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Sample records for density frequency dependence

  1. Equilibrium finite-frequency noise of an interacting mesoscopic capacitor studied in time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Niklas; Splettstoesser, Janine; Helbig, Nicole

    2018-03-01

    We calculate the frequency-dependent equilibrium noise of a mesoscopic capacitor in time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The capacitor is modeled as a single-level quantum dot with on-site Coulomb interaction and tunnel coupling to a nearby reservoir. The noise spectra are derived from linear-response conductances via the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Thereby, we analyze the performance of a recently derived exchange-correlation potential with time-nonlocal density dependence in the finite-frequency linear-response regime. We compare our TDDFT noise spectra with real-time perturbation theory and find excellent agreement for noise frequencies below the reservoir temperature.

  2. Adult trees cause density-dependent mortality in conspecific seedlings by regulating the frequency of pathogenic soil fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Minxia; Liu, Xubing; Gilbert, Gregory S; Zheng, Yi; Luo, Shan; Huang, Fengmin; Yu, Shixiao

    2016-12-01

    Negative density-dependent seedling mortality has been widely detected in tropical, subtropical and temperate forests, with soil pathogens as a major driver. Here we investigated how host density affects the composition of soil pathogen communities and consequently influences the strength of plant-soil feedbacks. In field censuses of six 1-ha permanent plots, we found that survival was much lower for newly germinated seedlings that were surrounded by more conspecific adults. The relative abundance of pathogenic fungi in soil increased with increasing conspecific tree density for five of nine tree species; more soil pathogens accumulated around roots where adult tree density was higher, and this greater pathogen frequency was associated with lower seedling survival. Our findings show how tree density influences populations of soil pathogens, which creates plant-soil feedbacks that contribute to community-level and population-level compensatory trends in seedling survival. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  3. Range-separated time-dependent density-functional theory with a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebolini, Elisa, E-mail: elisa.rebolini@kjemi.uio.no; Toulouse, Julien, E-mail: julien.toulouse@upmc.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2016-03-07

    We present a range-separated linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) which combines a density-functional approximation for the short-range response kernel and a frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter approximation for the long-range response kernel. This approach goes beyond the adiabatic approximation usually used in linear-response TDDFT and aims at improving the accuracy of calculations of electronic excitation energies of molecular systems. A detailed derivation of the frequency-dependent second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel is given using many-body Green-function theory. Preliminary tests of this range-separated TDDFT method are presented for the calculation of excitation energies of the He and Be atoms and small molecules (H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}). The results suggest that the addition of the long-range second-order Bethe-Salpeter correlation kernel overall slightly improves the excitation energies.

  4. Why Density Dependent Propulsion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 Khoury and Weltman produced a density dependent cosmology theory they call the Chameleon, as at its nature, it is hidden within known physics. The Chameleon theory has implications to dark matter/energy with universe acceleration properties, which implies a new force mechanism with ties to the far and local density environment. In this paper, the Chameleon Density Model is discussed in terms of propulsion toward new propellant-less engineering methods.

  5. Density dependent effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dortmans, P.J.; Amos, K.

    1994-01-01

    An effective nucleon-nucleon interaction is defined by an optimal fit to select on-and half-off-of-the-energy shell t-and g-matrices determined by solutions of the Lippmann-Schwinger and Brueckner-Bethe-Goldstone equations with the Paris nucleon-nucleon interaction as input. As such, it is seen to better reproduce the interaction on which it is based than other commonly used density dependent effective interactions. The new (medium modified) effective interaction when folded with appropriate density matrices, has been used to define proton- 12 C and proton- 16 O optical potentials. With them elastic scattering data are well fit and the medium effects identifiable. 23 refs., 8 figs

  6. Density dependent hadron field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, C.; Lenske, H.; Wolter, H.H.

    1995-01-01

    A fully covariant approach to a density dependent hadron field theory is presented. The relation between in-medium NN interactions and field-theoretical meson-nucleon vertices is discussed. The medium dependence of nuclear interactions is described by a functional dependence of the meson-nucleon vertices on the baryon field operators. As a consequence, the Euler-Lagrange equations lead to baryon rearrangement self-energies which are not obtained when only a parametric dependence of the vertices on the density is assumed. It is shown that the approach is energy-momentum conserving and thermodynamically consistent. Solutions of the field equations are studied in the mean-field approximation. Descriptions of the medium dependence in terms of the baryon scalar and vector density are investigated. Applications to infinite nuclear matter and finite nuclei are discussed. Density dependent coupling constants obtained from Dirac-Brueckner calculations with the Bonn NN potentials are used. Results from Hartree calculations for energy spectra, binding energies, and charge density distributions of 16 O, 40,48 Ca, and 208 Pb are presented. Comparisons to data strongly support the importance of rearrangement in a relativistic density dependent field theory. Most striking is the simultaneous improvement of charge radii, charge densities, and binding energies. The results indicate the appearance of a new ''Coester line'' in the nuclear matter equation of state

  7. Frequency dependent polarization in blazars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernsson, C.I.

    1984-10-01

    It is argued that the intrinsic frequency dependent polarization in blazars finds its most straightforward explanations in terms of a single rather than a multicomponent sourcemodel. In order to reproduce the observations, under the assumption that the emission mechanism is optically thin synchrotron radiation, both a well ordered magnetic field and an electron distribution with a sharp break or cuttoff are necessary. Non-uniform pitch angle distribution and/or environments where synchrotron losses are important are both conducive to producing strong frequency dependent polarization. Reasons are put forth as to why such conditions ar expected to occur in blazars. Two specific models are discussed in detail and it is shown that they are both able to produce strong frequency dependent polarization, even when the spectral index changes by a small amount only. (orig.)

  8. density-dependent selection revisited

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    is a more useful way of looking at density-dependent selection, and then go on ... these models was that the condition for maintenance of ... In a way, their formulation may be viewed as ... different than competition among species, and typical.

  9. Cell density dependence of transformation frequencies in C3H10T1/2 cells exposed to X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettega, D; Calzolari, P; Ottolenghi, A; Lombardi, L T [Milan Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Rimoldi, E [Milan Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Radiologia Veterinaria

    1989-12-01

    The effects of cell density on transformation frequencies were studied in C3H10T1/2 cells exposed to 0.5 and 7 Gy of 200 kVp X-rays. Initial cell density strongly influenced transformation frequency; this decreased by a factor of between 4 and 10 when the initial seeding density was changed from 50 to 2500 cells/10 cm diameter Petri dish. The data were fitted with two equations: (a) an allometric function represented on a log-log scale by a straight line and (b) a sigmoidal function with plateaux between 50 and 250 cells/dish and above 600. The two curves are compared and their probabilities discussed. Our data indicate that the region between 50 and 250 cells/dish would be the most suitable region for dose-effect measurements. A study of the growth curves at 0.5 and 8.5 Gy shows that cell growth rates are not influenced by initial cell density. (author).

  10. High frequency characterization of Galfenol minor flux density loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Weng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first measurement of ring-shaped Galfenol’s high frequency-dependent minor flux density loops. The frequencies of applied AC magnetic field are 1k, 5k, 10k, 50k, 100k, 200k, 300k, 500 kHz. The measurements show that the cycle area between the flux density and magnetic field curves increase with increasing frequency. High frequency-dependent characterization, including coercivity, specific power loss, residual induction, and maximum relative permeability are discussed. Minor loops for different max induction are also measured and discussed at the same frequency 100 kHz. Minor loops with the same max induction 0.05 T for different frequencies 50, 100, 200, 300, 400 kHz are measured and specific power loss are discussed.

  11. Linear response at the 4-component relativistic density-functional level: application to the frequency-dependent dipole polarizability of Hg, AuH and PtH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salek, Pawel; Helgaker, Trygve; Saue, Trond

    2005-01-01

    We report the implementation and application of linear response density-functional theory (DFT) based on the 4-component relativistic Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian. The theory is cast in the language of second quantization and is based on the quasienergy formalism (Floquet theory), replacing the initial state dependence of the Runge-Gross theorem by periodic boundary conditions. Contradictions in causality and symmetry of the time arguments are thereby avoided and the exchange-correlation potential and kernel can be expressed as functional derivatives of the quasienergy. We critically review the derivation of the quasienergy analogues of the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem and the Kohn-Sham formalism and discuss the nature of the quasienergy exchange-correlation functional. Structure is imposed on the response equations in terms of Hermiticity and time-reversal symmetry. It is observed that functionals of spin and current densities, corresponding to time-antisymmetric operators, contribute to frequency-dependent and not static electric properties. Physically, this follows from the fact that only a time-dependent electric field creates a magnetic field. It is furthermore observed that hybrid functionals enhance spin polarization since only exact exchange contributes to anti-Hermitian trial vectors. We apply 4-component relativistic linear response DFT to the calculation of the frequency-dependent polarizability of the isoelectronic series Hg, AuH and PtH 2 . Unlike for the molecules, the effect of electron correlation on the polarizability of the mercury atom is very large, about 25%. We observe a remarkable performance of the local-density approximation (LDA) functional in reproducing the experimental frequency-dependent polarizability of this atom, clearly superior to that of the BLYP and B3LYP functionals. This allows us to extract Cauchy moments (S(-4) = 382.82 and S(-6) = 6090.89 a.u.) that we believe are superior to experiment since we go to higher order in the Cauchy

  12. Density-dependent cladogenesis in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert B Phillimore

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A characteristic signature of adaptive radiation is a slowing of the rate of speciation toward the present. On the basis of molecular phylogenies, studies of single clades have frequently found evidence for a slowdown in diversification rate and have interpreted this as evidence for density dependent speciation. However, we demonstrated via simulation that large clades are expected to show stronger slowdowns than small clades, even if the probability of speciation and extinction remains constant through time. This is a consequence of exponential growth: clades, which, by chance, diversify at above the average rate early in their history, will tend to be large. They will also tend to regress back to the average diversification rate later on, and therefore show a slowdown. We conducted a meta-analysis of the distribution of speciation events through time, focusing on sequence-based phylogenies for 45 clades of birds. Thirteen of the 23 clades (57% that include more than 20 species show significant slowdowns. The high frequency of slowdowns observed in large clades is even more extreme than expected under a purely stochastic constant-rate model, but is consistent with the adaptive radiation model. Taken together, our data strongly support a model of density-dependent speciation in birds, whereby speciation slows as ecological opportunities and geographical space place limits on clade growth.

  13. Frequency-dependent heat capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Claus Flensted

    The frequency–dependent heat capacity of super-cooled glycerol near the glass transition is measured using the 3w detection technique. An electrical conducting thin film with a temperature–dependent electrical resistance is deposited on a substrate. The thin film is used simultaneously as a heater...

  14. Wildlife disease elimination and density dependence

    KAUST Repository

    Potapov, A.

    2012-05-16

    Disease control by managers is a crucial response to emerging wildlife epidemics, yet the means of control may be limited by the method of disease transmission. In particular, it is widely held that population reduction, while effective for controlling diseases that are subject to density-dependent (DD) transmission, is ineffective for controlling diseases that are subject to frequency-dependent (FD) transmission. We investigate control for horizontally transmitted diseases with FD transmission where the control is via culling or harvest that is non-selective with respect to infection and the population can compensate through DD recruitment or survival. Using a mathematical model, we show that culling or harvesting can eradicate the disease, even when transmission dynamics are FD. Eradication can be achieved under FD transmission when DD birth or recruitment induces compensatory growth of new, healthy individuals, which has the net effect of reducing disease prevalence by dilution. We also show that if harvest is used simultaneously with vaccination, and there is high enough transmission coefficient, application of both controls may be less efficient than vaccination alone. We illustrate the effects of these control approaches on disease prevalence for chronic wasting disease in deer where the disease is transmitted directly among deer and through the environment.

  15. On the interface trap density and series resistance of tin oxide film prepared on n-type Si (1 1 1) substrate: Frequency dependent effects before and after 60Co γ-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadeniz, S.; Selcuk, A. Birkan; Tugluoglu, N.; Ocak, S. Bilge

    2007-01-01

    We report the first investigation of the frequency dependent effects of gamma irradiation on interface state density and series resistance determined from capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G-V) characteristics in SnO 2 /n-Si structures prepared by spray deposition method. The samples were irradiated using a 60 Co γ-ray source at 500 kGy at room temperature. The C-V and G-V measurements of the samples were performed in the voltage range -6 V to 2 V and at 10 kHz, 100 kHz, 500 kHz and 1 MHz at room temperature before and after 500 kGy irradiation. The measurement capacitance and conductance are corrected for series resistance. It has been seen that the value of the series resistance R s of sample decreases from 204 Ω to 55.4 Ω with increasing the frequency before irradiation while it decreases from 248 Ω to 60 Ω with increasing frequency at 500 kGy irradiation. It has been found that and D it values of MOS structure increases up to 100 kHz and then decreases up to 1 MHz while the R s increases with increasing irradiation dose for our sample. The interface state density D it ranges from 1.83 x 10 13 cm -2 eV -1 for before irradiation to 1.54 x 10 13 cm -2 eV -1 for 500 kGy irradiation dose at 500 kHz and decreases with increasing frequency

  16. and density-dependent quark mass model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since a fair proportion of such dense proto stars are likely to be ... the temperature- and density-dependent quark mass (TDDQM) model which we had em- ployed in .... instead of Tc ~170 MeV which is a favoured value for the ud matter [26].

  17. Density dependence of the nuclear energy-density functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, Panagiota; Park, Tae-Sun; Lim, Yeunhwan; Hyun, Chang Ho

    2018-01-01

    Background: The explicit density dependence in the coupling coefficients entering the nonrelativistic nuclear energy-density functional (EDF) is understood to encode effects of three-nucleon forces and dynamical correlations. The necessity for the density-dependent coupling coefficients to assume the form of a preferably small fractional power of the density ρ is empirical and the power is often chosen arbitrarily. Consequently, precision-oriented parametrizations risk overfitting in the regime of saturation and extrapolations in dilute or dense matter may lose predictive power. Purpose: Beginning with the observation that the Fermi momentum kF, i.e., the cubic root of the density, is a key variable in the description of Fermi systems, we first wish to examine if a power hierarchy in a kF expansion can be inferred from the properties of homogeneous matter in a domain of densities, which is relevant for nuclear structure and neutron stars. For subsequent applications we want to determine a functional that is of good quality but not overtrained. Method: For the EDF, we fit systematically polynomial and other functions of ρ1 /3 to existing microscopic, variational calculations of the energy of symmetric and pure neutron matter (pseudodata) and analyze the behavior of the fits. We select a form and a set of parameters, which we found robust, and examine the parameters' naturalness and the quality of resulting extrapolations. Results: A statistical analysis confirms that low-order terms such as ρ1 /3 and ρ2 /3 are the most relevant ones in the nuclear EDF beyond lowest order. It also hints at a different power hierarchy for symmetric vs. pure neutron matter, supporting the need for more than one density-dependent term in nonrelativistic EDFs. The functional we propose easily accommodates known or adopted properties of nuclear matter near saturation. More importantly, upon extrapolation to dilute or asymmetric matter, it reproduces a range of existing microscopic

  18. Frequency dependent changes in NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind eKumar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity is thought to mediate several forms of learning, and can be induced by spike trains containing a small number of spikes occurring with varying rates and timing, as well as with oscillations. We computed the influence of these variables on the plasticity induced at a single NMDAR containing synapse using a reduced model that was analytically tractable, and these findings were confirmed using detailed, multi-compartment model. In addition to explaining diverse experimental results about the rate and timing dependence of synaptic plasticity, the model made several novel and testable predictions. We found that there was a preferred frequency for inducing long-term potentiation (LTP such that higher frequency stimuli induced lesser LTP, decreasing as 1/f when the number of spikes in the stimulus was kept fixed. Among other things, the preferred frequency for inducing LTP varied as a function of the distance of the synapse from the soma. In fact, same stimulation frequencies could induce LTP or LTD depending on the dendritic location of the synapse. Next, we found that rhythmic stimuli induced greater plasticity then irregular stimuli. Furthermore, brief bursts of spikes significantly expanded the timing dependence of plasticity. Finally, we found that in the ~5-15Hz frequency range both rate- and timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms work synergistically to render the synaptic plasticity most sensitive to spike-timing. These findings provide computational evidence that oscillations can have a profound influence on the plasticity of an NMDAR-dependent synapse, and show a novel role for the dendritic morphology in this process.

  19. Frequency dependence of polarization phase difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.S.; Rao, Y.S.; Wang, J.R.

    1993-09-01

    Polarimetric AIRSAR data of July 13, 1990 acquired over Mahatango watershed area was processed for the identification of corn fields an forested areas. Polarization Phase Difference (PPD) values were computed for the corn fields at P-, L- and C- bands and studied as a function of frequency. The results compare well with the model calculations at 24 deg. incidence angle where as the locations of corn fields were computed to be at 35 deg. incidence angle. The discrepancy is attributed to lack of accurate ground truth and the undulating topography of the corn fields. Another study reported here deals with the usefulness of Polarization Index (PI) for the study of vegetation. PI was found to be dependent on frequency for corn fields where as for forest trees no such dependence was noticed. PI HH,HV is more useful parameter compared to PI HH,VV even for the study of corn fields. (author). 19 refs, 7 figs

  20. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT DISPERSION MEASURES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PULSAR TIMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Shannon, R. M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Stinebring, D. R., E-mail: cordes@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: ryan.shannon@csiro.au, E-mail: dan.stinebring@oberlin.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH 44074 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency{sup 2}). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ∼ 4 × 10{sup −5} pc cm{sup −3} for pulsars at ∼1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm{sup −3} but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  1. Frequency-dependent Dispersion Measures and Implications for Pulsar Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, J. M.; Shannon, R. M.; Stinebring, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion measure (DM), the column density of free electrons to a pulsar, is shown to be frequency dependent because of multipath scattering from small-scale electron-density fluctuations. DMs vary between propagation paths whose transverse extent varies strongly with frequency, yielding arrival times that deviate from the high-frequency scaling expected for a cold, uniform, unmagnetized plasma (1/frequency2). Scaling laws for thin phase screens are verified with simulations; extended media are also analyzed. The rms DM difference across an octave band near 1.5 GHz is ˜ 4 × 10-5 pc cm-3 for pulsars at ˜1 kpc distance. The corresponding arrival-time variations are a few to hundreds of nanoseconds for DM ≲ 30 pc cm-3 but increase rapidly to microseconds or more for larger DMs and wider frequency ranges. Chromatic DMs introduce correlated noise into timing residuals with a power spectrum of “low pass” form. The correlation time is roughly the geometric mean of the refraction times for the highest and lowest radio frequencies used, ranging from days to years, depending on the pulsar. We discuss implications for methodologies that use large frequency separations or wide bandwidth receivers for timing measurements. Chromatic DMs are partially mitigable by including an additional chromatic term in arrival time models. Without mitigation, an additional term in the noise model for pulsar timing is implied. In combination with measurement errors from radiometer noise, an arbitrarily large increase in total frequency range (or bandwidth) will yield diminishing benefits and may be detrimental to overall timing precision.

  2. Charge density fluctuation of low frequency in a dusty plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳; 吕保维; O.Havnes

    1997-01-01

    The charge density fluctuation of low frequency in a dusty plasma, which is derived from the longitudinal dielectric permittivity of the dusty plasma, has been studied by kinetic theory. The results show that the P value, which describes the relative charge density on the dust in the plasma, and the charging frequency of a dust particle Ωc, which describes the ratio of charge changing of the dust particles, determine the character of the charge density fluctuation of low frequency. For a dusty plasma of P<<1, when the charging frequency Ωc is much smaller than the dusty plasma frequency wd, there is a strong charge density fluctuation which is of character of dust acoustic eigen wave. For a dusty plasma of P>>1, when the frequency Ωc, is much larger than wd there are weaker fluctuations with a wide spectrum. The results have been applied to the ionosphere and the range of radius and density of dust particles is found, where a strong charge density fluctuation of low frequency should exist.

  3. Evolutionary Graphs with Frequency Dependent Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Pu-Yan; Zhang, Pei-Ai

    Evolutionary graph theory was recently proposed by Lieberman et al. in 2005. In the previous papers about evolutionary graphs (EGs), the fitness of the residents in the EGs is in general assumed to be unity, and the fitness of a mutant is assumed to be a constant r. We aim to extend EG to general cases in this paper, namely, the fitness of a mutant is heavily dependent upon frequency. The corresponding properties for these new EGs are analyzed, and the fixation probability is obtained for large population.

  4. Frequency Dependent Losses in Transmission Cable Conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Holbøll, Joachim; Guðmundsdóttir, Unnur Stella

    2011-01-01

    , such as thermal conditions in and around the cable, as well as the heat generated in conductors, screens, armours etc., taking into account proximity and skin effects. The work performed and presented in this paper is concerned with an improved determination of the losses generated in the conductor, by means...... of better calculation of the AC resistance of transmission cable conductors, in particular regarding higher frequencies. In this way, also losses under harmonics can be covered. Furthermore, the model is suitable for modelling of transient attenuation in high voltage cables. The AC resistance is calculated...... based on the current density distribution in different conductor designs by means of the Finite Element Method (FEM). The obtained results and methods are compared to available standards (IEC publication 60287-1-1)....

  5. Nuclear spectroscopy with density dependent effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krewald, S.

    1976-07-01

    The paper investigates excited nuclear states with density-dependent effective interactions. In the first part of the paper, the structure and the width of the multipole giant resonances discovered in 1972 are derived microscopically. Because of their high excitation energy, these giant resonances are unstable to particle emission and thus often have a considerable decay width. Due to their collective structure, the giant resonances can be described by RPA in good approximation. In this paper, the continuum RPA is applied to the spherical nuclei 16 O, 40 Ca, 90 Zr and 208 Pb. The experimental centroid energy are in very good agreement with the calculations performed in the paper. (orig./WL) [de

  6. Studies of frequency dependent C-V characteristics of neutron irradiated p+-n silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zheng; Kraner, H.W.

    1990-10-01

    Frequency-dependent capacitance-voltage fluence (C-V) characteristics of neutron irradiated high resistivity silicon p + -n detectors have been observed up to a fluence of 8.0 x 10 12 n/cm 2 . It has been found that frequency dependence of the deviation of the C-V characteristic (from its normal V -1/2 dependence), is strongly dependent on the ratio of the defect density and the effective doping density N t /N' d . As the defect density approaches the effective dopant density, or N t /N' d → 1, the junction capacitance eventually assumes the value of the detector geometry capacitance at high frequencies (f ≤ 10 5 Hz), independent of voltage. A two-trap-level model using the concept of quasi-fermi levels has been developed, which predicts both the effects of C-V frequency dependence and dopant compensation observed in this study

  7. DPOAE generation dependence on primary frequencies ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Teresa; Sisto, Renata; Moleti, Arturo; D'Amato, Luisa; Sanjust, Filippo

    2015-12-01

    Two different mechanisms are responsible for the DPOAE generation. The nonlinear distortion wave-fixed mechanism generates the DPOAE Zero-Latency (ZL) component, as a backward traveling wave from the "overlap" region. Linear reflection of the forward DP wave (IDP) generates the DPOAE Long-Latency (LL) component through a place-fixed mechanism. ZL and LL components add up vectorially to generate the DPOAE recorded in the ear canal. The 2f1 - f2 and 2f2 - f1 DPOAE intensity depends on the stimulus level and on the primary frequency ratio r = f2/f1, where f1 and f2 are the primary stimuli frequencies. Here we study the behavior of the ZL and LL DPOAE components as a function of r by both numerical and laboratory experiments, measuring DPAOEs with an equal primary levels (L1 = L2) paradigm in the range [35, 75] dB SPL, with r ranging in [1.1, 1.45]. Numerical simulations of a nonlocal nonlinear model have been performed without cochlear roughness, to suppress the linear reflection mechanism. In this way the model solution at the base represents the DPOAE ZL component, and the solution at the corresponding DPOAE tonotopic place corresponds to the IDP. This technique has been not effectual to study the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE, as a consequence of its generation mechanism. While the 2f1 - f2 generation place is known to be the tonotopic place x(f2), the 2f2 - f1 DPOAE one has to be assumed basal to its corresponding reflection place. That is because ZL components generated in x(f2) cannot significantly pass through their resonant place. Moreover increasing the ratio r, 2f2 - f1 ZL and LL generation place approach each other, because the overlap region of primary tones decreases. Consequently, the distinction between the two places becomes complicated. DPOAEs have been measured in six young normal-hearing subjects. DPOAE ZL and LL components have been separated by a time-frequency filtering method based on the wavelet transform 1. due to their different phase gradient delay

  8. Effects of Density-Dependent Bag Constant and Strange Star Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qiao-Er; GUO Hua

    2003-01-01

    With the emphasis on the effects of the density-dependent bag constant and the rotation of strange star the limiting mass of strange star is calculated. The obtained results show that the limiting mass and the corresponding radius of strange star increase as the rotation frequency increases, and tend to be lowered when the density-dependent bag constant is considered.

  9. A mechanistic analysis of density dependence in algal population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eBorlestean

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Population density regulation is a fundamental principle in ecology, but the specific process underlying functional expression of density dependence remains to be fully elucidated. One view contends that patterns of density dependence are largely fixed across a species irrespective of environmental conditions, whereas another is that the strength and expression of density dependence are fundamentally variable depending on the nature of exogenous or endogenous constraints acting on the population. We conducted a study investigating the expression of density dependence in Chlamydomonas spp. grown under a gradient from low to high nutrient density. We predicted that the relationship between per capita growth rate (pgr and population density would vary from concave up to concave down as nutrient density became less limiting and populations experienced weaker density regulation. Contrary to prediction, we found that the relationship between pgr and density became increasingly concave-up as nutrient levels increased. We also found that variation in pgr increased, and pgr levels reached higher maxima in nutrient-limited environments. Most likely, these results are attributable to population growth suppression in environments with high intraspecific competition due to limited nutrient resources. Our results suggest that density regulation is strongly variable depending on exogenous and endogenous processes acting on the population, implying that expression of density dependence depends extensively on local conditions. Additional experimental work should reveal the mechanisms influencing how the expression of density dependence varies across populations through space and time.

  10. Nuclear symmetry energy in density dependent hadronic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, S.

    2008-12-01

    The density dependence of the symmetry energy and the correlation between parameters of the symmetry energy and the neutron skin thickness in the nucleus 208 Pb are investigated in relativistic Hadronic models. The dependency of the symmetry energy on density is linear around saturation density. Correlation exists between the neutron skin thickness in the nucleus 208 Pb and the value of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density, but not with the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. (author)

  11. The frequency-domain approach for apparent density mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, T.; Guo, L.

    2017-12-01

    Apparent density mapping is a technique to estimate density distribution in the subsurface layer from the observed gravity data. It has been widely applied for geologic mapping, tectonic study and mineral exploration for decades. Apparent density mapping usually models the density layer as a collection of vertical, juxtaposed prisms in both horizontal directions, whose top and bottom surfaces are assumed to be horizontal or variable-depth, and then inverts or deconvolves the gravity anomalies to determine the density of each prism. Conventionally, the frequency-domain approach, which assumes that both top and bottom surfaces of the layer are horizontal, is usually utilized for fast density mapping. However, such assumption is not always valid in the real world, since either the top surface or the bottom surface may be variable-depth. Here, we presented a frequency-domain approach for apparent density mapping, which permits both the top and bottom surfaces of the layer to be variable-depth. We first derived the formula for forward calculation of gravity anomalies caused by the density layer, whose top and bottom surfaces are variable-depth, and the formula for inversion of gravity anomalies for the density distribution. Then we proposed the procedure for density mapping based on both the formulas of inversion and forward calculation. We tested the approach on the synthetic data, which verified its effectiveness. We also tested the approach on the real Bouguer gravity anomalies data from the central South China. The top surface was assumed to be flat and was on the sea level, and the bottom surface was considered as the Moho surface. The result presented the crustal density distribution, which was coinciding well with the basic tectonic features in the study area.

  12. Variation in female morph frequencies and mating frequencies : random, frequency-dependent harassment or male mimicry?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammers, Martijn; Van Gossum, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Female-limited colour polymorphisms occur in a variety of species, where often one female morph (androchrome) resembles the body coloration of the conspecific male, whereas the other (gynochrome) does not. We tested predictions of two frequency-dependent hypotheses that are commonly invoked to

  13. Low-frequency oscillations at high density in JFT-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeno, Masaki; Katagiri, Masaki; Suzuki, Norio; Fujisawa, Noboru

    1977-12-01

    Low-frequency oscillations in a plasma were measured with magnetic probes and Si surface-barrier detectors, and behaviour of the high density plasmas was studied. The plasma current profile in the phase of decreasing density after the interruption of gas input is more peaked than during gas input. The introduction of hydrogen during a discharge results in a reduction of the impurities flux. The increase of density by fast gas input is limited with a negative voltage spike. Immediately before a negative voltage spike, oscillations of m=1,2 grow, leading to the spike. (auth.)

