge, Pierre M.; Bakr, Osman M.

    2013-05-01

    Size is a defining characteristic of nanoparticles; it influences their optical and electronic properties as well as their interactions with molecules and macromolecules. Producing nanoparticles with narrow size distributions remains one of the main challenges to their utilization. At this time, the number of practical approaches to optimize the size distribution of nanoparticles in many interesting materials systems, including diamond nanocrystals, remains limited. Diamond nanocrystals synthesized by detonation protocols - so-called detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) - are promising systems for drug delivery, photonics, and composites. DNDs are composed of primary particles with diameters mainly Applications requiring DNDs with specific particle or aggregate sizes are now within reach.Size is a defining characteristic of nanoparticles; it influences their optical and electronic properties as well as their interactions with molecules and macromolecules. Producing nanoparticles with narrow size distributions remains one of the main challenges to their utilization. At this time, the number of practical approaches to optimize the size distribution of nanoparticles in many interesting materials systems, including diamond nanocrystals, remains limited. Diamond nanocrystals synthesized by detonation protocols - so-called detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) - are promising systems for drug delivery, photonics, and composites. DNDs are composed of primary particles with diameters mainly Applications requiring DNDs with specific particle or aggregate sizes are now within reach. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Discussion of the influence of sample solution concentrations on DLS measurements, comparisons of the size distributions of our raw milled particles and NanoAmando particles, a detailed description of the RZDGU procedure, discussion of the influences of the gradients and centrifugation times on fractionation, TEM images, zeta potentials, AUC analysis and

  11. PIV MEASUREMENTS FOR GAS FLOW UNDER GRADIENT MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Xiaodong; WU Feng; F.YAMAMOTO

    2004-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) techniques were developed to measure the convective N2-air flow under gradient magnetic fields. The velocity fields were calculated by the Minimum Quadratic Difference (MQD) algorithm and spurious vectors were eliminated by Delaunay Tessellation.The N2-air flow was measured as the magnetic flux density varying from 0 ~ 1.5 T. A strengthened vortex flow of air was observed under the condition that the magnetic field was applied, and the velocity of N2 jet rose with the increase of the magnetic density. The experimental results show that the magnetic force will induce a vortex flow and cause a convection flow of the air mixture when both gradients of the O2 concentration and the magnetic field intensity exist.

  12. Space charge profiles in low density polyethylene samples containing a permittivity/conductivity gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambery, K.R.; Fleming, R.J.; Holbøll, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Laser induced pressure pulse space charge measurements were made on 1.5 mm thick plaques of high purity low density polyethylene equipped with vacuum-evaporated aluminium electrodes. Temperature differences up to 20 °C were maintained across the samples, which were subjected to dc fields up to 1.......5×107 V m-1. Current density was also measured as a function of temperature and field. Space charge due exclusively to the temperature gradient was detected, with density of order 0.01 C m-3. The activation energy associated with the transport of electrons through the bulk was calculated as 0.09 e...

  13. Moho Density Contrast in Central Eurasia from GOCE Gravity Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Eshagh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Seismic data are primarily used in studies of the Earth’s inner structure. Since large parts of the world are not yet sufficiently covered by seismic surveys, products from the Earth’s satellite observation systems have more often been used for this purpose in recent years. In this study we use the gravity-gradient data derived from the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE, the elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM and other global datasets to determine the Moho density contrast at the study area which comprises most of the Eurasian plate (including parts of surrounding continental and oceanic tectonic plates. A regional Moho recovery is realized by solving the Vening Meinesz-Moritz’s (VMM inverse problem of isostasy and a seismic crustal model is applied to constrain the gravimetric solution. Our results reveal that the Moho density contrast reaches minima along the mid-oceanic rift zones and maxima under the continental crust. This spatial pattern closely agrees with that seen in the CRUST1.0 seismic crustal model as well as in the KTH1.0 gravimetric-seismic Moho model. However, these results differ considerably from some previously published gravimetric studies. In particular, we demonstrate that there is no significant spatial correlation between the Moho density contrast and Moho deepening under major orogens of Himalaya and Tibet. In fact, the Moho density contrast under most of the continental crustal structure is typically much more uniform.

  14. Stable smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics in very steep density gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Benjamin T; Monaghan, Joseph J; Price, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The equations of smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD), even with the various corrections to instabilities so far proposed, have been observed to be unstable when a very steep density gradient is necessarily combined with a variable smoothing length formalism. Here we consider in more detail the modifications made to the SPMHD equations in LBP2015 that resolve this instability by replacing the smoothing length in the induction and anisotropic force equations with an average smoothing length term. We then explore the choice of average used and compare the effects on a test `cylinder-in-a-box' problem and the collapse of a magnetised molecular cloud core. We find that, aside from some benign numerical effects at low resolutions for the quadratic mean, the formalism is robust as to the choice of average but that in complicated models it is essential to apply the average to both equations; in particular, all four averages considered exhibit similar conservation properties. This improved formalism allows ...

  15. Vertical density gradient in the eastern North Atlantic during the last 30,000 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogerson, M.; Ramirez, J. [University of Hull, Geography Department, Hull (United Kingdom); Bigg, G.R. [University of Sheffield, Department of Geography, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Rohling, E.J. [University of Southampton, National Oceanography Centre, School of Ocean and Earth Science, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Past changes in the density and momentum structure of oceanic circulation are an important aspect of changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and consequently climate. However, very little is known about past changes in the vertical density structure of the ocean, even very extensively studied systems such as the North Atlantic. Here we exploit the physical controls on the settling depth of the dense Mediterranean water plume derived from the Strait of Gibraltar to obtain the first robust, observations-based, probabilistic reconstruction of the vertical density gradient in the eastern North Atlantic during the last 30,000 years. We find that this gradient was weakened by more than 50%, relative to the present, during the last Glacial Maximum, and that changes in general are associated with reductions in AMOC intensity. However, we find only a small change during Heinrich Event 1 relative to the Last Glacial Maximum, despite strong evidence that overturning was substantially altered. This implies that millennial-scale changes may not be reflected in vertical density structure of the ocean, which may be limited to responses on an ocean-overturning timescale or longer. Regardless, our novel reconstruction of Atlantic density structure can be used as the basis for a dynamical measure for validation of model-based AMOC reconstructions. In addition, our general approach is transferrable to other marginal sea outflow plumes, to provide estimates of oceanic vertical density gradients in other locations. (orig.)

  16. A novel technique for real-time estimation of edge pedestal density gradients via reflectometer time delay data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, L.; Doyle, E. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; Sung, C.; Peebles, W. A.; Bobrek, M.

    2016-11-01

    A new model-based technique for fast estimation of the pedestal electron density gradient has been developed. The technique uses ordinary mode polarization profile reflectometer time delay data and does not require direct profile inversion. Because of its simple data processing, the technique can be readily implemented via a Field-Programmable Gate Array, so as to provide a real-time density gradient estimate, suitable for use in plasma control systems such as envisioned for ITER, and possibly for DIII-D and Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. The method is based on a simple edge plasma model with a linear pedestal density gradient and low scrape-off-layer density. By measuring reflectometer time delays for three adjacent frequencies, the pedestal density gradient can be estimated analytically via the new approach. Using existing DIII-D profile reflectometer data, the estimated density gradients obtained from the new technique are found to be in good agreement with the actual density gradients for a number of dynamic DIII-D plasma conditions.

  17. [gamma]-ray CT examination of density gradients in slip ceramics: correlation with stress distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawicka, B.D. (AECL Research, Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada)); Murphy, J.G.; Taheri, F.; Kanary, L.E. (Advanced Materials Engineering Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada))

    1992-06-01

    Residual stresses caused by processing techniques reduce the safe allowable design life of components. This is especially critical for brittle materials, like ceramics, which do not exhibit plastic deformation. During development of the manufacturing process for an experimental high-precision ceramic component, a characteristic cracking pattern occurred in a series of prototypes, which suggested development of stresses during densification, either during drying or sintering. To examine parameters which may influence the development of these residual stresses, a series of simple geometry specimens were prepared and characterized for density gradients using computed tomography (CT). Using the measured values of density gradients, a model of the sintering process was made and the resultant stress distribution in the parts calculated. Results indicate that the use of nonlinear finite element analysis in conjunction with hypoelastic materials modeling qualitatively represents the sintering stresses.

  18. γ-ray CT examination of density gradients in slip cast ceramics: correlation with stress distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka, B. D.; Murphy, J. G.; Taheri, F.; Kanary, L. E.

    1992-06-01

    Residual stresses caused by processing techniques reduce the safe allowable design life of components. This is especially critical for brittle materials, like ceramics, which do not exhibit plastic deformation. During development of the manufacturing process for an experimental high-precision ceramic component, a characteristic cracking pattern occurred in a series of prototypes, which suggested development of stresses during densification, either during drying or sintering. To examine parameters which may influence the development of these residual stresses, a series of simple geometry specimens were prepared and characterized for density gradients using computed tomography (CT). Using the measured values of density gradients, a model of the sintering process was made and the resultant stress distribution in the parts calculated. Results indicate that the use of nonlinear finite element analysis in conjunction with hypoelastic materials modelling qualitatively represents the sintering stresses.

  19. Velocity Gradient Maps Directly Measured by PLF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintella, Cristina M.; Gonçalves, Cristiane C.; Lima, Angelo Mv; Pepe, Iuri M.

    2000-11-01

    Flows are macroscopically classified as laminar or turbulent due to their velocity distributions, nevertheless most chemical and biological phenomena are yield or enhanced by intermolecular orientation and microscopic turbulence. Here was studied a 100micra liquid sheet produced by a slit nozzle, both flowing freely into air and over a borosilicate surface (roughness bellow 5nm), ranging from 17 to 36Re (143 to 297cm/s, similar to muscles and brain blood flow). Mono ethylene glycol was used either pure, or with sodium alkyl benzene sulfated (ABS) surfactant (24.5mol/L, submicellar), or with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) (1409ppm, 4millions aw). Velocity gradients were directly measured by 514nm polarized laser induced fluorescence (PLF) with R6G as probe. Intermolecular alignment (IA) maps were obtained all over the flow (about 1,950 points, 0.02mm2 precision). The free jet average IA has increased 57% when flowing over borosilicate. With ABS, the IA increased, suggesting wall drag reduction. With PEO the IA decreases due to solvent intermolecular forces attenuation, generating wider turbulent areas. PLF proved to be an excellent method to evaluate IA within liquid thin flows. Chosen solute additions permits IA control over wide regions.

  20. Gram-scale fractionation of nanodiamonds by density gradient ultracentrifugation

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Size is a defining characteristic of nanoparticles; it influences their optical and electronic properties as well as their interactions with molecules and macromolecules. Producing nanoparticles with narrow size distributions remains one of the main challenges to their utilization. At this time, the number of practical approaches to optimize the size distribution of nanoparticles in many interesting materials systems, including diamond nanocrystals, remains limited. Diamond nanocrystals synthesized by detonation protocols-so-called detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs)-are promising systems for drug delivery, photonics, and composites. DNDs are composed of primary particles with diameters mainly <10 nm and their aggregates (ca. 10-500 nm). Here, we introduce a large-scale approach to rate-zonal density gradient ultracentrifugation to obtain monodispersed fractions of nanoparticles in high yields. We use this method to fractionate a highly concentrated and stable aqueous solution of DNDs and to investigate the size distribution of various fractions by dynamic light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. This fractionation method enabled us to separate gram-scale amounts of DNDs into several size ranges within a relatively short period of time. In addition, the high product yields obtained for each fraction allowed us to apply the fractionation method iteratively to a particular size range of particles and to collect various fractions of highly monodispersed primary particles. Our method paves the way for in-depth studies of the physical and optical properties, growth, and aggregation mechanism of DNDs. Applications requiring DNDs with specific particle or aggregate sizes are now within reach. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Calculate Electric Field Gradient of TiO2 Within Density Functional Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>TiO2 electric field gradient has been calculated utilizing WIEN2K program, which is ab initio based on density function theory (DFT). DFT uses the charge density as a variable instead of electronic wave

  2. Planar gradient coil design by scaling the spatial frequencies of minimum-inductance current density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S Y; Park, B S; Yi, J H; Yi, W

    1997-11-01

    Gradient coil inductance has been remarkably reduced by the minimum-inductance design technique, which minimizes the magnetic energy stored by the gradient coil. The planar gradient coil designed by this technique, however, often has poor magnetic field linearity. Scaling the spatial frequencies of the current density function derived by this method, the magnetic field linearity of the planar gradient coil can be greatly improved with a small sacrifice of gradient coil inductance. A figure of merit of the planar gradient coil has been found to be improved by scaling the spatial frequencies.

  3. A numerical study on charged-particle scattering and radiography of a steep density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Guangchao; Wang, Xiaofang

    2016-09-01

    Electron and proton radiography of polystyrene planar targets with different density gradients is studied by Monte Carlo simulations in a regime that the incident charged-particle's kinetic energy is much higher than its energy loss in the targets. It is shown that by scattering of the electrons or protons, the density gradient causes modulations of the charged-particle beam transmitted from the target and the modulation contrast is sensitive only to a steep gradient, which suggests a novel diagnostic method wherein a steep density gradient could be distinguished from the scattering of a charged-particle beam in radiography. By using a 100-MeV charged-particle beam, it is found that the modulation is evident for a steep density gradient of width smaller than 1 μm for electron radiography and 0.6 μm for proton radiography, respectively, but almost negligible when the density gradient width is greater than 1 μm. The feasibility of diagnosing the steep density gradients in compressed matter is confirmed by the simulations of radiographing a laser-ablated planar foil. Simulations also show that it is possible to diagnose the density gradients inside a multilayered spherical capsule.

  4. The causal relation between turbulent particle flux and density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligen, B. Ph. van; Martín de Aguilera, A.; Hidalgo, C. [CIEMAT - Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Carreras, B. A. [BACV Solutions, 110 Mohawk Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); García, L.; Nicolau, J. H. [Universidad Carlos III, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-07-15

    A technique for detecting the causal relationship between fluctuating signals is used to investigate the relation between flux and gradient in fusion plasmas. Both a resistive pressure gradient driven turbulence model and experimental Langmuir probe data from the TJ-II stellarator are studied. It is found that the maximum influence occurs at a finite time lag (non-instantaneous response) and that quasi-periodicities exist. Furthermore, the model results show very long range radial influences, extending over most of the investigated regions, possibly related to coupling effects associated with plasma self-organization. These results clearly show that transport in fusion plasmas is not local and instantaneous, as is sometimes assumed.

  5. Density gradient centrifugation in urografin of Moraxella and Kingella cells and appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøholm, L O; Bøvre, K

    1978-04-01

    Purification of fimbriae (pili) by density gradient banding in Urografin medium was attempted. Moraxella nonliquefaciens and Kingella kingae fimbriae were of higher density than their cells of origin, but fimbrial fractions obtained by homogenization and differential centrifugation still banded together with presumed outer membrane fragments and some whole cells in Urografin gradients. The cellular density of genetic variants with different fimbriation/competence levels was also studied. For one strain of M. nonliquefaciens and two strains of K. kingae, cells harvested from agar plates tended to show several bands on isopycnic density gradient centrifugation, with slightly higher general density of fimbriated variants than non-fimbriated. A single density band could be observed with cells from log phase broth cultures of selected strains which showed no distinct difference between fimbriation or competence variants of each strain. Cells of M. nonliquefaciens and M. bovis showed comparable buoyant densities, whereas those of K. kingae had a higher density.

  6. Inhomogeneous radiation degradation in polymers studied with a density gradient column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, K. T.; Clough, R. L.

    Radiation dose-rate effects are known to exist in many polymers and are typically caused by oxidation reactions. Since the buildup of oxidation products often leads to an increase in polymer density, a density gradient column was used in a novel way to study the mechanisms responsible for dose-rate effects in a commercial ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) electrical cable insulation material. After various aging conditions, density profiles of samples were obtained by measuring the density of small pieces cut successively from the outside to the inside of the approximately 1-mm thick insulation. By monitoring density profiles as a function of dose rate and total radiation dose, two inhomogeneous mechanisms were found to be responsible for the observed dose-rate effects in this EPR material. At high dose rates, oxygen-diffusion-limited degradation was identified, as evidenced by a density profile which showed increased density near the air-exposed surfaces of the insulation but little change in density in the interior of the sample. As the dose rate was lowered, the oxidation region spread inward until it encompassed the entire sample at dose rates below about 100 krad/hr. The second mechanism, responsible for continuing the dose-rate effects at lower dose rates, appears to involve copper-catalyzed oxidation. This mechanism is often found to be significant in thermal aging studies; evidence that it may also be significant under room-temperature, radiation-aging conditions came from the density profile results, which revealed large increases in density as the inside of the insulation (near the tinned-copper conductor) was approached. For the same total radiation dose, this increase became larger as the dose rate was lowered. Preliminary chemical analysis profiling techniques indicate significantly enhanced copper and tin concentrations as the inside of the insulation is approached, even for insulation stripped from the metallic conductor before aging. This implies that

  7. Cell Growth on ("Janus") Density Gradients of Bifunctional Zeolite L Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehr, Nermin Seda; Motealleh, Andisheh; Schäfer, Andreas H

    2016-12-28

    Nanoparticle density gradients on surfaces have attracted interest as two-dimensional material surfaces that can mimic the complex nano-/microstructure of the native extracellular matrix, including its chemical and physical gradients, and can therefore be used to systematically study cell-material interactions. In this respect, we report the preparation of density gradients made of bifunctional zeolite L crystals on glass surfaces and the effects of the density gradient and biopolymer functionalization of zeolite L crystals on cell adhesion. We also describe how we created "Janus" density gradient surfaces by gradually depositing two different types of zeolite L crystals that were functionalized and loaded with different chemical groups and guest molecules onto the two distinct sides of the same glass substrate. Our results show that more cells adhered on the density gradient of biopolymer-coated zeolites than on uncoated ones. The number of adhered cells increased up to a certain surface coverage of the glass by the zeolite L crystals, but then it decreased beyond the zeolite density at which a higher surface coverage decreased fibroblast cell adhesion and spreading. Additionally, cell experiments showed that cells gradually internalized the guest-molecule-loaded zeolite L crystals from the underlying density gradient containing bifunctional zeolite L crystals.

  8. BMP4 density gradient in disk-shaped confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgui, Behnaz; Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    We present a quantitative model that explains the scaling of BMP4 gradients during gastrulation and the recent experimental observation that geometric confinement of human embryonic stem cells is sufficient to recapitulate much of germ layer patterning. Based on a assumption that BMP4 diffusion rate is much smaller than the diffusion rate of it's inhibitor molecules, our results confirm that the length-scale which defines germ layer territories does not depend on system size.

  9. Density-gradient-assisted centrifugal microfluidics: an approach to continuous-mode particle separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukita, Yoshiaki; Oguro, Takayuki; Takamura, Yuzuru

    2017-06-01

    Centrifugal microfluidics has been recognized as a promising pumping method in microfluidics because of its simplicity, easiness of automation, and parallel processing. However, the patterning of stripe flow in centrifugal microfluidics is challenging because a fluid is significantly affected by the Coriolis force, which produces an intrinsic secondary flow. This paper reports a technical and design strategy for centrifugal microfluidics called "density-gradient-assisted centrifugal microfluidics." The flow behavior is observed with the presence of a density gradient and without a density gradient in two concentrically traveling phase flows. As a result, clear stripe flow pattern is observed with a density difference of 0.05 g/cm(3) between water and a percoll solution at a flow rate of 11.8 μl/s (7 ml/10 min) and spinning speed of 3000 rpm. In contrast, without a density gradient, it is necessary to reduce the flow rate and spinning speed to 0.1 μl/s and 1000 rpm, respectively. This paper also presents the use of a density gradient to assist in focusing resin (polystyrene) particles on the boundary of a stripe flow pattern that consists of water and percoll with different densities. Moreover, the density-based separation and sorting of particles in a mixed particle suspension is demonstrated. Polystyrene is selectively focused on the boundary, but silica particles are separated from the focused trajectory due to a difference in density. The separated particles are continuously sorted into different reservoirs with polystyrene and silica separation efficiencies of 96.5% and 98.5%, respectively. The pumping, stripe flow pattern formation, particle concentration, and sorting are simultaneously realized by applying a density gradient and centrifugal force. Therefore, this principle can realize a very simple technique for label-free particle separation by just spinning a disk device and can be applied in other applications by the use of the density-gradient

  10. Role of Density Gradient Driven Trapped Electron Modes in the H-Mode Inner Core with Electron Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D.

    2015-11-01

    We present new experiments and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations showing that density gradient driven TEM (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-Mode plasmas during strong electron heating. Thus α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-Mode plasmas with moderate density peaking. These DIII-D low torque quiescent H-mode experiments were designed to study DGTEM turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO (and GENE) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes, but also density fluctuation spectra, with and without ECH. Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te /Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear TEM critical density gradient, locally flattening the density profile. Density fluctuations from Doppler backscattering (DBS) intensify near ρ = 0.3 during ECH, displaying a band of coherent fluctuations with adjacent toroidal mode numbers. GYRO closely reproduces the DBS spectrum and its change in shape and intensity with ECH, identifying these as coherent TEMs. Prior to ECH, parallel flow shear lowers the effective nonlinear DGTEM critical density gradient 50%, but is negligible during ECH, when transport displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. GS2 predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0 >qmin > 1 . A related experiment in the same regime varied the electron temperature gradient in the outer half-radius (ρ ~ 0 . 65) using ECH, revealing spatially coherent 2D mode structures in the Te fluctuations measured by ECE imaging. Fourier analysis with modulated ECH finds a threshold in Te profile stiffness. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-08ER54966 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  11. Integration of the Density Gradient Model into a General Purpose Device Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Wettstein

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A generalized Density Gradient model has been implemented into the device simulator Dessis [DESSIS 7.0 reference manual (2001. ISE Integrated Systems Engineering AG, Balgriststrasse 102, CH-8008 Zürich].We describe the multidimensional discretization scheme used and discuss our modifications to the standard Density Gradient model. The evaluation of the model shows good agreement to results obtained by the Schro¨dinger equation.

  12. Minimax current density gradient coils: analysis of coil performance and heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Michael S; While, Peter T; Lopez, Hector Sanchez; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-08-01

    Standard gradient coils are designed by minimizing the inductance or resistance for an acceptable level of gradient field nonlinearity. Recently, a new method was proposed to minimize the maximum value of the current density in a coil additionally. The stated aim of that method was to increase the minimum wire spacing and to reduce the peak temperature in a coil for fixed efficiency. These claims are tested in this study with experimental measurements of magnetic field and temperature as well as simulations of the performance of many coils. Experimental results show a 90% increase in minimum wire spacing and 40% reduction in peak temperature for equal coil efficiency and field linearity. Simulations of many more coils indicate increase in minimum wire spacing of between 50 and 340% for the coils studied here. This method is shown to be able to increase coil efficiency when constrained by minimum wire spacing rather than switching times or total power dissipation. This increase in efficiency could be used to increase gradient strength, duty cycle, or buildability.

  13. Density functional theory for molecular and periodic systems using density fitting and continuous fast multipole method: Analytical gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łazarski, Roman; Burow, Asbjörn Manfred; Grajciar, Lukáš; Sierka, Marek

    2016-10-30

    A full implementation of analytical energy gradients for molecular and periodic systems is reported in the TURBOMOLE program package within the framework of Kohn-Sham density functional theory using Gaussian-type orbitals as basis functions. Its key component is a combination of density fitting (DF) approximation and continuous fast multipole method (CFMM) that allows for an efficient calculation of the Coulomb energy gradient. For exchange-correlation part the hierarchical numerical integration scheme (Burow and Sierka, Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation 2011, 7, 3097) is extended to energy gradients. Computational efficiency and asymptotic O(N) scaling behavior of the implementation is demonstrated for various molecular and periodic model systems, with the largest unit cell of hematite containing 640 atoms and 19,072 basis functions. The overall computational effort of energy gradient is comparable to that of the Kohn-Sham matrix formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Density gradients and internal dust in the Orion nebula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Binette

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available La estructura de ionización de la nebulosa de Orión puede ser descrita como una piel delgada sobre la superficie de una nube densa. Proponemos que una estratificación en la densidad, descrita por una ley de potencias (n / x_2, donde x es la distancia al frente de ionización, presenta propiedades que concuerdan con nuestros espectros de rendija larga de la nebulosa de Orión. Por ejemplo, existe una relación de unicidad entre el brillo superficial en HB, o la densidad del frente de ionización en [S II], y la escala L de la ley de potencias, donde L es la distancia entre el frente de ionización y el lugar donde comienza a crecer la densidad, cerca de la estrella excitadora. Es necesario incluir polvo interno a fin de obtener un ajuste aceptable a las observaciones tanto de la densidad del [S II], como del brillo superficial en HB. Los modelos que incluyen granos de polvo pequeños proporcionan un mejor ajuste que aquellos con granos grandes. Los gradientes de los cocientes de líneas observados a lo largo de la rendija se reproducen cualitativamente por nuestros modelos de densidad estratificada, suponiendo una temperatura estelar de 38,000 K. La desexcitación colisional parece ser la responsable de la mitad del gradiente observado en el cociente [N II] 5755/[N II] 6583, el cual es sensible a la temperatura. Proponemos que la relación empírica encontrada por Wen & O`Dell (1995 entre la densidad y la distancia a la estrella puede deberse a una estratificación de la densidad en forma de ley de potencias.

  15. Predicting Chemical Reactivity from the Charge Density through Gradient Bundle Analysis: Moving beyond Fukui Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Amanda; Wilson, Timothy R; Eberhart, M E

    2017-06-08

    Predicting chemical reactivity is a major goal of chemistry. Toward this end, atom condensed Fukui functions of conceptual density functional theory have been used to predict which atom is most likely to undergo electrophilic or nucleophilic attack, providing regioselectivity information. We show that the most probable regions for electrophilic attack within each atom can be predicted through analysis of gradient bundle volumes, a property that depends only on the charge density of the neutral molecules. We also introduce gradient bundle condensed Fukui functions to compare the stereoselectivity information obtained from gradient bundle volume analysis. We demonstrate this method using the test set of molecular fluorine, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen cyanide.

  16. Horizontal density-gradient effects on simulation of flow and transport in the Potomac Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Baltzer, Robert A.; ,

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional, depth-integrated, hydrodynamic/transport model of the Potomac Estuary between Indian Head and Morgantown, Md., has been extended to include treatment of baroclinic forcing due to horizontal density gradients. The finite-difference model numerically integrates equations of mass and momentum conservation in conjunction with a transport equation for heat, salt, and constituent fluxes. Lateral and longitudinal density gradients are determined from salinity distributions computed from the convection-diffusion equation and an equation of state that expresses density as a function of temperature and salinity; thus, the hydrodynamic and transport computations are directly coupled. Horizontal density variations are shown to contribute significantly to momentum fluxes determined in the hydrodynamic computation. These fluxes lead to enchanced tidal pumping, and consequently greater dispersion, as is evidenced by numerical simulations. Density gradient effects on tidal propagation and transport behavior are discussed and demonstrated.

  17. Comparing measurements of breast density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Highnam, R [Highnam Associates Limited, Wellington (New Zealand); Jeffreys, M [Massey University, Wellington (New Zealand); McCormack, V [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Warren, R [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Smith, G Davey [Department of Clinical Epidemiology, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Brady, M [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    Breast density measurements can be made from mammograms using either area-based methods, such as the six category classification (SCC), or volumetric based methods, such as the standard mammogram form (SMF). Previously, we have shown how both types of methods generate breast density estimates which are generally close. In this paper, we switch our attention to the question of why, for certain cases, they provide widely differing estimates. First, we show how the underlying physical models of the breast employed in the methods need to be consistent, and how area-based methods are susceptible to projection effects. We then analyse a set of patients whose mammograms show large differences between their SCC and SMF assessments. More precisely, 12% of 657 patients were found to fall into this category. Of these, 2.7% were attributable to errors either in the SMF segmentation algorithms, human error in SCC categorization or poor image exposure. More importantly, 9.3% of the cases appear to be due to fundamental differences between the area- and volume-based techniques. We conclude by suggesting how we might remove half of those discrepancies by introducing a new categorization of the SMF estimates based on the breast thickness. We note however, that this still leaves 6% of patients with large differences between SMF and SCC estimates. We discuss why it might not be appropriate to assume SMF (or any volume measure) has a similar breast cancer risk prediction capability to SCC.

  18. Effect of density gradient centrifugation on reactive oxygen species in human semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Teppei; Yumura, Yasushi; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Kawahara, Takashi; Uemura, Hiroji; Iwasaki, Akira

    2017-06-01

    Density gradient centrifugation can separate motile sperm from immotile sperm and other cells for assisted reproduction, but may also remove antioxidants from seminal plasma, resulting in oxidative stress. Therefore, we investigated reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations and distribution in semen before and after density gradient centrifugation. We assessed semen volume, sperm concentration, sperm motility, and ROS levels before and after density gradient centrifugation (300 x g for 20 minutes) in 143 semen samples from 118 patients. The ROS removal rate was evaluated in ROS-positive samples and ROS formation rate in ROS-negative samples. Thirty-eight of 143 untreated samples (26.6%) were ROS-positive; sperm motility was significantly lower in these samples than in ROS-negative samples (p density gradient centrifugation, only seven of the 38 ROS-positive samples (18.42%) exhibited a ROS-positive lower layer (containing motile sperm) with a ROS removal rate of 81.58%, whereas the upper layer was ROS-positive in 24 samples (63.16%). In the ROS-negative group (n = 105), ROS was detected in 19 samples after centrifugation (18.10%, ROS generation rate), of which 18 were ROS-positive only in the upper layer or interface and the other was ROS-positive in both layers. Density gradient centrifugation can separate motile sperm from immotile sperm as well as remove ROS (including newly generated ROS). This data supports the view that density gradient centrifugation can select motile spermatozoa without enhancing oxidative stress. ROS: reactive oxygen species; SOD: superoxide dismutase; GPx: glutathione peroxidase; DNA: deoxyribonucleic acid; DGC: density gradient centrifugation; IUI: intrauterine insemination; IVF: in vitro fertilization; HEPES: 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid; EDTA: ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid; HTF: HEPES-buffered human tubal fluid; IMSI: intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection; SMAS: sperm motility analyzing

  19. The influence of mineral matter on the separation of amorphous marine kerogens using density gradient centrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Hartgers, W.A.; Leeuw, J.W. de; Ling, Y.; Crelling, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    Three relatively immature amorphous marine kerogens were subjected to density gradient centrifugation (DGC). The density fractions obtained were analyzed by Curie-point pyrolysis in combination with gas chromatography (Py-GC) and with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS). Despite the

  20. Evaluation of centrifugation parameters for density gradient experiments by means of a programmable pocket calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzfeldt, C

    1980-10-01

    A calculation program is proposed suitable for programmable pocket calculators (e.g. HP series) to estimate s20,w f omega2 dt values from density gradient centrifugation data. The program can be applied to linear or exponential density gradients prepared from sucrose or glycerol solutions spun in zonal rotors or swinging bucket rotors. A wide solute concentration range and temperature range is accounted for. Constants for empirical density calculation of glycerol and sucrose solutions concentrated in % (w/v) are estimated. Experimental verification of the program was carried out.

  1. Multispecies Density and Temperature Gradient Dependence of Quasilinear Particle and Energy Fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Rewoldt; R.V. Budny; W.M. Tang

    2004-08-09

    The variations of the normalized quasilinear particle and energy fluxes with artificial changes in the density and temperature gradients, as well as the variations of the linear growth rates and real frequencies, for ion temperature gradient and trapped-electron modes, are calculated. The quasilinear fluxes are normalized to the total energy flux, summed over all species. Here, realistic cases for tokamaks and spherical torii are considered which have two impurity species. For situations where there are substantial changes in the normalized fluxes, the ''diffusive approximation,'' in which the normalized fluxes are taken to be linear in the gradients, is seen to be inaccurate. Even in the case of small artificial changes in density or temperature gradients, changes in the fluxes of different species (''off-diagonal'') generally are significant, or even dominant, compared to those for the same species (''diagonal'').

  2. Reproducible isolation of type II pneumocytes from fetal and adult rat lung using nycodenz density gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscardi, R M; Ullsperger, S; Resau, J H

    1992-01-01

    Isolating fresh, relatively pure type II pneumocytes from the lung, particularly of fetal origin, is a difficult process. Separation by buoyant density gradient centrifugation has been used successfully to isolate adult type II cells. There is concern, however, that Percoll, a gradient medium that is commonly used for type II cell isolation, may be toxic to cells. We evaluated a new gradient medium, Nycodenz, that is (1) a true solution, (2) transparent, (3) not metabolized by cells, and (4) nontoxic to cells. Type II pneumocytes were isolated from 19- and 21-day gestation fetal and adult rat lung by elastase digestion and separated on preformed isotonic Nycodenz gradients (2 mL each of 27.6, 20.7, 13.8, and 4.6 (w/v) solutions). Type II pneumocytes were recovered from the density range 1.057-1.061 and identified by binding of FITC-conjugated and gold-complexed Maclura pomifera lectin. Cells derived from 19-day fetal lung contained abundant glycogen and reacted with a monoclonal antibody to the cytokeratins 8 and 18, which are markers of the fetal type II cell. Adult type II cells reacted with antibodies to cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19. Type II cell purity was 79.7 +/- 2.4%, 83.8 +/- 2.8%, and 82.6 +/- 1.8% (means +/- SEM) for 19- and 21-day gestation fetal and adult lung preparations, respectively. Cell viability was greater than 95%. The final cell yield for adult preparations was 17.8 +/- 2.7 x 10(6)/rat (means +/- SEM). To determine if the freshly isolated type II pneumocytes were functionally active, the incorporation of [3H]choline into phosphatidylcholine was measured. The percent saturation of phosphatidylcholine was high for both populations of freshly isolated cells. However, adult type II pneumocytes incorporated [3H]choline into phosphatidylcholine more rapidly than 21-day gestation fetal cells (5.97 x 10(-3) dpm/10(6) cells/h vs. 0.32 x 10(-3) dpm/10(6) cells/h, P less than .005). We have demonstrated that, using the Nycodenz isolation method, it is

  3. Measurements of the coupling between the tumbling of rods and the velocity gradient tensor in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T; Voth, Greg A

    2014-01-01

    We present simultaneous experimental measurements of the dynamics of anisotropic particles transported by a turbulent flow and the velocity gradient tensor of the flow surrounding them. We track both rod-shaped particles and small spherical flow tracers using stereoscopic particle tracking. By using scanned illumination, we are able to obtain a high enough seeding density of tracers to measure the full velocity gradient tensor near the rod. The alignment of rods with the vorticity and the eigenvectors of the strain rate show agreement with numerical simulations. A full description of the tumbling of rods in turbulence requires specifying a seven-dimensional joint probability density function (PDF) of five scalars characterizing the velocity gradient tensor and two scalars describing the relative orientation of the rod. If these seven parameters are known, then Jeffery's equation specifies the rod tumbling rate and any statistic of rod rotations can be obtained as a weighted average over the joint PDF. To look...

  4. Projected gradient algorithms for Hartree-Fock and density matrix functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancès, Eric; Pernal, Katarzyna

    2008-04-01

    We present projected gradient algorithms designed for optimizing various functionals defined on the set of N-representable one-electron reduced density matrices. We show that projected gradient algorithms are efficient in minimizing the Hartree-Fock or the Müller-Buijse-Baerends functional. On the other hand, they converge very slowly when applied to the recently proposed BBk (k =1,2,3) functionals [O. Gritsenko et al., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 204102 (2005)]. This is due to the fact that the BBk functionals are not proper functionals of the density matrix.

  5. An Independent Component Analysis Algorithm through Solving Gradient Equation Combined with Kernel Density Estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Yun-feng; WANG Yu-jia; YANG Jie

    2009-01-01

    A new algorithm for linear instantaneous independent component analysis is proposed based on max-imizing the log-likelihood contrast function which can be changed into a gradient equation. An iterative method is introduced to solve this equation efficiently. The unknown probability density functions as well as their first and second derivatives in the gradient equation are estimated by kernel density method. Computer simulations on artificially generated signals and gray scale natural scene images confirm the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithm.

  6. Localization of the Proton Pump of Corn Coleoptile Microsomal Membranes by Density Gradient Centrifugation 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, Suzanne; Mettler, Irvin J.; Taiz, Lincoln

    1982-01-01

    Previous studies characterizing an ATP-dependent proton pump in microsomal membrane vesicles of corn coleoptiles led to the conclusion that the proton pump was neither mitochondrial nor plasma membrane in origin (Mettler, Mandala, Taiz 1982 Plant Physiol 70: 1738-1742). To facilitate positive identification of the vesicles, corn coleoptile microsomal membranes were fractionated on linear sucrose and dextran gradients, with ATP-dependent [14C]methylamine uptake as a probe for proton pumping. On sucrose gradients, proton pumping activity exhibited a density of 1.11 grams/cubic centimeter and was coincident with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In the presence of high magnesium, the ER shifted to a heavier density, while proton pumping activity showed no density shift. On linear dextran gradients, proton pumping activity peaked at a lighter density than the ER. The proton pump appears to be electrogenic since both [14C]SCN− uptake and 36Cl− uptake activities coincided with [14C] methylamine uptake on dextran gradients. On the basis of density and transport properties, we conclude that the proton pumping vesicles are probably derived from the tonoplast. Nigericin-stimulated ATPase activity showed a broad distribution which did not coincide with any one membrane marker. PMID:16662755

  7. Horizontal Ionospheric Electron Density Gradients Observed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC TIP: Spatial Distributions and Effects on VLF Wave Propagation at Mid-Latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien H. Chua

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatial variability of electron densities in the nightside ionosphere and its effects on very-low frequency (VLF wave propagation using a suite of instruments from the FORMOSAT-3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC spacecraft.We use observations from the Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP instruments to infer the horizontal electron density gradients along each satellite track. We demonstrate that the OI 1356 _ radiance measured by the TIP instruments tracks the horizontal electron density structure well with high spatial resolution and unprecedented sensitivity. Accurate measurements of the horizontal electron density gradients are important for improving retrieved electron density profiles from GPS occultation and other tomographic remote sensing techniques. The processes underlying the variability in the large-scale, nightside electron density gradients are the main drivers of ionospheric weather. TIP observations reveal significant variability in both the small and large scale structure of the nightside ionosphere. The relative intensities, relative widths, and latitudinal separation of the northern and southern ionization crests of the Appleton anomalies show a high degree of longitudinal variation.We demonstrate how the TIP observations can be used to measure the horizontal gradient of the refractive index of whistler-mode VLF waves propagating in a cold, collisionless plasma. These measurements are critical for understanding how gradients in electron density associated with ionospheric structure such as depletions and the Appleton anomalies affect VLF wave propagation through the equatorial and mid-latitude ionosphere.

  8. Preparation of Avocado Mitochondria Using Self-Generated Percoll Density Gradients and Changes in Buoyant Density during Ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, F; Romani, R

    1982-11-01

    Mitochondria from avocado (Persea americana Mill, var. Fuerte and Hass) can be rapidly prepared at every stage of ripening using differential centrifugation and self-generated Percoll gradients. The procedure results in improved oxidative and phosphorylative properties, especially for mitochondria isolated from preclimacteric fruits.A gradual change in the buoyant density of avocado mitochondria takes place during ripening. Climacteric and postclimacteric avocado mitochondria have the same buoyant density as other plant mitochondria (potato, cauliflower), whereas mitochondria from preclimacteric fruit have a lower density. The transition in buoyant density occurs during the climacteric rise, and two populations of intact mitochondria (p = 1.060 and p = 1.075) can be separated at this stage. Evidence indicates that the difference in mitochondrial buoyant density between preclimacteric and postclimacteric mitochondria is likely due to interactions with soluble cytosolic components.

  9. Purification of white spot syndrome virus by iodixanol density gradient centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas-Lima, J J; Corteel, M; Cornelissen, M; Bossier, P; Sorgeloos, P; Nauwynck, H J

    2013-10-01

    Up to now, only a few brief procedures for purifying white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) have been described. They were mainly based on sucrose, NaBr and CsCl density gradient centrifugation. This work describes for the first time the purification of WSSV through iodixanol density gradients, using virus isolated from infected tissues and haemolymph of Penaeus vannamei (Boone). The purification from tissues included a concentration step by centrifugation (2.5 h at 60,000 g) onto a 50% iodixanol cushion and a purification step by centrifugation (3 h at 80,000 g) through a discontinuous iodixanol gradient (phosphate-buffered saline, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%). The purification from infected haemolymph enclosed a dialysis step with a membrane of 1,000 kDa (18 h) and a purification step through the earlier iodixanol gradient. The gradients were collected in fractions and analysed. The number of particles, infectivity titre (in vivo), total protein and viral protein content were evaluated. The purification from infected tissues gave WSSV suspensions with a very high infectivity and an acceptable purity, while virus purified from haemolymph had a high infectivity and a very high purity. Additionally, it was observed that WSSV has an unusually low buoyant density and that it is very sensitive to high external pressures.

  10. Investigation of Vapor-Liquid Nucleation for Associating Fluids by Density Gradient Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Dong; LIU Jianmin

    2009-01-01

    An equation of state (EOS) applicable to both the uniform and non-uniform associating fluids was established by using the density-gradient expansion, in which the influence parameter κis formulated as a function of tempera-ture. The molecular parameters were regressed by fitting to the experimental data of vapor pressures and liquid den-sities. Within the framework of density gradient theory (DGT), the nucleation rates for water, heavy water, metha-nol, ethanol, 1-propanoi, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and 1-hexanol were calculated. The results were satisfactory com-pared with the experimental data. Our study shows that DGT preserves all the advantages of density functional the-ory (DFT) in capturing the structure and properties of nucleus but gives much more accurate nucleation rates by adjusting the influence parameter.

  11. Stabilized density gradient theory algorithm for modeling interfacial properties of pure and mixed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mu, Xiaoqun; Alpak, Faruk O; Chapman, Walter G

    2016-01-01

    Density gradient theory (DGT) allows fast and accurate determination of surface tension and density profile through a phase interface. Several algorithms have been developed to apply this theory in practical calculations. While the conventional algorithm requires a reference substance of the system, a modified "stabilized density gradient theory" (SDGT) algorithm is introduced in our work to solve DGT equations for multiphase pure and mixed systems. This algorithm makes it possible to calculate interfacial properties accurately at any domain size larger than the interface thickness without choosing a reference substance or assuming the functional form of the density profile. As part of DGT inputs, the perturbed chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) equation of state (EoS) was employed for the first time with the SDGT algorithm. PC-SAFT has excellent performance in predicting liquid phase properties as well as phase behaviors. The SDGT algorithm with the PC-SAFT EoS was tested and compared with ...

  12. Measurement of spatial stress gradients near grain boundaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, Indranil; Ocelík, Vaclav; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.

    2017-01-01

    A correlative method based on electron back scattered diffraction and focused ion-beam–digital image correlation slit milling technique was used to quantitatively determine spatially resolved stress profiles in the vicinity of grain boundaries in pure titanium. Measured local stress gradients were

  13. Density Gradient Ultracentrifugation to Isolate Endogenous Protein Complexes after Affinity Capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; LaCava, John; Rout, Michael P

    2016-07-01

    This protocol describes the isolation of native protein complexes by density gradient ultracentrifugation. The outcome of an affinity capture and native elution experiment is generally a mixture of (1) the complex(es) associated with the protein of interest under the specific conditions of capture, (2) fragments of the complex generated by degradation or disassembly during the purification procedure, and (3) the protease or reagent used to natively elute the sample. To separate these components and isolate a homogeneous complex, an additional step of purification is required. Rate-zonal density gradient ultracentrifugation is a reliable and powerful technique for separating particles based on their hydrodynamic volume. The density gradient is generated by mixing low- and high-density solutions of a suitable low-molecular-weight inert solute (e.g., sucrose or glycerol). The gradient is formed in a solvent that could be any of the solvents used for the affinity capture and native elution and should help to preserve the structure and activity of the assembly.

  14. Pressure Gradient Estimation Based on Ultrasonic Blood Flow Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Naotaka; Homma, Kazuhiro; Shiina, Tsuyoshi

    2006-05-01

    Mechanical load to the blood vessel wall, such as shear stress and pressure, which occurs in blood flow dynamics, contribute greatly to plaque rupture in arteriosclerosis and to biochemical activation of endothelial cells. Therefore, noninvasive estimations of these mechanical loads are able to provide useful information for the prevention of vascular diseases. Although the pressure is the dominant component of mechanical load, for practical purposes, the pressure gradient is also often important. So far, we have investigated the estimation of the kinematic viscosity coefficient using a combination of the Navier-Stokes equations and ultrasonic velocity measurement. In this paper, a method for pressure gradient estimation using the estimated kinematic viscosity coefficient is proposed. The validity of the proposed method was investigated on the basis of the analysis with the data obtained by computer simulation and a flow phantom experiment. These results revealed that the proposed method can provide a valid estimation of the pressure gradient.

  15. Low-Earth Orbit Determination from Gravity Gradient Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xiucong; Macabiau, Christophe; Han, Chao

    2016-01-01

    An innovative orbit determination method which makes use of gravity gradients for Low-Earth-Orbiting satellites is proposed. The measurement principle of gravity gradiometry is briefly reviewed and the sources of measurement error are analyzed. An adaptive hybrid least squares batch filter based on linearization of the orbital equation and unscented transformation of the measurement equation is developed to estimate the orbital states and the measurement biases. The algorithm is tested with the actual flight data from the European Space Agency Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer. The orbit determination results are compared with the GPS-derived orbits. The radial and cross-track position errors are on the order of tens of meters, whereas the along-track position error is over one order of magnitude larger. The gravity gradient based orbit determination method is promising for potential use in GPS-denied spacecraft navigation.

  16. Comparative study on density gradients and swim-up preparation techniques utilizing neat and cryopreserved spermatozoa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shyam S.R. Allamaneni; Ashok Agarwal; Sreedhar Rama; Pavithra Ranganathan; Rakesh K. Sharma

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To 1) compare post-wash and post-thaw parameters of sperm processed with PureSperm density gradient technique and swim-up method; and 2) test the efficacy of two commonly available density gradient media PureSperm and Isolate. Methods: This prospective study used semen specimens from 22 patients. Specimens from nine patients were processed by both PureSperm density gradient and swim-up method. These specimens were then cryopreserved.Thirteen specimens were processed by both PureSperm (40 % and 80 %) and Isolate (50 % and 90 %) double density gradient techniques. The two fractions processed by both PureSperm and swim-up were analyzed for post-wash sperm characteristics. Post-thaw analysis was done after 24 hours. Sperm fractions obtained after processing with PureSperm and Isolate were compared for post-wash sperm characteristics and ROS levels. Results: Specimens prepared with PureSperm had significantly higher median total motile sperm counts (TMSC) (32.2 × 106 vs.17.6 × 106), recovery rates (69.2 % vs. 50.0 %), and longevity at 4 hours (83.0 % vs. 55.0 %) compared to specimen prepared by swim-up. Post-thaw specimens also had a higher recovery and longevity at 4 hours with PureSperm as compared to the swim-up. Semen specimens processed by PureSperm had significantly higher total sperm count,TMSC, and percentage recovery rates (30.0 % vs. 19.7 %) than Isolate. Conclusion: Semen quality is better preserved in fresh and cryopreserved semen prepared with PureSperm density gradient compared to swim-up. A significant enrichment of sperm is observed with PureSperm compared to Isolate. Higher recovery rates of mature motile sperm obtained after PureSperm sperm preparation may be beneficial for successful ART.

  17. Microfluidic Adaptation of Density-Gradient Centrifugation for Isolation of Particles and Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxi Sun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Density-gradient centrifugation is a label-free approach that has been extensively used for cell separations. Though elegant, this process is time-consuming (>30 min, subjects cells to high levels of stress (>350 g and relies on user skill to enable fractionation of cells that layer as a narrow band between the density-gradient medium and platelet-rich plasma. We hypothesized that microfluidic adaptation of this technique could transform this process into a rapid fractionation approach where samples are separated in a continuous fashion while being exposed to lower levels of stress (<100 g for shorter durations of time (<3 min. To demonstrate proof-of-concept, we designed a microfluidic density-gradient centrifugation device and constructed a setup to introduce samples and medium like Ficoll in a continuous, pump-less fashion where cells and particles can be exposed to centrifugal force and separated via different outlets. Proof-of-concept studies using binary mixtures of low-density polystyrene beads (1.02 g/cm3 and high-density silicon dioxide beads (2.2 g/cm3 with Ficoll–Paque (1.06 g/cm3 show that separation is indeed feasible with >99% separation efficiency suggesting that this approach can be further adapted for separation of cells.

  18. The effect of density gradient on the growth rate of relativistic Weibel instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdavi, M., E-mail: m.mahdavi@umz.ac.ir [Physics Department, University of Mazandaran, P.O. Box 47415-416, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodadadi Azadboni, F., E-mail: f.khodadadi@stu.umz.ac.ir [Physics Department, University of Mazandaran, P.O. Box 47415-416, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Young Researchers Club, Sari Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 48161-194, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    In this paper, the effect of density gradient on the Weibel instability growth rate is investigated. The density perturbations in the near corona fuel, where temperature anisotropy, η, is larger than the critical temperature anisotropy, η{sub c}, (η > η{sub c}), enhances the growth rate of Weibel instability due to the sidebands coupled with the electron oscillatory velocity. But for η < η{sub c}, the thermal spread of the energetic electrons reduces the growth rate. Also, the growth rate can be reduced if the relativistic parameter (Lorentz factor) is sufficiently large, γ > 2. The analysis shows that relativistic effects and density gradient tend to stabilize the Weibel instability. The growth rate can be reduced by 88% by reducing η by a factor of 100 and increasing relativistic parameter by a factor of 3.

  19. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, A.; Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M.; Kikkawa, T.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck SSSE coefficient of 2.8 × 10 - 7 V K-1.

  20. Relative contributions of temperature and salinity to seasonal mixed layer density changes and horizontal density gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Gregory C.; Schmidtko, Sunke; Lyman, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Temperature and salinity both contribute to ocean density, including its seasonal cycle and spatial patterns in the mixed layer. Temperature and salinity profiles from the Argo Program allow construction and analysis of a global, monthly, mixed layer climatology. Temperature changes dominate the seasonal cycle of mixed layer density in most regions, but salinity changes are dominant in the tropical warm pools, Arctic, and Antarctic. Under the Intertropical Convergence Zone, temperature and sa...

  1. A collocation method for surface tension calculations with the density gradient theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Mahler; Maribo-Mogensen, Bjørn; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.

    2016-01-01

    Surface tension calculations are important in many industrial applications and over a wide range of temperatures, pressures and compositions. Empirical parachor methods are not suitable over a wide condition range and the combined use of density gradient theory with equations of state has been...... proposed in literature. Often, many millions of calculations are required in the gradient theory methods, which is computationally very intensive. In this work, we have developed an algorithm to calculate surface tensions an order of magnitude faster than the existing methods, with no loss of accuracy...

  2. Effects of density, velocity gradient, and compressibility on side-jet formation in round jets with variable density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Akinori

    2013-11-01

    When a low density gas compared with the ambient gas is discharged from a round nozzle, side jets that are radial ejections of jet fluid are generated at the initial region of the jet. The density ratio between the jet fluid and the ambient fluid is a main parameter for the side-jet formation. Since the side-jet formation is also related to the instability of shear layer, it depends on the velocity gradient of the shear layer in the jet. The velocity gradient is evaluated by a ratio of the momentum thickness and the nozzle diameter at the nozzle exit. Compressibility suppresses the instability and the generation of the side jets. The compressibility is evaluated by a Mach number, which is a ratio defined by an issuing velocity of the jet and a sound velocity in the ambient fluid. Influence of these three parameters on the side-jet formation was examined experimentally. The density ratio and momentum thickness ratio were varied from 0.14 to 1.53, and from 14 to 155, respectively. The Mach number was varied to 0.7. Existence of side jets was confirmed by flow visualization using a laser sheet. Domains for the side-jet formation by the density ratio, the momentum thickness ratio, and the Mach number were determined.

  3. Density Measurement of Liquid Metals Using Dilatometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianwen WANG; Qingsong MEI

    2006-01-01

    The dilatometer method for density measurement of liquid metals was improved to give a high measurement accuracy with simple operation. The density of liquid tin was measured and the results are in agreement with values in literature. The melting point density of liquid Sn was measured to be 6.966×103 Kg·m-3 and the temperature (T) dependence of the density (ρ) for liquid Sn can be well described by a polynomial equation ρ(T)=7.406 - 9.94 × 10-4T + 2.12 × 10-7T2.

  4. Pitfalls of using the geometric-mean combining rule in the density gradient theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Xiaodong; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    It is popular and attractive to model the interfacial tension using the density gradient theory with the geometric-mean combining rule, in which the same equation of state is used for the interface and bulk phases. The computational efficiency is the most important advantage of this theory. In th...... the interface could be considered as a warning for the unsuccessful applications of the geometric-mean density gradient theory combined with the chosen thermodynamic model, even if numerical pitfalls do not occur. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......It is popular and attractive to model the interfacial tension using the density gradient theory with the geometric-mean combining rule, in which the same equation of state is used for the interface and bulk phases. The computational efficiency is the most important advantage of this theory....... In this work, it has been mathematically shown that the theory fails if the solution profile is not monotonic in the path function, which is defined as the summation of the density multiplied by the square root of the influence parameter over all components. A computational solution procedure is then presented...

  5. Baroclinic pressure gradient difference schemes of subtracting the local averaged density stratification in sigma coordinates models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shouxian; ZHANG Wenjing

    2008-01-01

    Much has been written of the error in computing the baroclinic pressure gradient (BPG) with sigma coordinates in ocean or atmos- pheric numerical models. The usual way to reduce the error is to subtract area-averaged density stratification of the whole computa- tion region. But if there is great difference between the area-averaged and the local averaged density stratification, the error will be obvious. An example is given to show that the error from this method may be larger than that from no correction sometimes. The definition of local area is put forward. Then, four improved BPG difference schemes of subtracting the local averaged density strat- ification are designed to reduce the error. Two of them are for diagnostic calculation (density field is fixed), and the others are for prognostic calculation (density field is not fixed). The results show that the errors from these schemes all significantly decrease.

  6. MEASURING LOCAL GRADIENT AND SKEW QUADRUPOLE ERRORS IN RHIC IRS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CARDONA,J.; PEGGS,S.; PILAT,R.; PTITSYN,V.

    2004-07-05

    The measurement of local linear errors at RHIC interaction regions using an ''action and phase'' analysis of difference orbits has already been presented. This paper evaluates the accuracy of this technique using difference orbits that were taken when known gradient errors and skew quadrupole errors were intentionally introduced. It also presents action and phase analysis of simulated orbits when controlled errors are intentionally placed in a RHIC simulation model.

  7. Gravimetric Measurement of Magnetic Field Gradient Spatial Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Arutunian, S G; Egiazarian, S L; Mailian, M R; Sinenko, I G; Sinjavski, A V; Vasiniuk, I E

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic interaction between a weighing sample and an external magnetic field allows to measure characteristics of magnetic field (a sample with known magnetic characteristics), as well as the magnetic properties of a sample (a known magnetic field). Measurement of materials magnetic permeability is a well known application of this method. In this paper we restrict ourselves to the measurement of magnetic field spatial distribution, which was achieved by scanning of samples from known materials along the vertical axis. Field measurements by Hall detector were done to calibrate obtained data. Such measurements are of great interest in some branches of physics, in particular, in accelerator physics, where the quality of magnetic system parts eventually determine the quality of accelerated bunches. Development of a simple and cheep device for measurement of magnetic field spatial distribution is an urgent problem. The developed system for gravimetric measurement of magnetic field gradients partially solves this ...

  8. Effect of semen extender and density gradient centrifugation on the motility and fertility of turkey spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, J M; Persson, B; Tjellström, H; Laessker, A; Nilsson, H; Danilova, M; Holmes, P V

    2005-12-01

    In the absence of commercially viable methods for cryopreserving turkey spermatozoa, new processing methods are required to extend the functional life of stored turkey spermatozoa for artificial insemination. The present study evaluates the efficacy of a new extender (Turkey Semen Extend) and investigates the use of density gradient centrifugation in processing turkey spermatozoa for artificial insemination. The new extender is compared with two commercially available turkey semen extenders, Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender and Ovodyl. Turkey spermatozoa in Turkey Semen Extend were still motile 20 h after collection, representing a considerable improvement over the other semen extenders (40%, 0% and 8% for Turkey Semen Extend, Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender and Ovodyl, respectively). A field trial on a commercial turkey farm showed improved fertilization rates following insemination of turkey hens with semen extended in Turkey Semen Extend (89.7%) compared with Beltsville Poultry Semen Extender (86.9%). This difference is statistically significant (p < 0.05). Processing on a density gradient, optimized for turkey spermatozoa, also increased sperm survival (50% gradient-prepared spermatozoa still motile after 18 h compared with <10% non-processed spermatozoa). Preliminary studies indicate that gradient preparation of spermatozoa may aid survival during cryopreservation.

  9. Radial gradients of phase space density in the inner electron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shprits, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    While the outer radiation belt (3.5 inner radiation belt (1.2 inner electron belt in recent years. It has been generally accepted that the equilibrium structure of radiation belt electrons is explained by the slow inward radial diffusion from a source in the outer belt and losses by Coulomb collision and wave-particle interaction. In this study, we examine this well accepted theory using the radial profiles of the phase space density (PSD), inferred from in situ measurements made by three different satellites: S3-3, CRRES, and POLAR. Our results show that electron PSD in the inner electron belt has a clear prominent local peak and negative radial gradient in the outer portion of the inner zone, i.e., decreasing PSD with increasingL-value. A likely explanation for the peaks in PSD is acceleration due to energy diffusion produced by lightning-generated and anthropogenic whistlers. These results indicate that either additional local acceleration mechanism is responsible for the formation of the inner electron belt or inner electron belt is formed by sporadic injections of electrons into the inner zone. The currently well accepted model of slow diffusion and losses will be further examined by the upcoming Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission.