  14. Dependence of synchronization frequency of Kuramoto oscillators ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kuramoto oscillators have been proposed earlier as a model for interacting systems that exhibit synchronization. In this article, we study the difference between networks with symmetric and asymmetric distribution of natural frequencies. We first indicate that synchronization frequency of oscillators in a completely connected ...

  15. Dependence of synchronization frequency of Kuramoto oscillators ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Department of Theoretical Physics, Physical Research Laboratory, ... on the sine of the phase difference between the oscillators and hence, ... we study the change in synchronization frequency as the symmetry is changed under the limit of.

  16. Modal density of rectangular structures in a wide frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrinello, A.; Ghiringhelli, G. L.

    2018-04-01

    A novel approach to investigate the modal density of a rectangular structure in a wide frequency range is presented. First, the modal density is derived, in the whole frequency range of interest, on the basis of sound transmission through the infinite counterpart of the structure; then, it is corrected by means of the low-frequency modal behavior of the structure, taking into account actual size and boundary conditions. A statistical analysis reveals the connection between the modal density of the structure and the transmission of sound through its thickness. A transfer matrix approach is used to compute the required acoustic parameters, making it possible to deal with structures having arbitrary stratifications of different layers. A finite element method is applied on coarse grids to derive the first few eigenfrequencies required to correct the modal density. Both the transfer matrix approach and the coarse grids involved in the finite element analysis grant high efficiency. Comparison with alternative formulations demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  17. Density dependence of dielectronic recombination in selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagelstein, P.L.; Rosen, M.D.; Jacobs, V.L.

    1986-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination has been found to be the dominant recombination process in the determination of the ionization balance of selenium near the Ne-like sequence under conditions relevant to the exploding-foil EUV laser plasmas. The dielectronic recombination process tends to populate excited levels, and these levels in turn are more susceptible to subsequent excitation and ionization than are the ground-state ions. If one defines an effective recombination rate which includes, in addition to the primary recombination, the subsequent excitation and ionization of the additional excited-state population due to the primary recombination, then this effective recombination rate can be density-sensitive at relatively low electron density. We present results for this effective dielectronic recombination rate at an electron density of 3 x 10/sup 20/ electrons/cm 3 for recombination from Ne-like to Na-like selenium and from F-like to Ne-like selenium. In the former case, the effective recombination rate coefficient is found to be 1.8 x 10/sup -11/ cm 3 /sec at 1.0 keV, which is to be compared with the zero-density value of 2.8 x 10/sup -11/ cm 3 /sec. In the latter case (F-like to Ne-like), the effective recombination rate coefficient is found to be 1.3 x 10/sup -11/ cm 3 /sec, which is substantially reduced from the zero-density result of 3.3 x 10/sup -11/ cm 3 /sec. We have examined the effects of dielectronic recombination on the laser gain of the dominant Ne-like 3p-3s transitions and have compared our results with those presented by Whitten et al. [Phys. Rev. A 33, 2171 (1986)

  18. Density dependence of line intensities and application to plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masai, Kuniaki.

    1993-02-01

    Electron density dependence of spectral lines are discussed in view of application to density diagnostics of plasmas. The dependence arises from competitive level population processes, radiative and collisional transitions from the excited states. Results of the measurement on tokamak plasmas are presented to demonstrate the usefulness of line intensity ratios for density diagnostics. Also general characteristics related to density dependence are discussed with atomic-number scaling for H-like and He-like systems to be helpful for application to higher density plasmas. (author)

  19. Frequency dependence and frequency control of microbubble streaming flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2013-02-01

    Steady streaming from oscillating microbubbles is a powerful actuating mechanism in microfluidics, enjoying increased use due to its simplicity of manufacture, ease of integration, low heat generation, and unprecedented control over the flow field and particle transport. As the streaming flow patterns are caused by oscillations of microbubbles in contact with walls of the set-up, an understanding of the bubble dynamics is crucial. Here we experimentally characterize the oscillation modes and the frequency response spectrum of such cylindrical bubbles, driven by a pressure variation resulting from ultrasound in the range of 1 kHz raisebox {-.9ex{stackrel{textstyle <}{˜ }} }f raisebox {-.9ex{stackrel{textstyle <}{˜ }} } 100 kHz. We find that (i) the appearance of 2D streaming flow patterns is governed by the relative amplitudes of bubble azimuthal surface modes (normalized by the volume response), (ii) distinct, robust resonance patterns occur independent of details of the set-up, and (iii) the position and width of the resonance peaks can be understood using an asymptotic theory approach. This theory describes, for the first time, the shape oscillations of a pinned cylindrical bubble at a wall and gives insight into necessary mode couplings that shape the response spectrum. Having thus correlated relative mode strengths and observed flow patterns, we demonstrate that the performance of a bubble micromixer can be optimized by making use of such flow variations when modulating the driving frequency.

  20. Velocity form of the Kohn-Sham frequency-dependent polarizability equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolotti, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    A single equation is derived for the determination of the first-order correction to the frequency-dependent density, due to the perturbation of a time-varying electric field. This new expression for the first-order correction to the frequency-dependent Kohn-Sham amplitudes depends explicitly upon the velocity form of the dipole-moment operator and the square of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian

  1. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Thompson, Kelly G.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2011-01-01

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique. (author)

  2. Density-dependent growth in invasive Lionfish (Pterois volitans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkwitt, Cassandra E

    2013-01-01

    Direct demographic density dependence is necessary for population regulation and is a central concept in ecology, yet has not been studied in many invasive species, including any invasive marine fish. The red lionfish (Pterois volitans) is an invasive predatory marine fish that is undergoing exponential population growth throughout the tropical western Atlantic. Invasive lionfish threaten coral-reef ecosystems, but there is currently no evidence of any natural population control. Therefore, a manipulative field experiment was conducted to test for density dependence in lionfish. Juvenile lionfish densities were adjusted on small reefs and several demographic rates (growth, recruitment, immigration, and loss) were measured throughout an 8-week period. Invasive lionfish exhibited direct density dependence in individual growth rates, as lionfish grew slower at higher densities throughout the study. Individual growth in length declined linearly with increasing lionfish density, while growth in mass declined exponentially with increasing density. There was no evidence, however, for density dependence in recruitment, immigration, or loss (mortality plus emigration) of invasive lionfish. The observed density-dependent growth rates may have implications for which native species are susceptible to lionfish predation, as the size and type of prey that lionfish consume is directly related to their body size. The absence of density-dependent loss, however, contrasts with many native coral-reef fish species and suggests that for the foreseeable future manual removals may be the only effective local control of this invasion.

  3. Density-dependent growth in invasive Lionfish (Pterois volitans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra E Benkwitt

    Full Text Available Direct demographic density dependence is necessary for population regulation and is a central concept in ecology, yet has not been studied in many invasive species, including any invasive marine fish. The red lionfish (Pterois volitans is an invasive predatory marine fish that is undergoing exponential population growth throughout the tropical western Atlantic. Invasive lionfish threaten coral-reef ecosystems, but there is currently no evidence of any natural population control. Therefore, a manipulative field experiment was conducted to test for density dependence in lionfish. Juvenile lionfish densities were adjusted on small reefs and several demographic rates (growth, recruitment, immigration, and loss were measured throughout an 8-week period. Invasive lionfish exhibited direct density dependence in individual growth rates, as lionfish grew slower at higher densities throughout the study. Individual growth in length declined linearly with increasing lionfish density, while growth in mass declined exponentially with increasing density. There was no evidence, however, for density dependence in recruitment, immigration, or loss (mortality plus emigration of invasive lionfish. The observed density-dependent growth rates may have implications for which native species are susceptible to lionfish predation, as the size and type of prey that lionfish consume is directly related to their body size. The absence of density-dependent loss, however, contrasts with many native coral-reef fish species and suggests that for the foreseeable future manual removals may be the only effective local control of this invasion.

  4. Multicomponent density-functional theory for time-dependent systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butriy, O.; Ebadi, H.; de Boeij, P. L.; van Leeuwen, R.; Gross, E. K. U.

    2007-01-01

    We derive the basic formalism of density functional theory for time-dependent electron-nuclear systems. The basic variables of this theory are the electron density in body-fixed frame coordinates and the diagonal of the nuclear N-body density matrix. The body-fixed frame transformation is carried

  5. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Christiaan

    1998-01-01

    1.  Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not

  6. Experimental evidence for density dependence of reproduction in great tits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C.

    1998-01-01

    1. Density dependence of avian reproduction has often been analysed using correlations between annual mean reproductive output and population density. Experiments are necessary to prove that density is the cause of the observed patterns, but so far, three out of four experimental studies do not

  7. Density-dependent electron scattering in photoexcited GaAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mics, Zoltán; D'’Angio, Andrea; Jensen, Søren A.

    2013-01-01

    —In a series of systematic optical pump - terahertz probe experiments we study the density-dependent electron scattering rate in photoexcited GaAs in a large range of carrier densities. The electron scattering time decreases by as much as a factor of 4, from 320 to 60 fs, as the electron density...

  8. Prevalence and strength of density-dependent tree recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai Zhu; Christopher W. Woodall; Joao V.D. Monteiro; James S. Clark

    2015-01-01

    Density dependence could maintain diversity in forests, but studies continue to disagree on its role. Part of the disagreement results from the fact that different studies have evaluated different responses (survival, recruitment, or growth) of different stages (seeds, seedlings, or adults) to different inputs (density of seedlings, density or distance to adults). Most...

  9. Nonlinear low-frequency wave aspect of foreshock density holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations have uncovered short-duration density holes in the Earth's foreshock region. There is evidence that the formation of density holes involves non-linear growth of fluctuations in the magnetic field and plasma density, which results in shock-like boundaries followed by a decrease in both density and magnetic field. In this study we examine in detail a few such events focusing on their low frequency wave characteristics. The propagation properties of the waves are studied using Cluster's four point observations. We found that while these density hole-structures were convected with the solar wind, in the plasma rest frame they propagated obliquely and mostly sunward. The wave amplitude grows non-linearly in the process, and the waves are circularly or elliptically polarized in the left hand sense. The phase velocities calculated from four spacecraft timing analysis are compared with the velocity estimated from δEB. Their agreement justifies the plane electromagnetic wave nature of the structures. Plasma conditions are found to favor firehose instabilities. Oblique Alfvén firehose instability is suggested as a possible energy source for the wave growth. Resonant interaction between ions at certain energy and the waves could reduce the ion temperature anisotropy and thus the free energy, thereby playing a stabilizing role.

  10. Nonlinear low-frequency wave aspect of foreshock density holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Lin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations have uncovered short-duration density holes in the Earth's foreshock region. There is evidence that the formation of density holes involves non-linear growth of fluctuations in the magnetic field and plasma density, which results in shock-like boundaries followed by a decrease in both density and magnetic field. In this study we examine in detail a few such events focusing on their low frequency wave characteristics. The propagation properties of the waves are studied using Cluster's four point observations. We found that while these density hole-structures were convected with the solar wind, in the plasma rest frame they propagated obliquely and mostly sunward. The wave amplitude grows non-linearly in the process, and the waves are circularly or elliptically polarized in the left hand sense. The phase velocities calculated from four spacecraft timing analysis are compared with the velocity estimated from δE/δB. Their agreement justifies the plane electromagnetic wave nature of the structures. Plasma conditions are found to favor firehose instabilities. Oblique Alfvén firehose instability is suggested as a possible energy source for the wave growth. Resonant interaction between ions at certain energy and the waves could reduce the ion temperature anisotropy and thus the free energy, thereby playing a stabilizing role.

  11. Density-dependent electron scattering in photoexcited GaAs in strongly diffusive regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mics, Zoltán; D’Angio, Andrea; Jensen, Søren A.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of systematic optical pump–terahertz probe experiments, we study the density-dependent electron scattering rate in photoexcited GaAs in the regime of strong carrier diffusion. The terahertz frequency-resolved transient sheet conductivity spectra are perfectly described by the Drude...... model, directly yielding the electron scattering rates. A diffusion model is applied to determine the spatial extent of the photoexcited electron-hole gas at each moment after photoexcitation, yielding the time-dependent electron density, and hence the density-dependent electron scattering time. We find...

  12. Existence of time-dependent density-functional theory for open electronic systems: time-dependent holographic electron density theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Yam, ChiYung; Wang, Fan; Chen, GuanHua

    2011-08-28

    We present the time-dependent holographic electron density theorem (TD-HEDT), which lays the foundation of time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for open electronic systems. For any finite electronic system, the TD-HEDT formally establishes a one-to-one correspondence between the electron density inside any finite subsystem and the time-dependent external potential. As a result, any electronic property of an open system in principle can be determined uniquely by the electron density function inside the open region. Implications of the TD-HEDT on the practicality of TDDFT are also discussed.

  13. Study of nuclear level density parameter and its temperature dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Behkami, A. N.

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear level density ρ is the basic ingredient required for theoretical studies of nuclear reaction and structure. It describes the statistical nuclear properties and is expressed as a function of various constants of motion such as number of particles, excitation energy and angular momentum. In this work the energy and spin dependence of nuclear level density will be presented and discussed. In addition the level density parameter α will be extracted from this level density information, and its temperature and mass dependence will be obtained

  14. Density dependence of reactor performance with thermal confinement scalings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.

    1992-03-01

    Energy confinement scalings for the thermal component of the plasma published thus far have a different dependence on plasma density and input power than do scalings for the total plasma energy. With such thermal scalings, reactor performance (measured by Q, the ratio of the fusion power to the sum of the ohmic and auxiliary input powers) worsens with increasing density. This dependence is the opposite of that found using scalings based on the total plasma energy, indicating that reactor operation concepts may need to be altered if this density dependence is confirmed in future research

  15. Influence of driving frequency on oxygen atom density in O2 radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Takeshi; Noro, Kouichi; Nakano, Toshiki; Makabe, Toshiaki

    2004-01-01

    The influence of the driving frequency on the absolute oxygen atom density in an O 2 radio frequency (RF) capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) was investigated using vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with pulse modulation of the main plasma. A low-power operation of a compact inductively coupled plasma light source was enabled to avoid the significant measurement errors caused by self-absorption in the light source. The pulse modulation of the main plasma enabled accurate absorption measurement for high plasma density conditions by eliminating background signals due to light emission from the main plasma. As for the effects of the driving frequency, the effect of VHF (100 MHz) drive on oxygen atom production was small because of the modest increase in plasma density of electronegative O 2 in contrast to the significant increase in electron density previously observed for electropositive Ar. The recombination coefficient of oxygen atoms on the electrode surface was obtained from a decay rate in the afterglow by comparison with a diffusion model, and it showed agreement with previously reported values for several electrode materials

  16. Frequency-dependent ultrasound-induced transformation in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Jeremy; Windmill, James; Agbeze-Onuma, Maduka; Kalin, Robert M; Argondizza, Peter; Knapp, Charles W

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasound-enhanced gene transfer (UEGT) is continuing to gain interest across many disciplines; however, very few studies investigate UEGT efficiency across a range of frequencies. Using a variable frequency generator, UEGT was tested in E. coli at six ultrasonic frequencies. Results indicate frequency can significantly influence UEGT efficiency positively and negatively. A frequency of 61 kHz improved UEGT efficiency by ~70 % higher, but 99 kHz impeded UEGT to an extent worse than no ultrasound exposure. The other four frequencies (26, 133, 174, and 190 kHz) enhanced transformation compared to no ultrasound, but efficiencies did not vary. The influence of frequency on UEGT efficiency was observed across a range of operating frequencies. It is plausible that frequency-dependent dynamics of mechanical and chemical energies released during cavitational-bubble collapse (CBC) are responsible for observed UEGT efficiencies.

  17. Engineering frequency-dependent superfluidity in Bose-Fermi mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzamasovs, Maksims; Liu, Bo

    2018-04-01

    Unconventional superconductivity and superfluidity are among the most exciting and fascinating quantum phenomena in condensed-matter physics. Usually such states are characterized by nontrivial spin or spatial symmetry of the pairing order parameter, such as "spin triplet" or "p wave." However, besides spin and spatial dependence the order parameter may have unconventional frequency dependence which is also permitted by Fermi-Dirac statistics. Odd-frequency fermionic pairing is an exciting paradigm when discussing exotic superfluidity or superconductivity and is yet to be realized in experiments. In this paper we propose a symmetry-based method of controlling frequency dependence of the pairing order parameter via manipulating the inversion symmetry of the system. First, a toy model is introduced to illustrate that frequency dependence of the order parameter can be achieved through our proposed approach. Second, by taking advantage of recent rapid developments in producing spin-orbit-coupled dispersions in ultracold gases, we propose a Bose-Fermi mixture to realize such frequency-dependent superfluid. The key idea is introducing the frequency-dependent attraction between fermions mediated by Bogoliubov phonons with asymmetric dispersion. Our proposal should pave an alternative way for exploring frequency-dependent superfluids with cold atoms.

  18. Temperature and carrier density dependence of anisotropy in supercurrent density in layered cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.P.; Tewari, B.S.; Ajay

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we have studied the effect of temperature and carrier density on anisotropy in supercurrent density in bilayer cuprate superconductors. Here, we have considered a tight binding bilayered Hubbard Hamiltonian containing intra and interlayer attractive interactions. The situation considered here is similar to a SIS junction. We have got the expressions for the superconducting order parameters, carrier density and anisotropy in superconducting density (I ab /I c ) for such SIS junction. The numerical analysis show that the anisotropy in the supercurrent density depends on temperature and carrier density in layered high T c cuprates. (author)

  19. Density dependence of relaxation dynamics in glass formers, and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anshul D S Parmar

    formers, we study the variation of relaxation dynamics with density, rather than temperature, as a control ... stronger behaviour, the use of scaled variables involving temperature and ... of the temperature dependence of B as written defines.

  20. Density-dependent feedbacks can mask environmental drivers of populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, Johan Petter

    I present some results from studies identifying environmental drivers of vital rates and population dynamics when controlling for intraspecific density statistically or experimentally, show that density dependence can be strong even in populations of slow-growing species in stressful habitats, an...

  1. Anthropogenically-Mediated Density Dependence in a Declining Farmland Bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny C Dunn

    Full Text Available Land management intrinsically influences the distribution of animals and can consequently alter the potential for density-dependent processes to act within populations. For declining species, high densities of breeding territories are typically considered to represent productive populations. However, as density-dependent effects of food limitation or predator pressure may occur (especially when species are dependent upon separate nesting and foraging habitats, high territory density may limit per-capita productivity. Here, we use a declining but widespread European farmland bird, the yellowhammer Emberiza citrinella L., as a model system to test whether higher territory densities result in lower fledging success, parental provisioning rates or nestling growth rates compared to lower densities. Organic landscapes held higher territory densities, but nests on organic farms fledged fewer nestlings, translating to a 5 times higher rate of population shrinkage on organic farms compared to conventional. In addition, when parental provisioning behaviour was not restricted by predation risk (i.e., at times of low corvid activity, nestling provisioning rates were higher at lower territory densities, resulting in a much greater increase in nestling mass in low density areas, suggesting that food limitation occurred at high densities. These findings in turn suggest an ecological trap, whereby preferred nesting habitat does not provide sufficient food for rearing nestlings at high population density, creating a population sink. Habitat management for farmland birds should focus not simply on creating a high nesting density, but also on ensuring heterogeneous habitats to provide food resources in close proximity to nesting birds, even if this occurs through potentially restricting overall nest density but increasing population-level breeding success.

  2. Founder takes all: density-dependent processes structure biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Jonathan M; Fraser, Ceridwen I; Hewitt, Godfrey M

    2013-02-01

    Density-dependent processes play a key role in the spatial structuring of biodiversity. Specifically, interrelated demographic processes, such as gene surfing, high-density blocking, and competitive exclusion, can generate striking geographic contrasts in the distributions of genes and species. Here, we propose that well-studied evolutionary and ecological biogeographic patterns of postglacial recolonization, progressive island colonization, microbial sectoring, and even the 'Out of Africa' pattern of human expansion, are fundamentally similar, underpinned by a 'founder takes all' density-dependent principle. Additionally, we hypothesize that older historic constraints of density-dependent processes are seen today in the dramatic biogeographic shifts that occur in response to human-mediated extinction events, whereby surviving lineages rapidly expand their ranges to replace extinct sister taxa. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Temperature dependence of the resonance frequency of thermogravimetric devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iervolino, E.; Riccio, M.; Van Herwaarden, A.W.; Irace, A.; Breglio, G.; Van der Vlist, W.; Sarro, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the temperature dependence of the resonance frequency of thermogravimetric (TG) devices for tip heating over the temperature range of View the MathML source 25–600?C. The resonance frequency of a fabricated TG device shows to be temperature independent for tip heating up to

  4. Extended Opacity Tables with Higher Temperature-Density-Frequency Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Mark; Orban, Chris; Delahaye, Franck; Pinsonneault, Marc; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2015-05-01

    Theoretical models for plasma opacities underpin our understanding of radiation transport in many different astrophysical objects. These opacity models are also relevant to HEDP experiments such as ignition scale experiments on NIF. We present a significantly expanded set of opacity data from the widely utilized Opacity Project, and make these higher resolution data publicly available through OSU's portal with dropbox.com. This expanded data set is used to assess how accurate the interpolation of opacity data in temperature-density-frequency dimensions must be in order to adequately model the properties of most stellar types. These efforts are the beginning of a larger project to improve the theoretical opacity models in light of experimental results at the Sandia Z-pinch showing that the measured opacity of Iron disagrees strongly with all current models.

  5. Laser line shape and spectral density of frequency noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, G.M.; Blin, S.; Besnard, P.; Tam, T.T.; Tetu, M.

    2005-01-01

    Published experimental results show that single-mode laser light is characterized in the microwave range by a frequency noise which essentially includes a white part and a 1/f (flicker) part. We theoretically show that the spectral density (the line shape) which is compatible with these results is a Voigt profile whose Lorentzian part or homogeneous component is linked to the white noise and the Gaussian part to the 1/f noise. We measure semiconductor laser line profiles and verify that they can be fit with Voigt functions. It is also verified that the width of the Lorentzian part varies like 1/P where P is the laser power while the width of the Gaussian part is more of a constant. Finally, we theoretically show from first principles that laser line shapes are also described by Voigt functions where the Lorentzian part is the laser Airy function and the Gaussian part originates from population noise

  6. Density-dependence as a size-independent regulatory mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vladar, H.P.

    2006-01-01

    The growth function of populations is central in biomathematics. The main dogma is the existence of density-dependence mechanisms, which can be modelled with distinct functional forms that depend on the size of the Population. One important class of regulatory functions is the theta-logistic, which

  7. Density-dependent vulnerability of forest ecosystems to drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandra Bottero; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; John B. Bradford; Shawn Fraver; Mike A. Battaglia; Lance A. Asherin; Harald Bugmann

    2017-01-01

    Climate models predict increasing drought intensity and frequency for many regions, which may have negative consequences for tree recruitment, growth and mortality, as well as forest ecosystem services. Furthermore, practical strategies for minimizing vulnerability to drought are limited. Tree population density, a metric of tree abundance in a given area, is a primary...

  8. Accuracy of finite-difference harmonic frequencies in density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuan-Yu; Liu, Jie; Herbert, John M

    2017-07-15

    Analytic Hessians are often viewed as essential for the calculation of accurate harmonic frequencies, but the implementation of analytic second derivatives is nontrivial and solution of the requisite coupled-perturbed equations engenders a sizable memory footprint for large systems, given that these equations are not required for energy and gradient calculations in density functional theory. Here, we benchmark the alternative approach to harmonic frequencies based on finite differences of analytic first derivatives, a procedure that is amenable to large-scale parallelization. Not only for absolute frequencies but also for isotopic and conformer-dependent frequency shifts in flexible molecules, we find that the finite-difference approach exhibits mean errors numbers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The dependence of stellar properties on initial cloud density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michael O.; Bate, Matthew R.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the dependence of stellar properties on the initial mean density of the molecular cloud in which stellar clusters form using radiation hydrodynamical simulations that resolve the opacity limit for fragmentation. We have simulated the formation of three star clusters from the gravitational collapse of molecular clouds whose densities vary by a factor of a hundred. As with previous calculations including radiative feedback, we find that the dependence of the characteristic stellar mass, Mc, on the initial mean density of the cloud, ρ, is weaker than the dependence of the thermal Jeans mass. However, unlike previous calculations, which found no statistically significant variation in the median mass with density, we find a weak dependence approximately of the form Mc∝ρ-1/5. The distributions of properties of multiple systems do not vary significantly between the calculations. We compare our results to the result of observational surveys of star-forming regions, and suggest that the similarities between the properties of our lowest density calculation and the nearby Taurus-Auriga region indicate that the apparent excess of solar-type stars observed may be due to the region's low density.

  10. Temperature Dependence Viscosity and Density of Different Biodiesel Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Kumbár

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this paper is to assess the effect of rapeseed oil methyl ester (RME concentration in diesel fuel on its viscosity and density behaviour. The density and dynamic viscosity were observed at various mixing ratios of RME and diesel fuel. All measurements were performed at constant temperature of 40 °C. Increasing ratio of RME in diesel fuel was reflected in increased density value and dynamic viscosity of the blend. In case of pure RME, pure diesel fuel, and a blend of both (B30, temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was examined. Temperature range in the experiment was −10 °C to 80 °C. Considerable temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity and density was found and demonstrated for all three samples. This finding is in accordance with theoretical assumptions and reference data. Mathematical models were developed and tested. Temperature dependence of dynamic viscosity was modeled using a polynomial 3rd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.796, −0.948, and −0.974 between measured and calculated values were found. Temperature dependence of density was modeled using a 2nd polynomial degree. Correlation coefficients R −0.994, −0.979, and −0.976 between measured and calculated values were acquired. The proposed models can be used for flow behaviour prediction of RME, diesel fuel, and their blends.

  11. Frequency and voltage dependent electrical responses of poly(triarylamine thin film-based organic Schottky diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Khairul Anuar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A metal-organic-metal (MOM type Schottky diode based on poly (triarylamine (PTAA thin films has been fabricated by using the spin coating method. Investigation of the frequency dependent conductance-voltage (G-V-f and capacitance-voltage (C-V-f characteristics of the ITO/PTAA/Al MOM type diode were carried out in the frequency range from 12 Hz to 100 kHz using an LCR meter at room temperature. The frequency and bias voltage dependent electrical response were determined by admittance-based measured method in terms of an equivalent circuit model of the parallel combination of resistance and capacitance (RC circuit. Investigation revealed that the conductance is frequency and a bias voltage dependent in which conductance continuous increase as the increasing frequency, respectively. Meanwhile, the capacitance is dependent on frequency up to a certain value of frequency (100 Hz but decreases at high frequency (1 – 10 kHz. The interface state density in the Schottky diode was determined from G-V and C-V characteristics. The interface state density has values almost constant of 2.8 x 1012 eV−1cm−2 with slightly decrease by increasing frequencies. Consequently, both series resistance and interface trap density were found to decrease with increasing frequency. The frequency dependence of the electrical responses is attributed the distribution density of interface states that could follow the alternating current (AC signal.

  12. Frequency and voltage dependent electrical responses of poly(triarylamine) thin film-based organic Schottky diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuar Mohamad, Khairul; Tak Hoh, Hang; Alias, Afishah; Ghosh, Bablu Kumar; Fukuda, Hisashi

    2017-11-01

    A metal-organic-metal (MOM) type Schottky diode based on poly (triarylamine) (PTAA) thin films has been fabricated by using the spin coating method. Investigation of the frequency dependent conductance-voltage (G-V-f) and capacitance-voltage (C-V-f) characteristics of the ITO/PTAA/Al MOM type diode were carried out in the frequency range from 12 Hz to 100 kHz using an LCR meter at room temperature. The frequency and bias voltage dependent electrical response were determined by admittance-based measured method in terms of an equivalent circuit model of the parallel combination of resistance and capacitance (RC circuit). Investigation revealed that the conductance is frequency and a bias voltage dependent in which conductance continuous increase as the increasing frequency, respectively. Meanwhile, the capacitance is dependent on frequency up to a certain value of frequency (100 Hz) but decreases at high frequency (1 - 10 kHz). The interface state density in the Schottky diode was determined from G-V and C-V characteristics. The interface state density has values almost constant of 2.8 x 1012 eV-1cm-2 with slightly decrease by increasing frequencies. Consequently, both series resistance and interface trap density were found to decrease with increasing frequency. The frequency dependence of the electrical responses is attributed the distribution density of interface states that could follow the alternating current (AC) signal.

  13. Density-dependent squeezing of excitons in highly excited semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hong Quang.

    1995-07-01

    The time evolution from coherent states to squeezed states of high density excitons is studied theoretically based on the boson formalism and within the Random Phase Approximation. Both the mutual interaction between excitons and the anharmonic exciton-photon interaction due to phase-space filling of excitons are taken into account. It is shown that the exciton squeezing depends strongly on the exciton density in semiconductors and becomes smaller with increasing the latter. (author). 16 refs, 2 figs

  14. Computational complexity of time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitfield, J D; Yung, M-H; Tempel, D G; Aspuru-Guzik, A; Boixo, S

    2014-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is rapidly emerging as a premier method for solving dynamical many-body problems in physics and chemistry. The mathematical foundations of TDDFT are established through the formal existence of a fictitious non-interacting system (known as the Kohn–Sham system), which can reproduce the one-electron reduced probability density of the actual system. We build upon these works and show that on the interior of the domain of existence, the Kohn–Sham system can be efficiently obtained given the time-dependent density. We introduce a V-representability parameter which diverges at the boundary of the existence domain and serves to quantify the numerical difficulty of constructing the Kohn-Sham potential. For bounded values of V-representability, we present a polynomial time quantum algorithm to generate the time-dependent Kohn–Sham potential with controllable error bounds. (paper)

  15. Intercohort density dependence drives brown trout habitat selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayllón, Daniel; Nicola, Graciela G.; Parra, Irene; Elvira, Benigno; Almodóvar, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Habitat selection can be viewed as an emergent property of the quality and availability of habitat but also of the number of individuals and the way they compete for its use. Consequently, habitat selection can change across years due to fluctuating resources or to changes in population numbers. However, habitat selection predictive models often do not account for ecological dynamics, especially density dependent processes. In stage-structured population, the strength of density dependent interactions between individuals of different age classes can exert a profound influence on population trajectories and evolutionary processes. In this study, we aimed to assess the effects of fluctuating densities of both older and younger competing life stages on the habitat selection patterns (described as univariate and multivariate resource selection functions) of young-of-the-year, juvenile and adult brown trout Salmo trutta. We observed all age classes were selective in habitat choice but changed their selection patterns across years consistently with variations in the densities of older but not of younger age classes. Trout of an age increased selectivity for positions highly selected by older individuals when their density decreased, but this pattern did not hold when the density of younger age classes varied. It suggests that younger individuals are dominated by older ones but can expand their range of selected habitats when density of competitors decreases, while older trout do not seem to consider the density of younger individuals when distributing themselves even though they can negatively affect their final performance. Since these results may entail critical implications for conservation and management practices based on habitat selection models, further research should involve a wider range of river typologies and/or longer time frames to fully understand the patterns of and the mechanisms underlying the operation of density dependence on brown trout habitat

  16. Global asymptotic stability of density dependent integral population projection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebarber, Richard; Tenhumberg, Brigitte; Townley, Stuart

    2012-02-01

    Many stage-structured density dependent populations with a continuum of stages can be naturally modeled using nonlinear integral projection models. In this paper, we study a trichotomy of global stability result for a class of density dependent systems which include a Platte thistle model. Specifically, we identify those systems parameters for which zero is globally asymptotically stable, parameters for which there is a positive asymptotically stable equilibrium, and parameters for which there is no asymptotically stable equilibrium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. CLIMATIC SIGNALS FROM INTRA-ANNUAL DENSITY FLUCTUATION FREQUENCY IN MEDITERRANEAN PINES AT A REGIONAL SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica eZalloni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tree rings provide information about the climatic conditions during the growing season by recording them in different anatomical features, such as Intra-Annual Density Fluctuations (IADFs. IADFs are intra-annual changes of wood density appearing as latewood-like cells within earlywood, or earlywood-like cells within latewood. The occurrence of IADFs is dependent on the age and size of the tree, and it is triggered by climatic drivers. The variations of IADF frequency of different species and their dependence on climate across a wide geographical range have still to be explored. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of age, tree-ring width and climate on IADF formation and frequency at a regional scale across the Mediterranean Basin in Pinus halepensis Mill., Pinus pinaster Ait. and Pinus pinea L. The analyzed tree-ring network was composed of P. pinea trees growing at 11 sites (2 in Italy, 4 in Spain and 4 in Portugal, P. pinaster from 19 sites (2 in Italy, 13 in Spain and 4 in Portugal, and P. halepensis from 38 sites in Spain. The correlations between IADF frequency and monthly minimum, mean and maximum temperatures, as well as between IADF frequency and total precipitation, were analyzed. A significant negative relationship between IADF frequency and tree-ring age was found for the three Mediterranean pines. Moreover, IADFs were more frequent in wider rings than in narrower ones, although the widest rings showed a reduced IADF frequency. Wet conditions during late summer/early autumn triggered the formation of IADFs in the three species. Our results suggest the existence of a common climatic driver for the formation of IADFs in Mediterranean pines, highlighting the potential use of IADF frequency as a proxy for climate reconstructions with geographical resolution.

  18. Climatic Signals from Intra-annual Density Fluctuation Frequency in Mediterranean Pines at a Regional Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalloni, Enrica; de Luis, Martin; Campelo, Filipe; Novak, Klemen; De Micco, Veronica; Di Filippo, Alfredo; Vieira, Joana; Nabais, Cristina; Rozas, Vicente; Battipaglia, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Tree rings provide information about the climatic conditions during the growing season by recording them in different anatomical features, such as intra-annual density fluctuations (IADFs). IADFs are intra-annual changes of wood density appearing as latewood-like cells within earlywood, or earlywood-like cells within latewood. The occurrence of IADFs is dependent on the age and size of the tree, and it is triggered by climatic drivers. The variations of IADF frequency of different species and their dependence on climate across a wide geographical range have still to be explored. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of age, tree-ring width and climate on IADF formation and frequency at a regional scale across the Mediterranean Basin in Pinus halepensis Mill., Pinus pinaster Ait., and Pinus pinea L. The analyzed tree-ring network was composed of P. pinea trees growing at 10 sites (2 in Italy, 4 in Spain, and 4 in Portugal), P. pinaster from 19 sites (2 in Italy, 13 in Spain, and 4 in Portugal), and P. halepensis from 38 sites in Spain. The correlations between IADF frequency and monthly minimum, mean and maximum temperatures, as well as between IADF frequency and total precipitation, were analyzed. A significant negative relationship between IADF frequency and tree-ring age was found for the three Mediterranean pines. Moreover, IADFs were more frequent in wider rings than in narrower ones, although the widest rings showed a reduced IADF frequency. Wet conditions during late summer/early autumn triggered the formation of IADFs in the three species. Our results suggest the existence of a common climatic driver for the formation of IADFs in Mediterranean pines, highlighting the potential use of IADF frequency as a proxy for climate reconstructions with geographical resolution. PMID:27200052

  19. Decay of autoionizing states in time-dependent density functional and reduced density matrix functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Varun; Brics, Martins; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Autoionizing states are inaccessible to time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using known, adiabatic Kohn-Sham (KS) potentials. We determine the exact KS potential for a numerically exactly solvable model Helium atom interacting with a laser field that is populating an autoionizing state. The exact single-particle density of the population in the autoionizing state corresponds to that of the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose height and width allows for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. However, devising a useful exchange-correlation potential that is capable of governing such a scenario in general and in more complex systems is hopeless. As an improvement over TDDFT, time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory has been proposed. We are able to obtain for the above described autoionization process the exact time-dependent natural orbitals (i.e., the eigenfunctions of the exact, time-dependent one-body reduced density matrix) and study the potentials that appear in the equations of motion for the natural orbitals and the structure of the two-body density matrix expanded in them.

  20. Watching excitons move: the time-dependent transition density matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Carsten

    2012-02-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory allows one to calculate excitation energies and the associated transition densities in principle exactly. The transition density matrix (TDM) provides additional information on electron-hole localization and coherence of specific excitations of the many-body system. We have extended the TDM concept into the real-time domain in order to visualize the excited-state dynamics in conjugated molecules. The time-dependent TDM is defined as an implicit density functional, and can be approximately obtained from the time-dependent Kohn-Sham orbitals. The quality of this approximation is assessed in simple model systems. A computational scheme for real molecular systems is presented: the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations are solved with the OCTOPUS code and the time-dependent Kohn-Sham TDM is calculated using a spatial partitioning scheme. The method is applied to show in real time how locally created electron-hole pairs spread out over neighboring conjugated molecular chains. The coupling mechanism, electron-hole coherence, and the possibility of charge separation are discussed.

  1. Frequency-Dependent Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticle Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majetich, Sara [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-05-17

    In the proposed research program we will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of ordered nanoparticle assemblies, or nanoparticle crystals. Magnetostatic interactions are long-range and anisotropic, and this leads to complex behavior in nanoparticle assemblies, particularly in the time- and frequency-dependent properties. We hypothesize that the high frequency performance of composite materials has been limited because of the range of relaxation times; if a composite is a dipolar ferromagnet at a particular frequency, it should have the advantages of a single phase material, but without significant eddy current power losses. Arrays of surfactant-coated monodomain magnetic nanoparticles can exhibit long-range magnetic order that is stable over time. The magnetic domain size and location of domain walls is governed not by structural grain boundaries but by the shape of the array, due to the local interaction field. Pores or gaps within an assembly pin domain walls and limit the domain size. Measurements of the magnetic order parameter as a function of temperature showed that domains can exist at high temoerature, and that there is a collective phase transition, just as in an exchange-coupled ferromagnet. Dipolar ferromagnets are not merely of fundamental interest; they provide an interesting alternative to exchange-based ferromagnets. Dipolar ferromagnets made with high moment metallic particles in an insulating matrix could have high permeability without large eddy current losses. Such nanocomposites could someday replace the ferrites now used in phase shifters, isolators, circulators, and filters in microwave communications and radar applications. We will investigate the time- and frequency-dependent behavior of nanoparticle crystals with different magnetic core sizes and different interparticle barrier resistances, and will measure the magnetic and electrical properties in the DC, low frequency (0.1 Hz - 1 kHz), moderate frequency (10 Hz - 500

  2. Radio-frequency slurry-density measurement for dredging pipelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eeten, M.J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Hydraulic dredgers make use of a density meter to measure the instantaneous density in the slurry transport pipeline, primarily for process control and production calculation. the current ‘golden’ standard for slurry density measurement is the radioactive density meter. It is based on a slurry

  3. Stationary solution of a time dependent density matrix formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, Mitsuru

    1994-01-01

    A stationary solution of a time-dependent density-matrix formalism, which is an extension of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory to include the effects of two-body correlations, is obtained for the Lipkin model hamiltonian, using an adiabatic treatment of the two-body interaction. It is found that the obtained result is a reasonable approximation for the exact solution of the model. (author)

  4. Comment on “Frequency-dependent dispersion in porous media”

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Yohan

    2012-07-10

    In a recent paper, Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez used the technique of volume averaging to derive a "frequency-dependent" dispersion tensor, Dγ*, the goal of which is to describe solute transport in porous media undergoing periodic processes. We describe two issues related to this dispersion tensor. First, we demonstrate that the definition of Dγ* is erroneous and derive a corrected version, Dγ*c. With this modification, the approach of Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez becomes strictly equivalent to the one devised by Moyne. Second, we show that the term "frequency-dependent dispersion" is misleading because Dγ* and Dγ*c do not depend on the process operating frequency, χ. The study carried out by Valdès-Parada and Alvarez-Ramirez represents a spectral analysis of the relaxation of Dγ* towards its steady-state, independent of any periodic operation or excitation. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  5. Fluctuation-dissipation theorem for frequency-dependent specific heat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe; Nielsen, Johannes K.

    1996-01-01

    A derivation of the fluctuation-dissipation (FD) theorem for the frequency-dependent specific heat of a system described by a master equation is presented. The FD theorem is illustrated by a number of simple examples, including a system described by a linear Langevin equation, a two-level system......, and a system described by the energy master equation. It is shown that for two quite different models with low-energy cutoffs—a collection of two-level systems and a system described by the energy master equation—the frequency-dependent specific heat in dimensionless units becomes universal at low temperatures......, i.e., independent of both energy distribution and temperature. These two models give almost the same universal frequency-dependent specific heat, which compares favorably to experiments on supercooled alcohols....

  6. Cuticular antifungals in spiders: density- and condition dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel González-Tokman

    Full Text Available Animals living in groups face a high risk of disease contagion. In many arthropod species, cuticular antimicrobials constitute the first protective barrier that prevents infections. Here we report that group-living spiders produce cuticular chemicals which inhibit fungal growth. Given that cuticular antifungals may be costly to produce, we explored whether they can be modulated according to the risk of contagion (i.e. under high densities. For this purpose, we quantified cuticular antifungal activity in the subsocial crab spider Diaea ergandros in both natural nests and experimentally manipulated nests of varying density. We quantified the body-condition of spiders to test whether antifungal activity is condition dependent, as well as the effect of spider density on body-condition. We predicted cuticular antifungal activity to increase and body-condition to decrease with high spider densities, and that antifungal activity would be inversely related to body-condition. Contrary to our predictions, antifungal activity was neither density- nor condition-dependent. However, body-condition decreased with density in natural nests, but increased in experimental nests. We suggest that pathogen pressure is so important in nature that it maintains high levels of cuticular antifungal activity in spiders, impacting negatively on individual energetic condition. Future studies should identify the chemical structure of the isolated antifungal compounds in order to understand the physiological basis of a trade-off between disease prevention and energetic condition caused by group living, and its consequences in the evolution of sociality in spiders.

  7. Cuticular antifungals in spiders: density- and condition dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tokman, Daniel; Ruch, Jasmin; Pulpitel, Tamara; Ponton, Fleur

    2014-01-01

    Animals living in groups face a high risk of disease contagion. In many arthropod species, cuticular antimicrobials constitute the first protective barrier that prevents infections. Here we report that group-living spiders produce cuticular chemicals which inhibit fungal growth. Given that cuticular antifungals may be costly to produce, we explored whether they can be modulated according to the risk of contagion (i.e. under high densities). For this purpose, we quantified cuticular antifungal activity in the subsocial crab spider Diaea ergandros in both natural nests and experimentally manipulated nests of varying density. We quantified the body-condition of spiders to test whether antifungal activity is condition dependent, as well as the effect of spider density on body-condition. We predicted cuticular antifungal activity to increase and body-condition to decrease with high spider densities, and that antifungal activity would be inversely related to body-condition. Contrary to our predictions, antifungal activity was neither density- nor condition-dependent. However, body-condition decreased with density in natural nests, but increased in experimental nests. We suggest that pathogen pressure is so important in nature that it maintains high levels of cuticular antifungal activity in spiders, impacting negatively on individual energetic condition. Future studies should identify the chemical structure of the isolated antifungal compounds in order to understand the physiological basis of a trade-off between disease prevention and energetic condition caused by group living, and its consequences in the evolution of sociality in spiders.

  8. Frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance in neural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Daqing; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Xu, Peng; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-08-01

    Biological neurons receive multiple noisy oscillatory signals, and their dynamical response to the superposition of these signals is of fundamental importance for information processing in the brain. Here we study the response of neural systems to the weak envelope modulation signal, which is superimposed by two periodic signals with different frequencies. We show that stochastic resonance occurs at the beat frequency in neural systems at the single-neuron as well as the population level. The performance of this frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance is influenced by both the beat frequency and the two forcing frequencies. Compared to a single neuron, a population of neurons is more efficient in detecting the information carried by the weak envelope modulation signal at the beat frequency. Furthermore, an appropriate fine-tuning of the excitation-inhibition balance can further optimize the response of a neural ensemble to the superimposed signal. Our results thus introduce and provide insights into the generation and modulation mechanism of the frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance in neural systems.

  9. Detection of density dependence requires density manipulations and calculation of lambda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, N L; Overath, R Deborah; Pease, Craig M

    2006-03-01

    To investigate density-dependent population regulation in the perennial bunchgrass Bouteloua rigidiseta, we experimentally manipulated density by removing adults or adding seeds to replicate quadrats in a natural population for three annual intervals. We monitored the adjacent control quadrats for 14 annual intervals. We constructed a population projection matrix for each quadrat in each interval, calculated lambda, and did a life table response experiment (LTRE) analysis. We tested the effects of density upon lambda by comparing experimental and control quadrats, and by an analysis of the 15-year observational data set. As measured by effects on lambda and on N(t+1/Nt in the experimental treatments, negative density dependence was strong: the population was being effectively regulated. The relative contributions of different matrix elements to treatment effect on lambda differed among years and treatments; overall the pattern was one of small contributions by many different life cycle stages. In contrast, density dependence could not be detected using only the observational (control quadrats) data, even though this data set covered a much longer time span. Nor did experimental effects on separate matrix elements reach statistical significance. These results suggest that ecologists may fail to detect density dependence when it is present if they have only descriptive, not experimental, data, do not have data for the entire life cycle, or analyze life cycle components separately.

  10. Evolution of density-dependent movement during experimental range expansions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronhofer, E A; Gut, S; Altermatt, F

    2017-12-01

    Range expansions and biological invasions are prime examples of transient processes that are likely impacted by rapid evolutionary changes. As a spatial process, range expansions are driven by dispersal and movement behaviour. Although it is widely accepted that dispersal and movement may be context-dependent, for instance density-dependent, and best represented by reaction norms, the evolution of density-dependent movement during range expansions has received little experimental attention. We therefore tested current theory predicting the evolution of increased movement at low densities at range margins using highly replicated and controlled range expansion experiments across multiple genotypes of the protist model system Tetrahymena thermophila. Although rare, we found evolutionary changes during range expansions even in the absence of initial standing genetic variation. Range expansions led to the evolution of negatively density-dependent movement at range margins. In addition, we report the evolution of increased intrastrain competitive ability and concurrently decreased population growth rates in range cores. Our findings highlight the importance of understanding movement and dispersal as evolving reaction norms and plastic life-history traits of central relevance for range expansions, biological invasions and the dynamics of spatially structured systems in general. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  11. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A time-dependent generalized non-linear Schrödinger equation (GNLSE) of motion was earlier derived in our laboratory by combining density functional theory and quantum fluid dynamics in threedimensional space. In continuation of the work reported previously, the GNLSE is applied to provide additional knowledge on ...

  12. Density of biogas digestate depending on temperature and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Mandy; Schneider, Nico

    2015-09-01

    Density is one of the most important physical properties of biogas digestate to ensure an optimal dimensioning and a precise design of biogas plant components like stirring devices, pumps and heat exchangers. In this study the density of biogas digestates with different compositions was measured using pycnometers at ambient pressure in a temperature range from 293.15 to 313.15K. The biogas digestates were taken from semi-continuous experiments, in which the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina, corn silage and a mixture of both were used as feedstocks. The results show an increase of density with increasing total solid content and a decrease with increasing temperature. Three equations to calculate the density of biogas digestate were set up depending on temperature as well as on the total solid content, organic composition and elemental composition, respectively. All correlations show a relative deviation below 1% compared to experimental data. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Role of the Coulomb interaction in the low-frequency density of states of DNA double helices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.E.; Krumhansl, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The complete vibrational frequency spectrum of several DNA double-helical oligomers is calculated using established pair potentials. Various cutoff values are used for the range of the Coulomb interactions. At very low frequency the integrated density of states shows a noninteger exponent with values ranging from 0.75 to 1.55, depending on the cutoff value for the Coulomb interactions. We conclude that the cumulative densities of states in those molecules depend more on competing interactions than on various proposed universal laws

  14. Model dependence of isospin sensitive observables at high densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Wen-Mei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Science, Huzhou Teachers College, Huzhou 313000 (China); Yong, Gao-Chan, E-mail: yonggaochan@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, Yongjia [School of Science, Huzhou Teachers College, Huzhou 313000 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Qingfeng [School of Science, Huzhou Teachers College, Huzhou 313000 (China); Zhang, Hongfei [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zuo, Wei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2013-10-07

    Within two different frameworks of isospin-dependent transport model, i.e., Boltzmann–Uehling–Uhlenbeck (IBUU04) and Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) transport models, sensitive probes of nuclear symmetry energy are simulated and compared. It is shown that neutron to proton ratio of free nucleons, π{sup −}/π{sup +} ratio as well as isospin-sensitive transverse and elliptic flows given by the two transport models with their “best settings”, all have obvious differences. Discrepancy of numerical value of isospin-sensitive n/p ratio of free nucleon from the two models mainly originates from different symmetry potentials used and discrepancies of numerical value of charged π{sup −}/π{sup +} ratio and isospin-sensitive flows mainly originate from different isospin-dependent nucleon–nucleon cross sections. These demonstrations call for more detailed studies on the model inputs (i.e., the density- and momentum-dependent symmetry potential and the isospin-dependent nucleon–nucleon cross section in medium) of isospin-dependent transport model used. The studies of model dependence of isospin sensitive observables can help nuclear physicists to pin down the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy through comparison between experiments and theoretical simulations scientifically.

  15. Ion–Cyclotron Resonance Frequency Interval Dependence on the O ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The frequency intervals in which O VI ions get in resonance with ion–cyclotron waves are calculated using the kinetic model, for the latest six values found in literature on O VI ion number densities in the 1.5–3 region of the NPCH. It is found that the common resonance interval is 1.5 kHz to 3 kHz.

  16. Quantitative interpretation of the magnetic susceptibility frequency dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustra, Andrea; Mendonça, Carlos A.; Leite, Aruã; Jovane, Luigi; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.

    2018-05-01

    Low-field mass-specific magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements using multifrequency alternating fields are commonly used to evaluate concentration of ferrimagnetic particles in the transition of superparamagnetic (SP) to stable single domain (SSD). In classical palaeomagnetic analyses, this measurement serves as a preliminary assessment of rock samples providing rapid, non-destructive, economical and easy information of magnetic properties. The SP-SSD transition is relevant in environmental studies because it has been associated with several geological and biogeochemical processes affecting magnetic mineralogy. MS is a complex function of mineral-type and grain-size distribution, as well as measuring parameters such as external field magnitude and frequency. In this work, we propose a new technique to obtain quantitative information on grain-size variations of magnetic particles in the SP-SSD transition by inverting frequency-dependent susceptibility. We introduce a descriptive parameter named as `limiting frequency effect' that provides an accurate estimation of MS loss with frequency. Numerical simulations show the methodology capability in providing data fitting and model parameters in many practical situations. Real-data applications with magnetite nanoparticles and core samples from sediments of Poggio le Guaine section of Umbria-Marche Basin (Italy) provide additional information not clearly recognized when interpreting cruder MS data. Caution is needed when interpreting frequency dependence in terms of single relaxation processes, which are not universally applicable and depend upon the nature of magnetic mineral in the material. Nevertheless, the proposed technique is a promising tool for SP-SSD content analyses.

  17. Frequency and temperature dependence of dielectric properties of chicken meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dielectric properties of chicken breast meat were measured with an open-ended coaxial-line probe between 200 MHz and 20 GHz at temperatures ranging from -20 degree C to +25 degree C. At a given temperature, the frequency dependence of the dielectric constant reveals two relaxations while those of th...

  18. Angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level density parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta; Kailas, S.

    2010-01-01

    Dependence of nuclear level density parameter on the angular momentum and temperature is investigated in a theoretical framework using the statistical theory of hot rotating nuclei. The structural effects are incorporated by including shell correction, shape, and deformation. The nuclei around Z≅50 with an excitation energy range of 30 to 40 MeV are considered. The calculations are in good agreement with the experimentally deduced inverse level density parameter values especially for 109 In, 113 Sb, 122 Te, 123 I, and 127 Cs nuclei.

  19. Nonlocal and Nonadiabatic Effects in the Charge-Density Response of Solids: A Time-Dependent Density-Functional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panholzer, Martin; Gatti, Matteo; Reining, Lucia

    2018-04-01

    The charge-density response of extended materials is usually dominated by the collective oscillation of electrons, the plasmons. Beyond this feature, however, intriguing many-body effects are observed. They cannot be described by one of the most widely used approaches for the calculation of dielectric functions, which is time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) in the adiabatic local density approximation (ALDA). Here, we propose an approximation to the TDDFT exchange-correlation kernel which is nonadiabatic and nonlocal. It is extracted from correlated calculations in the homogeneous electron gas, where we have tabulated it for a wide range of wave vectors and frequencies. A simple mean density approximation allows one to use it in inhomogeneous materials where the density varies on a scale of 1.6 rs or faster. This kernel contains effects that are completely absent in the ALDA; in particular, it correctly describes the double plasmon in the dynamic structure factor of sodium, and it shows the characteristic low-energy peak that appears in systems with low electronic density. It also leads to an overall quantitative improvement of spectra.

  20. Tuning of Human Modulation Filters Is Carrier-Frequency Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Andrew J. R.; Reiss, Joshua D.; McAlpine, David

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies employing speech stimuli to investigate ‘cocktail-party’ listening have focused on entrainment of cortical activity to modulations at syllabic (5 Hz) and phonemic (20 Hz) rates. The data suggest that cortical modulation filters (CMFs) are dependent on the sound-frequency channel in which modulations are conveyed, potentially underpinning a strategy for separating speech from background noise. Here, we characterize modulation filters in human listeners using a novel behavioral method. Within an ‘inverted’ adaptive forced-choice increment detection task, listening level was varied whilst contrast was held constant for ramped increments with effective modulation rates between 0.5 and 33 Hz. Our data suggest that modulation filters are tonotopically organized (i.e., vary along the primary, frequency-organized, dimension). This suggests that the human auditory system is optimized to track rapid (phonemic) modulations at high sound-frequencies and slow (prosodic/syllabic) modulations at low frequencies. PMID:24009759

  1. Decay of hollow states in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Varun; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Wismarsche Str. 43-45, Universitaet Rostock, Rostock-18051 (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Hollow or multiply excited states are inaccessible in time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using adiabatic Kohn-Sham potentials. We determine the exact Kohn Sham (KS) potential for doubly excited states in an exactly solvable model Helium atom. The exact single-particle density corresponds to the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose origin is traced back to phase of the exact KS orbital. The potential controls the barrier height and width in order for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as the doubly excited state in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. Instead, adiabatic KS potentials only show direct photoionization but no autoionization. A frequency-dependent linear response kernel would be necessary in order to capture the decay of autoionizing states.

  2. Does density-dependent diversification mirror ecological competitive exclusion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie J Monroe

    Full Text Available Density-dependence is a term used in ecology to describe processes such as birth and death rates that are regulated by the number of individuals in a population. Evolutionary biologists have borrowed the term to describe decreasing rates of species accumulation, suggesting that speciation and extinction rates depend on the total number of species in a clade. If this analogy with ecological density-dependence holds, diversification of clades is restricted because species compete for limited resources. We hypothesize that such competition should not only affect numbers of species, but also prevent species from being phenotypically similar. Here, we present a method to detect whether competitive interactions between species have ordered phenotypic traits on a phylogeny, assuming that competition prevents related species from having identical trait values. We use the method to analyze clades of birds and mammals, with body size as the phenotypic trait. We find no sign that competition has prevented species from having the same body size. Thus, since body size is a key ecological trait and competition does not seem to be responsible for differences in body size between species, we conclude that the diversification slowdown that is prevalent in these clades is unlikely due to the ecological interference implied by the term density dependence.