  10. Variable density sampling based on physically plausible gradient waveform. Application to 3D MRI angiography

    CERN Document Server

    Chauffert, Nicolas; Boucher, Marianne; Mériaux, Sébastien; CIUCIU, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Performing k-space variable density sampling is a popular way of reducing scanning time in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, given a sampling trajectory, it is not clear how to traverse it using gradient waveforms. In this paper, we actually show that existing methods [1, 2] can yield large traversal time if the trajectory contains high curvature areas. Therefore, we consider here a new method for gradient waveform design which is based on the projection of unrealistic initial trajectory onto the set of hardware constraints. Next, we show on realistic simulations that this algorithm allows implementing variable density trajectories resulting from the piecewise linear solution of the Travelling Salesman Problem in a reasonable time. Finally, we demonstrate the application of this approach to 2D MRI reconstruction and 3D angiography in the mouse brain.

  11. Analytic calculations of hyper-Raman spectra from density functional theory hyperpolarizability gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringholm, Magnus; Ruud, Kenneth [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø (Norway); Bast, Radovan [Theoretical Chemistry and Biology, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova University Center, S-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); PDC Center for High Performance Computing, Royal Institute of Technology, S-10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Oggioni, Luca [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø (Norway); Department of Physics G. Occhialini, University of Milano Bicocca, Piazza della scienza 3, 20126 Milan (Italy); Ekström, Ulf [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, 0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-10-07

    We present the first analytic calculations of the geometrical gradients of the first hyperpolarizability tensors at the density-functional theory (DFT) level. We use the analytically calculated hyperpolarizability gradients to explore the importance of electron correlation effects, as described by DFT, on hyper-Raman spectra. In particular, we calculate the hyper-Raman spectra of the all-trans and 11-cis isomers of retinal at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and density-functional levels of theory, also allowing us to explore the sensitivity of the hyper-Raman spectra on the geometrical characteristics of these structurally related molecules. We show that the HF results, using B3LYP-calculated vibrational frequencies and force fields, reproduce the experimental data for all-trans-retinal well, and that electron correlation effects are of minor importance for the hyper-Raman intensities.

  12. Analytic calculations of hyper-Raman spectra from density functional theory hyperpolarizability gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringholm, Magnus; Bast, Radovan; Oggioni, Luca; Ekström, Ulf; Ruud, Kenneth

    2014-10-01

    We present the first analytic calculations of the geometrical gradients of the first hyperpolarizability tensors at the density-functional theory (DFT) level. We use the analytically calculated hyperpolarizability gradients to explore the importance of electron correlation effects, as described by DFT, on hyper-Raman spectra. In particular, we calculate the hyper-Raman spectra of the all-trans and 11-cis isomers of retinal at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and density-functional levels of theory, also allowing us to explore the sensitivity of the hyper-Raman spectra on the geometrical characteristics of these structurally related molecules. We show that the HF results, using B3LYP-calculated vibrational frequencies and force fields, reproduce the experimental data for all-trans-retinal well, and that electron correlation effects are of minor importance for the hyper-Raman intensities.

  13. Mammographic density estimation with automated volumetric breast density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Su Yeon; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung

    2014-01-01

    To compare automated volumetric breast density measurement (VBDM) with radiologists' evaluations based on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to identify the factors associated with technical failure of VBDM. In this study, 1129 women aged 19-82 years who underwent mammography from December 2011 to January 2012 were included. Breast density evaluations by radiologists based on BI-RADS and by VBDM (Volpara Version 1.5.1) were compared. The agreement in interpreting breast density between radiologists and VBDM was determined based on four density grades (D1, D2, D3, and D4) and a binary classification of fatty (D1-2) vs. dense (D3-4) breast using kappa statistics. The association between technical failure of VBDM and patient age, total breast volume, fibroglandular tissue volume, history of partial mastectomy, the frequency of mass > 3 cm, and breast density was analyzed. The agreement between breast density evaluations by radiologists and VBDM was fair (k value = 0.26) when the four density grades (D1/D2/D3/D4) were used and moderate (k value = 0.47) for the binary classification (D1-2/D3-4). Twenty-seven women (2.4%) showed failure of VBDM. Small total breast volume, history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density were significantly associated with technical failure of VBDM (p = 0.001 to 0.015). There is fair or moderate agreement in breast density evaluation between radiologists and VBDM. Technical failure of VBDM may be related to small total breast volume, a history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density.

  14. Mammography density estimation with automated volumetic breast density measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Su Yeon; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To compare automated volumetric breast density measurement (VBDM) with radiologists' evaluations based on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to identify the factors associated with technical failure of VBDM. In this study, 1129 women aged 19-82 years who underwent mammography from December 2011 to January 2012 were included. Breast density evaluations by radiologists based on BI-RADS and by VBDM (Volpara Version 1.5.1) were compared. The agreement in interpreting breast density between radiologists and VBDM was determined based on four density grades (D1, D2, D3, and D4) and a binary classification of fatty (D1-2) vs. dense (D3-4) breast using kappa statistics. The association between technical failure of VBDM and patient age, total breast volume, fibroglandular tissue volume, history of partial mastectomy, the frequency of mass > 3 cm, and breast density was analyzed. The agreement between breast density evaluations by radiologists and VBDM was fair (k value = 0.26) when the four density grades (D1/D2/D3/D4) were used and moderate (k value = 0.47) for the binary classification (D1-2/D3-4). Twenty-seven women (2.4%) showed failure of VBDM. Small total breast volume, history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density were significantly associated with technical failure of VBDM (p 0.001 to 0.015). There is fair or moderate agreement in breast density evaluation between radiologists and VBDM. Technical failure of VBDM may be related to small total breast volume, a history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density.

  15. An Empirical Measure for Labor Market Density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Gautier (Pieter); C.N. Teulings (Coen)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we derive a structural measure for labor market density based on the Ellison and Glasear (1997) index for industry concentration''. This labor market density measure serves as a proxy for the number of workers that can reach a certain work area within a reasonal amount of t

  16. Bio-potential amplifier for potential gradient measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bermudez, Andrea N; Spinelli, Enrique M; Muravchik, Carlos H [LEICI, Departamento de Electrotecnia, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CC 91 (1900) La Plata (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    This work proposes a bio-potential amplifier suitable for measurements from an electric potential gradient sensor, in electro-encephalography (EEG). The sensor is an array made by three electrodes placed on the vertices of an equilateral triangle of reduced size. Measuring the gradient requires small separation between electrodes hence, very low amplitude signals, of a few {mu}V, are obtained. Therefore, it is important to minimize amplifier noise and electromagnetic interference effects. In the proposed scheme, the first stage is a passive and balanced ac-coupling network adapted to the gradient configuration and the second stage is an 80 dB gain amplifier. The implementation requires a reduced number of components. Therefore, the circuit can be mounted just above the electrodes (active electrodes). The proposed amplifier was built and tested. It achieves a CMRR of 125dB at 50 Hz and an equivalent input noise voltage of 0,3{mu}V RMS in the band 0.5 - 500 Hz. Finally, some preliminary results in the detection of occipital alpha rhythm are presented.

  17. Separation of Bacteria, Protozoa and Carbon Nanotubes by Density Gradient Centrifugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Mortimer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable production and use of carbon nanotube (CNT-enabled materials require efficient assessment of CNT environmental hazards, including the potential for CNT bioaccumulation and biomagnification in environmental receptors. Microbes, as abundant organisms responsible for nutrient cycling in soil and water, are important ecological receptors for studying the effects of CNTs. Quantification of CNT association with microbial cells requires efficient separation of CNT-associated cells from individually dispersed CNTs and CNT agglomerates. Here, we designed, optimized, and demonstrated procedures for separating bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa from unbound multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and MWCNT agglomerates using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. We demonstrate separation of protozoa (Tetrahymena thermophila from MWCNTs, bacterial agglomerates, and protozoan fecal pellets by centrifugation in an iodixanol solution. The presence of MWCNTs in the density gradients after centrifugation was determined by quantification of 14C-labeled MWCNTs; the recovery of microbes from the density gradient media was confirmed by optical microscopy. Protozoan intracellular contents of MWCNTs and of bacteria were also unaffected by the designed separation process. The optimized methods contribute to improved efficiency and accuracy in quantifying MWCNT association with bacteria and MWCNT accumulation in protozoan cells, thus supporting improved assessment of CNT bioaccumulation.

  18. Separation of Bacteria, Protozoa and Carbon Nanotubes by Density Gradient Centrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Monika; Petersen, Elijah J.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Holden, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production and use of carbon nanotube (CNT)-enabled materials require efficient assessment of CNT environmental hazards, including the potential for CNT bioaccumulation and biomagnification in environmental receptors. Microbes, as abundant organisms responsible for nutrient cycling in soil and water, are important ecological receptors for studying the effects of CNTs. Quantification of CNT association with microbial cells requires efficient separation of CNT-associated cells from individually dispersed CNTs and CNT agglomerates. Here, we designed, optimized, and demonstrated procedures for separating bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) from unbound multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and MWCNT agglomerates using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. We demonstrate separation of protozoa (Tetrahymena thermophila) from MWCNTs, bacterial agglomerates, and protozoan fecal pellets by centrifugation in an iodixanol solution. The presence of MWCNTs in the density gradients after centrifugation was determined by quantification of 14C-labeled MWCNTs; the recovery of microbes from the density gradient media was confirmed by optical microscopy. Protozoan intracellular contents of MWCNTs and of bacteria were also unaffected by the designed separation process. The optimized methods contribute to improved efficiency and accuracy in quantifying MWCNT association with bacteria and MWCNT accumulation in protozoan cells, thus supporting improved assessment of CNT bioaccumulation. PMID:27917301

  19. Phase-mixing self-injection into wakefield acceleration structure driven in a rising density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash

    2015-11-01

    We model the phase-mixing self-injection of electrons into the plasma-wakefield acceleration structures driven in a longitudinally rising density gradient. In several laser-plasma acceleration experiments a long tail of accelerated electrons of different energies is experimentally observed. Self-injection is the process where some of the plasma electrons lose coherence with the wave due to non-linearities. The non-linearity is inherently and intentionally induced in the plasma oscillations due to the variation of the restoring force along the rising density gradient. These electrons then get trapped in and propagate with the accelerating phase of the plasma-wave. The onset of trapping is shown to scale with the gradient of the rising density and the amplitude of oscillations using the phase-mixing model. We computationally verify the phase-mixing model in planar geometry using PIC codes. The trapping of electrons in cylindrical electron plasma oscillations in the non-linear regime is verified with scaling similar to the planar geometry phase-mixing model. A full theory of longitudinal phase-mixing of radial oscillations is currently underway. The importance of this work for laser-plasma acceleration lies in consistently accelerating just the desired mono-energetic bunch. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-SC0010012 and the National Science Foundation under NSF-PHY-0936278. Done...processed 1928 records...14:16:38

  20. A spatially resolved nucleic acid biochip based on a gradient of density of immobilized probe oligonucleotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Han [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ontario, L5L 1C6 (Canada); Krull, Ulrich [Chemical Sensors Group, Department of Chemical and Physical Sciences, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, Ontario, L5L 1C6 (Canada)]. E-mail: ukrull@utm.utoronto.ca

    2006-04-06

    The potential for a new biochip design based on a continuous gradient of density of immobilized single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide probes (ssDNA) is explored. This gradient resolved information platform (GRIP) can provide sequence identification based on the spatial location and extent of hybridization by a target sequence. Surfaces based on indium-tin oxide (ITO) on glass were first functionalized by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) followed by attachment of glutaraldehyde, prior to immobilization of oligonucleotide probe that was terminated with amine. The use of Cy{sub 3} and Cy{sub 5} dye-labelled ssDNA probes and targets allowed estimation of density and correlation of the location of binding of labelled targets. Probe molecules of 20 mer lengths were loaded to produce density gradients in the range of 1.0-200 ng/mm{sup 2}. The biochips could resolve a mixture of fully complementary five base-pair mismatched targets by the location of binding on the surface. Thermal control provided additional selectivity. Thermal cycling and washing provided for regeneration of the surface, and the fluorescence intensities showed no deterioration in at least five cycles of hybridization reactions.

  1. The influence of near-wall density and viscosity gradients on turbulence in channel flows

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Ashish; Pecnik, Rene

    2016-01-01

    The influence of near-wall density and viscosity gradients on near-wall turbulence in a channel are studied by means of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the low-Mach number approximation of the Navier--Stokes equations. Different constitutive relations for density and viscosity as a function of temperature are used in order to mimic a wide range of fluid behaviours and to develop a generalised framework for studying turbulence modulations in variable property flows. Instead of scaling the velocity solely based on local density, as done for the van Driest transformation, we derive an extension of the scaling that is based on gradients of the semi-local Reynolds number $Re_\\tau^*$. This extension of the van Driest transformation is able to collapse velocity profiles for flows with near-wall property gradients as a function of the semi-local wall coordinate. However, flow quantities like mixing length, turbulence anisotropy and turbulent vorticity fluctuations do not show a universal scaling very close to th...

  2. Isolation of human salivary extracellular vesicles by iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation and their characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Iwai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic methods that focus on the extracellular vesicles (EVs present in saliva have been attracting great attention because of their non-invasiveness. EVs contain biomolecules such as proteins, messenger RNA (mRNA and microRNA (miRNA, which originate from cells that release EVs, making them an ideal source for liquid biopsy. Although there have been many reports on density-based fractionation of EVs from blood and urine, the number of reports on EVs from saliva has been limited, most probably because of the difficulties in separating EVs from viscous saliva using density gradient centrifugation. This article establishes a protocol for the isolation of EVs from human saliva using density gradient centrifugation. The fractionated salivary EVs were characterized by atomic force microscopy, western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicate that salivary EVs have a smaller diameter (47.8±12.3 nm and higher density (1.11 g/ml than EVs isolated from conditioned cell media (74.0±23.5 nm and 1.06 g/ml, respectively. Additionally, to improve the throughput of density-based fractionation of EVs, the original protocol was further modified by using a fixed angle rotor instead of a swinging rotor. It was also confirmed that several miRNAs were expressed strongly in the EV-marker-expressing fractions.

  3. Isolation of human salivary extracellular vesicles by iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation and their characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Kazuya; Minamisawa, Tamiko; Suga, Kanako; Yajima, Yasutomo; Shiba, Kiyotaka

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic methods that focus on the extracellular vesicles (EVs) present in saliva have been attracting great attention because of their non-invasiveness. EVs contain biomolecules such as proteins, messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA (miRNA), which originate from cells that release EVs, making them an ideal source for liquid biopsy. Although there have been many reports on density-based fractionation of EVs from blood and urine, the number of reports on EVs from saliva has been limited, most probably because of the difficulties in separating EVs from viscous saliva using density gradient centrifugation. This article establishes a protocol for the isolation of EVs from human saliva using density gradient centrifugation. The fractionated salivary EVs were characterized by atomic force microscopy, western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicate that salivary EVs have a smaller diameter (47.8±12.3 nm) and higher density (1.11 g/ml) than EVs isolated from conditioned cell media (74.0±23.5 nm and 1.06 g/ml, respectively). Additionally, to improve the throughput of density-based fractionation of EVs, the original protocol was further modified by using a fixed angle rotor instead of a swinging rotor. It was also confirmed that several miRNAs were expressed strongly in the EV-marker-expressing fractions. PMID:27193612

  4. The effect of longitudinal density gradient on electron plasma wake field acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiklauri, David

    2016-01-01

    3-, 2- and 1-dimensional, particle-in-cell, fully electromagnetic simulations of electron plasma wake field acceleration in the blow out regime are presented. Earlier results are extended by (i) studying the effect of longitudinal density gradient; (ii) avoiding use of co-moving simulation box; (iii) inclusion of ion motion; and (iv) studying fully electromagnetic plasma wake fields. It is established that injecting driving and trailing electron bunches into a positive density gradient of ten-fold increasing density over 10 cm long Lithium vapor plasma, results in spatially more compact and three times larger, compared to the uniform density case, electric fields (-6.4 x 10^{10} V/m), leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 24.4 GeV (starting from initial 20.4 GeV), with an energy transfer efficiencies from leading to trailing bunch of 75 percent. In the uniform density case -2.5 x 10^{10} V/m wake is created leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 22.4 GeV, with an energy transfer eff...

  5. Gradient-based image recovery methods from incomplete Fourier measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vishal M; Maleh, Ray; Gilbert, Anna C; Chellappa, Rama

    2012-01-01

    A major problem in imaging applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and synthetic aperture radar is the task of trying to reconstruct an image with the smallest possible set of Fourier samples, every single one of which has a potential time and/or power cost. The theory of compressive sensing (CS) points to ways of exploiting inherent sparsity in such images in order to achieve accurate recovery using sub-Nyquist sampling schemes. Traditional CS approaches to this problem consist of solving total-variation (TV) minimization programs with Fourier measurement constraints or other variations thereof. This paper takes a different approach. Since the horizontal and vertical differences of a medical image are each more sparse or compressible than the corresponding TV image, CS methods will be more successful in recovering these differences individually. We develop an algorithm called GradientRec that uses a CS algorithm to recover the horizontal and vertical gradients and then estimates the original image from these gradients. We present two methods of solving the latter inverse problem, i.e., one based on least-square optimization and the other based on a generalized Poisson solver. After a thorough derivation of our complete algorithm, we present the results of various experiments that compare the effectiveness of the proposed method against other leading methods.

  6. Structured DC Electric Fields With and Without Associated Plasma Density Gradients Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Liebrecht, C.; Roddy, P.; Hunton, D.

    2009-01-01

    DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts gathered with the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite typically reveal considerable variation at large scales (approximately 100's of km), in both daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures usually confined to the nightside. Although such electric field structures are typically associated with plasma density depletions and structures, as observed by the Planar Langmuir Probe on C/NOFS, what is surprising is the number of cases in which large amplitude, structured DC electric fields are observed without a significant plasma density counterpart structure, including their appearance at times when the ambient plasma density appears relatively quiescent. We investigate the relationship of such structured DC electric fields and the ambient plasma density in the C/NOFS satellite measurements observed thus far, taking into account both plasma density depletions and enhancements. We investigate the mapping of the electric fields along magnetic field lines from distant altitudes and latitudes to locations where the density structures, which presumably formed the original seat of the electric fields, are no longer discernible in the observations. In some cases, the electric field structures and spectral characteristics appear to mimic those associated with equatorial spread-F processes, providing important clues to their origins. We examine altitude, seasonal, and longitudinal effects in an effort to establish the origin of such structured DC electric fields observed both with, and without, associated plasma density gradients

  7. Absolute density measurements in the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rapp

    Full Text Available In the last ten years a total of 25 sounding rockets employing ionization gauges have been launched at high latitudes ( ~ 70° N to measure total atmospheric density and its small scale fluctuations in an altitude range between 70 and 110 km. While the determination of small scale fluctuations is unambiguous, the total density analysis has been complicated in the past by aerodynamical disturbances leading to densities inside the sensor which are enhanced compared to atmospheric values. Here, we present the results of both Monte Carlo simulations and wind tunnel measurements to quantify this aerodynamical effect. The comparison of the resulting ‘ram-factor’ profiles with empirically determined density ratios of ionization gauge measurements and falling sphere measurements provides excellent agreement. This demonstrates both the need, but also the possibility, to correct aerodynamical influences on measurements from sounding rockets. We have determined a total of 20 density profiles of the mesosphere-lower-thermosphere (MLT region. Grouping these profiles according to season, a listing of mean density profiles is included in the paper. A comparison with density profiles taken from the reference atmospheres CIRA86 and MSIS90 results in differences of up to 40%. This reflects that current reference atmospheres are a significant potential error source for the determination of mixing ratios of, for example, trace gas constituents in the MLT region.

    Key words. Middle atmosphere (composition and chemistry; pressure, density, and temperature; instruments and techniques

  8. Beta Function Measurement in the Tevatron Using Quadrupole Gradient Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Jansson, Andreas; Volk, James T

    2005-01-01

    Early in Run2, there was an effort to compare the different emittance measurements in the Tevatron (flying wires and synchtotron light) and understand the origin of the observed differences. To measure the beta function at a few key locations near the instruments, air-core quadrupoles were installed. By modulating the gradient of these magents and measuring the effect on the tune, the lattice parameters can be extracted. Initially, the results seem to disagree with with other methods. At the time, the lattice was strongly coupled due to a skew component in the main dipoles, caused by sagging of the cryostat. After a large fraction of the superconducting magnets were shimmed to remove a strong skew quadrupole component, the results now agree with expectations, confirming that the beta function is not the major error source of discrepancy in the emittance measurement.

  9. Current Density Functional Theory Using Meta-Generalized Gradient Exchange-Correlation Functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, James W; Verbeke, Joachim; Tellgren, Erik I; Stopkowicz, Stella; Ekström, Ulf; Helgaker, Trygve; Teale, Andrew M

    2015-09-08

    We present the self-consistent implementation of current-dependent (hybrid) meta-generalized gradient approximation (mGGA) density functionals using London atomic orbitals. A previously proposed generalized kinetic energy density is utilized to implement mGGAs in the framework of Kohn-Sham current density functional theory (KS-CDFT). A unique feature of the nonperturbative implementation of these functionals is the ability to seamlessly explore a wide range of magnetic fields up to 1 au (∼235 kT) in strength. CDFT functionals based on the TPSS and B98 forms are investigated, and their performance is assessed by comparison with accurate coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) data. In the weak field regime, magnetic properties such as magnetizabilities and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants show modest but systematic improvements over generalized gradient approximations (GGA). However, in the strong field regime, the mGGA-based forms lead to a significantly improved description of the recently proposed perpendicular paramagnetic bonding mechanism, comparing well with CCSD(T) data. In contrast to functionals based on the vorticity, these forms are found to be numerically stable, and their accuracy at high field suggests that the extension of mGGAs to CDFT via the generalized kinetic energy density should provide a useful starting point for further development of CDFT approximations.

  10. Apparent deposition velocity and compensation point of ammonia inferred from gradient measurements above and through alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, Seth M.; Bouldin, David R.

    Understanding the cycling of ammonia between croplands and the atmosphere is of importance to agriculturalists and atmospheric scientists. Flux densities of gaseous ammonia (NH 3), particulate ammonium (NH 4+), and total ammoniacal nitrogen (AN) were measured using an aerodynamic method above an alfalfa ( Medicago sativa, L.) canopy between April and July 1981 at a rural location in central New York State. In air not influenced by local sources, NH 3 and NH 4+ averaged 1.5 and 3.0 ppb, respectively, at 1 m above the crop. Ambient NH 4+ varied consistently with synoptic air masses, being lowest (2.3 ppb) for NW and highest (6.4 ppb) for SW flows. Concentrations and gradients of both species were higher during periods of hay harvest. Gradients of NH 3 were much steeper than those of NH 4+ within the alfalfa canopy, but NH 4+ contributed appreciably (36% on average) to above-canopy AN gradients. Alfalfa's NH 3 compensation point was estimated by combining concentration and gradient data with transport resistances. Gaseous gradients indicated a compensation point of 2 ppb, lower than previously published estimates. Conversion of NH 3 to NH 4+ within the canopy air could have reduced NH 3 gradients and caused a low estimate of the compensation point. Acidic aerosols, by keeping NH 3 levels low, may compete with plants for NH 3. Future studies of ammonia exchange should distinguish between NH 3 and NH 4+ if flux densities are to be related to ambient conditions. Total AN level is a poor predictor of soil-plant-atmosphere ammonia exchange since high AN was frequently associated with low NH 3, and NH 3 is more surface reactive than NH 4+.

  11. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sola, A., E-mail: a.sola@inrim.it; Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Turin (Italy); Kikkawa, T. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Uchida, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Saitoh, E. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo 102-0076 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck S{sub SSE} coefficient of 2.8×10{sup −7} V K{sup −1}.

  12. Spacetime Average Density (SAD) Cosmological Measures

    CERN Document Server

    Page, Don N

    2014-01-01

    The measure problem of cosmology is how to obtain normalized probabilities of observations from the quantum state of the universe. This is particularly a problem when eternal inflation leads to a universe of unbounded size so that there are apparently infinitely many realizations or occurrences of observations of each of many different kinds or types, making the ratios ambiguous. There is also the danger of domination by Boltzmann Brains. Here two new Spacetime Average Density (SAD) measures are proposed, Maximal Average Density (MAD) and Biased Average Density (BAD), for getting a finite number of observation occurrences by using properties of the Spacetime Average Density (SAD) of observation occurrences to restrict to finite regions of spacetimes that have a preferred beginning or bounce hypersurface. These measures avoid Boltzmann brain domination and appear to give results consistent with other observations that are problematic for other widely used measures, such as the observation of a positive cosmolo...

  13. Measuring liquid density using Archimedes' principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen W.

    2006-09-01

    A simple technique is described for measuring absolute and relative liquid density based on Archimedes' principle. The technique involves placing a container of the liquid under test on an electronic balance and suspending a probe (e.g. a glass marble) attached to a length of line beneath the surface of the liquid. If the volume of the probe is known, the density of liquid is given by the difference between the balance reading before and after immersion of the probe divided by the volume of the probe. A test showed that the density of water at room temperature could be measured to an accuracy and precision of 0.01 ± 0.1%. The probe technique was also used to measure the relative density of milk, Coca-Cola, fruit juice, olive oil and vinegar.

  14. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Use of density gradient centrifugation, magnetically activated cell sorting and in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagnoli, C; Multhaupt, H A; Ludomirski, A;

    1997-01-01

    cells recovered did not differ. Seven of seven male pregnancies were correctly identified. One case of trisomy 21 was detected. CONCLUSION: The in situ hybridization analysis of fetal nucleated erythrocytes isolated from maternal blood using single density gradient centrifugation, anti-CD71/anti...... of the isolated cells were subjected to in situ hybridization with specific DNA probes for the Y chromosome and chromosome 21 to confirm the fetal origin. RESULTS: After MiniMACS the enrichment factors for the CD71/GPA- and CD36/GPA-positive cells from maternal blood were similar, and the percentages of fetal...

  15. Density functional theory optimized basis sets for gradient corrected functionals: 3d transition metal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaminici, Patrizia; Janetzko, Florian; Köster, Andreas M; Mejia-Olvera, Roberto; Zuniga-Gutierrez, Bernardo

    2007-01-28

    Density functional theory optimized basis sets for gradient corrected functionals for 3d transition metal atoms are presented. Double zeta valence polarization and triple zeta valence polarization basis sets are optimized with the PW86 functional. The performance of the newly optimized basis sets is tested in atomic and molecular calculations. Excitation energies of 3d transition metal atoms, as well as electronic configurations, structural parameters, dissociation energies, and harmonic vibrational frequencies of a large number of molecules containing 3d transition metal elements, are presented. The obtained results are compared with available experimental data as well as with other theoretical data from the literature.

  16. The formulation and implementation of analytic energy gradients for periodic density functional calculations with STO/NAO Bloch basis set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadantsev, Eugene S.; Klooster, Rob; De Boeij, Paul L.; Ziegler, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Analytic energy gradients with respect to atomic coordinates for systems with translational invariance are formulated within the framework of Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory. The energy gradients are implemented in the BAND program for periodic DFT calculations which directly employs a Bloch bas

  17. Eddy covariance measurements in screenhouses: turbulence characteristics and flux gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicken, U.; Cohen, S.; Tanny, J.

    2012-04-01

    Shading banana and other orchard crops with screens is popular in arid and semi-arid regions for decreasing water use and increasing fruit quality. However, crop water use within this unique environment is much less studied than for canopies in the open. Previous studies of our research group have established the use of the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique for reliable evapotranspiration and sensible heat flux measurements within screenhouses. These studies focused on operating conditions of the system. The present paper is a comprehensive study which examined the performance of the EC system in different types of screenhouses (shading and insect-proof), different crops (banana and pepper) at different development stages (small and large plants) and different climatic regions in Israel. The main goal was to establish guidelines for optimal application of the EC technique in screenhouses. The research consisted of 6 field campaigns: in 3 campaigns two EC systems were simultaneously deployed either vertically or horizontally, and in 3 other campaigns a single EC system was deployed at one measurement height. EC systems were deployed at different normalized system heights, Zs, which define the relative measurement heights within the air gap between the canopy top and the horizontal screened roof. System performance was examined using quality tests like energy balance closure, flux variance similarity, friction velocity, footprint modeling, energy spectrum, turbulence intensity and vertical and horizontal flux gradient analyses. Resulting energy balance closure slopes averaged 0.81±0.08 and 0.91±0.08 for the smaller and larger plants, respectively. Turbulent flows were found to be marginally developed within the air gap between the top of the plants and the horizontal screened roof. Turbulence intensity, flux variance similarity test, energy spectrum decay rate and friction velocity were essentially independent of the measurement height and were within the common range

  18. Georadar Measurements for the Snow Cover Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Godio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground Probing Radar (GPR devices is adopted for the analysis of thickness and the mechanical properties (density of the snow cover in some test site in Alps, in Northern Italy. The performances of standard radar systems for the snow cover characterisation are analysed, the main aim is to assess the reliability of the method to estimate the snow density, the snowpack thickness and the depth resolution in terms of capability to detect thin layers. The main relationships between the electrical permittivity and the density of the dry-snow are applied to estimate the density vertical profiles inferred by the GPR investigation. The data were calibrated and compared with the results coming from direct measurements of the density and thickness.

  19. A density-adaptive SPH method with kernel gradient correction for modeling explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M. B.; Zhang, Z. L.; Feng, D. L.

    2017-05-01

    Explosive welding involves processes like the detonation of explosive, impact of metal structures and strong fluid-structure interaction, while the whole process of explosive welding has not been well modeled before. In this paper, a novel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model is developed to simulate explosive welding. In the SPH model, a kernel gradient correction algorithm is used to achieve better computational accuracy. A density adapting technique which can effectively treat large density ratio is also proposed. The developed SPH model is firstly validated by simulating a benchmark problem of one-dimensional TNT detonation and an impact welding problem. The SPH model is then successfully applied to simulate the whole process of explosive welding. It is demonstrated that the presented SPH method can capture typical physics in explosive welding including explosion wave, welding surface morphology, jet flow and acceleration of the flyer plate. The welding angle obtained from the SPH simulation agrees well with that from a kinematic analysis.

  20. Affinity-mediated sorting order reversal of single-walled carbon nanotubes in density gradient ultracentrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Myungsu; Kim, Somin; Jeong, Haneul; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-10-01

    Sorted single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of paramount importance for their utilization in high-end optoelectronic applications. Sodium cholate (SC)-based density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) has been instrumental in isolating small diameter (d t) SWNTs. Here, we show that SWNTs wrapped by flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as a dispersing agent are sorted in DGU, and show sorting order reversal behavior, departing from prototypical SC-SWNT trends. Larger d t SWNTs are sorted in lower density (ρ), and buoyant ρ distribution of FMN-SWNT ranges from 1.15-1.25 g cm-3. Such a nanotube layering pattern originates from both the binding affinity between FMN and SWNT and the less-susceptible hydrated volume of remote phosphate sidechains of FMN according to nanotube d t change.

  1. CO{sub 2} laser diagnostics for measurements of the plasma density profile and plasma density fluctuations on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyacheslavov, L.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    A CO{sub 2} laser based diagnostics complimentary to the existing FIR interferometer is proposed. It combines interferometry for plasma density profile measurement under conditions of large density gradients, and both imaging and scattering techniques for observation of plasma fluctuations. Two-colour interferometer with a slablike probe beam and a single multichannel linear detector array provide observation of plasma density profile and density fluctuations at two locations along the probe beam. Basic characteristics of the diagnostics are considered as well as some effects that include dispersion and are critical for two colour imaging technique. The results of the bench-top experiments with the prototype of the interferometer are presented. (author)

  2. High-Sensitivity Measurement of Density by Magnetic Levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Kumar, A A; Soh, Siowling; Harburg, Daniel V; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents methods that use Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) to measure very small differences in density of solid diamagnetic objects suspended in a paramagnetic medium. Previous work in this field has shown that, while it is a convenient method, standard MagLev (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are parallel) cannot resolve differences in density mm) because (i) objects close in density prevent each other from reaching an equilibrium height due to hard contact and excluded volume, and (ii) using weaker magnets or reducing the magnetic susceptibility of the medium destabilizes the magnetic trap. The present work investigates the use of weak magnetic gradients parallel to the faces of the magnets as a means of increasing the sensitivity of MagLev without destabilization. Configuring the MagLev device in a rotated state (i.e., where the direction of magnetization and gravitational force are perpendicular) relative to the standard configuration enables simple measurements along the axes with the highest sensitivity to changes in density. Manipulating the distance of separation between the magnets or the lengths of the magnets (along the axis of measurement) enables the sensitivity to be tuned. These modifications enable an improvement in the resolution up to 100-fold over the standard configuration, and measurements with resolution down to 10(-6) g/cm(3). Three examples of characterizing the small differences in density among samples of materials having ostensibly indistinguishable densities-Nylon spheres, PMMA spheres, and drug spheres-demonstrate the applicability of rotated Maglev to measuring the density of small (0.1-1 mm) objects with high sensitivity. This capability will be useful in materials science, separations, and quality control of manufactured objects.

  3. Measurement of Density Inhomogeneity for Glass Pendulum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lin-Xia; LIU Qi; SHAO Cheng-Gang; ZHANG Ya-Ting; LUO Jun; Vadim Milyukov

    2008-01-01

    @@ The density inhomogeneity of a glass pendulum is determined by an optical interference method.The relative variations of the densities over a volume with sizes of 5 × 5 × 5mm3 are (0.64±0.97) × 10-5 and (0.99 ± 0.92) ×10-5 for the K9 glass and silica glass pendulum, respectively.These variations of densities contributing to the relative uncertainties of the Newtonian gravitational constant G are 0.20 ppm and 0.21 ppm in our experiment on measurement of G.

  4. Microgravity vertical gradient measurement in the site of VIRGO interferometric antenna (Pisa plain, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fidecaro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The site of the European Gravitational Observatory (EGO located in the countryside near Pisa (Tuscany, Italy was investigated by a microgravity vertical gradient (MVG survey. The EGO site houses the VIRGO interferometric antenna for gravitational waves detection. The microgravity survey aims to highlight the gravity anomalies of high-frequency related to more superficial geological sources in order to obtain a detailed model of the lithologic setting of the VIRGO site, that will allow an estimate of the noise induced by seismic waves and by Newtonian interference. This paper presents the results of the gradiometric survey of 2006 in the area of the interferometric antenna. MVG measurements allow us to enhance the high frequency signal strongly associated with the shallow structures. The gradient gravity map shows a main negative pattern that seems related to the trending of the high density layer of gravel that was evidenced in geotechnical drillings executed along the orthogonal arms during the construction of the VIRGO complex. Calibrating the relationship between the vertical gradient and the depth of the gravel interface we have computed a model of gravity gradient for the whole VIRGO site, defining the 3D distribution of the top surface of this layer. This latter shows a NE-SW negative pattern that may represent a palaeo-bed alluvial of the Serchio from the Bientina River system.

  5. Occupational exposure measurements of static and pulsed gradient magnetic fields in the vicinity of MRI scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kännälä, Sami; Toivo, Tim; Alanko, Tommi; Jokela, Kari

    2009-04-07

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have increased occupational exposure to magnetic fields. In this study, we examined the assessment of occupational exposure to gradient magnetic fields and time-varying magnetic fields generated by motion in non-homogeneous static magnetic fields of MRI scanners. These magnetic field components can be measured simultaneously with an induction coil setup that detects the time rate of change of magnetic flux density (dB/dt). The setup developed was used to measure the field components around two MRI units (1 T open and 3 T conventional). The measured values can be compared with dB/dt reference levels derived from magnetic flux density reference levels given by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The measured motion-induced dB/dt values were above the dB/dt reference levels for both MRI units. The measured values for the gradient fields (echo planar imaging (EPI) and fast field echo (FFE) sequences) also exceeded the dB/dt reference levels in positions where the medical staff may have access during interventional procedures. The highest motion-induced dB/dt values were 0.7 T s(-1) for the 1 T scanner and 3 T s(-1) for the 3 T scanner when only the static field was present. Even higher values (6.5 T s(-1)) were measured for simultaneous exposure to motion-induced and gradient fields in the vicinity of the 3 T scanner.

  6. Ionospheric tomography by gradient-enhanced kriging with STEC measurements and ionosonde characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkwitz, David; van den Boogaart, Karl Gerald; Gerzen, Tatjana; Hoque, Mainul; Hernández-Pajares, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The estimation of the ionospheric electron density by kriging is based on the optimization of a parametric measurement covariance model. First, the extension of kriging with slant total electron content (STEC) measurements based on a spatial covariance to kriging with a spatial-temporal covariance model, assimilating STEC data of a sliding window, is presented. Secondly, a novel tomography approach by gradient-enhanced kriging (GEK) is developed. Beyond the ingestion of STEC measurements, GEK assimilates ionosonde characteristics, providing peak electron density measurements as well as gradient information. Both approaches deploy the 3-D electron density model NeQuick as a priori information and estimate the covariance parameter vector within a maximum likelihood estimation for the dedicated tomography time stamp. The methods are validated in the European region for two periods covering quiet and active ionospheric conditions. The kriging with spatial and spatial-temporal covariance model is analysed regarding its capability to reproduce STEC, differential STEC and foF2. Therefore, the estimates are compared to the NeQuick model results, the 2-D TEC maps of the International GNSS Service and the DLR's Ionospheric Monitoring and Prediction Center, and in the case of foF2 to two independent ionosonde stations. Moreover, simulated STEC and ionosonde measurements are used to investigate the electron density profiles estimated by the GEK in comparison to a kriging with STEC only. The results indicate a crucial improvement in the initial guess by the developed methods and point out the potential compensation for a bias in the peak height hmF2 by means of GEK.

  7. Vole preference of bilberry along gradients of simulated moose density and site productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Simen; Andreassen, Harry P; Persson, Inga-Lill; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Danell, Kjell; Skarpe, Christina

    2011-12-01

    Browsing by large herbivores might either increase or decrease preference for the plant by other herbivores, depending on the plant response. Using a cafeteria test, we studied the preference by root voles (Microtus oeconomus [Pallas, 1776]) for bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) previously subjected to 4 levels of simulated moose (Alces alces [Linnaeus, 1758]) density. The different levels of moose density were simulated at population densities relevant for Fennoscandian conditions, in exclosures situated along a site productivity gradient. We expected: (i) voles to prefer bilberry from high productivity sites over low productivity sites; (ii) voles to prefer browsed bilberry, if plants allocate resources to compensatory growth or to avoid browsed bilberry if plants allocate resources to defense; (iii) these effects to increase with increasing simulated moose density; and (iv) the concentration of plant chemicals and the plant morphology to explain vole preference. Specifically, we predicted that voles would prefer: (i) plants with high nitrogen content; (ii) plants with low content of defensive substances; and (iii) tall plants with long shoots. Voles preferred bilberry from the high productivity sites compared to the low productivity sites. We also found an interaction between site productivity and simulated moose density, where voles preferred unbrowsed plants at low productivity sites and intermediate levels of browsing at high productivity sites. There was no effect of plant chemistry or morphology on vole preference. We conclude that moose browsing impacts the food preference of voles. With the current high densities of moose in Fennoscandia, this could potentially influence vole food selection and population dynamics over large geographical areas.

  8. Geothermal Gradient Drilling and Measurements Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibbett, B.S.; Nielson, D.L.; Adams, M.C.

    1984-07-01

    This technical report on the Phase II geothermal exploration of Ascension Island documents the data collected during thermal gradient drilling and the subsequent thermal and fluid chemical investigations. It also documents the completion of the Phase II exploration strategy which was proposed at the end of the Phase I--Preliminary Examination of Ascension Island. The thermal gradient drilling resulted in seven holes which range from 206 to 1750 ft (53-533 m) deep, with a cumulative footage of 6563 ft (2000 m). The drilling procedure and the problems encountered during the drilling have been explained in detail to provide information valuable for any subsequent drilling program on the island. In addition, the subsurface geology encountered in the holes has been documented and, where possible, correlated with other holes or the geology mapped on the surface of the island. Temperatures measured in the holes reach a maximum of 130 F (54.4 C) at 1285 ft (391.7 m) in hole GH-6. When the temperatures of all holes are plotted against elevation, the holes can be classed into three distinct groups, those which have no thermal manifestations, those with definite geothermal affinities, and one hole which is intermediate between the other two. From consideration of this information, it is clear that the highest geothermal potential on the island is in the Donkey Flat area extending beneath Middleton Ridge, and in the Cricket Valley area. Because of the greater drilling depths and the remote nature of the Cricket Valley area, it is recommended that future exploration concentrate in the area around Middleton Ridge.

  9. Measuring and modelling above-ground carbon and tree allometry along a tropical elevation gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, A.R.; Willcock, S.; Platts, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    of disturbance, topography, climate, soil and methods for stem measurement, on the estimation of AGC, or the costs of improving AGC estimates by altering sample regimes. We established 18 one hectare plots containing 7201 stems, stratified along forested elevation gradients in Tanzania. We recorded a broad set...... associated with AGC, revealed significant positive influence of basal area, stem density, and height:diameter ratio, rather than the mean wood density of species present. Large stems (⩾70 cm dbh; 4.6% of stems) contained 52% of AGC in all plots, declining to 36% in lowland plots. We discuss the cost......:benefit of different measurements and recommend a tiered approach to AGC monitoring, depending on available resources. AGC assessments in African forests could exclude small stems, but should aim to record disturbance, topography and species. Stem height is vital for AGC estimation and valuation; when excluding height...

  10. Sea surface density gradients in the Nordic Seas during the Holocene as revealed by paired microfossil and isotope proxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Nieuwenhove, Nicolas; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Bauch, Henning A.

    2016-01-01

    We attempt to assess the Holocene surface-subsurface seawater density gradient on millennial time-scale based on the reconstruction of potential density (σθ) by combining data from dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and planktic foraminiferal (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (s)) stable oxygen isotopes (δ...

  11. Controls on stand transpiration and soil water utilization along a tree density gradient in a Neotropical savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra J. Bucci; Fabian G. Scholz; Guillermo Goldstein; William A. Hoffmann; Frederick C. Meinzer; Augusto C. Franco; Thomas Giambelluca; Fernando Miralles-Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Environmental controls of stand-level tree transpiration (E) and seasonal patterns of soil water utilization were studied in five central Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) sites differing in tree density. Tree density of Cerrado vegetation in the study area consistently changes along topographic gradients from ~1,000 trees ha-1 in open savannas (campo...

  12. Emergence flux declines disproportionately to larval density along a stream metals gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Travis S; Kraus, Johanna M; Walters, David M; Wanty, Richard B

    2013-08-01

    Effects of contaminants on adult aquatic insect emergence are less well understood than effects on insect larvae. We compared responses of larval density and adult emergence along a metal contamination gradient. Nonlinear threshold responses were generally observed for larvae and emergers. Larval densities decreased significantly at low metal concentrations but precipitously at concentrations of metal mixtures above aquatic life criteria (cumulative criterion accumulation ratio (CCAR) ≥ 1). In contrast, adult emergence declined precipitously at low metal concentrations (CCAR ≤ 1), followed by a modest decline above this threshold. Adult emergence was a more sensitive indicator of the effect of low metals concentrations on aquatic insect communities compared to larvae, presumably because emergence is limited by a combination of larval survival and other factors limiting successful emergence. Thus effects of exposure to larvae are not manifest until later in life (during metamorphosis and emergence). This loss in emergence reduces prey subsidies to riparian communities at concentrations considered safe for aquatic life. Our results also challenge the widely held assumption that adult emergence is a constant proportion of larval densities in all streams.

  13. Current Density-Functional Theory using meta-Generalized Gradient Exchange--Correlation Functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Furness, James W; Tellgren, Erik I; Stopkowicz, Stella; Ekström, Ulf; Helgaker, Trygve; Teale, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    We present the self-consistent implementation of current-dependent (hybrid) meta generalized gradient approximation (mGGA) density functionals using London atomic orbitals. A previously proposed generalized kinetic energy density is utilized to implement mGGAs in the framework of Kohn--Sham current density-functional theory (KS-CDFT). A unique feature of the non-perturbative implementation of these functionals is the ability to seamlessly explore a wide range of magnetic fields up to 1 a.u. ($\\sim 235000$T) in strength. CDFT functionals based on the TPSS and B98 forms are investigated and their performance is assessed by comparison with accurate CCSD(T) data. In the weak field regime magnetic properties such as magnetizabilities and NMR shielding constants show modest but systematic improvements over GGA functionals. However, in strong field regime the mGGA based forms lead to a significantly improved description of the recently proposed perpendicular paramagnetic bonding mechanism, comparing well with CCSD(T...

  14. Strain energy density gradients in bone marrow predict osteoblast and osteoclast activity: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Duncan; Schulte, Friederike A; Lambers, Floor M; Kuhn, Gisela; Müller, Ralph

    2015-03-18

    Huiskes et al. hypothesized that mechanical strains sensed by osteocytes residing in trabecular bone dictate the magnitude of load-induced bone formation. More recently, the mechanical environment in bone marrow has also been implicated in bone׳s response to mechanical stimulation. In this study, we hypothesize that trabecular load-induced bone formation can be predicted by mechanical signals derived from an integrative µFE model, incorporating a description of both the bone and marrow phase. Using the mouse tail loading model in combination with in vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) we tracked load induced changes in the sixth caudal vertebrae of C57BL/6 mice to quantify the amount of newly mineralized and eroded bone volumes. To identify the mechanical signals responsible for adaptation, local morphometric changes were compared to micro-finite element (µFE) models of vertebrae prior to loading. The mechanical parameters calculated were strain energy density (SED) on trabeculae at bone forming and resorbing surfaces, SED in the marrow at the boundary between bone forming and resorbing surfaces, along with SED in the trabecular bone and marrow volumes. The gradients of each parameter were also calculated. Simple regression analysis showed mean SED gradients in the trabecular bone matrix to significantly correlate with newly mineralized and eroded bone volumes R(2)=0.57 and 0.41, respectively, pbone marrow plays a significant role in determining osteoblast and osteoclast activity.

  15. DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF DENSITY GRADIENT CENTRIFUGATION FOR EXFOLIATIVE TUMOR CELLS IN MALIGNANT PLEURAL EFFUSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭胤仕; 朱任之

    2004-01-01

    Objective To find out a specific method for diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions( MPEs )with higher sensitivity and practicality. Methods The diagnosis of MPEs were made using density gradient centrifugation ( DGC ) , smear cytologic examination (SCE) and pleural needle biopsy (PNB). Comparisons between these results and those of benign pleural effusions were also made. Results The positive rates of DGC,SCE and PNB for diagnosing MPEs were 94. 3% ,62.9% and 44.6% , respectively, and the positive rate of SCE combined with PNB for diagnosing MPEs was 73.2 %. The positive rate of the exfoliative tumor cells ( ETCs ) by DGC was much higher than that of SCE or/and PNB with no false-positive. Conclusion The ETCs isolated by DGC from the MPEs is quite specific for the diagnosis of malignant tumors with higher sensitivity and practicality in clinico-pathological practice.

  16. Separation of arginase isoforms by capillary zone electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing in density gradient column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, M M; Legaz, M E

    1995-04-01

    Four major arginase isoforms, I, II, III and IV, have been detected in Evernia prunastri thallus. They differ in terms of both physical and biochemical properties. The isoelectric point (pI) of these proteins has been determined by both isoelectric focusing in density gradient column and high-performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE). Isoelectric focusing revealed charge microheterogeneity for isoforms II and IV whereas arginases I and II had the same pI value of 5.8. HPCE separation confirmed this charge microheterogeneity for isoform IV but not for isoform III, and provided evidence of microheterogeneity for isoforms I and II. The effect of various electrolyte buffers and running conditions on the HPCE separation of arginase isoform were investigated. Addition of 0.5 mM spermidine (SPD) to the running buffer reduced the electroosmotic flow (EOF) and permitted discriminating between the native proteins and protein fragments.

  17. Self-injection by trapping of plasma electrons oscillating in rising density gradient at the vacuum-plasma interface

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A; Muggli, Patric

    2014-01-01

    We model the trapping of plasma $e^-$ within the density structures excited by a propagating energy source ($\\beta_{S}\\simeq1$) in a rising plasma density gradient. Rising density gradient leads to spatially contiguous coupled up-chirped plasmons ($d{\\omega^2_{pe}(x)}/{dx}>0$). Therefore phase mixing between plasmons can lead to trapping until the plasmon field is high enough such that $e^-$ trajectories returning towards a longer wavelength see a trapping potential. Rising plasma density gradients are ubiquitous for confining the plasma within sources at the vacuum-plasma interfaces. Therefore trapping of plasma-$e^-$ in a rising ramp is important for acceleration diagnostics and to understand the energy dissipation from the excited plasmon train \\cite{LTE-2013}. Down-ramp in density \\cite{density-transition-2001} has been used for plasma-$e^-$ trapping within the first bucket behind the driver. Here, in rising density gradient the trapping does not occur in the first plasmon bucket but in subsequent plasmon...

  18. Measurement of Threshold Pressure Gradient of Microchannels by Static Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Fu-Quan; JIANG Ren-Jie; BIAN Shu-Li

    2007-01-01

    The development of oil fields and laboratory experiment present the threshold pressure gradient (TPG) of liquid flow in low permeability porous media, which is called the micro-size effect in porous media. Some micro-size effects in micro-electro-mechanism systems (MEMS) are not always in agreement with each other. We propose an experiment setup to measure the TPG of microchannels by static method in the microchannels with the diameter ranging from 20-320 μm. The results present the existence of TPG in microchannel, and show an effect that the TPG of microchannel increases with decreasing hydrodynamic diameter. The relation between TPG and diameter is in agreement with single-log normalization. Additionally, the influence of errors in the experiment shows the data of experiment are valid. Finally, the mechanism of micro-size effects is discussed by revealing the facial force between liquid and solid and theory of boundary liquid, but the explanation is still not good, and needs further study.

  19. A Rotation Measure Gradient on the M87 VLA Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algaba Juan Carlos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rotation measures (RMs have proven to be an excellent tool to study magnetic field structures in AGNs. Here we study RM properties on kiloparsec scales of theM87 jet via stacked multi wavelength polarized VLA observations. Our results show for the first time an indication of the RM gradient transverse to the jet in knot A, and possibly knot C and HST-1. Motivated by the shape of the RM in knots A and B, we discuss that part of it may be a filamentary structure of higher RM due to an external Faraday screen, although we consider this unlikely The data presented here can be easily explained by a helical magnetic field. By combining this result together with polarization direction plus the shape and degree of the fractional polarization across the jet, we can fairly conclude the presence of systematically wrapped, possibly helical, magnetic fields tightly wounded in knots A and C, in agreement with an MHD quad shock model.

  20. Temperature and Density Measurements in a Quiet Coronal Streamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Warshall, Andrew D.

    2002-06-01

    Many previous studies have used emission line or broadband filter ratios to infer the presence of temperature gradients in the quiet solar corona. Recently it has been suggested that these temperature gradients are not real, but result from the superposition of isothermal loops with different temperatures and density scale heights along the line of sight. A model describing this hydrostatic weighting bias has been developed by Aschwanden & Acton. In this paper we present the application of the Aschwanden & Acton differential emission measure model to Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) observations of a quiet coronal streamer. Simultaneous Yohkoh soft X-ray telescope (SXT) observations show increases in the filter ratios with height above the limb, indicating an increase in temperature. The application of the Aschwanden & Acton model to these SUMER data, however, show that the temperature is constant with height and that the distribution of temperatures in the corona is much too narrow for the hydrostatic weighting bias to have any effect on the SXT filter ratios. We consider the possibility that there is a tenuous hot component (~3 MK) that accounts for the SXT observations. We find that a hot plasma with an emission measure sufficient to reproduce the observed SXT fluxes would also produce significant count rates in the high-temperature emission lines in the SUMER wavelength range. These lines are not observed, and we conclude that the SUMER spectra are not consistent with the SXT filter ratio temperatures. Calculations from a hydrodynamic loop model suggest that nonuniform footpoint heating may be consistent with the temperatures and densities observed at most heights, consistent with the recent analysis of relatively cool (~1 MK) active region loops. We also find, however, that at the lowest heights the observed densities are smaller than those predicted by uniform or footpoint heating.

  1. Non-invasive measurement of pressure gradients using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Traberg, Marie Sand; Pihl, Michael Johannes

    2013-01-01

    A non-invasive method for estimating 2-D pressure gradients from ultrasound vector velocity data is presented. The method relies on in-plane vector velocity fields acquired using the Transverse Oscillation method. The pressure gradients are estimated by applying the Navier-Stokes equations...... Medical 2202 UltraView Pro Focus scanner. The results are validated through finite element simulations of the carotid flow model where the geometry is determined from MR images. This proof of concept study was conducted at nine ultrasound frames per second. Estimated pressure gradients along...... the longitudinal direction of the constriction varied from 0 kPa/m to 10 kPa/m with a normalized bias of -9.1% for the axial component and -7.9% for the lateral component. The relative standard deviation of the estimator, given in reference to the peak gradient, was 28.4% in the axial direction and 64...

  2. Phase-mixing self-injection into plasma-wakefield acceleration structures driven in a rising density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash Ajit

    We model the phase-mixing self-injection of electrons into plasma-wakefield acceleration structures driven in a longitudinally rising density gradient. Self-injection is the process where some of the plasma electrons lose coherence with the wave due to non-linearities. The non-linearity is inherently and intentionally induced in the plasma oscillations due to the variation of the restoring force along the rising density gradient. These electrons then get trapped in and propagate with the accelerating phase of the plasma-wave. The electron oscillations driven by matched energy-sources are shown to get trapped in the wakefields similar in scaling to the phase-mixing of free oscillations. The onset of trapping is shown to scale with the gradient of rising density and the amplitude of oscillations. The planar longitudinal electron oscillations undergo trajectory crossing above a threshold amplitude or in a density inhomogeneity leading to phase-mixing and trapping of the oscillating electrons to a phase of the wave. In this thesis, we analyze the scaling of the phase-mixing based trapping of electron oscillations, independent of a threshold, in planar geometry driven by an electron beam in a rising density gradient. The cylindrical and spherical geometry electron oscillations undergo phase-mixing irrespective of the amplitude of oscillations. Here, driven radial electron oscillations in cylindrical geometry are shown to undergo phase-mixing leading to trapping of the plasma electrons in a longitudinally rising density gradient. We also present preliminary scaling results of phase-mixing based trapping of radially oscillating electrons in a rising density gradient.

  3. Versatile van der Waals Density Functional Based on a Meta-Generalized Gradient Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haowei Peng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A “best-of-both-worlds” van der Waals (vdW density functional is constructed, seamlessly supplementing the strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN meta-generalized gradient approximation for short- and intermediate-range interactions with the long-range vdW interaction from rVV10, the revised Vydrov–van Voorhis nonlocal correlation functional. The resultant SCAN+rVV10 is the only vdW density functional to date that yields excellent interlayer binding energies and spacings, as well as intralayer lattice constants in 28 layered materials. Its versatility for various kinds of bonding is further demonstrated by its good performance for 22 interactions between molecules; the cohesive energies and lattice constants of 50 solids; the adsorption energy and distance of a benzene molecule on coinage-metal surfaces; the binding energy curves for graphene on Cu(111, Ni(111, and Co(0001 surfaces; and the rare-gas solids. We argue that a good semilocal approximation should (as SCAN does capture the intermediate-range vdW through its exchange term. We have found an effective range of the vdW interaction between 8 and 16 Å for systems considered here, suggesting that this interaction is negligibly small at the larger distances where it reaches its asymptotic power-law decay.

  4. Versatile van der Waals Density Functional Based on a Meta-Generalized Gradient Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haowei; Yang, Zeng-Hui; Perdew, John P.; Sun, Jianwei

    2016-10-01

    A "best-of-both-worlds" van der Waals (vdW) density functional is constructed, seamlessly supplementing the strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalized gradient approximation for short- and intermediate-range interactions with the long-range vdW interaction from r VV 10 , the revised Vydrov-van Voorhis nonlocal correlation functional. The resultant SCAN +r VV 10 is the only vdW density functional to date that yields excellent interlayer binding energies and spacings, as well as intralayer lattice constants in 28 layered materials. Its versatility for various kinds of bonding is further demonstrated by its good performance for 22 interactions between molecules; the cohesive energies and lattice constants of 50 solids; the adsorption energy and distance of a benzene molecule on coinage-metal surfaces; the binding energy curves for graphene on Cu(111), Ni(111), and Co(0001) surfaces; and the rare-gas solids. We argue that a good semilocal approximation should (as SCAN does) capture the intermediate-range vdW through its exchange term. We have found an effective range of the vdW interaction between 8 and 16 Å for systems considered here, suggesting that this interaction is negligibly small at the larger distances where it reaches its asymptotic power-law decay.

  5. The effect of electron beam pitch angle and density gradient on solar type III radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pechhacker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    1.5D Particle-In-Cell simulations of a hot, low density electron beam injected into magnetized, maxwellian plasma were used to further explore the alternative non-gyrotropic beam driven electromagnetic emission mechanism, first studied in Tsiklauri (2011). Variation of beam injection angle and background density gradient showed that the emission process is caused by the perpendicular component of the beam injection current, whereas the parallel component only produces Langmuir waves, which play no role in the generation of EM waves in our mechanism. Particular emphasis was put on the case, where the beam is injected perpendicularly to the background magnetic field, as this turned off any electrostatic wave generation along the field and left a purely electromagnetic signal in the perpendicular components. The simulations establish the following key findings: i) Initially waves at a few w_ce/gamma are excited, mode converted and emitted at w_pe ii) The emission intensity along the beam axis is proportional to ...

  6. Analytic energy gradients for the coupled-cluster singles and doubles method with the density-fitting approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkaya, Uğur; Sherrill, C David

    2016-05-07

    An efficient implementation is presented for analytic gradients of the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method with the density-fitting approximation, denoted DF-CCSD. Frozen core terms are also included. When applied to a set of alkanes, the DF-CCSD analytic gradients are significantly accelerated compared to conventional CCSD for larger molecules. The efficiency of our DF-CCSD algorithm arises from the acceleration of several different terms, which are designated as the "gradient terms": computation of particle density matrices (PDMs), generalized Fock-matrix (GFM), solution of the Z-vector equation, formation of the relaxed PDMs and GFM, back-transformation of PDMs and GFM to the atomic orbital (AO) basis, and evaluation of gradients in the AO basis. For the largest member of the alkane set (C10H22), the computational times for the gradient terms (with the cc-pVTZ basis set) are 2582.6 (CCSD) and 310.7 (DF-CCSD) min, respectively, a speed up of more than 8-folds. For gradient related terms, the DF approach avoids the usage of four-index electron repulsion integrals. Based on our previous study [U. Bozkaya, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 124108 (2014)], our formalism completely avoids construction or storage of the 4-index two-particle density matrix (TPDM), using instead 2- and 3-index TPDMs. The DF approach introduces negligible errors for equilibrium bond lengths and harmonic vibrational frequencies.

  7. Systematics in Metallicity Gradient Measurements I : Angular Resolution, Signal-to-Noise and Annuli Binning

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, T -T; Rich, J

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid progress in metallicity gradient studies at high-redshift, it is imperative that we thoroughly understand the systematics in these measurements. This work investigates how the [NII]/Halpha ratio based metallicity gradients change with angular resolution, signal-to-noise (S/N), and annular binning parameters. Two approaches are used: 1. We downgrade the high angular resolution integral-field data of a gravitationally lensed galaxy and re-derive the metallicity gradients at different angular resolution; 2. We simulate high-redshift integral field spectroscopy (IFS) observations under different angular resolution and S/N conditions using a local galaxy with a known gradient. We find that the measured metallicity gradient changes systematically with angular resolution and annular binning. Seeing-limited observations produce significantly flatter gradients than higher angular resolution observations. There is a critical angular resolution limit beyond which the measured metallicity gradient is subst...

  8. Role of density gradient driven trapped electron mode turbulence in the H-mode inner core with electron heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Guttenfelder, W.; Rhodes, T. L.; Dimits, A. M.; Bravenec, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Holland, C.; Lohr, J.; Marinoni, A.; McKee, G. R.; Petty, C. C.; Rost, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zemedkun, S.; Zeng, L.

    2016-05-01

    A series of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] low torque quiescent H-mode experiments show that density gradient driven trapped electron mode (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-mode plasmas during strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te/Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear DGTEM critical density gradient, locally reducing density peaking, while transport in all channels displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. This suggests that fusion α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-mode plasmas with moderate density peaking and low collisionality, with equal electron and ion temperatures, key conditions expected in burning plasmas. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] (and GENE [Jenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000)]) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes but also density fluctuation spectra from Doppler backscattering (DBS), with and without ECH. Inner core DBS density fluctuations display discrete frequencies with adjacent toroidal mode numbers, which we identify as DGTEMs. GS2 [Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)] predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0>qmin>1 .

  9. Up-Hill Diffusion Creating Density Gradient - What is the Proper Entropy?

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    It is always some constraint that yields any nontrivial structure from statistical averages. As epitomized by the Boltzmann distribution, the energy conservation is often the principal constraint acting on mechanical systems. Here, we investigate a different type: the topological constraint imposed on `space'. Such constraint emerges from the null space of the Poisson operator linking energy gradient to phase space velocity, and appears as an adiabatic invariant altering the preserved phase space volume at the core of statistical mechanics. The correct measure of entropy, built on the distorted invariant measure, behaves consistently with the second law of thermodynamics. The opposite behavior (decreasing entropy and negative entropy production) arises in arbitrary coordinates. An ensamble of rotating rigid bodies is worked out. The theory is then applied to up-hill diffusion in a magnetosphere.

  10. Sperm fractions obtained following density gradient centrifugation in human ejaculates show differences in sperm DNA longevity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime Goslvez; Stephen Johnston; Carmen Lpez-Fernndez; Altea Goslbez; Francisca Arroyo; Jose Lus Fernndez; Juan G lvarez

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the DNA longevity characteristics associated with each resultant fraction following density gradient centrifugation (DGC) in comparison to that of the original neat ejaculated sample. Methods:An aliquot of neat semen (NSS) collected from 7 patients was processed using DGC resulting in 3 fractions;Fraction 1:seminal plasma/40%gradient interface (GI);Fraction 2:40%GI/80%GI;Fraction 3:80%GI/pellet. An aliquot of each fraction and NSS was cryopreserved, thawed and incubated at 37 ℃for 24h;the increase of sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed using the Dyn-Halosperm assay following 0, 3, 6 and 24h of incubation. Results:While there was a significant reduction in the incidence of baseline sperm DNA fragmentation following DGC in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity was shown to be higher in the NSS than in any other sub-population following incubation. The highest levels of baseline DNA damage were found in Fractions 1 and 2;these fractions also showed the highest rate DNA fragmentation following incubation, subsequently exhibiting the lowest DNA longevity. Conclusion:1) Unnecessary incubation of spermatozoa prior to artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization, should be avoided, since sperm DNA longevity is significantly reduced after ex vivo sperm handling and 2) Although sperm selection by DCG significantly reduces the baseline levels of SDF of sperm in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity in this fraction was ultimately lower following 24 h incubation when compared to sperm recovered from non-centrifuged NSS.

  11. Density measurement of thin layers by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jürgen; Ramm, Jürgen; Gemming, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    A method to measure the density of thin layers is presented which utilizes electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) techniques within a transmission electron microscope. The method is based on the acquisition of energy filtered images in the low loss region as well as of an element distribution map using core loss edges. After correction of multiple inelastic scattering effects, the intensity of the element distribution map is proportional to density and thickness. The dependence of the intensities of images with low energy loss electrons on the density is different from that. This difference allows the calculation of the relative density pixel by pixel and to determine lateral density gradients or fluctuations in thin films without relying on a constant specimen thickness. The method is demonstrated at thin carbon layers produced with density gradients.

  12. Measuring Air Density in the Introductory Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzà, G.; Gratton, L. M.; López-Arias, T.; Oss, S.

    2010-03-01

    The measurement of the mass, or the density, of air can easily be done with very simple materials and offers many interesting phenomena for discussion—buoyancy and its effects being the most obvious but not the only one. Many interesting considerations can be done regarding the behavior of gases, the effect of the external conditions in the measurement, and the reason for the choice of the procedure, among others. One of the most widespread approaches makes use of rubber balloons. Such an approach can be misleading if attention is not paid to the effect of the buoyant force on the balloon, exerted by the surrounding air. Air is weightless in an environment full of it. While this fact can usually be neglected in daily, nontechnical weight measurements, it is not the case when we are interested in the weight of air itself. A sketch such as the one depicted in Fig. 1 is often presented in elementary science textbooks, as a demonstration that air has weight. A search of the Internet will reveal that this misleading approach is often presented as the simplest one for this kind of measurement at an elementary level and represents one among other common misconceptions that can be found in K-6 science textbooks as discussed, for instance, in Ref. 2. For a more detailed description of the flaws inherent to the measurement of air's weight with a rubber balloon, see Ref. 3. In this paper we will describe two procedures to measure the density of air: weighing a PET bottle and a vacuum rigid container. There are other interesting ways to estimate the weight of air; see, for instance, the experiment of Zhu and Se-yuen using carbon dioxide and Archimedes' principle.4 We emphasize the experimental implications and the physical reasons for the accuracy and conceptual correctness of each method. It is important not to undervalue the importance of both simplicity and reliability for any experimental measurement made in a didactic context.

  13. A rapid and scalable density gradient purification method for Plasmodium sporozoites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Mark

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains a major human health problem, with no licensed vaccine currently available. Malaria infections initiate when infectious Plasmodium sporozoites are transmitted by Anopheline mosquitoes during their blood meal. Investigations of the malaria sporozoite are, therefore, of clear medical importance. However, sporozoites can only be produced in and isolated from mosquitoes, and their isolation results in large amounts of accompanying mosquito debris and contaminating microbes. Methods Here is described a discontinuous density gradient purification method for Plasmodium sporozoites that maintains parasite infectivity in vitro and in vivo and greatly reduces mosquito and microbial contaminants. Results This method provides clear advantages over previous approaches: it is rapid, requires no serum components, and can be scaled to purify >107 sporozoites with minimal operator involvement. Moreover, it can be effectively applied to both human (Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax and rodent (Plasmodium yoelii infective species with excellent recovery rates. Conclusions This novel method effectively purifies viable malaria sporozoites by greatly reducing contaminating mosquito debris and microbial burdens associated with parasite isolation. Large-scale preparations of purified sporozoites will allow for enhanced in vitro infections, proteomics, and biochemical characterizations. In conjunction with aseptic mosquito rearing techniques, this purification technique will also support production of live attenuated sporozoites for vaccination.

  14. Measurement of induced magnetic flux density using injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Lee, Byung Il; Kwon, Ohin; Woo, Eung Je

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures induced magnetic flux densities subject to externally injected currents in order to visualize conductivity distributions inside an electrically conducting object. Injection currents induce magnetic flux densities that appear in phase parts of acquired MR image data. In the conventional current injection method, we inject currents during the time segment between the end of the first RF pulse and the beginning of the reading gradient in order to ensure the gradient linearity. Noting that longer current injections can accumulate more phase changes, we propose a new pulse sequence called injection current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) where the duration of the injection current pulse is extended until the end of the reading gradient. Since the current injection during the reading gradient disturbs the gradient linearity, we first analyze the MR signal produced by the ICNE pulse sequence and suggest a novel algorithm to extract the induced magnetic flux density from the acquired MR signal. Numerical simulations and phantom experiments show that the new method is clearly advantageous in terms of the reduced noise level in measured magnetic flux density data. The amount of noise reduction depends on the choice of the data acquisition time and it was about 24% when we used a prolonged data acquisition time of 10.8 ms. The ICNE method will enhance the clinical applicability of the MREIT technique when it is combined with an appropriate phase artefact minimization method.

  15. A comparison of density functional theory and coupled cluster methods for the calculation of electric dipole polarizability gradients of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paidarová, Ivana; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2012-01-01

    We have compared the performance of density functional theory (DFT) using five different exchange-correlation functionals with four coupled cluster theory based wave function methods in the calculation of geometrical derivatives of the polarizability tensor of methane. The polarizability gradient...

  16. Differential heating: A versatile method for thermal conductivity measurements in high-energy-density matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping, Y.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Correa, A.; Shepherd, R.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Sterne, P. A.; Whitley, H. D.; Fratanduono, D.; Collins, G. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Sio, H. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Boehly, T. R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    We propose a method for thermal conductivity measurements of high energy density matter based on differential heating. A temperature gradient is created either by surface heating of one material or at an interface between two materials by different energy deposition. The subsequent heat conduction across the temperature gradient is observed by various time-resolved probing techniques. Conceptual designs of such measurements using laser heating, proton heating, and x-ray heating are presented. The sensitivity of the measurements to thermal conductivity is confirmed by simulations.

  17. Critical current density: Measurements vs. reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, A. V.; Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Fedoseev, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Different experimental techniques are employed to evaluate the critical current density (Jc), namely transport current measurements and two different magnetisation measurements forming quasi-equilibrium and dynamic critical states. Our technique-dependent results for superconducting YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) film and MgB2 bulk samples show an extremely high sensitivity of Jc and associated interpretations, such as irreversibility fields and Kramer plots, which lose meaning without a universal approach. We propose such approach for YBCO films based on their unique pinning features. This approach allows us to accurately recalculate the magnetic-field-dependent Jc obtained by any technique into the Jc behaviour, which would have been measured by any other method without performing the corresponding experiments. We also discovered low-frequency-dependent phenomena, governing flux dynamics, but contradicting the considered ones in the literature. The understanding of these phenomena, relevant to applications with moving superconductors, can clarify their dramatic impact on the electric-field criterion through flux diffusivity and corresponding measurements.

  18. Arrays of quasi-hexagonally ordered silica nanopillars with independently controlled areal density, diameter and height gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Burcin; Huang, Wenting; Plettl, Alfred; Ziemann, Paul

    2015-03-01

    A consecutive fabrication approach of independently tailored gradients of the topographical parameters distance, diameter and height in arrays of well-ordered nanopillars on smooth SiO2-Si-wafers is presented. For this purpose, previously reported preparation techniques are further developed and combined. First, self-assembly of Au-salt loaded micelles by dip-coating with computer-controlled pulling-out velocities and subsequent hydrogen plasma treatment produce quasi-hexagonally ordered, 2-dimensional arrays of Au nanoparticles (NPs) with unidirectional variations of the interparticle distances along the pulling direction between 50-120 nm. Second, the distance (or areal density) gradient profile received in this way is superimposed with a diameter-controlled gradient profile of the NPs applying a selective photochemical growth technique. For demonstration, a 1D shutter is used for locally defined UV exposure times to prepare Au NP size gradients varying between 12 and 30 nm. Third, these double-gradient NP arrangements serve as etching masks in a following reactive ion etching step delivering arrays of nanopillars. For height gradient generation, the etching time is locally controlled by applying a shutter made from Si wafer piece. Due to the high flexibility of the etching process, the preparation route works on various materials such as cover slips, silicon, silicon oxide, silicon nitride and silicon carbide.

  19. A model for thin layer formation by delayed particle settling at sharp density gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prairie, Jennifer C.; White, Brian L.

    2017-02-01

    Thin layers - regions where plankton or particles accumulate vertically on scales of a few meters or less - are common in coastal waters, and have important implications for both trophic dynamics and carbon cycling. These features can form by a variety of biological and physical mechanisms, including localized growth, shear-thinning, and directed swimming. An additional mechanism may result in the formation of thin layers of marine aggregates, which have been shown to decrease their settling velocity when passing through sharp density gradients, a behavior termed delayed settling. Here, we apply a simple vertical advection-diffusion model to predict the properties of aggregate thin layers formed by this process. We assume a constant vertical flux of particles from the surface, which is parameterized by observations from laboratory experiments with marine aggregates. The formation, maintenance, and shape of the layers are described in relation to non-dimensional numbers that depend on environmental conditions and particle settling properties. In particular, model results demonstrate layer intensity and sharpness both increase with higher Péclet number (Pe), that is, under conditions with weaker mixing relative to layer formation. Similarly, more intense and sharper layers are found when the delayed settling behavior of aggregates is characterized by a lower velocity minimum. The model also predicts layers that are vertically asymmetric and highly "peaky" when compared with a Gaussian distribution, features often seen in thin layers in natural environments. Lastly, by comparing model predictions with observations of thin layers in the field, we are able to gain some insight into the applicability of delayed settling as a thin layer formation mechanism in different environmental conditions.

  20. Analytical gradients of the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method with density fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delcey, Mickaël G. [Department of Chemistry – Ångström, The Theoretical Chemistry Programme, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 518, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Pedersen, Thomas Bondo [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, 0315 Oslo (Norway); Aquilante, Francesco [Department of Chemistry – Ångström, The Theoretical Chemistry Programme, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 518, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Dipartimento di chimica “G. Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, V. F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Lindh, Roland, E-mail: roland.lindh@kemi.uu.se [Department of Chemistry – Ångström, The Theoretical Chemistry Programme, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 518, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala Center for Computational Chemistry - UC_3, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 518, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-07-28

    An efficient implementation of the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) gradients employing density fitting (DF) is presented. The DF allows a reduction both in scaling and prefactors of the different steps involved. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on a set of molecules ranging up to an iron-Heme b complex which with its 79 atoms and 811 basis functions is to our knowledge the largest SA-CASSCF gradient computed. For smaller systems where the conventional code could still be used as a reference, both the linear response calculation and the gradient formation showed a clear timing reduction and the overall cost of a geometry optimization is typically reduced by more than one order of magnitude while the accuracy loss is negligible.

  1. Kinetic measurements using EPR imaging with a modulated field gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrling, Thomas; Fuchs, Jürgen; Groth, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    EPR imaging with modulated field gradient was applied for the investigation of fast diffusion processes. Three different imaging methods are possible: spectral-temporal, spatio-temporal, and spectral-spatial imaging. The time resolution is on the order of seconds and the spatial resolution is in the micrometer region. The efficiency of this imaging technique is demonstrated for the penetration of the spin probe Tempol in the skin of hairless mice biopsies. The skin is normally protected against the penetration of water soluble substances by the horny layer, a resistive thin lipophilic layer. Overcoming this horny layer for water soluble ingredients is one of the main practical problems for the topical application of pharmaceutics which could be investigated by EPR imaging. Different images represent the penetration behavior of the water soluble Tempol in the skin after treatment with the penetration enhancer DMSO (Dimethylsulfoxide) and after removing the horny layer.

  2. Kinetic Measurements Using EPR Imaging with a Modulated Field Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrling, Thomas; Fuchs, Jürgen; Groth, Norbert

    2002-01-01

    EPR imaging with modulated field gradient was applied for the investigation of fast diffusion processes. Three different imaging methods are possible: spectral-temporal, spatio-temporal, and spectral-spatial imaging. The time resolution is on the order of seconds and the spatial resolution is in the micrometer region. The efficiency of this imaging technique is demonstrated for the penetration of the spin probe Tempol in the skin of hairless mice biopsies. The skin is normally protected against the penetration of water soluble substances by the horny layer, a resistive thin lipophilic layer. Overcoming this horny layer for water soluble ingredients is one of the main practical problems for the topical application of pharmaceutics which could be investigated by EPR imaging. Different images represent the penetration behavior of the water soluble Tempol in the skin after treatment with the penetration enhancer DMSO (Dimethylsulfoxide) and after removing the horny layer.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of gravity acceleration and gravity gradient with an atom interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrentino, F.; Lien, Y.-H.; Rosi, G.; Tino, G. M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Universita di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bertoldi, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, F-91127 Palaiseau cedex (France); Bodart, Q. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia and LENS, Universita di Firenze, INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); European Space Agency, Research and Scientific Support Department, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Cacciapuoti, L. [European Space Agency, Research and Scientific Support Department, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Angelis, M. de [Istituto di Fisica Applicata ' Nello Carrara' CNR, via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Prevedelli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, I-40126, Bologna (Italy)

    2012-09-10

    We demonstrate a method to measure the gravitational acceleration with a dual cloud atom interferometer; the use of simultaneous atom interferometers reduces the effect of seismic noise on the gravity measurement. At the same time, the apparatus is capable of accurate measurements of the vertical gravity gradient. The ability to determine the gravity acceleration and gravity gradient simultaneously and with the same instrument opens interesting perspectives in geophysical applications.

  4. On the formation of sharp gradients in electron density resulting from an ice-plasma feedback instabilities in the polar summer mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSEs) have commonly been attributed to scattering from (1) volume-filled electron density turbulence and (2) extremely sharp (meter-scale) gradients in electron density. In-situ sounding rockets have measured both extended regions of turbulence as well as electron density ledges. Unlike the turbulence theory, which has been extensively studied, a theory on the formation of sharp edges has yet to be explored. In this study, we reconsider the study of Gumbel et al. [2002] on the influences of ice particles on the ion chemistry and propose a theory of ice-plasma feedback instability in order to explain the origin of sharp electron density gradients. A one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of a multi-constituent weakly-ionized plasma has been developed to capture the physics of proton-hydrates (H+[H20]n), ice, and plasma interactions on a spatial grid of approximately 25 m. The simulation captures (1) the development of the proton-hydrate chain starting at n=4 via Thomson's model and Natanson's recombination scheme, (2) the formation of ice nucleation on large cluster proton-hydrates (n > 73), (3) the attachment of electrons (and ions) to ice particles, and resulting depletion of the plasma density, which significantly accelerates the proton-hydrate chain and ionic nucleation of new ice particles, (4) and the development of an ice-plasma feedback instability whereby the repeated process of developing new ice particles leads to capture of even more electrons and further depletion of existing regions of lower plasma density. Since this feedback instability process is faster than typical aerosol diffusion rates in this region, existing gradients steepen to produce electron density ledges. Although ionic nucleation is not feasible as the major mesospheric nucleation process, it can become efficient locally, near the coldest parts of the mesosphere because the proton-hydrate chain development is extremely sensitive to ambient

  5. Sedimentation properties in density gradients correspond with levels of sperm DNA fragmentation, chromatin compaction and binding affinity to hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Forough; Binduraihem, Adel; Miller, David

    2017-03-01

    Mature spermatozoa bind hyaluronic acid in the extracellular matrix via hyaladherins. Immature spermatozoa may be unable to interact because they do not express the appropriate hyaladherins on their surface. Fresh human semen samples were fractionated using differential density gradient centrifugation (DDGC) and the ability of these fractions to bind hyaluronic acid was evaluated. The presence of sperm hyaladherins was also assessed. CD44 was located mainly on the acrosome and equatorial segment and became more restricted to the equatorial segment in capacitated spermatozoa. Hyaluronic acid-TRITC (hyaluronic acid conjugated with tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanante), a generic hyaluronic-acid-binding reagent, labelled the membrane and the neck region, particularly after capacitation. Sperm populations obtained after DDGC or after interaction with hyaluronic acid were assessed for DNA fragmentation and chromatin maturity. Strong relationships between both measures and sperm sedimentation and hyaluronic-acid-binding profiles were revealed. Capacitation enhanced hyaluronic acid binding of both DDGC-pelleted sperm and sperm washed free of seminal fluid. In conclusion, hyaladherins were detected on human sperm and a higher capacity for sperm hyaluronic-acid-binding was shown to correspond with their DDGC sedimentation profiles and with lower levels of DNA fragmentation and better chromatin maturity. Capacitation induced changes in the distribution and presence of hyaladherins may enhance hyaluronic-acid-binding.

  6. Space Electron Density Gradient Studies using a 3D Embedded Reconfigurable Sounder and ESA/NASA CLUSTER Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides a direct comparison between data captured by a new embedded reconfigurable digital sounder, different ground-based ionospheric sounders spread around Europe and the ESA/NASA CLUSTER mission. The CLUSTER mission consists of four identical space probes flying in a formation that allows measurements of the electron density gradient in the local magnetic field. Both the ground-based and the spacecraft instrumentations assist in studying the motion, geometry and boundaries of the plasmasphere. The comparison results are in accordance to each other. Some slight deviations among the captured data were expected from the beginning of this investigation. These small discrepancies are reasonable and seriatim analyzed. The results of this research are significant, since the level of the plasma's ionization, which is related to the solar activity, dominates the propagation of electromagnetic waves through it. Similarly, unusually high solar activity presents serious hazards to orbiting satellites, spaceborne instrumentation, satellite communications and infrastructure located on the Earth's surface. Long-term collaborative study of the data is required to continue, in order to identify and determine the enhanced risk in advance. This would allow scientists to propose an immediate cure.

  7. Reineke’s stand density index: a quantitative and non-unitless measure of stand density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis L. VanderSchaaf

    2013-01-01

    When used as a measure of relative density, Reineke’s stand density index (SDI) can be made unitless by relating the current SDI to a standard density but when used as a quantitative measure of stand density SDI is not unitless. Reineke’s SDI relates the current stand density to an equivalent number of trees per unit area in a stand with a quadratic mean diameter (Dq)...

  8. Simultaneous measurement of reactions in microdroplets filled by concentration gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damean, Nicolae; Olguin, Luis F; Hollfelder, Florian; Abell, Chris; Huck, Wilhelm T S

    2009-06-21

    This work describes a technology for performing and monitoring simultaneously several reactions confined in strings of microdroplets having identical volumes but different composition, and travelling with the same speed in parallel channels of a microfluidic device. This technology, called parallel microdroplets technology (PmicroD), uses an inverted optical microscope and a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to collect images and analyze them so as to report on the reactions occurring in these microdroplets. A concentration gradient of one reactant is created in the microfluidic device. In each channel, a different concentration of this reactant is mixed with a fixed amount of a second reactant. Using planar flow-focusing methodology, these mixtures are confined in microdroplets of pL size which travel in oil as continuous medium, avoiding laminar dispersion. By analyzing the images of parallel strings of microdroplets, the time courses of several reactions with different reagent compositions are investigated simultaneously. In order to design the microfluidic device that consists in a complex network of channels having well-defined geometries and restricted positions, the theoretical concept of equivalent channels (i.e. channels having identical hydraulic resistance) is exploited and developed. As a demonstration of the PmicroD technology, an enzyme activity assay was carried out and the steady-state kinetic constants were determined.

  9. Development of gradient-corrected exchange-correlation functionals in the density functional theory; Developpement de fonctionnelles corrigees du gradient en theorie de la fonctionnelle de la densite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lembarki, A.

    1994-12-01

    In this work, we have developed some gradient-corrected exchange-correlation functionals. This study is in keeping with the density functional theory (DFT) formalism. In the first part of this memory, a description of Hartree-Fock (HF), post-HF and density functional theories is given. The second part is devoted the study the different approximations of DFT exchange-correlation functionals which have been proposed in the last years. In particular, we have underlined the approximations used for the construction of these functionals. The third part of this memory consists in the development of new gradient-corrected functionals. In this study, we have established a new relation between exchange energy, correlation energy and kinetic energy. We have deduced two new possible forms of exchange or correlation functionals, respectively. In the fourth part, we have studied the exchange potential, for which the actual formulation does not satisfy some theoretical conditions, such as the asymptotic behavior -1/r. Our contribution lies in the development of an exchange potential with a correct asymptotic -1/r behavior for large values of r. In this chapter, we have proposed a model which permits the obtention of the exchange energy from the exchange potential, using the virial theorem. The fifth part of this memory is devoted the application of these different functionals to simple systems (H{sub 2}O, CO, N{sub 2}O, H{sub 3}{sup +} and H{sub 5}{sup +}) in order to characterize the performance of DFT calculations in regards to those obtained with post-HF methods. (author). 215 refs., 8 figs., 28 tabs.

  10. PHASE GRADIENT METHOD OF MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS IN ELECTRIC VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Ptitsyna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Operation of electric and hybrid vehicles demands real time magnetic field control, for instance, for fire and electromagnetic safety. The article deals with a method of magnetic field measurements onboard electric cars taking into account peculiar features of these fields. The method is based on differential methods of measurements, and minimizes the quantity of magnetic sensors.

  11. Turbulence measurements in axisymmetric supersonic boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gootzait, E.; Childs, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    Mean flow and turbulence measurements are presented for adiabatic compressible turbulent boundary layer flow in adverse pressure gradients. The gradients were induced on the wall of an axially symmetric wind tunnel by contoured centerbodies mounted on the wind tunnel centerline. The boundary layer turbulence downstream of a boundary layer bleed section in a zero pressure gradient was also examined. The measurements were obtained using a constant temperature hot-wire anemometer. The adverse pressure gradients were found to significantly alter the turbulence properties of the boundary layer. With flow through the bleed holes there was a measureable decrease in the rms longitudinal velocity fluctuations near the wall and the turbulent shear stress in the boundary layer was reduced.

  12. High density of tree-cavities and snags in tropical dry forest of western Mexico raises questions for a latitudinal gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Vázquez

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that a latitudinal gradient exists of a low density of snags and high density of naturally-formed tree-cavities in tropical vs. temperate forests, though few cavities may have characteristics suitable for nesting by birds. We determined snag and cavity density, characteristics, and suitability for birds in a tropical dry forest biome of western Mexico, and evaluated whether our data fits the trend of snag and cavity density typically found in tropical moist and wet forests. We established five 0.25-ha transects to survey and measure tree-cavities and snags in each of three vegetation types of deciduous, semi-deciduous, and mono-dominant Piranhea mexicana forest, comprising a total of 3.75 ha. We found a high density of 77 cavities/ha, with 37 cavities suitable for birds/ha, where density, and characteristics of cavities varied significantly among vegetation types. Lowest abundance of cavities occurred in deciduous forest, and these were in smaller trees, at a lower height, and with a narrower entrance diameter. Only 8.6% of cavities were excavated by woodpeckers, and only 11% of cavities were occupied, mainly by arthropods, though 52% of all cavities were unsuitable for birds. We also found a high density of 56 snags/ha, with greatest density in deciduous forest (70 snags/ha, though these were of significantly smaller diameter, and snags of larger diameter were more likely to contain cavities. The Chamela-Cuixmala tropical dry forest had the highest density of snags recorded for any tropical or temperate forest, and while snag density was significantly correlated with mean snag dbh, neither latitude nor mean dbh predicted snag density in ten forest sites. The high spatial aggregation of snag and cavity resources in tropical dry forest may limit their availability, particularly for large-bodied cavity adopters, and highlights the importance of habitat heterogeneity in providing resources for primary and secondary cavity-nesters.

  13. High density of tree-cavities and snags in tropical dry forest of western Mexico raises questions for a latitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Leopoldo; Renton, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that a latitudinal gradient exists of a low density of snags and high density of naturally-formed tree-cavities in tropical vs. temperate forests, though few cavities may have characteristics suitable for nesting by birds. We determined snag and cavity density, characteristics, and suitability for birds in a tropical dry forest biome of western Mexico, and evaluated whether our data fits the trend of snag and cavity density typically found in tropical moist and wet forests. We established five 0.25-ha transects to survey and measure tree-cavities and snags in each of three vegetation types of deciduous, semi-deciduous, and mono-dominant Piranhea mexicana forest, comprising a total of 3.75 ha. We found a high density of 77 cavities/ha, with 37 cavities suitable for birds/ha, where density, and characteristics of cavities varied significantly among vegetation types. Lowest abundance of cavities occurred in deciduous forest, and these were in smaller trees, at a lower height, and with a narrower entrance diameter. Only 8.6% of cavities were excavated by woodpeckers, and only 11% of cavities were occupied, mainly by arthropods, though 52% of all cavities were unsuitable for birds. We also found a high density of 56 snags/ha, with greatest density in deciduous forest (70 snags/ha), though these were of significantly smaller diameter, and snags of larger diameter were more likely to contain cavities. The Chamela-Cuixmala tropical dry forest had the highest density of snags recorded for any tropical or temperate forest, and while snag density was significantly correlated with mean snag dbh, neither latitude nor mean dbh predicted snag density in ten forest sites. The high spatial aggregation of snag and cavity resources in tropical dry forest may limit their availability, particularly for large-bodied cavity adopters, and highlights the importance of habitat heterogeneity in providing resources for primary and secondary cavity-nesters.

  14. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation: field programming using density and viscosity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plocková, Jana; Chmelík, Josef

    2006-06-23

    In previous papers, several approaches to programming of the resulting force field in GFFF were described and investigated. The experiments were dealing with flow-velocity and channel thickness, i.e. factors influencing hydrodynamic lift forces (HLF). The potential of density and viscosity of carrier liquid for field programming was predicted and demonstrated by preliminary experiments. This work is devoted to experimental verification of the influence of carrier liquid density and viscosity. Several carrier liquid density and simultaneously viscosity gradients using water-methanol mixtures are in this work implemented in the separation of a model silica mixture. Working with the water-methanol gradients, one is not able to separate the influence of density from the contribution of viscosity. However, we found experimental conditions to show the isolated effect of carrier liquid density (two water-methanol mixtures of equal viscosity differing in their densities). In order to demonstrate the isolated effect of viscosity, we implemented in this work a new system of (hydroxypropyl)methyl cellulose (HPMC) carrier liquids. Three different HPMC compositions enabled to vary the viscosity more than two times at almost constant density. With increasing carrier liquid viscosity, the focusing and elevating trend was clearly pronounced for 5 and 10 microm silica particles. By the isolated effect of increased viscosity, the centre of the 10 microm particle zone was elevated to the streamline at 16% of the channel height. These experiments have shown that the influence of carrier liquid viscosity on HLF should be taken into account even at higher levels above the channel bottom, i.e. beyond the near-wall region. Further, it is shown that higher value of carrier liquid viscosity improves the separation of the model mixture in terms of time and resolution.

  15. Analytical nuclear excited-state gradients for the Tamm-Dancoff approximation using uncoupled frozen-density embedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Johannes; Höfener, Sebastian

    2017-10-15

    We report the derivation and implementation of analytical nuclear gradients for excited states using time-dependent density functional theory using the Tamm-Dancoff approximation combined with uncoupled frozen-density embedding using density fitting. Explicit equations are presented and discussed. The implementation is able to treat singlet as well as triplet states and functionals using the local density approximation, the generalized gradient approximation, combinations with Hartree-Fock exchange (hybrids), and range-separated functionals such as CAM-B3LYP. The new method is benchmarked against supermolecule calculations in two case studies: The solvatochromic shift of the (vertical) fluorescence energy of 4-aminophthalimide on solvation, and the first local excitation of the benzonitrile dimer. Whereas for the 4-aminophthalimide-water complex deviations of about 0.2 eV are obtained to supermolecular calculations, for the benzonitrile dimer the maximum error for adiabatic excitation energies is below 0.01 eV due to a weak coupling of the subsystems. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Correlation between density fluctuations and plasma gradients at the edge of the TORE SUPRA tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devynck, P.; Garbet, X.; Laviron, C.; Payan, J.; Haas, J. de; Clairet, F.; Talvard, M. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Gervais, F.; Gresillon, D.; Hennequin, P.; Quemeneur, A.; Truc, A. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    1993-12-31

    The ALTAIR diagnostic uses scattering on the plasma electrons with the help of an IR laser beam to obtain information on the density fluctuations. This diagnostic can simultaneously record fluctuations from two independent wave numbers. Two experiments are carried out: study of the density fluctuations during strong plasma heating that combined both low hybrid waves and ion cyclotron heating; density fluctuations associated to the tokamak gas-feed modulation. 6 figs., 5 refs.

  17. [The study of the growth of tylosin producer using differential centrifugation of mycelium in a sucrose density gradient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamakha, O V; Rogatykh, N P; Savochkina, I V; Tikhomirova, L A; Bazarenko, I L

    1989-01-01

    The mycelium of Streptomyces fradiae was fractionated by differential centrifugation in a sucrose density gradient (SDG) using various samples of the inoculation material and aliquots of the cultural broth taken in the course of tylosin production. The mode of mycelium distribution in SDG made it possible to select the most active inoculation material. The mycelium was redistributed from sucrose layers with a high density to those with a lower density in the course of fermentation. The fractions differed in the antibiotic activity but none of them had an activity higher than in the control centrifuged in 30% sucrose and washed off just like the fractions. Therefore, mycelium fractionation in SDG would not elevate its antibiotic activity. The paper presents the cytological characteristics of different fractions changing in the course of fermentation.

  18. 46 CFR 164.009-17 - Density measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Density measurement. 164.009-17 Section 164.009-17... measurement. (a) The measurements described in this section are made to determine the density of a sample. (b... the specimen. The average of at least four measurements of each dimension is determined. (c) If...

  19. Laplacian-dependent models of the kinetic energy density: Applications in subsystem density functional theory with meta-generalized gradient approximation functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śmiga, Szymon; Fabiano, Eduardo; Constantin, Lucian A; Della Sala, Fabio

    2017-02-14

    The development of semilocal models for the kinetic energy density (KED) is an important topic in density functional theory (DFT). This is especially true for subsystem DFT, where these models are necessary to construct the required non-additive embedding contributions. In particular, these models can also be efficiently employed to replace the exact KED in meta-Generalized Gradient Approximation (meta-GGA) exchange-correlation functionals allowing to extend the subsystem DFT applicability to the meta-GGA level of theory. Here, we present a two-dimensional scan of semilocal KED models as linear functionals of the reduced gradient and of the reduced Laplacian, for atoms and weakly bound molecular systems. We find that several models can perform well but in any case the Laplacian contribution is extremely important to model the local features of the KED. Indeed a simple model constructed as the sum of Thomas-Fermi KED and 1/6 of the Laplacian of the density yields the best accuracy for atoms and weakly bound molecular systems. These KED models are tested within subsystem DFT with various meta-GGA exchange-correlation functionals for non-bonded systems, showing a good accuracy of the method.

  20. Measuring protoplanetary disk gas surface density profiles with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    McPartland, Jonathan P Williams Conor

    2016-01-01

    The gas and dust are spatially segregated in protoplanetary disks due to the vertical settling and radial drift of large grains. A fuller accounting of the mass content and distribution in disks therefore requires spectral line observations. We extend the modeling approach presented in Williams & Best (2014) to show that gas surface density profiles can be measured from high fidelity 13CO integrated intensity images. We demonstrate the methodology by fitting ALMA observations of the HD 163296 disk to determine a gas mass, Mgas = 0.048 solar masse, and accretion disk characteristic size Rc = 213au and gradient gamma = 0.39. The same parameters match the C18O 2--1 image and indicates an abundance ratio [13CO]/[C18O] of 700 independent of radius. To test how well this methodology can be applied to future line surveys of smaller, lower mass T Tauri disks, we create a large 13CO 2--1 image library and fit simulated data. For disks with gas masses 3-10 Jupiter masses at 150pc, ALMA observations with a resolutio...

  1. Procedure for Uranium-Molybdenum Density Measurements and Porosity Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Ramprashad [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-13

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidelines for preparing uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) specimens, performing density measurements, and computing sample porosity. Typical specimens (solids) will be sheared to small rectangular foils, disks, or pieces of metal. A mass balance, solid density determination kit, and a liquid of known density will be used to determine the density of U-Mo specimens using the Archimedes principle. A standard test weight of known density would be used to verify proper operation of the system. By measuring the density of a U-Mo sample, it is possible to determine its porosity.

  2. Selection of the Optimum Electrospray Voltage for Gradient Elution LC-MS Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marginean, Ioan; Kelly, Ryan T.; Moore, Ronald J.; Prior, David C.; LaMarche, Brian L.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in liquid composition during gradient elution liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) analyses affect the electrospray operation. To establish methodologies for judicious selection of the electrospray voltage, we monitored in real-time the effect of the LC gradient on the spray current. The optimum range of the electrospray voltage decreased as the concentration of organic solvent in the eluent increased during reversed-phase LC analyses. These results provided the means to rationally select the voltage so as to ensure effective electrospray operation throughout gradient-elution LC separations. For analyses in which the electrospray was operated at constant voltage, a small run-to-run variation in the spray current was observed, indicating a changing electric field due to fouling or degradation of the emitter. Algorithms using feedback from spray current measurements to maintain the electrospray voltage within the optimum operating range throughout gradient elution LC-MS were evaluated. The electrospray operation with voltage regulation and at a constant, judiciously selected voltage during gradient elution LC-MS measurements produced data with similar reproducibility. SYNOPSIS Electrospray current measurements during gradient elution liquid chromatography analyses provide reliable feedback for monitoring, understanding, and improving performance. PMID:19196520

  3. Non-invasive Measurement of Pressure Gradients in Pulsatile Flow using Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Traberg, Marie Sand; Pihl, Michael Johannes

    2013-01-01

    approach. Pressure gradients are calculated from the measured velocity fields using the Navier-Stokes equation. Velocity fields are measured during constant and pulsating flow on a carotid bifurcation phantom and on a common carotid artery in-vivo. Scanning is performed with a 5 MHz BK8670 linear......This paper demonstrates how pressure gradients in a pulsatile flow environment can be measured non-invasively using ultrasound. The proposed method relies on vector velocity fields acquired from ultrasound data. 2-D flow data are acquired at 18-23 frames/sec using the Transverse Oscillation...... transducer using a BK Medical 2202 UltraView Pro Focus scanner. The calculated pressure gradients are validated through a finite element simulation of the constant flow model. The geometry of the flow simulation model is reproduced using MRI data, thereby providing identical flow domains in measurement...

  4. Flow gradient corrections on hot-wire measurements using an X-wire probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooden, J. H. M.; van Lent, M.

    A method has been developed to correct hot-wire measurements by means of a single X-wire probe for the effect of gradients normal to the plane of the wires in the mean flow velocities as well as in the turbulence intensities. Dataprocessing is performed in an iterative way, using the results of measurements with different probe rolling angles, to determine the gradient corrections along the traverse from the previous loop. The method has been applied to measurements in the wake above the trailing edge flap of a wing and it is shown that substantial improvements in the results have been achieved.

  5. Fractionation of Saprolegnia diclina (Oomycetes) satelite DNAs by AgNO3/Cs2SO4 density gradient centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, G A; Green, B R

    1977-12-14

    Saprolegnia diclina DNA has been fractionated using preparative AgNO3/Cs2SO4 and CsCl density gradients. In addition to the previously identified major satellite DNA, there are two minor DNA components banding at 1.682 and 1.701 g - cm(-3) in CsCl. Purified major satellite DNA bands at 1.707 g - cm(-3) giving a base composition of 48% G + C in good agreement with 47% G + C calculated from its Tm value. The nuclear DNA base composition is 58% G + C by both methods. The base composition of the major satellite DNA suggests that it may represent ribosomal DNA cistrons.

  6. Mapping axonal density and average diameter using non-monotonic time-dependent gradient-echo MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Daniel; Cruz, Tomás L; Jespersen, Sune N

    2017-01-01

    Abstract White Matter (WM) microstructures, such as axonal density and average diameter, are crucial to the normal function of the Central Nervous System (CNS) as they are closely related with axonal conduction velocities. Conversely, disruptions of these microstructural features may result....... While clearly further modelling and theoretical developments are necessary, we conclude that salient WM microstructural features can be extracted from these simple, SNR-efficient multi-gradient echo MRI, and that this paves the way towards easier estimation of WM microstructure in vivo....

  7. A hybrid two-component Bose–Einstein condensate interferometer for measuring magnetic field gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Fei [Key Laboratory of Fiber Optic Sensing Technology and Information Processing, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang, Jiahao, E-mail: hjiahao@mail2.sysu.edu.cn [TianQin Research Center & School of Physics and Astronomy, Sun Yat-Sen University, SYSU Zhuhai Campus, Zhuhai 519082 (China); Liu, Quan [Key Laboratory of Fiber Optic Sensing Technology and Information Processing, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2017-03-03

    Highlights: • A scheme for detecting magnetic field gradients via a double-well two-component Bose–Einstein condensate interferometer. • The magnetic field gradient can be extracted by either the spin population or the external state. • Our proposal is potentially sensitive to weak magnetic field inhomogeneity due to its small sensor size. - Abstract: We have proposed a scheme to detect magnetic field gradients via an interferometer based on a double-well two-component Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC). Utilizing a sequence of quantum control operations on both external and internal degree of the BEC, one can extract the magnetic field gradients by measuring either the population in one component or the fidelity between the final external state and the initial ground state. Our scheme can be implemented by current experimental techniques of manipulating ultracold atoms.

  8. Intercomparison of snow density measurements: bias, precision and spatial resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Proksch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Density is a fundamental property of porous media such as snow. A wide range of snow properties and physical processes are linked to density, but few studies have addressed the uncertainty in snow density measurements. No study has yet considered the recent advances in snow measurement methods such as micro-computed tomography (CT. During the MicroSnow Davos 2014 workshop different approaches to measure snow density were applied in a controlled laboratory environment and in the field. Overall, the agreement between CT and gravimetric methods (density cutters was 5 to 9 %, with a bias of −5 to 2 %, expressed as percentage of the mean CT density. In the field, the density cutters tend to overestimate (1 to 6 % densities below and underestimate (1 to 6 % densities above 296 to 350 kg m−3, respectively, depending on the cutter type. Using the mean per layer of all measurement methods applied in the field (CT, box, wedge and cylinder cutter and ignoring ice layers, the variation of layer density between the methods was 2 to 5 % with a bias of −1 to 1 %. In general, our result suggests that snow densities measured by different methods agree within 9 %. However, the density profiles resolved by the measurement methods differed considerably. In particular, the millimeter scale density variations revealed by the high resolution CT contrasted the thick layers with sharp boundaries introduced by the observer. In this respect, the unresolved variation, i.e. the density variation within a layer, which is lost by sampling with lower resolution or layer aggregation, is critical when snow density measurements are used as boundary or initial conditions in numerical simulations.

  9. Neutron Flux Density Measured by Analysis of Annealing Heat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Fan; SHI; Yong-qian; ZHU; Qing-fu; LU; Jin; LI; Lai-dong

    2015-01-01

    Neutron flux density measurement by thermal analysis is a new method different from the previous.This method is first put the sample to the neutron field.Second,measure the annealingheat of the sample.Find out the suitable mixture of crystal boron and apatite to measure the neutron flux density.Then put the sample to the neutron field in

  10. Nonisothermal turbulent boundary-layer adverse pressure gradient large scale thermal structure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; White, Bruce R.; Lei, Ting-Kwo

    1994-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements in an incompressible turbulent boundary-layer flow over a heated flat plate under equilibrium adverse-pressure-gradient conditions (beta = 1.8) were made for two different temperature difference cases (10 and 15 C) between the wall and the freestream. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations (T') were obtained with a pair of subminiature temperature fluctuation probes. The mean convection velocities, the mean inclination angles, and coherence characteristics of the T' large-scale structure were determined. The present temperature structures measurements for a nonisothermal boundary layer are compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case with identical temperature differences previously reported, in which the mean convection velocity of the T' structure was a function of position y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested. The three major findings of the present study, as compared to the zero-pressure-gradient case, are (1) the mean convection speed of the T' structure under beta = 1.8 pressure-gradient conditions was found to be substantially lower in the logarithmic core region than the zero-pressure-gradient case. Additionally, the mean convection speed is felt by the authors to be a function of pressure-gradient parameter beta; (2) the mean inclination angle of the T' structure to the wall under the adverse-pressure-gradient flow was 32 deg, which compares favorably to the 30-deg value of the zero-pressure-gradient case; and (3) the limited data suggests that the mean convection velocity of the T' structure is a function of y(sup +) and independent of the limited temperature-difference cases tested.

  11. Thermodynamic, energy efficiency, and power density analysis of reverse electrodialysis power generation with natural salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Vermaas, David A; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-05-06

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) can harness the Gibbs free energy of mixing when fresh river water flows into the sea for sustainable power generation. In this study, we carry out a thermodynamic and energy efficiency analysis of RED power generation, and assess the membrane power density. First, we present a reversible thermodynamic model for RED and verify that the theoretical maximum extractable work in a reversible RED process is identical to the Gibbs free energy of mixing. Work extraction in an irreversible process with maximized power density using a constant-resistance load is then examined to assess the energy conversion efficiency and power density. With equal volumes of seawater and river water, energy conversion efficiency of ∼ 33-44% can be obtained in RED, while the rest is lost through dissipation in the internal resistance of the ion-exchange membrane stack. We show that imperfections in the selectivity of typical ion exchange membranes (namely, co-ion transport, osmosis, and electro-osmosis) can detrimentally lower efficiency by up to 26%, with co-ion leakage being the dominant effect. Further inspection of the power density profile during RED revealed inherent ineffectiveness toward the end of the process. By judicious early discontinuation of the controlled mixing process, the overall power density performance can be considerably enhanced by up to 7-fold, without significant compromise to the energy efficiency. Additionally, membrane resistance was found to be an important factor in determining the power densities attainable. Lastly, the performance of an RED stack was examined for different membrane conductivities and intermembrane distances simulating high performance membranes and stack design. By thoughtful selection of the operating parameters, an efficiency of ∼ 37% and an overall gross power density of 3.5 W/m(2) represent the maximum performance that can potentially be achieved in a seawater-river water RED system with low

  12. A process study of the interaction of tidal currents, tidal mixing and density gradients in a region of freshwater influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jiuxing; Chen, Shengli

    2017-08-01

    A three dimensional unstructured grid model of the west coast of Britain is used to study the process of the interaction of tidal currents, tidal mixing and density gradient in the Liverpool Bay region. Calculations with M2 tidal forcing and omitting freshwater discharge show that tidal currents in the region are strong (of order 1 ms- 1), with tidal current ellipses essentially rectilinear in the surface and bottom. In the absence of tidal forcing, the freshwater is confined to a thin surface layer. With the inclusion of tidal mixing the surface layer thickens, and in the shallow water area mixed layer occupies the whole water depth. This has a significant effect of reducing its lateral spread. A detailed study of time series of velocity, salinity and turbulence reveals that at flood tide, more saline water is advected into the coastal region and rapid vertical mixing occurs, whereas at ebb tide, fresher water is advected over more saline water. The induced strong pycnocline uncouples surface and bottom layers leading to more circular tidal ellipses which rotate in opposite directions in the vertical, as found in observations. The three dimensional nature of the model reveals that this process involves both horizontal and vertical density gradients, and shows significant horizontal variability in the Liverpool Bay region.

  13. Interrelationships between seminal parameters and sperm nuclear DNA damage before and after density gradient centrifugation: implications for assisted conception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, M J; Moffatt, O; Manicardi, G C; Bizzaro, D; Afnan, M; Sakkas, D

    2001-10-01

    With an increase in the use of assisted reproduction technologies the requirements of the diagnostic semen analysis are constantly changing. Spermatozoa from patients undergoing IVF were analysed by examining the conventional semen parameters and DNA/chromatin integrity, using in-situ nick translation (NT) and the Chromomycin A(3) fluorochrome, which indirectly demonstrates a decreased presence of protamine. Samples were examined before and after preparation using discontinuous density gradient centrifugation. Density gradient centrifugation enriched samples by improving the percentage of morphologically normal forms by 138% and sperm nuclear integrity by 450%. Sperm nuclear integrity as assessed by in-situ nick translation (NT) demonstrated a very clear relationship with sperm concentration, motility and morphology. Morphology correlated with fertilization rates of patients undergoing IVF, while NT values of the spermatozoa post-preparation were significantly lower in pregnant patients. We have demonstrated that along with the classical semen parameters, the assessment of nuclear integrity improves the characterization of the semen sample and may be used as a tool for allocating patients to specific assisted reproduction treatments.

  14. Damping-Growth Transition for Ion-Acoustic Waves in a Density Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    A damping-growth transition for ion-acoustic waves propagating in a nonuniform plasma (e-folding length for the density ln) is observed at a wavelength λ∼2πln. This result supports calculations performed in connection with the problem of heating of the solar corona by ion-acoustic waves generated...

  15. Quantum probability measures and tomographic probability densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amosov, GG; Man'ko, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    Using a simple relation of the Dirac delta-function to generalized the theta-function, the relationship between the tomographic probability approach and the quantum probability measure approach with the description of quantum states is discussed. The quantum state tomogram expressed in terms of the

  16. Measurement and Analysis of Bath-Side Interfacial Concentration Gradients during Membrane Quenching by Phase Inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaides, Gary Edward

    A technique based on Fourier transform optical theory has been developed which allows for transient measurements of bath-side interfacial refractive index gradients during the quench step of membrane formation by phase inversion. From examination of individual Fourier components in a diffraction pattern associated with this one-dimensional mass transport process one is able to overcome the temporal and spatial resolution limitations imposed by many of the more traditional optical techniques. A first order expression relating the local refractive index gradient in the quench cell as a function of its measured spatial offset in the Fourier plane was derived for the purpose of determining the interfacial gradient which may be readily converted to individual species (solvent/nonsolvent) concentration gradients. Real-time interfacial gradients were able to be measured anywhere from 2 to 5 seconds after initiation of the quench using this technique. The r.m.s. errors associated with the reported interfacial species concentration gradient values were determined to range between 3% and 7% of the reported values for quench times less than 60 seconds. However, the reproducability of the experiment was shown to be well within these error limits. The bath-side interfacial refractive index gradient was measured as a function of time for both delayed (cellulose acetate in N,N-dimethylformamide with added nonsolvent ethanol) and instantaneous (cellulose acetate or polysulfone in N,N-dimethylformamide with added nonsolvent water) phase separation conditions with allowed variability in the following processing conditions: initial cast film thickness, initial solvent composition in the coagulation bath, initial nonsolvent composition in the casting solution, and initial polymer concentration in the casting solution. The directionality of the change associated with experimentally observed phenomena (bath-side interfacial solvent gradient and the time at which phase separation occurs

  17. Direct Measurement of the Density Matrix of a Quantum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekkadath, G. S.; Giner, L.; Chalich, Y.; Horton, M. J.; Banker, J.; Lundeen, J. S.

    2016-09-01

    One drawback of conventional quantum state tomography is that it does not readily provide access to single density matrix elements since it requires a global reconstruction. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a scheme that can be used to directly measure individual density matrix elements of general quantum states. The scheme relies on measuring a sequence of three observables, each complementary to the last. The first two measurements are made weak to minimize the disturbance they cause to the state, while the final measurement is strong. We perform this joint measurement on polarized photons in pure and mixed states to directly measure their density matrix. The weak measurements are achieved using two walk-off crystals, each inducing a polarization-dependent spatial shift that couples the spatial and polarization degrees of freedom of the photons. This direct measurement method provides an operational meaning to the density matrix and promises to be especially useful for large dimensional states.

  18. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  19. Numerical Studies of Electron Acceleration Behind Self-Modulating Proton Beam in Plasma with a Density Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Petrenko, Alexey; Sosedkin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1e15 1/cm^3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project --- the proof-of-prin...

  20. A Study on Effects on Current Density Distribution, Inductance Gradient, and Contact Force by Variation of Armature and Rail Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bok Ki [Kwangwoon University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-02-01

    The distribution of current in the conductors influenced by armature geometry and velocity is an important parameter for determining performance of an electromagnetic launcher(EML). The electric current in the early launching stage tends to flow on the outer surface of the conductors, resulting in very high local electric current density. However, the tendency for current to concentrate on the surface is driven by the velocity skin effect later in launching stage. The high current density produces high local heating and, consequently, increases armature wear which causes several defects on EML system. This paper investigates the effect of rail/armature geometry on current density distribution, launcher inductance gradient (L'), and contact force. Three geometrical parameters are used to characterize the railgun system. These are the ratio of contact length, relative position of contact leading edge to root trailing edge, and the ratio of rail overhang to the rail height. The distribution of current density, L',contact force between various configurations of the armature and the rail are analyzed and compared by using the EMAP3D program. (author). 6 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Mapping the genome of meta-generalized gradient approximation density functionals: The search for B97M-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardirossian, Narbe [Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Head-Gordon, Martin, E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu [Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-02-21

    A meta-generalized gradient approximation density functional paired with the VV10 nonlocal correlation functional is presented. The functional form is selected from more than 10{sup 10} choices carved out of a functional space of almost 10{sup 40} possibilities. Raw data come from training a vast number of candidate functional forms on a comprehensive training set of 1095 data points and testing the resulting fits on a comprehensive primary test set of 1153 data points. Functional forms are ranked based on their ability to reproduce the data in both the training and primary test sets with minimum empiricism, and filtered based on a set of physical constraints and an often-overlooked condition of satisfactory numerical precision with medium-sized integration grids. The resulting optimal functional form has 4 linear exchange parameters, 4 linear same-spin correlation parameters, and 4 linear opposite-spin correlation parameters, for a total of 12 fitted parameters. The final density functional, B97M-V, is further assessed on a secondary test set of 212 data points, applied to several large systems including the coronene dimer and water clusters, tested for the accurate prediction of intramolecular and intermolecular geometries, verified to have a readily attainable basis set limit, and checked for grid sensitivity. Compared to existing density functionals, B97M-V is remarkably accurate for non-bonded interactions and very satisfactory for thermochemical quantities such as atomization energies, but inherits the demonstrable limitations of existing local density functionals for barrier heights.

  2. Numerical studies of electron acceleration behind self-modulating proton beam in plasma with a density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, A.; Lotov, K.; Sosedkin, A.

    2016-09-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1015cm-3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project-the proof-of-principle experiment on proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CERN.

  3. Smart density: a more accurate method of measuring rural residential density for health-related research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson Lucinda

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies involving the built environment have typically relied on US Census data to measure residential density. However, census geographic units are often unsuited to health-related research, especially in rural areas where development is clustered and discontinuous. Objective We evaluated the accuracy of both standard census methods and alternative GIS-based methods to measure rural density. Methods We compared residential density (units/acre in 335 Vermont school neighborhoods using conventional census geographic units (tract, block group and block with two GIS buffer measures: a 1-kilometer (km circle around the school and a 1-km circle intersected with a 100-meter (m road-network buffer. The accuracy of each method was validated against the actual residential density for each neighborhood based on the Vermont e911 database, which provides an exact geo-location for all residential structures in the state. Results Standard census measures underestimate residential density in rural areas. In addition, the degree of error is inconsistent so even the relative rank of neighborhood densities varies across census measures. Census measures explain only 61% to 66% of the variation in actual residential density. In contrast, GIS buffer measures explain approximately 90% of the variation. Combining a 1-km circle with a road-network buffer provides the closest approximation of actual residential density. Conclusion Residential density based on census units can mask clusters of development in rural areas and distort associations between residential density and health-related behaviors and outcomes. GIS-defined buffers, including a 1-km circle and a road-network buffer, can be used in conjunction with census data to obtain a more accurate measure of residential density.

  4. Estimation of measurement uncertainty caused by surface gradient for a white light interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyu; Cheung, Chi Fai; Ren, Mingjun; Cheng, Ching-Hsiang

    2015-10-10

    Although the scanning white light interferometer can provide measurement results with subnanometer resolution, the measurement accuracy is far from perfect. The surface roughness and surface gradient have significant influence on the measurement uncertainty since the corresponding height differences within a single CCD pixel cannot be resolved. This paper presents an uncertainty estimation method for estimating the measurement uncertainty due to the surface gradient of the workpiece. The method is developed based on the mathematical expression of an uncertainty estimation model which is derived and verified through a series of experiments. The results show that there is a notable similarity between the predicted uncertainty from the uncertainty estimation model and the experimental measurement uncertainty, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method. With the establishment of the proposed uncertainty estimation method, the uncertainty associated with the measurement result can be determined conveniently.