  3. Reproducibility of frequency-dependent low frequency fluctuations in reaction time over time and across tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zan-Zan; Qu, Hui-Jie; Tian, Zhuo-Ling; Han, Meng-Jian; Fan, Yi; Ge, Lie-Zhong; Zang, Yu-Feng; Zhang, Hang

    2017-01-01

    Increased levels of reaction time variability (RTV) are characteristics of sustained attention deficits. The clinical significance of RTV has been widely recognized. However, the reliability of RTV measurements has not been widely studied. The present study aimed to assess the test-retest reliability of RTV conventional measurements, e.g., the standard deviation (SD), the coefficient of variation (CV), and a new measurement called the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) of RT. In addition, we aimed to assess differences and similarities of these measurements between different tasks. Thirty-seven healthy college students participated in 2 tasks, i.e., an Eriksen flanker task (EFT) and a simple reaction task (SRT), twice over a mean interval of 56 days. Conventional measurements of RTV including RT-SD and RT-CV were assessed first. Then the RT time series were converted into frequency domains, and RT-ALFF was further calculated for the whole frequency band (0.0023-0.167 Hz) and for a few sub-frequency bands including Slow-6 (frequency bands (Slow-3), but SRT RT-ALFF values showed slightly higher ICC values than EFT values in lower frequency bands (Slow-5 and Slow-4). 2) RT-ALFF magnitudes in each sub-frequency band were greater for the SRT than those for the EFT. 3) The RT-ALFF in the Slow-4 of the EFT was found to be correlated with the RT-ALFF in the Slow-5 of the SRT for both two visits, but no consistently significant correlation was found between the same frequency bands. These findings reveal good test-retest reliability for conventional measurements and for the RT-ALFF of RTV. The RT-ALFF presented frequency-dependent similarities across tasks. All of our results reveal the presence of different frequency structures between the two tasks, and thus the frequency-dependent characteristics of different tasks deserve more attention in future studies.

  4. Modelling the effect of autotoxicity on density-dependent phytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkkonen, A

    2007-01-21

    An established method to separate resource competition from chemical interference is cultivation of monospecific, even-aged stands. The stands grow at several densities and they are exposed to homogenously spread toxins. Hence, the dose received by individual plants is inversely related to stand density. This results in distinguishable alterations in dose-response slopes. The method is often recommended in ecological studies of allelopathy. However, many plant species are known to release autotoxic compounds. Often, the probability of autotoxicity increases as sowing density increases. Despite this, the possibility of autotoxicity is ignored when experiments including monospecific stands are designed and when their results are evaluated. In this paper, I model mathematically how autotoxicity changes the outcome of dose-response slopes as different densities of monospecific stands are grown on homogenously phytotoxic substrata. Several ecologically reasonable relations between plant density and autotoxin exposure are considered over a range of parameter values, and similarities between different relations are searched for. The models indicate that autotoxicity affects the outcome of density-dependent dose-response experiments. Autotoxicity seems to abolish the effects of other phytochemicals in certain cases, while it may augment them in other cases. Autotoxicity may alter the outcome of tests using the method of monospecific stands even if the dose of autotoxic compounds per plant is a fraction of the dose of non-autotoxic phytochemicals with similar allelopathic potential. Data from the literature support these conclusions. A faulty null hypothesis may be accepted if the autotoxic potential of a test species is overlooked in density-response experiments. On the contrary, if test species are known to be non-autotoxic, the method of monospecific stands does not need fine-tuning. The results also suggest that the possibility of autotoxicity should be investigated in

  5. Modelling interactions of toxicants and density dependence in wildlife populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Aafke M.; Hendriks, Harrie W.M.; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Hendriks, A. Jan; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.

    2013-01-01

    1. A major challenge in the conservation of threatened and endangered species is to predict population decline and design appropriate recovery measures. However, anthropogenic impacts on wildlife populations are notoriously difficult to predict due to potentially nonlinear responses and interactions with natural ecological processes like density dependence. 2. Here, we incorporated both density dependence and anthropogenic stressors in a stage-based matrix population model and parameterized it for a density-dependent population of peregrine falcons Falco peregrinus exposed to two anthropogenic toxicants [dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)]. Log-logistic exposure–response relationships were used to translate toxicant concentrations in peregrine falcon eggs to effects on fecundity. Density dependence was modelled as the probability of a nonbreeding bird acquiring a breeding territory as a function of the current number of breeders. 3. The equilibrium size of the population, as represented by the number of breeders, responded nonlinearly to increasing toxicant concentrations, showing a gradual decrease followed by a relatively steep decline. Initially, toxicant-induced reductions in population size were mitigated by an alleviation of the density limitation, that is, an increasing probability of territory acquisition. Once population density was no longer limiting, the toxicant impacts were no longer buffered by an increasing proportion of nonbreeders shifting to the breeding stage, resulting in a strong decrease in the equilibrium number of breeders. 4. Median critical exposure concentrations, that is, median toxicant concentrations in eggs corresponding with an equilibrium population size of zero, were 33 and 46 μg g−1 fresh weight for DDE and PBDEs, respectively. 5. Synthesis and applications. Our modelling results showed that particular life stages of a density-limited population may be relatively insensitive to

  6. Density dependence in a recovering osprey population: demographic and behavioural processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretagnolle, V; Mougeot, F; Thibault, J-C

    2008-09-01

    1. Understanding how density-dependent and independent processes influence demographic parameters, and hence regulate population size, is fundamental within population ecology. We investigated density dependence in growth rate and fecundity in a recovering population of a semicolonial raptor, the osprey Pandion haliaetus [Linnaeus, 1758], using 31 years of count and demographic data in Corsica. 2. The study population increased from three pairs in 1974 to an average of 22 pairs in the late 1990s, with two distinct phases during the recovery (increase followed by stability) and contrasted trends in breeding parameters in each phase. 3. We show density dependence in population growth rate in the second phase, indicating that the stabilized population was regulated. We also show density dependence in productivity (fledging success between years and hatching success within years). 4. Using long-term data on behavioural interactions at nest sites, and on diet and fish provisioning rate, we evaluated two possible mechanisms of density dependence in productivity, food depletion and behavioural interference. 5. As density increased, both provisioning rate and the size of prey increased, contrary to predictions of a food-depletion mechanism. In the time series, a reduction in fledging success coincided with an increase in the number of non-breeders. Hatching success decreased with increasing local density and frequency of interactions with conspecifics, suggesting that behavioural interference was influencing hatching success. 6. Our study shows that, taking into account the role of non-breeders, in particular in species or populations where there are many floaters and where competition for nest sites is intense, can improve our understanding of density-dependent processes and help conservation actions.

  7. Density-Dependent Phase Polyphenism in Nonmodel Locusts: A Minireview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojun Song

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the specific mechanisms of locust phase transformation are wellunderstood for model locust species such as the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria and the migratory locust Locusta migratoria, the expressions of density-dependent phase polyphenism in other nonmodel locust species are not wellknown. The present paper is an attempt to review and synthesize what we know about these nonmodel locusts. Based on all available data, I find that locust phase polyphenism is expressed in many different ways in different locust species and identify a pattern that locust species often belong to large taxonomic groups which contain mostly nonswarming grasshopper species. Although locust phase polyphenism has evolved multiple times within Acrididae, I argue that its evolution should be studied from a phylogenetic perspective because I find similar density-dependent phenotypic plasticity among closely related species. Finally, I emphasize the importance of comparative analyses in understanding the evolution of locust phase and propose a phylogeny-based research framework.

  8. Time dependent density matrix theory and effective interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohyama, Mitsuru [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-07-01

    A correlated ground state of {sup 16}O and an E2 giant resonance built on it are calculated using an extended version of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory called the time-dependent density-matrix theory (TDDM). The Skyrme force is used in the calculation of both a mean field and two-body correlations. It is found that TDDM gives reasonable ground-state correlations and a large spreading width of the E2 giant resonance when single-particle states in the continuum are treated appropriately. (author)

  9. Frequency-Dependent Tidal Triggering of Low Frequency Earthquakes Near Parkfield, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, L.; Burgmann, R.; Shelly, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of small periodic stress perturbations on earthquake generation is not clear, however, the rate of low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) near Parkfield, California has been found to be strongly correlated with solid earth tides. Laboratory experiments and theoretical analyses show that the period of imposed forcing and source properties affect the sensitivity to triggering and the phase relation of the peak seismicity rate and the periodic stress, but frequency-dependent triggering has not been quantitatively explored in the field. Tidal forcing acts over a wide range of frequencies, therefore the sensitivity to tidal triggering of LFEs provides a good probe to the physical mechanisms affecting earthquake generation. In this study, we consider the tidal triggering of LFEs near Parkfield, California since 2001. We find the LFEs rate is correlated with tidal shear stress, normal stress rate and shear stress rate. The occurrence of LFEs can also be independently modulated by groups of tidal constituents at semi-diurnal, diurnal and fortnightly frequencies. The strength of the response of LFEs to the different tidal constituents varies between LFE families. Each LFE family has an optimal triggering frequency, which does not appear to be depth dependent or systematically related to other known properties. This suggests the period of the applied forcing plays an important role in the triggering process, and the interaction of periods of loading history and source region properties, such as friction, effective normal stress and pore fluid pressure, produces the observed frequency-dependent tidal triggering of LFEs.

  10. Spatial-frequency dependent binocular imbalance in amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, MiYoung; Wiecek, Emily; Dakin, Steven C; Bex, Peter J

    2015-11-25

    While amblyopia involves both binocular imbalance and deficits in processing high spatial frequency information, little is known about the spatial-frequency dependence of binocular imbalance. Here we examined binocular imbalance as a function of spatial frequency in amblyopia using a novel computer-based method. Binocular imbalance at four spatial frequencies was measured with a novel dichoptic letter chart in individuals with amblyopia, or normal vision. Our dichoptic letter chart was composed of band-pass filtered letters arranged in a layout similar to the ETDRS acuity chart. A different chart was presented to each eye of the observer via stereo-shutter glasses. The relative contrast of the corresponding letter in each eye was adjusted by a computer staircase to determine a binocular Balance Point at which the observer reports the letter presented to either eye with equal probability. Amblyopes showed pronounced binocular imbalance across all spatial frequencies, with greater imbalance at high compared to low spatial frequencies (an average increase of 19%, p imbalance may be useful for diagnosing amblyopia and as an outcome measure for recovery of binocular vision following therapy.

  11. Nuclear level density parameter 's dependence on angular momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Mamta; Kailas, S.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear level densities represent a very important ingredient in the statistical Model calculations of nuclear reaction cross sections and help to understand the microscopic features of the excited nuclei. Most of the earlier experimental nuclear level density measurements are confined to low excitation energy and low spin region. A recent experimental investigation of nuclear level densities in high excitation energy and angular momentum domain with some interesting results on inverse level density parameter's dependence on angular momentum in the region around Z=50 has motivated us to study and analyse these experimental results in a microscopic theoretical framework. In the experiment, heavy ion fusion reactions are used to populate the excited and rotating nuclei and measured the α particle evaporation spectra in coincidence with ray multiplicity. Residual nuclei are in the range of Z R 48-55 with excitation energy range 30 to 40 MeV and angular momentum in 10 to 25. The inverse level density parameter K is found to be in the range of 9.0 - 10.5 with some exceptions

  12. High density terahertz frequency comb produced by coherent synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammaro, S.; Pirali, O.; Roy, P.; Lampin, J.-F.; Ducournau, G.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.

    2015-07-01

    Frequency combs have enabled significant progress in frequency metrology and high-resolution spectroscopy extending the achievable resolution while increasing the signal-to-noise ratio. In its coherent mode, synchrotron radiation is accepted to provide an intense terahertz continuum covering a wide spectral range from about 0.1 to 1 THz. Using a dedicated heterodyne receiver, we reveal the purely discrete nature of this emission. A phase relationship between the light pulses leads to a powerful frequency comb spanning over one decade in frequency. The comb has a mode spacing of 846 kHz, a linewidth of about 200 Hz, a fractional precision of about 2 × 10-10 and no frequency offset. The unprecedented potential of the comb for high-resolution spectroscopy is demonstrated by the accurate determination of pure rotation transitions of acetonitrile.

  13. 2D Spatial Frequency Considerations in Comparing 1D Power Spectral Density Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takacs, P.Z.; Barber, S.; Church, E.L.; Kaznatcheev, K.; McKinney, W.R.; Yashchuk, V.Y.

    2010-01-01

    The frequency footprint of ID and 2D profiling instruments needs to be carefully considered in comparing ID surface roughness spectrum measurements made by different instruments. Contributions from orthogonal direction frequency components can not be neglected. The use of optical profiling instruments is ubiquitous in the measurement of the roughness of optical surfaces. Their ease-of-use and non-contact measurement method found widespread use in the optics industry for measuring the quality of delicate optical surfaces. Computerized digital data acquisition with these instruments allowed for quick and easy calculation of surface roughness statistics, such as root-mean-square (RMS) roughness. The computing power of the desktop computer allowed for the rapid conversion of spatial domain data into the frequency domain, enabling the application of sophisticated signal processing techniques to be applied to the analysis of surface roughness, the most powerful of which is the power spectral density (PSP) function. Application of the PSD function to surface statistics introduced the concept of 'bandwidth-limited' roughness, where the value of the RMS roughness depends critically upon the spatial frequency response of the instrument. Different instruments with different spatial frequency response characteristics give different answers when measuring the same surface.

  14. Frequency-dependent complex modulus of the uterus: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiss, Miklos Z [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Hobson, Maritza A [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Varghese, Tomy [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Harter, Josephine [Department of Surgical Pathology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kliewer, Mark A [Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Hartenbach, Ellen M [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Zagzebski, James A [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2006-08-07

    The frequency-dependent complex moduli of human uterine tissue have been characterized. Quantification of the modulus is required for developing uterine ultrasound elastography as a viable imaging modality for diagnosing and monitoring causes for abnormal uterine bleeding and enlargement, as well assessing the integrity of uterine and cervical tissue. The complex modulus was measured in samples from hysterectomies of 24 patients ranging in age from 31 to 79 years. Measurements were done under small compressions of either 1 or 2%, at low pre-compression values (either 1 or 2%), and over a frequency range of 0.1-100 Hz. Modulus values of cervical tissue monotonically increased from approximately 30-90 kPa over the frequency range. Normal uterine tissue possessed modulus values over the same range, while leiomyomas, or uterine fibroids, exhibited values ranging from approximately 60-220 kPa.

  15. Frequency-dependent complex modulus of the uterus: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, Miklos Z; Hobson, Maritza A; Varghese, Tomy; Harter, Josephine; Kliewer, Mark A; Hartenbach, Ellen M; Zagzebski, James A

    2006-01-01

    The frequency-dependent complex moduli of human uterine tissue have been characterized. Quantification of the modulus is required for developing uterine ultrasound elastography as a viable imaging modality for diagnosing and monitoring causes for abnormal uterine bleeding and enlargement, as well assessing the integrity of uterine and cervical tissue. The complex modulus was measured in samples from hysterectomies of 24 patients ranging in age from 31 to 79 years. Measurements were done under small compressions of either 1 or 2%, at low pre-compression values (either 1 or 2%), and over a frequency range of 0.1-100 Hz. Modulus values of cervical tissue monotonically increased from approximately 30-90 kPa over the frequency range. Normal uterine tissue possessed modulus values over the same range, while leiomyomas, or uterine fibroids, exhibited values ranging from approximately 60-220 kPa

  16. Frequency-Dependent Disease Transmission and the Dynamics of the Silene-Ustilago Host-Pathogen System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thrall, P.H.; Biere, A.; Uyenoyama, M.K.

    1995-01-01

    Models incorporating density-dependent disease transmission functions generally provide a good fit for airborne and directly transmitted bacterial or viral diseases. However, the transmission dynamics of sexually transmitted and vector-borne diseases are likely to be frequency- rather than density-

  17. Density-dependence as a size-independent regulatory mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vladar, Harold P

    2006-01-21

    The growth function of populations is central in biomathematics. The main dogma is the existence of density-dependence mechanisms, which can be modelled with distinct functional forms that depend on the size of the population. One important class of regulatory functions is the theta-logistic, which generalizes the logistic equation. Using this model as a motivation, this paper introduces a simple dynamical reformulation that generalizes many growth functions. The reformulation consists of two equations, one for population size, and one for the growth rate. Furthermore, the model shows that although population is density-dependent, the dynamics of the growth rate does not depend either on population size, nor on the carrying capacity. Actually, the growth equation is uncoupled from the population size equation, and the model has only two parameters, a Malthusian parameter rho and a competition coefficient theta. Distinct sign combinations of these parameters reproduce not only the family of theta-logistics, but also the van Bertalanffy, Gompertz and Potential Growth equations, among other possibilities. It is also shown that, except for two critical points, there is a general size-scaling relation that includes those appearing in the most important allometric theories, including the recently proposed Metabolic Theory of Ecology. With this model, several issues of general interest are discussed such as the growth of animal population, extinctions, cell growth and allometry, and the effect of environment over a population.

  18. Frequency Dependence of Damping and Compliance in Loudspeaker Suspensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorborg, Knud; Tinggaard, Carsten; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2010-01-01

    ]. It is an empirical model mathematically describing the effects of visco-elasticity in loudspeaker suspensions. The evaluation is to a high degree based on test loudspeakers with rubber surrounds with a high content of plasticizer combining high compliance and high damping. This is very effective to reduce rim...... resonances, but less used in high quality loudspeakers today – where “Low Loss Rubber Surround” is currently seen as a marketing feature, as it is expected to have positive impact on sound quality. The plasticized type of surround shows significant creep, followed by compliance and damping increasing towards...... - with the additives normally used to adjust stiffness and damping - neither frequency dependency of compliance nor creep are significant problems. Despite this, experience shows that frequency dependent mechanical damping nevertheless might be present. In this paper some modifications to the LOG-model are proposed...

  19. Drive frequency dependent phase imaging in piezoresponse force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bo Huifeng; Kan Yi; Lu Xiaomei; Liu Yunfei; Peng Song; Wang Xiaofei; Cai Wei; Xue Ruoshi; Zhu Jinsong

    2010-01-01

    The drive frequency dependent piezoresponse (PR) phase signal in near-stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals is studied by piezoresponse force microscopy. It is clearly shown that the local and nonlocal electrostatic forces have a great contribution to the PR phase signal. The significant PR phase difference of the antiparallel domains are observed at the contact resonances, which is related to the electrostatic dominated electromechanical interactions of the cantilever and tip-sample system. Moreover, the modulation voltage induced frequency shift at higher eigenmodes could be attributed to the change of indention force depending on the modulation amplitude with a piezoelectric origin. The PR phase of the silicon wafer is also measured for comparison. It is certificated that the electrostatic interactions are universal in voltage modulated scanning probe microscopy and could be extended to other phase imaging techniques.

  20. Direct measurement of density oscillation induced by a radio-frequency wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T.; Ejiri, A.; Shimada, Y.; Oosako, T.; Tsujimura, J.; Takase, Y.; Kasahara, H.

    2007-01-01

    An O-mode reflectometer at a frequency of 25.85 GHz was applied to plasmas heated by the high harmonic fast wave (21 MHz) in the TST-2 spherical tokamak. An oscillation in the phase of the reflected microwave in the rf range was observed directly for the first time. In TST-2, the rf (250 kW) induced density oscillation depends mainly on the poloidal rf electric field, which is estimated to be about 0.2 kV/m rms by the reflectometer measurement. Sideband peaks separated in frequency by ion cyclotron harmonics from 21 MHz, and peaks at ion cyclotron harmonics which are suggested to be quasimodes generated by parametric decay, were detected

  1. Density and starting-energy dependent effective interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Norio; Nagata, Sinobu; Kasuga, Teruo

    1979-01-01

    A new effective potential constructed from the reaction matrix calculation of nuclear matters is proposed, taking three-body effects into account. Starting from the two-body scattering equation for nuclear matters, an equation with averaged momentum is introduced as the definition of effective interaction. The parameters in the equation are the Fermi momentum and the starting energy. The nuclear density dependence and the starting energy dependence are independently treated in the potential. The effective interactions including three-body effects were calculated. The dependence on the starting energy is large. The effective interaction is more attractive in the triplet E state, and assures overall saturation without any artificial renormalization. The reaction matrix calculation can be well reproduced by the calculation with this effective potential. The results of calculation for the binding energy of He-4 and O-16 and the shell model matrix elements of O-16 are represented. (Kato, T.)

  2. Density regulation in Northeast Atlantic fish populations: Density dependence is stronger in recruitment than in somatic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Fabian; Ricard, Daniel; Heino, Mikko

    2018-05-01

    Population regulation is a central concept in ecology, yet in many cases its presence and the underlying mechanisms are difficult to demonstrate. The current paradigm maintains that marine fish populations are predominantly regulated by density-dependent recruitment. While it is known that density-dependent somatic growth can be present too, its general importance remains unknown and most practical applications neglect it. This study aimed to close this gap by for the first time quantifying and comparing density dependence in growth and recruitment over a large set of fish populations. We fitted density-dependent models to time-series data on population size, recruitment and age-specific weight from commercially exploited fish populations in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and the Baltic Sea. Data were standardized to enable a direct comparison within and among populations, and estimated parameters were used to quantify the impact of density regulation on population biomass. Statistically significant density dependence in recruitment was detected in a large proportion of populations (70%), whereas for density dependence in somatic growth the prevalence of density dependence depended heavily on the method (26% and 69%). Despite age-dependent variability, the density dependence in recruitment was consistently stronger among age groups and between alternative approaches that use weight-at-age or weight increments to assess growth. Estimates of density-dependent reduction in biomass underlined these results: 97% of populations with statistically significant parameters for growth and recruitment showed a larger impact of density-dependent recruitment on population biomass. The results reaffirm the importance of density-dependent recruitment in marine fishes, yet they also show that density dependence in somatic growth is not uncommon. Furthermore, the results are important from an applied perspective because density dependence in somatic growth affects productivity and

  3. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-07-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ1(r) cos(kz) cos(ωt-lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ωR, is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ vr/ωT, so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles.

  4. Dependence of enhanced asymmetry-induced transport on collision frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggleston, D. L.

    2014-01-01

    A single-particle code with collisional effects is used to study how asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral plasma depends on collision frequency. For asymmetries of the form ϕ 1 (r) cos(kz) cos(ωt−lθ), two sources for the transport have been identified: resonant particles and axially trapped particles. The simulation shows that this latter type, which occurs near the radius where ω matches the azimuthal rotation frequency ω R , is usually dominant at low collision frequency ν but becomes negligible at higher ν. This behavior can be understood by noting that axially trapped particles have a lower trapping frequency than resonant particles. In the low ν (banana) regime, the radial oscillations have amplitude Δr ≈ v r /ω T , so axially trapped particles dominate, and the transport may even exceed the resonant particle plateau regime level. As ν increases, collisions start to interrupt the slower axially trapped particle oscillations, while the resonant particles are still in the banana regime, so the axially trapped particle contribution to the transport decreases. At the largest ν values, axially trapped particle transport is negligible and the observed diffusion coefficient matches that given by plateau regime resonant particle theory. Heuristic models based on these considerations give reasonable agreement with the observed scaling laws for the value of the collision frequency where axially trapped particle transport starts to decrease and for the enhancement of the diffusion coefficient produced by axially trapped particles

  5. Parity dependence of the nuclear level density at high excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, B.V.; Agrawal, H.M.

    1995-01-01

    The basic underlying assumption ρ(l+1, J)=ρ(l, J) in the level density function ρ(U, J, π) has been checked on the basis of high quality data available on individual resonance parameters (E 0 , Γ n , J π ) for s- and p-wave neutrons in contrast to the earlier analysis where information about p-wave resonance parameters was meagre. The missing level estimator based on the partial integration over a Porter-Thomas distribution of neutron reduced widths and the Dyson-Mehta Δ 3 statistic for the level spacing have been used to ascertain that the s- and p-wave resonance level spacings D(0) and D(1) are not in error because of spurious and missing levels. The present work does not validate the tacit assumption ρ(l+1, J)=ρ(l, J) and confirms that the level density depends upon parity at high excitation. The possible implications of the parity dependence of the level density on the results of statistical model calculations of nuclear reaction cross sections as well as on pre-compound emission have been emphasized. (orig.)

  6. Chaotic dynamics dependence on doping density in weakly coupled GaAs/AlAs superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Gui; Zhang Fengying; Li Yuanhong; Li Yuqi

    2012-01-01

    A discrete sequential tunneling model is used for studying the influence of the doping density on the dynamical behaviors in weakly coupled GaAs/AlAs superlattices. Driven by the DC bias, the system exhibits self-sustained current oscillations induced by the period motion of the unstable electric field domain, and an electrical hysteresis in the loop of current density voltage curve is deduced. It is found that the hysteresis range strongly depends on the doping density, and the width of the hysteresis loop increases with increasing the doping density. By adding an external driving ac voltage, more complicated nonlinear behaviors are observed including quasiperiodicity, period-3, and the route of an inverse period-doubling to chaos when the driving frequency changes. (semiconductor physics)

  7. Spatial resolution dependence on spectral frequency in human speech cortex electrocorticography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Leah; Hamilton, Liberty S.; Edwards, Erik; Bouchard, Kristofer E.; Chang, Edward F.

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Electrocorticography (ECoG) has become an important tool in human neuroscience and has tremendous potential for emerging applications in neural interface technology. Electrode array design parameters are outstanding issues for both research and clinical applications, and these parameters depend critically on the nature of the neural signals to be recorded. Here, we investigate the functional spatial resolution of neural signals recorded at the human cortical surface. We empirically derive spatial spread functions to quantify the shared neural activity for each frequency band of the electrocorticogram. Approach. Five subjects with high-density (4 mm center-to-center spacing) ECoG grid implants participated in speech perception and production tasks while neural activity was recorded from the speech cortex, including superior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus, and postcentral gyrus. The cortical surface field potential was decomposed into traditional EEG frequency bands. Signal similarity between electrode pairs for each frequency band was quantified using a Pearson correlation coefficient. Main results. The correlation of neural activity between electrode pairs was inversely related to the distance between the electrodes; this relationship was used to quantify spatial falloff functions for cortical subdomains. As expected, lower frequencies remained correlated over larger distances than higher frequencies. However, both the envelope and phase of gamma and high gamma frequencies (30-150 Hz) are largely uncorrelated (<90%) at 4 mm, the smallest spacing of the high-density arrays. Thus, ECoG arrays smaller than 4 mm have significant promise for increasing signal resolution at high frequencies, whereas less additional gain is achieved for lower frequencies. Significance. Our findings quantitatively demonstrate the dependence of ECoG spatial resolution on the neural frequency of interest. We demonstrate that this relationship is consistent across patients and

  8. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sissay, Adonay [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Lopata, Kenneth, E-mail: klopata@lsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2016-09-07

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  9. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  10. Landau parameters for finite range density dependent nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farine, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Landau parameters represent the effective particle-hole interaction at Fermi level. Since between the physical observables and the Landau parameters there is a direct relation their derivation from an effective interaction is of great interest. The parameter F 0 determines the incompressibility K of the system. The parameter F 1 determines the effective mass (which controls the level density at the Fermi level). In addition, F 0 ' determines the symmetry energy, G 0 the magnetic susceptibility, and G 0 ' the pion condensation threshold in nuclear matter. This paper is devoted to a general derivation of Landau parameters for an interaction with density dependent finite range terms. Particular carefulness is devoted to the inclusion of rearrangement terms. This report is part of a larger project which aims at defining a new nuclear interaction improving the well-known D1 force of Gogny et al. for describing the average nuclear properties and exotic nuclei and satisfying, in addition, the sum rules

  11. Momentum and density dependence of the nuclear mean field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behera, B.; Routray, T.R.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this is to analyse the momentum, density and temperature dependence of the mean field in nuclear matter derived from finite range effective interactions and to examine the influence of the functional form of the interaction on the high momentum behaviour of the mean field. Emphasis will be given to use very simple parametrizations of the effective interaction with a minimum number of adjustable parameters and yet capable of giving a good description of the mean field in nuclear matter over a wide range of momentum, density and temperature. As an application of the calculated equation of state of nuclear matter, phase transitions to quark-gluon plasma is studied where the quark phase is described by a zeroth order bag model equation of state

  12. The time-dependent density matrix renormalisation group method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Haibo; Luo, Zhen; Yao, Yao

    2018-04-01

    Substantial progress of the time-dependent density matrix renormalisation group (t-DMRG) method in the recent 15 years is reviewed in this paper. By integrating the time evolution with the sweep procedures in density matrix renormalisation group (DMRG), t-DMRG provides an efficient tool for real-time simulations of the quantum dynamics for one-dimensional (1D) or quasi-1D strongly correlated systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. In the illustrative applications, the t-DMRG approach is applied to investigate the nonadiabatic processes in realistic chemical systems, including exciton dissociation and triplet fission in polymers and molecular aggregates as well as internal conversion in pyrazine molecule.

  13. Nuclear ``pasta'' phase within density dependent hadronic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avancini, S. S.; Brito, L.; Marinelli, J. R.; Menezes, D. P.; de Moraes, M. M. W.; Providência, C.; Santos, A. M.