  5. A study of solar photospheric temperature gradient variation using limb darkening measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Criscuoli, Serena

    2016-01-01

    The variation in area of quiet magnetic network measured over the sunspot cycle should modulate the spatially averaged photospheric temperature gradient, since temperature declines with optical depth more gradually in magnetic flux tube atmospheres. Yet, limb darkening measurements show no dependence upon activity level, even at an rms precision of 0.04%. We study the sensitivity of limb darkening to changes in area filling factor using a 3D MHD model of the magnetized photosphere. The limb darkening change expected from the measured 11 yr area variation lies below the level of measured limb darkening variations, for a reasonable range of magnetic flux in quiet network and internetwork regions. So the remarkably constant limb darkening observed over the solar activity cycle is not inconsistent with the measured 11 year change in area of quiet magnetic network. Our findings offer an independent constraint on photospheric temperature gradient changes reported from measurements of the solar spectral irradiance f...

  6. Selection of the Optimum Electrospray Voltage for Gradient Elution LC-MS Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marginean, Ioan; Kelly, Ryan T.; Moore, Ronald J.; Prior, David C.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-04-01

    Changes in liquid composition during gradient elution liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses affect the electrospray operation. To establish methodologies for judicious selection of the electrospray voltage, we monitored in real-time the effect of the LC gradient on the spray current. The optimum range of the electrospray voltage shifted to lower values as the concentration of organic solvent in the eluent increased during reversed-phase LC analyses. These results provided the means to rationally select the voltage that ensured successful electrospray operation throughout gradient elution LC-MS experiments. A small run-to-run drift in the spray current was observed for electrosprays operated at constant voltage. This could be the result of fouling or degradation of the electrospray emitter, which affected the electric field driving the electrospray. Algorithms using feedback from spray current measurements to maintain the electrospray voltage within the optimum operating range throughout gradient elution LC-MS were evaluated. The electrospray operation with voltage regulation and at constant, judiciously selected voltage during gradient elution LC-MS measurements produced data with similar reproducibility.

  7. Highly durable superhydrophobic coatings with gradient density by movable spray method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenjimbayashi, Mizuki; Shiratori, Seimei

    2014-09-01

    Superhydrophobic surface is expected to be applied in anti-fouling, anti-icing, and anti-bacterial. However, practical use is interrupted by low mechanical strength, time-consuming process, and limited coating substrate. Here highly durable superhydrophobic coatings were prepared by simple and novel spraying method, which sprays with changing the "spray distance between substrate and spray" (SD), named "movable spray method." We prepared the solution that changes wettability and durability with spraying distance by mixing SiO2 nanoparticles and ethyl alpha cyanoacrylate polymer (EAC). Then, we evaluated the chemical components and surface morphologies of each spraying distance coatings (0 ˜ 50 cm) by XPS, SEM, and laser scanning microscope. It revealed that surface roughness and SiO2/EAC ratio increased as the SD increases. Thus, durable superhydrophobic coatings were designed by spraying with increasing SD gradually. Glow discharge-optical emission spectrometry analysis revealed that designed coatings showed the gradual increase of SiO2/EAC ratio. As a result, coatings prepared on glass, wood, or aluminum substrates maintained their superhydrophobicity up to the abrasion at 40 kPa. This movable spray method is simple coating by the wet process and prepares robust hydrophobic coating on complex shape and large area substrates. The gradient functional surface was found to have mechanical durability and superhydrophobicity, and wide area applications will be expected.

  8. Thermospheric mass density measurement from precise orbit ephemeris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric drag, which can be inferred from orbit information of low-Earth orbiting (LEO satellites, provides a direct means of measuring mass density. The temporal resolution of derived mass density could be in the range from minutes to days, depending on the precision of the satellite orbit data. This paper presents two methods potentially being able to estimate thermosphere mass density from precise obit ephemeris with high temporal resolution. One method is based on the drag perturbation equation of the semi-major axis and the temporal resolution of retrieved density could be 150 s for CHAMP satellite. Another method generates corrections to densities computed from a baseline density model through a Kalman filter orbit drag coefficient determination (KFOD process and the temporal resolution of derived density could be as high as 30 s for CHAMP satellite. The densities estimated from these two methods are compared with densities obtained from accelerometer data of CHAMP satellite. When the accelerometer data based densities are used as reference values, the mean relative accuracy of the densities derived from precision orbit data using the two methods is within approximately 10%. An application of the derived densities shows that the derived densities can reduce orbit predication errors.

  9. Thermospheric mass density measurement from precise orbit ephemeris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junyu Chen; Jizhang Sang

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric drag,which can be inferred from orbit information of low-Earth orbiting (LEO)satellites,provides a direct means of measuring mass density.The temporal resolution of derived mass density could be in the range from minutes to days,depending on the precision of the satellite orbit data.This paper presents two methods potentially being able to estimate thermosphere mass density from precise obit ephemeris with high temporal resolution.One method is based on the drag perturbation equation of the semi-major axis and the temporal resolution of retrieved density could be 150 s for CHAMP satellite.Another method generates corrections to densities computed from a baseline density model through a Kalman filter orbit drag coefficient determination (KFOD) process and the temporal resolution of derived density could be as high as 30 s for CHAMP satellite.The densities estimated from these two methods are compared with densities obtained from accelerometer data of CHAMP satellite.When the accelerometer data based densities are used as reference values,the mean relative accuracy of the densities derived from precision orbit data using the two methods is within approximately 10%.An application of the derived densities shows that the derived densities can reduce orbit predication errors.

  10. Current density imaging using directly measured harmonic Bz data in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chunjae; Kwon, Oh In

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) measures magnetic flux density signals through the use of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in order to visualize the internal conductivity and/or current density. Understanding the reconstruction procedure for the internal current density, we directly measure the second derivative of Bz data from the measured k-space data, from which we can avoid a tedious phase unwrapping to obtain the phase signal of Bz . We determine optimal weighting factors to combine the derivatives of magnetic flux density data, [Symbol: see text](2) Bz , measured using the multi-echo train. The proposed method reconstructs the internal current density using the relationships between the induced internal current and the measured [Symbol: see text](2) Bz data. Results from a phantom experiment demonstrate that the proposed method reduces the scanning time and provides the internal current density, while suppressing the background field inhomogeneity. To implement the real experiment, we use a phantom with a saline solution including a balloon, which excludes other artifacts by any concentration gradient in the phantom.

  11. Broadening of the Measured Frequency Spectrum in a Differential Laser Anemometer due to Interference Plane Gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Steen Grüner

    1973-01-01

    It is shown how an inaccurate alignment of a differential laser anemometer may cause a significant broadening of the Doppler spectrum. The reason is the appearance of gradients in the interference pattern in the measuring volume. The phenomenon was investigated theoretically, and a method...

  12. Experimental Measurements of a High Reynolds Num- ber Adverse Pressure Gradient Turbulent Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Callum; Amili, Omid; Stanislas, Michel; Cuvier, Christophe; Foucaut, Jean-Marc; Srinath, Sricharan; Laval, Jean-Philippe; Kaehler, Christian; Hain, Rainer; Scharnowski, Sven; Schroeder, Andreas; Geisler, Reinhard; Agocs, Janos; Roese, Anni; Willert, Christian; Klinner, Joachim; Soria, Julio

    2016-11-01

    The study of adverse pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers is complicated by the need to characterise both the local pressure gradient and it's upstream flow history. It is therefore necessary to measure a significant streamwise domain at a resolution sufficient to resolve the small scales features. To achieve this collaborative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed in the large boundary layer wind-tunnel at the Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille, including: planar measurements spanning a streamwise domain of 3.5m using 16 cameras covering 15 δ spanwise wall-normal stereo-PIV measurements, high-speed micro-PIV of the near wall region and wall shear stress; and streamwise wall-normal PIV in the viscous sub layer. Details of the measurements and preliminary results will be presented.

  13. Density measurements using coherence imaging spectroscopy based on Stark broadeninga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischtschenko, O.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G.; Howard, J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; König, R.

    2010-10-01

    A coherence imaging camera has been set up at Pilot-PSI. The system is to be used for imaging the plasma density through the Stark effect broadening of the Hγ line. Local density values are then obtained by the Abel inversion of the measured interferometric fringe contrast. This report will present the instrument setup and proof-of-principle demonstration. The inverted spatial electron density profiles obtained near the cascaded arc source of Pilot-PSI in discharges with axial magnetic field of B=0.4 T are compared with an independent measurement of electron density by Thomson scattering and good agreement is found.

  14. Density measurements using coherence imaging spectroscopy based on Stark broadening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lischtschenko, O.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G. [Association EURATOM-FOM, FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Howard, J. [Research Laboratory, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia); Jaspers, R. J. E. [Fusion Group, Eindhoven University of Technology, Postbus 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Koenig, R. [EURATOM Association, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, TI Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr.1, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    A coherence imaging camera has been set up at Pilot-PSI. The system is to be used for imaging the plasma density through the Stark effect broadening of the H{sub {gamma}} line. Local density values are then obtained by the Abel inversion of the measured interferometric fringe contrast. This report will present the instrument setup and proof-of-principle demonstration. The inverted spatial electron density profiles obtained near the cascaded arc source of Pilot-PSI in discharges with axial magnetic field of B=0.4 T are compared with an independent measurement of electron density by Thomson scattering and good agreement is found.

  15. A hybrid two-component Bose-Einstein condensate interferometer for measuring magnetic field gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Huang, Jiahao; Liu, Quan

    2017-03-01

    We have proposed a scheme to detect magnetic field gradients via an interferometer based on a double-well two-component Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Utilizing a sequence of quantum control operations on both external and internal degree of the BEC, one can extract the magnetic field gradients by measuring either the population in one component or the fidelity between the final external state and the initial ground state. Our scheme can be implemented by current experimental techniques of manipulating ultracold atoms.

  16. Mapping axonal density and average diameter using non-monotonic time-dependent gradient-echo MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Daniel; Cruz, Tomás L.; Jespersen, Sune N.; Shemesh, Noam

    2017-04-01

    White Matter (WM) microstructures, such as axonal density and average diameter, are crucial to the normal function of the Central Nervous System (CNS) as they are closely related with axonal conduction velocities. Conversely, disruptions of these microstructural features may result in severe neurological deficits, suggesting that their noninvasive mapping could be an important step towards diagnosing and following pathophysiology. Whereas diffusion based MRI methods have been proposed to map these features, they typically entail the application of powerful gradients, which are rarely available in the clinic, or extremely long acquisition schemes to extract information from parameter-intensive models. In this study, we suggest that simple and time-efficient multi-gradient-echo (MGE) MRI can be used to extract the axon density from susceptibility-driven non-monotonic decay in the time-dependent signal. We show, both theoretically and with simulations, that a non-monotonic signal decay will occur for multi-compartmental microstructures - such as axons and extra-axonal spaces, which were here used as a simple model for the microstructure - and that, for axons parallel to the main magnetic field, the axonal density can be extracted. We then experimentally demonstrate in ex-vivo rat spinal cords that its different tracts - characterized by different microstructures - can be clearly contrasted using the MGE-derived maps. When the quantitative results are compared against ground-truth histology, they reflect the axonal fraction (though with a bias, as evident from Bland-Altman analysis). As well, the extra-axonal fraction can be estimated. The results suggest that our model is oversimplified, yet at the same time evidencing a potential and usefulness of the approach to map underlying microstructures using a simple and time-efficient MRI sequence. We further show that a simple general-linear-model can predict the average axonal diameters from the four model parameters, and

  17. Direct Measurements of Oxygen Gradients in Spheroid Culture System Using Electron Parametric Resonance Oximetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Langan

    Full Text Available Advanced in vitro culture from tissues of different origin includes three-dimensional (3D organoid micro structures that may mimic conditions in vivo. One example of simple 3D culture is spheroids; ball shaped structures typically used as liver and tumour models. Oxygen is critically important in physiological processes, but is difficult to quantify in 3D culture: and the question arises, how small does a spheroid have to be to have minimal micro-environment formation? This question is of particular importance in the growing field of 3D based models for toxicological assessment. Here, we describe a simple non-invasive approach modified for the quantitative measurement and subsequent evaluation of oxygen gradients in spheroids developed from a non-malignant fish cell line (i.e. RTG-2 cells using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR oximetry. Sonication of the paramagnetic probe Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc allows for incorporation of probe particulates into spheroid during its formation. Spectra signal strength after incorporation of probe into spheroid indicated that a volume of 20 μl of probe (stock solution: 0.10 mg/mL is sufficient to provide a strong spectra across a range of spheroid sizes. The addition of non-toxic probes (that do not produce or consume oxygen report on oxygen diffusion throughout the spheroid as a function of size. We provide evidence supporting the use of this model over a range of initial cell seeding densities and spheroid sizes with the production of oxygen distribution as a function of these parameters. In our spheroid model, lower cell seeding densities (∼2,500 cells/spheroid and absolute size (118±32 μm allow control of factors such as pre-existing stresses (e.g. ∼ 2% normoxic/hypoxic interface for more accurate measurement of treatment response. The applied methodology provides an elegant, widely applicable approach to directly characterize spheroid (and other organoid cultures in biomedical and

  18. Direct Measurements of the Electron Energy Flux versus Electron Temperature Gradient in Tokamak Discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.W. Gentle; M.E. Austin; P.E. Phillips

    2004-01-01

    Electron thermal transport is one of the most complex processes in fusion plasmas. It is generally described by a simple thermal diffusivity in transport analyses of discharges, but there is evidence of critical gradient effects with moderate stiffness. By analyzing periodic perturbations to an equilibrium, one can measure the variations in electron energy flux and electron temperature gradient over the perturbation cycle, obtaining the flux as a function of gradient over the range of parameters generated by the perturbation. Although time-dependent transport analysis is very sensitive to noise in the input data, averaging over many cycles of a periodic perturbation can provide data of sufficient quality. The analyses presented here are based on the ECE temperature data with high spatial and temporal resolution and full profile coverage on DIII-D for sawteeth and modulated ECH heating.

  19. Non-invasive fluid density and viscosity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2012-05-01

    The noninvasively measurement of the density and viscosity of static or flowing fluids in a section of pipe such that the pipe performs as the sensing apparatus, is described. Measurement of a suitable structural vibration resonance frequency of the pipe and the width of this resonance permits the density and viscosity to be determined, respectively. The viscosity may also be measured by monitoring the decay in time of a vibration resonance in the pipe.

  20. Electron density and gas density measurements in a millimeter-wave discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaub, S. C., E-mail: sschaub@mit.edu; Hummelt, J. S.; Guss, W. C.; Shapiro, M. A.; Temkin, R. J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 167 Albany St., Bldg. NW16, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Electron density and neutral gas density have been measured in a non-equilibrium air breakdown plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and two-dimensional laser interferometry, respectively. A plasma was created with a focused high frequency microwave beam in air. Experiments were run with 110 GHz and 124.5 GHz microwaves at powers up to 1.2 MW. Microwave pulses were 3 μs long at 110 GHz and 2.2 μs long at 124.5 GHz. Electron density was measured over a pressure range of 25 to 700 Torr as the input microwave power was varied. Electron density was found to be close to the critical density, where the collisional plasma frequency is equal to the microwave frequency, over the pressure range studied and to vary weakly with input power. Neutral gas density was measured over a pressure range from 150 to 750 Torr at power levels high above the threshold for initiating breakdown. The two-dimensional structure of the neutral gas density was resolved. Intense, localized heating was found to occur hundreds of nanoseconds after visible plasma formed. This heating led to neutral gas density reductions of greater than 80% where peak plasma densities occurred. Spatial structure and temporal dynamics of gas heating at atmospheric pressure were found to agree well with published numerical simulations.

  1. Paramagnetic ionic liquids for measurements of density using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwambok, David K; Thuo, Martin M; Atkinson, Manza B J; Mirica, Katherine A; Shapiro, Nathan D; Whitesides, George M

    2013-09-03

    Paramagnetic ionic liquids (PILs) provide new capabilities to measurements of density using magnetic levitation (MagLev). In a typical measurement, a diamagnetic object of unknown density is placed in a container containing a PIL. The container is placed between two magnets (typically NdFeB, oriented with like poles facing). The density of the diamagnetic object can be determined by measuring its position in the magnetic field along the vertical axis (levitation height, h), either as an absolute value or relative to internal standards of known density. For density measurements by MagLev, PILs have three advantages over solutions of paramagnetic salts in aqueous or organic solutions: (i) negligible vapor pressures; (ii) low melting points; (iii) high thermal stabilities. In addition, the densities, magnetic susceptibilities, glass transition temperatures, thermal decomposition temperatures, viscosities, and hydrophobicities of PILs can be tuned over broad ranges by choosing the cation-anion pair. The low melting points and high thermal stabilities of PILs provide large liquidus windows for density measurements. This paper demonstrates applications and advantages of PILs in density-based analyses using MagLev.

  2. Effect of cockpit temperature gradients on the validity of single-point measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, J R; Belyavin, A J; Higenbottam, C; Nunneley, S A; Stribley, R F

    1979-07-01

    Dry bulb temperature was measured at six sites throughout seven sorties in F4E aircraft in a study of vertical and lateral cockpit temperature gradients designed to determine the validity of single-point measurements. The results show that both vertical and lateral gradients exist in F4E aircraft and that single-point measurements of Tdb close to the right shoulder show a bias of up to 4 degrees C in relation to mean cockpit dry bulb temperature derived from measurements at five sites. This bias may be removed by using the predictive relationships developed in this study. The relationship between black globe and dry bulb temperatures is also given for F4E aircraft flown in warm, sunny conditions.

  3. Two-resonance probe for measuring electron density in low-pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. W.; You, S. J.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, W. Y.

    2017-04-01

    A technique for measuring double-checked electron density using two types of microwave resonance is presented. Simultaneous measurement of the resonances (plasma and quarter-wavelength resonator resonances), which were used for the cutoff probe (CP) and hairpin probe (HP), was achieved by the proposed microwave resonance probe. The developed two-resonance probe (TRP) consists of parallel separated coaxial cables exposing the radiation and detection tips. The structure resembles that of the CP, except the gapped coaxial cables operate not only as a microwave feeder for the CP but also as a U- shaped quarter-wavelength resonator for the HP. By virtue of this structure, the microwave resonances that have typically been used for measuring the electron density for the CP and HP were clearly identified on the microwave transmission spectrum of the TRP. The two types of resonances were measured experimentally under various power and pressure conditions for the plasma. A three-dimensional full-wave simulation model for the TRP is also presented and used to investigate and reproduce the resonances. The electron densities inferred from the resonances were compared and showed good agreement. Quantitative differences between the densities were attributed to the effects of the sheath width and spatial density gradient on the resonances. This accessible technique of using the TRP to obtain double-checked electron densities may be useful for comparative study and provides complementary uses for the CP and HP.

  4. Proton acceleration using doped Argon plasma density gradient interacting with relativistic CO2 -laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash; Ettlinger, Oliver; Hicks, George; Ditter, Emma-Jane; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2016-10-01

    We investigate proton and light-ion acceleration driven by the interaction of relativistic CO2 laser pulses with overdense Argon or other heavy-ion gas targets doped with lighter-ion species. Optically shaping the gas targets allows tuning of the pre-plasma scale-length from a few to several laser wavelengths, allowing the laser to efficiently drive a propagating snowplow through the bunching in the electron density. Preliminary PIC-based modeling shows that the lighter-ion species is accelerated even without any significant motion of the heavier ions which is a signature of the Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration mechanism. Some outlines of possible experiments at the TW CO2 laser at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented.

  5. Isolation of bacterial plasmids by density gradient centrifugation in cesium trifluoroacetate (CsTFA) without the use of ethidium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, K; Hjorth, R

    1985-01-01

    Plasmids extracted from bacterial cells by alkaline extraction can easily be isolated from linear DNA by isopycnic centrifugation in CsTFA. This is a fast and simple method which circumvents the use of the intercalating dye, ethidium bromide, and consequently the problems associated with its removal. The buoyant densities for covalently closed circular DNA and linear DNA in CsTFA are 1.60 g/ml and 1.65 g/ml, respectively. The isolation is achieved regardless of plasmid size and can be accomplished at temperatures of between 4 and 30 degrees C. Plasmid DNA isolated in gradients of CsTFA are of a high purity and have been found to be intact when cleaved with restriction enzymes and ligated with T4 DNA ligase.

  6. Optical density measurements in a multiphase cryogenic fluid flow system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Valentin; Wiley, John; Gregory, Don A.

    2006-05-01

    An accurate determination of fluid flow in a cryogenic propulsion environment is difficult under the best of circumstances. The extreme thermal environment increases the mechanical constraints, and variable density conditions create havoc with traditional flow measurement schemes. Presented here are secondary results of cryogenic testing of an all-optical sensor capable of a mass flow measurement by directly interrogating the fluid's density state and a determination of the fluid's velocity. The sensor's measurement basis does not rely on any inherent assumptions as to the state of the fluid flow (density or otherwise). The fluid sensing interaction model will be discussed. Current test and evaluation data and future development work will be presented.

  7. Synchrotron X-ray measurement techniques for thermal barrier coated cylindrical samples under thermal gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Sanna F.; Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Raghavan, Seetha [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Bartsch, Marion [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Materials Research, 51147 Cologne (Germany); Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Karlsson, Anette M. [Cleveland State University, 2121 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Measurement techniques to obtain accurate in situ synchrotron strain measurements of thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) applied to hollow cylindrical specimens are presented in this work. The Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition coated specimens with internal cooling were designed to achieve realistic temperature gradients over the TBC coated material such as that occurring in the turbine blades of aeroengines. Effects of the circular cross section on the x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in the various layers, including the thermally grown oxide, are investigated using high-energy synchrotron x-rays. Multiple approaches for beam penetration including collection, tangential, and normal to the layers, along with variations in collection parameters are compared for their ability to attain high-resolution XRD data from the internal layers. This study displays the ability to monitor in situ, the response of the internal layers within the TBC, while implementing a thermal gradient across the thickness of the coated sample. The thermal setup maintained coating surface temperatures in the range of operating conditions, while monitoring the substrate cooling, for a controlled thermal gradient. Through variation in measurement location and beam parameters, sufficient intensities are obtained from the internal layers which can be used for depth resolved strain measurements. Results are used to establish the various techniques for obtaining XRD measurements through multi-layered coating systems and their outcomes will pave the way towards goals in achieving realistic in situ testing of these coatings.

  8. Synchrotron X-ray measurement techniques for thermal barrier coated cylindrical samples under thermal gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sanna F; Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2013-08-01

    Measurement techniques to obtain accurate in situ synchrotron strain measurements of thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) applied to hollow cylindrical specimens are presented in this work. The Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition coated specimens with internal cooling were designed to achieve realistic temperature gradients over the TBC coated material such as that occurring in the turbine blades of aeroengines. Effects of the circular cross section on the x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in the various layers, including the thermally grown oxide, are investigated using high-energy synchrotron x-rays. Multiple approaches for beam penetration including collection, tangential, and normal to the layers, along with variations in collection parameters are compared for their ability to attain high-resolution XRD data from the internal layers. This study displays the ability to monitor in situ, the response of the internal layers within the TBC, while implementing a thermal gradient across the thickness of the coated sample. The thermal setup maintained coating surface temperatures in the range of operating conditions, while monitoring the substrate cooling, for a controlled thermal gradient. Through variation in measurement location and beam parameters, sufficient intensities are obtained from the internal layers which can be used for depth resolved strain measurements. Results are used to establish the various techniques for obtaining XRD measurements through multi-layered coating systems and their outcomes will pave the way towards goals in achieving realistic in situ testing of these coatings.

  9. Isolation of Plasmodium berghei ookinetes in culture using Nycodenz density gradient columns and magnetic isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Jackie

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large scale in vitro production of the mosquito stages of malaria parasites remains elusive, with only limited success for complete sporogonic development and only one report of development through to infective sporozoites. The initial step in this process is the production, in vitro, of ookinetes from gametocytaemic blood. Methods for isolation of these ookinetes from blood cells have been described; however, in addition to yield often being low, processing time and potential for contamination by erythrocytes remain high. Methods This study compares two procedures for retaining mature ookinetes from blood stage cultures, whilst removing red blood cells and other contaminants prior to further culture of the parasite. The well established method of isolation on Nycodenz cushions is compared with a novel method utilizing the innate magnetic properties of the haem pigment crystals found in the cytoplasm of ookinetes. Results Yield and viability of ookinetes were similar with both isolation methods. However, in our hands magnetic isolation produced a cleaner ookinete preparation much more quickly. Moreover, decreasing the flow rate through the magnetic column could further enhance the yield. Conclusion We recommend the enrichment of an ookinete preparation prior to further culture being performed using the magnetic properties of Plasmodium berghei ookinetes as an alternative to their density. The former technique is faster, removes more erythrocytes, but day-to-day costs are greater.

  10. Optimized phase gradient measurements and phase-amplitude interplay in optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Vladimir Y.; Matveyev, Alexander L.; Matveev, Lev A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Sovetsky, Aleksandr A.; Vitkin, Alex

    2016-11-01

    In compressional optical coherence elastography, phase-variation gradients are used for estimating quasistatic strains created in tissue. Using reference and deformed optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans, one typically compares phases from pixels with the same coordinates in both scans. Usually, this limits the allowable strains to fairly small values measurement noises. Here, we extend the OCT phase-resolved elastographic methodology by (1) showing that an order of magnitude greater strains can significantly increase the accuracy of derived phase-gradient differences, while also avoiding error-phone phase-unwrapping procedures and minimizing the influence of decorrelation noise caused by suprapixel displacements, (2) discussing the appearance of artifactual stiff inclusions in resultant OCT elastograms in the vicinity of bright scatterers due to the amplitude-phase interplay in phase-variation measurements, and (3) deriving/evaluating methods of phase-gradient estimation that can outperform conventionally used least-square gradient fitting. We present analytical arguments, numerical simulations, and experimental examples to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed optimized phase-variation methodology.

  11. Modified coherent gradient sensing method for slope measurement of reflective surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kang; Xie, Huimin

    2015-05-01

    A phase shifting method was developed for Coherent Gradient Sensing (CGS) using a three-step phase shifting method. Three different inteferograms were obtained by changing the distance between two gratings. The phase filed can be calculated accurately from the three inteferograms. The interference fringes (phase field) in reflection mode represent the gradient contours of the out-of-plane displacement of a surface. The curvatures and shape of the surface both can be calculated by numerical methods using the fringe patterns. The measurement principle and experimental setup were introduced in detail. As an application, a standard specimen with a curvature radius of 5 m was measured. From the analysis of the experimental results, we find that the relative error of the curvature using this method was about 0.78%. The method has good potentials for measuring the slopes, curvatures and shapes of thin film/substrate systems.

  12. A magnetic suspension system for measuring liquid density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Centeno González

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Density is a derived quantity of mass and length; it is defined as mass per volume unit and its SI unit is kg/m3. National metrology institutes have been designing and building their own magnetic suspension systems during the last 5 decades for making fluid density measurements; this has allowed them to carry out research into liquids and gases’ physical characteristics. This paper was aimed at designing and developing a magnetic suspension system for a magnetic balance used in determining liquid density to be used in CENAM’s metrology density laboratories.

  13. A density functional study of (17)O, (14)N and (2)H electric field gradient tensors in the real crystalline structure of alpha-glycine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Hadi; Hadipour, Nasser L; Mirzaei, Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    A density functional theory (DFT) study was carried out to calculate (17)O, (14)N and (2)H electric field gradient (EFG) tensors in accurate neutron diffraction structures of alpha-glycine at 288 and 427 K. B3LYP is the used method and 6-311+G(*) and 6-311++G(**) are the basis sets in the calculations of EFG tensors at the sites of (17)O, (14)N and (2)H nuclei in the monomer and the octameric cluster of alpha-glycine at two temperatures. Quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters are the converted parameters of calculated EFG tensors to experimentally measurable ones. The calculated results of monomer and the target molecule in octameric cluster reveal that hydrogen-bonding interactions play an important role in the crystalline structure of alpha-glycine where the results of the target molecule in octameric cluster are in good agreement with the experiments.

  14. Mammographic density measurement: a comparison of automated volumetric density measurement to BIRADS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Mark F.; Damases, Christine N.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare mammographic breast density assessment with automated volumetric software with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) categorization by radiologists on two imaging systems. A data set of 120 mammograms was classified by twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) Examiners. The mammograms were of 20 women (mean age, 60 years; range, 42-89 years). These women were image twice once with GE system and the following year with Hologic system. These images also had their volumetric density classified by using Volpara Density Grade (VDG). The radiologists were asked to estimate the mammographic density according to BIRADS categories (1- 4). There was a moderate agreement between VDG classification and radiologist BIRADS density shown with Cohen's Kappa (K=0.45; pBIRADS having a mean of 2.13 and the mean VDG higher at 2.50 (t = -11.99; pBIRADS showed a positive strong correlation (r=0.84; pBIRADS and VDG AvBD% also showed a strong positive correlation (r=0.86; pBIRADS categories for each of the VDG AvBD% classifications. Using Volpara, the Hologic system showed a higher meanAvBD% (10.02 vs. 9.97). However using BIRADS the Hologic systems showed a lower mean (2.05 vs. 2.21). Automated systems demonstrated higher internal validity. The results demonstrated a moderate agreement and a strong correlation between VDG classification and radiologist BIRADS density assessment.

  15. Quantitatively measuring the orbital angular momentum density of light : Presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although many techniques are efficient at measuring optical orbital angular momentum (OAM), they do not allow one to obtain a quantitative measurement for the OAM density across an optical field and instead only measure its global OAM. Numerous...

  16. Hydrogen density measurements using an open-ended microwave cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, N. C.; Smetana, J.

    1972-01-01

    The density measurement of liquid hydrogen and two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous hydrogen is considered. This paper describes a complete prototype system that uses an open-ended microwave cavity for making dynamic density measurements of flowing hydrogen in a transfer line. The theory of operation along with test results for both the single- and two-phase cases are presented and discussed.

  17. The effects of lateral density gradients, slopes and buoyancy on channel flow: 1D analytical solutions and applications to the SE Canadian Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Félix; Ranalli, Giorgio

    2017-08-01

    We present 1D analytical solutions for channel flow in orogens driven by various types of pressure gradients. Our calculations demonstrate that lateral density gradients in the upper crust, such as would occur across a suture zone separating arc rocks from pericratonic sediments provide a driving force for Poiseuille flow as large as topographic gradients observed in modern mountain belts. For cases for which the gradients are external (topographic and lateral density gradients) and internal (e.g. partial melting of channel material) to the channel, inclination decreases and increases the Poiseuille component of the average flow-velocity within the channel by the cosine and sine of the slope, respectively. The magnitude of the pressure gradient consequent upon the buoyancy generated by partial melting of metapelites in a channel with a 30° slope, such as would occur above an underthrusting basement ramp, is similar to that of topographic or lateral density gradients. Channel flow up a ramp could thus constitute an important exhumation mechanism in large hot orogens. Our calculations indicate that mid-crustal channel flow was a highly likely process in the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene setting of the southeastern Canadian Cordillera. The flow was first driven by the lateral density contrast between pericratonic sediments and the arc-related Intermontane terrane, then by combined effect of topographic gradient and melt-induced buoyancy of the Lower Selkirk Allochthon (part of the Shuswap Complex). Flow up the underthrusting basement ramp resulted in exhumation from mid- to upper-crustal levels. Channel flow then migrated downward to involve basement and overlying cover sequence rocks. Our results indicate that syn-convergent channel flow was a viable and very likely process in the southeastern Canadian Cordillera.

  18. Quantification of ultrasound correlation-based flow velocity mapping and edge velocity gradient measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J; Weitzel, William F

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the use of ultrasound speckle decorrelation- and correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking methods for transverse and longitudinal blood velocity profile measurement, respectively. By studying the blood velocity gradient at the vessel wall, vascular wall shear stress, which is important in vascular physiology as well as the pathophysiologic mechanisms of vascular diseases, can be obtained. Decorrelation-based blood velocity profile measurement transverse to the flow direction is a novel approach, which provides advantages for vascular wall shear stress measurement over longitudinal blood velocity measurement methods. Blood flow velocity profiles are obtained from measurements of frame-to-frame decorrelation. In this research, both decorrelation and lateral speckle-tracking flow estimation methods were compared with Poiseuille theory over physiologic flows ranging from 50 to 1000 mm/s. The decorrelation flow velocity measurement method demonstrated more accurate prediction of the flow velocity gradient at the wall edge than the correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking method. The novelty of this study is that speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements determine the blood velocity across a vessel. In addition, speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements have higher axial spatial resolution than Doppler ultrasound measurements to enable more accurate measurement of blood velocity near a vessel wall and determine the physiologically important wall shear.

  19. The new method for the residual gas density measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Anashin, V V; Krasnov, A A; Malyshev, O B; Nas'mov, V P; Pyata, E I; Shaftan, T V

    2001-01-01

    A new method of measurement for residual gas density in the vacuum chambers in presence of synchrotron radiation (SR) is described. The method is based on using a photomultiplier tube for the detection of the SR-stimulated residual gas luminescence, which is proportional to the residual gas density and SR intensity. The design of the experimental setup and results of the measurements of densities of residual gases (H sub 2 , CO sub 2 , CO, N sub 2 , Ar and O sub 2) are submitted.

  20. Mammographic density measurements are not affected by mammography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damases, Christine N; Brennan, Patrick C; McEntee, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a significant risk factor for breast cancer and has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of mammography screening. Knowledge of a woman's density can be used to predict her risk of developing breast cancer and personalize her imaging pathway. However, measurement of breast density has proven to be troublesome with wide variations in density recorded using radiologists' visual Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS). Several automated methods for assessing breast density have been proposed, each with their own source of measurement error. The use of differing mammographic imaging systems further complicates MD measurement, especially for the same women imaged over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer's equipment affects a woman's MD measurement. Raw mammographic images were acquired on two mammography imaging systems (General Electric and Hologic) one year apart and processed using VolparaDensity™ to obtain the Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average volumetric breast density percentage (AvBD%). Visual BIRADS scores were also obtained from 20 expert readers. BIRADS scores for both systems showed strong positive correlation ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]), while the VDG ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) and AvBD% ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) showed stronger positive correlations. Substantial agreement was shown between the systems for BIRADS ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]), however, the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG ([Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]).

  1. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymantas Kazys

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10−3 g/cm3 (1%.

  2. Forest biomass density across large climate gradients in northern South America is related to water availability but not with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayuela, Luis; González-Caro, Sebastián; Aldana, Ana M.; Stevenson, Pablo R.; Phillips, Oliver; Cogollo, Álvaro; Peñuela, Maria C.; von Hildebrand, Patricio; Jiménez, Eliana; Melo, Omar; Londoño-Vega, Ana Catalina; Mendoza, Irina; Velásquez, Oswaldo; Fernández, Fernando; Serna, Marcela; Velázquez-Rua, Cesar; Benítez, Doris; Rey-Benayas, José M.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding and predicting the likely response of ecosystems to climate change are crucial challenges for ecology and for conservation biology. Nowhere is this challenge greater than in the tropics as these forests store more than half the total atmospheric carbon stock in their biomass. Biomass is determined by the balance between biomass inputs (i.e., growth) and outputs (mortality). We can expect therefore that conditions that favor high growth rates, such as abundant water supply, warmth, and nutrient-rich soils will tend to correlate with high biomass stocks. Our main objective is to describe the patterns of above ground biomass (AGB) stocks across major tropical forests across climatic gradients in Northwestern South America. We gathered data from 200 plots across the region, at elevations ranging between 0 to 3400 m. We estimated AGB based on allometric equations and values for stem density, basal area, and wood density weighted by basal area at the plot-level. We used two groups of climatic variables, namely mean annual temperature and actual evapotranspiration as surrogates of environmental energy, and annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality, and water availability as surrogates of water availability. We found that AGB is more closely related to water availability variables than to energy variables. In northwest South America, water availability influences carbon stocks principally by determining stand structure, i.e. basal area. When water deficits increase in tropical forests we can expect negative impact on biomass and hence carbon storage. PMID:28301482

  3. Modelling The Effects of Density Gradients and Fluctuations on the Apparent Sizes and Positions of Low Frequency Solar Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Benjamin Thomas; Kontar, Eduard; Jeffrey, Natasha

    2017-08-01

    Recent high spatial and temporal resolution imaging of fast growth of the Type-III source and movement of the source centroid. In this work, we use a Monte-Carlo ray tracing simulation to model the passage of low frequency (5-240 MHz) radio waves through the solar corona from a point source, considering both isotropic and dipole emission. We model the effects of random density fluctuations and an isotropic density gradient on the transport of the rays, varying the strength of the scattering to observe the effects on images of the source from an observer at 1 AU. Absorption of photons is included, and the effects on the reproduced images and flux curves are observed. The apparent source size and centroid position are tracked through the simulation, and we find a general increase in source size with time, and a variation of centroid position in both directions throughout the simulation. We find that the size of the variation is strongly dependant upon frequency, with lower frequency sources appearing to move further on the disk than higher frequency sources. We also observe the strength of the effects at different viewing angles, finding that the greatest variation occurs closer to the solar limb. Further observational work is required to limit the scattering parameters, in order to allow for comparison with current radio images.

  4. Forest biomass density across large climate gradients in northern South America is related to water availability but not with temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Dávila, Esteban; Cayuela, Luis; González-Caro, Sebastián; Aldana, Ana M; Stevenson, Pablo R; Phillips, Oliver; Cogollo, Álvaro; Peñuela, Maria C; von Hildebrand, Patricio; Jiménez, Eliana; Melo, Omar; Londoño-Vega, Ana Catalina; Mendoza, Irina; Velásquez, Oswaldo; Fernández, Fernando; Serna, Marcela; Velázquez-Rua, Cesar; Benítez, Doris; Rey-Benayas, José M

    2017-01-01

    Understanding and predicting the likely response of ecosystems to climate change are crucial challenges for ecology and for conservation biology. Nowhere is this challenge greater than in the tropics as these forests store more than half the total atmospheric carbon stock in their biomass. Biomass is determined by the balance between biomass inputs (i.e., growth) and outputs (mortality). We can expect therefore that conditions that favor high growth rates, such as abundant water supply, warmth, and nutrient-rich soils will tend to correlate with high biomass stocks. Our main objective is to describe the patterns of above ground biomass (AGB) stocks across major tropical forests across climatic gradients in Northwestern South America. We gathered data from 200 plots across the region, at elevations ranging between 0 to 3400 m. We estimated AGB based on allometric equations and values for stem density, basal area, and wood density weighted by basal area at the plot-level. We used two groups of climatic variables, namely mean annual temperature and actual evapotranspiration as surrogates of environmental energy, and annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality, and water availability as surrogates of water availability. We found that AGB is more closely related to water availability variables than to energy variables. In northwest South America, water availability influences carbon stocks principally by determining stand structure, i.e. basal area. When water deficits increase in tropical forests we can expect negative impact on biomass and hence carbon storage.

  5. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy: measuring the effects of topical moisturizers on stratum corneum water gradient in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Anke; Crowther, Jonathan; Blenkiron, Peter; Marcott, Curtis; Matts, Paul J.

    2006-02-01

    The stratum corneum (SC) water concentration gradient is fundamental to skin's role as a barrier, regulating its physical and biochemical properties. Standard instruments utilizing changes in SC electrical properties to estimate SC water concentration provide simple, rapid measurements but cannot provide true interval data as a function of depth. Confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS) of human subjects provides non-invasive, real-time, in vivo measures of molecular concentration profiles. A state-of-the-art confocal Raman microspectrometer equipped with a fiber-coupled laser source operating at a wavelength of 671 nm was used to obtain measurements in the high wavenumber region (~2400-4000 cm -1). An aircooled, high-sensitivity back-illuminated, deep-depletion CCD camera captured radiation scattered inelastically from focal planes within the skin in vivo (a high-precision, computer-controlled piezo-electric stage and objective allowing depth resolutions of niacinamide on SC water concentration gradient, as measured by CRS, in vivo. The approach to compare SC water gradient effects will be discussed and the utility of this exciting new method will be compared and contrasted to existing methodology.

  6. Enzyme kinetic measurements using a droplet-based microfluidic system with a concentration gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Minh-Phuong Ngoc; Li, Cheng Ai; Han, Kwi Nam; Choo, Jaebum; Lee, Eun Kyu; Seong, Gi Hun

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a microfluidic device that is capable of generating a concentration gradient followed by parallel droplet formation within channels with a simple T-junction geometry. Linear concentration gradient profiles can be obtained based on fluid diffusion under laminar flow. Optimized conditions for generating a linear concentration gradient and parallel droplet formation were investigated using fluorescent dye. The concentration gradient profile under diffusive mixing was dominated by the flow rate at sample inlets, while parallel droplet formation was affected by the channel geometry at both the inlet and outlet. The microfluidic device was experimentally characterized using optimal layout and operating conditions selected through a design process. Furthermore, in situ enzyme kinetic measurements of the β-galactosidase-catalyzed hydrolysis of resorufin-β-d-galactopyranoside were performed to demonstrate the application potential of our simple, time-effective, and low sample volume microfluidic device. We expect that, in addition to enzyme kinetics, drug screening and clinical diagnostic tests can be rapidly and accurately performed using this droplet-based microfluidic system.

  7. Measured Predictively by a Density-Salinity Refractometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Lorenzon

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are major contributors to hemolymph density, and the present study correlates the easy and low cost measure of hemolymph density by a density-salinity refractometer with the total protein concentration, measured with a colorimetric method. Moreover, the study evaluates the accuracy of the relationship and provides a conversion factor from hemolymph density to protein in seven species of crustaceans, representative of taxa far apart in the phylogenetic tree and characterized by different life habits. Measuring serum-protein concentration by using a refractometer can provide a non-destructive field method to assess crustacean populations/species protein-related modifications of physiological state without need of costly laboratory facilities and procedures.

  8. Wireless Sensor Node for Surface Seawater Density Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Saletti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An electronic meter to measure surface seawater density is presented. It is based on the measurement of the difference in displacements of a surface level probe and a weighted float, which according to Archimedes’ law depends on the density of the water. The displacements are simultaneously measured using a high-accuracy magnetostrictive sensor, to which a custom electronic board provides a wireless connection and power supply so that it can become part of a wireless sensor network. The electronics are designed so that different kinds of wireless networks can be used, by simply changing the wireless module and the relevant firmware of the microcontroller. Lastly, laboratory and at-sea tests are presented and discussed in order to highlight the functionality and the performance of a prototype of the wireless density meter node in a Bluetooth radio network. The experimental results show a good agreement of the values of the calculated density compared to reference hydrometer readings.

  9. Transmembrane pH gradients in vivo: measurements using fluorinated vitamin B6 derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, R P

    1999-06-01

    It is well recognized that pH plays a significant regulatory role in most cellular processes. Increasingly, there is interest in transmembrane pH gradients, particularly with respect to tumor growth and response to therapy. NMR offers a non-invasive approach to monitoring cellular pH and detecting changes in response to interventions. This review will consider the strengths of various approaches to measuring pH with particular focus on the reporter molecules designed to interrogate the cellular milieu. In particular, fluorinated vitamin B6 derivatives (6-fluoropyridoxol and 6-fluoropyridoxamine) will be described, which for the first time provide a practical non-destructive method to measure simultaneously intra- and extracellular pH, i.e., the transmembrane pH gradient in animals in vivo based on a single reporter molecule.

  10. Measurement of temperature and temperature gradient in millimeter samples by chlorine NQR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lužnik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko

    2009-09-01

    A mini-thermometer based on the 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency temperature dependence in the chlorates KClO3 and NaClO3 was built and successfully tested by measuring temperature and temperature gradient at 77 K and higher in about 100 mm3 active volume of a mini Joule-Thomson refrigerator. In the design of the tank-circuit coil, an array of small coils connected in series enabled us (a) to achieve a suitable ratio of inductance to capacity in the NQR spectrometer input tank circuit, (b) to use a single crystal of KClO3 or NaClO3 (of 1-2 mm3 size) in one coil as a mini-thermometer with a resolution of 0.03 K and (c) to construct a system for measuring temperature gradients when the spatial coordinates of each chlorate single crystal within an individual coil are known.

  11. Interpretation of very low frequency electromagnetic measurements in terms of normalized current density over variable topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anand; Sharma, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    A 2D inversion approach is developed to interpret VLF electromagnetic measurement recorded over variable topography. To depict the variable topography accurately, an octree mesh discretization is incorporated. Subsurface structure is modeled in terms of apparent current density distribution and compared with the inversion results for actual resistivity distribution obtained using numerical techniques. The study demonstrates that the results obtained using both approaches (current density and resistivity distribution) are comparable, but due to analytical expression, current density imaging is faster. The conjugate gradient method is used to reduce the computation time and storage space when solving the matrix equations, resulting in feasible and practical imaging inversion of VLF data. The preconditioned matrix, which is determined by the distances between the blocks and observation points, has an important function in improving the resolution. In case of flat earth, preconditioned conjugate gradient inversion of data results in images that are comparable to those obtained using resistivity inversion. We also test whether topography variation in the order of skin depth is significant to incorporate topography in the modeling. The example of a topographical field VLF data inversion shows the efficacy of the presented approach to appraise the subsurface structure in terms of current density.

  12. Regional time-density measurement of myocardial perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusemann, Christian D.; Breen, Jerome F.; Robb, Richard A.

    2003-05-01

    The measurement of time-density relationships of the myocardium in studies of Magnetic Resonance perfusion data sets is a clinical technique used in assessing myocardial perfusion. Traditionally, to measure the time-density relationship a physician draws a region on the same 2-D image of the myocardium in sequential cardiac cycles. Throughout multiple cardiac cycles the density changes in this region are measured. A major limitation of this technique is change in anatomy relative to the selected region on the myocardium during consecutive cardiac cycles. This causes measurement errors, which are amplified if the traced region does not encompass the entire myocardial thickness, or includes a boundary exterior to the epicardial or endocardial surface. The technique described in this paper uses approximately the same myocardial region throughout the entire perfusion study, which insures inclusion of the entire endocardial to epicardial region and exclusion of exterior regions. Moreover, this region can be subdivided into smaller regions of interest. This can be accomplished by careful segmentation and reformatting of the data into polar coordinates. This allows sectioning both axially and transaxially through the myocardium permitting regional assessment of perfusion specific values such as maximum and/or the time to reach maximum density. These values can then be illustrated using density-mapped colors or time-density curves. This measurement and display technique may provide enhanced detection and evaluation of regional deficits in myocardial contractility and perfusion.

  13. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory: A Fully Translated Gradient Approximation and Its Performance for Transition Metal Dimers and the Spectroscopy of Re2Cl8(2-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Rebecca K; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-09-08

    We extend the on-top density functional of multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT) to include the gradient of the on-top density as well as the gradient of the density. We find that the theory is reasonably stable to this extension; furthermore, it provides improved accuracy for molecules containing transition metals. We illustrate the extended on-top density functionals by applying them to Cr2, Cu2, Ag2, Os2, and Re2Cl8(2-) as well as to our previous database of 56 data for bond dissociation energies, barrier heights, reaction energies, proton affinities, and the water dimer. The performance of MC-PDFT is comparable to or better than that of CASPT2.

  14. Energy gradients with respect to atomic positions and cell parameters for the Kohn-Sham density-functional theory at the Gamma point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Valéry; Tymczak, Christopher J; Challacombe, Matt

    2006-06-14

    The application of theoretical methods based on density-functional theory is known to provide atomic and cell parameters in very good agreement with experimental values. Recently, construction of the exact Hartree-Fock exchange gradients with respect to atomic positions and cell parameters within the Gamma-point approximation has been introduced. In this article, the formalism is extended to the evaluation of analytical Gamma-point density-functional atomic and cell gradients. The infinite Coulomb summation is solved with an effective periodic summation of multipole tensors. While the evaluation of Coulomb and exchange-correlation gradients with respect to atomic positions are similar to those in the gas phase limit, the gradients with respect to cell parameters needs to be treated with some care. The derivative of the periodic multipole interaction tensor needs to be carefully handled in both direct and reciprocal space and the exchange-correlation energy derivative leads to a surface term that has its origin in derivatives of the integration limits that depend on the cell. As an illustration, the analytical gradients have been used in conjunction with the QUICCA algorithm to optimize one-dimensional and three-dimensional periodic systems at the density-functional theory and hybrid Hartree-Fock/density-functional theory levels. We also report the full relaxation of forsterite supercells at the B3LYP level of theory.

  15. Gradient descent approach for minimizing dissimilarity measure in log-polarimagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Yong-jun; JIANG You-yi

    2006-01-01

    Log-polar mapping has been proposed as a very appropriate space-variant imaging model in active vision applications.There is no doubt about the importance of translation estimation in active visual tracking.In this paper an approach is presented,and its performances are evaluated.The approach uses a gradient descent for minimizing a dissimilarity measure.The experimental results reveal that this method is efficient for approaching active image translations.

  16. Comment on 'Simultaneous gravity and gradient measurements from a recoil-compensated absolute gravimeter'

    CERN Document Server

    Nagornyi, V D

    2011-01-01

    The article (Niebauer et al. 2011 Metrologia 48 154-163) reports on the important innovations enhancing the ability of absolute gravimeter to measure vertical gravity gradient along with the gravity acceleration. This comment suggests experiments to further assess the improvements and the results obtained with the modified instrument, considers some limitations of non-linear models in metrology and ways to overcome them, and discusses possible applications of the described instrument.

  17. Nineteenth century air pollution variations in Paris inferred from Eiffel Tower potential gradient measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, R G

    2003-01-01

    Early surface measurements of atmospheric Potential Gradient were made in many European cities in the nineteenth century (C19th). The data was usually obtained at hourly resolution, and good accounts of the calibration of the instruments are also often available. The PG measurements made by Chauveau on the Eiffel Tower, soon after its completion in the 1890s, are particularly notable. Atmospheric electrical proxy techniques in combination with simple boundary layer meteorology are used to determine air pollution levels. The C19th PG measurements in both polluted and clean Parisian air present a unique resource for European air pollution and atmospheric composition studies.

  18. Measurement of temperature gradient in a heated liquid cylinder using rainbow refractometry assisted with infrared thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Feihu; Xu, Chuanlong; Wang, Shimin; Li, Zhenfeng

    2016-12-01

    In a heated liquid cylinder, a temperature gradient exists between the hotter surface and the colder core. Measurement of the temperature gradient is very important for the in-depth investigation into the mechanism and optimized control of the heat transfer process. Rainbow refractometry has been attempted to achieve the measurement since several years ago. Yet there is no effective inversion algorithm without predicting refractive index profiles based on experience. In the paper, an improved rainbow refractometry assisted with infrared thermometry was proposed to measure the diameter and the inside temperature gradient of a heated liquid cylinder. The inversion algorithm was designed based on the nonlinear least square method and an optimization process. To evaluate the feasibility of the proposed method, numerical simulations and experiments were carried out. The results of the numerical simulation showed that the relative error of the inversion diameter was about 1%, and the error of the refractive index was less than 6×10-4 at all the radial locations. In the experimental research, t rainbows reconstructed with the reversion parameters were all similar to the corresponding captured ones.

  19. Using the gradient method to measure soil gas fluxes: limitations and pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Martin; Schack-Kirchner, Helmer

    2015-04-01

    The gradient method (De Jong & Schappert,1974) can be used to determine gas efflux from the soil, representing an alternative to the widely used chamber methods. In addition, valuable information about the vertical distribution of the sources/sinks of gas (e.g. CO2, CH4) in the soil can be derived. Although the method seems to be simple, care must be taken whether all assumption and simplifications are made: (1) Diffusion only: Gas transport can be described by Fick's law. (2) 1D vertical gas diffusion: No horizontal concentration gradients. (3) Gas diffusion in the soil is at steady-state: Changes are negligible. If the preconditions are not met, the gradient method may yield unreliable results. We tried to address some of these and further issues in different studies. We identified the method used to interpolate the gas concentration profile between the measurement locations as an issue affecting substantially the calculated efflux and vertical partitioning. Another critical issue is deriving the correct soil gas diffusivity. The assumption of steady-state diffusion is not always justified, especially after rain, and may lead to substantial misinterpretation if ignored. We also observed that soil gas transport can be affected by turbulence-driven pressure-pumping, so that the effect of non-diffusive gas transport must be considered. The Temporal and spatial resolution must match the research question and gas species. The gradient method is a valuable tool , that, Ideally, the GM should be used on well aerated, horizontally homogeneous soils where gas exchange is entirely driven by diffusion. Here the gradient method promises to yield reliable results when soil respiration and methane consumption is studied. Substantial discrepancy in these conditions could lead to increasing uncertainty in the flux estimates

  20. Measurement and analyses of molten Ni-Co alloy density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; K. MUKAI; FANG Liang; FU Ya; YANG Ren-hui

    2006-01-01

    With the advent of powerful mathematical modeling techniques for material phenomena, there is renewed interest in reliable data for the density of the Ni-based superalloys. Up to now, there has been few report on the density of molten Ni-Co alloy.In order to obtain more accurate density data for molten Ni-Co alloy, the density of molten Ni-Co alloy was measured with a modified sessile drop method, and the accommodation of different atoms in molten Ni-Co alloy was analyzed. The density of alloy is found to decrease with increasing temperature and Co concentration in the alloy. The molar volume of molten Ni-Co alloy increases with increasing Co concentration. The molar volume of Ni-Co alloy determined shows a positive deviation from the linear molar volume, and the deviation of molar volume from ideal mixing increases with increasing Co concentration over the experimental concentration range.

  1. Electrostatic density measurements in green-state PM parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, Georg H. W.

    The goal of this research is to show the feasibility of detecting density variations in greenstate powder metallurgy (P/M) compacts from surface voltage measurements. By monitoring a steady electric current flow through the sample and recording the voltages over the surface, valuable information is gathered leading to the prediction of the structural health of the compacts. Unlike prior research that concentrated on the detection of surface-breaking and subsurface defects, the results presented in this thesis target the density prediction throughout the volume of the sample. The detection of density variations is achieved by establishing a correlation between the conductivity and their respective density. The data obtained from the surface measurements is used as part of an inversion algorithm, calculating the conductivity distribution, and subsequently the density within the compact. In a first step, the relationship between conductivity and density of green-state P/M compacts was investigated. Tests were conducted for a number of parts of various powder mixtures. In all cases a clear correlation between conductivity and density could be established, indicating that measurements of electric conductivity could indeed be exploited in an effort to render valid information about the density of the sample under test. We found a linear correlation for nonlubricated parts and a non-linear behavior for lubricated samples. Specifically, it was found that the conductivity increases with increasing density only up to a maximum value obtained at approximately 6.9g/cm 3. Interestingly, any additional density increase leads to a reduction of the conductivity. This behavior was confirmed to be inherent in all powder mixtures with lubricants. The thesis research is able to provide a physical model and a mathematical formulation describing this counter-intuitive phenomenon. A finite element solver in conjunction with an inversion algorithm was then implemented to study arbitrarily

  2. 3D imaging of flow patterns in an internally-pumped microfluidic device: redox magnetohydrodynamics and electrochemically-generated density gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Kreidermacher, Adam; Fritsch, Ingrid; Heyes, Colin D

    2013-05-07

    Redox magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is a promising technique for developing new electrochemical-based microfluidic flow devices with unique capabilities, such as easily switching flow direction and adjusting flow speeds and flow patterns as well as avoiding bubble formation. However, a detailed description of all the forces involved and predicting flow patterns in confined geometries is lacking. In addition to redox-MHD, density gradients caused by the redox reactions also play important roles. Flow in these devices with small fluid volumes has mainly been characterized by following microbead motion by optical microscopy either by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) or by processing the microbead images by particle image velocimetry (PIV) software. This approach has limitations in spatial resolution and dimensionality. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to quantitatively and accurately measure flow speeds and patterns in the ~5-50 μm/s range in redox-MHD-based microfluidic devices, from which 3D flow maps are obtained with a spatial resolution down to 2 μm. The 2 μm spatial resolution flow speeds map revealed detailed flow profiles during redox-MHD in which the velocity increases linearly from above the electrode and reaches a plateau across the center of the cell. By combining FCS and video-microscopy (with PTV and PIV processing approaches), we are able to quantify a vertical flow of ~10 μm/s above the electrodes as a result of density gradients caused by the redox reactions and follow convection flow patterns. Overall, combining FCS, PIV, and PTV analysis of redox-MHD is a powerful combination to more thoroughly characterize the underlying forces in these promising microfluidic devices.

  3. Finding the Density of Objects without Measuring Mass and Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumba, Frackson; Tsige, Mesfin

    2007-01-01

    A simple method based on the moment of forces and Archimedes' principle is described for finding density without measuring the mass and volume of an object. The method involves balancing two unknown objects of masses M[subscript 1] and M[subscript 2] on each side of a pivot on a metre rule and measuring their corresponding moment arms. The object…

  4. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cross-flow filtration methods for the production of arbovirus antigens inactivated by binary ethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Teck F

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cross-flow filtration methods have been developed and standardised for the safe and reproducible production of inactivated arbovirus antigens which are appropriate for use in diagnostic serological applications. Methods To optimise the maximum titre of growth during the propagation of arboviruses, the multiplicity of infection and choice of cell line were investigated using stocks of Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus grown in both mosquito and mammalian cell lines. To standardise and improve the efficacy of the inactivation of arboviral suspensions, stocks of Ross River virus, Barmah Forest virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus and Alfuy virus were chemically inactivated using binary ethylenimine at a final concentration of 3 mM. Aliquots were then taken at hourly intervals and crude inactivation rates were determined for each virus using a plaque assay. To ensure complete inactivation, the same aliquots were each passaged 3 times in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells and the presence of viral growth was detected using an immunofluorescent assay. For larger quantities of viral suspensions, centrifugation on an isopycnic sucrose density gradient or cross-flow filtration was used to produce concentrated, pure antigens or partially concentrated, semi-purified antigens respectively. Results The results of the propagation experiments suggested that the maximum viral titres obtained for both Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus were affected by the incubation period and choice of cell line, rather than the use of different multiplicity of infection values. Results of the binary ethylenimine inactivation trial suggested that standardised periods of 5 or 8 hours would be suitable to ensure effective and complete inactivation for a number of different arboviral antigens. Conclusion Two methods used to prepare inactivated arbovirus antigens have been

  5. WSN-Based Space Charge Density Measurement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dawei; Yuan, Haiwen; Lv, Jianxun; Ju, Yong

    2017-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission line endures the drawback of large area, because of which the utilization of cable for space charge density monitoring system is of inconvenience. Compared with the traditional communication network, wireless sensor network (WSN) shows advantages in small volume, high flexibility and strong self-organization, thereby presenting great potential in solving the problem. Additionally, WSN is more suitable for the construction of distributed space charge density monitoring system as it has longer distance and higher mobility. A distributed wireless system is designed for collecting and monitoring the space charge density under HVDC transmission lines, which has been widely applied in both Chinese state grid HVDC test base and power transmission projects. Experimental results of the measuring system demonstrated its adaptability in the complex electromagnetic environment under the transmission lines and the ability in realizing accurate, flexible, and stable demands for the measurement of space charge density.

  6. Void alignment and density profile applied to measuring cosmological parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, De-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We study the orientation and density profiles of the cosmological voids with SDSS10 data. Using voids to test Alcock-Paczynski effect has been proposed and tested in both simulations and actual SDSS data. Previous observations imply that there exist an empirical stretching factor which plays an important role in the voids' orientation. Simulations indicate that this empirical stretching factor is caused by the void galaxies' peculiar velocities. Recently Hamaus et al. found that voids' density profiles are universal and their average velocities satisfy linear theory very well. In this article we first confirm that the stretching effect exists using independent analysis. We then apply the universal density profile to measure the cosmological parameters. We find that the void density profile can be a tool to measure the cosmological parameters.

  7. Optimization of magnetic flux density measurement using multiple RF receiver coils and multi-echo in MREIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo Chul; Chauhan, Munish; Sajib, Saurav Z K; Kim, Hyung Joong; Serša, Igor; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) is an MRI method that enables mapping of internal conductivity and/or current density via measurements of magnetic flux density signals. The MREIT measures only the z-component of the induced magnetic flux density B = (Bx, By, Bz) by external current injection. The measured noise of Bz complicates recovery of magnetic flux density maps, resulting in lower quality conductivity and current-density maps. We present a new method for more accurate measurement of the spatial gradient of the magnetic flux density gradient (∇ Bz). The method relies on the use of multiple radio-frequency receiver coils and an interleaved multi-echo pulse sequence that acquires multiple sampling points within each repetition time. The noise level of the measured magnetic flux density Bz depends on the decay rate of the signal magnitude, the injection current duration, and the coil sensitivity map. The proposed method uses three key steps. The first step is to determine a representative magnetic flux density gradient from multiple receiver coils by using a weighted combination and by denoising the measured noisy data. The second step is to optimize the magnetic flux density gradient by using multi-echo magnetic flux densities at each pixel in order to reduce the noise level of ∇ Bz and the third step is to remove a random noise component from the recovered ∇ Bz by solving an elliptic partial differential equation in a region of interest. Numerical simulation experiments using a cylindrical phantom model with included regions of low MRI signal to noise ('defects') verified the proposed method. Experimental results using a real phantom experiment, that included three different kinds of anomalies, demonstrated that the proposed method reduced the noise level of the measured magnetic flux density. The quality of the recovered conductivity maps using denoised ∇ Bz data showed that the proposed method reduced the conductivity

  8. Measurements of electron density profiles using an angular filter refractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberberger, D., E-mail: dhab@lle.rochester.edu; Ivancic, S.; Hu, S. X.; Boni, R.; Barczys, M.; Craxton, R. S.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A novel diagnostic technique, angular filter refractometry (AFR), has been developed to characterize high-density, long-scale-length plasmas relevant to high-energy-density physics experiments. AFR measures plasma densities up to 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3} with a 263-nm probe laser and is used to study the plasma expansion from CH foil and spherical targets that are irradiated with ∼9 kJ of ultraviolet (351-nm) laser energy in a 2-ns pulse. The data elucidate the temporal evolution of the plasma profile for the CH planar targets and the dependence of the plasma profile on target radius for CH spheres.

  9. The effect of horizontal gradients and spatial measurement resolution on the retrieval of global vertical NO2 distributions from SCIAMACHY measurements in limb only mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Platt

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Limb measurements provided by the Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY on the ENVISAT satellite allow retrieving stratospheric profiles of various trace gases on a global scale. Combining measurements of the same air volume from different viewing positions along the orbit, a tomographic approach can be applied and 2-D distribution fields of stratospheric trace gases can be acquired in one inversion. With this approach, it is possible to improve the accounting for the effect of horizontal gradients in the trace gas distribution on the profile retrieval. This was shown in a previous study for the retrieval of NO2 and OClO profiles in the Arctic region near the polar vortex boundary. In this study, the tomographic retrieval is applied on measurements during special limb-only orbits performed on 14 December 2008. For these orbits the distance between consecutive limb scanning sequences was reduced to ~3.3° of the orbital circle (i.e. more than two times with respect to the nominal operational mode. Thus, the same air volumes are scanned successively by more than one scanning sequence also for midlatitudes and the tropics. It is found that the profiles obtained by the tomographic 2-D approach show significant differences to those obtained by the 1-D approach. In particular, for regions close to stratospheric transport barriers (i.e. near to the edge of the polar vortex and subtropical transport barrier up to 50% larger or smaller NO2 number densities (depending on the sign of the gradient along the line of sight for altitudes below the peak of the profile (around 20 km are obtained. The limb-only measurements allow examining the systematic error if the horizontal gradient is not accounted for, and studying the impact of the gradient strength on the profile retrieval on a global scale. The findings for the actual SCIAMACHY observations are verified by sensitivity studies for simulated data for which the NO2

  10. The effect of horizontal gradients and spatial measurement resolution on the retrieval of global vertical NO2 distributions from SCIAMACHY measurements in limb only mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Platt

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Limb measurements provided by the Scanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY on the ENVISAT satellite allow retrieving stratospheric profiles of various trace gases on a global scale. Combining measurements of the same air volume from different viewing positions along the orbit, a tomographic approach can be applied and 2-D distribution fields of stratospheric trace gases can be acquired in one inversion. With this approach, it is possible to improve the accounting for the effect of horizontal gradients in the trace gas distribution on the profile retrieval. This was shown in a previous study for the retrieval of NO2 and OClO profiles in the Arctic region near the polar vortex boundary. In this study, the tomographic retrieval is applied on measurements during special limb-only orbits performed on 14 December 2008. For these orbits the distance between consecutive limb scanning sequences was reduced to ~3.3° of the orbital circle (i.e. more than two times with respect to the nominal operational mode. Thus, the same air volumes are scanned successively by more than one scanning sequence also for midlatitudes and the tropics. It is found that the profiles obtained by the tomographic 2-D approach show significant differences to those obtained by the 1-D approach. In particular, for regions close to stratospheric transport barriers (i.e. near to the edge of the polar vortex and subtropical transport barrier up to 50% larger or smaller NO2 number densities (depending on the sign of the gradient along the line of sight for altitudes below the peak of the profile (around 20 km are obtained. The limb-only measurements allow examining the systematic error if the horizontal gradient is not accounted for, and studying the impact of the gradient strength on the profile retrieval on a global scale. The findings for the actual SCIAMACHY observations are verified by sensitivity studies for simulated data for which the NO2

  11. Density and Temperature Measurements in a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2003-10-01

    We present electron density and temperature measurements from an active region observed above the limb with the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation spectrometer on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Density-sensitive line ratios from Si VIII and S X indicate densities greater than 108 cm-3 as high as 200" (or 145 Mm) above the limb. At these heights, static, uniformly heated loop models predict densities close to 107 cm-3. Differential emission measure analysis shows that the observed plasma is nearly isothermal with a mean temperature of about 1.5 MK and a dispersion of about 0.2 MK. Both the differential emission measure and the Si XI/Si VIII line ratios indicate only small variations in the temperature at the heights observed. These measurements confirm recent observations from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer of ``overdense'' plasma at temperatures near 1 MK in solar active regions. Time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations suggest that impulsive heating models can account for the large densities, but they have a difficult time reproducing the narrow range of observed temperatures. The observations of overdense, nearly isothermal plasma in the solar corona provide a significant challenge to theories of coronal heating.

  12. A Miniature Four-Hole Probe for Measurement of Three-Dimensional Flow with Large Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravirai Jangir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A miniature four-hole probe with a sensing area of 1.284 mm2 to minimise the measurement errors due to the large pressure and velocity gradients that occur in highly three-dimensional turbomachinery flows is designed, fabricated, calibrated, and validated. The probe has good spatial resolution in two directions, thus minimising spatial and flow gradient errors. The probe is calibrated in an open jet calibration tunnel at a velocity of 50 m/s in yaw and pitch angles range of ±40 degrees with an interval of 5 degrees. The calibration coefficients are defined, determined, and presented. Sensitivity coefficients are also calculated and presented. A lookup table method is used to determine the four unknown quantities, namely, total and static pressures and flow angles. The maximum absolute errors in yaw and pitch angles are 2.4 and 1.3 deg., respectively. The maximum absolute errors in total, static, and dynamic pressures are 3.4, 3.9, and 4.9% of the dynamic pressures, respectively. Measurements made with this probe, a conventional five-hole probe and a miniature Pitot probe across a calibration section, demonstrated that the errors due to gradient and surface proximity for this probe are considerably reduced compared to the five-hole probe.

  13. On a Gradient-Based Algorithm for Sparse Signal Reconstruction in the Signal/Measurements Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubiša Stanković

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sparse signals can be recovered from a reduced set of samples by using compressive sensing algorithms. In common compressive sensing methods the signal is recovered in the sparsity domain. A method for the reconstruction of sparse signals which reconstructs the missing/unavailable samples/measurements is recently proposed. This method can be efficiently used in signal processing applications where a complete set of signal samples exists. The missing samples are considered as the minimization variables, while the available samples are fixed. Reconstruction of the unavailable signal samples/measurements is preformed using a gradient-based algorithm in the time domain, with an adaptive step. Performance of this algorithm with respect to the step-size and convergence are analyzed and a criterion for the step-size adaptation is proposed in this paper. The step adaptation is based on the gradient direction angles. Illustrative examples and statistical study are presented. Computational efficiency of this algorithm is compared with other two commonly used gradient algorithms that reconstruct signal in the sparsity domain. Uniqueness of the recovered signal is checked using a recently introduced theorem. The algorithm application to the reconstruction of highly corrupted images is presented as well.

  14. A Study of Solar Photospheric Temperature Gradient Variation Using Limb Darkening Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscuoli, Serena; Foukal, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The variation in area of quiet magnetic network measured over the sunspot cycle should modulate the spatially averaged photospheric temperature gradient, since temperature declines with optical depth more gradually in magnetic flux tube atmospheres. Yet, limb darkening measurements show no dependence upon activity level, even at an rms precision of 0.04%. We study the sensitivity of limb darkening to changes in area filling factor using a 3D MHD model of the magnetized photosphere. The limb darkening change expected from the measured 11-year area variation lies below the level of measured limb darkening variations, for a reasonable range of magnetic flux in quiet network and internetwork regions. So the remarkably constant limb darkening observed over the solar activity cycle is not inconsistent with the measured 11-year change in area of quiet magnetic network. Our findings offer an independent constraint on photospheric temperature gradient changes reported from measurements of the solar spectral irradiance from the Spectral Irradiance Monitor, and recently, from wavelength-differential spectrophotometry using the Solar Optical Telescope aboard the HINODE spacecraft.

  15. Magnetic field gradients inferred from multi-point measurements of Cluster FGM and EDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teubenbacher, Robert; Nakamura, Rumi; Giner, Lukas; Plaschke, Ferdinand; Baumjohann, Wolfgang; Magnes, Werner; Eichelberger, Hans; Steller, Manfred; Torbert, Roy

    2013-04-01

    We use Cluster data from fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) and electron drift instrument (EDI) to determine the magnetic field gradients in the near-Earth magnetotail. Here we use the magnetic field data from FGM measurements as well as the gyro-time data of electrons determined from the time of flight measurements of EDI. The results are compared with the values estimated from empirical magnetic field models for different magnetospheric conditions. We also estimated the spin axis offset of FGM based on comparison between EDI and FGM data and discuss the possible effect in determining the current sheet characteristics.

  16. Measuring thermal gradients in a melting/freezing PCM with a laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, R. M.; Papo, R.

    1982-12-01

    A water loop was constructed and used to control the temperature on one face of a 64 cu. in. cell containing PCM. Two faces were equipped with plate glass windows allowing a laser beam to pass through the cell and its net deflection to be measured. Thermal gradients in the liquid phase were compared with computer simulation of conduction in a PCM. Preliminary measurements with the current cell design show significant contributions to heat transfer in the PCM from convection despite attempts to limit heat transfer to conduction.

  17. Laser-strophometry high-resolution technique for velocity gradient measurements in fluid flows

    CERN Document Server

    Staude, Wilfried

    2001-01-01

    This book describes techniques that allow the measurement of arbitrary velocity gradient components in fluids with high spatial and temporal resolution, e.g. turbulent fluids. The techniques are based on the properties of scattered laser light. The book gives a detailed and rigorous treatment of the physical and mathematical background in a pedagogical presentation accessible to students in physics and engineering. From both the theoretical and experimental points of view, four different schemes are discussed in detail; the schemes differ in the way the velocity of the moving pattern of the scattered laser light is measured.

  18. Three-dimensional measurement of cAMP gradients using hyperspectral confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Thomas C.; Annamdevula, Naga; Britain, Andrea L.; Mayes, Samuel; Favreau, Peter F.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger known to differentially regulate many cellular functions over a wide range of timescales. Several lines of evidence have suggested that the distribution of cAMP within cells is not uniform, and that cAMP compartmentalization is largely responsible for signaling specificity within the cAMP signaling pathway. However, to date, no studies have experimentally measured three dimensional (3D) cAMP distributions within cells. Here we use both 2D and 3D hyperspectral microscopy to visualize cAMP gradients in endothelial cells from the pulmonary microvasculature (PMVECs). cAMP levels were measured using a FRETbased cAMP sensor comprised of a cAMP binding domain from EPAC sandwiched between FRET donors and acceptors -- Turquoise and Venus fluorescent proteins. Data were acquired using either a Nikon A1R spectral confocal microscope or custom spectral microscopy system. Analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from a single confocal slice or from summed images of all slices (2D analysis) indicated little or no cAMP gradients were formed within PMVECs under basal conditions or following agonist treatment. However, analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from 3D cellular geometries (z stacks) demonstrate marked cAMP gradients from the apical to basolateral membrane of PMVECs. These results strongly suggest that 2D imaging studies of cAMP compartmentalization -- whether epifluorescence or confocal microscopy -- may lead to erroneous conclusions about the existence of cAMP gradients, and that 3D studies are required to assess mechanisms of signaling specificity.

  19. Simulation of density measurements in plasma wakefields using photo acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Sadler, James; Burrows, Philip N; Trines, Raoul; Holloway, James; Wing, Matthew; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One obstacle in plasma accelerator development is the limitation of techniques to diagnose and measure plasma wakefield parameters. In this paper, we present a novel concept for the density measurement of a plasma wakefield using photon acceleration, supported by extensive particle in cell simulations of a laser pulse that copropagates with a wakefield. The technique can provide the perturbed electron density profile in the laser’s reference frame, averaged over the propagation length, to be accurate within 10%. We discuss the limitations that affect the measurement: small frequency changes, photon trapping, laser displacement, stimulated Raman scattering, and laser beam divergence. By considering these processes, one can determine the optimal parameters of the laser pulse and its propagation length. This new technique allows a characterization of the density perturbation within a plasma wakefield accelerator.

  20. Anomalous diurnal variation of atmospheric potential gradient and air-Earth current density observed at Maitri, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeeva, K.; Gurubaran, S.; Williams, E. R.; Kamra, A. K.; Sinha, A. K.; Guha, A.; Selvaraj, C.; Nair, K. U.; Dhar, Ajay

    2016-11-01

    The scope of this paper is to explore the mechanisms operating over Maitri (70.76°S, 11.74°E, 117 m above mean sea level), a coastal Antarctic station, that produce an anomalous fair-weather diurnal pattern of the atmospheric electric potential gradient (PG) and air-Earth current density (AEC). The anomaly in the diurnal variations of AEC and the PG is displaying an ostensible minimum at 10 UT and a diminished response to the thunderstorm over the African continent in the 14-16 UT time frame. The data sets (2005-2014, except 2012) of the PG, and to some extent, AEC, from Maitri, are used to explore this anomaly. It follows that the fair-weather electrical phenomena over Maitri can be ascribed to global electrified convection on the one hand and to regional phenomena like convection due to the replacement of warm air by katabatic winds on the other hand. The katabatic winds originate on the polar plateau and blow from 130° at Maitri which are likely to transport various elements from the mountain slopes, and space charge from the polar plateau is expected to produce various disturbances in the PG and AEC monitored over the coastal Antarctica. This mechanism may be responsible for peaks in the early UT hours and also for the anomalous behavior of atmospheric electrical parameters observed at Maitri. Maitri data are compared with that of Carnegie cruise and Vostok to explain the source of anomaly.

  1. PFISR GPS tracking mode for researching high-latitude ionospheric electron density gradients associated with GPS scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, D. C.; Palo, S. E.; Pilinski, M.; Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Hampton, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Ionospheric behavior in the high-latitudes can significantly impact Ultra High Frequency (UHF) signals in the 300 MHz to 3 GHz band, resulting in degradation of Global Positioning System (GPS) position solutions and satellite communications interruptions. To address these operational concerns, a need arises to identify and understand the ionospheric structure that leads to disturbed conditions in the Arctic. Structures in the high-latitude ionosphere are known to change on the order of seconds or less, can be decameters to kilometers in scale, and elongate across magnetic field lines at auroral latitudes. Nominal operations at Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) give temporal resolution on the order of minutes, and range resolution on the order of tens of kilometers, while specialized GPS receivers available for ionospheric sensing have a 100Hz observation sampling rate. One of these, ASTRA's Connected Autonomous Space Environment Sensor (CASES) is used for this study. We have developed a new GPS scintillation tracking mode for PFISR to address open scientific questions regarding temporal and spatial electron density gradients. The mode will be described, a number of experimental campaigns will be analyzed, and results and lessons learned will be presented.

  2. First-principles local density approximation (LDA)+ U and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) + U studies of plutonium oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Bo; Zhang Ping

    2008-01-01

    The electronic structures and properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 have been studied according to the first principles by using the all-electron projector-augmented-wave (PAW) method. The local density approximation (LDA)+U and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)+U formalisms have been used to account for the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion among the localized Pu 5f electrons. We discuss how the properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 are affected by choosing the values of U and exchange-correlation potential. Also, the oxidation reaction of Pu2O3, leading to the formation of PuO2, and its dependence on U and exchange-correlation potential have been studied. Our results show that by choosing an appropriate U it is possible to consistently describe structural, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3, which enable the modelling of the redox process involving Pu-based materials.

  3. Application of density gradient for the isolation of the fecal microbial stool component and the potential use thereof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevia, Arancha; Delgado, Susana; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-11-19

    The idea of considering the gut microbiota as a virtual human organ has led to the concept of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), which has recently been extremely successful in the treatment of cases of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. Administration of safe, viable, and representative fecal microbiota is crucial for FMT. To our knowledge, suitable techniques and systematic conditions for separating the fecal microbiota from stool samples have not been thoroughly investigated. In this work we show the potential to separate stool microorganisms from the rest of fecal material using a procedure with a Nycodenz® density gradient, yielding 10(10) viable bacteria per two grams of feces. This procedure did not affect the original microbiota composition in terms of viability, distribution and proportions, as assessed by a phylogenetic metagenomic approach. Obtaining the fecal microbiota by concentration and separation of the microorganisms from the rest of the stool components would allow the standardization of its recovery and its long-term preservation. FMT or similar microbiota restoration therapies could be used for the treatment of several disorders, or even for aesthetic purposes, so the method described in our work may contribute to the setting of the basis for the development of safe and standardized products.

  4. Standardizing CT lung density measure across scanner manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen-Mayer, Huaiyu Heather; Fuld, Matthew K; Hoppel, Bernice; Judy, Philip F; Sieren, Jered P; Guo, Junfeng; Lynch, David A; Possolo, Antonio; Fain, Sean B

    2017-03-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) imaging of the lung, reported in Hounsfield Units (HU), can be parameterized as a quantitative image biomarker for the diagnosis and monitoring of lung density changes due to emphysema, a type of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). CT lung density metrics are global measurements based on lung CT number histograms, and are typically a quantity specifying either the percentage of voxels with CT numbers below a threshold, or a single CT number below which a fixed relative lung volume, nth percentile, falls. To reduce variability in the density metrics specified by CT attenuation, the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) Lung Density Committee has organized efforts to conduct phantom studies in a variety of scanner models to establish a baseline for assessing the variations in patient studies that can be attributed to scanner calibration and measurement uncertainty. Data were obtained from a phantom study on CT scanners from four manufacturers with several protocols at various tube potential voltage (kVp) and exposure settings. Free from biological variation, these phantom studies provide an assessment of the accuracy and precision of the density metrics across platforms solely due to machine calibration and uncertainty of the reference materials. The phantom used in this study has three foam density references in the lung density region, which, after calibration against a suite of Standard Reference Materials (SRM) foams with certified physical density, establishes a HU-electron density relationship for each machine-protocol. We devised a 5-step calibration procedure combined with a simplified physical model that enabled the standardization of the CT numbers reported across a total of 22 scanner-protocol settings to a single energy (chosen at 80 keV). A standard deviation was calculated for overall CT numbers for each density, as well as by scanner and other variables, as a measure of the variability, before and after the

  5. In vitro comparison of Doppler and catheter-measured pressure gradients in 3D models of mitral valve calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Tarrah A; Siefert, Andrew W; Pressman, Gregg S; Gollin, Hannah R; Touchton, Steven A; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2013-09-01

    Mitral annular calcification (MAC) involves calcium deposition in the fibrous annulus supporting the mitral valve (MV). When calcification extends onto the leaflets, valve opening can be restricted. The influence of MAC MV geometry on Doppler gradients is unknown. This study describes a novel methodology to rapid-prototype subject-specific MAC MVs. Replicated valves were used to assess the effects of distorted annular-leaflet geometry on Doppler-derived, transmitral gradients in comparison to direct pressure measurements and to determine if transmitral gradients vary according to measurement location. Three-dimensional echocardiography data sets were selected for two MAC MVs and one healthy MV. These MVs were segmented and rapid prototyped in their middiastolic configuration for in vitro testing. The effects of MV geometry, measurement modality, and measurement location on transmitral pressure gradient were assessed by Doppler and catheter at three locations along the MV's intercommissural axis. When comparing dimensions of the rapid-prototyped valves to the subject echocardiography data sets, mean relative errors ranged from 6.2% to 35%. For the evaluated MVs, Doppler pressure gradients exhibited good agreement with catheter-measured gradients at a variety of flow rates, though with slight systematic overestimation in the recreated MAC valves. For all of the tested MVs, measuring the transmitral pressure gradient at differing valve orifice positions had minimal impact on observed gradients. Upon the testing of additional normal and calcific MVs, these data may contribute to an improved clinical understanding of MAC-related mitral stenosis. Moreover, they provide the ability to statistically evaluate between measurement locations, flow rates, and valve geometries for Doppler-derived pressure gradients. Determining these end points will contribute to greater clinical understanding for the diagnosis MAC patients and understanding the use and application of Doppler

  6. TRACTOGRAPHY DENSITY AND NETWORK MEASURES IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Gautam; Nir, Talia M; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-04-01

    Brain connectivity declines in Alzheimer's disease (AD), both functionally and structurally. Connectivity maps and networks derived from diffusion-based tractography offer new ways to track disease progression and to understand how AD affects the brain. Here we set out to identify (1) which fiber network measures show greatest differences between AD patients and controls, and (2) how these effects depend on the density of fibers extracted by the tractography algorithm. We computed brain networks from diffusion-weighted images (DWI) of the brain, in 110 subjects (28 normal elderly, 56 with early and 11 with late mild cognitive impairment, and 15 with AD). We derived connectivity matrices and network topology measures, for each subject, from whole-brain tractography and cortical parcellations. We used an ODF lookup table to speed up fiber extraction, and to exploit the full information in the orientation distribution function (ODF). This made it feasible to compute high density connectivity maps. We used accelerated tractography to compute a large number of fibers to understand what effect fiber density has on network measures and in distinguishing different disease groups in our data. We focused on global efficiency, transitivity, path length, mean degree, density, modularity, small world, and assortativity measures computed from weighted and binary undirected connectivity matrices. Of all these measures, the mean nodal degree best distinguished diagnostic groups. High-density fiber matrices were most helpful for picking up the more subtle clinical differences, e.g. between mild cognitively impaired (MCI) and normals, or for distinguishing subtypes of MCI (early versus late). Care is needed in clinical analyses of brain connectivity, as the density of extracted fibers may affect how well a network measure can pick up differences between patients and controls.

  7. Sexagem de espermatozoides bovinos por centrifugação em gradiente descontínuo de densidade de Percoll Sex selection in bovine spermatozoa by using Percoll discontinuos density gradient centrifugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Fernanda Martins Hossepian de Lima

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo neste trabalho foi desenvolver um método de seleção do sexo de espermatozoides bovinos por centrifugação em gradiente de densidade de Percoll. Utilizou-se sêmen congelado de touros mantidos em regime de colheita de sêmen. A fração de espermatozoides X ou Y foi separada por centrifugação em treze diferentes gradientes de densidade de Percoll formados por 1 a 12 camadas com densidades que variaram de 1,004 g/mL a 1,123 g/mL. As soluções com diferentes densidades foram preparadas misturando-se, em proporções diferentes, meio de cultura Hank's e uma solução estoque composta de NaCl 1,5 M e Percoll (1:9, v/v. Sobre cada gradiente foi colocado um total de 50 × 10(6 espermatozoides descongelados em 0,7 mL de meio Hank's e centrifugados a 250 X g por 30 minutos, em rotor horizontal, a 25°C. Os espermatozoides das frações superior e inferior foram tratados com Quinacrina Mustarda e analisados (200 deles quanto à presença do corpúsculo-F. Dos espermatozoides encontrados no sedimento de dois gradientes, compostos de 8 e 12 frações com densidades variando entre 1,050 a 1,120 g/mL e 1,044 a 1,123 g/mL, respectivamente, visualizaram-se 25% com corpúsculo-F e os 75% restantes prováveis portadores do cromossomo X. O aumento na porcentagem de espermatozoides X após a centrifugação em gradiente de densidade permitirá que esse método de sexagem seja usado em larga escala na produção comercial de carne e leite bem como no teste de progênie.The objective of this work was to develop a bovine spermatozoid sex selection method by using Percoll density gradient centrifugation. It was used frozen semen of bulls kept in semen collection regime. Fraction X or Y was separated by centrifugation in three different Percoll density gradient formed by 1 to 12 layers with densities varying from 1.004 g/mL to 1.123 g/mL. Solutions with different densities were prepared by mixing, at different proportions, Hank's culture medium and a

  8. Precision measurements of Linear Scattering Density using Muon Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Åström, E; Calliari, I; Calvini, P; Checchia, P; Donzella, A; Faraci, E; Forsberg, F; Gonella, F; Hu, X; Klinger, J; Ödqvist, L S; Pagano, D; Rigoni, A; Ramous, E; Urbani, M; Vanini, S; Zenoni, A; Zumerle, G

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that muon tomography can be used to precisely measure the properties of various materials. The materials which have been considered have been extracted from an experimental blast furnace, including carbon (coke) and iron oxides, for which measurements of the linear scattering density relative to the mass density have been performed with an absolute precision of 10%. We report the procedures that are used in order to obtain such precision, and a discussion is presented to address the expected performance of the technique when applied to heavier materials. The results we obtain do not depend on the specific type of material considered and therefore they can be extended to any application.

  9. Precision measurements of linear scattering density using muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åström, E.; Bonomi, G.; Calliari, I.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Donzella, A.; Faraci, E.; Forsberg, F.; Gonella, F.; Hu, X.; Klinger, J.; Sundqvist Ökvist, L.; Pagano, D.; Rigoni, A.; Ramous, E.; Urbani, M.; Vanini, S.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that muon tomography can be used to precisely measure the properties of various materials. The materials which have been considered have been extracted from an experimental blast furnace, including carbon (coke) and iron oxides, for which measurements of the linear scattering density relative to the mass density have been performed with an absolute precision of 10%. We report the procedures that are used in order to obtain such precision, and a discussion is presented to address the expected performance of the technique when applied to heavier materials. The results we obtain do not depend on the specific type of material considered and therefore they can be extended to any application.

  10. Density measurements of compressed-liquid dimethyl ether + pentane mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outcalt, Stephanie L; Lemmon, Eric W

    2016-01-01

    Compressed-liquid densities of three compositions of the binary mixture dimethyl ether (CAS No. 115-10-6) + pentane (CAS No. 109-66-0) have been measured with a vibrating U-tube densimeter. Measurements were made at temperatures from 270 K to 390 K with pressures from 1.0 MPa to 50 MPa. The overall combined uncertainty (k=2) of the density data is 0.81 kg·m(-3). Data presented here have been used to improve a previously formulated Helmholtz energy based mixture model. The newly derived parameters are given.

  11. Spectral density matrix of a single photon measured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Wojciech; Kolenderski, Piotr; Frankowski, Robert

    2007-09-21

    We propose and demonstrate a method for measuring the spectral density matrix of a single photon pulse. The method is based on registering Hong-Ou-Mandel interference between a photon to be measured and a pair of attenuated and suitably delayed laser pulses described by a known spectral amplitude. The density matrix is retrieved from a two-dimensional interferogram of coincidence counts. The method has been implemented for a type-I down-conversion source, pumped by ultrashort laser pulses. The experimental results agree well with a theoretical model which takes into account the temporal as well as spatial effects in the source.

  12. Spectral density matrix of a single photon measured

    CERN Document Server

    Wasilewski, W; Frankowski, R; Wasilewski, Wojciech; Kolenderski, Piotr; Frankowski, Robert

    2007-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a method for measuring the spectral density matrix of a single photon pulse. The method is based on registering Hong-Ou-Mandel interference between photon to be measured and a pair of attenuated and suitably delayed laser pulses described by a known spectral amplitude. The density matrix is retrieved from a two-dimensional interferogram of coincidence counts. The method has been implemented for a type-I downconversion source, pumped by ultrashort laser pulses. The experimental results agree well with a theoretical model which takes into account the temporal as well as spatial effects in the source.

  13. Maxwell-Schrodinger Equation for X-Ray Laser Propagation and Interferometry Measurement of Plasma Electron Density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘承宜; 郭弘; 付喜泉; 胡巍; 喻松

    2001-01-01

    By starting with the Maxwell theory of x-ray laser propagation in collisionless plasmas, we study the phase difference of the probe and reference beams of x-ray laser interferometry in measuring the plasma electron density. The basic idea is to reduce the Maxwell equation to a Schrodinger-like equation. By using the quantum mechanical technique and introducing a novel picture, we obtain a modified relation between the phase and the electron density, where the phase corresponds to the interference of probe and reference light and the contribution of gradient of the electron density has been taken into account.

  14. Outcomes of bone density measurements in coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolland, Mark J; Grey, Andrew; Rowbotham, David S

    2016-01-29

    Some guidelines recommend that patients with newly diagnosed coeliac disease undergo bone density scanning. We assessed the bone density results in a cohort of patients with coeliac disease. We searched bone density reports over two 5-year periods in all patients from Auckland District Health Board (2008-12) and in patients under 65 years from Counties Manukau District Health Board (2009-13) for the term 'coeliac.' Reports for 137 adults listed coeliac disease as an indication for bone densitometry. The average age was 47 years, body mass index (BMI) 25 kg/m(2), and 77% were female. The median time between coeliac disease diagnosis and bone densitometry was 261 days. The average bone density Z-score was slightly lower than expected (Z-score -0.3 to 0.4) at the lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck, but 88-93% of Z-scores at each site lay within the normal range. Low bone density was strongly related to BMI: the proportions with Z-score 30 kg/m(2) were 28%, 15%, 6% and 0% respectively. Average bone density was normal, suggesting that bone density measurement is not indicated routinely in coeliac disease, but could be considered on a case-by-case basis for individuals with strong risk factors for fracture.

  15. Comparison of bone density measurement techniques: DXA and Archimedes' principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, M J; Hegsted, M; Jones, K L; Delany, J P; Kime, J C; Melancon, L E; Tulley, R T; Hong, K D

    1997-11-01

    The standard method for determination of density (g/cm3) of bones from small animals has been the application of Archimedes' principle. A recent development has been software for the determination of "density" (g/cm2) of small animal bones with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We compared Archimedes' principle and DXA (Hologic QDR-2000) in the measurement of the densities of whole and hollowed femurs of 5- to 6-month-old retired female breeder rats. In an attempt to ensure detectable treatment differences, rats were used from a low-vitamin D Holtzman and a supplemental-vitamin D Sprague-Dawley colony. Whole femur densities were higher for supplemental-vitamin D colony rats than for low vitamin D rats using both techniques (Archimedes' principle, p Archimedes' principle than for DXA. Other variables such as femur ash weight and calcium content were also highly correlated to densities with both techniques. Hollowed femur density values were higher than whole femur values with Archimedes' principle but lower with DXA. Colony effects for hollowed femur densities were diminished with Archimedes' principle (p < 0.03) and eliminated with DXA (p < 0.53). Investigation of whole bones is more biologically relevant, and both techniques were effective in detecting differences between whole femurs from low-vitamin D and supplemental-vitamin D colony rats.

  16. A mechanistic niche model for measuring species' distributional responses to seasonal temperature gradients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B Monahan

    Full Text Available Niche theory is central to understanding how species respond geographically to climate change. It defines a species' realized niche in a biological community, its fundamental niche as determined by physiology, and its potential niche--the fundamental niche in a given environment or geographic space. However, most predictions of the effects of climate change on species' distributions are limited to correlative models of the realized niche, which assume that species are in distributional equilibrium with respect to the variables or gradients included in the model. Here, I present a mechanistic niche model that measures species' responses to major seasonal temperature gradients that interact with the physiology of the organism. I then use lethal physiological temperatures to parameterize the model for bird species in North and South America and show that most focal bird species are not in direct physiological equilibrium with the gradients. Results also show that most focal bird species possess broad thermal tolerances encompassing novel climates that could become available with climate change. I conclude with discussion of how mechanistic niche models may be used to (i gain insights into the processes that cause species to respond to climate change and (ii build more accurate correlative distribution models in birds and other species.

  17. Gradient measurement technique to identify phase transitions in nano-dispersed liquid crystalline compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardhasaradhi, P.; Madhav, B. T. P.; Venugopala Rao, M.; Manepalli, R. K. N. R.; Pisipati, V. G. K. M.

    2016-09-01

    Characterization and phase transitions in pure and 0.5% BaTiO3 nano-dispersed liquid crystalline (LC) N-(p-n-heptyloxybenzylidene)-p-n-nonyloxy aniline, 7O.O9, com-pounds are carried out using a polarizing microscope attached with hot stage and camera. We observed that when any of these images are distorted, different local structures suffer from various degradations in a gradient magnitude. So, we examined the pixel-wise gradient magnitude similarity between the reference and distorted images combined with a novel pooling strategy - the standard deviation of the GMS map - to determine the overall phase transition variations. In this regard, MATLAB software is used for gradient measurement technique to identify the phase transitions and transition temperature of the pure and nano-dispersed LC compounds. The image analysis of this method proposed is in good agreement with the standard methods like polarizing microscope (POM) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). 0.5% BaTiO3 nano-dispersed 7O.O9 compound induces cholesteric phase quenching the nematic phase, which the pure compound exhibits.

  18. Oscillating gradient measurements of water diffusion in normal and globally ischemic rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Does, Mark D; Parsons, Edward C; Gore, John C

    2003-02-01

    Oscillating gradients were used to probe the diffusion-time/frequency dependence of water diffusion in the gray matter of normal and globally ischemic rat brain. In terms of a conventional definition of diffusion time, the oscillating gradient measurements provided the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water with diffusion times between 9.75 ms and 375 micros, an order of magnitude shorter than previously studied in vivo. Over this range, ADCs increased as much as 24% in vivo and 50% postmortem, depending on the nature of the oscillating gradient waveform used. Novel waveforms were employed to sample narrow frequency bands of the so-called diffusion spectrum. This spectral description of ADC includes the effects of restriction and/or flow, and is independent of experimental parameters, such as diffusion time. The results in rat brain were found to be consistent with restricted diffusion and the known micro-anatomy of gray matter. Differences between normal and postmortem data were consistent with an increase in water restriction and/or a decrease in flow, and tentatively suggest that physical changes following the onset of ischemia occur on a scale of about 2 microm, similar to a typical cellular dimension in gray matter.

  19. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudisco, O; Lucca Fabris, A; Falcetta, C; Accatino, L; De Angelis, R; Manente, M; Ferri, F; Florean, M; Neri, C; Mazzotta, C; Pavarin, D; Pollastrone, F; Rocchi, G; Selmo, A; Tasinato, L; Trezzolani, F; Tuccillo, A A

    2013-03-01

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10(16) m(-3) and 10(19) m(-3)) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small (λ = 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02° has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 × 10(16) m(-3).

  20. A microwave interferometer for small and tenuous plasma density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tudisco, O.; Falcetta, C.; De Angelis, R.; Florean, M.; Neri, C.; Mazzotta, C.; Pollastrone, F.; Rocchi, G.; Tuccillo, A. A. [ENEA CR Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Lucca Fabris, A.; Manente, M.; Ferri, F.; Tasinato, L.; Trezzolani, F. [CISAS ' G.Colombo,' Universita degli studi di Padova, Via Venezia 15, 35131 Padova (Italy); Accatino, L. [ACC Antenna and MW tech, Via Trieste 16/B, 10098 Rivoli (Italy); Pavarin, D. [Dip. di Ingegneria Industriale (DII), Universita degli Studi di Padova, Via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova (Italy); Selmo, A. [RESIA, Studio Progettazione e Realizzazione di Apparati Elettronici, via Roma 17, 37041 Albaredo d' Adige (Italy)

    2013-03-15

    The non-intrusive density measurement of the thin plasma produced by a mini-helicon space thruster (HPH.com project) is a challenge, due to the broad density range (between 10{sup 16} m{sup -3} and 10{sup 19} m{sup -3}) and the small size of the plasma source (2 cm of diameter). A microwave interferometer has been developed for this purpose. Due to the small size of plasma, the probing beam wavelength must be small ({lambda}= 4 mm), thus a very high sensitivity interferometer is required in order to observe the lower density values. A low noise digital phase detector with a phase noise of 0.02 Degree-Sign has been used, corresponding to a density of 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}.

  1. Optimization of the AC-gradient method for velocity profile measurement and application to slow flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartäusch, Ralf; Helluy, Xavier; Jakob, Peter Michael; Fidler, Florian

    2014-11-01

    This work presents a spectroscopic method to measure slow flow. Within a single shot the velocity distribution is acquired. This allows distinguishing rapidly between single velocities within the sampled volume with a high sensitivity. The technique is based on signal acquisition in the presence of a periodic gradient and a train of refocussing RF pulses. The theoretical model for trapezoidal bipolar pulse shaped gradients under consideration of diffusion and the outflow effect is introduced. A phase correction technique is presented that improves the spectral accuracy. Therefore, flow phantom measurements are used to validate the new sequence and the simulation based on the theoretical model. It was demonstrated that accurate parabolic flow profiles can be acquired and flow variations below 200 μm/s can be detected. Three post-processing methods that eliminate static background signal are also presented for applications in which static background signal dominates. Finally, this technique is applied to flow measurement of a small alder tree demonstrating a typical application of in vivo plant measurements.

  2. BIAS ERRORS INDUCED BY CONCENTRATION GRADIENT IN SEDIMENT-LADEN FLOW MEASUREMENT WITH PTV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dan-xun; LIN Qiu-sheng; ZHONG Qiang; WANG Xing-kui

    2012-01-01

    Sediment-laden flow measurement with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) introduces a series of finite-sized sampling bins along the vertical of the flow.Instantaneous velocities are collected at each bin and a significantly large sample is established to evaluate mean and root mean square (rms) velocities of the flow.Due to the presence of concentration gradient,the established sample for the solid phase inv(o)lves more data from the lower part of the sampling bin than from the upper part.The concentration effect causes bias errors in the measured mean and rms velocities when velocity varies across the bin.These bias errors are analytically quantified in this study based on simplified linear velocity and concentration distributions.Typical bulk flow characteristics from sediment-laden flow measurements are used to demonstrate rough estimation of the error magnitude.Results indicate that the mean velocity is underestimated while the rms velocity is overestimated in the ensemble-averaged measurement.The extent of deviation is commensurate with the bin size and the rate of concentration gradient.Procedures are proposed to assist determining an appropriate sampling bin size in certain error limits.

  3. A Novel Microcharacterization Technique in the Measurement of Strain and Orientation Gradient in Advanced Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmestai, H.; Harris, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-01-01

    Representation of morphology and evolution of the microstructure during processing and their relation to properties requires proper experimental techniques. Residual strains, lattice distortion, and texture (micro-texture) at the interface and the matrix of a layered structure or a functionally gradient material and their variation are among parameters important in materials characterization but hard to measure with present experimental techniques. Current techniques available to measure changes in interred material parameters (residual stress, micro-texture, microplasticity) produce results which are either qualitative or unreliable. This problem becomes even more complicated in the case of a temperature variation. These parameters affect many of the mechanical properties of advanced materials including stress-strain relation, ductility, creep, and fatigue. A review of some novel experimental techniques using recent advances in electron microscopy is presented here to measure internal stress, (micro)texture, interracial strength and (sub)grain formation and realignment. Two of these techniques are combined in the chamber of an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope to measure strain and orientation gradients in advanced materials. These techniques which include Backscattered Kikuchi Diffractometry (BKD) and Microscopic Strain Field Analysis are used to characterize metallic and intermetallic matrix composites and superplastic materials. These techniques are compared with the more conventional x-ray diffraction and indentation techniques.

  4. Staging of liver fibrosis or cirrhosis: The role of hepaticvenous pressure gradient measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ki Tae Suk; Dong Joon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a common histological change ofchronic liver injury and it is closely related with portalhypertension which is hemodynamic complication ofchronic liver disease. Currently, liver fibrosis has beenknown as a reversible dynamic process in previousliteratures. Although liver biopsy is a gold standardfor assessing the stage of liver fibrosis, it may notcompletely represent the stage of liver fibrosis becauseof sampling error or semi-quantative measurement.Recent evidences suggested that histologic, clinical,hemodynamic, and biologic features are closelyassociated in patients with chronic liver disease. Hepaticvenous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurement has beenknown as a modality to evaluate the portal pressure.The HVPG measurement has been used clinicallyfor fibrosis diagnosis, risk stratification, preoperativescreening for liver resection, monitoring the efficacy ofmedical treatments, and assessing the prognosis of liverfibrosis. Therefore, the HVPG measurement can be usedto monitor areas the chronic liver disease but also otherimportant areas of chronic liver disease.

  5. Multi-image gradient-based algorithms for motion measurement using wavelet transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A multi-image wavelet transform motion estimation algorithm based on gradient methods is presented by using the characteristic of wavelet transfom.In this algorithm,the accuracy can be improved greatly using data in many images to measure motions between two images.In combination with the reliability measure for constraints function,the reliable data constraints of the images were decomposed with multi-level simultaneous wavelet transform rather than the traditional coarse-to-fine approach.Compared with conventional methods,this motion measurement algorithm based on multi-level simultaneous wavelet transform avoids propagating errors between the decomposed levels.Experimental simulations show that the implementation of this algo rithm is simple,and the measurement accuracy is improved.

  6. Improved measurement of ice layer density in seasonal snowpacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Watts

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ice layers in snowpacks introduce uncertainty in satellite derived estimates of snow water equivalent, have ecological impacts on plants and animals, and change the thermal and vapour transport properties of the snowpack. The microstructure and specifically the density of ice layers is poorly quantified. Here we present a new field method, for measuring the density of ice layers caused by melt or rain-on-snow events. The method was used on 87 ice layer samples in the Canadian Arctic and mid-latitudes; the mean measured ice layer density was 909 ± 18 kg m−3 with a standard deviation of 23 kg m−3, significantly higher than values typically used in the literature.

  7. Urinary density measurement and analysis methods in neonatal unit care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão Cardoso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess urine collection methods through cotton in contact with genitalia and urinary collector to measure urinary density in newborns. This is a quantitative intervention study carried out in a neonatal unit of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil, in 2010. The sample consisted of 61 newborns randomly chosen to compose the study group. Most neonates were full term (31/50.8% males (33/54%. Data on urinary density measurement through the methods of cotton and collector presented statistically significant differences (p<0.05. The analysis of interquartile ranges between subgroups resulted in statistical differences between urinary collector/reagent strip (1005 and cotton/reagent strip (1010, however there was no difference between urinary collector/ refractometer (1008 and cotton/ refractometer. Therefore, further research should be conducted with larger sampling using methods investigated in this study and whenever possible, comparing urine density values to laboratory tests.

  8. 3 dimensional ionospheric electron density reconstruction based on GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolle, C.; Schlüter, S.; Jacobi, C.; Jakowski, N.

    When radio waves as sended by the naviagtion system GPS are passing through the ionosphere they are subject to delays in phase, travel time and polarisation which is an effect of the free electrons. The measured integrated value of Total Electron Content can be utilised for three-dimensional reconstruction of electron density patterns in the ionosphere. Here a tomographic approach is represented. Scince the distribution of data is very sparse and patchy we decided for an algebraic iterative algorithm. The ground based GPS data collected by IGS receivers can be combined by space based GPS of radio limb sounding, incoherent scatter radar and ionosondes data. Hereby, radio occultation data improve beside the amount of available data especially the vertical resolution of electron density distribution. Ionosonde peack electron densities are taken as stop criteria determination for iteration. Reconstructed ionospheric scenarios and validations of the system by independent measurements are presented.

  9. Quantitative measurement of the orbital angular momentum density of light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we derive expressions for the orbital angular momentum (OAM) density of light, for both symmetric and nonsymmetric optical fields, that allow a direct comparison between theory and experiment. We present a simple method for measuring...

  10. Measurement of D-region electron density by partial reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, R. O.; Mott, D. L.; Gammill, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of electron density in the lower ionosphere were made at White Sands Missile Range throughout the STRATCOM VIII launch day using a partial-reflection sounder. Information regarding the sounder's antenna pattern was gained from the passage of the balloon over the array.

  11. Current Density Measurements of an Annular-Geometry Ion Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Rohit; Patterson, Michael J.; Herman, Daniel A.; Foster, John E.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of the annular-geometry ion engine, or AGI-Engine, has been shown to have many potential benefits when scaling electric propulsion technologies to higher power. However, the necessary asymmetric location of the discharge cathode away from thruster centerline could potentially lead to non-uniformities in the discharge not present in conventional geometry ion thrusters. In an effort to characterize the degree of this potential nonuniformity, a number of current density measurements were taken on a breadboard AGI-Engine. Fourteen button probes were used to measure the ion current density of the discharge along a perforated electrode that replaced the ion optics during conditions of simulated beam extraction. Three Faraday probes spaced apart in the vertical direction were also used in a separate test to interrogate the plume of the AGI-Engine during true beam extraction. It was determined that both the discharge and the plume of the AGI-Engine are highly uniform, with variations under most conditions limited to 10% of the average current density in the discharge and 5% of the average current density in the plume. Beam flatness parameter measured 30 mm from the ion optics ranged from 0.85 0.95, and overall uniformity was shown to generally increase with increasing discharge and beam currents. These measurements indicate that the plasma is highly uniform despite the asymmetric location of the discharge cathode.

  12. Measurement of temperature and temperature gradient in millimeter samples by chlorine NQR

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A mini-thermometer based on the ▫$^{35}Cl$▫ nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency temperature dependence in the chlorates KClO▫$_3$▫ and NaClO▫$_3$▫ was built and successfully tested by measuring temperature and temperature gradient at 77 K and higher in about 100 mm▫$^3$▫ active volume of a mini Joule-Thomson refrigerator. In the design of the tank-circuit coil, an array of small coils connected in series enabled us (a) to achieve a suitable ratio of inductance to capacity in the NQR ...

  13. Measurement of the Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget of a Turbulent Planar Wake Flow in Pressure Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Feng; Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is a very important quantity for turbulence modeling and the budget of this quantity in its transport equation can provide insight into the flow physics. Turbulence kinetic energy budget measurements were conducted for a symmetric turbulent wake flow subjected to constant zero, favorable and adverse pressure gradients in year-three of research effort. The purpose of this study is to clarify the flow physics issues underlying the demonstrated influence of pressure gradient on wake development and provide experimental support for turbulence modeling. To ensure the reliability of these notoriously difficult measurements, the experimental procedure was carefully designed on the basis of an uncertainty analysis. Four different approaches, based on an isotropic turbulence assumption, a locally axisymmetric homogeneous turbulence assumption, a semi-isotropy assumption and a forced balance of the TKE equation, were applied for the estimate of the dissipation term. The pressure transport term is obtained from a forced balance of the turbulence kinetic energy equation. This report will present the results of the turbulence kinetic energy budget measurement and discuss their implication on the development of strained turbulent wakes.

  14. Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) of Protons and Light-ions with Ultrashort Laser Interaction with Heavy-ion Plasma Density Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A; Tableman, A R; Mori, W B; Katsouleas, T C

    2014-01-01

    The relativistically induced transparency acceleration (RITA) scheme of proton and ion acceleration using laser-plasma interactions is introduced, modeled, and compared to the existing schemes. Protons are accelerated with femtosecond relativistic pulses to produce quasimonoenergetic bunches with controllable peak energy. The RITA scheme works by a relativistic laser inducing transparency to densities higher than the cold-electron critical density, while the background heavy ions are stationary. The rising laser pulse creates a traveling acceleration structure at the relativistic critical density by ponderomotively driving a local electron density inflation, creating an electron snowplow and a co-propagating electrostatic potential. The snowplow advances with a velocity determined by the rate of the rise of the laser's intensity envelope and the heavy-ion-plasma density gradient scale length. The rising laser is incrementally rendered transparent to higher densities such that the relativistic-electron plasma ...

  15. Measuring the Densities of Aqueous Glasses at Cryogenic Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Julius, Ethan F; Tyree, Timothy J; Dan, Ritwik; Moreau, David W; Thorne, Robert

    2017-06-28

    We demonstrate a method for determining the vitreous phase cryogenic temperature densities of aqueous mixtures, and other samples that require rapid cooling, to prepare the desired cryogenic temperature phase. Microliter to picoliter size drops are cooled by projection into a liquid nitrogen-argon (N2-Ar) mixture. The cryogenic temperature phase of the drop is evaluated using a visual assay that correlates with X-ray diffraction measurements. The density of the liquid N2-Ar mixture is adjusted by adding N2 or Ar until the drop becomes neutrally buoyant. The density of this mixture and thus of the drop is determined using a test mass and Archimedes principle. With appropriate care in drop preparation, management of gas above the liquid cryogen mixture to minimize icing, and regular mixing of the cryogenic mixture to prevent density stratification and phase separation, densities accurate to <0.5% of drops as small as 50 pL can readily be determined. Measurements on aqueous cryoprotectant mixtures provide insight into cryoprotectant action, and provide quantitative data to facilitate thermal contraction matching in biological cryopreservation.

  16. Measurements of the horizontal gradient of ammonia over a conifer forest in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovmand, M.F.; Andersen, H.V.; Løfstrøm, P.;

    1998-01-01

    Horizontal gradients of ammonia have been measured in order to determine the spatial variation of the concentration above a forest as a function of distance from ammonia emitting areas. Measurements were carried out in June 1994 during conditions with winds from north and west. Concentration levels...... of ammonia were generally low, ranging from 0.04 to 0.7 mu g NH3-N m(-3). At northerly winds the concentration levels were about four times higher than at westerly winds, which relates well to more intensive and larger areas of ammonia emission towards north of the forest. The ammonia concentration decreases...... in the forest; in general the percentage decreases were lower during northerly winds (16%) than those obtained during westerly winds (67%). This is probably due to the larger extension of emitting areas towards north than towards the west. Model calculations are comparable with the measured ammonia...

  17. Advancing biodiversity-ecosystem functioning science using high-density tree-based experiments over functional diversity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobner, Cornelia M; Paquette, Alain; Reich, Peter B; Gravel, Dominique; Messier, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Increasing concern about loss of biodiversity and its effects on ecosystem functioning has triggered a series of manipulative experiments worldwide, which have demonstrated a general trend for ecosystem functioning to increase with diversity. General mechanisms proposed to explain diversity effects include complementary resource use and invoke a key role for species' functional traits. The actual mechanisms by which complementary resource use occurs remain, however, poorly understood, as well as whether they apply to tree-dominated ecosystems. Here we present an experimental approach offering multiple innovative aspects to the field of biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) research. The International Diversity Experiment Network with Trees (IDENT) allows research to be conducted at several hierarchical levels within individuals, neighborhoods, and communities. The network investigates questions related to intraspecific trait variation, complementarity, and environmental stress. The goal of IDENT is to identify some of the mechanisms through which individuals and species interact to promote coexistence and the complementary use of resources. IDENT includes several implemented and planned sites in North America and Europe, and uses a replicated design of high-density tree plots of fixed species-richness levels varying in functional diversity (FD). The design reduces the space and time needed for trees to interact allowing a thorough set of mixtures varying over different diversity gradients (specific, functional, phylogenetic) and environmental conditions (e.g., water stress) to be tested in the field. The intention of this paper is to share the experience in designing FD-focused BEF experiments with trees, to favor collaborations and expand the network to different conditions.

  18. Grain bulk density measurement based on wireless network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Fangming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To know the accurate quantity of stored grain, grain density sensors must be used to measure the grain’s bulk density. However, multi-sensors should be inserted into the storage facility, to quickly collect data during the inventory checking of stored grain. In this study, the ZigBee and Wi-Fi coexistence network’s ability to transmit data collected by density sensors was investigated. A system consisting of six sensor nodes, six router nodes, one gateway and one Android Pad was assembled to measure the grain’s bulk density and calculate its quantity. The CC2530 chip with ZigBee technology was considered as the core of the information processing, and wireless nodes detection in sensor, and router nodes. ZigBee worked in difference signal channel with Wi-Fi to avoid interferences and connected with Wi-Fi module by UART serial communications interfaces in gateway. The Android Pad received the measured data through the gateway and processed this data to calculate quantity. The system enabled multi-point and real-time parameter detection inside the grain storage. Results show that the system has characteristics of good expansibility, networking flexibility and convenience.

  19. Measurement of temperature and temperature gradient in millimeter samples by chlorine NQR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luznik, Janko; Pirnat, Janez; Trontelj, Zvonko [Institute of Mathematics, Physics and Mechanics, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-09-15

    A mini-thermometer based on the {sup 35}Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequency temperature dependence in the chlorates KClO{sub 3} and NaClO{sub 3} was built and successfully tested by measuring temperature and temperature gradient at 77 K and higher in about 100 mm{sup 3} active volume of a mini Joule-Thomson refrigerator. In the design of the tank-circuit coil, an array of small coils connected in series enabled us (a) to achieve a suitable ratio of inductance to capacity in the NQR spectrometer input tank circuit, (b) to use a single crystal of KClO{sub 3} or NaClO{sub 3} (of 1-2 mm{sup 3} size) in one coil as a mini-thermometer with a resolution of 0.03 K and (c) to construct a system for measuring temperature gradients when the spatial coordinates of each chlorate single crystal within an individual coil are known. (orig.)

  20. Filtered gradient compressive sensing reconstruction algorithm for sparse and structured measurement matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Yuri H.; Arguello, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Compressive sensing state-of-the-art proposes random Gaussian and Bernoulli as measurement matrices. Nev- ertheless, often the design of the measurement matrix is subject to physical constraints, and therefore it is frequently not possible that the matrix follows a Gaussian or Bernoulli distribution. Examples of these lim- itations are the structured and sparse matrices of the compressive X-Ray, and compressive spectral imaging systems. A standard algorithm for recovering sparse signals consists in minimizing an objective function that includes a quadratic error term combined with a sparsity-inducing regularization term. This problem can be solved using the iterative algorithms for solving linear inverse problems. This class of methods, which can be viewed as an extension of the classical gradient algorithm, is attractive due to its simplicity. However, current algorithms are slow for getting a high quality image reconstruction because they do not exploit the structured and sparsity characteristics of the compressive measurement matrices. This paper proposes the development of a gradient-based algorithm for compressive sensing reconstruction by including a filtering step that yields improved quality using less iterations. This algorithm modifies the iterative solution such that it forces to converge to a filtered version of the residual AT y, where y is the measurement vector and A is the compressive measurement matrix. We show that the algorithm including the filtering step converges faster than the unfiltered version. We design various filters that are motivated by the structure of AT y. Extensive simulation results using various sparse and structured matrices highlight the relative performance gain over the existing iterative process.

  1. DIFFUSE MOLECULAR CLOUD DENSITIES FROM UV MEASUREMENTS OF CO ABSORPTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, Paul F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    We use UV measurements of interstellar CO toward nearby stars to calculate the density in the diffuse molecular clouds containing the molecules responsible for the observed absorption. Chemical models and recent calculations of the excitation rate coefficients indicate that the regions in which CO is found have hydrogen predominantly in molecular form and that collisional excitation is by collisions with H{sub 2} molecules. We carry out statistical equilibrium calculations using CO-H{sub 2} collision rates to solve for the H{sub 2} density in the observed sources without including effects of radiative trapping. We have assumed kinetic temperatures of 50 K and 100 K, finding this choice to make relatively little difference to the lowest transition. For the sources having T{sup ex}{sub 10} only for which we could determine upper and lower density limits, we find (n(H{sub 2})) = 49 cm{sup -3}. While we can find a consistent density range for a good fraction of the sources having either two or three values of the excitation temperature, there is a suggestion that the higher-J transitions are sampling clouds or regions within diffuse molecular cloud material that have higher densities than the material sampled by the J = 1-0 transition. The assumed kinetic temperature and derived H{sub 2} density are anticorrelated when the J = 2-1 transition data, the J = 3-2 transition data, or both are included. For sources with either two or three values of the excitation temperature, we find average values of the midpoint of the density range that is consistent with all of the observations equal to 68 cm{sup -3} for T{sup k} = 100 K and 92 cm{sup -3} for T{sup k} = 50 K. The data for this set of sources imply that diffuse molecular clouds are characterized by an average thermal pressure between 4600 and 6800 K cm{sup -3}.