    2009-03-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the onset of the “pasta” phase with different parametrizations of the density dependent hadronic model and compare the results with one of the usual parametrizations of the nonlinear Walecka model. The influence of the scalar-isovector virtual δ meson is shown. At zero temperature, two different methods are used, one based on coexistent phases and the other on the Thomas-Fermi approximation. At finite temperature, only the coexistence phases method is used. npe matter with fixed proton fractions and in β equilibrium are studied. We compare our results with restrictions imposed on the values of the density and pressure at the inner edge of the crust, obtained from observations of the Vela pulsar and recent isospin diffusion data from heavy-ion reactions, and with predictions from spinodal calculations.

  14. Nuclear 'pasta' phase within density dependent hadronic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avancini, S. S.; Marinelli, J. R.; Menezes, D. P.; Moraes, M. M. W. de; Brito, L.; Providencia, C.; Santos, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the onset of the 'pasta' phase with different parametrizations of the density dependent hadronic model and compare the results with one of the usual parametrizations of the nonlinear Walecka model. The influence of the scalar-isovector virtual δ meson is shown. At zero temperature, two different methods are used, one based on coexistent phases and the other on the Thomas-Fermi approximation. At finite temperature, only the coexistence phases method is used. npe matter with fixed proton fractions and in β equilibrium are studied. We compare our results with restrictions imposed on the values of the density and pressure at the inner edge of the crust, obtained from observations of the Vela pulsar and recent isospin diffusion data from heavy-ion reactions, and with predictions from spinodal calculations

  15. Perspective: Fundamental aspects of time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitra, Neepa T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College and the Physics Program at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2016-06-14

    In the thirty-two years since the birth of the foundational theorems, time-dependent density functional theory has had a tremendous impact on calculations of electronic spectra and dynamics in chemistry, biology, solid-state physics, and materials science. Alongside the wide-ranging applications, there has been much progress in understanding fundamental aspects of the functionals and the theory itself. This Perspective looks back to some of these developments, reports on some recent progress and current challenges for functionals, and speculates on future directions to improve the accuracy of approximations used in this relatively young theory.

  16. Time-dependent density-functional theory concepts and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ullrich, Carsten A

    2011-01-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) describes the quantum dynamics of interacting electronic many-body systems formally exactly and in a practical and efficient manner. TDDFT has become the leading method for calculating excitation energies and optical properties of large molecules, with accuracies that rival traditional wave-function based methods, but at a fraction of the computational cost.This book is the first graduate-level text on the concepts and applications of TDDFT, including many examples and exercises, and extensive coverage of the literature. The book begins with a s

  17. Frequency-dependent micromechanics of cellularized biopolymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Chris; Kim, Jihan; McIntyre, David; Sun, Bo

    Mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence many cellular behaviors such as growth, differentiation, and migration. These are dynamic processes in which the cells actively remodel the ECM. Reconstituted collagen gel is a common model ECM for studying cell-ECM interactions in vitro because collagen is the most abundant component of mammalian ECM and gives the ECM its material stiffness. We embed micron-sized particles in collagen and use holographic optical tweezers to apply forces to the particles in multiple directions and over a range of frequencies up to 10 Hz. We calculate the local compliance and show that it is dependent on both the direction and frequency of the applied force. Performing the same measurement on many particles allows us to characterize the spatial inhomogeneity of the mechanical properties and shows that the compliance decreases at higher frequencies. Performing these measurements on cell-populated collagen gels shows that cellular remodeling of the ECM changes the mechanical properties of the collagen and we investigate whether this change is dependent on the local strain and distance from nearby cells.

  18. How can we model selectively neutral density dependence in evolutionary games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argasinski, Krzysztof; Kozłowski, Jan

    2008-03-01

    The problem of density dependence appears in all approaches to the modelling of population dynamics. It is pertinent to classic models (i.e., Lotka-Volterra's), and also population genetics and game theoretical models related to the replicator dynamics. There is no density dependence in the classic formulation of replicator dynamics, which means that population size may grow to infinity. Therefore the question arises: How is unlimited population growth suppressed in frequency-dependent models? Two categories of solutions can be found in the literature. In the first, replicator dynamics is independent of background fitness. In the second type of solution, a multiplicative suppression coefficient is used, as in a logistic equation. Both approaches have disadvantages. The first one is incompatible with the methods of life history theory and basic probabilistic intuitions. The logistic type of suppression of per capita growth rate stops trajectories of selection when population size reaches the maximal value (carrying capacity); hence this method does not satisfy selective neutrality. To overcome these difficulties, we must explicitly consider turn-over of individuals dependent on mortality rate. This new approach leads to two interesting predictions. First, the equilibrium value of population size is lower than carrying capacity and depends on the mortality rate. Second, although the phase portrait of selection trajectories is the same as in density-independent replicator dynamics, pace of selection slows down when population size approaches equilibrium, and then remains constant and dependent on the rate of turn-over of individuals.

  19. Development and application of a density dependent matrix ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranging along the Atlantic coast from US Florida to the Maritime Provinces of Canada, the Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) is an important and well-studied model organism for understanding the effects of pollutants and other stressors in estuarine and marine ecosystems. Matrix population models are useful tools for ecological risk assessment because they integrate effects across the life cycle, provide a linkage between endpoints observed in the individual and ecological risk to the population as a whole, and project outcomes for many generations in the future. We developed a density dependent matrix population model for Atlantic killifish by modifying a model developed for fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) that has proved to be extremely useful, e.g. to incorporate data from laboratory studies and project effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals. We developed a size-structured model (as opposed to one that is based upon developmental stages or age class structure) so that we could readily incorporate output from a Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model, currently under development. Due to a lack of sufficient data to accurately define killifish responses to density dependence, we tested a number of scenarios realistic for other fish species in order to demonstrate the outcome of including this ecologically important factor. We applied the model using published data for killifish exposed to dioxin-like compounds, and compared our results to those using

  20. Filter frequency response of time dependent signal using Laplace transform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestakov, Aleksei I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-16

    We analyze the effect a filter has on a time dependent signal x(t). If X(s) is the Laplace transform of x and H (s) is the filter Transfer function, the response in frequency space is X (s) H (s). Consequently, in real space, the response is the convolution (x*h) (t), where hi is the Laplace inverse of H. Effects are analyzed and analytically for functions such as (t/tc)2 e-t/t$_c$, where tc = const. We consider lowpass, highpass and bandpass filters.

  1. The Influence of Orthographic Neighborhood Density and Word Frequency on Visual Word Recognition: Insights from RT Distributional Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Wee Hun eLim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of orthographic neighborhood density and word frequency in visual word recognition were investigated using distributional analyses of response latencies in visual lexical decision. Main effects of density and frequency were observed in mean latencies. Distributional analyses, in addition, revealed a density x frequency interaction: for low-frequency words, density effects were mediated predominantly by distributional shifting whereas for high-frequency words, density effects were absent except at the slower RTs, implicating distributional skewing. The present findings suggest that density effects in low-frequency words reflect processes involved in early lexical access, while the effects observed in high-frequency words reflect late postlexical checking processes.

  2. Frequency-dependent hydrodynamic interaction between two solid spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gerhard; Schmid, Friederike

    2017-12-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions play an important role in many areas of soft matter science. In simulations with implicit solvent, various techniques such as Brownian or Stokesian dynamics explicitly include hydrodynamic interactions a posteriori by using hydrodynamic diffusion tensors derived from the Stokes equation. However, this equation assumes the interaction to be instantaneous which is an idealized approximation and only valid on long time scales. In the present paper, we go one step further and analyze the time-dependence of hydrodynamic interactions between finite-sized particles in a compressible fluid on the basis of the linearized Navier-Stokes equation. The theoretical results show that at high frequencies, the compressibility of the fluid has a significant impact on the frequency-dependent pair interactions. The predictions of hydrodynamic theory are compared to molecular dynamics simulations of two nanocolloids in a Lennard-Jones fluid. For this system, we reconstruct memory functions by extending the inverse Volterra technique. The simulation data agree very well with the theory, therefore, the theory can be used to implement dynamically consistent hydrodynamic interactions in the increasingly popular field of non-Markovian modeling.

  3. Autobiographical Memory Performance in Alzheimer's Disease Depends on Retrieval Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan; Mychajliw, Christian; Reichert, Carolin; Melcher, Tobias; Leyhe, Thomas

    2016-04-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory disturbances primarily caused by pathogenic mechanisms affecting medial temporal lobe structures. As proposed by current theories of memory formation, this decrease is mediated by the age of the acquired knowledge. However, they cannot fully explain specific patterns of retrograde amnesia in AD. In the current study we examined an alternative approach and investigated whether the extent and severity of retrograde amnesia in AD is mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval or whether it depends on the mere age of knowledge. We compared recall of autobiographical incidents from three life periods in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), patients with early dementia of Alzheimer type (eDAT), and healthy control (HC) individuals using the Autobiographical Memory Interview. Retrieval frequency was operationalized by a paired comparison analysis. In contrast to HC individuals, recall of autobiographical incidents was impaired in patients with aMCI and eDAT following Ribot's gradient, with a reduced memory loss for remote compared to more recent life events. However, there was a strong effect of retrieval frequency on memory performance with frequently retrieved incidents memorized in more detail than less frequently retrieved episodes. Remote memories were recalled more often than recent ones. These findings suggest that more frequently retrieved autobiographical memories generally become more independent of the hippocampal complex and might thus be better protected against early hippocampal damage related to AD. Hence, the extent of retrograde amnesia in AD appears mainly mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval, which could plausibly explain why cognitive activity can effectively delay the onset of memory decline in AD.

  4. Density dependence triggers runaway selection of reduced senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Seymour

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of exogenous mortality risks, future reproduction by an individual is worth less than present reproduction to its fitness. Senescent aging thus results inevitably from transferring net fertility into younger ages. Some long-lived organisms appear to defy theory, however, presenting negligible senescence (e.g., hydra and extended lifespans (e.g., Bristlecone Pine. Here, we investigate the possibility that the onset of vitality loss can be delayed indefinitely, even accepting the abundant evidence that reproduction is intrinsically costly to survival. For an environment with constant hazard, we establish that natural selection itself contributes to increasing density-dependent recruitment losses. We then develop a generalized model of accelerating vitality loss for analyzing fitness optima as a tradeoff between compression and spread in the age profile of net fertility. Across a realistic spectrum of senescent age profiles, density regulation of recruitment can trigger runaway selection for ever-reducing senescence. This novel prediction applies without requirement for special life-history characteristics such as indeterminate somatic growth or increasing fecundity with age. The evolution of nonsenescence from senescence is robust to the presence of exogenous adult mortality, which tends instead to increase the age-independent component of vitality loss. We simulate examples of runaway selection leading to negligible senescence and even intrinsic immortality.

  5. Fundamentals of time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Miguel A.L.; Rubio, Angel

    2012-01-01

    There have been many significant advances in time-dependent density functional theory over recent years, both in enlightening the fundamental theoretical basis of the theory, as well as in computational algorithms and applications. This book, as successor to the highly successful volume Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (Lect. Notes Phys. 706, 2006) brings together for the first time all recent developments in a systematic and coherent way. First, a thorough pedagogical presentation of the fundamental theory is given, clarifying aspects of the original proofs and theorems, as well as presenting fresh developments that extend the theory into new realms such as alternative proofs of the original Runge-Gross theorem, open quantum systems, and dispersion forces to name but a few. Next, all of the basic concepts are introduced sequentially and building in complexity, eventually reaching the level of open problems of interest. Contemporary applications of the theory are discussed, from real-time coupled-electron-ion dynamics, to excited-state dynamics and molecular transport. Last but not least, the authors introduce and review recent advances in computational implementation, including massively parallel architectures and graphical processing units. Special care has been taken in editing this volume as a multi-author textbook, following a coherent line of thought, and making all the relevant connections between chapters and concepts consistent throughout. As such it will prove to be the text of reference in this field, both for beginners as well as expert researchers and lecturers teaching advanced quantum mechanical methods to model complex physical systems, from molecules to nanostructures, from biocomplexes to surfaces, solids and liquids. (orig.)

  6. Dependences of Ultrasonic Parameters for Osteoporosis Diagnosis on Bone Mineral Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Kyo Seung; Kim, Yoon Mi; Park, Jong Chan; Choi, Min Joo; Lee, Kang Il

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound technologies for osteoporosis diagnosis measure ultrasonic parameters such as speed of sound(SOS) and normalized broadband ultrasound attenuation(nBUA) in the calcaneus (heel bone). In the present study, the dependences of SOS and nBUA on bone mineral density in the proximal femur with high risk of fracture were investigated by using 20 trabecular bone samples extracted from bovine femurs. SOS and nBUA in the femoral trabecular bone samples were measured by using a transverse transmission method with one matched pair of ultrasonic transducers with a center frequency of 1.0 MHz. SOS and nBUA measured in the 20 trabecular bone samples exhibited high Pearson's correlation coefficients (r) of r = 0.83 and 0.72 with apparent bone density, respectively. The multiple regression analysis with SOS and nBUA as independent variables and apparent bone density as a dependent variable showed that the correlation coefficient r = 0.85 of the multiple linear regression model was higher than those of the simple linear regression model with either parameter SOS or nBUA as an independent variable. These high linear correlations between the ultrasonic parameters and the bone density suggest that the ultrasonic parameters measured in the femur can be useful for predicting the femoral bone mineral density.

  7. Frequency dependence and passive drains in fish-eye lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo-Teruel, O.; Mitchell-Thomas, R. C.; Hao, Y.

    2012-11-01

    The Maxwell fish eye lens has previously been reported as being capable of the much sought after phenomenon of subwavelength imaging. The inclusion of a drain in this system is considered crucial to the imaging ability, although its role is the topic of much debate. This paper provides a numerical investigation into a practical implementation of a drain in such systems, and analyzes the strong frequency dependence of both the Maxwell fish eye lens and an alternative, the Miñano lens. The imaging capability of these types of lens is questioned, and it is supported by simulations involving various configurations of drain arrays. Finally, a discussion of the near-field and evanescent wave contribution is given.

  8. Frequency-dependence of the slow force response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lewinski, Dirk; Zhu, Danan; Khafaga, Mounir; Kockskamper, Jens; Maier, Lars S; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Pieske, Burkert

    2008-05-01

    Stretch induces biphasic inotropic effects in mammalian myocardium. A delayed component (slow force response, SFR) has been demonstrated in various species, however, experimental conditions varied and the underlying mechanisms are controversial. The physiological relevance of the SFR is poorly understood. Experiments were performed in ventricular muscle strips from failing human hearts and non-failing rabbit hearts. Upon stretch, twitch force was assessed at basal conditions (1 Hz, 37 degrees C) and after changing stimulation frequency with and without blockade of the Na+/H+-exchanger-1 (NHE1) or reverse-mode Na+/Ca2+-exchange (NCX). Action potential duration (APD) was assessed using floating electrodes. Low stimulation rates (0.2 Hz) potentiated and higher stimulation rates (2 and 3 Hz) reduced the SFR. The extent of SFR inhibition by NHE1 or NCX inhibition was not affected by stimulation rate. APD decreased at 0.2 Hz but was not altered at higher stimulation rates. The data demonstrate frequency-dependence of the SFR with greater positive inotropic effects at lower stimulation rates. Subcellular mechanisms underlying the SFR are not fundamentally affected by stimulation rate. The SFR may have more pronounced physiological effects at lower heart rates.

  9. Frequency-dependent springs in the seismic analysis of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyapin, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a two-step algorithm for the seismic analysis of structure resting on the rigid embedded basement. Frequency-domain analysis of SSI is carried out on the second step for a platform model with special 'soil spring' which is complex, frequency-dependent, wave-dependent and non-balanced. Theory is presented to obtain the parameters of the soil spring on the first step of the analysis, performed without structure (only geometry of the basement is used) using well-known SASSI code (Lysmer et al, 1981) or in some other ways. On the second step in the SASSI analysis the soil spring is included in the model as a special finite element. Thus, the first step enables to save the computer resources on structure, the second step-to save resources on soil. Soil spring is the most general form for a SSI linear analysis: conventional springs and dashpots can be easily represented in such a format. Thus, the presented approach enables to study the impact of various factors (such as the embedment depth and soil-structure separation, the off-diagonal stiffness, various formulas for stiffness and damping, etc.) on the soil spring parameters. These parameters can be studied separately from the structure itself. As an example, the study of the horizontal soil mesh size is presented. Lumped soil spring may be used on the second step to obtain structural response spectra. To get stresses complex stiffness may be distributed over the basement slab and embedded walls. The proposed approach may be considered to be the alternative to the impedance method (see ASCE4-98). (authors)

  10. The frequency dependence of friction in experiment, theory, and observations of low frequency earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A.; Beeler, N. M.; Burgmann, R.; Shelly, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) are small amplitude, short duration events composing tectonic tremor, probably generated by shear slip on asperities downdip of the seismogenic zone. In Parkfield, Shelly and Hardebeck [2010] have identified 88 LFE families, or hypocentral locations, that contain over half a million LFEs since 2001 on a 160-km-long section of the San Andreas fault between 16 and 30 km depth. A number of studies have demonstrated the extreme sensitivity of low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) near Parkfield to stress changes ranging from contingent upon the amplitude and frequency content of the applied stress. We attempt to test this framework by comparing observations of LFEs triggered in response to stresses spanning several orders of magnitude in both frequency and amplitude (e.g. tides, teleseismic surface waves, static stress changes, etc.) to the predicted response of a single degree of freedom slider block model with rate and state dependent strength. The sensitivity of failure time in the friction model as developed in previous studies does not distinguish between shear and normal stresses; laboratory experiments show a more complicated sensitivity of failure time to normal stress change than in the published model. Because the shear and normal tidal stresses at Parkfield have different amplitudes and are not in phase, we have modified the model to include the expected sensitivity to normal stress. Our prior investigations of the response of both regular and low frequency earthquakes to tidal stresses [Thomas et al., 2009; Shelly and Johnson, 2011] are qualitatively consistent with the predictions of the friction model , as both the timing and degree (probability) of correlation are in agreement.

  11. Relaxation oscillations induced by amplitude-dependent frequency in dissipative trapped electron mode turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.; Ware, A.S.; Newman, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    A nonlinear frequency shift in dissipative trapped electron mode turbulence is shown to give rise to a relaxation oscillation in the saturated power density spectrum. A simple non-Markovian closure for the coupled evolution of ion momentum and electron density response is developed to describe the oscillations. From solutions of a nonlinear oscillator model based on the closure, it is found that the oscillation is driven by the growth rate, as modified by the amplitude-dependent frequency shift, with inertia provided by the memory of the growth rate of prior amplitudes. This memory arises from time-history integrals common to statistical closures. The memory associated with a finite time of energy transfer between coupled spectrum components does not sustain the oscillation in the simple model. Solutions of the model agree qualitatively with the time-dependent numerical solutions of the original dissipative trapped electron model, yielding oscillations with the proper phase relationship between the fluctuation energy and the frequency shift, the proper evolution of the wave number spectrum shape and particle flux, and a realistic period

  12. Pulse frequency dependency of photobiomodulation on the bioenergetic functions of human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Bae; Baik, Ku Youn; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2017-11-21

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy contributes to pain relief, wound healing, and tissue regeneration. The pulsed wave (PW) mode has been reported to be more effective than the continuous wave (CW) mode when applying PBM to many biological systems. However, the reason for the higher effectiveness of PW-PBM is poorly understood. Herein, we suggest using delayed luminescence (DL) as a reporter of mitochondrial activity after PBM treatment. DL originates mainly from mitochondrial electron transport chain systems, which produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The decay time of DL depends on the pulse frequencies of applied light, which correlate with the biological responses of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). Using a low-power light whose wavelength is 810 nm and energy density is 38 mJ/cm 2 , we find that a 300-Hz pulse frequency prolonged the DL pattern and enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity. In addition, we analyze mitochondrial morphological changes and their volume density and find evidence supporting mitochondrial physiological changes from PBM treatment. Our data suggest a new methodology for determining the effectiveness of PBM and the specific pulse frequency dependency of PBM in the differentiation of hDPSCs.

  13. On the locus and spread of pseudo-density functions in the time-frequency plane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, A.J.E.M.

    1982-01-01

    Various time-frequency pseudo-density functions used in signal analysis are compared with respect to spread. Among the members of Cohen's class of pseudo-density functions satisfying the finite support property as well as Moyal's formula, the Wigner distribution is the most well-behaved one in the

  14. Diagnosis of Unmagnetized Plasma Electron Number Density and Electron-neutral Collision Frequency by Using Microwave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zhongcai; Shi Jiaming; Xu Bo

    2005-01-01

    The plasma diagnostic method using the transmission attenuation of microwaves at double frequencies (PDMUTAMDF) indicates that the frequency and the electron-neutral collision frequency of the plasma can be deduced by utilizing the transmission attenuation of microwaves at two neighboring frequencies in a non-magnetized plasma. Then the electron density can be obtained from the plasma frequency. The PDMUTAMDF is a simple method to diagnose the plasma indirectly. In this paper, the interaction of electromagnetic waves and the plasma is analyzed. Then, based on the attenuation and the phase shift of a microwave in the plasma, the principle of the PDMUTAMDF is presented. With the diagnostic method, the spatially mean electron density and electron collision frequency of the plasma can be obtained. This method is suitable for the elementary diagnosis of the atmospheric-pressure plasma

  15. Time-dependent quantum fluid density functional theory of hydrogen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    density functional theory; quantum fluid dynamics. 1. Introduction ... dynamics of strongly non-linear interaction of atoms with intense ... theory and quantum fluid dynamics in real space. .... clear evidence of bond softening since density in the.

  16. Experimental evidence for density-dependent reproduction in a cooperatively breeding passerine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Lyanne; Tinbergen, Joost M.; Both, Christiaan; Bristol, Rachel; Richardson, David S.; Komdeur, Jan; Sauer, J.R.

    Temporal variation in survival, fecundity, and dispersal rates is associated with density-dependent and density-independent processes. Stable natural populations are expected to be regulated by density-dependent factors. However, detecting this by investigating natural variation in density is

  17. Density-dependent expressions for photoionization cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Weiguo; Ma Xiaoguang; Cheng Yansong

    2004-06-07

    Alternative expressions for photoionization cross-sections and dielectric influence functions are suggested to study the photoionization cross-sections of atoms in solid system. The basic picture is that the photoionization cross-section of atoms in a real system can be described as the coupling between quantum quantity (QQ) and classical quantity (CQ) parts. The QQ part represents the photoionization cross-sections of an isolated particle, while the CQ part may represent most of the important influence of the macroscopic effects (e.g., the interactions of all surrounding polarized particles, and the dielectric property, etc.) on the photoionization cross-sections. The applications to the barium system show that the number-density-dependent new photoionization formula not only obtains the same cross-sections as those from the first order approximation for ideal gas, but also can generate the cross-sections for solid barium by transforming those of ideal gas of the same species using the dielectric influence function.

  18. Density-dependent expressions for photoionization cross-sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Weiguo; Ma Xiaoguang; Cheng Yansong

    2004-01-01

    Alternative expressions for photoionization cross-sections and dielectric influence functions are suggested to study the photoionization cross-sections of atoms in solid system. The basic picture is that the photoionization cross-section of atoms in a real system can be described as the coupling between quantum quantity (QQ) and classical quantity (CQ) parts. The QQ part represents the photoionization cross-sections of an isolated particle, while the CQ part may represent most of the important influence of the macroscopic effects (e.g., the interactions of all surrounding polarized particles, and the dielectric property, etc.) on the photoionization cross-sections. The applications to the barium system show that the number-density-dependent new photoionization formula not only obtains the same cross-sections as those from the first order approximation for ideal gas, but also can generate the cross-sections for solid barium by transforming those of ideal gas of the same species using the dielectric influence function

  19. Multiscale time-dependent density functional theory: Demonstration for plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiajian; Abi Mansour, Andrew; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2017-08-07

    Plasmon properties are of significant interest in pure and applied nanoscience. While time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) can be used to study plasmons, it becomes impractical for elucidating the effect of size, geometric arrangement, and dimensionality in complex nanosystems. In this study, a new multiscale formalism that addresses this challenge is proposed. This formalism is based on Trotter factorization and the explicit introduction of a coarse-grained (CG) structure function constructed as the Weierstrass transform of the electron wavefunction. This CG structure function is shown to vary on a time scale much longer than that of the latter. A multiscale propagator that coevolves both the CG structure function and the electron wavefunction is shown to bring substantial efficiency over classical propagators used in TDDFT. This efficiency follows from the enhanced numerical stability of the multiscale method and the consequence of larger time steps that can be used in a discrete time evolution. The multiscale algorithm is demonstrated for plasmons in a group of interacting sodium nanoparticles (15-240 atoms), and it achieves improved efficiency over TDDFT without significant loss of accuracy or space-time resolution.

  20. Frequency-dependent glycinergic inhibition modulates plasticity in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Tara; Lillis, Kyle P; Zhou, Yu-Dong; White, John A

    2008-07-16

    Previous studies have demonstrated the presence of functional glycine receptors (GlyRs) in hippocampus. In this work, we examine the baseline activity and activity-dependent modulation of GlyRs in region CA1. We find that strychnine-sensitive GlyRs are open in the resting CA1 pyramidal cell, creating a state of tonic inhibition that "shunts" the magnitude of EPSPs evoked by electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collateral inputs. This GlyR-mediated shunting conductance is independent of the presynaptic stimulation rate; however, pairs of presynaptic and postsynaptic action potentials, repeated at frequencies above 5 Hz, reduce the GlyR-mediated conductance and increase peak EPSP magnitudes to levels at least 20% larger than those seen with presynaptic stimulation alone. We refer to this phenomenon as rate-dependent efficacy (RDE). Exogenous GlyR agonists (glycine, taurine) block RDE by preventing the closure of postsynaptic GlyRs. The GlyR antagonist strychnine blocks postsynaptic GlyRs under all conditions, occluding RDE. During RDE, GlyRs are less responsive to local glycine application, suggesting that a reduction in the number or sensitivity of membrane-inserted GlyRs underlies RDE. By extending the RDE induction protocol to include 500 paired presynaptic and postsynaptic spikes, we can induce long-term synaptic depression (LTD). Manipulations that lead to reduced functionality of GlyRs, either pharmacologically or through RDE, also lead to increased LTD. This result suggests that RDE contributes to long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus.

  1. Dependence of regular background noise of VLF radiation and thunder-storm activity on solar wind proton density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, A.V.; Kozlov, V.I.

    1997-01-01

    Correlation of the intensity of slowly changing regular background noise within 9.7 kHz frequency in Yakutsk (L = 3) and of the solar wind density protons was determined. This result explains the reverse dependence of the intensity of the regular background noise on the solar activity, 27-day frequency, increase before and following geomagnetic storms, absence of relation with K p index of geomagnetic activity. Conclusion is made that growth of density of the solar wind protons results in increase of the regular background noise and thunderstorm activity

  2. Complexity of low-frequency blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations covaries with local connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeffrey S; Zielinski, Brandon A; Nielsen, Jared A; Ferguson, Michael A

    2014-04-01

    Very low-frequency blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fluctuations have emerged as a valuable tool for describing brain anatomy, neuropathology, and development. Such fluctuations exhibit power law frequency dynamics, with largest amplitude at lowest frequencies. The biophysical mechanisms generating such fluctuations are poorly understood. Using publicly available data from 1,019 subjects of age 7-30, we show that BOLD fluctuations exhibit temporal complexity that is linearly related to local connectivity (regional homogeneity), consistently and significantly covarying across subjects and across gray matter regions. This relationship persisted independently of covariance with gray matter density or standard deviation of BOLD signal. During late neurodevelopment, BOLD fluctuations were unchanged with age in association cortex while becoming more random throughout the rest of the brain. These data suggest that local interconnectivity may play a key role in establishing the complexity of low-frequency BOLD fluctuations underlying functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity. Stable low-frequency power dynamics may emerge through segmentation and integration of connectivity during development of distributed large-scale brain networks. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Frequency dependent capacitance and conductance properties of Schottky diode based on rubrene organic semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barış, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    Al/rubrene/p-Si Schottky diode has been fabricated by forming a rubrene layer on p type Si by using the spin coating method. The frequency dependent capacitance–voltage (C–V–f) and conductance–voltage (G–V–f) characteristics of Al/rubrene/p-Si Schottky diyotes has been investigated in the frequency range of 5 kHz–500 kHz at room temperature. The C–V plots show a peak for each frequency. The capacitance of the device decreased with increasing frequency. The decrease in capacitance results from the presence of interface states. The plots of series resistance–voltage (R s −V) gave a peak in the depletion region at all frequencies. The density of interface states (N ss ) and relaxation time (τ) distribution profiles as a function of applied voltage bias have been determined from the C–V and G–V measurements. The values of the N ss and τ have been calculated in the ranges of 8.37×10 11 –4.85×10 11 eV −1 cm −2 and 5.17×10 −6 –1.02×10 −5 s, respectively

  4. Frequency dependent capacitance and conductance properties of Schottky diode based on rubrene organic semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barış, Behzad, E-mail: behzadbaris@gmail.com

    2013-10-01

    Al/rubrene/p-Si Schottky diode has been fabricated by forming a rubrene layer on p type Si by using the spin coating method. The frequency dependent capacitance–voltage (C–V–f) and conductance–voltage (G–V–f) characteristics of Al/rubrene/p-Si Schottky diyotes has been investigated in the frequency range of 5 kHz–500 kHz at room temperature. The C–V plots show a peak for each frequency. The capacitance of the device decreased with increasing frequency. The decrease in capacitance results from the presence of interface states. The plots of series resistance–voltage (R{sub s}−V) gave a peak in the depletion region at all frequencies. The density of interface states (N{sub ss}) and relaxation time (τ) distribution profiles as a function of applied voltage bias have been determined from the C–V and G–V measurements. The values of the N{sub ss} and τ have been calculated in the ranges of 8.37×10{sup 11}–4.85×10{sup 11} eV{sup −1} cm{sup −2} and 5.17×10{sup −6}–1.02×10{sup −5} s, respectively.