  2. Cumulative sum quality control for calibrated breast density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heine, John J.; Cao Ke; Beam, Craig [Cancer Prevention and Control Division, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St., Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Although various methods are used to estimate breast density, there is no standard measurement for this important factor. The authors are developing a breast density standardization method for use in full field digital mammography (FFDM). The approach calibrates for interpatient acquisition technique differences. The calibration produces a normalized breast density pixel value scale. The method relies on first generating a baseline (BL) calibration dataset, which required extensive phantom imaging. Standardizing prospective mammograms with calibration data generated in the past could introduce unanticipated error in the standardized output if the calibration dataset is no longer valid. Methods: Sample points from the BL calibration dataset were imaged approximately biweekly over an extended timeframe. These serial samples were used to evaluate the BL dataset reproducibility and quantify the serial calibration accuracy. The cumulative sum (Cusum) quality control method was used to evaluate the serial sampling. Results: There is considerable drift in the serial sample points from the BL calibration dataset that is x-ray beam dependent. Systematic deviation from the BL dataset caused significant calibration errors. This system drift was not captured with routine system quality control measures. Cusum analysis indicated that the drift is a sign of system wear and eventual x-ray tube failure. Conclusions: The BL calibration dataset must be monitored and periodically updated, when necessary, to account for sustained system variations to maintain the calibration accuracy.

  3. Laser pumping Cs atom magnetometer of theory research based on gradient tensor measuring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhang; Chong Kang; Wang Qingtao; Lei Cheng; Zheng Caiping, E-mail: zhangyang@hrbeu.edu.cn [College of Science, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2011-02-01

    At present, due to space exploration, military technology, geological exploration, magnetic navigation, medical diagnosis and biological magnetic fields study of the needs of research and development, the magnetometer is given strong driving force. In this paper, it will discuss the theoretical analysis and system design of laser pumping cesium magnetometer, cesium atomic energy level formed hyperfine structure with the I-J coupling, the hyperfine structure has been further split into Zeeman sublevels for the effects of magnetic field. To use laser pump and RF magnetic field make electrons transition in the hyperfine structure to produce the results of magneto-optical double resonance, and ultimately through the resonant frequency will be able to achieve accurate value of the external magnetic field. On this basis, we further have a discussion about magnetic gradient tensor measuring method. To a large extent, it increases the magnetic field measurement of information.

  4. Forced and natural gradient tracer tests in a highly heterogeneous porous aquifer: instrumentation and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, T.; Teutsch, G.

    1994-07-01

    At the Horkheimer Insel experimental field site, several short to intermediate distance forced and natural gradient tracer tests with depth-integrated and multilevel sampling were conducted to characterize the aquifer transport properties. Compared with other test sites, the aquifer at the Horkheimer Insel is highly heterogeneous and highly conductive. Hence, new tracer measurement techniques had to be developed. This paper presents some of the instrumentation developed together with measurements and their initial interpretation. The results demonstrate that for contaminant transport predictions in highly heterogeneous and highly conductive aquifers, investigation techniques with a high resolution in time and space are needed. The aquifer heterogeneity is evident from the spatial variability of peak concentration, transport velocity and longitudinal macrodispersivity values obtained from the tracer tests. Furthermore, the tracer test results indicate that at the observation scale investigated, a complex numerical flow and transport model is needed to describe adequately mass transport within the heterogeneous aquifer.

  5. Pulse compression radar reflectometry for density measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costley, A.; Prentice, R. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Laviron, C. [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), 78 - Velizy-Villacoublay (France); Prentice, R. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements

    1994-07-01

    On tokamaks and other toroidal machines, reflectometry is a very rapidly developing technique for density profile measurements, particularly near the edge. Its principle relies on the total reflection of an electromagnetic wave at a cutoff layer, where the critical density is reached and the local refractive index goes to zero. With the new fast frequency synthesizers now available, a method based on pulse compression radar is proposed for plasma reflectometry, overcoming the limitations of the previous reflectometry methods. The measurement can be made on a time-scale which is effectively very short relatively to the plasma fluctuations, and the very high reproducibility and stability of the source allows an absolute calibration of the waveguides to be made, which corrects for the effects of the parasitic reflections. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  7. EPR measurement and the origin of cosmic density fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morikawa Masahiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We explore consistent application of quantum mechanics to the objects in the Universe and in laboratories. The measurement dynamics in quantum mechanics is modeled as a physical process of spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB which is described by the generalized effective action method. A violation of the Bell inequality is observed in this model and the generation of the density fluctuations in the early Universe is described as the SSB process of the spatially translational symmetry.

  8. An ultracold neutron storage bottle for UCN density measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bison, G; Daum, M; Kirch, K; Krempel, J; Lauss, B; Meier, M; Ries, D; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Zsigmond, G

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a storage bottle for ultracold neutrons (UCN) in order to measure the UCN density at the beamports of the Paul Scherrer Institute's (PSI) UCN source. This paper describes the design, construction and commissioning of the robust and mobile storage bottle with a volume comparable to typical storage experiments 32 liter e.g. searching for an electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  9. An ultracold neutron storage bottle for UCN density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bison, G.; Burri, F.; Daum, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kirch, K. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Krempel, J. [Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Lauss, B., E-mail: bernhard.lauss@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Meier, M. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ries, D., E-mail: dieter.ries@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute for Particle Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Zsigmond, G. [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2016-09-11

    We have developed a storage bottle for ultracold neutrons (UCNs) in order to measure the UCN density at the beamports of the Paul Scherrer Institute's (PSI) UCN source. This paper describes the design, construction and commissioning of the robust and mobile storage bottle with a volume comparable to typical storage experiments (32 L) e.g. searching for an electric dipole moment of the neutron.

  10. Microwave/Sonic Apparatus Measures Flow and Density in Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, G. D.; Ngo, Phong; Carl, J. R.; Byerly, Kent A.

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the rate of flow and the mass density of a liquid or slurry includes a special section of pipe instrumented with microwave and sonic sensors, and a computer that processes digitized readings taken by the sensors. The apparatus was conceived specifically for monitoring a flow of oil-well-drilling mud, but the basic principles of its design and operation are also applicable to monitoring flows of other liquids and slurries.

  11. Collagen density gradient on three-dimensional printed poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds for interface tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amora, Ugo; D'Este, Matteo; Eglin, David; Safari, Fatemeh; Sprecher, Christoph M; Gloria, Antonio; De Santis, Roberto; Alini, Mauro; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2017-05-09

    The ability to engineer scaffolds that resemble the transition between tissues would be beneficial to improve repair of complex organs, but has yet to be achieved. In order to mimic tissue organization, such constructs should present continuous gradients of geometry, stiffness and biochemical composition. Although the introduction of rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing techniques allows deposition of heterogeneous layers and shape control, the creation of surface chemical gradients has not been explored on three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds obtained through fused deposition modelling technique. Thus, the goal of this study was to introduce a gradient functionalization method in which a poly(ε-caprolactone) surface was first aminolysed and subsequently covered with collagen via carbodiimide reaction. The 2D constructs were characterized for their amine and collagen contents, wettability, surface topography and biofunctionality. Finally, chemical gradients were created in 3D printed scaffolds with controlled geometry and porosity. The combination of additive manufacturing and surface modification is a viable tool for the fabrication of 3D constructs with controlled structural and chemical gradients. These constructs can be employed for mimicking continuous tissue gradients for interface tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Bone mineral density measurement over the shoulder region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doetsch, A M; Faber, J; Lynnerup, N

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to (1). establish a method for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) over the shoulder region; (2). compare the relationship between shoulder BMD levels with hip BMD and body mass index (BMI); and (3). discuss the relevance of the shoulder scan as an early indicator...... to the least relative influence of weight and stress loading because of migration of calcium to weight and stress-bearing areas. Since the effect of this migration could mask local osteoporotic bone loss, shoulder BMD measurement is likely to minimize false indicators of healthy bone in women with high BMI...

  13. Reflectometry techniques for density profile measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviron, C. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Donne, A.J.H. [Associatie Euratom-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands). FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica; Manso, M.E. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Lab. de Quimica Organica; Sanchez, J. [EURATOM-CIEMAT for Fusion Association, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-03-01

    Reflectometry applied to the measurement of density profiles on fusion plasmas has been subject to many recent developments. After a brief reminder of the principles of reflectometry, the theoretical accuracy of reflectometry measurements is discussed. The main difficulties limiting the performance, namely the plasma fluctuations and the quality of the transmission lines, are analysed. The different techniques used for reflectometry are then presented. The present status and achievements of actual implementations of these techniques are shown, with an analysis of their respective limitations and merits, as well as foreseen developments. (author). 70 refs.

  14. Thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate gradient measurements by PADC detectors in LINAC radiotherapy treatments-field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, M. T., E-mail: mariate9590@gmail.com; Barros, H.; Pino, F.; Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simón Bolívar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Sartenejas, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Dávila, J. [Física Médica C. A. and Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-07-23

    LINAC VARIAN 2100 is where energetic electrons produce Bremsstrahlung radiation, with energies above the nucleon binding energy (E≈5.5MeV). This radiation induce (γ,n) and (e,e’n) reactions mainly in the natural tungsten target material (its total photoneutron cross section is about 4000 mb in a energy range from 9-17 MeV). These reactions may occur also in other components of the system (e.g. multi leaf collimator). During radiation treatment the human body may receive an additional dose inside and outside the treated volume produced by the mentioned nuclear reactions. We measured the neutron density at the treatment table using nuclear track detectors (PADC-NTD). These covered by a boron-converter are employed, including a cadmium filter, to determine the ratio between two groups of neutron energy, i.e. thermal and epithermal. The PADC-NTD detectors were exposed to the radiation field at the iso-center during regular operation of the accelerator. Neutron are determined indirectly by the converting reaction {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li the emerging charged particle leave their kinetic energy in the PADC forming a latent nuclear track, enlarged by chemical etching (6N, NaOH, 70°C). Track density provides information on the neutron density through calibration coefficient (∼1.6 10{sup 4} neutrons /track) obtained by a californium source. We report the estimation of the thermal and epithermal neutron field and its gradient for photoneutrons produced in radiotherapy treatments with 18 MV linear accelerators. It was obsered that photoneutron production have higher rate at the iso-center.

  15. Comparative assessment of density functional methods for evaluating essential parameters to simulate SERS spectra within the excited state energy gradient approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Mozhdeh; Jamshidi, Zahra

    2016-05-01

    The prospect of challenges in reproducing and interpretation of resonance Raman properties of molecules interacting with metal clusters has prompted the present research initiative. Resonance Raman spectra based on the time-dependent gradient approximation are examined in the framework of density functional theory using different methods for representing the exchange-correlation functional. In this work the performance of different XC functionals in the prediction of ground state properties, excitation state energies, and gradients are compared and discussed. Resonance Raman properties based on time-dependent gradient approximation for the strongly low-lying charge transfer states are calculated and compared for different methods. We draw the following conclusions: (1) for calculating the binding energy and ground state geometry, dispersion-corrected functionals give the best performance in comparison to ab initio calculations, (2) GGA and meta GGA functionals give good accuracy in calculating vibrational frequencies, (3) excited state energies determined by hybrid and range-separated hybrid functionals are in good agreement with EOM-CCSD calculations, and (4) in calculating resonance Raman properties GGA functionals give good and reasonable performance in comparison to the experiment; however, calculating the excited state gradient by using the hybrid functional on the hessian of GGA improves the results of the hybrid functional significantly. Finally, we conclude that the agreement of charge-transfer surface enhanced resonance Raman spectra with experiment is improved significantly by using the excited state gradient approximation.

  16. On the Geometric Structure of Flows I: The Referential Gradient. A Generally Covariant Measure of Flow Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Edmondson, J K

    2014-01-01

    Assuming a-priori a smooth generating vector field, we introduce a generally covariant measure of the flow geometry called the referential gradient of the flow. The main result is the explicit relation between the referential gradient and the generating vector field, and is provided for from two equivalent perspectives: a Lagrangian specification with respect to a generalized parameter, and an Eulerian specification making explicit the evolution dynamics. Furthermore, we provide explicit non-trivial conditions which govern the transformation properties of the referential gradient object.

  17. Precise Measurement of Magnetic Field Gradients from Free Spin Precession Signals of $^{3}$He and $^{129}$Xe Magnetometers

    CERN Document Server

    Allmendinger, F; Doll, M; Grasdijk, O; Heil, W; Jungmann, K; Karpuk, S; Krause, H -J; Offenhäusser, A; Repetto, M; Schmidt, U; Sobolev, Yu; Tullney, K; Willmann, L; Zimmer, S

    2016-01-01

    We report on precise measurements of magnetic field gradients extracted from transverse relaxation rates of precessing spin samples. The experimental approach is based on the free precession of gaseous, nuclear spin polarized $^3$He and $^{129}$Xe atoms in a spherical cell inside a magnetic guiding field of about 400 nT using LT$_C$ SQUIDs as low-noise magnetic flux detectors. The transverse relaxation rates of both spin species are simultaneously monitored as magnetic field gradients are varied. For transverse relaxation times reaching 100 h, the residual longitudinal field gradient across the spin sample could be deduced to be$|\\vec{\

  18. Multifractal analysis of high resolution solar wind proton density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorriso-Valvo, Luca; Carbone, Francesco; Leonardis, Ersilia; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Šafránková, Jana; Němeček, Zdenek

    2017-03-01

    The solar wind is a highly turbulent medium, with a high level of field fluctuations throughout a broad range of scales. These include an inertial range where a turbulent cascade is assumed to be active. The solar wind cascade shows intermittency, which however may depend on the wind conditions. Recent observations have shown that ion-scale magnetic turbulence is almost self-similar, rather than intermittent. A similar result was observed for the high resolution measurements of proton density provided by the spacecraft Spektr-R. Intermittency may be interpreted as the result of the multifractal properties of the turbulent cascade. In this perspective, this paper is devoted to the description of the multifractal properties of the high resolution density measurements. In particular, we have used the standard coarse-graining technique to evaluate the generalized dimensions Dq , and from these the multifractal spectrum f (α) , in two ranges of scale. A fit with the p-model for intermittency provided a quantitative measure of multifractality. Such indicator was then compared with alternative measures: the width of the multifractal spectrum, the peak of the kurtosis, and its scaling exponent. The results indicate that the small-scale fluctuations are multifractal, and suggest that different measures of intermittency are required to fully understand the small scale cascade.

  19. Measurement of bone mineral density in patients with psoriasis vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurgül Köse

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine thechanges of bone mineral density in patients with psoriasisvulgaris.Methods: 33 patients, diagnosed with psoriasis vulgarisin Erciyes University, Medical School, Department of Dermatology,and 23 healthy subjects as control group wereincluded in this study. Lumbar and femur bone mineraldensity of all patients and control group were measured.Biochemical tests related to bone metabolism were performed.Results: We did not find statistically significant differencebetween patient and control groups’ bone mineral density.However, the lumbar spine t score of men, were found tobe significantly lower in the patient group than the controlgroup (p<0.05. There was no statistically significant differencein bone mineral density of women between thepatient and control groups. The effects on bone mineraldensity of disease period and using the topical corticosteroidswere not statistically significant.Conclusion: Our study indicates that bone mineral densityof patients with psoriasis vulgaris was not differentfrom healthy subject.Key words: Psoriasis vulgaris, bone mineral density, osteoporosis

  20. Neutralino relic density from ILC measurements in the CPV MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Bélanger, G; Kraml, Sabine; Martyn, H -U; Pukhov, A

    2008-01-01

    We discuss ILC measurements for a specific MSSM scenario with CP phases, where the lightest neutralino is a good candidate for dark matter, annihilating efficiently through t-channel exchange of light staus. These prospective (CP-even) ILC measurements are then used to fit the underlying model parameters. A collider prediction of the relic density of the neutralino from this fit gives 0.116measurements of electric dipole moments is also discussed. Finally we comment on collider measurements at higher energies for refining the prediction of Omega h^2.

  1. A Breast Cell Atlas: Organelle analysis of the MDA-MB-231 cell line by density-gradient fractionation using isotopic marking and label-free analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Sandin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein translocation between organelles in the cell is an important process that regulates many cellular functions. However, organelles can rarely be isolated to purity so several methods have been developed to analyse the fractions obtained by density gradient centrifugation. We present an analysis of the distribution of proteins amongst organelles in the human breast cell line, MDA-MB-231 using two approaches: an isotopic labelling and a label-free approach.

  2. Secular Gravity Gradients in Non-Dynamical Chern-Simons Modified Gravity for Satellite Gradiometry Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Qiang, Li-E

    2016-01-01

    With continuous advances in related technologies, relativistic gravitational experiments with orbiting gradiometers becomes feasible, which could naturally be incorporated into future satellite gravity missions. Tests of Chern-Simons modified gravity are meaningful since such a modification gives us insights into (possible) parity-violations in gravitation. In this work, we derive, at the post-Newtonian level, the new observables of secular gradients from the non-dynamical Chern-Simons modified gravity, which will greatly improve the constraint on the mass scale $M_{CS}$ that may be drawn from satellite gradiometry measurements. For superconducting gradiometers, a strong bound $M_{CS}\\geq 10^{-7}\\ eV$ could in principle be obtained. For future optical gradiometers based on similar technologies from the LISA PathFinder mission, a even stronger bound $M_{CS}\\geq 10^{-5}\\ eV$ might be expected.

  3. Evaluation of the flux gradient technique for measurement of ozone surface fluxes over snowpack at Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bocquet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step procedure for investigating ozone surface fluxes over polar snow by the tower gradient method was developed and evaluated. These measurements were then used to obtain five months (April–August 2004 of turbulent ozone flux data at the Summit research camp located in the center of the Greenland ice shield. Turbulent fluxes were determined by the gradient method incorporating tower measurements of (a ozone gradients measured by commercial ultraviolet absorption analyzers, (b ambient temperature gradients using aspirated thermocouple sensors, and (c wind speed gradients determined by cup anemometers. All gradient instruments were regularly inter-compared by bringing sensors or inlets to the same measurement height. The developed protocol resulted in an uncertainty on the order of 0.1 ppbv for 30-min averaged ozone gradients that were used for the ozone flux calculations. This protocol facilitated a lower sensitivity threshold for the ozone flux determination of ∼8 × 10−3μg m−2 s−1, respectively ∼0.01 cm s−1 for the ozone deposition velocity for typical environmental conditions encountered at Summit. Uncertainty in the 30-min ozone exchange measurements (evaluated by the Monte Carlo statistical approach was on the order of 10−2 cm s−1. This uncertainty typically accounted to ~20–100% of the ozone exchange velocities that were determined. These measurements are among the most sensitive ozone deposition determinations reported to date. This flux experiment allowed for measurements of the relatively low ozone uptake rates encountered for polar snow, and thereby the study of their environmental and spring-versus-summer dependencies.

  4. Evaluation of the flux gradient technique for measurement of ozone surface fluxes over snowpack at Summit, Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bocquet

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A multi-step procedure for investigating ozone surface fluxes over polar snow by the tower gradient method was developed and evaluated. These measurements were then used to obtain four months of turbulent ozone flux data at the Summit research camp located in the center of the Greenland ice shield. Turbulent fluxes were determined by the aerodynamic gradient method incorporating tower measurements of (a ozone gradients measured by commercial ultraviolet absorption analyzers, (b ambient temperature gradients using aspirated thermocouple sensors, and (c wind speed gradients determined by cup anemometers. All gradient instruments were regularly inter-compared by bringing sensors or inlets to the same measurement height. The developed protocol resulted in an uncertainty on the order of 0.1 ppbv for 30-min averaged ozone gradients that were used for the ozone flux calculations. This protocol facilitated a lower sensitivity threshold for the ozone flux determination of −8 × 10−3 μg m−2 s−1, respectively ~0.01 cm s−1 for the ozone deposition velocity for typical environmental conditions encountered at Summit. Uncertainty in the 30-min ozone exchange measurements (evaluated by the Monte Carlo statistical approach was on the order of 10−2 cm s−1. This uncertainty typically accounted to ~20–100% of the ozone exchange velocities that were determined. These measurements are among the most sensitive ozone deposition determinations reported to date. This flux experiment, deployed at Summit for a period of four months, allowed for measurements of the relatively low ozone uptake rates encountered for polar snow, and thereby the study of their environmental and seasonal dependencies.

  5. Evaluation of the flux gradient technique for measurement of ozone surface fluxes over snowpack at Summit, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquet, F.; Helmig, D.; van Dam, B. A.; Fairall, C. W.

    2011-10-01

    A multi-step procedure for investigating ozone surface fluxes over polar snow by the tower gradient method was developed and evaluated. These measurements were then used to obtain five months (April-August 2004) of turbulent ozone flux data at the Summit research camp located in the center of the Greenland ice shield. Turbulent fluxes were determined by the gradient method incorporating tower measurements of (a) ozone gradients measured by commercial ultraviolet absorption analyzers, (b) ambient temperature gradients using aspirated thermocouple sensors, and (c) wind speed gradients determined by cup anemometers. All gradient instruments were regularly inter-compared by bringing sensors or inlets to the same measurement height. The developed protocol resulted in an uncertainty on the order of 0.1 ppbv for 30-min averaged ozone gradients that were used for the ozone flux calculations. This protocol facilitated a lower sensitivity threshold for the ozone flux determination of ∼8 × 10-3μg m-2 s-1, respectively ∼0.01 cm s-1 for the ozone deposition velocity for typical environmental conditions encountered at Summit. Uncertainty in the 30-min ozone exchange measurements (evaluated by the Monte Carlo statistical approach) was on the order of 10-2 cm s-1. This uncertainty typically accounted to ~20-100% of the ozone exchange velocities that were determined. These measurements are among the most sensitive ozone deposition determinations reported to date. This flux experiment allowed for measurements of the relatively low ozone uptake rates encountered for polar snow, and thereby the study of their environmental and spring-versus-summer dependencies.

  6. Invasive assessment of doubtful aortic stenosis by measuring simultaneous transaortic gradient with a pressure wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopard, Romain; Meneveau, Nicolas; Plastaras, Philoktimon; Janin, Sebastien; Seronde, Marie-France; Ecarnot, Fiona; Schiele, Francois

    2013-06-15

    Two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (2D-TTE) is the reference technique for evaluating aortic stenosis (AS) but may be unreliable in some cases. We aimed to assess whether the use of a pressure wire to measure simultaneous transaortic gradient and aortic valve area (AVA) could be helpful in patients in whom initial noninvasive evaluations were considered doubtful for AS. Fifty-seven patients (mean age 76 years; 39 men) underwent cardiac catheterization with single arterial access for assessment of AVA with the Gorlin and Gorlin formula. Transaortic pressure was obtained by 2 invasive methods: (1) conventional pullback method (PM) from the left ventricle toward the aorta and (2) simultaneous method (SM) with transaortic pressure simultaneously recorded with a 0.014-inch pressure wire introduced into the left ventricle and with a diagnostic catheter placed in the ascending aorta. Reasons for inaccurate assessment by 2D-TTE were low flow states (88%) and/or atrial fibrillation (79%). Agreement for severe AS defined by AVA <0.6 cm²/m² between SM and 2D-TTE and between SM and PM was fair, with kappa coefficients of 0.38 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14-0.75) and 0.36 (95% CI 0.22-0.7) respectively; agreement was poor between 2D-TTE and PM (kappa: 0.23; 95% CI 0.002-0.36). SM led to a reclassification of the severity of AS in 9 patients (15.8%) compared with 2D-TTE and in 11 patients (19.3%) compared with PM. In conclusion, invasive evaluation of doubtful AS by measuring simultaneous transaortic gradient using a pressure wire may provide an attractive method that can lead to a change in therapeutic strategy in a substantial proportion of patients.

  7. Applicability of diffusive gradients in thin films for measuring Mn in soils and freshwater sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundus, Simon; Tandy, Susan; Cheng, Hao; Lombi, Enzo; Husted, Søren; Holm, Peter E; Zhang, Hao

    2011-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant nutrient, receiving increased attention due to significant deficiency problems in modern crop production. In aquatic sediments, Mn plays an important role in controlling the mobility of other elements due to its high redox sensitivity. Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) is recognized as one of the most promising techniques to assess plant availability of nutrients in soils and mobility in sediments. However, the appropriate conditions where DGT can be used to measure Mn in soils and sediments have not been thoroughly investigated. We deployed DGTs in soil, sediment, and solution to investigate the effect of pH and competition from Ca and Fe ions. We found that by using DGT it is possible to accurately measure Mn in soils at pH levels and Ca and Fe concentrations resembling those of normal and fertile agricultural soils. However, in acid soils at pH below 5.5, Mn measurements might be biased due to potential competition effects caused by Ca. Soil deployments showed that changes in soil redox conditions were closely reflected by the DGT based Mn measurements. This might enable a novel approach of using DGT to predict Mn mobility and plant availability in soils. In reducing aquatic sediments, high concentrations of ferrous ions can displace Mn from the resin-gel of the DGT device. We found this to be a significant problem with longer deployment times.

  8. Accounting for the effect of horizontal gradients in limb measurements of scattered sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Puķīte

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Limb measurements provided by the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY on the ENVISAT satellite allow retrieving stratospheric profiles of various trace gases on a global scale, among them BrO for the first time. For limb observations in the UV/VIS spectral region the instrument measures scattered light with a complex distribution of light paths: the light is measured at different elevation angles and can be scattered or absorbed in the atmosphere or reflected by the ground. By means of spectroscopy and radiative transfer modelling the measurements can be inverted to retrieve the vertical distribution of stratospheric trace gases.

    A full spherical 3-D Monte Carlo radiative transfer model "Tracy-II" is applied in this study. The Monte Carlo method benefits from conceptual simplicity and allows realizing the concept of full spherical geometry of the atmosphere and also its 3-D properties, which is important for a realistic description of the limb geometry. Furthermore it allows accounting for horizontal gradients in the distribution of trace gases.

    In this study the effect ofhorizontal inhomogeneous distributions of trace gases on the retrieval of profiles from limb measurements of scattered UV/VIS light is investigated. We introduce a method to correct for this effect by combining consecutive limb scanning sequences and utilizing the overlap in their measurement sensitivity regions. It is found that if horizontal inhomogenity is not properly accounted for, typical errors of 20% for NO2 and up to 50% for OClO around the altitude of the profile peak can arise for measurements close to the Arctic polar vortex boundary in boreal winter.

  9. The Physical Density of the City—Deconstruction of the Delusive Density Measure with Evidence from Two European Megacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Taubenböck

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Density is among the most important descriptive as well as normative measures in urban research. While its basic concept is generally understandable, approaches towards the density measure are manifold, diverse and of multidimensional complexity. This evolves from differing thematic, spatial and calculative specifications. Consequently, applied density measures are often used in a subjective, non-transparent, unspecific and thus non-comparable manner. In this paper, we aim at a systematic deconstruction of the measure density. Varying thematic, spatial and calculative dimensions show significant influence on the measure. With both quantitative and qualitative techniques of evaluation, we assess the particular influences on the measure density. To do so, we reduce our experiment setting to a mere physical perspective; that is, the quantitative measures building density, degree of soil sealing, floor space density and, more specifically, the density of generic structural classes such as open spaces and highest built-up density areas. Using up-to-date geodata derived from remote sensing and volunteered geographic information, we build upon high-quality spatial information products such as 3-D city models. Exemplified for the comparison of two European megacities, namely Paris and London, we reveal and systemize necessary variables to be clearly defined for meaningful conclusions using the density measure.

  10. Translational diffusion of macromolecular assemblies measured using transverse-relaxation-optimized pulsed field gradient NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Reto; Horwich, Arthur L; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2011-10-19

    In structural biology, pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy for the characterization of size and hydrodynamic parameters of macromolecular solutes has the advantage over other techniques that the measurements can be recorded with identical solution conditions as used for NMR structure determination or for crystallization trials. This paper describes two transverse-relaxation-optimized (TRO) (15)N-filtered PFG stimulated-echo (STE) experiments for studies of macromolecular translational diffusion in solution, (1)H-TRO-STE and (15)N-TRO-STE, which include CRINEPT and TROSY elements. Measurements with mixed micelles of the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein X (OmpX) and the detergent Fos-10 were used for a systematic comparison of (1)H-TRO-STE and (15)N-TRO-STE with conventional (15)N-filtered STE experimental schemes. The results provide an extended platform for evaluating the NMR experiments available for diffusion measurements in structural biology projects involving molecular particles with different size ranges. An initial application of the (15)N-TRO-STE experiment with very long diffusion delays showed that the tedradecamer structure of the 800 kDa Thermus thermophilus chaperonin GroEL is preserved in aqueous solution over the temperature range 25-60 °C.

  11. Accounting for the effect of horizontal gradients in limb measurements of scattered sunlight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Puķīte

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Limb measurements provided by the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY on the ENVISAT satellite allow retrieving stratospheric profiles of various trace gases on a global scale, among them BrO for the first time. For limb observations in the UV/VIS spectral region the instrument measures scattered light with a complex distribution of light paths: the light is measured at different tangent heights and can be scattered or absorbed in the atmosphere or reflected by the ground. By means of spectroscopy and radiative transfer modelling these measurements can be inverted to retrieve the vertical distribution of stratospheric trace gases.

    The fully spherical 3-D Monte Carlo radiative transfer model "Tracy-II" is applied in this study. The Monte Carlo method benefits from conceptual simplicity and allows realizing the concept of full spherical geometry of the atmosphere and also its 3-D properties, which is important for a realistic description of the limb geometry. Furthermore it allows accounting for horizontal gradients in the distribution of trace gases.

    In this study the effect of horizontally inhomogeneous distributions of trace gases along flight/viewing direction on the retrieval of profiles is investigated. We introduce a tomographic method to correct for this effect by combining consecutive limb scanning sequences and utilizing the overlap in their measurement sensitivity regions. It is found that if horizontal inhomogenity is not properly accounted for, typical errors of 20% for NO2 and up to 50% for OClO around the altitude of the profile peak can arise for measurements close to the Arctic polar vortex boundary in boreal winter.

  12. FFT integration of instantaneous 3D pressure gradient fields measured by Lagrangian particle tracking in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, F.; Schanz, D.; Gesemann, S.; Schröder, A.

    2016-09-01

    Pressure gradient fields in unsteady flows can be estimated through flow measurements of the material acceleration in the fluid and the assumption of the governing momentum equation. In order to derive pressure from its gradient, almost exclusively two numerical methods have been used to spatially integrate the pressure gradient until now: first, direct path integration in the spatial domain, and second, the solution of the Poisson equation for pressure. Instead, we propose an alternative third method that integrates the pressure gradient field in Fourier space. Using a FFT function, the method is fast and easy to implement in programming languages for scientific computing. We demonstrate the accuracy of the integration scheme on a synthetic pressure field and apply it to an experimental example based on time-resolved material acceleration data from high-resolution Lagrangian particle tracking with the Shake-The-Box method.

  13. The impact of mammographic imaging systems on density measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damases, Christine N.; Brennan, Patrick C.; McEntee, Mark F.

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether having a mammogram on differing manufacturer equipment will affect a woman's breast density (BD) measurement. The data set comprised of 40 cases, each containing a combined image of the left craniocaudal (LCC) and left mediolateral oblique (LMLO). These images were obtained from 20 women age between 42-89 years. The images were acquired on two imaging systems (GE and Hologic) one year apart. Volumetric BD was assessed by using Volpara Density Grade (VDG) and average BD% (AvBD%). Twenty American Board of Radiology (ABR) examiners assessed the same images using the BIRADS BD scale 1-4. Statistical comparisons were performed on the means using Mann-Whitney, on correlation using Spearman's rank coefficient of correlation and agreement using Cohen's Kappa. The absolute median BIRADS difference between GE and Hologic was 0.225 (2.00 versus 2.00; pBIRADS for GE and Hologic systems showed strong positive correlation (ρ=0.904; pBIRADS density shown with Cohen's Kappa (κ=0.692; p<0.001), however the systems demonstrated an almost perfect agreement for VDG (κ=0.933; p<0.001).

  14. On the errors of local density (LDA) and generalized gradient (GGA) approximations to the Kohn-Sham potential and orbital energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, O V; Mentel, Ł M; Baerends, E J

    2016-05-28

    In spite of the high quality of exchange-correlation energies Exc obtained with the generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) of density functional theory, their xc potentials vxc are strongly deficient, yielding upshifts of ca. 5 eV in the orbital energy spectrum (in the order of 50% of high-lying valence orbital energies). The GGAs share this deficiency with the local density approximation (LDA). We argue that this error is not caused by the incorrect long-range asymptotics of vxc or by self-interaction error. It arises from incorrect density dependencies of LDA and GGA exchange functionals leading to incorrect (too repulsive) functional derivatives (i.e., response parts of the potentials). The vxc potential is partitioned into the potential of the xc hole vxchole (twice the xc energy density ϵxc), which determines Exc, and the response potential vresp, which does not contribute to Exc explicitly. The substantial upshift of LDA/GGA orbital energies is due to a too repulsive LDA exchange response potential vxresp (LDA) in the bulk region. Retaining the LDA exchange hole potential plus the B88 gradient correction to it but replacing the response parts of these potentials by the model orbital-dependent response potential vxresp (GLLB) of Gritsenko et al. [Phys. Rev. A 51, 1944 (1995)], which has the proper step-wise form, improves the orbital energies by more than an order of magnitude. Examples are given for the prototype molecules: dihydrogen, dinitrogen, carbon monoxide, ethylene, formaldehyde, and formic acid.

  15. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions during BEARPEX 2009 measured by eddy covariance and flux-gradient similarity methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-H. Park

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Biosphere Effects on AeRosols and Photochemistry EXperiment (BEARPEX took place in Blodgett Forest, a Ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, during summer 2009. We deployed a Proton Transfer Reaction – Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS to measure fluxes and concentrations of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs. Eighteen ion species including the major BVOC expected at the site were measured sequentially at 5 heights to observe their vertical gradient from the forest floor to above the canopy. Fluxes of the 3 dominant BVOCs methanol, 2-Methyl-3-butene-2-ol (MBO, and monoterpenes, were measured above the canopy by the eddy covariance method. Canopy scale fluxes were also determined by the flux-gradient similarity method (K-theory. A universal K (Kuniv was determined as the mean of individual K's calculated from the measured fluxes divided by vertical gradients for methanol, MBO, and monoterpenes. This Kuniv was then multiplied by the gradients of each observed ion species to compute their fluxes. The flux-gradient similarity method showed very good agreement with the Eddy Covariance method. Fluxes are presented for all measured species and compared to historical measurements from the same site, and used to test emission algorithms used to model fluxes at the regional scale. MBO was the dominant emission observed followed by methanol, monoterpenes, acetone, and acetaldehyde. The flux-gradient similarity method is shown to be a useful, and we recommend its use especially in experimental conditions when fast measurement of BVOC species is not available.

  16. Insights into soil carbon dynamics across climatic and geologic gradients from temporally-resolved radiocarbon measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, T. S.; Hagedorn, F.; Mannu, U.; Walthert, L.; McIntyre, C.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2016-12-01

    Soil carbon constitutes the largest terrestrial reservoir of organic carbon, and therefore quantifying soil organic matter dynamics (carbon turnover, stocks and fluxes) across spatial gradients is essential for an understanding of the carbon cycle and the impacts of global change. In particular, links between soil carbon dynamics and different climatic and compositional factors remains poorly understood. Radiocarbon constitutes a powerful tool for unraveling soil carbon dynamics. Temporally-resolved radiocarbon measurements, which take advantage of "bomb-radiocarbon"-driven changes in atmospheric 14C, enable further constraints to be placed on C turnover times. These in turn can yield more precise flux estimates for both upper and deeper soil horizons. This project combines bulk radiocarbon measurements on a suite of soil profiles spanning strong climatic (MAT 1.3-9.2°C, MAP 600 to 2100 mm m-2y-1) and geologic gradients with a more in-depth approach for a subset of locations. For this subset, temporal and carbon-fraction specific radiocarbon data has been acquired for both topsoil and deeper soils. These well-studied sites are part of the Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research (LWF) program of the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape research (WSL). Resulting temporally-resolved turnover estimates are coupled to carbon stocks, fluxes across this wide range of forest ecosystems and are examined in the context of environmental drivers (temperature, precipitation, primary production and soil moisture) as well as composition (sand, silt and clay content). Statistical analysis on the region-scale - correlating radiocarbon signature with climatic variables such as temperature, precipitation, primary production and elevation - indicates that composition rather than climate is a key driver of ­­Δ14C signatures. Estimates of carbon turnover, stocks and fluxes derived from temporally-resolved measurements highlight the pivotal role of soil moisture as a

  17. Density Measurement of Compact Toroid with Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufman-Wollitzer, Lauren; Endrizzi, Doug; Brookhart, Matt; Flanagan, Ken; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    Utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) built by Tri Alpha Energy, a dense compact toroid (CT) is created and injected at high speed into the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory (WiPAL) vessel. A modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer from the Line-Tied Reconnection Experiment (LTRX) provides an absolute measurement of electron density. The interferometer is located such that the beam intersects the plasma across the diameter of the MCPG drift region before the CT enters the vessel. This placement ensures that the measurement is taken before the CT expand. Results presented will be used to further analyze characteristics of the CT. Funding provided by DoE, NSF, and WISE Summer Research.

  18. Analytical representations of the spread harmonic measure density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2015-05-01

    We study the spread harmonic measure that characterizes the spatial distribution of reaction events on a partially reactive surface. For Euclidean domains in which Brownian motion can be split into independent lateral and transverse displacements, we derive analytical formulas for the spread harmonic measure density and analyze its asymptotic behavior. This analysis is applicable to slab domains, general cylindrical domains, and a half-space. We investigate the spreading effect due to multiple reflections on the surface, and the underlying role of finite reactivity. We discuss further extensions and applications of analytical results to describe Laplacian transfer phenomena such as permeation through semipermeable membranes, secondary current distribution on partially blocking electrodes, and surface relaxation in nuclear magnetic resonance.

  19. Selection and Evaluation of a new Pu Density Measurement Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dziewinska, Krystyna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peters, Michael A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Patrick P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dziewinski, Jacek J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pugmire, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Stephen M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; La Verne, Jake A [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME; Rajesh, P [UNIV OF NOTRE DAME

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes efforts leading to selection of a new fluid for the determination of the density of large Pu parts. Based on an extended literature search, perfluorotributylamine (FC-43) was chosen for an experimental study. Plutonium coupon corrosion studies were performed by exposing Pu to deaerated and aerated solutions and measuring corrosion gravimetrically. Corrosion rates were determined. Samples of deaerated and aerated perfuluorotributylamine (FC-43) were also irradiated with {sup 60}Co gamma rays (96 Gy/min) to various doses. The samples were extracted with NaOH and analyzed by IC and showed the presence of F and Cl{sup -}. The G-values were established. In surface study experiments Pu coupons were exposed to deaerated and aerated solutions of FC-43 and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS data indicate that there is no detectable surface effect caused by the new fluid. In conclusion the FC-43 was determined to be a very effective and practical fluid for Pu density measurements.

  20. Early and long-term impacts of browsing by roe deer in oak coppiced woods along a gradient of population density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chianucci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few decades, wild ungulate populations have exhibited relevant geographic and demographic expansion in most European countries; roe deer is amongst the most widespread ungulate species. The increasing roe deer densities have led to strong impact on forest regeneration; the problem has been recently recognized in coppice woods, a silvicultural system which is widespread in Italy, where it amounts to about 56% of the total national forested area.In this study we investigated the effect of roe deer browsing on the vegetative regeneration of Turkey oak few years after coppicing, along a gradient of roe deer density. A browsing index revealed that browsing impact was high at any given roe deer density but increased at higher density, with the browsing rate ranging from 65% to 79%. We also analyzed the long-term impact of browsing six and eleven years after coppicing under a medium roe deer density. Results indicated the early impact are not ephemeral but produced prolonged impacts through time, with an average reduction in volume of -57% and -41% six and eleven years after coppicing, respectively. Based on these results we proposed integrating browsing monitoring with roe deer density estimation to allow identifying ungulate densities which are compatible with silvicultural and forest management objectives. The proposed browsing index can be regarded as an effective management tool, on account of its simplicity and cost-effectiveness, being therefore highly suitable for routine, large scale monitoring of browsing impact.

  1. Laplacian-Level Kinetic Energy Approximations Based on the Fourth-Order Gradient Expansion: Global Assessment and Application to the Subsystem Formulation of Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laricchia, Savio; Constantin, Lucian A; Fabiano, Eduardo; Della Sala, Fabio

    2014-01-14

    We tested Laplacian-level meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) noninteracting kinetic energy functionals based on the fourth-order gradient expansion (GE4). We considered several well-known Laplacian-level meta-GGAs from the literature (bare GE4, modified GE4, and the MGGA functional of Perdew and Constantin (Phys. Rev. B 2007,75, 155109)), as well as two newly designed Laplacian-level kinetic energy functionals (L0.4 and L0.6). First, a general assessment of the different functionals is performed to test them for model systems (one-electron densities, Hooke's atom, and different jellium systems) and atomic and molecular kinetic energies as well as for their behavior with respect to density-scaling transformations. Finally, we assessed, for the first time, the performance of the different functionals for subsystem density functional theory (DFT) calculations on noncovalently interacting systems. We found that the different Laplacian-level meta-GGA kinetic functionals may improve the description of different properties of electronic systems, but no clear overall advantage is found over the best GGA functionals. Concerning the subsystem DFT calculations, the here-proposed L0.4 and L0.6 kinetic energy functionals are competitive with state-of-the-art GGAs, whereas all other Laplacian-level functionals fail badly. The performance of the Laplacian-level functionals is rationalized thanks to a two-dimensional reduced-gradient and reduced-Laplacian decomposition of the nonadditive kinetic energy density.

  2. Density-dependent regulation of brook trout population dynamics along a core-periphery distribution gradient in a central Appalachian watershed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brock M Huntsman

    Full Text Available Spatial population models predict strong density-dependence and relatively stable population dynamics near the core of a species' distribution with increasing variance and importance of density-independent processes operating towards the population periphery. Using a 10-year data set and an information-theoretic approach, we tested a series of candidate models considering density-dependent and density-independent controls on brook trout population dynamics across a core-periphery distribution gradient within a central Appalachian watershed. We sampled seven sub-populations with study sites ranging in drainage area from 1.3-60 km(2 and long-term average densities ranging from 0.335-0.006 trout/m. Modeled response variables included per capita population growth rate of young-of-the-year, adult, and total brook trout. We also quantified a stock-recruitment relationship for the headwater population and coefficients of variability in mean trout density for all sub-populations over time. Density-dependent regulation was prevalent throughout the study area regardless of stream size. However, density-independent temperature models carried substantial weight and likely reflect the effect of year-to-year variability in water temperature on trout dispersal between cold tributaries and warm main stems. Estimated adult carrying capacities decreased exponentially with increasing stream size from 0.24 trout/m in headwaters to 0.005 trout/m in the main stem. Finally, temporal variance in brook trout population size was lowest in the high-density headwater population, tended to peak in mid-sized streams and declined slightly in the largest streams with the lowest densities. Our results provide support for the hypothesis that local density-dependent processes have a strong control on brook trout dynamics across the entire distribution gradient. However, the mechanisms of regulation likely shift from competition for limited food and space in headwater streams to

  3. Formulation of a Lagrangian stochastic model of dispersion in the convective boundary layer with skewed turbulence conditions and vertical density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    cassiani, massimo; stohl, andreas; brioude, jerome

    2014-05-01

    The vertical gradient of air density has been included in a skewed probability density function formulation for turbulence in the convective boundary layer and the related drift term for Lagrangian stochastic particle modelling has been obtained based on the well-mixed condition. The formulation has been extended to include unsteady turbulence statistics. Tests were carried out to validate the model including consistency between forward and backward simulations and preservation of well-mixed state with unsteady conditions. The stationary state CBL drift term with density correction was incorporated in the FLEXPART/FLEXPART-WRF Lagrangian models. Currently only the steady state horizontally homogeneous drift term were included. To avoid numerical instability, using the steady homogenous drift in the presence of non-stationary and horizontally non-homogeneous conditions, a re-initialization procedure for particle velocity was used. The criteria for re-initialization and resulting errors were assessed.

  4. Electric field gradients of transition metal complexes from density functional theory: assessment of functionals, geometries and basis sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsson, Ragnar; Bühl, Michael

    2010-06-14

    Electric field gradients (EFGs) were computed for the first-row transition metal nuclei in Cr(C(6)H(6))(CO)(3), MnO(3)F, Mn(CO)(5)H, MnCp(CO)(3), Co(CO)(4)H, Co(CO)(3)(NO) and VCp(CO)(4), for which experimental gas-phase data (in form of nuclear quadrupole coupling constants) are available from microwave spectroscopy. A variety of exchange-correlation functionals were assessed, among which range-separated hybrids (such as CAM-B3LYP or LC-omegaPBE) perform best, followed by global hybrids (such as B3LYP and PBE0) and gradient-corrected functionals (such as BP86). While large basis sets are required on the metal atom for converged EFGs, smaller basis sets can be employed on the ligands. In most cases, EFGs show little sensitivity toward the geometrical parameters.

  5. Measurement of Density Inhomogeneity for Source Masses in Time-of-Swing Method of Measuring G

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lin-Xia; SHAO Cheng-Gang; TU Liang-Cheng; LUO Jun

    2009-01-01

    A method with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is presented to measure the density inhomogeneity of the stainless steel (SS316) sphere prepared for measuring G using time-of-swing method. The experimental result shows that the relative density inhomogeneity of the sphere is better than 5.9 × 10-4 over the volume of 0.272 × 0.234 × 0.005 mm3. If we assume that the density inhomogeneity of the spheres used in our G measurement is the same as that of the sphere destroyed in testing, it will contribute to G value with an uncertainty of less than O.034 ppm in our G measurement. Furthermore, the mass centre offset from the geometric centre of the sphere will be less than 4.3 × 10-4 μm due to this inhomogeneity.

  6. Impact of local environmental conditions on atmospheric electrical potential gradient measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, Attila; Barta, Veronika; Steinbach, Péter; Bór, József

    2017-04-01

    The atmospheric electrical potential gradient (PG) is a fundamental parameter of the global electric circuit (GEC) which comprises all large scale quasi-static electrical processes occurring in between the surface of the Earth and the lower ionosphere. The observation of PG near the Earth's surface plays a pivotal role in surveying our atmospheric electrical environment. The PG shows high variability in different temporal and spatial scales and it is especially sensitive to local effects. Therefore, obtaining a PG value which represents the general state of the GEC over a larger area rather than various effects due to measuring site-specific local factors is a challenging task. PG measurements are going on in the Széchenyi István Geophysical Observatory (NCK, 47°38' N, 16°43' E) of the Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences near Nagycenk, Hungary since 1961. PG sensors are set up in NCK in an open area surrounded by buildings and trees within 20 m distance. The effect of the changing vegetation on the long-term trend observed in the PG variation at NCK has been subject of debates [1,2,3]. In order to examine the possible bias in the measured PG values due to the relatively close buildings and trees at NCK, two sets of simultaneous PG measurements from two EFM-100 field mills were compared. One field mill was kept at a fixed location while the other was moved to grid points covering the open area around the fixed field mill. The measurement was done in fair weather conditions in summer and was repeated during the winter. The poster demonstrates the performance of this method in surveying the effect of various objects and the state of vegetation on the measured PG values by comparing the measured PG differences to those obtained from electrostatic models calculated by the finite element method using the FEMM 4.2 software package. [1] F. Märcz and R. G. Harrison, 2003, Annales Gephysicae, 21: 2193-2200 [2] F. Märcz and R

  7. Application of an online ion-chromatography-based instrument for gradient flux measurements of speciated nitrogen and sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Ian C.; Walker, John T.

    2016-06-01

    The dry component of total nitrogen and sulfur atmospheric deposition remains uncertain. The lack of measurements of sufficient chemical speciation and temporal extent make it difficult to develop accurate mass budgets and sufficient process level detail is not available to improve current air-surface exchange models. Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the development of continuous air sampling measurement techniques, resulting with instruments of sufficient sensitivity and temporal resolution to directly quantify air-surface exchange of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. However, their applicability is generally restricted to only one or a few of the compounds within the deposition budget. Here, the performance of the Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA 2S), a commercially available online ion-chromatography-based analyzer is characterized for the first time as applied for air-surface exchange measurements of HNO3, NH3, NH4+, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-. Analytical accuracy and precision are assessed under field conditions. Chemical concentrations gradient precision are determined at the same sampling site. Flux uncertainty measured by the aerodynamic gradient method is determined for a representative 3-week period in fall 2012 over a grass field. Analytical precision and chemical concentration gradient precision were found to compare favorably in comparison to previous studies. During the 3-week period, percentages of hourly chemical concentration gradients greater than the corresponding chemical concentration gradient detection limit were 86, 42, 82, 73, 74 and 69 % for NH3, NH4+, HNO3, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-, respectively. As expected, percentages were lowest for aerosol species, owing to their relatively low deposition velocities and correspondingly smaller gradients relative to gas phase species. Relative hourly median flux uncertainties were 31, 121, 42, 43, 67 and 56 % for NH3, NH4+, HNO3, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-, respectively. Flux

  8. Estimation of in-situ thermal conductivities from temperature gradient measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, V.T.

    1980-12-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to study the effect of variable thermal conductivity of the formations, and the wellbore characteristics, on the fluid temperature behavior inside the wellbore during injection or production and after shut-in. During the injection or production period the wellbore fluid temperature is controlled mainly by the fluid flow rate and the heat lost from the fluid to the formation. During the shut-in period, the fluid temperature is strongly affected by differences in the formation thermal conductivities. Based on the results of the present analysis, two methods for estimating in-situ thermal conductivity were derived. First, the line source concept is extended to estimate values of the formation thermal conductivities utilizing the fluid temperature record during the transient period of injection or production and shut-in. The second method is applied when a well is under thermal equilibrium conditions. Values of the formation thermal conductivities can also be estimated by using a continuous temperature gradient log and by measuring the thermal conductivity of the formation at a few selected wellbore locations.

  9. High temperature gradient micro-sensor for wall shear stress and flow direction measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouila-Houri, C.; Claudel, J.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Gallas, Q.; Garnier, E.; Merlen, A.; Viard, R.; Talbi, A.; Pernod, P.

    2016-12-01

    We present an efficient and high-sensitive thermal micro-sensor for near wall flow parameters measurements. By combining substrate-free wire structure and mechanical support using silicon oxide micro-bridges, the sensor achieves a high temperature gradient, with wires reaching 1 mm long for only 3 μm wide over a 20 μm deep cavity. Elaborated to reach a compromise solution between conventional hot-films and hot-wire sensors, the sensor presents a high sensitivity to the wall shear stress and to the flow direction. The sensor can be mounted flush to the wall for research studies such as turbulence and near wall shear flow analysis, and for technical applications, such as flow control and separation detection. The fabrication process is CMOS-compatible and allows on-chip integration. The present letter describes the sensor elaboration, design, and micro-fabrication, then the electrical and thermal characterizations, and finally the calibration experiments in a turbulent boundary layer wind tunnel.

  10. Laplacian-level kinetic energy approximations based on the fourth-order gradient expansion: Global assessment and application to the subsystem formulation of density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Laricchia, S; Fabiano, E; Della Sala, F

    2014-01-01

    We test Laplacian-level meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) non-interacting kinetic energy functionals based on the fourth-order gradient expansion (GE4). We consider several well known Laplacian-level meta-GGAs from literature (bare GE4, modified GE4, and the MGGA functional of Perdew and Constantin [Phys. Rev. B \\textbf{75},155109 (2007)]), as well as two newly designed Laplacian-level kinetic energy functionals (named L0.4 and L0.6). First, a general assessment of the different functionals is performed, testing them for model systems (one-electron densities, Hooke's atom and different jellium systems), atomic and molecular kinetic energies as well as for their behavior with respect to density-scaling transformations. Finally, we assess, for the first time, the performance of the different functionals for Subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations on non-covalently interacting systems. We find that the different Laplacian-level meta-GGA kinetic functionals may improve the descript...

  11. Measurement of Bone Mineral Density in Male Detainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Bakan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to investigate the increased risk for osteoporosis due to closed environment and sedentary lifestyle of prisoners. In this way, we planned to inform prisoners and supervisors for protective measures that should be taken if low bone mineral density (BMD is detected compared with normal population. Materials and Methods: Sixty six prisoner men over the age of 45 as the study group and 66 male volunteers who are not detainees over the age of 45 as a control group were included in the study. All participants' age, occupation, duration in prison, habits, nutrition, exercise, diseases and medications used were noted. BMD values were measured using a phalangeal radiographic absorptiometry (Alara Metriscan®. Results: BMD values in the study group were measured as 0.341±0.030 g/cm2 and as 0.346±0.029 g/cm2 in the control group (p=0.968. BMD values of the study group were lower than those of the control group. Conclusion: In this study, we found that BMD values of the detainees were lower than those of the control group but this difference was not statistically significant. However, there was a negative correlation between BMD values and duration in prison. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2012;18: 81-5

  12. Measurements of ultimate accelerating gradients in the SLAC disk-loaded structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.W.; Loew, G.A.

    1985-03-01

    This paper is a status report on an on-going program at SLAC to study accelerator structures under high-gradient electric field conditions. The study is a part of a much broader program dealing with future linear colliders. The accelerating gradient that might be achievable in such machines is a crucial parameter because once the beam energy is selected, the gradient determines the length of the linac and directly or indirectly affects the choice of many other parameters. To reach 100 MV/m in a conventional 3 m constant-gradient section without SLED, one would need a klystron with a peak power output of 900 MW. Since such a tube is not available, we decided to use a short standing-wave section in which the resonant fields can build up. The design criteria for this section, the fabrication, matching and tuning, the experimental set-up and the results are described. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Derivation of general analytic gradient expressions for density-fitted post-Hartree-Fock methods: an efficient implementation for the density-fitted second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkaya, Uğur

    2014-09-28

    General analytic gradient expressions (with the frozen-core approximation) are presented for density-fitted post-HF methods. An efficient implementation of frozen-core analytic gradients for the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with the density-fitting (DF) approximation (applying to both reference and correlation energies), which is denoted as DF-MP2, is reported. The DF-MP2 method is applied to a set of alkanes, conjugated dienes, and noncovalent interaction complexes to compare the computational cost of single point analytic gradients with MP2 with the resolution of the identity approach (RI-MP2) [F. Weigend and M. Häser, Theor. Chem. Acc. 97, 331 (1997); R. A. Distasio, R. P. Steele, Y. M. Rhee, Y. Shao, and M. Head-Gordon, J. Comput. Chem. 28, 839 (2007)]. In the RI-MP2 method, the DF approach is used only for the correlation energy. Our results demonstrate that the DF-MP2 method substantially accelerate the RI-MP2 method for analytic gradient computations due to the reduced input/output (I/O) time. Because in the DF-MP2 method the DF approach is used for both reference and correlation energies, the storage of 4-index electron repulsion integrals (ERIs) are avoided, 3-index ERI tensors are employed instead. Further, as in case of integrals, our gradient equation is completely avoid construction or storage of the 4-index two-particle density matrix (TPDM), instead we use 2- and 3-index TPDMs. Hence, the I/O bottleneck of a gradient computation is significantly overcome. Therefore, the cost of the generalized-Fock matrix (GFM), TPDM, solution of Z-vector equations, the back transformation of TPDM, and integral derivatives are substantially reduced when the DF approach is used for the entire energy expression. Further application results show that the DF approach introduce negligible errors for closed-shell reaction energies and equilibrium bond lengths.

  14. Derivation of general analytic gradient expressions for density-fitted post-Hartree-Fock methods: An efficient implementation for the density-fitted second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozkaya, Uğur, E-mail: ugur.bozkaya@atauni.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Atatürk University, Erzurum 25240, Turkey and Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2014-09-28

    General analytic gradient expressions (with the frozen-core approximation) are presented for density-fitted post-HF methods. An efficient implementation of frozen-core analytic gradients for the second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with the density-fitting (DF) approximation (applying to both reference and correlation energies), which is denoted as DF-MP2, is reported. The DF-MP2 method is applied to a set of alkanes, conjugated dienes, and noncovalent interaction complexes to compare the computational cost of single point analytic gradients with MP2 with the resolution of the identity approach (RI-MP2) [F. Weigend and M. Häser, Theor. Chem. Acc. 97, 331 (1997); R. A. Distasio, R. P. Steele, Y. M. Rhee, Y. Shao, and M. Head-Gordon, J. Comput. Chem. 28, 839 (2007)]. In the RI-MP2 method, the DF approach is used only for the correlation energy. Our results demonstrate that the DF-MP2 method substantially accelerate the RI-MP2 method for analytic gradient computations due to the reduced input/output (I/O) time. Because in the DF-MP2 method the DF approach is used for both reference and correlation energies, the storage of 4-index electron repulsion integrals (ERIs) are avoided, 3-index ERI tensors are employed instead. Further, as in case of integrals, our gradient equation is completely avoid construction or storage of the 4-index two-particle density matrix (TPDM), instead we use 2- and 3-index TPDMs. Hence, the I/O bottleneck of a gradient computation is significantly overcome. Therefore, the cost of the generalized-Fock matrix (GFM), TPDM, solution of Z-vector equations, the back transformation of TPDM, and integral derivatives are substantially reduced when the DF approach is used for the entire energy expression. Further application results show that the DF approach introduce negligible errors for closed-shell reaction energies and equilibrium bond lengths.