  5. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamitani, Atsushi; Yokono, Takafumi [Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yokono, Takafumi [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Information Sciences and Electronics

    2000-06-01

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency {omega}. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with {omega} > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  6. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitani, Atsushi; Yokono, Takafumi; Yokono, Takafumi

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency ω. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with ω > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  7. Density-dependent growth and metamorphosis in the larval bronze ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effects of density and kinship on growth and metamorphosis in tadpoles of Rana temporalis were studied in a 2 × 4 factorial experiment. Fifteen egg masses were collected from streams in the Western Ghat region of south India. The tadpoles were raised as siblings or in groups of non-siblings at increasing density levels, viz ...

  8. Diameter dependent failure current density of gold nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, S; Maaz, K; Ali, G; Ensinger, W

    2009-01-01

    Failure current density of single gold nanowires is investigated in this paper. Single wires with diameters ranging from 80 to 720 nm and length 30 μm were electrochemically deposited in ion track-etched single-pore polycarbonate membranes. The maximum current density was investigated while keeping the wires embedded in the polymer matrix and ramping up the current until failure occurred. The current density is found to increase with diminishing diameter and the wires with a diameter of 80 nm withstand 1.2 x 10 12 A m -2 before undergoing failure. Possible reasons for these results are discussed in this paper.

  9. Two-electron Rabi oscillations in real-time time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habenicht, Bradley F.; Tani, Noriyuki P.; Provorse, Makenzie R.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the Rabi oscillations of electrons excited by an applied electric field in several simple molecular systems using time-dependent configuration interaction (TDCI) and real-time time-dependent density-functional theory (RT-TDDFT) dynamics. While the TDCI simulations exhibit the expected single-electron Rabi oscillations at a single resonant electric field frequency, Rabi oscillations in the RT-TDDFT simulations are a two-electron process. The existence of two-electron Rabi oscillations is determined both by full population inversion between field-free molecular orbitals and the behavior of the instantaneous dipole moment during the simulations. Furthermore, the Rabi oscillations in RT-TDDFT are subject to an intensity threshold of the electric field, below which Rabi oscillations do not occur and above which the two-electron Rabi oscillations occur at a broad range of frequencies. It is also shown that at field intensities near the threshold intensity, the field frequency predicted to induce Rabi oscillations by linear response TDDFT only produces detuned Rabi oscillations. Instead, the field frequency that yields the full two-electron population inversion and Rabi oscillation behavior is shown to be the average of single-electron transition frequencies from the ground S 0 state and the doubly-excited S 2 state. The behavior of the two-electron Rabi oscillations is rationalized via two possible models. The first model is a multi-photon process that results from the electric field interacting with the three level system such that three level Rabi oscillations may occur. The second model suggests that the mean-field nature of RT-TDDFT induces paired electron propagation

  10. Frequency-resolved interferometric measurement of local density fluctuations for turbulent combustion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köberl, S; Giuliani, F; Woisetschläger, J; Fontaneto, F

    2010-01-01

    A validation of a novel interferometric measurement technique for the frequency-resolved detection of local density fluctuation in turbulent combustion analysis was performed in this work. Two laser vibrometer systems together with a signal analyser were used to obtain frequency spectra of density fluctuations across a methane-jet flame. Since laser vibrometry is based on interferometric techniques, the derived signals are path-integrals along the measurement beam. To obtain local frequency spectra of density fluctuations, long-time-averaged measurements from each of the two systems were performed using correlation functions and cross spectra. Results were compared to data recorded by standard interferometric techniques for validation purposes. Additionally, Raman scattering and laser Doppler velocimetry were used for flame characterization

  11. Quantum Drude friction for time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Lopata, Kenneth

    2008-10-01

    way to very simple finite grid description of scattering and multistage conductance using time-dependent density functional theory away from the linear regime, just as absorbing potentials and self-energies are useful for noninteracting systems and leads.

  12. Density dependence of stopping cross sections measured in liquid ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both, G.; Krotz, R.; Lohmer, K.; Neuwirth, W.

    1983-01-01

    Electronic stopping cross sections for 7 Li projectiles (840--175 keV) have been measured with the inverted Doppler-shift attenuation method in liquid ethane (C 2 H 6 ) at two different densities. The density of the target has been varied by changing the temperature, and measurements have been performed at 0.525 g/cm 3 (199 K) and 0.362 g/cm 3 (287 K). At the higher density the stopping cross section is about 2% smaller. This result agrees with a calculation of the stopping cross section of liquid ethane, applying Lindhard's theory in the local-density approximation using a simple model of the liquid. It is also in agreement with various observations of the so-called physical-state effect, which show that the stopping cross section of the same substance is smaller in a condensed phase than in the gaseous one

  13. Density-dependent phonoriton states in highly excited semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hong Quang; Nguyen Minh Khue; Nguyen Que Huong

    1995-09-01

    The dynamical aspects of the phonoriton state in highly-photoexcited semiconductors is studied theoretically. The effect of the exciton-exciton interaction and nonbosonic character of high-density excitons are taken into account. Using Green's function method and within the Random Phase Approximation it is shown that the phonoriton dispersion and damping are very sensitive to the exciton density, characterizing the excitation degree of semiconductors. (author). 18 refs, 3 figs

  14. Density-dependent effects on physical condition and reproduction in North American elk: an experimental test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley M. Stewart; R. Terry Bowyer; Brian L. Dick; Bruce K. Johnson; John G. Kie

    2005-01-01

    Density dependence plays a key role in life-history characteristics and population ecology of large, herbivorous mammals. We designed a manipulative experiment to test hypotheses relating effects of density-dependent mechanisms on physical condition and fecundity of North American elk (Cervus elaphus) by creating populations at low and high density...

  15. RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE FREQUENCY BREAK BETWEEN FLUID AND KINETIC SCALES IN THE SOLAR WIND FLUCTUATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L., E-mail: roberto.bruno@iaps.inaf.it [INAF-IAPS Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the radial dependence of the spectral break separating the inertial from the dissipation range in power density spectra of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations, between 0.42 and 5.3 AU, during radial alignments between MESSENGER and WIND for the inner heliosphere and between WIND and ULYSSES for the outer heliosphere. We found that the spectral break moves to higher and higher frequencies as the heliocentric distance decreases. The radial dependence of the corresponding wavenumber is of the kind κ {sub b} ∼ R {sup –1.08}, in good agreement with that of the wavenumber derived from the linear resonance condition for proton cyclotron damping. These results support conclusions from previous studies which suggest that a cyclotron-resonant dissipation mechanism must participate in the spectral cascade together with other possible kinetic noncyclotron-resonant mechanisms.

  16. Ultrasonic Characterization of Tissues via Backscatter Frequency Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.

    1997-01-01

    , significantly lower mean frequency of ultrasound backscattered from cirrhotic, compared to normal, liver tissue was noted, Studies of benign and malignant liver tumors (hemangiomas and metastases, respectively) indicated differences in frequency content of these tumors, compared to the adjacent normal liver...

  17. Dependence of synchronization frequency of Kuramoto oscillators on symmetry of intrinsic frequency in ring network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Arindam; Amritkar, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    Kuramoto oscillators have been proposed earlier as a model for interacting systems that exhibit synchronisation. In this article we study the difference between networks with symmetric and asymmetric distribution of natural frequencies. We first indicate that the synchronisation frequency of the oscillators is independent of the natural frequency distribution for a completely connected network. Further we analyse the case of oscillators in a directed ring-network where asymmetry in the natural frequency distribution is seen to shift the synchronisation frequency of the network. We also present an estimate of the shift in the frequencies for slightly asymmetric distributions.

  18. On the profile of frequency and voltage dependent interface states and series resistance in MIS structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doekme, Ilbilge [Science Education Department, Faculty of Kirsehir Education, Gazi University, Kirsehir (Turkey)]. E-mail: ilbilgedokme@gazi.edu.tr; Altindal, Semsettin [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Gazi University, 06500, Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-04-30

    The variation in the capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/{omega}-V) characteristics of Au/SiO{sub 2}/n-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure have been systematically investigated as a function of frequencies in the frequency range 0.5 kHz-10 MHz at room temperature. In addition, the forward and reverse bias current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of this structure were measured at room temperature. The high value of ideality factor was attributed to the high density of interface states localized at Si/SiO{sub 2} interface and interfacial oxide layer. The density of interface states (N{sub ss}) and the series resistance (R{sub ss}) were calculated from I-V and C-V measurements using different methods and the effect of them on C-V and G/{omega}-V characteristics were deeply researched. At the same energy position near the top of valance band, the calculated N{sub ss} values, obtained without taking into account the series resistance of the devices almost one order of magnitude larger than N{sub ss} values obtained by taking into account R{sub ss} values. It is found that the C-V and G/{omega}-V curves exhibit a peak at low frequencies and the peak values of C and G/{omega} decrease with increasing frequency. Also, the plots of R {sub s} as a function of bias give two peaks in the certain voltage range at low frequencies. These observations indicate that at low frequencies, the charges at interface states can easily follow an AC signal and the number of them increases with decreasing frequency. The I-V, C-V and G/{omega}-V characteristics of the MIS structure are affected not only with R {sub s} but also N {sub ss}. Experimental results show that both the R{sub s} and C{sub o} values should be taken into account in determining frequency-dependent electrical characteristics.

  19. Frequency-dependent failure mechanisms of nanocrystalline gold interconnect lines under general alternating current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, X. M.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, G. P.

    2014-09-01

    Thermal fatigue failure of metallization interconnect lines subjected to alternating currents (AC) is becoming a severe threat to the long-term reliability of micro/nanodevices with increasing electrical current density/power. Here, thermal fatigue failure behaviors and damage mechanisms of nanocrystalline Au interconnect lines on the silicon glass substrate have been investigated by applying general alternating currents (the pure alternating current coupled with a direct current (DC) component) with different frequencies ranging from 0.05 Hz to 5 kHz. We observed both thermal fatigue damages caused by Joule heating-induced cyclic strain/stress and electromigration (EM) damages caused by the DC component. Besides, the damage formation showed a strong electrically-thermally-mechanically coupled effect and frequency dependence. At lower frequencies, thermal fatigue damages were dominant and the main damage forms were grain coarsening with grain boundary (GB) cracking/voiding and grain thinning. At higher frequencies, EM damages took over and the main damage forms were GB cracking/voiding of smaller grains and hillocks. Furthermore, the healing effect of the reversing current was considered to elucidate damage mechanisms of the nanocrystalline Au lines generated by the general AC. Lastly, a modified model was proposed to predict the lifetime of the nanocrystalline metal interconnect lines, i.e., that was a competing drift velocity-based approach based on the threshold time required for reverse diffusion/healing to occur.

  20. Long-term persistence, density dependence and effects of climate change on rosyside dace (Cyprinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary D. Grossman; Gary Sundin; Robert E. Ratajczak

    2016-01-01

    SummaryWe used long-term population data for rosyside dace (Clinostomus funduloides), a numerically dominant member of a stochastically organised fish assemblage, to evaluate the relative importance of density-dependent and density-independent processes to population...

  1. Complete FDTD analysis of microwave heating processes in frequency-dependent and temperature dependent media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, F.; Jecko, B. [Univ. de Limoges (France). Inst. de Recherche en Communications Optiques et Microondes

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the temperature rise in a material modifies its physical properties and, particularly, its dielectric permittivity. The dissipated electromagnetic power involved in microwave heating processes depending on {var_epsilon}({omega}), the electrical characteristics of the heated media must vary with the temperature to achieve realistic simulations. In this paper, the authors present a fast and accurate algorithm allowing, through a combined electromagnetic and thermal procedure, to take into account the influence of the temperature on the electrical properties of materials. First, the temperature dependence of the complex permittivity ruled by a Debye relaxation equation is investigated, and a realistic model is proposed and validated. Then, a frequency-dependent finite-differences time-domain ((FD){sup 2}TD) method is used to assess the instantaneous electromagnetic power lost by dielectric hysteresis. Within the same iteration, a time-scaled form of the heat transfer equation allows one to calculate the temperature distribution in the heated medium and then to correct the dielectric properties of the material using the proposed model. These new characteristics will be taken into account by the EM solver at the next iteration. This combined algorithm allows a significant reduction of computation time. An application to a microwave oven is proposed.

  2. Density dependence, whitebark pine, and vital rates of grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Frank T.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Bjornlie, Daniel D.; Ebinger, Michael R.; Thompson, Daniel J.; Costello, Cecily M.; White, Gary C.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding factors influencing changes in population trajectory is important for effective wildlife management, particularly for populations of conservation concern. Annual population growth of the grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) population in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA has slowed from 4.2–7.6% during 1983–2001 to 0.3–2.2% during 2002–2011. Substantial changes in availability of a key food source and bear population density have occurred. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), the seeds of which are a valuable but variable fall food for grizzly bears, has experienced substantial mortality primarily due to a mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak that started in the early 2000s. Positive growth rates of grizzly bears have resulted in populations reaching high densities in some areas and have contributed to continued range expansion. We tested research hypotheses to examine if changes in vital rates detected during the past decade were more associated with whitebark pine decline or, alternatively, increasing grizzly bear density. We focused our assessment on known-fate data to estimate survival of cubs-of-the-year (cubs), yearlings, and independent bears (≥2 yrs), and reproductive transition of females from having no offspring to having cubs. We used spatially and temporally explicit indices for grizzly bear density and whitebark pine mortality as individual covariates. Models indicated moderate support for an increase in survival of independent male bears over 1983–2012, whereas independent female survival did not change. Cub survival, yearling survival, and reproductive transition from no offspring to cubs all changed during the 30-year study period, with lower rates evident during the last 10–15 years. Cub survival and reproductive transition were negatively associated with an index of grizzly bear density, indicating greater declines where bear densities were higher. Our analyses did not support a similar relationship for the

  3. Density dependent atomic motion in a liquid alkali metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilgrim, W.-C.; Hosokawa, S.; Morkel, C.

    2001-01-01

    Inelastic X-ray and neutron scattering results obtained from liquid sodium and rubidium are presented. They cover the entire liquid range between melting and liquid vapour critical point. At high densities the dynamics of the liquid metal is characterized by collective excitations. The corresponding dispersion relations indicate the existence of surprisingly stable next neighbouring shells leading to an increase of the propagation speed for the collective modes. Below 2ρ crit. the dynamics changes from collective to localized indicating the existence of molecular aggregates. This interpretation is in accord with a simple model where the properties of a Rb- and a Rb 2 - lattice are calculated using density functional theory. (orig.)

  4. Frequency and Magnetic Field Dependence of the Skin Depth in Co-rich Soft Magnetic Microwires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zhukov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We studied giant magnetoimpedance (GMI effect in magnetically soft amorphous Co-rich microwires in the extended frequency range. From obtained experimentally dependences of GMI ratio on magnetic field and different frequencies we estimated the penetration depth and its dependence on applied magnetic field and frequency

  5. Structural and frequency dependencies of a.c. and dielectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    6Thin Film Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, Ain Shams ... conductivity and its frequency exponents were interpreted in terms of correlated barrier hopping ... cations in high-electron-mobility and heterostructure bipolar.

  6. Frequency Dependence of Measured Massive MIMO Channel Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveras Martínez, Àlex; Carvalho, Elisabeth De; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum

    2016-01-01

    A multi-user massive MIMO measurement campaign is conducted to study the channel propagation characteristics (e.g. user correlation, sum of eigenvalues and condition number), focusing on the stability over frequencies and the impact of the array aperture. We use 3 arrays with 64 antennas (6m linear...... array, 2m linear array and 25cm by 28cm squared 2D array) serving 8 users holding a handset with 2 antennas. The study of the measurements shows that the propagation characteristics of the channel are stable for all the measured frequencies. We also observe that user proximity and user handgrip...... stabilize the studied properties of the channel across the frequencies, and in such case the larger the aperture of the array the more stable the properties. The number of base station antennas improves the propagation characteristics of the channel and stabilizes the properties in the frequency domain....

  7. Frequency-Dependent Blanking with Digital Linear Chirp Waveform Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Andrews, John M. [General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Wideband radar systems, especially those that operate at lower frequencies such as VHF and UHF, are often restricted from transmitting within or across specific frequency bands in order to prevent interference to other spectrum users. Herein we describe techniques for notching the transmitted spectrum of a generated and transmitted radar waveform. The notches are fully programmable as to their location, and techniques are given that control the characteristics of the notches.

  8. Frequency and temperature dependence of high damping elastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1993-01-01

    High damping steel-laminated elastomeric seismic isolation bearings are one of the preferred devices for isolating large buildings and structures. In the US, the current reference design for the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) uses laminated bearings for seismic isolation. These bearings are constructed from alternating layers of high damping rubber and steel plates. They are typically designed for shear strains between 50 and 100% and are expected to sustain two to three times these levels for beyond design basis loading conditions. Elastomeric bearings are currently designed to provide a system frequency between 0.4 and 0.8 Hz and expected to operate between -20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. To assure proper performance of isolation bearings, it is necessary to characterize the elastomer's response under expected variations of frequency and temperature. The dynamic response of the elastomer must be characterized within the frequency range that spans the bearing acceptance test frequency, which may be as low as 0.005 Hz, and the design frequency. Similarly, the variation in mechanical characteristics of the elastomer must be determined over the design temperature range, which is between -20 and 40 degrees Centigrade. This paper reports on (1) the capabilities of a testing facility at ANL for testing candidate elastomers, (2) the variation with frequency and temperature of the stiffness and damping of one candidate elastomer, and (3) the effect of these variations on bearing acceptance testing criteria and on the choice of bearing design values for stiffness and damping

  9. Collision frequency of Lennard–Jones fluids at high densities by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Detailed classical molecular dynamics simulation of transport coefficients and collision frequencies at high densities in rare gases are presented in this paper with a view to investigate the likely cause of discrepancy between theory and experiments. The results, when compared with experiments, showed an ...

  10. How important is self-consistency for the dDsC density dependent dispersion correction?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brémond, Éric; Corminboeuf, Clémence, E-mail: clemence.corminboeuf@epfl.ch [Laboratory for Computational Molecular Design, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Golubev, Nikolay [Laboratory for Computational Molecular Design, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Steinmann, Stephan N., E-mail: sns25@duke.edu [Laboratory for Computational Molecular Design, Institut des Sciences et Ingénierie Chimiques, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    The treatment of dispersion interactions is ubiquitous but computationally demanding for seamless ab initio approaches. A highly popular and simple remedy consists in correcting for the missing interactions a posteriori by adding an attractive energy term summed over all atom pairs to standard density functional approximations. These corrections were originally based on atom pairwise parameters and, hence, had a strong touch of empiricism. To overcome such limitations, we recently proposed a robust system-dependent dispersion correction, dDsC, that is computed from the electron density and that provides a balanced description of both weak inter- and intramolecular interactions. From the theoretical point of view and for the sake of increasing reliability, we here verify if the self-consistent implementation of dDsC impacts ground-state properties such as interaction energies, electron density, dipole moments, geometries, and harmonic frequencies. In addition, we investigate the suitability of the a posteriori scheme for molecular dynamics simulations, for which the analysis of the energy conservation constitutes a challenging tests. Our study demonstrates that the post-SCF approach in an excellent approximation.

  11. Density dependence of the diffusion coefficient of alkali metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adebayo, G.A.; Anusionwu, B.C.; Njah, A.N.; Mathew, B.; Fabamise, O.A.T.

    2004-06-01

    The effect of density on transport coefficients of liquid Li, Na and K at high temperatures using the method of Molecular Dynamics simulation has been studied. Simulation of these liquid alkali metals were carried out with 800 particles in simulation boxes with periodic boundary conditions imposed. In order to test the reliability of the interatomic potential used in the calculations, experimental data on the structural properties were compared with calculated results. The calculations showed a linear relationship between the density and the diffusion coefficient in all the systems investigated except in lithium, where, due to the small size of the atom, standard molecular dynamics simulation method may not be appropriate for calculating the properties of interest. (author)

  12. Time-dependent density functional theory of open quantum systems in the linear-response regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, David G; Watson, Mark A; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2011-02-21

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has recently been extended to describe many-body open quantum systems evolving under nonunitary dynamics according to a quantum master equation. In the master equation approach, electronic excitation spectra are broadened and shifted due to relaxation and dephasing of the electronic degrees of freedom by the surrounding environment. In this paper, we develop a formulation of TDDFT linear-response theory (LR-TDDFT) for many-body electronic systems evolving under a master equation, yielding broadened excitation spectra. This is done by mapping an interacting open quantum system onto a noninteracting open Kohn-Sham system yielding the correct nonequilibrium density evolution. A pseudoeigenvalue equation analogous to the Casida equations of the usual LR-TDDFT is derived for the Redfield master equation, yielding complex energies and Lamb shifts. As a simple demonstration, we calculate the spectrum of a C(2 +) atom including natural linewidths, by treating the electromagnetic field vacuum as a photon bath. The performance of an adiabatic exchange-correlation kernel is analyzed and a first-order frequency-dependent correction to the bare Kohn-Sham linewidth based on the Görling-Levy perturbation theory is calculated.

  13. Time-dependent density functional methods for Raman spectra in open-shell systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Fredy W; Schatz, George C

    2014-01-16

    We present an implementation of a time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) linear response module in NWChem for unrestricted DFT calculations and apply it to the calculation of resonant Raman spectra in open-shell molecular systems using the short-time approximation. The new source code was validated and applied to simulate Raman spectra on several doublet organic radicals (e.g., benzyl, benzosemiquinone, TMPD, trans-stilbene anion and cation, and methyl viologen) and the metal complex copper phthalocyanine. We also introduce a divide-and-conquer approach for the evaluation of polarizabilities in relatively large systems (e.g., copper phthalocyanine). The implemented tool gives comparisons with experiment that are similar to what is commonly found for closed-shell systems, with good agreement for most features except for small frequency shifts, and occasionally large deviations for some modes that depend on the molecular system studied, experimental conditions not being accounted in the modeling such as solvation effects and extra solvent-based peaks, and approximations in the underlying theory. The approximations used in the quantum chemical modeling include (i) choice of exchange-correlation functional and basis set; (ii) harmonic approximation used in the frequency analysis to determine vibrational normal modes; and (iii) short-time approximation (omission of nuclear motion effects) used in calculating resonant Raman spectra.

  14. Multisensory representation of frequency across audition and touch: high density electrical mapping reveals early sensory-perceptual coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John S; Foxe, John J; Fiebelkorn, Ian C; Mercier, Manuel R; Molholm, Sophie

    2012-10-31

    The frequency of environmental vibrations is sampled by two of the major sensory systems, audition and touch, notwithstanding that these signals are transduced through very different physical media and entirely separate sensory epithelia. Psychophysical studies have shown that manipulating frequency in audition or touch can have a significant cross-sensory impact on perceived frequency in the other sensory system, pointing to intimate links between these senses during computation of frequency. In this regard, the frequency of a vibratory event can be thought of as a multisensory perceptual construct. In turn, electrophysiological studies point to temporally early multisensory interactions that occur in hierarchically early sensory regions where convergent inputs from the auditory and somatosensory systems are to be found. A key question pertains to the level of processing at which the multisensory integration of featural information, such as frequency, occurs. Do the sensory systems calculate frequency independently before this information is combined, or is this feature calculated in an integrated fashion during preattentive sensory processing? The well characterized mismatch negativity, an electrophysiological response that indexes preattentive detection of a change within the context of a regular pattern of stimulation, served as our dependent measure. High-density electrophysiological recordings were made in humans while they were presented with separate blocks of somatosensory, auditory, and audio-somatosensory "standards" and "deviants," where the deviant differed in frequency. Multisensory effects were identified beginning at ∼200 ms, with the multisensory mismatch negativity (MMN) significantly different from the sum of the unisensory MMNs. This provides compelling evidence for preattentive coupling between the somatosensory and auditory channels in the cortical representation of frequency.

  15. Frequency dependence of the active impedance component of silicon thin-film resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belogurov, S.V.; Gostilo, V.V.; Yurov, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    A high-resistant resistor on the silicon thin-film substrate considerably superior in noise and frequency performance than commercial resistors is described. The frequency dependence of the active impedance component is tested for determining noise and frequency dependences of silicon thin-film resistors. The obtained results permit to calculate the energy equivalent of resistor noise in nuclear radiation detection units at any temperature according to its frequency characteristic at room temperature

  16. Inelastic collisions and density-dependent excitation suppression in a 87Sr optical lattice clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishof, M.; Martin, M. J.; Swallows, M. D.; Benko, C.; Lin, Y.; Quemener, G.; Rey, A. M.; Ye, J.

    2011-01-01

    We observe two-body loss of 3 P 0 87 Sr atoms trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice. We measure loss rate coefficients for atomic samples between 1 and 6 μK that are prepared either in a single nuclear-spin sublevel or with equal populations in two sublevels. The measured temperature and nuclear-spin preparation dependence of rate coefficients agree well with calculations and reveal that rate coefficients for distinguishable atoms are only slightly enhanced over those of indistinguishable atoms. We further observe a suppression of excitation and losses during interrogation of the 1 S 0 - 3 P 0 transition as density increases and Rabi frequency decreases, which suggests the presence of strong interactions in our dynamically driven many-body system.

  17. Frequency-dependent electrostatic actuation in microfluidic MEMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Michalske, Terry A.; Sounart, Thomas L.

    2003-09-01

    Electrostatic actuators exhibit fast response times and are easily integrated into microsystems because they can be fabricated with standard IC micromachining processes and materials. Although electrostatic actuators have been used extensively in 'dry' MEMS, they have received less attention in microfluidic systems probably because of challenges such as electrolysis, anodization, and electrode polarization. Here we demonstrate that ac drive signals can be used to prevent electrode polarization, and thus enable electrostatic actuation in many liquids, at potentials low enough to avoid electrochemistry. We measure the frequency response of an interdigitated silicon comb-drive actuator in liquids spanning a decade of dielectric permittivities and four decades of conductivity, and present a simple theory that predicts the characteristic actuation frequency. The analysis demonstrates the importance of the native oxide on silicon actuator response, and suggests that the actuation frequency can be shifted by controlling the thickness of the oxide. For native silicon devices, actuation is predicted at frequencies less than 10 MHz, in electrolytes of ionic strength up to 100 mmol/L, and thus electrostatic actuation may be feasible in many bioMEMS and other microfluidic applications.