  15. Comparison of denitrification activity measurements in groundwater using cores and natural-gradient tracer tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.L.; Garabedian, S.P.; Brooks, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    The transport of many solutes in groundwater is dependent upon the relative rates of physical flow and microbial metabolism. Quantifying rates of microbial processes under subsurface conditions is difficult and is most commonly approximated using laboratory studies with aquifer materials. In this study, we measured in situ rates of denitrification in a nitrate- contaminated aquifer using small-scale, natural-gradient tracer tests and compared the results with rates obtained from laboratory incubations with aquifer core material. Activity was measured using the acetylene block technique. For the tracer tests, co-injection of acetylene and bromide into the aquifer produced a 30 ??M increase in nitrous oxide after 10 m of transport (23-30 days). An advection-dispersion transport model was modified to include an acetylene-dependent nitrous oxide production term and used to simulate the tracer breakthrough curves. The model required a 4-day lag period and a relatively low sensitivity to acetylene to match the narrow nitrous oxide breakthrough curves. Estimates of in situ denitrification rates were 0.60 and 1.51 nmol of N2O produced cm-3 aquifer day-1 for two successive tests. Aquifer core material collected from the tracer test site and incubated as mixed slurries in flasks and as intact cores yielded rates that were 1.2-26 times higher than the tracer test rate estimates. Results with the coring-dependent techniques were variable and subject to the small- scale heterogeneity within the aquifer, while the tracer tests integrated the heterogeneity along a flow path, giving a rate estimate that is more applicable to transport at the scale of the aquifer.

  16. Using skin temperature gradients or skin heat flux measurements to determine thresholds of vasoconstriction and vasodilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2002-11-01

    Forearm-fingertip skin temperature differentials (T(sk-diff)) are used to indicate vasomotor tone, vasoconstriction defined as having occurred when T(sk-diff)> or =4 degrees C (Sessler et al. 1987, 1988a, b). This study was conducted to determine whether T(sk-diff) or finger pad heat flux (HF) can be used to predict when vasoconstriction and vasodilatation occur. Seven subjects (one female) sat in water at [mean (SD)] 40.7 (0.8) degrees C until their core temperature (T(c)) increased by 1 degrees C, ensuring vasodilatation. The water was then cooled [at a rate of 0.6 (0.1) degrees C x min(-1)] until T(c) fell to 0.5 degrees C below pretesting values, causing vasoconstriction. Subjects were then rewarmed in water [41.2 (1.0) degrees C]. Skin blood flow (SkBF) was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) on the left second finger pad [immersed in water at 10.4 (1.4) degrees C as part of another experiment], and infrared plethysmography on the third finger pad of both hands. T(sk-diff) and HF were measured on the right upper limb, which remained in air. When vasodilated, the subjects had a stable T(sk-diff) and HF. During cooling, rapid-onset vasoconstriction occurred coincidental with large gradient changes in HF and T(sk-diff) (inflection points). In two subjects the original vasoconstriction definition (T(sk-diff)> or =4 degrees C) was not attained, in the other five this was achieved 31-51 min after vasoconstriction. During rewarming, the T(sk-diff) and HF inflection points less accurately reflected the onset of vasodilatation, although with one exception they were within 5 min of the LDF changes. We conclude that T(sk-diff) and HF inflection points predict vasoconstriction accurately, and better than T(sk-diff)> or =4 degrees C.

  17. Comparison of Conjugate Gradient Density Matrix Search and Chebyshev Expansion Methods for Avoiding Diagonalization in Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Kevin R.; Daniels, Andrew D.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    1998-01-01

    We report a comparison of two linear-scaling methods which avoid the diagonalization bottleneck of traditional electronic structure algorithms. The Chebyshev expansion method (CEM) is implemented for carbon tight-binding calculations of large systems and its memory and timing requirements compared to those of our previously implemented conjugate gradient density matrix search (CG-DMS). Benchmark calculations are carried out on icosahedral fullerenes from C60 to C8640 and the linear scaling memory and CPU requirements of the CEM demonstrated. We show that the CPU requisites of the CEM and CG-DMS are similar for calculations with comparable accuracy.

  18. Precise measurement of magnetic field gradients from free spin precession signals of 3He and 129Xe magnetometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allmendinger, Fabian; Blümler, Peter; Doll, Michael; Grasdijk, Oliver; Heil, Werner; Jungmann, Klaus; Karpuk, Sergej; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Offenhäuser, Andreas; Repetto, Maricel; Schmidt, Ulrich; Sobolev, Yuri; Tullney, Kathlyne; Willmann, Lorenz; Zimmer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We report on precise measurements of magnetic field gradients extracted from transverse relaxation rates of precessing spin samples. The experimental approach is based on the free precession of gaseous, nuclear spin polarized 3He and 129Xe atoms in a spherical cell inside a magnetic guiding field of

  19. Advection of NH3 over a pasture field and its effect on gradient flux measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Sutton

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of atmospheric ammonia (NH3 to semi-natural ecosystems leads to serious adverse effects, such as acidification and eutrophication. A step in quantifying such effects is the measurement of NH3 fluxes over semi-natural and agricultural land. However, measurement of NH3 fluxes over vegetation in the vicinity of strong NH3 sources is challenging, since NH3 emissions are highly heterogeneous. Indeed, under such conditions, local advection errors may alter the measured fluxes. In this study, local advection errors (ΔFz,adv were estimated over a 14 ha grassland field, which was successively cut and fertilised, as part of the GRAMINAE integrated Braunschweig experiment. The magnitude of ΔFz,adv was determined up to 810 m downwind from farm buildings emitting between 6.2 and 9.9 kg NH3 day−1. The GRAMINAE experiment provided a unique opportunity to compare two methods of estimating ΔFz,adv: one inference method based on measurements of horizontal concentration gradients, and one based on inverse dispersion modelling with a two-dimensional model. Two sources of local advection were clearly identified: the farm NH3 emissions leading to positive ΔFz,adv ("bias towards emissions" and field NH3 emissions, which led to a negative ΔFz,adv ("bias towards deposition". The local advection flux from the farm was in the range 0 to 27 ng NH3 m−2 s−1 at 610 m from the farm, whereas ΔFz,adv due to field emission was proportional to the local flux, and ranged between −209 and 13 ng NH3 m−2 s−1. The local advection flux ΔFz,adv was either positive or negative depending on the magnitude of these two contributions. The modelled and inferred advection errors agreed well. The inferred advection errors, relative to the vertical flux at 1 m height, were 52% on average, before the field was cut, and less than 2.1% when the field was fertilised. The variability of the advection errors in response to changes in micrometeorological conditions is also

  20. How to measure the charm density in the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, N Ya

    2012-01-01

    We study two experimental ways to measure the heavy-quark content of the proton: using the Callan-Gross ratio $R(x,Q^2)=F_L/F_T$ and/or the azimuthal $\\cos(2\\varphi)$ asymmetry in DIS. Our approach is based on the following observations. First, the ratio $R(x,Q^2)=F_L/F_T$ and azimuthal $\\cos(2\\varphi)$ asymmetry in heavy-quark leptoproduction are stable, both parametrically and perturbatively, within pQCD. Second, both these quantities are sensitive to resummation of the mass logarithms of the type $\\alpha_{s}\\ln(Q^{2}/m^{2})$. We conclude that the heavy-quark densities in the nucleon can, in principle, be determined from high-$Q^2$ data on the Callan-Gross ratio and/or the azimuthal asymmetry. In particular, the charm content of the proton can be measured in future studies at the proposed Large Hadron-Electron (LHeC) and Electron-Ion (EIC) Colliders.

  1. Effect of Clothing on Measurement of Bone Mineral Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Elizabeth A; Feldman, Anna Z; Malabanan, Alan O; Abate, Ejigayehu G; Whittaker, LaTarsha G; Yano-Litwin, Amanda; Dorazio, Jolene; Rosen, Harold N

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown whether allowing patients to have BMD (bone mineral density) studies acquired while wearing radiolucent clothing adlib contributes appreciably to the measurement error seen. To examine this question, a spine phantom was scanned 30 times without any clothing, while draped with a gown, and while draped with heavy winter clothing. The effect on mean BMD and on SD (standard deviation) was assessed. The effect of clothing on mean or SD of the area was not significant. The effect of clothing on mean and SD for BMD was small but significant and was around 1.6% for the mean. However, the effect on BMD precision was much more clinically important. Without clothing the spine phantom had an least significant change of 0.0077 gm/cm(2), while when introducing variability of clothing the least significant change rose as high as 0.0305 gm/cm(2). We conclude that, adding clothing to the spine phantom had a small but statistically significant effect on the mean BMD and on variance of the measurement. It is unlikely that the effect on mean BMD has any clinical significance, but the effect on the reproducibility (precision) of the result is likely clinically significant.

  2. First measurements results of the LHC longitudinal density monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Jeff , A; Bravin, E; Boccardi, A; Bozyigit, S; Lefevre, T; Rabiller, A; Roncarolo, F; Welsch, C P; Fisher, A S

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the longitudinal distribution of particles is important for various aspects of accelerator operation, for example to check the injection quality and to characterize the development of ghost bunches before and during the physics periods. A new detector, the LHC Longitudinal Density Monitor (LDM) is a single-photon counting system measuring synchrotron light by means of an avalanche photodiode detector. The unprecedented energies reached in the LHC allow synchrotron light diagnostics to be used with both protons and heavy ions. The LDM is able to longitudinally profile the whole ring with a resolution close to the target of 50 ps. On-line correction for the effects of the detector deadtime, pile-up and afterpulsing allow a dynamic range of 105 to be achieved. The LDM operated during the 2010 lead ion run and during 2011 with protons. Measurements from both runs are presented in this contribution along with an analysis of the LDM performance and an outlook for future upgrades.

  3. Relativistically induced transparency acceleration of light ions by an ultrashort laser pulse interacting with a heavy-ion-plasma density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash A.; Tsung, Frank S.; Tableman, Adam R.; Mori, Warren B.; Katsouleas, Thomas C.

    2013-10-01

    The relativistically induced transparency acceleration (RITA) scheme of proton and ion acceleration using laser-plasma interactions is introduced, modeled, and compared to the existing schemes. Protons are accelerated with femtosecond relativistic pulses to produce quasimonoenergetic bunches with controllable peak energy. The RITA scheme works by a relativistic laser inducing transparency [Akhiezer and Polovin, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz 30, 915 (1956); Kaw and Dawson, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1692942 13, 472 (1970); Max and Perkins, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.27.1342 27, 1342 (1971)] to densities higher than the cold-electron critical density, while the background heavy ions are stationary. The rising laser pulse creates a traveling acceleration structure at the relativistic critical density by ponderomotively [Lindl and Kaw, Phys. FluidsPFLDAS0031-917110.1063/1.1693437 14, 371 (1971); Silva , Phys. Rev. E1063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.59.2273 59, 2273 (1999)] driving a local electron density inflation, creating an electron snowplow and a co-propagating electrostatic potential. The snowplow advances with a velocity determined by the rate of the rise of the laser's intensity envelope and the heavy-ion-plasma density gradient scale length. The rising laser is incrementally rendered transparent to higher densities such that the relativistic-electron plasma frequency is resonant with the laser frequency. In the snowplow frame, trace density protons reflect off the electrostatic potential and get snowplowed, while the heavier background ions are relatively unperturbed. Quasimonoenergetic bunches of velocity equal to twice the snowplow velocity can be obtained and tuned by controlling the snowplow velocity using laser-plasma parameters. An analytical model for the proton energy as a function of laser intensity, rise time, and plasma density gradient is developed and compared to 1D and 2D PIC OSIRIS [Fonseca , Lect. Note Comput. Sci.9783

  4. Seismic spatial wavefield gradient and rotational rate measurements as new observables in land seismic exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzbach, Cedric; Sollberger, David; Van Renterghem, Cédéric; Häusler, Mauro; Robertsson, Johan; Greenhalgh, Stewart

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, land-seismic data acquisition is conducted using vertical-component sensors. A more complete representation of the seismic wavefield can be obtained by employing multicomponent sensors recording the full vector wavefield. If groups of multicomponent sensors are deployed, then spatial seismic wavefield gradients and rotational rates can be estimated by differencing the outputs of closely spaced sensors. Such data capture all six degrees of freedom of a rigid body (three components of translation and three components of rotation), and hence allow an even more complete representation of the seismic wavefield compared to single station triaxial data. Seismic gradient and rotation data open up new possibilities to process land-seismic data. Potential benefits and applications of wavefield gradient data include local slowness estimation, improved arrival identification, wavefield separation and noise suppression. Using synthetic and field data, we explored the reliability and sensitivity of various multicomponent sensor layouts to estimate seismic wavefield gradients and rotational rates. Due to the wavelength and incidence-angle dependence of sensor-group reception patterns as a function of the number of sensors, station spacing and layout, one has to counterbalance the impacts of truncation errors, random noise attenuation, and sensitivity to perturbations such as amplitude variations and positioning errors when searching for optimum receiver configurations. Field experiments with special rotational rate sensors were used to verify array-based rotational-rate estimates. Seismic wavefield gradient estimates and inferred wavefield attributes such as instantaneous slowness enable improved arrival identification, e.g. wave type and path. Under favorable conditions, seismic-wavefield gradient attributes can be extracted from conventional vertical-component data and used to, for example, enhance the identification of shear waves. A further promising

  5. A comparison of NEXRAD WSR-88D rain estimates with gauge measurements for high and low reflectivity gradient precipitation events.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jendrowski, P.; Kelly, D. S.; Klazura, G. E.; Thomale, J. M.

    1999-04-14

    Rain gauge measurements were compared with radar-estimated storm total precipitation for 43 rain events that occurred at ten locations. Gauge-to-radar ratios (G/R) were computed for each case. The G/R ratio is strongly related to precipitation type, with the mean G/R slightly less than 1.00 for high-reflectivity gradient cases and greater than 2.00 (factor of 2 radar underestimation) for low-reflectivity gradient cases. both precipitation types indicated radar underestimate at the nearest ranges. However, the high-reflectivity gradient cases indicated radar overestimation at further ranges, while the low-reflectivity gradient cases indicated significant radar underestimation at all ranges. Occurrences of radar overestimates may have been related to high reflectivity returns from melting ice, bright-band effects in stratiform systems and hail from convective systems. Bright-band effects probably were responsible for improving the radar underestimates in the second range interval (50-99.9 km) for the low-reflectivity gradient cases. Other possibilities for radar overestimates are anomalous propagation (AP) of the radar beam. Smith, et al. (1996) concluded that bright band and AP lead to systematic overestimate of rainfall at intermediate ranges.

  6. Strategies for diagnosing and alleviating artifactual attenuation associated with large gradient pulses in PGSE NMR diffusion measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, W S; Hayamizu, K; Ide, H; Arata, Y

    1999-08-01

    The generation of phase-based artifacts resulting from mismatch in the effective areas (i.e., the time integrals) of sequential gradient pulses is discussed in the context of large gradient pulsed-gradient spin-echo (PGSE) NMR diffusion measurements. Such effects result in artifactual attenuation and distortion in the spectra which, in the first instance, are similar to (and commonly mistaken for) the effects of eddy currents. Small degrees of mismatch cause "unphysical" concave downward curvature in PGSE attenuation plots of freely diffusing species. However, larger mismatches can result in artifactual diffraction peaks in the plots which could easily be confused for true restricted diffusion effects. Although "rectangular" gradient pulses are preferable from a theoretical viewpoint, we found that shaped gradient (e.g., half-sine) pulses, which due to their slower rise and fall times were more tractable for the current amplifier, were more sequentially reproducible. As well as generating fewer phase-based artifacts such shaped pulses also decrease the likelihood of vibration problems.

  7. Assessment of density functional theory optimized basis sets for gradient corrected functionals to transition metal systems: the case of small Nin (n

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Arvizu, Gregorio; Calaminici, Patrizia

    2007-05-21

    Density functional calculations have been performed for small nickel clusters, Ni(n), Ni(n) (+), and Ni(n)(-) (ntheory approach. Newly developed nickel all-electron basis sets optimized for generalized gradient approximation (GGA) as well as an all-electron basis set optimized for the local density approximation were employed. For both neutral and charged systems, several isomers and different multiplicities were studied in order to determine the lowest energy structures. A vibrational analysis was performed in order to characterize these isomers. Structural parameters, harmonic frequencies, binding energies, ionization potentials, and electron affinities are reported. This work shows that the employed GGA basis sets for the nickel atom are important for the correct prediction of the ground state structures of small nickel clusters and that the structural assignment of these systems can be performed, with a good resolution, over the ionization potential.

  8. 密度梯度碳/碳复合材料的制备及性能%Preparation and Properties of Density Gradient Carbon/Carbon Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈强; 张守阳

    2011-01-01

    采用强制流动热梯度化学气相渗透法在1000~1250℃制备了密度梯度碳/碳复合材料;借助三点弯曲试验和激光闪烁法测定了复合材料的弯曲性能与导热系数,用偏光显微镜及扫描电子显微镜观察了基体热解碳的组织结构及断口形貌。结果表明:该复合材料上层的最大密度为1.65g·cm^-3,下层的最小密度为1.10g·cm^-3,具有明显的密度梯度;复合材料的密度越大,抗弯强度越高;其导热系数也随密度的增加而增大;沉积温度是影响基体热解碳组织的主要因素,高温有利于粗糙层热解碳的生成,而低温有利于光滑层热解碳的生成。%Density gradient carbon/carbon composites were infiltrated using forced flow thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration in the range of 1 000- 1 250℃. Flexural strength and thermal conductivity were determined by 3 point bending test and laser flashing method. Mierostructure of deposited pyrolytic carbon and morphology of fracture surface were observed by polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that maximal density of upper part of the composites was 1.65 g · cm^-3 , while miniumum density of bottom part was 1. 10 g ·em^-3 , and obvions density gradient was found. Flexural strength and coefficient of thermal conductivity increased with the increase of density of the composites. The deposition temperature had a great impact on the mierostrueture of the pyolytic carbon. A higher temperature was favourable for the formation of rough layer hydrocarbon, while a lower temperature was favourable for the formation of smooth layer hydrocarbon.

  9. Lagrangian Stochastic Modelling of Dispersion in the Convective Boundary Layer with Skewed Turbulence Conditions and a Vertical Density Gradient: Formulation and Implementation in the FLEXPART Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiani, Massimo; Stohl, Andreas; Brioude, Jerome

    2015-03-01

    A correction for the vertical gradient of air density has been incorporated into a skewed probability density function formulation for turbulence in the convective boundary layer. The related drift term for Lagrangian stochastic dispersion modelling has been derived based on the well-mixed condition. Furthermore, the formulation has been extended to include unsteady turbulence statistics and the related additional component of the drift term obtained. These formulations are an extension of the drift formulation reported by Luhar et al. (Atmos Environ 30:1407-1418, 1996) following the well-mixed condition proposed by Thomson (J Fluid Mech 180:529-556, 1987). Comprehensive tests were carried out to validate the formulations including consistency between forward and backward simulations and preservation of a well-mixed state with unsteady conditions. The stationary state CBL drift term with density correction was incorporated into the FLEXPART and FLEXPART-WRF Lagrangian models, and included the use of an ad hoc transition function that modulates the third moment of the vertical velocity based on stability parameters. Due to the current implementation of the FLEXPART models, only a steady-state horizontally homogeneous drift term could be included. To avoid numerical instability, in the presence of non-stationary and horizontally inhomogeneous conditions, a re-initialization procedure for particle velocity was used. The criteria for re-initialization and resulting errors were assessed for the case of non-stationary conditions by comparing a reference numerical solution in simplified unsteady conditions, obtained using the non-stationary drift term, and a solution based on the steady drift with re-initialization. Two examples of "real-world" numerical simulations were performed under different convective conditions to demonstrate the effect of the vertical gradient in density on the particle dispersion in the CBL.

  10. On the errors of local density (LDA) and generalized gradient (GGA) approximations to the Kohn-Sham potential and orbital energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, O. V.; Mentel, Ł. M.; Baerends, E. J.

    2016-05-01

    In spite of the high quality of exchange-correlation energies Exc obtained with the generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) of density functional theory, their xc potentials vxc are strongly deficient, yielding upshifts of ca. 5 eV in the orbital energy spectrum (in the order of 50% of high-lying valence orbital energies). The GGAs share this deficiency with the local density approximation (LDA). We argue that this error is not caused by the incorrect long-range asymptotics of vxc or by self-interaction error. It arises from incorrect density dependencies of LDA and GGA exchange functionals leading to incorrect (too repulsive) functional derivatives (i.e., response parts of the potentials). The vxc potential is partitioned into the potential of the xc hole vxchole (twice the xc energy density ɛxc), which determines Exc, and the response potential vresp, which does not contribute to Exc explicitly. The substantial upshift of LDA/GGA orbital energies is due to a too repulsive LDA exchange response potential vxresp L D A in the bulk region. Retaining the LDA exchange hole potential plus the B88 gradient correction to it but replacing the response parts of these potentials by the model orbital-dependent response potential vxresp G L L B of Gritsenko et al. [Phys. Rev. A 51, 1944 (1995)], which has the proper step-wise form, improves the orbital energies by more than an order of magnitude. Examples are given for the prototype molecules: dihydrogen, dinitrogen, carbon monoxide, ethylene, formaldehyde, and formic acid.

  11. Comparative validation using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR and conventional PCR of bovine semen centrifuged in continuous density gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Resende

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the sperm enrichment with X-bearing spermatozoa, after one centrifugation in a Percoll or OptiPrep continuous density gradient, using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR of sperm DNA and resultant in vitro-produced bovine embryos by PCR. Frozen/thawed sperm was layered on density gradients and the tubes were centrifuged. Supernatants were gently aspirated and the sperm recovered from the bottom of the tubes. Cleavage and blastocyst rates were determined through in vitro production of embryos and PCR was performed to identify the embryos' genetic sex. A difference in blastocyst rate was found in the Percoll treatment compared to OptiPrep (P<0.05. The percentage of female embryos in the Percoll and OptiPrep groups was 62.0% and 47.1%, respectively. These results were confirmed by qPCR of spermatozoa DNA and underestimation was seen only in the Percoll group. It was possible to sexing sperm using simple approach.

  12. Electron cyclotron maser emission mode coupling to the z-mode on a longitudinal density gradient in the context of solar type III bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pechhacker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    A beam of super-thermal, hot electrons was injected into maxwellian plasma with a density gradient along a magnetic field line. 1.5D particle-in-cell simulations were carried out which established that the EM emission is produced by the perpendicular component of the beam injection momentum. The beam has a positive slope in the distribution function in perpendicular momentum phase space, which is the characteristic feature of a cyclotron maser. The cyclotron maser in the overdense plasma generates emission at the electron cyclotron frequency. The frequencies of generated waves were too low to propagate away from the injection region, hence the wavelet transform shows a pulsating wave generation and decay process. The intensity pulsation frequency is twice the relativistic cyclotron frequency. Eventually, a stable wave packet formed and could mode couple on the density gradient to reach frequencies of the order of the plasma frequency, that allowed for propagation. The emitted wave is likely to be a z-mode wav...

  13. Density-Gradient Mediated Band Extraction of Leukocytes from Whole Blood Using Centrifugo-Pneumatic Siphon Valving on Centrifugal Microfluidic Discs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Kinahan

    Full Text Available Here we present retrieval of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by density-gradient medium based centrifugation for subsequent analysis of the leukocytes on an integrated microfluidic "Lab-on-a-Disc" cartridge. Isolation of white blood cells constitutes a critical sample preparation step for many bioassays. Centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are particularly suited for blood processing as they function without need of surface treatment and are 'low-pass', i.e., holding at high centrifugation speeds and opening upon reduction of the spin rate. Both 'hydrostatically' and 'hydrodynamically' triggered centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valving schemes are presented. Firstly, the geometry of the pneumatic chamber of hydrostatically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves is optimised to enable smooth and uniform layering of blood on top of the density-gradient medium; this feature proves to be key for efficient Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction. A theoretical analysis of hydrostatically primed valves is also presented which determines the optimum priming pressure for the individual valves. Next, 'dual siphon' configurations for both hydrostatically and hydrodynamically primed centrifugo-pneumatic siphon valves are introduced; here plasma and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells are extracted through a distinct siphon valve. This work represents a first step towards enabling on disc multi-parameter analysis. Finally, the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells extraction in these structures is characterised using a simplified design. A microfluidic mechanism, which we termed phase switching, is identified which affects the efficiency of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell extraction.

  14. Temperature gradient measurements by using thermoelectric effect in CNTs-silicone adhesive composite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tariq Saeed Chani

    Full Text Available This work presents the fabrication and investigation of thermoelectric cells based on composite of carbon nanotubes (CNT and silicone adhesive. The composite contains CNT and silicon adhesive 1∶1 by weight. The current-voltage characteristics and dependences of voltage, current and Seebeck coefficient on the temperature gradient of cell were studied. It was observed that with increase in temperature gradient the open circuit voltage, short circuit current and the Seebeck coefficient of the cells increase. Approximately 7 times increase in temperature gradient increases the open circuit voltage and short circuit current up to 40 and 5 times, respectively. The simulation of experimental results is also carried out; the simulated results are well matched with experimental results.

  15. Influence of stem temperature changes on heat pulse sap flux density measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandegehuchte, Maurits W; Burgess, Stephen S O; Downey, Alec; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    While natural spatial temperature gradients between measurement needles have been thoroughly investigated for continuous heat-based sap flow methods, little attention has been given to how natural changes in stem temperature impact heat pulse-based methods through temporal rather than spatial effects. By modelling the theoretical equation for both an ideal instantaneous pulse and a step pulse and applying a finite element model which included actual needle dimensions and wound effects, the influence of a varying stem temperature on heat pulse-based methods was investigated. It was shown that the heat ratio (HR) method was influenced, while for the compensation heat pulse and Tmax methods changes in stem temperatures of up to 0.002 °C s(-1) did not lead to significantly different results. For the HR method, rising stem temperatures during measurements led to lower heat pulse velocity values, while decreasing stem temperatures led to both higher and lower heat pulse velocities, and to imaginary results for high flows. These errors of up to 40% can easily be prevented by including a temperature correction in the data analysis procedure, calculating the slope of the natural temperature change based on the measured temperatures before application of the heat pulse. Results of a greenhouse and outdoor experiment on Pinus pinea L. show the influence of this correction on low and average sap flux densities.

  16. Measured and theoretical characterization of the RF properties of stacked, high-gradient insulator material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houck, T. L., LLNL

    1997-05-09

    Recent high-voltage breakdown experiments of periodic metallic-dielectric insulating structures have suggested several interesting high-gradient applications. One such area is the employment of high-gradient insulators in high-current, electron-beam, accelerating induction modules. For this application, the understanding of the rf characteristics of the insulator plays an important role in estimating beam-cavity interactions. In this paper, we examine the rf properties of the insulator comparing simulation results with experiment. Different insulator designs are examined to determine their rf transmission properties in gap geometries.

  17. Density gradient multilayered polymerization (DGMP): a novel technique for creating multi-compartment, customizable scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi-Barr, Shivanjali; Karpiak, Jerome V; Ner, Yogesh; Wen, Jessica H; Engler, Adam J; Almutairi, Adah

    2013-02-12

    Complex tissue culture matrices, in which types and concentrations of biological stimuli (e.g. growth factors, inhibitors, or small molecules) or matrix structure (e.g. composition, concentration, or stiffness of the matrix) vary over space, would enable a wide range of investigations concerning how these variables affect cell differentiation, migration, and other phenomena. The major challenge in creating layered matrices is maintaining the structural integrity of layer interfaces without diffusion of individual components from each layer. Current methodologies to achieve this include photopatterning, lithography, sequential functionalization5, freeze drying, microfluidics, or centrifugation, many of which require sophisticated instrumentation and technical skills. Others rely on sequential attachment of individual layers, which may lead to delamination of layers. DGMP overcomes these issues by using an inert density modifier such as iodixanol to create layers of varying densities. Since the density modifier can be mixed with any prepolymer or bioactive molecule, DGMP allows each scaffold layer to be customized. Simply varying the concentration of the density modifier prevents mixing of adjacent layers while they remain aqueous. Subsequent single step polymerization gives rise to a structurally continuous multilayered scaffold, in which each layer has distinct chemical and mechanical properties. The density modifier can be easily removed with sufficient rinsing without perturbation of the individual layers or their components. This technique is therefore well suited for creating hydrogels of various sizes, shapes, and materials. A protocol for fabricating a 2D-polyethylene glycol (PEG) gel, in which alternating layers incorporate RGDS-350, is outlined below. We use PEG because it is biocompatible and inert. RGDS, a cell adhesion peptide, is used to demonstrate spatial restriction of a biological cue, and the conjugation of a fluorophore (Alexa Fluor 350) enables

  18. How Do Vegetation Density and Transportation Network Density Affect Crime across an Urban Central-Peripheral Gradient? A Case Study in Kitchener—Waterloo, Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yikang Du

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between vegetation, transportation networks, and crime has been under debate. Vegetation has been positively correlated with fear of crime; however, the actual correlation between vegetation and occurrences of crime is uncertain. Transportation networks have also been connected with crime occurrence but their impact on crime tends to vary over different circumstances. By conducting spatial analyses, this study explores the associations between crime and vegetation as well as transportation networks in Kitchener-Waterloo. Further, geographically weighted regression modeling and a dummy urban variable representing the urban center/other urban areas were employed to explore the associations across an urban central-peripheral gradient. Associations were analyzed for crimes against persons and crimes against property for four specific crime types (assaults, vehicle theft, sex offences, and drugs. Results suggest that vegetation has a reverse association with crimes against persons and crimes against property while transportation networks have a positive relationship with these two types of crime. Additionally, vegetation can be a deterrent to vehicle theft crime and drugs, while transportation networks can be a facilitator of drug-related crimes. Besides, these two associations appear stronger in the urban center compared to the urban periphery.

  19. Gradient-based quantitative reconstruction of optical absorption and scattering coefficients in ultrasound-modulated optical tomography: first harmonic measurement type

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, Samuel; Leung, Terence S

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which uses the spatially localised acoustically-driven modulation of coherent light as a probe of the structure and optical properties of biological tissues. In this work we pose the inverse problem of simultaneously recovering the optical absorption and scattering coefficients in a given domain from measurement of the power-spectral density of the optical field modulated to the acoustic frequency. As part of this exposition we provide an overview of forward modelling techniques, and derive an efficient linearised diffusion-style model. To ameliorate the computational burden and memory requirements of a traditional Newton-based optimisation approach, we develop an adjoint-assisted gradient based method. We validate our reconstruction in two- and three-dimensions using simulated measurements with 1% proportional Gaussian noise, and demonstrate the successful recovery of the parameters to within +/-5% of their true values when th...

  20. Measurement of water vapour transport through a porous non-hygroscopic material in a temperature gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thor; Padfield, Tim; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2014-01-01

    This was an experiment to identify the driving potential for water vapour diffusion through porous materials in a temperature gradient. The specimen of mineral fibre insulation was placed between a space with controlled temperature and relative humidity and a space with a controlled, higher...

  1. Comparison of heat-pulse flow measurements and vertical gradients in a fractured limestone aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dearborn, L.L.; Calkin, S.F.; Andolsek, R.H. [ABB Environmental Services, Inc., Portland, ME (United States); Allison, W.S. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oliver Springs, TN (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Establishing a site-specific relationship between heat-pulse flowmeter (HPFM) data and corresponding vertical gradient data may allow prediction of potential vertical gradients through BPFM logging alone. Vertical gradient and corresponding BPFM rates were determined for 117 test intervals in a fractured limestone bedrock aquifer. From these data, it appears that HPFM data can be used in place of more labor intensive borehole packer testing to provide estimates of vertical gradients in this type of hydrogeologic system. Groundwater conditions in the fractured bedrock were investigated through testing of 66 open boreholes, as part of the hazardous waste remedial investigation at the former Loring Air Force Base (LAFB) in northern Maine, USA. Borehole geophysical logging tools, including BPFM and acoustic televiewer (ATV), in conjunction with air hammer drilling logs, were used to target specific fracture(s) to test using conventional straddle packers. HPFM and head data from 41 boreholes met general requirements for comparison purposes, and a linear correlation trend was identified.

  2. Correlations Between the Gradient of Contrast Density, Evaluated by Cardio CT, and Functional Significance of Coronary Artery Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orzan Marius

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assessment of the hemodynamic significance of a coronary artery stenosis is a challenging task, being extremely important for the establishment of indication for revascularization in atherosclerotic coronary artery stenosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of a new marker reflecting the functional significance of a coronary artery stenosis, represented by the attenuation degree of contrast density along the stenosis by Coronary CT.

  3. The role of adequate reference materials in density measurements in hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, A.; Moutinho, J.; Moura, S.; Oliveira, F.; Filipe, E.

    2015-02-01

    In hemodialysis, oscillation-type density meters are used to measure the density of the acid component of the dialysate solutions used in the treatment of kidney patients. An incorrect density determination of this solution used in hemodialysis treatments can cause several and adverse events to patients. Therefore, despite the Fresenius Medical Care (FME) tight control of the density meters calibration results, this study shows the benefits of mimic the matrix usually measured to produce suitable reference materials for the density meter calibrations.

  4. Tilted Magnetic Levitation Enables Measurement of the Complete Range of Densities of Materials with Low Magnetic Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Soh, Siowling; Kwok, Sen Wai; Yu, Hai-Dong; Whitesides, George M

    2016-02-03

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) of diamagnetic or weakly paramagnetic materials suspended in a paramagnetic solution in a magnetic field gradient provides a simple method to measure the density of small samples of solids or liquids. One major limitation of this method, thus far, has been an inability to measure or manipulate materials outside of a narrow range of densities (0.8 g/cm(3) levitated magnetically. Tilting the MagLev device relative to the gravitational vector enables the magnetic force to be decreased (relative to the magnetic force) along the axis of measurement. This approach enables many practical measurements over the entire range of densities observed in matter at ambient conditions-from air bubbles (ρ ≈ 0) to osmium and iridium (ρ ≈ 23 g/cm(3)). The ability to levitate, simultaneously, objects with a broad range of different densities provides an operationally simple method that may find application to forensic science (e.g., for identifying the composition of miscellaneous objects or powders), industrial manufacturing (e.g., for quality control of parts), or resource-limited settings (e.g., for identifying and separating small particles of metals and alloys).

  5. Biomimetic Gradient Polymers with Enhanced Damping Capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zhang, Huan; Guo, Jing; Cheng, Beichen; Cao, Yuan; Lu, Shengjun; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Designing gradient structures, mimicking biological materials, such as pummelo peels and tendon, is a promising strategy for developing advanced materials with superior energy damping capacities. Here a facile and effective approach for fabricating polymers with composition gradients at millimeter length scale is presented. The gradient thiol-ene polymers (TEPs) are created by the use of density difference of ternary thiol-ene-ene precursors and the subsequent photo-crosslinking via thiol-ene reaction. The compositional gradients are analyzed via differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), compressive modulus testing, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indentation, and swelling measurements. In contrast to homogeneous TEPs networks, the resultant gradient polymer shows a broader effective damping temperature range combining with good mechanical properties. The present result provides an effective route toward high damping materials by the fabrication of gradient structures.

  6. Experiment to measure oxygen opacity at high density and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, Paul; Mussack, Katie; Orban, Chris; Colgan, James; Ducret, Jean-Eric; Fontes, Christopher J.; Guzik, Joyce Ann; Heeter, Robert F.; Kilcrease, Dave; Le Pennec, Maelle; Mancini, Roberto; Perry, Ted; Turck-Chièze, Sylvaine; Trantham, Matt

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a debate over the abundances of heavy elements (Z >2) in the solar interior. Recent solar atmosphere models [Asplund 2009] find a significantly lower abundance for C, N, and O compared to models used roughly a decade ago. This discrepancy has led to an investigation of opacities through laboratory experiments and improved opacity models for many of the larger contributors to the sun’s opacity, including iron and oxygen. Recent opacity measurements of iron disagree with opacity model predictions [Bailey et al, 2015]. Although these results are still controversial, repeated scrutiny of the experiment and data has not produced a conclusive reason for the discrepancy. New models have been implemented in the ATOMIC opacity code for C, O and Fe to address the solar abundance issue [Colgan, 2013]. Armstrong et al [2014] have also implemented changes in the ATOMIC code for low-Z elements. However, no data currently exists to test the low-Z material models in the regime relevant to the solar convection zone. We present an experimental design using the opacity platform developed at the National Ignition Facility to study the oxygen opacity at densities and temperatures near the solar convection zone conditions.This work is funded by the U.S. DOE, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in HEDPLP, grant No. DE-NA0001840, and the NLUF Program, grant No. DE-NA0000850, and through LLE, University of Rochester by the NNSA/OICF under Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  7. Linking Soil Physical Parameters Along a Density Gradient in a Loess-Soil Long-Term Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eden, Marie; Møldrup, Per; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    It is important to understand the impact of texture and organic carbon (OC) on soil structure development. Only few studies investigated this for silt-dominated soils. In this study, soil physical properties were determined on samples from a controlled experiment (Static Fertilization Experiment...... coefficient data; the model pore-connectivity factor was fairly constant, whereas the water blockage factor was markedly different. Water and air parameters both implied that change in bulk density was the major driver for diffusive and convective parameters in the experiment....

  8. Energetic Neutral Atom (ENA) intensity gradients in the heliotail during year 2003, using Cassini/INCA measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialynas, K.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Roelof, E. C.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we use all-sky energy-resolved (5-55 keV) energetic neutral atom (ENA) maps obtained by the Ion and Neutral CAmera (INCA) on board Cassini during the time period DOY 265/2003 to 268/2003, to investigate the properties of the peak-to-basin ENA emissions in the direction of the heliotail. Our conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) a relatively smooth boundary (called "transition region") between the very low (basin) and high (tail) ENA emissions from the heliosheath, with a spatial width of ~30° deg in ecl. longitude, that no theory had predicted to date, is identified in the energy range of 5-55 keV; (2) the ENA intensity gradient in this transition region is almost invariant as a function of both ecl. Latitude and energy, with an average value of ~2.4% per degree; (3) the deduced partial plasma pressure distributions in the 5-55 keV energy range are consistent with the ENA intensity distributions in the same energy range, while the ENA intensity gradient translates to a corresponding partial pressure gradient that occurs in the transition region; and (4) this partial pressure gradient is possibly not consistent with a tail magnetic field configuration that is similar to the measured magnetic fields by the Voyagers in the nose hemisphere.

  9. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Jain, Nupur; Ghiran, Ionita Calin; Tasoglu, Savas

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary) and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary) relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform.

  10. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Knowlton

    Full Text Available Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform.

  11. Dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution measured by diffraction-limited nanothermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chengmingyue; Gan, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangping; Gu, Min, E-mail: mgu@swin.edu.au [Centre for Micro-Photonics, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2015-09-21

    We quantify the dynamic microscale temperature gradient in a gold nanorod solution using quantum-dot-based microscopic fluorescence nanothermometry. By incorporating CdSe quantum dots into the solution as a nanothermometer, precise temperature mapping with diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-degree temperature resolution is achieved. The acquired data on heat generation and dissipation show an excellent agreement with theoretical simulations. This work reveals an effective approach for noninvasive temperature regulation with localized nanoheaters in microfluidic environment.

  12. The Effect of Pre-Impact Porosity and Vertical Density Gradients on the Gravity Signature of Lunar Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbury, Colleen; Johnson, Brandon C.; Melosh, H. Jay; Collins, Gareth S.; Blair, David M.; Soderblom, Jason M.; Nimmo, Francis; Phillips, Roger J.; Bierson, Carver J.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2015-11-01

    overall porosity, but higher vertical gradients, giving craters within SPA more-negative BAs than those within the highlands crust. These simulations demonstrate that the BA and porosities reported here are valid for determining general trends only.

  13. A protocol for exosome isolation and characterization: evaluation of ultracentrifugation, density-gradient separation, and immunoaffinity capture methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, David W; Xu, Rong; Ji, Hong; Tauro, Bow J; Simpson, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are 40-150 nm extracellular vesicles that are released from a multitude of cell types, and perform diverse cellular functions including intercellular communication, antigen presentation, and transfer of tumorigenic proteins, mRNA and miRNA. Exosomes are important regulators of the cellular niche, and their altered characteristics in many diseases, such as cancer, suggest their importance for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, and as drug delivery vehicles. Exosomes have been purified from biological fluids and in vitro cell cultures using a variety of strategies and techniques. In this chapter, we reveal the protocol and key insights into the isolation, purification and characterization of exosomes, distinct from shed microvesicles and apoptotic blebs. Using the colorectal cancer cell line LIM1863 as a cell model, a comprehensive evaluation of exosome isolation methods including ultracentrifugation (UC-Exos), OptiPrep™ density-based separation (DG-Exos), and immunoaffinity capture using anti-EpCAM-coated magnetic beads (IAC-Exos) were examined. All exosome isolation methodologies contained 40-150 nm vesicles based on electron microscopy, and positive for exosome markers (Alix, TSG101, HSP70) based on immunoblotting. This protocol employed a proteomic profiling approach to characterize the protein composition of exosomes, and label-free spectral counting to evaluate the effectiveness of each method in exosome isolation. Based on the number of MS/MS spectra identified for exosome markers and proteins associated with their biogenesis, trafficking, and release, IAC-Exos was shown to be the most effective method to isolate exosomes. However, the use of density-based separation (DG-Exos) provides significant advantages for exosome isolation when the use of immunoaffinity capture is limited (due to antibody availability and suitability of exosome markers).

  14. Experimental measurements of the SP response to concentration and temperature gradients in sandstones with application to subsurface geophysical monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinov, E.; Jackson, M. D.

    2014-09-01

    Exclusion-diffusion potentials arising from temperature gradients are widely neglected in self-potential (SP) surveys, despite the ubiquitous presence of temperature gradients in subsurface settings such as volcanoes and hot springs, geothermal fields, and oil reservoirs during production via water or steam injection. Likewise, with the exception of borehole SP logging, exclusion-diffusion potentials arising from concentration gradients are also neglected or, at best, it is assumed that the diffusion potential dominates. To better interpret these SP sources requires well-constrained measurements of the various coupling terms. We report measurements of thermoelectric and electrochemical exclusion-diffusion potentials across sandstones saturated with NaCl brine and find that electrode effects can dominate the measured voltage. After correcting for these, we find that Hittorf transport numbers are the same within experimental error regardless of whether ion transport occurs in response to temperature or concentration gradients over the range of NaCl concentration investigated that is typical of natural systems. Diffusion potentials dominate only if the pore throat radius is more than approximately 4000 times larger than the diffuse layer thickness. In fine-grained sandstones with small pore throat diameter, this condition is likely to be met only if the saturating brine is of relatively high salinity; thus, in many cases of interest to earth scientists, exclusion-diffusion potentials will comprise significant contributions from both ionic diffusion through, and ionic exclusion from, the pore space of the rock. However, in coarse-grained sandstones, or sandstones saturated with high-salinity brine, exclusion-diffusion potentials can be described using end-member models in which ionic exclusion is neglected. Exclusion-diffusion potentials in sandstones depend upon pore size and salinity in a complex way: they may be positive, negative, or zero depending upon sandstone

  15. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, E.M.; Yoo, A.J.; Beenen, L.F.; Berkhemer, O.A.; Blanken, M.D. den; Wismans, C.; Niessen, W.J.; Majoie, C.B.; Marquering, H.A.; Dijk, E.J. van

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and

  16. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M.M. Santos (Emilie M.); A.J. Yoo (Albert J.); L.F.M. Beenen (Ludo); O.A. Berkhemer (Olvert); M.D. Den Blanken (Mark D.); C. Wismans (Carrie); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); C.B. Majoie (Charles); H. Marquering (Henk)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by

  17. Polarization curve measurements combined with potential probe sensing for determining current density distribution in vanadium redox-flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Maik; Bredemeyer, Niels; Tenhumberg, Nils; Turek, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Potential probes are applied to vanadium redox-flow batteries for determination of effective felt resistance and current density distribution. During the measurement of polarization curves in 100 cm2 cells with different carbon felt compression rates, alternating potential steps at cell voltages between 0.6 V and 2.0 V are applied. Polarization curves are recorded at different flow rates and states of charge of the battery. Increasing compression rates lead to lower effective felt resistances and a more uniform resistance distribution. Low flow rates at high or low state of charge result in non-linear current density distribution with high gradients, while high flow rates give rise to a nearly linear behavior.

  18. Density-based similarity measures for content based search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hush, Don R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Porter, Reid B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruggiero, Christy E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We consider the query by multiple example problem where the goal is to identify database samples whose content is similar to a coUection of query samples. To assess the similarity we use a relative content density which quantifies the relative concentration of the query distribution to the database distribution. If the database distribution is a mixture of the query distribution and a background distribution then it can be shown that database samples whose relative content density is greater than a particular threshold {rho} are more likely to have been generated by the query distribution than the background distribution. We describe an algorithm for predicting samples with relative content density greater than {rho} that is computationally efficient and possesses strong performance guarantees. We also show empirical results for applications in computer network monitoring and image segmentation.

  19. Efficient enrichment of hepatic cancer stem-like cells from a primary rat HCC model via a density gradient centrifugation-centered method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-hui Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because few definitive markers are available for hepatic cancer stem cells (HCSCs, based on physical rather than immunochemical properties, we applied a novel method to enrich HCSCs. METHODOLOGY: After hepatic tumor cells (HTCs were first isolated from diethylinitrosamine-induced F344 rat HCC model using percoll discontinuous gradient centrifugation (PDGC and purified via differential trypsinization and differential attachment (DTDA, they were separated into four fractions using percoll continuous gradient centrifugation (PCGC and sequentially designated as fractions I-IV (FI-IV. Morphological characteristics, mRNA and protein levels of stem cell markers, proliferative abilities, induced differentiation, in vitro migratory capacities, in vitro chemo-resistant capacities, and in vivo malignant capacities were determined for the cells of each fraction. FINDINGS: As the density of cells increased, 22.18%, 11.62%, 4.73% and 61.47% of primary cultured HTCs were segregated in FI-FIV, respectively. The cells from FIII (density between 1.041 and 1.062 g/ml displayed a higher nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio and fewer organelles and expressed higher levels of stem cell markers (AFP, EpCAM and CD133 than cells from other fractions (P<0.01. Additionally, in vitro, the cells from FIII showed a greater capacity to self-renew, differentiate into mature HTCs, transit across membranes, close scratches, and carry resistance to chemotherapy than did cells from any other fraction; in vivo, injection of only 1×10(4 cells from FIII could generate tumors not only in subcutaneous tissue but also in the livers of nude mice. CONCLUSIONS: Through our novel method, HCSC-like cells were successfully enriched in FIII. This study will greatly contribute to two important areas of biological interest: CSC isolation and HCC therapy.

  20. Multiple Traffic Control Using Wireless Sensor and Density Measuring Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita RAI

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present scenario vehicular travel is increasing all over the world, especially in large urban areas. Therefore for simulating and optimizing traffic control to better accommodate this increasing demand is arises. In this paper we studied the optimization of traffic light controller in a City using wireless sensor and CCTV (Camera. We have proposed a traffic light controller and simulator that allows us to study different situation of traffic density in City and controlling the traffic of entire City by visual monitoring using CCTV. Using wireless sensor we can easily senses the density of traffic because the general architecture of wireless sensor network is an infrastructure less communication network.

  1. Ecohydrologic controls on vegetation density and evapotranspiration partitioning across the climatic gradients of the central United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Kochendorfer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The soil-water balance and plant water use are investigated over a domain encompassing the central United States using the Statistical-Dynamical Ecohydrology Model (SDEM. The seasonality in the model and its use of the two-component Shuttleworth-Wallace canopy model allow for application of an ecological optimality hypothesis in which vegetation density, in the form of peak green leaf area index (LAI, is maximized, within upper and lower bounds, such that, in a typical season, soil moisture in the latter half of the growing season just reaches the point at which water stress is experienced. Another key feature of the SDEM is that it partitions evapotranspiration into transpiration, evaporation from canopy interception, and evaporation from the soil surface. That partitioning is significant for the soil-water balance because the dynamics of the three processes are very different. The partitioning and the model-determined peak in green LAI are validated based on observations in the literature, as well as through the calculation of water-use efficiencies with modeled transpiration and large-scale estimates of grassland productivity. Modeled-determined LAI are seen to be at least as accurate as the unaltered satellite-based observations on which they are based. Surprising little dependence on climate and vegetation type is found for the percentage of total evapotranspiration that is soil evaporation, with most of the variation across the study region attributable to soil texture and the resultant differences in vegetation density. While empirical evidence suggests that soil evaporation in the forested regions of the most humid part of the study region is somewhat overestimated, model results are in excellent agreement with observations from croplands and grasslands. The implication of model results for water-limited vegetation is that the higher (lower soil moisture content in wetter (drier climates is more-or-less completely offset by the greater

  2. Age and Socioeconomic Gradients of Health of Indian Adults: An Assessment of Self-Reported and Biological Measures of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arokiasamy, Perianayagam; Uttamacharya; Kowal, Paul; Chatterji, Somnath

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes overall socioeconomic gradients and the age patterns of socioeconomic gradients of health of Indian adults for multiple health indicators encompassing the multiple aspects of health. Cross-sectional data on 11,230 Indians aged 18 years and older from the WHO-SAGE India Wave 1, 2007 were analyzed. Multivariate logit models were estimated to examine effects of socioeconomic status (education and household wealth) and age on four health domains: self-rated health, self-reported functioning, chronic diseases, and biological health measures. Results show that socioeconomic status (SES) was negatively associated with prevalence of each health measure but with considerable heterogeneity across age groups. Results for hypertension and COPD were inconclusive. SES effects are significant while adjusting for background characteristics and health risk factors. The age patterns of SES gradient of health depict divergence with age, however, no conclusive age pattern emerged for biological markers. Overall, results in this paper dispelled the conclusion of negative SES-health association found in some previous Indian studies and reinforced the hypothesis of positive association of SES with health for Indian adults. Higher prevalence of negative health outcomes and SES disparities of health outcomes among older age-groups highlight need for inclusive and focused health care interventions for older adults across socioeconomic spectrum.

  3. Diffusion-assisted selective dynamical recoupling: A new approach to measure background gradients in magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Gonzalo A.; Shemesh, Noam; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-02-01

    Dynamical decoupling, a generalization of the original NMR spin-echo sequence, is becoming increasingly relevant as a tool for reducing decoherence in quantum systems. Such sequences apply non-equidistant refocusing pulses for optimizing the coupling between systems, and environmental fluctuations characterized by a given noise spectrum. One such sequence, dubbed Selective Dynamical Recoupling (SDR) [P. E. S. Smith, G. Bensky, G. A. Álvarez, G. Kurizki, and L. Frydman, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 109, 5958 (2012)], allows one to coherently reintroduce diffusion decoherence effects driven by fluctuations arising from restricted molecular diffusion [G. A. Álvarez, N. Shemesh, and L. Frydman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 080404 (2013)]. The fully-refocused, constant-time, and constant-number-of-pulses nature of SDR also allows one to filter out "intrinsic" T1 and T2 weightings, as well as pulse errors acting as additional sources of decoherence. This article explores such features when the fluctuations are now driven by unrestricted molecular diffusion. In particular, we show that diffusion-driven SDR can be exploited to investigate the decoherence arising from the frequency fluctuations imposed by internal gradients. As a result, SDR presents a unique way of probing and characterizing these internal magnetic fields, given an a priori known free diffusion coefficient. This has important implications in studies of structured systems, including porous media and live tissues, where the internal gradients may serve as fingerprints for the system's composition or structure. The principles of this method, along with full analytical solutions for the unrestricted diffusion-driven modulation of the SDR signal, are presented. The potential of this approach is demonstrated with the generation of a novel source of MRI contrast, based on the background gradients active in an ex vivo mouse brain. Additional features and limitations of this new method are discussed.

  4. Dark current measurements at field gradients above 1 GV/m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Schill, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Batchelor, K.; Farrell, J.P. [Brookhaven Technology Group Inc., Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1998-07-01

    In this paper, the authors report the results of dark current studies on copper cathodes and stainless steel anodes held at a field gradient > 1 GV/m. The field emission current is , 1 A for fields less than 1 GV/m. As the field is increased, the dark current increases rapidly to 150 A for applied fields of {approximately} 1.7 GV/m. Fowler-Nordheim plots in this range of applied fields indicate a field enhancement factor of 10--20 for a copper cathode with a work function of 4.6 eV.

  5. Hardness Measurement of (TiB2-TiAl)/TiAl Symmetrically Function Gradient Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    (TiB2-TiAl)/TiAl symmetrically function gradient materials (FGM) were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Owing to the difference of the thermal expansion coefficients between TiB2 and TiAl, a compressive surface stress was introduced to the FGM by the thermal expansion mismatch. The hardness values of the uniform materials and the FGM were tested, respectively. For the FGM with a compressive surface stress, hardness is obviously superior to that of the uniform material.When the FGM was subjected to heat treatment,the hardness decreased due to a partial relaxation of the compressive surface stress.

  6. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    CERN Document Server

    Öz, E; Muggli, P

    2016-01-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE)~\\cite{bib:awake} project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook~\\cite{bib:Hook} method and has been described in great detail in the work by W. Tendell Hill et. al.~\\cite{bib:densitymeter}. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of $1\\%$ for the vapor density-length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach-Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prot...

  7. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, E.; Batsch, F.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE) (Assmann et al., 2014 [1]) project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook (Marlow, 1967 [2]) method and has been described in great detail in the work by Hill et al. (1986) [3]. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of 1% for the vapor density-length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach-Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prototype 8 cm long novel Rb vapor cell.

  8. Experimental Measurement of Diffusive Extinction Depth and Soil Moisture Gradients in Southwestern Saudi Arabian Dune Sand

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Iqra

    2013-05-01

    In arid lands, a major contribution to water loss is by soil water evaporation. Desert sand dunes in arid regions are devoid of runoff and have high rates of infiltration. Rainwater is commonly stored within them because of the low permeability soils in the underlying desert pavement. In such cases, moisture is confined in the sand dune below a depth, termed as the “extinction depth”, where it is protected from evaporation during long dry periods. Moreover, desert sand dunes have sparse vegetation, which results in low transpiration losses from the stored water. The water accumulated below the extinction depth of the sand dunes can be utilized for various purposes such as in irrigation to support desert agriculture. In this study, field experiments were conducted in Western Saudi Arabia to monitor the soil moisture gradients and determine the diffusive extinction depth of dune sand. The dune sand was saturated with water and was exposed to natural conditions (evaporation and precipitation). The decline of the water level in the sand column was continuously recorded using transducers and sensors installed at different depths monitored the temporal variation of temperature and moisture content within the sand. The hydrological simulator HYDRUS-1D was used to construct the vertical profiles of soil water content and temperature and the results obtained from HYDRUS-1D were compared to the gradients monitored by the sensors.

  9. Simultaneous perfusion and permeability measurements using combined spin- and gradient-echo MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedeskamp, Heiko; Andre, Jalal B; Straka, Matus; Christen, Thomas; Nagpal, Seema; Recht, Lawrence; Thomas, Reena P; Zaharchuk, Greg; Bammer, Roland

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate magnetic resonance imaging-based brain perfusion parameters from combined multiecho spin-echo and gradient-echo acquisitions, to correct them for T₁₋, T₂₋, and T₂₋*-related contrast agent (CA) extravasation effects, and to simultaneously determine vascular permeability. Perfusion data were acquired using a combined multiecho spin- and gradient-echo (SAGE) echo-planar imaging sequence, which was corrected for CA extravasation effects using pharmacokinetic modeling. The presented method was validated in simulations and brain tumor patients, and compared with uncorrected single-echo and multiecho data. In the presence of CA extravasation, uncorrected single-echo data resulted in underestimated CA concentrations, leading to underestimated single-echo cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT). In contrast, uncorrected multiecho data resulted in overestimations of CA concentrations, CBV, and MTT. The correction of CA extravasation effects resulted in CBV and MTT estimates that were more consistent with the underlying tissue characteristics. Spin-echo perfusion data showed reduced large-vessel blooming effects, facilitating better distinction between increased CBV due to active tumor progression and elevated CBV due to the presence of cortical vessels in tumor proximity. Furthermore, extracted permeability parameters were in good agreement with elevated T1-weighted postcontrast signal values.

  10. Density measurement of confined water with neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yang [ORNL; Faraone, Antonio [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Kamitakahara, William [ORNL; Liu, Kao-Hsiang [National Taiwan University; Mou, Chung-Yuan [National Taiwan University; Leao, Juscelino B [ORNL; Chang, Sung C [ORNL; Chen, Sow-hsin H [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This is a response to Soper's two comments (1) regarding our papers (2, 3) in PNAS that (a) the distribution of water across the pores is not uniform and (b) the majority of water may reside outside the pores. Here, we show that we have given proper consideration to both issues and have reconfirmed the validity of our method and conclusion as elaborated in the following. The possibility that layering effects across the pores may introduce errors in associating the (100) interchannel peak height with density is not a new idea (reference 3 in ref. 1), and it has already been addressed (2). The arguments of Sopor (4) mainly rest on the assumption that the average density of water does not depend on temperature.