  18. Frequency dependent characteristics of solar impulsive radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, T.K.; Das Gupta, M.K.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was made of the impulsive radio bursts observed in the frequency range 0.245 to 35 GHz. Important results obtained are: (i) Simple type 1 bursts with intensities 0 to 10 f.u. and simple type 2 bursts with intensities 10 to 500 f.u. are predominant in the frequency ranges 1.415 to 4.995 GHz and 4.995 to 8.8 GHz, respectively; (ii) With maxima around 2.7 GHz and 4 GHz for the first and second types respectively, the durations of the radio bursts decrease gradually both towards lower and higher frequencies; (iii) As regards occurrences, the first type dominates in the southern solar hemisphere peaking around 8.8 GHz, whereas the second type favours the north with no well-defined maximum in any frequency; (iv) Both types prefer the eastern hemisphere, the peak occurrences being around 8.8 GHz and 5 GHz for the two successive types, respectively; (c) The spectra of impulsive radio bursts are generally of the inverted U-type with the maximum emission intensity between 5 and 15 GHz. (author)

  19. Calculation of the intrinsic spectral density of current fluctuations in nanometric Schottky-barrier diodes at terahertz frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahi, F.Z. [Science and Technology Institute, University of Bechar, 08000 Bechar (Algeria)], E-mail: fati_zo_mahi2002@yahoo.fr; Helmaoui, A. [Science and Technology Institute, University of Bechar, 08000 Bechar (Algeria); Varani, L. [Institut d' Electronique du Sud (CNRS UMR 5214), Universite Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier (France); Shiktorov, P.; Starikov, E.; Gruzhinskis, V. [Semiconductor Physics Institute, 01108 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2008-10-01

    An analytical model for the noise spectrum of nanometric Schottky-barrier diodes (SBD) is developed. The calculated frequency dependence of the spectral density of current fluctuations exhibits resonances in the terahertz domain which are discussed and analyzed as functions of the length of the diode, free carrier concentration, length of the depletion region and applied voltage. A good agreement obtained with direct Monte Carlo simulations of GaAs SBDs operating from barrier-limited to flat-band conditions fully validates the proposed approach.

  20. Time-dependent density functional theory for multi-component systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiecheng Li; Peiqing Tong

    1985-10-01

    The Runge-Gross version of Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham's density functional theory is generalized to multi-component systems, both for arbitrary time-dependent pure states and for arbitrary time-dependent ensembles. (author)

  1. Study of excitation energy dependence of nuclear level density parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanto, G.; Nayak, B.K.; Saxena, A.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have populated CN by fusion reaction and excitation energy of the intermediate nuclei is determined after first chance α-emission to investigate excitation energy dependence of the NLD parameter. Evaporated neutron spectra were measured following alpha evaporation for obtaining NLD parameter for the reaction 11 B + 197 Au, populating CN 208 Po. This CN after evaporating an α-particle populates intermediate nucleus 204 Pb. The 204 Pb has magic number of Z=82. Our aim is to study the excitation energy dependence of NLD parameter for closed shell nuclei

  2. Exponential integrators in time-dependent density-functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Daniel; Covington, Cody; Varga, Kálmán

    2017-12-01

    The integrating factor and exponential time differencing methods are implemented and tested for solving the time-dependent Kohn-Sham equations. Popular time propagation methods used in physics, as well as other robust numerical approaches, are compared to these exponential integrator methods in order to judge the relative merit of the computational schemes. We determine an improvement in accuracy of multiple orders of magnitude when describing dynamics driven primarily by a nonlinear potential. For cases of dynamics driven by a time-dependent external potential, the accuracy of the exponential integrator methods are less enhanced but still match or outperform the best of the conventional methods tested.

  3. Density-dependence of functional spiking networks in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Michael I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gintautuas, Vadas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bettencourt, Luis M A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bennett, Ryan [UNIV OF NORTH TEXAS; Santa Maria, Cara L [UNIV OF NORTH TEXAS

    2008-01-01

    During development, the mammalian brain differentiates into specialized regions with unique functional abilities. While many factors contribute to this functional specialization, we explore the effect neuronal density can have on neuronal interactions. Two types of networks, dense (50,000 neurons and glia support cells) and sparse (12,000 neurons and glia support cells), are studied. A competitive first response model is applied to construct activation graphs that represent pairwise neuronal interactions. By observing the evolution of these graphs during development in vitro we observe that dense networks form activation connections earlier than sparse networks, and that link-!llltropy analysis of the resulting dense activation graphs reveals that balanced directional connections dominate. Information theoretic measures reveal in addition that early functional information interactions (of order 3) are synergetic in both dense and sparse networks. However, during development in vitro, such interactions become redundant in dense, but not sparse networks. Large values of activation graph link-entropy correlate strongly with redundant ensembles observed in the dense networks. Results demonstrate differences between dense and sparse networks in terms of informational groups, pairwise relationships, and activation graphs. These differences suggest that variations in cell density may result in different functional specialization of nervous system tissue also in vivo.

  4. High frequency electric field spikes formed by electron beam-plasma interaction in plasma density gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunell, H.; Loefgren, T.

    1997-02-01

    In the electron beam-plasma interaction at an electric double layer the beam density is much higher than in the classical beam-plasma experiments. The wave propagation takes place along the density gradient, that is present at the high potential side of the double layer. Such a case is studied experimentally by injecting the electron beam from a plane cathode, without any grids suppressing the gradient, and by particle simulations. The high frequency field concentrates in a sharp 'spike' with a half width of the order of one wavelength. The spike is found to be a standing wave surrounded by regions dominated by propagating waves. It forms at a position where its frequency is close to the local plasma frequency. The spike forms also when the electric field is well below the threshold for modulational instability, and long before a density cavity is formed in the simulations. Particle simulations reveal that, at the spike, there is a backward travelling wave that, when it is strongly damped, accelerates electrons back towards the cathode. In a simulation of a homogeneous plasma without the density gradient no spike is seen, and the wave is purely travelling instead of standing. 9 refs

  5. Very Long Baseline Interferometry: Dependencies on Frequency Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothnagel, Axel; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2018-04-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is a differential technique observing radiation of compact extra-galactic radio sources with pairs of radio telescopes. For these observations, the frequency standards at the telescopes need to have very high stability. In this article we discuss why this is, and we investigate exactly how precise the frequency standards need to be. Four areas where good clock performance is needed are considered: coherence, geodetic parameter estimation, correlator synchronization, and UT1 determination. We show that in order to ensure the highest accuracy of VLBI, stability similar to that of a hydrogen maser is needed for time-scales up to a few hours. In the article, we are considering both traditional VLBI where extra-galactic radio sources are observed, as well as observation of man-made artificial radio sources emitted by satellites or spacecrafts.

  6. Frequency dependence of p-mode frequency shifts induced by magnetic activity in Kepler solar-like stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salabert, D.; Régulo, C.; Pérez Hernández, F.; García, R. A.

    2018-04-01

    The variations of the frequencies of the low-degree acoustic oscillations in the Sun induced by magnetic activity show a dependence on radial order. The frequency shifts are observed to increase towards higher-order modes to reach a maximum of about 0.8 μHz over the 11-yr solar cycle. A comparable frequency dependence is also measured in two other main sequence solar-like stars, the F-star HD 49933, and the young 1 Gyr-old solar analog KIC 10644253, although with different amplitudes of the shifts of about 2 μHz and 0.5 μHz, respectively. Our objective here is to extend this analysis to stars with different masses, metallicities, and evolutionary stages. From an initial set of 87 Kepler solar-like oscillating stars with known individual p-mode frequencies, we identify five stars showing frequency shifts that can be considered reliable using selection criteria based on Monte Carlo simulations and on the photospheric magnetic activity proxy Sph. The frequency dependence of the frequency shifts of four of these stars could be measured for the l = 0 and l = 1 modes individually. Given the quality of the data, the results could indicate that a physical source of perturbation different from that in the Sun is dominating in this sample of solar-like stars.

  7. Similarity of dependences of thermal conductivity and density of uranium and tungsten hexafluorides on desublimation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkov, V.A.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of investigations of the dependence of thermal conductivity and density of UF 6 and WF 6 desublimates on volume content of hexafluoride in initial gaseous mixture. Similarity of these dependences, as well as the dependences of thermal conductivity of desublimates on their density was revealed. Generalized expressions, relating thermal conductivity and density of desublimates among each ofter and with volume content of hexafluoride in gaseous mixture were derived. Possibility of applying the generalized relations for calculation of thermal conductivity and density of other compounds of MeF 6 type under prescribed desublimation conclitions is shown. 15 refs.; 6 figs

  8. Anisotropic frequency response of critical density fluctuation of NIPA gel under oscillation shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Masaaki [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)]. E-mail: sugiyama@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Vigild, Martin E. [Danish Polymer Centre, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Fukunaga, Toshiharu [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Itoh, Keiji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Mori, Kazuhiro [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Sato, Takashi [Department of Engineering Physics and Mechanics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Annaka, Masahiko [Department of Chemistry, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2006-11-15

    A relation between rheology and structure of high density NIPA gel around a critical point on volume phase transition was studied by a simultaneous rheology and small-angle neutron scattering measurement. Just below the critical temperature, the NIPA gel showed softening: G{sup '} and G{sup '}' get closer (G{sup '}>G{sup '}'). At this temperature, the density fluctuation enhanced along the shear direction corresponding to the shear frequency but not to the shear strength. It means that this anisotropy is different from that observed in a statically stretched gel.

  9. On Polarization and Frequency Dependence of Diffuse Indoor Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Andersen, Jørgen Bach; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2011-01-01

    The room electromagnetics (RE) theory describes the radio propagation in a single room assuming diffuse scat- tering. A main characteristic is the exponential power-delay profile (PDP) decaying with the so-called reverberation time (RT) parameter, depending only on the wall area, the volume...... of the room and an absorption coefficient. The PDP is independent on the location in the room, except for the arrival time. Based on measurements in a room with a spherical array of 16 dual- polarized wideband horn antennas, the current work studies how the RE parameters depend on the receiver (Rx) antenna...

  10. Low-frequency permittivity of spin-density wave in (TMTSF)2PF6 at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nad, F.; Monceau, P.; Bechgaard, K.

    1995-01-01

    Conductivity and permittivity epsilon of(TMTSF)(2)PF6 have been measured at low frequencies of (10(2)-10(7) Hz) at low temperatures below the spin-density wave (SDW) transition temperature T-p. The temperature dependence of the conductivity shows a deviation from thermally activated behavior at T...

  11. Frequency-Dependent FDTD Algorithm Using Newmark’s Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the characteristics of the polarizability in frequency domain of three common models of dispersive media, the relation between the polarization vector and electric field intensity is converted into a time domain differential equation of second order with the polarization vector by using the conversion from frequency to time domain. Newmark βγ difference method is employed to solve this equation. The electric field intensity to polarizability recursion is derived, and the electric flux to electric field intensity recursion is obtained by constitutive relation. Then FDTD iterative computation in time domain of electric and magnetic field components in dispersive medium is completed. By analyzing the solution stability of the above differential equation using central difference method, it is proved that this method has more advantages in the selection of time step. Theoretical analyses and numerical results demonstrate that this method is a general algorithm and it has advantages of higher accuracy and stability over the algorithms based on central difference method.

  12. Effective size of density-dependent two-sex populations: the effect of mating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, A M; Engen, S; SAEther, B-E

    2017-08-01

    Density dependence in vital rates is a key feature affecting temporal fluctuations of natural populations. This has important implications for the rate of random genetic drift. Mating systems also greatly affect effective population sizes, but knowledge of how mating system and density regulation interact to affect random genetic drift is poor. Using theoretical models and simulations, we compare N e in short-lived, density-dependent animal populations with different mating systems. We study the impact of a fluctuating, density-dependent sex ratio and consider both a stable and a fluctuating environment. We find a negative relationship between annual N e /N and adult population size N due to density dependence, suggesting that loss of genetic variation is reduced at small densities. The magnitude of this decrease was affected by mating system and life history. A male-biased, density-dependent sex ratio reduces the rate of genetic drift compared to an equal, density-independent sex ratio, but a stochastic change towards male bias reduces the N e /N ratio. Environmental stochasticity amplifies temporal fluctuations in population size and is thus vital to consider in estimation of effective population sizes over longer time periods. Our results on the reduced loss of genetic variation at small densities, particularly in polygamous populations, indicate that density regulation may facilitate adaptive evolution at small population sizes. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  13. Density and relative frequency effects on competitive interactions and resource use in pea–barley intercrops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Andersen, H.K.; Jørnsgaard, B.

    2006-01-01

    or specific grain yield composition are wanted. Keywords: Competition dynamics; Grain quality; Hordeum vulgare; Intercropping; Nitrogen use; Organic farming; Pisum sativum; Weeds; Yield Abbreviations: IC, mixed intercropping; LER, land equivalent ratio; N, nitrogen; REIc, relative efficiency index; SC, sole...... not increase its reliance on atmospheric nitrogen fixation compared to the pea sole crop. With respect to soil nitrogen uptake there were no effect of plant density but a strong effect of the relative frequency of pea in the intercrop, the greater the proportion the lower the uptake. Changes in the competitive...... and tillering ability of barley are seen as likely explanations of lower weed load in the barley dominated crop treatments. This study points at the potential of employing density and relative crop frequency as "regulators" when specific intercrop objectives such as increased competitiveness towards weeds...

  14. Nuclear matter studies with density-dependent meson-nucleon coupling constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, M.K.; Tjon, J.A.; Banerjee, M.K.; Tjon, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Due to the internal structure of the nucleon, we should expect, in general, that the effective meson nucleon parameters may change in nuclear medium. We study such changes by using a chiral confining model of the nucleon. We use density-dependent masses for all mesons except the pion. Within a Dirac-Brueckner analysis, based on the relativistic covariant structure of the NN amplitude, we show that the effect of such a density dependence in the NN interaction on the saturation properties of nuclear matter, while not large, is quite significant. Due to the density dependence of the g σNN , as predicted by the chiral confining model, we find, in particular, a looping behavior of the binding energy at saturation as a function of the saturation density. A simple model is described, which exhibits looping and which is shown to be mainly caused by the presence of a peak in the density dependence of the medium modified σN coupling constant at low density. The effect of density dependence of the coupling constants and the meson masses tends to improve the results for E/A and density of nuclear matter at saturation. From the present study we see that the relationship between binding energy and saturation density may not be as universal as found in nonrelativistic studies and that more model dependence is exhibited once medium modifications of the basic nuclear interactions are considered. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  15. Software Toolbox for Low-Frequency Conductivity and Current Density Imaging Using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajib, Saurav Z K; Katoch, Nitish; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2017-11-01

    Low-frequency conductivity and current density imaging using MRI includes magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), diffusion tensor MREIT (DT-MREIT), conductivity tensor imaging (CTI), and magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI). MRCDI and MREIT provide current density and isotropic conductivity images, respectively, using current-injection phase MRI techniques. DT-MREIT produces anisotropic conductivity tensor images by incorporating diffusion weighted MRI into MREIT. These current-injection techniques are finding clinical applications in diagnostic imaging and also in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), deep brain stimulation (DBS), and electroporation where treatment currents can function as imaging currents. To avoid adverse effects of nerve and muscle stimulations due to injected currents, conductivity tensor imaging (CTI) utilizes B1 mapping and multi-b diffusion weighted MRI to produce low-frequency anisotropic conductivity tensor images without injecting current. This paper describes numerical implementations of several key mathematical functions for conductivity and current density image reconstructions in MRCDI, MREIT, DT-MREIT, and CTI. To facilitate experimental studies of clinical applications, we developed a software toolbox for these low-frequency conductivity and current density imaging methods. This MR-based conductivity imaging (MRCI) toolbox includes 11 toolbox functions which can be used in the MATLAB environment. The MRCI toolbox is available at http://iirc.khu.ac.kr/software.html . Its functions were tested by using several experimental datasets, which are provided together with the toolbox. Users of the toolbox can focus on experimental designs and interpretations of reconstructed images instead of developing their own image reconstruction softwares. We expect more toolbox functions to be added from future research outcomes. Low-frequency conductivity and current density imaging using MRI includes

  16. Automatic detection of frequency changes depends on auditory stimulus intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, S; Lang, A H; Aaltonen, O; Lertola, K; Kärki, T

    1999-06-01

    A cortical cognitive auditory evoked potential, mismatch negativity (MMN), reflects automatic discrimination and echoic memory functions of the auditory system. For this study, we examined whether this potential is dependent on the stimulus intensity. The MMN potentials were recorded from 10 subjects with normal hearing using a sine tone of 1000 Hz as the standard stimulus and a sine tone of 1141 Hz as the deviant stimulus, with probabilities of 90% and 10%, respectively. The intensities were 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80 dB HL for both standard and deviant stimuli in separate blocks. Stimulus intensity had a statistically significant effect on the mean amplitude, rise time parameter, and onset latency of the MMN. Automatic auditory discrimination seems to be dependent on the sound pressure level of the stimuli.

  17. Time-domain analysis of frequency dependent inertial wave forces on cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2013-01-01

    a simple time-domain procedure for the inertial force, in which the frequency dependence is represented via a simple explicit time filter on the wave particle acceleration or velocity. The frequency dependence of the inertia coefficient is known analytically as a function of the wave......-number, and the relevant range of waves shorter than about six times the diameter typically corresponds to deep water waves. This permits a universal non-dimensional frequency representation, that is converted to rational form to provide the relevant filter equation. Simple time-domain simulations demonstrate...... the reduction of the resonant part of the response for natural structural frequencies above the dominating wave frequency....

  18. Maitra-Burke example of initial-state dependence in time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holas, A.; Balawender, R.

    2002-01-01

    In a recent paper, Maitra and Burke [Phys. Rev. A 63, 042501 (2001); 64, 039901(E) (2001)] have given an interesting and instructive example that illustrates a specific feature of the time-dependent density-functional theory--the dependence of the reconstructed time-dependent potential not only on the electron density, but also on the initial state of the system. However, a concise form of its presentation by these authors is insufficient to reveal all its peculiarities. Our paper represents a very detailed study of this valuable example, intended to facilitate a better understanding and appreciation

  19. Determination of acoustic properties of thin polymer films utilizing the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohmyoh, Hironori; Sakamoto, Yuhei

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports on a technique to measure the acoustic properties of a thin polymer film utilizing the frequency dependence of the reflection coefficient of ultrasound reflected back from a system comprising a reflection plate, the film, and a material that covers the film. The frequency components of the echo reflected from the back of the plate, where the film is attached, take their minimum values at the resonant frequency, and from these frequency characteristics, the acoustic impedance, sound velocity, and the density of the film can be determined. We applied this technique to characterize an ion exchange membrane, which has high water absorbability, and successfully determined the acoustic properties of the membrane without getting it wet.

  20. Population-Level Density Dependence Influences the Origin and Maintenance of Parental Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Reyes

    Full Text Available Parental care is a defining feature of animal breeding systems. We now know that both basic life-history characteristics and ecological factors influence the evolution of care. However, relatively little is known about how these factors interact to influence the origin and maintenance of care. Here, we expand upon previous work and explore the relationship between basic life-history characteristics (stage-specific rates of mortality and maturation and the fitness benefits associated with the origin and the maintenance of parental care for two broad ecological scenarios: the scenario in which egg survival is density dependent and the case in which adult survival is density dependent. Our findings suggest that high offspring need is likely critical in driving the origin, but not the maintenance, of parental care regardless of whether density dependence acts on egg or adult survival. In general, parental care is more likely to result in greater fitness benefits when baseline adult mortality is low if 1 egg survival is density dependent or 2 adult mortality is density dependent and mutant density is relatively high. When density dependence acts on egg mortality, low rates of egg maturation and high egg densities are less likely to lead to strong fitness benefits of care. However, when density dependence acts on adult mortality, high levels of egg maturation and increasing adult densities are less likely to maintain care. Juvenile survival has relatively little, if any, effect on the origin and maintenance of egg-only care. More generally, our results suggest that the evolution of parental care will be influenced by an organism's entire life history characteristics, the stage at which density dependence acts, and whether care is originating or being maintained.

  1. Population-Level Density Dependence Influences the Origin and Maintenance of Parental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Elijah; Thrasher, Patsy; Bonsall, Michael B; Klug, Hope

    2016-01-01

    Parental care is a defining feature of animal breeding systems. We now know that both basic life-history characteristics and ecological factors influence the evolution of care. However, relatively little is known about how these factors interact to influence the origin and maintenance of care. Here, we expand upon previous work and explore the relationship between basic life-history characteristics (stage-specific rates of mortality and maturation) and the fitness benefits associated with the origin and the maintenance of parental care for two broad ecological scenarios: the scenario in which egg survival is density dependent and the case in which adult survival is density dependent. Our findings suggest that high offspring need is likely critical in driving the origin, but not the maintenance, of parental care regardless of whether density dependence acts on egg or adult survival. In general, parental care is more likely to result in greater fitness benefits when baseline adult mortality is low if 1) egg survival is density dependent or 2) adult mortality is density dependent and mutant density is relatively high. When density dependence acts on egg mortality, low rates of egg maturation and high egg densities are less likely to lead to strong fitness benefits of care. However, when density dependence acts on adult mortality, high levels of egg maturation and increasing adult densities are less likely to maintain care. Juvenile survival has relatively little, if any, effect on the origin and maintenance of egg-only care. More generally, our results suggest that the evolution of parental care will be influenced by an organism's entire life history characteristics, the stage at which density dependence acts, and whether care is originating or being maintained.

  2. Time-dependent density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order expansion of electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Yoshio

    2015-09-07

    We develop a formalism for the calculation of excitation energies and excited state gradients for the self-consistent-charge density-functional tight-binding method with the third-order contributions of a Taylor series of the density functional theory energy with respect to the fluctuation of electron density (time-dependent density-functional tight-binding (TD-DFTB3)). The formulation of the excitation energy is based on the existing time-dependent density functional theory and the older TD-DFTB2 formulae. The analytical gradient is computed by solving Z-vector equations, and it requires one to calculate the third-order derivative of the total energy with respect to density matrix elements due to the inclusion of the third-order contributions. The comparison of adiabatic excitation energies for selected small and medium-size molecules using the TD-DFTB2 and TD-DFTB3 methods shows that the inclusion of the third-order contributions does not affect excitation energies significantly. A different set of parameters, which are optimized for DFTB3, slightly improves the prediction of adiabatic excitation energies statistically. The application of TD-DFTB for the prediction of absorption and fluorescence energies of cresyl violet demonstrates that TD-DFTB3 reproduced the experimental fluorescence energy quite well.

  3. Frequency, moisture content, and temperature dependent dielectric properties of potato starch related to drying with radio-frequency/microwave energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhuozhuo; Guo, Wenchuan

    2017-08-24

    To develop advanced drying methods using radio-frequency (RF) or microwave (MW) energy, dielectric properties of potato starch were determined using an open-ended coaxial-line probe and network analyzer at frequencies between 20 and 4,500 MHz, moisture contents between 15.1% and 43.1% wet basis (w.b.), and temperatures between 25 and 75 °C. The results showed that both dielectric constant (ε') and loss factor (ε″) were dependent on frequency, moisture content, and temperature. ε' decreased with increasing frequency at a given moisture content or temperature. At low moisture contents (≤25.4% w.b.) or low temperatures (≤45 °C), ε″ increased with increasing frequency. However, ε″ changed from decrease to increase with increasing frequency at high moisture contents or temperatures. At low temperatures (25-35 °C), both ε' and ε″ increased with increasing moisture content. At low moisture contents (15.1-19.5% w.b.), they increased with increasing temperature. The change trends of ε' and ε″ were different and dependent on temperature and moisture content at their high levels. The penetration depth (d p ) decreased with increasing frequency. RF treatments may provide potential large-scale industrial drying application for potato starch. This research offers useful information on dielectric properties of potato starch related to drying with electromagnetic energy.

  4. Benchmarks for electronically excited states: Time-dependent density functional theory and density functional theory based multireference configuration interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Schreiber, Marko; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and DFT-based multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations are reported for a recently proposed benchmark set of 28 medium-sized organic molecules. Vertical excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state dipole...

  5. Frequency-dependent changes in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in Internet gaming disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao eLin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies have revealed that the task-related functional brain activities are impaired in Internet gaming disorder (IGD subjects. However, little is known about the alternations in spontaneous brain activities about them. Recent studies have proposed that the brain activities of different frequency ranges are generated by different nervous activities and have different physiological and psychological functions. Thus, in this study, we set to explore the spontaneous brain activities in IGD subjects by measuring the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF, to investigate band-specific changes of resting-state fALFF. We subdivided the frequency range into five bands based on literatures. Comparing to healthy controls, the IGD group showed decreased fALFF values in the cerebellum posterior lobe and increased fALFF values in superior temporal gyrus. Significant interactions between frequency bands and groups were found in the cerebellum, the anterior cingulate, the lingual gyrus, the middle temporal gyrus and the middle frontal gyrus. Those brain regions are proved related to the executive function and decision-making. These results revealed the changed spontaneous brain activity of IGD, which contributed to understanding the underlying pathophysiology of IGD.

  6. Efficient exact-exchange time-dependent density-functional theory methods and their relation to time-dependent Hartree-Fock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselmann, Andreas; Görling, Andreas

    2011-01-21

    A recently introduced time-dependent exact-exchange (TDEXX) method, i.e., a response method based on time-dependent density-functional theory that treats the frequency-dependent exchange kernel exactly, is reformulated. In the reformulated version of the TDEXX method electronic excitation energies can be calculated by solving a linear generalized eigenvalue problem while in the original version of the TDEXX method a laborious frequency iteration is required in the calculation of each excitation energy. The lowest eigenvalues of the new TDEXX eigenvalue equation corresponding to the lowest excitation energies can be efficiently obtained by, e.g., a version of the Davidson algorithm appropriate for generalized eigenvalue problems. Alternatively, with the help of a series expansion of the new TDEXX eigenvalue equation, standard eigensolvers for large regular eigenvalue problems, e.g., the standard Davidson algorithm, can be used to efficiently calculate the lowest excitation energies. With the help of the series expansion as well, the relation between the TDEXX method and time-dependent Hartree-Fock is analyzed. Several ways to take into account correlation in addition to the exact treatment of exchange in the TDEXX method are discussed, e.g., a scaling of the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues, the inclusion of (semi)local approximate correlation potentials, or hybrids of the exact-exchange kernel with kernels within the adiabatic local density approximation. The lowest lying excitations of the molecules ethylene, acetaldehyde, and pyridine are considered as examples.

  7. Experimental evidence that density dependence strongly influences plant invasions through fragmented landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennifer L; Levine, Jonathan M

    2018-04-01

    Populations of range expanding species encounter patches of both favorable and unfavorable habitat as they spread across landscapes. Theory shows that increasing patchiness slows the spread of populations modeled with continuously varying population density when dispersal is not influence by the environment or individual behavior. However, as is found in uniformly favorable landscapes, spread remains driven by fecundity and dispersal from low density individuals at the invasion front. In contrast, when modeled populations are composed of discrete individuals, patchiness causes populations to build up to high density before dispersing past unsuitable habitat, introducing an important influence of density dependence on spread velocity. To test the hypothesized interaction between habitat patchiness and density dependence, we simultaneously manipulated these factors in a greenhouse system of annual plants spreading through replicated experimental landscapes. We found that increasing the size of gaps and amplifying the strength of density dependence both slowed spread velocity, but contrary to predictions, the effect of amplified density dependence was similar across all landscape types. Our results demonstrate that the discrete nature of individuals in spreading populations has a strong influence on how both landscape patchiness and density dependence influence spread through demographic and dispersal stochasticity. Both finiteness and landscape structure should be critical components to theoretical predictions of future spread for range expanding native species or invasive species colonizing new habitat. © 2018 by the Ecological Society of America.

  8. Strings on a Violin: Location Dependence of Frequency Tuning in Active Dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anindita; Rathour, Rahul K; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2017-01-01

    Strings on a violin are tuned to generate distinct sound frequencies in a manner that is firmly dependent on finger location along the fingerboard. Sound frequencies emerging from different violins could be very different based on their architecture, the nature of strings and their tuning. Analogously, active neuronal dendrites, dendrites endowed with active channel conductances, are tuned to distinct input frequencies in a manner that is dependent on the dendritic location of the synaptic inputs. Further, disparate channel expression profiles and differences in morphological characteristics could result in dendrites on different neurons of the same subtype tuned to distinct frequency ranges. Alternately, similar location-dependence along dendritic structures could be achieved through disparate combinations of channel profiles and morphological characteristics, leading to degeneracy in active dendritic spectral tuning. Akin to strings on a violin being tuned to different frequencies than those on a viola or a cello, different neuronal subtypes exhibit distinct channel profiles and disparate morphological characteristics endowing each neuronal subtype with unique location-dependent frequency selectivity. Finally, similar to the tunability of musical instruments to elicit distinct location-dependent sounds, neuronal frequency selectivity and its location-dependence are tunable through activity-dependent plasticity of ion channels and morphology. In this morceau, we explore the origins of neuronal frequency selectivity, and survey the literature on the mechanisms behind the emergence of location-dependence in distinct forms of frequency tuning. As a coda to this composition, we present some future directions for this exciting convergence of biophysical mechanisms that endow a neuron with frequency multiplexing capabilities.