  11. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host–guest complex (TTFcCBPQT4+). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host–guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. Finally, however, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  12. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shunsuke A.; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Shinohara, Yasushi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  13. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shunsuke A. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Taniguchi, Yasutaka [Center for Computational Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Department of Medical and General Sciences, Nihon Institute of Medical Science, 1276 Shimogawara, Moroyama-Machi, Iruma-Gun, Saitama 350-0435 (Japan); Shinohara, Yasushi [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, 06120 Halle (Germany); Yabana, Kazuhiro [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Center for Computational Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan)

    2015-12-14

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  14. Density Measurement System for Weights of 1 kg to 20 kg Using Hydrostatic Weighing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Jae; Lee, Woo Gab; Abdurahman, Mohammed; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    This paper presents a density measurement system to determine density of weights from 1 kg to 20 kg using hydrostatic weighing. The system works based on Archimedes principle. The density of reference liquid is determined using this setup while determining the density of the test weight. Density sphere is used as standard density ball to determine density of the reference liquid. A new immersion pan is designed for dual purpose to carry the density sphere and the cylindrical test weight for weighing in liquid. Main parts of the setup are an electronic balance, a thermostat controlled liquid bath, reference weights designed for bottom weighing, dual purpose immersion pans and stepping motors to load and unload in weighing process. The results of density measurement will be evaluated as uncertainties for weights of 1 kg to 20 kg.

  15. Influence of measuring algorithm on shape accuracy in the compensating turning of high gradient thin-wall parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Guilin; Zhu, Dengchao; Li, Shengyi

    2015-02-01

    In order to meet the requirement of aerodynamics, the infrared domes or windows with conformal and thin-wall structure becomes the development trend of high-speed aircrafts in the future. But these parts usually have low stiffness, the cutting force will change along with the axial position, and it is very difficult to meet the requirement of shape accuracy by single machining. Therefore, on-machine measurement and compensating turning are used to control the shape errors caused by the fluctuation of cutting force and the change of stiffness. In this paper, on the basis of ultra precision diamond lathe, a contact measuring system with five DOFs is developed to achieve on-machine measurement of conformal thin-wall parts with high accuracy. According to high gradient surface, the optimizing algorithm is designed on the distribution of measuring points by using the data screening method. The influence rule of sampling frequency is analyzed on measuring errors, the best sampling frequency is found out based on planning algorithm, the effect of environmental factors and the fitting errors are controlled within lower range, and the measuring accuracy of conformal dome is greatly improved in the process of on-machine measurement. According to MgF2 conformal dome with high gradient, the compensating turning is implemented by using the designed on-machine measuring algorithm. The shape error is less than PV 0.8μm, greatly superior compared with PV 3μm before compensating turning, which verifies the correctness of measuring algorithm.

  16. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikov, V

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm.

  17. Multi Point Velocity, Density and Temperature Measurements using LITA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Laser induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a nonintrusive, transient-grating optical technique that provides simultaneous high-accuracy measurements of velocity,...

  18. Phase-shifted reflective coherent gradient sensor for measuring Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of polished alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kang; Xie, Huimin; Fan, Bozhao

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of Ni-Cr Alloy are measured using phase-shifted reflective coherent gradient sensing (CGS) method. Three-point bending experiment is applied to obtain the Young's modulus by measuring the specimen out-of-plane displacement slopes. Bending experiment of a circular plate with fixed edges loaded by a centric concentrated force is applied to obtain the specimen bending stiffness. The Poisson's ratio is then solved by substituting the bending stiffness into Young's modulus. The results show that the phase-shifted reflective CGS method is valid for measuring Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of metals and alloys. In addition, the reflective specimen surfaces are obtained with precision finishing operations and the polishing parameters are optimized for CGS measurement. This method is more effective than the reflecting film transfer method, which is widely used in previous studies.

  19. Evaluation of Modified Pycnometric Method for Accurately Measuring the Density of Molten Nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Feng; FANG Liang; FU Yuechao; YANG Lingchuan

    2004-01-01

    A modified pycnometric method has been developed to obtain accurate densities of molten nickel.The new method allows continuous measurement of density over a wide temperature range from a single experiment.The measurement error of the method was analyzed, and the total uncertainty of the measurement was estimated to be within ±0.34%. The measured density of molten nickel decreases linearly with increasing temperature over a range from the melting point to 1873K. The density at the melting point and the thermal expansion coefficient of molten nickel are 7.90Mg·m-3 and 1.92×10-4 K-1,respectively.

  20. Intra-plasmaspheric wave power density deduced from long-term DEMETER measurements of terrestrial VLF transmitter wave amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauben, D.; Cohen, M.; Inan, U.

    2012-12-01

    We deduce the 3d intra-plasmaspheric distribution of VLF wave power between conjugate regions of strong VLF wave amplitudes as measured by DEMETER for high-power terrestrial VLF transmitters during its ~6-yr lifetime. We employ a mixed WKB/full-wave technique to solve for the primary and secondary electromagnetic and electrostatic waves which are transmitted and reflected from strong cold-plasma density gradients and posited irregularities, in order to match the respective end-point measured amplitude distributions. Energy arriving in the conjugate region and also escaping to other regions of the magnetosphere is note. The resulting 3d distribution allows improved estimates for the long-term average particle scattering induced by terrestrial VLF transmitters.

  1. Field measurement of water quality in a partially overturning reservoir with inverse temperature gradient in its bottomlayer; Teibu ni gyakuten suionso wo yusuru bubun junkan chosuichi no suishitsu kosei ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michioku, K.; Kanda, T. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Nishikawa, T. [Hyogo Prefectural Government Office, Kobe (Japan); Ishikawa, K.; Higashino, M. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan); Ito, T.

    1997-08-21

    A partially overturning dam reservoir with an inverse temperature gradient in its bottom layer was studied which is sited in the Seto-Naikai climatic zone, Hyogo prefecture for flood control and supply of irrigation water and clean water. The reservoir is featured by high concentration of materials, inverse temperature gradient, and stable lean-oxygen water mass in its bottom layer throughout the year. To clarify the relation between the formation factor of these specific water temperature and quality structures, and eutrophication of this water zone, water quality indexes were measured. In spite of the unstable temperature gradient ascending downward around the bottom layer, the bottom water mass stably stays throughout the year. The bottom layer contains dense soluble materials and suspended ones enough to compensate the density defect of the inverse temperature gradient. The main components for forming the density of bottom water was Ca and organic materials estimated by ignition loss. Based on water quality transport process, the formation factor of water quality structure, and the relation between eutrophication and a water quality profile were verified. 15 refs., 28 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Accuracy of cutoff probe for measuring electron density: simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Woong; You, Shin-Jae; Kim, Si-June; Lee, Jang-Jae; Kim, Jung-Hyung; Oh, Wang-Yuhl

    2016-09-01

    The electron density has been used for characterizing the plasma for basic research as well as industrial application. To measure the exact electron density, various type of microwave probe has been developed and improved. The cutoff probe is a promising technique inferring the electron density from the plasma resonance peak on the transmission spectrum. In this study, we present the accuracy of electron density inferred from cutoff probe. The accuracy was investigated by electromagnetic simulation and experiment. The discrepancy between the electron densities from the cutoff probe and other sophisticated microwave probes were investigated and discussed. We found that the cutoff probe has good accuracy in inferred electron density. corresponding author.

  3. Two new methods to detect cosmic voids without density measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Elyiv, Andrii; Pollina, Giorgia; Baldi, Marco; Branchini, Enzo; Cimatti, Andrea; Moscardini, Lauro

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic voids are effective cosmological probes to discriminate among competing world models. Their precise and unbiased identification is a prerequisite to perform accurate observational tests. The identification is generally based on density or geometry criteria that, because of their very nature, are prone to shot noise errors. In this work we propose two new void finders that are based on dynamical and clustering criteria to select voids in the Lagrangian coordinates and minimise the impact of sparse sampling. The first approach exploits the Zeldovich approximation to trace back in time the orbits of galaxies located in the voids and their surroundings, whereas the second uses the observed galaxy-galaxy correlation function to relax the objects' spatial distribution to homogeneity and isotropy. In both cases voids are defined as regions of the negative velocity divergence in Lagrangian coordinates, that can be regarded as sinks of the back-in-time streamlines of the mass tracers. To assess the performance ...

  4. The Effect of Pre-Impact Porosity and Vertical Density Gradients on the Gravity Signature of Lunar Craters as Seen by GRAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbury, C.; Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, H., IV; Collins, G. S.; Blair, D. M.; Soderblom, J. M.; Nimmo, F.; Bierson, C. J.; Phillips, R. J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    As a result of NASA's dual spacecraft Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission [Zuber et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231507], we now know that the lunar crust is highly porous and that the porosity varies laterally [Wieczorek et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231530] and vertically [Besserer et al., 2014; doi:10.1002/2014GL060240]. Analysis of complex craters located within the lunar highlands reveals that: 1) craters larger than diameter D~210 have positive Bouguer Anomalies (BAs), 2) craters with D ≲ 100 km have both positive and negative BAs that vary about the (near 0) mean by approximately ± 25 mGal, and, 3) D and BA are anticorrelated for craters with D ≲ 100 km [Soderblom et al., 2015; submitted]. Numerical modeling by Milbury et al. [2015, LPSC] shows that pre-impact porosity is the dominant influence on the gravity signature of complex craters with D ≲ 100 km, and mantle uplift dominates the gravity for those with D > 140 km. Phillips et al. [2015, LPSC] showed that complex craters located in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin tend to have more-negative BAs than similar craters in the highlands. By including (pre-impact) vertical porosity/density gradients in our impact simulations, we reproduce the observed anticorrelation between BA and D for D ≲ 100 km, and the observed difference between the BAs of SPA and highland craters. We use the iSALE hydrocode including pore space compaction [Wünnemann et al., 2006; doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.10.013] and dilatant bulking [Collins, 2014; doi:10.1002/2014JE004708] to understand how the gravity signature of impact craters develop. In this study we vary density/porosity with depth. We find that simulations that have constant porosity with depth have a lower BA for a given crater diameter than those with varying porosity. We used two different mean porosities (7% and 14%) and found that the BA increases with increasing porosity, similar to simulations with constant porosity. Larger

  5. Reconstruction of conductivity and current density images using only one component of magnetic field measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jin Keun; Yoon, Jeong-Rock; Woo, Eung Je; Kwon, Ohin

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI) is to provide current density images of a subject using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner with a current injection apparatus. The injection current generates a magnetic field that we can measure from MR phase images. We obtain internal current density images from the measured magnetic flux densities via Ampere's law. However, we must rotate the subject to acquire all of the three components of the induced magnetic flux density. This subject rotation is impractical in clinical MRI scanners when the subject is a human body. In this paper, we propose a way to eliminate the requirement of subject rotation by careful mathematical analysis of the MRCDI problem. In our new MRCDI technique, we need to measure only one component of the induced magnetic flux density and reconstruct both cross-sectional conductivity and current density images without any subject rotation.

  6. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öz, E.; Batsch, F.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE) (Assmann et al., 2014 [1]) project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook (Marlow, 1967 [2]) method and has been described in great detail in the work by Hill et al. (1986) [3]. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of 1% for the vapor density–length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach–Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prototype 8 cm long novel Rb vapor cell.

  7. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  8. The effect of plasma density structure on HF radio wave propagation at auroral and polar latitudes measured by e-POP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, G. W.; James, H. G.; Gillies, R.; McWilliams, K. A.; St-Maurice, J. P.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    One of the scientific objectives of the enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) Radio Receiver Instrument (RRI) is to study ionospheric density structure and its impact on High Frequency (HF) radio wave propagation. We present a survey of several ePOP RRI transits through isolated beams of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) Saskatoon and Rankin Inlet radars. It reveals that the spreading of a SuperDARN beam beyond its nominal azimuthal beam width of 3.24° is a common occurrence at auroral and polar latitudes. Furthermore, on multiple occasions, lateral deviations of a beam's power peak by several beam widths was measured, indicating the presence of significant plasma density gradients along the ray path. The e-POP RRI measurements illustrate that our understanding and recognition of plasma density gradients and their influence on HF radio wave propagation is limited. We report on the results of employing HF ray tracing techniques to quantify the impact of ionospheric structuring on HF radio wave propagation, and consider the source of the gradients contributing to the spreading of the SuperDARN beams.

  9. Modeling dendrite density from magnetic resonance diffusion measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Kroenke, CD; Østergaard, Leif;

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provides a noninvasive tool to probe tissue microstructure. We propose a simplified model of neural cytoarchitecture intended to capture the essential features important for water diffusion as measured by NMR. Two components contribute to the NMR signal in this mo...

  10. Bioimpedance for the spot measurement of tissue density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylke, E. S.; Ward, L. C.; Stannard, C.; Leigh, A.; Kilbreath, S. L.

    2013-04-01

    Long-standing lymphoedema is characterised by tissues changes which are currently not detectable using bioimpedance spectroscopy. It has been suggested that a combination of bipolar and tetrapolar measurements may be used to detect these tissues changes for a single site in the transverse direction. This was technique was trialled in a group of control participants with no history of lymphoedema or recent upper limb trauma. Repeated spot measurements were done without removal of electrodes to determine biological variability as well as with removal of electrodes to determine technical reproducibility. The inter-limb spot ratio of the controls was then compared to that of a number of women previously diagnosed with secondary lymphoedema in the forearm. Biological variability was not found to greatly influence repeated measures but only moderate technical reliability was found despite excellent co-efficient of variation for the majority of the measurements. A difference was seen between those with more severe swelling and the controls. This novel technique shows promise in detecting tissue changes associated with long-standing lymphoedema.

  11. Measurement of Inhomogeneities in MIMS Thermocouples Using a Linear-Gradient Furnace and Dual Heat-Pipe Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, E. S.; White, D. R.; Edgar, H.

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a linear-gradient furnace and a thermocouple homogeneity scanner that, together, measure changes in the Seebeck coefficient as a function of time and temperature. The furnace first exposes the test thermocouple to all temperatures in the range spanned by the furnace gradient. The homogeneity scanner then measures the Seebeck coefficient along the length of the thermocouple. By correlating the position on the thermocouple with the temperature in the furnace, changes in the Seebeck coefficient can be correlated with the temperature to which that part of the thermocouple was exposed. Repeat exposures for different durations allow the rapid accumulation of data describing drift versus temperature and time. The known profile of the furnace combined with the high resolution of the dual heat-pipe scanner enable the detection of Seebeck coefficient changes of less than 0.02 % over sub-millimeter distances. The high resolution of the scanner also minimizes the underestimation of short-range changes in the Seebeck coefficient. With the addition of other treatment processes, such as annealing, quenching, and cold work, the system can assess the full variety of reversible and irreversible effects in thermocouples. Preliminary experiments on base-metal thermocouples confirm much of the known long-term behavior. However, the system has also exposed the rapid onset of some of these effects at low temperatures, the large amount and variability of cold work in new thermocouples, and large variations between different thermocouples of the same type.

  12. Calorific value of Prosopis africana and Balanites aegyptiaca wood: Relationships with tree growth, wood density and rainfall gradients in the West African Sahel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Carmen Sotelo; Weber, John C. [World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Sahel Office, B.P. E 5118 Bamako (Mali); Silva, Dimas Agostinho da; Bolzon de Muniz, Graciela Ines [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Av. Lothario Meissner, 900, CEP.: 80270-170-Curitiba (Brazil); Garcia, Rosilei A. [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Instituto de Florestas, Departamento de Produtos Florestais, BR 465, km 07, 23890-000, Seropedica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Prosopis africana and Balanites aegyptiaca are native tree species in the West African Sahel and provide wood for fuel, construction and other essential products. A provenance/progeny test of each species was established at one relatively dry site in Niger, and evaluated at 13 years. Gross calorific value of the wood was determined for a random sample of trees in each test: gross CV and CVm{sup 3} = gross calorific value in MJ kg{sup -1} and MJ m{sup -3}, respectively. The major objectives were to determine if gross CV was positively correlated with wood density and tree growth, and if gross CV and/or CVm{sup 3} varied with rainfall gradients in the sample region. Provenances were grouped into a drier and more humid zone, and correlations were computed among all trees and separately in each zone. Results indicated that gross CV was not significantly correlated with density in either species. Gross CV was positively correlated with growth of P. africana (but not B. aegyptiaca) only in the drier zone. Gross CVm{sup 3} was positively correlated with growth of both species, and the correlations were stronger in the drier zone. Multiple regressions with provenance latitude, longitude and elevation indicated that provenance means for gross CV increased, in general, from the drier to the more humid zones. Regressions with gross CVm{sup 3} were not significant. Results are compared with earlier research reports from the provenance/progeny tests and with other tropical hardwood species; and practical implications are presented for tree improvement and conservation programs in the region. (author)

  13. Plasma Density Measurements on Refuelling by Solid Hydrogen Pellets in a Rotating Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma.......The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma....

  14. Observer variability of absolute and relative thrombus density measurements in patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Emilie M.M. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Yoo, Albert J. [Texas Stroke Institute, Plano, TX (United States); Beenen, Ludo F.; Majoie, Charles B. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berkhemer, Olvert A. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Neurology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Blanken, Mark D. den; Wismans, Carrie [AMC, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Niessen, Wiro J. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft (Netherlands); Marquering, Henk A. [Department of Radiology, AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); AMC, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: on behalf of the MR CLEAN investigators

    2016-02-15

    Thrombus density may be a predictor for acute ischemic stroke treatment success. However, only limited data on observer variability for thrombus density measurements exist. This study assesses the variability and bias of four common thrombus density measurement methods by expert and non-expert observers. For 132 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke, three experts and two trained observers determined thrombus density by placing three standardized regions of interest (ROIs) in the thrombus and corresponding contralateral arterial segment. Subsequently, absolute and relative thrombus densities were determined using either one or three ROIs. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was determined, and Bland-Altman analysis was performed to evaluate interobserver and intermethod agreement. Accuracy of the trained observer was evaluated with a reference expert observer using the same statistical analysis. The highest interobserver agreement was obtained for absolute thrombus measurements using three ROIs (ICCs ranging from 0.54 to 0.91). In general, interobserver agreement was lower for relative measurements, and for using one instead of three ROIs. Interobserver agreement of trained non-experts and experts was similar. Accuracy of the trained observer measurements was comparable to the expert interobserver agreement and was better for absolute measurements and with three ROIs. The agreement between the one ROI and three ROI methods was good. Absolute thrombus density measurement has superior interobserver agreement compared to relative density measurement. Interobserver variation is smaller when multiple ROIs are used. Trained non-expert observers can accurately and reproducibly assess absolute thrombus densities using three ROIs. (orig.)

  15. Sperm selection by Capripure(®) density-gradient centrifugation versus the dextran swim-up procedure in wild mountain ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Moreno, J; Esteso, M C; Castaño, C; Toledano-Díaz, A; Rodríguez, E; López-Sebastián, A

    2014-10-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of two methods of sperm selection - Capripure(®) density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) and dextran swim-up (DSU) - in semen samples from Iberian ibex (Capra pyrenaica) and European mouflon (Ovis musimon). During the increasing photoperiod, Capripure(®) DGC improved the percentage of sperm with progressive motility (Pmouflon, Capripure(®) DGC selection was unaffected by photoperiod, had no influence on any sperm variable, and selected 47.8% of the initial total number of mouflon spermatozoa in ejaculate samples. Photoperiod had no influence on the effectiveness of DSU in either ibexes or mouflons. In the ibexes, DSU reduced (Pmouflons, DSU had no significant influence on any sperm variable, and selected 27.8% of the initial total number. Capripure(®) DGC improved ibex and mouflon sperm motility (Pmouflon, sperm cells showing non-progressive motility were found after only 20 h of post-centrifugation incubation following Capripure(®) DGC selection. In conclusion, Capripure(®) DGC would seem a useful method for selecting the best spermatozoa from both ibex and mouflon ejaculates.

  16. [Development of a gentamicin producer under different culture conditions studied by a method of differential centrifugation of the mycelium in a saccharose density gradient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losev, V V; Laznikova, T N; Dmitrieva, S V

    1981-05-01

    The method of differential centrifugation in the sucrose density gradient (SDG) enabled one to trace the changes in the development of the seed and fermentation mycelium of the gentamicin-producing organism. Correlation between gentamicin distribution in the SDG and the culture productivity was found. It was shown that the culture grown under the optimal aeration and agitation conditions was characterized by formation of higher amounts of the mycelium in the 5th and 6th layers of the SDG. Such mycelium was more productive than that from the other SDG layers. The most productive 48-hour seed culture had the more significant part of the mycelium in the 3rd layer of the SDG. When such a culture had the more significant part of the mycelium in the 3rd layer of the SDG. When such a culture was used as the seed material, the activity of the fermentation broth was the highest. The method of differential centrifugation in the SDG provides determination of the culture productivity by the volumes of the fermentation mycelium in the 5th and 6th layers or the seed mycelium in the 3rd layer of the SDG.

  17. Instability of spiral and scroll waves in the presence of a gradient in the fibroblast density: the effects of fibroblast-myocyte coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Zimik, Soling

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast-myocyte coupling can modulate electrical-wave dynamics in cardiac tissue. In diseased hearts, the distribution of fibroblasts is heterogeneous, so there can be gradients in the fibroblast density (henceforth we call this GFD) especially from highly injured regions, like infarcted or ischemic zones, to less-wounded regions of the tissue. Fibrotic hearts are known to be prone to arrhythmias, so it is important to understand the effects of GFD in the formation and sustenance of arrhythmic re- entrant waves, like spiral or scroll waves. Therefore, we investigate the effects of GFD on the stability of spiral and scroll waves of electrical activation in a state-of-the- art mathematical model for cardiac tissue in which we also include fibroblasts. By introducing GFD in controlled ways, we show that spiral and scroll waves can be unstable in the presence of GFDs because of regions with varying spiral or scroll-wave frequency {\\omega}, induced by the GFD. We examine the effects of the resting membrane pote...

  18. Clinical efficacy of a combination of Percoll continuous density gradient and swim-up techniques for semen processing in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Inoue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the clinical efficacy of a procedure comprising a combination of Percoll continuous density gradient and modified swim-up techniques for the removal of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 from the semen of HIV-1 infected males, a total of 129 couples with an HIV-1 positive male partner and an HIV-1 negative female partner (serodiscordant couples who were treated at Keio University Hospital between January 2002 and April 2012 were examined. A total of 183 ejaculates from 129 HIV-1 infected males were processed. After swim-up, we successfully collected motile sperms at a recovery rate as high as 100.0% in cases of normozoospermia (126/126 ejaculates, oligozoospermia (6/6, and asthenozoospermia (36/36. The recovery rate of oligoasthenozoospermia was 86.7% (13/15. In processed semen only four ejaculates (4/181:2.2% showed viral nucleotide sequences consistent with those in the blood of the infected males. After using these sperms, no horizontal infections of the female patients and no vertical infections of the newborns were observed. Furthermore, no obvious adverse effects were observed in the offspring. This protocol allowed us to collect HIV-1 negative motile sperms at a high rate, even in male factor cases. We concluded that our protocol is clinically effective both for decreasing HIV-1 infections and for yielding a healthy child.

  19. Clinical efficacy of a combination of Percoll continuous density gradient and swim-up techniques for semen processing in HIV-1 serodiscordant couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Osamu; Kuji, Naoaki; Ito, Hiroe; Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Hamatani, Toshio; Oyadomari, Aimi; Kato, Shingo; Hanabusa, Hideji; Isaka, Keiichi; Tanaka, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of a procedure comprising a combination of Percoll continuous density gradient and modified swim-up techniques for the removal of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from the semen of HIV-1 infected males, a total of 129 couples with an HIV-1 positive male partner and an HIV-1 negative female partner (serodiscordant couples) who were treated at Keio University Hospital between January 2002 and April 2012 were examined. A total of 183 ejaculates from 129 HIV-1 infected males were processed. After swim-up, we successfully collected motile sperms at a recovery rate as high as 100.0% in cases of normozoospermia (126/126 ejaculates), oligozoospermia (6/6), and asthenozoospermia (36/36). The recovery rate of oligoasthenozoospermia was 86.7% (13/15). In processed semen only four ejaculates (4/181:2.2%) showed viral nucleotide sequences consistent with those in the blood of the infected males. After using these sperms, no horizontal infections of the female patients and no vertical infections of the newborns were observed. Furthermore, no obvious adverse effects were observed in the offspring. This protocol allowed us to collect HIV-1 negative motile sperms at a high rate, even in male factor cases. We concluded that our protocol is clinically effective both for decreasing HIV-1 infections and for yielding a healthy child. PMID:26908065

  20. Density gradient theory combined with the PC-SAFT equation of state used for modeling the surface tension of associating systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinš Václav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The density gradient theory (GT combined with a SAFT-type (Statistical Associating Fluid Theory equation of state has been used for modeling the surface tension of associating fluids represented by a series of six alkanols ranging from methanol to 1-pentanol. The effect of nonzero dipole moment of the selected alkanols on the predicted surface tension was investigated in this study. Results of the GT + non-polar Perturbed Chain (PC SAFT equation of state were compared to predictions of GT combined with the PC-polar-SAFT, i.e. PCP-SAFT, equation. Both GT + PC-SAFT and GT + PCP-SAFT give reasonable prediction of the surface tension for pure alkanols. Results of both models are comparable as no significant difference in the modeled saturation properties and in the predicted surface tension using GT was found. Consideration of dipolar molecules of selected alkanols using PCP-SAFT had only minor effect on the predicted properties compared to the non-polar PC-SAFT model.

  1. Measurements of ammonia emissions from spreading of manure using gradient FTIR techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, B.; Klemedtsson, L.; Bergqvist, B.

    2000-01-01

    is derived from simultaneous measurements of a tracer gas released over the area under study. Although not ideal in the actual measurement situation, this latter method has a potential for use on more local sources with less restrictions on micrometeorological conditions, and is thus included for validation...

  2. Gradient-Based Quantitative Image Reconstruction in Ultrasound-Modulated Optical Tomography: First Harmonic Measurement Type in a Linearised Diffusion Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Samuel; Arridge, Simon R; Leung, Terence S

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which uses the spatially localised acoustically-driven modulation of coherent light as a probe of the structure and optical properties of biological tissues. In this work we begin by providing an overview of forward modelling methods, before deriving a linearised diffusion-style model which calculates the first-harmonic modulated flux measured on the boundary of a given domain. We derive and examine the correlation measurement density functions of the model which describe the sensitivity of the modality to perturbations in the optical parameters of interest. Finally, we employ said functions in the development of an adjoint-assisted gradient based image reconstruction method, which ameliorates the computational burden and memory requirements of a traditional Newton-based optimisation approach. We validate our work by performing reconstructions of optical absorption and scattering in two- and three-dimensions using simulated measurements with 1% proportional Gaussian noise, and demonstrate the successful recovery of the parameters to within ±5% of their true values when the resolution of the ultrasound raster probing the domain is sufficient to delineate perturbing inclusions.

  3. Self-diffusion measurements of methanol and 1-decanol in supercritical CO{sub 2} by {sup 13}C pulsed field gradient NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, S.; Mayne, C.L.; Grant, D.M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Taylor, C.M.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Organic Analytical Chemistry Group

    1997-10-01

    A small amount of a highly polar compound, such as methanol, is frequently added to supercritical fluid (SCF) carbon dioxide to enhance its ability to dissolve polar molecules in SCF separation technology. Few diffusion coefficients in SCF mixtures have been reported in the literature. The pulsed field gradient spin-echo technique (PGSE) has been used extensively to measure self-diffusion in neat monohydric alcohols under pressure. Hurle et al. and Luedemann et al. showed that the experimental diffusion coefficients of methanol may be explained by a rough hard-sphere model (RHS) with a roughness parameter, A. In this paper, diffusion measurements are reported for CO{sub 2}-methanol and CO{sub 2}-decanol mixtures in supercritical fluids. Since methanol in CO{sub 2} is primarily monomeric at low concentration, the RHS model, that is accurate for most simple, non-associated liquids, should apply. Previous nuclear spin-lattice relaxation studies in SCF CO{sub 2} suggest a large local solvent density enhancement, or solvent clustering, near a alcohol solute molecule under SCF conditions. If solvent clustering occurs in the vicinity of alcohol solute molecules, it should affect the diffusion coefficients. The authors have made the requisite measurements and found that they corroborate their previous spin-relaxation data.

  4. One versus Two Breast Density Measures to Predict 5- and 10-Year Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlikowske, Karla; Gard, Charlotte C; Sprague, Brian L; Tice, Jeffrey A; Miglioretti, Diana L

    2015-06-01

    One measure of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density improves 5-year breast cancer risk prediction, but the value of sequential measures is unknown. We determined whether two BI-RADS density measures improve the predictive accuracy of the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium 5-year risk model compared with one measure. We included 722,654 women of ages 35 to 74 years with two mammograms with BI-RADS density measures on average 1.8 years apart; 13,715 developed invasive breast cancer. We used Cox regression to estimate the relative hazards of breast cancer for age, race/ethnicity, family history of breast cancer, history of breast biopsy, and one or two density measures. We developed a risk prediction model by combining these estimates with 2000-2010 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results incidence and 2010 vital statistics for competing risk of death. The two-measure density model had marginally greater discriminatory accuracy than the one-measure model (AUC, 0.640 vs. 0.635). Of 18.6% of women (134,404 of 722,654) who decreased density categories, 15.4% (20,741 of 134,404) of women whose density decreased from heterogeneously or extremely dense to a lower density category with one other risk factor had a clinically meaningful increase in 5-year risk from breast cancer risk and improves risk classification for women with risk factors and a decrease in density. A two-density model should be considered for women whose density decreases when calculating breast cancer risk. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke

    CERN Document Server

    Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

  6. Study of density field measurement based on NPLS technique in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Due to the influence of shock wave and turbulence, supersonic density field exhibits strongly inhomogeneous and unsteady characteristics. Applying traditional density field measurement techniques to supersonic flows yields three problems: low spatiotemporal resolution, limitation of measuring 3D density field, and low signal to noise ratio (SNR). A new method based on Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering (NPLS) technique is proposed in this paper to measure supersonic density field. This method measures planar transient density field in 3D supersonic flow by calibrating the relationship between density and concentration of tracer particles, which would display the density fluctuation due to the influence of shock waves and vortexes. The application of this new method to density field measurement of supersonic optical bow cap is introduced in this paper, and the results reveal shock wave, turbulent boundary layer in the flow with the spatial resolution of 93.2 μm/pixel. By analyzing the results at interval of 5 μs, temporal evolution of density field can be observed.

  7. Study of density field measurement based on NPLS technique in supersonic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN LiFeng; YI ShiHe; ZHAO YuXin; HE Lin; CHENG ZhongYu

    2009-01-01

    Due to the influence of shock wave and turbulence,supersonic density field exhibits strongly inho-mogeneous and unsteady characteristics.Applying traditional density field measurement techniques to supersonic flows yields three problems: low spatiotemporal resolution,limitation of measuring 3D density field,and low signal to noise ratio (SNR).A new method based on Nano-based Planar Laser Scattering (NPLS) technique is proposed in this paper to measure supersonic density field.This method measures planar transient density field in 3D supersonic flow by calibrating the relationship between density and concentration of tracer particles,which would display the density fluctuation due to the influence of shock waves and vortexes.The application of this new method to density field measurement of supersonic optical bow cap is introduced in this paper,and the results reveal shock wave,turbulent boundary layer in the flow with the spatial resolution of 93.2 pm/pixel.By analyzing the results at interval of 5 μs,temporal evolution of density field can be observed.

  8. Exchange Flow Rate Measurement Technique in Density Different Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoo Fumizawa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Buoyancy-driven exchange flows of helium-air through inclined a narrow tube was investigated. Exchange flows may occur following the opening of a window for ventilation, as well as when a pipe ruptures in a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The experiment in this paper was carried out in a test chamber filled with helium and the flow was visualized using the smoke wire method. A high-speed camera recorded the flow behavior. The image of the flow was transferred to digital data, and the slow flow velocity, i.e. micro flow rate was measured by PIV software. Numerical simulation was carried out by the code of moving particle method with Lagrange method.

  9. Elasticity-density and viscoelasticity-density relationships at the tibia mid-diaphysis assessed from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Simon; Schneider, Joannes; Varga, Peter; Laugier, Pascal; Raum, Kay; Grimal, Quentin

    2016-02-01

    Cortical bone tissue is an anisotropic material characterized by typically five independent elastic coefficients (for transverse isotropy) governing shear and longitudinal deformations in the different anatomical directions. It is well established that the Young's modulus in the direction of the bone axis of long bones has a strong relationship with mass density. It is not clear, however, whether relationships of similar strength exist for the other elastic coefficients, for they have seldom been investigated, and the results available in the literature are contradictory. The objectives of the present work were to document the anisotropic elastic properties of cortical bone at the tibia mid-diaphysis and to elucidate their relationships with mass density. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) was used to measure the transverse isotropic stiffness tensor of 55 specimens from 19 donors. Except for Poisson's ratios and the non-diagonal stiffness coefficient, strong linear correlations between the different elastic coefficients (0.7 tibia. RUS also measures the viscous part of the stiffness tensor. An anisotropy ratio close to two was found for damping coefficients. Damping increased as the mass density decreased. The data suggest that a relatively accurate estimation of all the mid-tibia elastic coefficients can be derived from mass density. This is of particular interest (1) to design organ-scale bone models in which elastic coefficients are mapped according to Hounsfield values from computed tomography scans as a surrogate for mass density and (2) to model ultrasound propagation at the mid-tibia, which is an important site for the in vivo assessment of bone status with axial transmission techniques.

  10. Large density amplification measured on jets ejected from a magnetized plasma gun

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Gunsu S.; You, Setthivoine; Bellan, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    Observation of a large density amplification in the collimating plasma jet ejected from a coplanar coaxial plasma gun is reported. The jet velocity is ~30 km s^-1 and the electron density increases from ~10^20 to 10^(22–23) m^-3. In previous spheromak experiments, electron density of the order 10^(19–21) m^-3 had been measured in the flux conserver region, but no density measurement had been reported for the source gun region. The coplanar geometry of our electrodes permits direct observation...

  11. Density profile evolution and nonequilibrium effects in partial and full spreading measurements of surface diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikunen, P.; Vattulainen, Ilpo Tapio; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2001-01-01

    in D-C(theta) depend on the initial density gradient and the initial state from which the spreading starts. To this end, we carry out extensive Monte Carlo simulations for a lattice-gas model of the O/W(110) system. Studies of submonolayer spreading from an initially ordered p(2x1) phase at theta = 1....../2 reveal that the spreading and diffusion rates in directions parallel and perpendicular to rows of oxygen atoms are significantly different within the ordered phase. Aside from this effect, we find that the degree of ordering in the initial phase has a relatively small impact on the overall behavior of D...

  12. Two-photon microscopy measurement of CMRO2 using periarteriolar PO2 gradients(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakadžić, Sava; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Jaswal, Rajeshwer S.; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Dale, Anders M.; Buxton, Richard B.; Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Boas, David A.; Devor, Anna

    2017-02-01

    The cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) is an essential parameter for evaluating brain function and pathophysiology. Measurements of CMRO2 with high spatio-temporal resolution are critically important for understanding how the brain copes with metabolic and blood perfusion changes associated with various clinical conditions, such as stroke, periinfarct depolarizations, and various microvasculopathies (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, chronic hypertension). CMRO2 measurements are also important for understanding the physiological underpinnings of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging signals. However, the currently available approaches for quantifying CMRO2 rely on complex multimodal imaging and mathematical modeling. Here, we introduce a novel method that allows estimation of CMRO2 based on a single measurement modality - two-photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy (2PLM) imaging of the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in cortical tissue. CMRO2 is estimated by fitting the changes of tissue PO2 around cortical penetrating arterioles with the Krogh cylinder model of oxygen diffusion. We measured the baseline CMRO2 in anesthetized rats, and modulated tissue PO2 levels by manipulating the depth of anesthesia. This method has a spatial resolution of approximately 200 μm and it may provide CMRO2 measurements in individual cortical layers or within confined cortical regions such as in ischemic penumbra and the foci of functional activation.

  13. Separate density and viscosity measurements of unknown liquid using quartz crystal microbalance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Tan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous liquids have a wide range of applications in many fields. Basic physical properties like the density and the viscosity have great impacts on the functionalities of a given ionic liquid. For the millions kinds of existing liquids, only a few have been systematically measured with the density and the viscosity using traditional methods. However, these methods are limited to measure the density and the viscosity of an ionic liquid simultaneously especially in processing micro sample volumes. To meet this challenge, we present a new theoretical model and a novel method to separate density and viscosity measurements with single quartz crystal microbalance (QCM in this work. The agreement of experimental results and theocratical calculations shows that the QCM is capable to measure the density and the viscosity of ionic liquids.

  14. Numerical shadows: measures and densities on the numerical range

    CERN Document Server

    Dunkl, Charles F; Holbrook, John A; Puchała, Zbigniew; Zyczkowski, Karol \\

    2010-01-01

    For any operator $M$ acting on an $N$-dimensional Hilbert space $H_N$ we introduce its numerical shadow, which is a probability measure on the complex plane supported by the numerical range of $M$. The shadow of $M$ at point $z$ is defined as the probability that the inner product $(Mu,u)$ is equal to $z$, where $u$ stands for a random complex vector from $H_N$, satisfying $||u||=1$. In the case of N=2 the numerical shadow of a non-normal operator can be interpreted as a shadow of a hollow sphere projected on a plane. A similar interpretation is provided also for higher dimensions. For a hermitian $M$ its numerical shadow forms a probability distribution on the real axis which is shown to be a one dimensional $B$-spline. In the case of a normal $M$ the numerical shadow corresponds to a shadow of a transparent solid simplex in $R^{N-1}$ onto the complex plane. Numerical shadow is found explicitly for Jordan matrices $J_N$, direct sums of matrices and in all cases where the shadow is rotation invariant. Results...

  15. Blood Density Is Nearly Equal to Water Density: A Validation Study of the Gravimetric Method of Measuring Intraoperative Blood Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitello, Dominic J; Ripper, Richard M; Fettiplace, Michael R; Weinberg, Guy L; Vitello, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The gravimetric method of weighing surgical sponges is used to quantify intraoperative blood loss. The dry mass minus the wet mass of the gauze equals the volume of blood lost. This method assumes that the density of blood is equivalent to water (1 gm/mL). This study's purpose was to validate the assumption that the density of blood is equivalent to water and to correlate density with hematocrit. Methods. 50 µL of whole blood was weighed from eighteen rats. A distilled water control was weighed for each blood sample. The averages of the blood and water were compared utilizing a Student's unpaired, one-tailed t-test. The masses of the blood samples and the hematocrits were compared using a linear regression. Results. The average mass of the eighteen blood samples was 0.0489 g and that of the distilled water controls was 0.0492 g. The t-test showed P = 0.2269 and R (2) = 0.03154. The hematocrit values ranged from 24% to 48%. The linear regression R (2) value was 0.1767. Conclusions. The R (2) value comparing the blood and distilled water masses suggests high correlation between the two populations. Linear regression showed the hematocrit was not proportional to the mass of the blood. The study confirmed that the measured density of blood is similar to water.

  16. Combining moving inlets for measuring gradients of reactive trace gases and thoron measurements for the determination of near surface fluxes -first results from the Amazon rain forest-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörgel, Matthias; Artaxo, Paulo; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Quesada, Carlos Alberto; Ferreira de Souza, Rodrigo Augusto; Trebs, Ivonne; Vega, Oscar; Yañez-Serrano, Ana Maria

    2016-04-01

    For many compounds of interest no fast response sensors for the determination of eddy covariance fluxes are available. Therefore, flux-gradient relationships are used. The most common are the aerodynamic gradient method and the modified Bowen ratio method. For those approaches some assumptions have to be made which restrict their use. An alternative approach to calculate these fluxes might be given by the "thoron clock" method. The radon isotope Thoron (220Rn) is exhaled from the soil and has a half life time of 56 seconds. Therefore, it exists in measureable amounts only close to the ground and is hardly advected. Its only source is the radioactive decay of Thorium in soil. As it is a noble gas Thoron is not influenced by biochemical processes in air. Consequently, its concentration profile only depends on vertical mixing and the radioactive decay which is a physical constant. According to Lehmann et al. (1999) and Plake and Trebs (2013) a transport-time can be directly calculated from two heights thoron concentration/activity for the layer in-between without further assumptions. From this transport time the transfer velocity is derived which is then applied to calculate the fluxes of other (reactive) trace gases. A major advantage of the method is that the transport-time is known and using the measured concentration profile the chemical loss of a compound can be directly calculated and corrected for. We have applied this method for a first time in the Amazon rainforest during a field campaign at the ATTO site 150 km North East of Manaus in the dry season of 2014. We measured gradients of NO, NO2, O3, HONO and VOCs by using a movable inlet on a lift system close to the forest floor (0.19 m, 0.52 m and 1.59 m). A Thoron profile was measure in parallel at the lower two heights. First results of the gradients, the transport times and some preliminary flux values will be presented. References: Lehmann, B.E., Lehmann, M., Neftel, A .: 220 Radon calibration of near

  17. Mass Function Gradients and the Need for Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, J A

    1998-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that the initial mass function (IMF) may be a function of the local star formation conditions. In particular, the IMF is predicted to flatten with increasing local luminosity density, with the formation of massive stars being preferentially enhanced in brighter regions. If IMF gradients are general features of galaxies, several previous astrophysical measurements, such as the surface mass densities of spirals (obtained assuming constant mass to light ratios), were plagued by substantial systematic errors. In this Letter, calculations which account for possible IMF gradients are presented of surface densities of spiral galaxies. Compared to previous estimates, the mass densities corrected for IMF gradients are higher in the outer regions of the disks. For a model based on the Milky Way but with an IMF scaled according to R136, the rotation curve without the traditional dark halo component falls with galactrocentric radius, though slower than it would without IMF gradients. For a s...

  18. Lack of correlation of glucose levels in filtered blood plasma to density and conductivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David M; Ash, Stephen R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to determine whether the glucose level of a blood plasma sample from a diabetic patient could be predicted by measuring the density and conductivity of ultrafiltrate of plasma created by a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. Conductivity of the plasma filtrate measures electrolyte concentration and should correct density measurements for changes in electrolytes and water concentration. In vitro studies were performed measuring conductivity and density of solutions of varying glucose and sodium chloride concentrations. Plasma from seven hospitalized patients with diabetes was filtered across a 30,000 m.w. cutoff membrane. The filtrate density and conductivity were measured and correlated to glucose levels. In vitro studies confirmed the ability to predict glucose from density and conductivity measurements, in varying concentrations of glucose and saline. In plasma filtrate, the conductivity and density measurements of ultrafiltrate allowed estimation of glucose in some patients with diabetes but not others. The correlation coefficient for the combined patient data was 0.45 which was significant but only explained 20% of the variability in the glucose levels. Individually, the correlation was significant in only two of the seven patients with correlation coefficients of 0.79 and 0.88. The reasons for lack of correlation are not clear, and cannot be explained by generation of idiogenic osmoles, effects of alcohol dehydrogenase, water intake, etc. This combination of physical methods for glucose measurement is not a feasible approach to measuring glucose in plasma filtrate.

  19. Sap flow measurements combining sap-flux density radial profiles with punctual sap-flux density measurements in oak trees (Quercus ilex and Quercus pyrenaica) - water-use implications in a water-limited savanna-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J. Leonardo; Lubczynski1, Maciek W.

    2010-05-01

    Sap flow measurement is a key aspect for understanding how plants use water and their impacts on the ecosystems. A variety of sensors have been developed to measure sap flow, each one with its unique characteristics. When the aim of a research is to have accurate tree water use calculations, with high temporal and spatial resolution (i.e. scaled), a sensor with high accuracy, high measurement efficiency, low signal-to-noise ratio and low price is ideal, but such has not been developed yet. Granier's thermal dissipation probes (TDP) have been widely used in many studies and various environmental conditions because of its simplicity, reliability, efficiency and low cost. However, it has two major flaws when is used in semi-arid environments and broad-stem tree species: it is often affected by high natural thermal gradients (NTG), which distorts the measurements, and it cannot measure the radial variability of sap-flux density in trees with sapwood thicker than two centimeters. The new, multi point heat field deformation sensor (HFD) is theoretically not affected by NTG, and it can measure the radial variability of the sap flow at different depths. However, its high cost is a serious limitation when simultaneous measurements are required in several trees (e.g. catchment-scale studies). The underlying challenge is to develop a monitoring schema in which HFD and TDP are combined to satisfy the needs of measurement efficiency and accuracy in water accounting. To assess the level of agreement between TDP and HFD methods in quantifying sap flow rates and temporal patterns on Quercus ilex (Q.i ) and Quercus pyrenaica trees (Q.p.), three measurement schemas: standard TDP, TDP-NTG-corrected and HFD were compared in dry season at the semi-arid Sardon area, near Salamanca in Spain in the period from June to September 2009. To correct TDP measurements with regard to radial sap flow variability, a radial sap flux density correction factor was applied and tested by adjusting TDP

  20. Measurement of intracellular calcium gradients in single living cells using optical sectioning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelamarty, Rao V.; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    1992-06-01

    Intracellular free calcium has been recognized as a regulator of many cellular processes and plays a key role in mediating actions of many drugs. To elucidate subcellular spatial calcium changes throughout the cell in three dimensions (3-D), optical sectioning microscopy was applied using digital imaging coupled fluorescence microscopy. The cell was loaded with a fluorescent indicator, fura-2, and a stack of sectional fluorescent images were acquired, digitized and finally stored on-line for post image analysis. Each sectional image was then deconvolved, to remove contaminating light signals from adjacent planes, using the Nearest Neighboring Deconvolution Algorithm (NNDA) and the overall imaging system's empirical Point Spread Function (PSF) that is measured with a 0.25 micrometers fluorescent bead. Using this technique, we measured that the addition of growth factors caused a 2 - 3 fold increase (1) in nuclear calcium compared to cytosolic calcium in blood cells and (2) in both nuclear and cytosolic calcium in liver cells. Such spatial information, which is important in understanding subcellular processes, would not be possible to measure with other methods.

  1. Density Measurements of Na2WO4-WO3-ZnO Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on Archimedes principle, the densities of Na2WO4-WO3-ZnO melts at a fixed mole ratio of 3.43 of Na2WO4 to ZnO were measured. The results indicated that there was a linear relationship between the densities and temperatures at a fixed composition. At a fixed temperature, the linear relationship between densities and compositions showed different slop within different composition regions. The reasons were explained in view of ionic composition changes.

  2. Surface Tension of Binary Mixtures Including Polar Components Modeled by the Density Gradient Theory Combined with the PC-SAFT Equation of State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinš, Václav; Planková, Barbora; Hrubý, Jan

    2013-05-01

    In this study, the Cahn-Hilliard density gradient theory (GT) is used for predicting the surface tension of various binary mixtures at relatively wide temperature ranges and for testing the application of the GT for predictions of homogeneous nucleation. The GT was combined with two physically based equations of state (EoS), namely the perturbed-chain (PC) statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT) and its modification for polar substances the perturbed-chain polar (PCP) SAFT. The GT applied to the planar phase interface was employed to predict the interfacial tension for various quadrupolar (CO2 and benzene) and dipolar (difluoromethane, i.e., R32; pentafluoroethane, i.e., R125; and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane, i.e., R134a) substances and for five binary mixtures including polar components ( n-decane + CO2, benzene + CO2, R32 + R125, R32 + R134a, R134a + R125). The PCP-SAFT EoS combined with the GT provides more accurate results for both the quadrupolar and dipolar substances than the original PC-SAFT EoS. Besides the planar phase interface, the GT was also applied to the spherical phase interface simulating a critical cluster occurring in homogeneous nucleation of droplets. Carbon dioxide was considered, because it has a relatively high quadrupole moment and because of its relevance to natural gas processing. Application of the PCP-SAFT EoS provides a significant improvement compared to the PC-SAFT EoS, and it is clearly superior to the classical cubic Peng-Robinson EoS, which is still used for modeling droplet nucleation.

  3. Comparison of the effect of different media on the clinical outcomes of the density-gradient centrifugation/swim-up and swim-up methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Eun-Ha; Kim, Eun-Ah; Lee, Kyung-Ah; Shin, Ji-Eun; Kwon, Hwang

    2015-03-01

    Sperm must be properly prepared in in vitro fertilization (IVF)-embryo transfer (ET) programs in order to control the fertilization rate and ensure that embryos are of high quality and have appropriate developmental abilities. The objective of this study was to determine the most optimal sperm preparation method for IVF. Patients less than 40 years of age who participated in a fresh IVF-ET cycle from November 2012 to March 2013 were included in this study. Poor responders with less than three mature oocytes were excluded. Ham's F-10 medium or sperm-washing medium (SWM) was used in combination with the density-gradient centrifugation/swim-up (DGC-SUP) or SUP methods for sperm preparation. A total of 429 fresh IVF-ET cycles were grouped according to the media and methods used for sperm preparation and retrospectively analyzed (DGC-SUP/Ham's F-10, n=82; DGC-SUP/SWM, n=43; SUP/Ham's F-10, n=181; SUP/SWM, n=123). There were no significant differences among these four groups with respect to the mean age of the female partners, duration of infertility, number of previous IVF cycles, and retrieved oocytes. We determined that both the DGC-SUP and SUP methods for sperm preparation from whole semen, using either Ham's F-10 or SWM media, result in comparable clinical outcomes, including fertilization and pregnancy rates. We suggest that both media and both methods for sperm preparation can be used for selecting high-quality sperm for assistive reproductive technology programs.

  4. Efficient isolation of sperm with high DNA integrity and stable chromatin packaging by a combination of density-gradient centrifugation and magnetic-activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Hee-Jun; Kwak, Su-Jin; Kim, Seok-Gi; Kim, Youn-Young; Park, Ji-Young; Yoo, Chang-Seok; Park, Il-Hae; Sun, Hong-Gil; Kim, Jae-Won; Lee, Kyeong-Ho

    2016-12-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the correlations of the sperm DNA fragmentation index (DFI) with semen parameters and apoptosis, and to investigate the effects of density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) on reducing the proportion of sperm with DNA fragmentation and protamine deficiency. Semen analysis and a sperm DNA fragmentation assay were performed to assess the correlations between semen parameters and the DFI in 458 semen samples. Sperm with progressive motility or non-apoptosis were isolated by DGC or MACS, respectively, in 29 normozoospermic semen samples. The effects of DGC or MACS alone and of DGC and MACS combined on reducing the amount of sperm in the sample with DNA fragmentation and protamine deficiency were investigated. The sperm DFI showed a significant correlation (r=-0.347, p<0.001) with sperm motility and morphology (r=-0.114, p<0.05) but not with other semen parameters. The DFI (11.5%±2.0%) of semen samples was significantly reduced by DGC (8.1%±4.1%) or MACS alone (7.4%±3.9%) (p<0.05). The DFI was significantly further reduced by a combination of DGC and MACS (4.1%±1.3%, p<0.05). Moreover, the combination of DGC and MACS (1.6%±1.1%, p<0.05) significantly reduced the protamine deficiency rate of semen samples compared to DGC (4.4%±3.2%) or MACS alone (3.4%±2.2%). The combination of DGC and MACS may be an effective method to isolate high-quality sperm with progressive motility, non-apoptosis, high DNA integrity, and low protamine deficiency in clinical use.

  5. 3-D density imaging with muon flux measurements from underground galleries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesparre, N.; Cabrera, J.; Marteau, J.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric muon flux measurements provide information on subsurface density distribution. In this study, muon flux was measured underground, in the Tournemire experimental platform (France). The objective was to image the medium between the galleries and the surface and evaluate the feasibility to detect the presence of discontinuities, for example, produced by secondary subvertical faults or by karstic networks. Measurements were performed from three different sites with a partial overlap of muon trajectories, offering the possibility to seek density variations at different depths. The conversion of the measured muon flux to average density values showed global variations further analysed through a 3-D nonlinear inversion procedure. Main results are the presence of a very low density region at the level of the upper aquifer, compatible with the presence of a karstic network hosting local cavities, and the absence of secondary faults. We discuss the validity of the present results and propose different strategies to improve the accuracy of such measurements and analysis.

  6. Testing the performance of freeform LED optics by gradient based measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbig, David; Fleischmann, Friedrich; Henning, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LED) increasingly replace conventional filaments in various illumination applications due to higher performance and efficiency. However, their common luminous intensity profiles do not match all requirements and need to be adapted using secondary beam shaping optics. Aside from reflectors, such optics are commonly realized by freeform optical components. More sophisticated tasks such as safety and security applications are covered by strict regulations and demand a well defined spatial distribution of the emitted light. Up to now, correct functionality is only verified at system level by determining the resulting radiation pattern with a photogoniometer after packaging the optic with the light source and the fixture. However, the correct functionality of the individual optical component is usually not verified and in a fail case, the actual error source cannot be identified. A new measurement method based on experimental ray tracing (ERT) is introduced that enables performance testing of beam shaping secondary optics at component level. Rays emerging from a virtual point source are traced through the device under test. The angle of the refracted ray is recorded as a function of the incident angle. In an additional step, the resulting radiation distribution is determined based on the energy conservation law. Measurement result of a freeform lens for marine application are presented as an example and compared to results from a photogoniometer.

  7. Comparison of subjective and fully automated methods for measuring mammographic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshina, Nataliia; Roman, Marta; Sebuødegård, Sofie; Waade, Gunvor G; Ursin, Giske; Hofvind, Solveig

    2017-01-01

    Background Breast radiologists of the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program subjectively classified mammographic density using a three-point scale between 1996 and 2012 and changed into the fourth edition of the BI-RADS classification since 2013. In 2015, an automated volumetric breast density assessment software was installed at two screening units. Purpose To compare volumetric breast density measurements from the automated method with two subjective methods: the three-point scale and the BI-RADS density classification. Material and Methods Information on subjective and automated density assessment was obtained from screening examinations of 3635 women recalled for further assessment due to positive screening mammography between 2007 and 2015. The score of the three-point scale (I = fatty; II = medium dense; III = dense) was available for 2310 women. The BI-RADS density score was provided for 1325 women. Mean volumetric breast density was estimated for each category of the subjective classifications. The automated software assigned volumetric breast density to four categories. The agreement between BI-RADS and volumetric breast density categories was assessed using weighted kappa (kw). Results Mean volumetric breast density was 4.5%, 7.5%, and 13.4% for categories I, II, and III of the three-point scale, respectively, and 4.4%, 7.5%, 9.9%, and 13.9% for the BI-RADS density categories, respectively ( P for trend density categories was kw = 0.5 (95% CI = 0.47-0.53; P density increased with increasing density category of the subjective classifications. The agreement between BI-RADS and volumetric breast density categories was moderate.

  8. Measurements relating fire radiative energy density and surface fuel consumption - RxCADRE 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew T. Hudak; Matthew B. Dickinson; Benjamin C. Bright; Robert L. Kremens; E. Louise Loudermilk; Joseph J. O' Brien; Benjamin S. Hornsby; Roger D. Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale experiments have demonstrated that fire radiative energy is linearly related to fuel combusted but such a relationship has not been shown at the landscape level of prescribed fires. This paper presents field and remotely sensed measures of pre-fire fuel loads, consumption, fire radiative energy density (FRED) and fire radiative power flux density (FRFD),...

  9. Measurement of Plasma Density Produced in Dielectric Barrier Discharge for Active Aerodynamic Control with Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHANG Yi; XU Yan-Ji; LIN Bin; LI Yu-Tong; ZHU Jun-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    We utilize an interferometer to investigate the changes of the refractive index caused by dielectric barrier discharge plasma.The electronic density of the plasma produced is measured and analyzed tentatively.The results show that density of the plasma increases linearly with exciting voltages.

  10. Multiple Sparse Measurement Gradient Reconstruction Algorithm for DOA Estimation in Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijian Si

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel direction of arrival (DOA estimation method in compressed sensing (CS is proposed, in which the DOA estimation problem is cast as the joint sparse reconstruction from multiple measurement vectors (MMV. The proposed method is derived through transforming quadratically constrained linear programming (QCLP into unconstrained convex optimization which overcomes the drawback that l1-norm is nondifferentiable when sparse sources are reconstructed by minimizing l1-norm. The convergence rate and estimation performance of the proposed method can be significantly improved, since the steepest descent step and Barzilai-Borwein step are alternately used as the search step in the unconstrained convex optimization. The proposed method can obtain satisfactory performance especially in these scenarios with low signal to noise ratio (SNR, small number of snapshots, or coherent sources. Simulation results show the superior performance of the proposed method as compared with existing methods.

  11. Measuring forest structure along productivity gradients in the Canadian boreal with small-footprint Lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Douglas K; Coops, Nicholas C; Wulder, Michael A

    2013-08-01

    The structure and productivity of boreal forests are key components of the global carbon cycle and impact the resources and habitats available for species. With this research, we characterized the relationship between measurements of forest structure and satellite-derived estimates of gross primary production (GPP) over the Canadian boreal. We acquired stand level indicators of canopy cover, canopy height, and structural complexity from nearly 25,000 km of small-footprint discrete return Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) data and compared these attributes to GPP estimates derived from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). While limited in our capacity to control for stand age, we removed recently disturbed and managed forests using information on fire history, roads, and anthropogenic change. We found that MODIS GPP was strongly linked to Lidar-derived canopy cover (r = 0.74, p Lidar-derived canopy height and structural complexity as these attributes are largely a function of stand age. A relationship was apparent between MODIS GPP and the maximum sampled heights derived from Lidar as growth rates and resource availability likely limit tree height in the prolonged absence of disturbance. The most structurally complex stands, as measured by the coefficient of variation of Lidar return heights, occurred where MODIS GPP was highest as productive boreal stands are expected to contain a wider range of tree heights and transition to uneven-aged structures faster than less productive stands. While MODIS GPP related near-linearly to Lidar-derived canopy cover, the weaker relationships to Lidar-derived canopy height and structural complexity highlight the importance of stand age in determining the structure of boreal forests. We conclude that an improved quantification of how both productivity and disturbance shape stand structure is needed to better understand the current state of boreal forests in Canada and how these forests are changing in

  12. Density manifolds, geometric measures and high-energy physics in transfinite dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nada, S.I. [Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar)], E-mail: snada@qu.edu.qa

    2009-11-15

    We discuss certain manifolds with density. Furthermore, we outline natural connections leading to E-infinity theory and high-energy physics from a geometric measure and transfinite dimensional theoretical viewpoints.

  13. Modal decomposition for measuring the orbital angular momentum density of light

    CSIR Research Space (South Afri