  9. Intraspecific density dependence and a guild of consumers coexisting on one resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeek, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    The importance of negative intraspecific density dependence to promoting species coexistence in a community is well accepted. However, such mechanisms are typically omitted from more explicit models of community dynamics. Here I analyze a variation of the Rosenzweig-MacArthur consumer-resource model that includes negative intraspecific density dependence for consumers to explore its effect on the coexistence of multiple consumers feeding on a single resource. This analysis demonstrates that a guild of multiple consumers can easily coexist on a single resource if each limits its own abundance to some degree, and stronger intraspecific density dependence permits a wider variety of consumers to coexist. The mechanism permitting multiple consumers to coexist works in a fashion similar to apparent competition or to each consumer having its own specialized predator. These results argue for a more explicit emphasis on how negative intraspecific density dependence is generated and how these mechanisms combine with species interactions to shape overall community structure.

  10. Time dependentdensity functional theory characterization of organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hilal, Rifaat; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Osman, Osman I.; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    We aim at providing better insight into the parameters that govern the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and photo-injection processes in dyes for dye-sensitised solar cells (DSSC). Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD

  11. Optical properties of Al nanostructures from time dependent density functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The optical properties of Al nanostructures are investigated by means of time dependent density functional theory, considering chains of varying length and ladders/stripes of varying aspect ratio. The absorption spectra show redshifting

  12. Explaining density-dependent regulation in earthworm populations using life-history analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammenga, J.E.; Spurgeon, D.J.; Svendsen, C.; Weeks, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    At present there is little knowledge about how density regulates population growth rate and to what extent this is determined by life-history patterns. We compared density dependent population consequences in the Nicholsonian sense based oil experimental observations and life-history modeling for

  13. Magnetic field dependence of the critical current density in YBa2Cu3Ox ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukov, A.A.; Moshchalkov, V.V.; Komarkov, D.A.; Shabatin, V.P.; Gordeev, S.N.; Shelomov, D.V.

    1989-01-01

    Three magnetic field ranges corresponding to different critical current density j c behavior have been found out. They correlate with grain magnetization changes. The inverse critical current density is shown to depend linearly on the sample cross-section due to the magnetic field induced by the flowing current

  14. Dependence of the Spin Transfer Torque Switching Current Density on the Exchange Stiffness Constant

    OpenAIRE

    You, Chun-Yeol

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the switching current density on the exchange stiffness constant in the spin transfer torque magnetic tunneling junction structure with micromagnetic simulations. Since the widely accepted analytic expression of the switching current density is based on the macro-spin model, there is no dependence of the exchange stiffness constant. When the switching is occurred, however, the spin configuration forms C-, S-type, or complicated domain structures. Since the spi...

  15. Density Dependence and Growth Rate: Evolutionary Effects on Resistance Development to Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jeannette C; Caprio, Michael A; Friedenberg, Nicholas A

    2018-02-09

    It has long been recognized that pest population dynamics can affect the durability of a pesticide, but dose remains the primary component of insect resistance management (IRM). For transgenic pesticidal traits such as Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bacillales: Bacillaceae)), dose (measured as the mortality of susceptibles caused by a toxin) is a relatively fixed characteristic and often falls below the standard definition of high dose. Hence, it is important to understand how pest population dynamics modify durability and what targets they present for IRM. We used a deterministic model of a generic arthropod pest to examine how timing and strength of density dependence interacted with population growth rate and Bt mortality to affect time to resistance. As in previous studies, durability typically reached a minimum at intermediate doses. However, high population growth rates could eliminate benefits of high dose. The timing of density dependence had a more subtle effect. If density dependence operated simultaneously with Bt mortality, durability was insensitive to its strengths. However, if density dependence was driven by postselection densities, decreasing its strength could increase durability. The strength of density dependence could affect durability of both single traits and pyramids, but its influence depended on the timing of density dependence and size of the refuge. Our findings suggest the utility of a broader definition of high dose, one that incorporates population-dynamic context. That maximum growth rates and timing and strength of interactions causing density dependent mortality can all affect durability, also highlights the need for ecologically integrated approaches to IRM research. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. An experimental field study of delayed density dependence in natural populations of Aedes albopictus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael K Walsh

    Full Text Available Aedes albopictus, a species known to transmit dengue and chikungunya viruses, is primarily a container-inhabiting mosquito. The potential for pathogen transmission by Ae. albopictus has increased our need to understand its ecology and population dynamics. Two parameters that we know little about are the impact of direct density-dependence and delayed density-dependence in the larval stage. The present study uses a manipulative experimental design, under field conditions, to understand the impact of delayed density dependence in a natural population of Ae. albopictus in Raleigh, North Carolina. Twenty liter buckets, divided in half prior to experimentation, placed in the field accumulated rainwater and detritus, providing oviposition and larval production sites for natural populations of Ae. albopictus. Two treatments, a larvae present and larvae absent treatment, were produced in each bucket. After five weeks all larvae were removed from both treatments and the buckets were covered with fine mesh cloth. Equal numbers of first instars were added to both treatments in every bucket. Pupae were collected daily and adults were frozen as they emerged. We found a significant impact of delayed density-dependence on larval survival, development time and adult body size in containers with high larval densities. Our results indicate that delayed density-dependence will have negative impacts on the mosquito population when larval densities are high enough to deplete accessible nutrients faster than the rate of natural food accumulation.

  17. Solar wind electron densities from Viking dual-frequency radio measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhleman, D.O.; Anderson, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    Simultaneous phase coherent, two-frequency measurements of the time delay between the Earth station and the Viking spacecraft have been analyzed in terms of the electron density profiles from 4 solar radii (R/sub sun/) to 200 R/sub sun/. The measurements were made during a period of solar activity minimum (1976--1977) and show a strong solar latitude effect. The data were analyzed with both a model independent, direct numerical inversion technique and with model fitting, yielding essentially the same results. It is shown that the solar wind density can be represented by two power laws near the solar equator proportional to r/sup -2.7/ and r/sup -2.04/. However, the more rapidly falling term quickly disappears at moderate latitudes (approx.20 0 ), leaving only the inverse-square behavior

  18. Microwave frequency sweep interferometer for plasma density measurements in ECR ion sources: Design and preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, Giuseppe [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria (Italy); Mascali, David; Neri, Lorenzo; Leonardi, Ornella; Celona, Luigi; Castro, Giuseppe; Agnello, Riccardo; Caruso, Antonio; Passarello, Santi; Longhitano, Alberto; Gammino, Santo [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Sorbello, Gino [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); University of Catania, Catania, Italy and INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Isernia, Tommaso [University Mediterranea of Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRISs) development is strictly related to the availability of new diagnostic tools, as the existing ones are not adequate to such compact machines and to their plasma characteristics. Microwave interferometry is a non-invasive method for plasma diagnostics and represents the best candidate for plasma density measurement in hostile environment. Interferometry in ECRISs is a challenging task mainly due to their compact size. The typical density of ECR plasmas is in the range 10{sup 11}–10{sup 13} cm{sup −3} and it needs a probing beam wavelength of the order of few centimetres, comparable to the chamber radius. The paper describes the design of a microwave interferometer developed at the LNS-INFN laboratories based on the so-called “frequency sweep” method to filter out the multipath contribution in the detected signals. The measurement technique and the preliminary results (calibration) obtained during the experimental tests will be presented.

  19. 1 μs broadband frequency sweeping reflectometry for plasma density and fluctuation profile measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairet, F.; Bottereau, C.; Medvedeva, A.; Molina, D.; Conway, G. D.; Silva, A.; Stroth, U.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Tore Supra Team; Eurofusion Mst1 Team

    2017-11-01

    Frequency swept reflectometry has reached the symbolic value of 1 μs sweeping time; this performance has been made possible, thanks to an improved control of the ramp voltage driving the frequency source. In parallel, the memory depth of the acquisition system has been upgraded and can provide up to 200 000 signals during a plasma discharge. Additional improvements regarding the trigger delay determination of the acquisition and the voltage ramp linearity required by this ultra-fast technique have been set. While this diagnostic is traditionally dedicated to the plasma electron density profile measurement, such a fast sweeping rate can provide the study of fast plasma events and turbulence with unprecedented time and radial resolution from the edge to the core. Experimental results obtained on ASDEX Upgrade plasmas are presented to demonstrate the performances of the diagnostic.

  20. A simple microwave technique for plasma density measurement using frequency modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bora, D.; Jayakumar, R.; Vijayashankar, M.K.

    1984-01-01

    A simple method of determining the phase variation unambiguously during microwave interferometric measurement is described. The frequency of the Klystron source is modulated with the help of staircase voltage pulse. The height of each stair is adjusted such that the corresponding phase shift in the test branch with an additional path length is 90 0 . Signals, proportional to cosine and sine of the phase shift due to plasma, can be generated in the same channel and plasma density information can be inferred. The microwave hardware remains the same as in conventional interferometry and the cost of such a scheme is low. (author)

  1. Density dependence, density independence, and recruitment in the American shad (Alosa sapidissima) population of the Connecticut River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    The role of density-dependent and density-independent factors in the regulation of the stock-recruitment relationship of the American shad (Alosa sapidissima) population of the Connecticut River was investigated. Significant reductions in egg-to-adult survival and juvenile growth rates occurred in the Holyoke--Turners Falls region in response to increases in the intensity of spawning in this area. For the Connecticut River population as a whole, egg-to-adult survival was estimated to be 0.00056 percent at replacement levels, and 0.00083 percent at the point of maximum population growth. Density-independent factors result in significant annual deviations from recruitment levels predicted by the density-dependent model. Temperature and flow regimes during spawning and early larval development are involved, but they explain only a small portion (less than 16 percent) of the total variation. In spite of an extensive data base, the accuracy of predictions concerning the potential effects of additional mortality to pre-recruit stages is low. The implications of these findings for environmental impact assessment are discussed

  2. Assessment of plasma impedance probe for measuring electron density and collision frequency in a plasma with spatial and temporal gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, Mark A.; King, Lyon B.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations and experimental measurements were combined to determine the ability of a plasma impedance probe (PIP) to measure plasma density and electron collision frequency in a plasma containing spatial gradients as well as time-varying oscillations in the plasma density. A PIP is sensitive to collision frequency through the width of the parallel resonance in the Re[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic, while also being sensitive to electron density through the zero-crossing of the Im[Z]-vs.-frequency characteristic at parallel resonance. Simulations of the probe characteristic in a linear plasma gradient indicated that the broadening of Re[Z] due to the spatial gradient obscured the broadening due to electron collision frequency, preventing a quantitative measurement of the absolute collision frequency for gradients considered in this study. Simulation results also showed that the PIP is sensitive to relative changes in electron collision frequency in a spatial density gradient, but a second broadening effect due to time-varying oscillations made collision frequency measurements impossible. The time-varying oscillations had the effect of causing multiple zero-crossings in Im[Z] at parallel resonance. Results of experiments and simulations indicated that the lowest-frequency zero-crossing represented the lowest plasma density in the oscillations and the highest-frequency zero-crossing represented the highest plasma density in the oscillations, thus the PIP probe was found to be an effective tool to measure both the average plasma density as well as the maximum and minimum densities due to temporal oscillations

  3. Anomalous frequency-dependent ionic conductivity of lesion-laden human-brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Fallah, Aria; Vinters, Harry V.; Mathern, Gary W.

    2017-10-01

    We study the effect of lesions on our four-electrode measurements of the ionic conductivity of (˜1 cm3) samples of human brain excised from patients undergoing pediatric epilepsy surgery. For most (˜94%) samples, the low-frequency ionic conductivity rises upon increasing the applied frequency. We attributed this behavior to the long-range (˜0.4 mm) diffusion of solvated sodium cations before encountering intrinsic impenetrable blockages such as cell membranes, blood vessels, and cell walls. By contrast, the low-frequency ionic conductivity of some (˜6%) brain-tissue samples falls with increasing applied frequency. We attribute this unusual frequency-dependence to the electric-field induced liberation of sodium cations from traps introduced by the unusually severe pathology observed in samples from these patients. Thus, the anomalous frequency-dependence of the ionic conductivity indicates trap-producing brain lesions.

  4. An asymptotic preserving unified gas kinetic scheme for frequency-dependent radiative transfer equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wenjun, E-mail: sun_wenjun@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Jiang, Song, E-mail: jiang@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Xu, Kun, E-mail: makxu@ust.hk [Department of Mathematics and Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong (China); Li, Shu, E-mail: li_shu@iapcm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an extension of previous work (Sun et al., 2015 [22]) of the unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for the gray radiative transfer equations to the frequency-dependent (multi-group) radiative transfer system. Different from the gray radiative transfer equations, where the optical opacity is only a function of local material temperature, the simulation of frequency-dependent radiative transfer is associated with additional difficulties from the frequency-dependent opacity. For the multiple frequency radiation, the opacity depends on both the spatial location and the frequency. For example, the opacity is typically a decreasing function of frequency. At the same spatial region the transport physics can be optically thick for the low frequency photons, and optically thin for high frequency ones. Therefore, the optical thickness is not a simple function of space location. In this paper, the UGKS for frequency-dependent radiative system is developed. The UGKS is a finite volume method and the transport physics is modeled according to the ratio of the cell size to the photon's frequency-dependent mean free path. When the cell size is much larger than the photon's mean free path, a diffusion solution for such a frequency radiation will be obtained. On the other hand, when the cell size is much smaller than the photon's mean free path, a free transport mechanism will be recovered. In the regime between the above two limits, with the variation of the ratio between the local cell size and photon's mean free path, the UGKS provides a smooth transition in the physical and frequency space to capture the corresponding transport physics accurately. The seemingly straightforward extension of the UGKS from the gray to multiple frequency radiation system is due to its intrinsic consistent multiple scale transport modeling, but it still involves lots of work to properly discretize the multiple groups in order to design an asymptotic preserving (AP

  5. Spin-dependent tunnelling at infrared frequencies: magnetorefractive effect in magnetic nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovsky, A.B.; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2004-01-01

    We present a brief review of recent experimental and theoretical results on magnetorefractive effect in magnetic metal-insulator nanogranular alloys with tunnel-type magnetoresistance focusing on its relation with high-frequency spin-dependent tunnelling

  6. Spin-dependent tunnelling at infrared frequencies: magnetorefractive effect in magnetic nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, A.B. E-mail: granov@magn.ru; Inoue, Mitsuteru

    2004-05-01

    We present a brief review of recent experimental and theoretical results on magnetorefractive effect in magnetic metal-insulator nanogranular alloys with tunnel-type magnetoresistance focusing on its relation with high-frequency spin-dependent tunnelling.

  7. The long-term evolution of multilocus traits under frequency-dependent disruptive selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Doorn, G. Sander; Dieckmann, Ulf

    Frequency-dependent disruptive selection is widely recognized as an important source of genetic variation. Its evolutionary consequences have been extensively studied using phenotypic evolutionary models, based on quantitative genetics, game theory, or adaptive dynamics. However, the genetic

  8. The infrared Hall effect in YBCO: Temperature and frequency dependence of Hall scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grayson, M.; Cerne, J.; Drew, H.D.; Schmadel, D.C.; Hughes, R.; Preston, J.S.; Kung, P.J.; Vale, L.

    1999-01-01

    The authors measure the Hall angle, θ H , in YBCO films in the far- and mid-infrared to determine the temperature and frequency dependence of the Hall scattering. Using novel modulation techniques they measure both the Faraday rotation and ellipticity induced by these films in high magnetic fields to deduce the complex conductivity tensor. They observe a strong temperature dependence of the mid-infrared Hall conductivity in sharp contrast to the weak dependence of the longitudinal conductivity. By fitting the frequency dependent normal state Hall angle to a Lorentzian θ H (ω) = ω H /(γ H minus iω) they find the Hall frequency, ω H , is nearly independent of temperature. The Hall scattering rate, γ H , is consistent with γ H ∼ T 2 up to 200 K and is remarkably independent of IR frequency suggesting non-Fermi liquid behavior

  9. Color-flavor locked strange quark matter in a mass density-dependent model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yuede; Wen Xinjian

    2007-01-01

    Properties of color-flavor locked (CFL) strange quark matter have been studied in a mass-density-dependent model, and compared with the results in the conventional bag model. In both models, the CFL phase is more stable than the normal nuclear matter for reasonable parameters. However, the lower density behavior of the sound velocity in this model is completely opposite to that in the bag model, which makes the maximum mass of CFL quark stars in the mass-density-dependent model larger than that in the bag model. (authors)

  10. Stochastic seasonality and nonlinear density-dependent factors regulate population size in an African rodent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leirs, Herwig; Steneth, Nils Chr.; Nichols, James D.

    1997-01-01

    , but clear examples of both processes acting in the same population are rare(7,8). Key-factor analysis (regression of population changes on possible causal factors) and time-series analysis are often used to investigate the presence of density dependence, but such approaches may be biased and provide...... no information on actual demographic rates(9,10). Here we report on both density-dependent and density-independent effects in a murid rodent pest species, the multimammute rat Mastomys natalensis (Smith, 1834), using statistical capture-recapture models, Both effects occur simultaneously, but we also demonstrate...

  11. Frequency and temperature dependent mobility of a charged carrier and randomly interrupted strand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Jayannavar, A.M.

    1981-05-01

    Randomly interrupted strand model of a one-dimensional conductor is considered. Exact analytical expression is obtained for the temperature dependent as mobility for a finite segment drawn at random, taking into account the reflecting barriers at the two open ends. The real part of mobility shows a broad resonance as a function of both frequency and tempeature, and vanishes quadratically in the dc limit. The frequency (temperature) maximum shifts to higher values for higher temperatures (frequencies). (author)

  12. IDENTIFYING ANTHROPOGENIC METALLIC POLLUTANTS USING FREQUENCY DEPENDENT MAGNETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY MEASUREMENTS IN ABUJA METROPOLIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatto S. Solomon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil formed from lithological and weathering processes of parent rocks generally exhibit paramagnetic properties due to some minerals contained in the rocks and thus have significant value of magnetic susceptibility. This susceptibility arising from the influence of the parent rocks tend to mask anthropogenic grains pollutants released into the environment by human activities. Hence, it becomes difficult to identify the effect of the lithological and anthropogenic magnetic susceptibility in complex soil found in urban areas. The superparamagnetic effect of lithological soil, a single state domain and multi-domain state of anthropogenic grains can easily be investigated by frequency dependent measurements where readings between 0-2.0% indicates the absence of lithological influence, 2.0-8.0% indicates multi-domain grains or mixture of both single stage and multi-domian grains and 8.0-12% indicates the superparamagntic (SP grain from lithological origin. In this work frequency dependent measurements were carried out along 5 selected road networks within the 5 districts of Abuja phase 1. Measurements were also carried out in 379 random points at the surface and depth of 40.0cm to investigate the distribution of anthropogenic grains in Abuja metropolis using the Bartington susceptibility meter. Frequency dependent measurements along the selected road networks indicate0-3.0% immediately after the roads pavement to a distance of about 3.0m from the road, indicating that the magnetic susceptibility arise mostly form anthropogenic influence rather than lithological processes. At the distance of 3.0-8.0m, frequency dependent values of about 3.0-8.0% were recorded, indicating mixture of both superparamagnetic and multi-domain grains. Beyond the distance of 8.0m, the frequency dependent values are mostly above 8.0.0%, indicating virtually all SP grains. The spatial distribution frequency dependent surface map shows the presence of anthropogenic grains in

  13. Assessing the utility of frequency dependent nudging for reducing biases in biogeochemical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, Karl B.; Fennel, Katja; Thompson, Keith R.; Bianucci, Laura

    2014-09-01

    Bias errors, resulting from inaccurate boundary and forcing conditions, incorrect model parameterization, etc. are a common problem in environmental models including biogeochemical ocean models. While it is important to correct bias errors wherever possible, it is unlikely that any environmental model will ever be entirely free of such errors. Hence, methods for bias reduction are necessary. A widely used technique for online bias reduction is nudging, where simulated fields are continuously forced toward observations or a climatology. Nudging is robust and easy to implement, but suppresses high-frequency variability and introduces artificial phase shifts. As a solution to this problem Thompson et al. (2006) introduced frequency dependent nudging where nudging occurs only in prescribed frequency bands, typically centered on the mean and the annual cycle. They showed this method to be effective for eddy resolving ocean circulation models. Here we add a stability term to the previous form of frequency dependent nudging which makes the method more robust for non-linear biological models. Then we assess the utility of frequency dependent nudging for biological models by first applying the method to a simple predator-prey model and then to a 1D ocean biogeochemical model. In both cases we only nudge in two frequency bands centered on the mean and the annual cycle, and then assess how well the variability in higher frequency bands is recovered. We evaluate the effectiveness of frequency dependent nudging in comparison to conventional nudging and find significant improvements with the former.

  14. A new rate-dependent model for high-frequency tracking performance enhancement of piezoactuator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lizhi; Xiong, Zhenhua; Wu, Jianhua; Ding, Han

    2017-05-01

    Feedforward-feedback control is widely used in motion control of piezoactuator systems. Due to the phase lag caused by incomplete dynamics compensation, the performance of the composite controller is greatly limited at high frequency. This paper proposes a new rate-dependent model to improve the high-frequency tracking performance by reducing dynamics compensation error. The rate-dependent model is designed as a function of the input and input variation rate to describe the input-output relationship of the residual system dynamics which mainly performs as phase lag in a wide frequency band. Then the direct inversion of the proposed rate-dependent model is used to compensate the residual system dynamics. Using the proposed rate-dependent model as feedforward term, the open loop performance can be improved significantly at medium-high frequency. Then, combining the with feedback controller, the composite controller can provide enhanced close loop performance from low frequency to high frequency. At the frequency of 1 Hz, the proposed controller presents the same performance as previous methods. However, at the frequency of 900 Hz, the tracking error is reduced to be 30.7% of the decoupled approach.

  15. Concept of frequency separation in life prediction for time-dependent fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, L.F.

    1976-01-01

    Two methods are described to improve the predictive capability of the frequency-modified fatigue equations for time-dependent fatigue. These built-on the earlier approach and are applicable to severely unbalanced hysteresis loops. Comparisons made with various wave-shape investigations show favorable results. A new form of hysteresis loop is introduced utilizing frequency separation concepts. 4 tables, 11 fig

  16. The vestibular implant: Frequency-dependency of the electrically evoked Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR shows frequency-dependent behavior. This study investigated whether the characteristics of the electrically evoked VOR (eVOR elicited by a vestibular implant, showed the same frequency-dependency.Twelve vestibular electrodes implanted in 7 patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction were tested. Stimuli consisted of amplitude-modulated electrical stimulation with a sinusoidal profile at frequencies of 0.5Hz, 1Hz, and 2Hz. The main characteristics of the eVOR were evaluated and compared to the natural VOR characteristics measured in a group of age-matched healthy volunteers who were subjected to horizontal whole body rotations with equivalent sinusoidal velocity profiles at the same frequencies.A strong and significant effect of frequency was observed in the total peak eye velocity of the eVOR. This effect was similar to that observed in the natural VOR. Other characteristics of the (eVOR (angle, habituation-index, and asymmetry showed no significant frequency-dependent effect. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that, at least at the specific (limited frequency range tested, responses elicited by a vestibular implant closely mimic the frequency-dependency of the normal vestibular system.

  17. Frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in fiber optical parametric amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakarzadeh Dezfuli Nezhad, Hassan; Rottwitt, Karsten; Zakery, A.

    2009-01-01

    Using a numerical model, the frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in FOPAs has been investigated. The model includes fiber loss, pump depletion as well as difference in group velocity among interacting beams.......Using a numerical model, the frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in FOPAs has been investigated. The model includes fiber loss, pump depletion as well as difference in group velocity among interacting beams....

  18. Density matrix-based time-dependent configuration interaction approach to ultrafast spin-flip dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Bokarev, Sergey I.; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Kühn, Oliver

    2017-08-01

    Recent developments in attosecond spectroscopy yield access to the correlated motion of electrons on their intrinsic timescales. Spin-flip dynamics is usually considered in the context of valence electronic states, where spin-orbit coupling is weak and processes related to the electron spin are usually driven by nuclear motion. However, for core-excited states, where the core-hole has a nonzero angular momentum, spin-orbit coupling is strong enough to drive spin-flips on a much shorter timescale. Using density matrix-based time-dependent restricted active space configuration interaction including spin-orbit coupling, we address an unprecedentedly short spin-crossover for the example of L-edge (2p→3d) excited states of a prototypical Fe(II) complex. This process occurs on a timescale, which is faster than that of Auger decay (∼4 fs) treated here explicitly. Modest variations of carrier frequency and pulse duration can lead to substantial changes in the spin-state yield, suggesting its control by soft X-ray light.

  19. Excitation energy and angular momentum dependence of the nuclear level densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razavi, R.; Kakavand, T.; Behkami, A. N.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the excitation energy (E) dependence of nuclear level density for Bethe formula and constant temperature model. The level density parameter aa nd the back shifted energy from the Bethe formula are obtained by fitting the complete level schemes. Also the level density parameters from the constant temperature model have been determined for several nuclei. we have shown that the microscopic theory provides more precise information on the nuclear level densities. On the other hand, the spin cut-off parameter and effective moment of inertia are determined by studying of the angular momentum (J) dependence of the nuclear level density, and effective moment of inertia is compared with rigid body value.

  20. Collision frequency of Lennard-Jones fluids at high densities by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adebayo, G.A.; Anusionwu, B.C.; Njah, A.N.; Adeniran, O.J.; Mathew, B.; Sunmonu, R.S.

    2009-01-01

    Arising from the inability of theoretical calculations to give accurate descriptions of (shear) viscosity in rare gases at high densities, we investigated the likely cause of discrepancy between theory and experiments. Molecular Dynamics simulations were performed to calculate transport coefficients and collision frequency of rare gases at high densities and different temperatures using a Lennard-Jones modelled pair potential. The results, when compared with experiments show an underestimation of the viscosity calculated through the Green-Kubo formalism, but in agreement with some other calculations performed by other groups. In the present work the origin of the underestimation is considered. Analyses of the transport coefficients show a very high collision frequency which suggests an atom may spend much less time in the neighbourhood of the fields of force of another atom and that the distribution in the systems studied adjusts itself to a nearly Maxwellian type which resulted in a locally and temporarily slowly varying temperature. We show that the time spent in the fields of force is so small compared with relaxation time thereby leading to a possible reduction in local velocity auto-correlation between atoms. (author)

  1. Effect of pulse frequency and current density on anomalous composition and nanomechanical property of electrodeposited Ni-Co films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, C.K., E-mail: ckchung@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Chang, W.T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China)

    2009-07-01

    Effect of pulse frequency and current density on the anomalous cobalt content and nanomechanical property of the electrodeposited nickel-cobalt (Ni-Co) films has been investigated. The composition, morphology, phase and hardness of the Ni-Co alloy films were examined by scanning electron microscope with an attached energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope, X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation techniques, respectively. The different Co composition of the Ni-Co films codeposited from the fixed sulfamate-chloride bath is subject to the pulse frequencies and current densities. The frequencies varied from 0 to 100 Hz and current densities varied from 1 to 20 ASD (ampere per square decimeter). The Co composition has no significant variation in pulse electrodeposition but it is greatly influenced by current densities from 22.53% at 1 ASD decreased to 13.39% at 20 ASD under DC codeposition. The mean hardness of Ni-Co films has no eminent change at a pulse frequency of 10-100 Hz but it decreases with current densities from 8.72 GPa (1 ASD) to 7.13 GPa (20 ASD). The smoother morphology can be obtained at higher pulse frequency or lower current density. Good Ni-Co films with high hardness and smooth morphology can be obtained by reducing current density and increasing pulse frequency.

  2. Mutational jackpot events generate effective frequency-dependent selection in adapting populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallatschek, Oskar

    The site-frequency spectrum is one the most easily measurable quantities that characterize the genetic diversity of a population. While most neutral models predict that site frequency spectra should decay with increasing frequency, a high-frequency uptick has been reported in many populations. Anomalies in the high-frequency tail are particularly unsettling because the highest frequencies can be measured with greatest accuracy. Here, we show that an uptick in the spectrum of neutral mutations generally arises when mutant frequencies are dominated by rare jackpot events, mutational events with large descendant numbers. This leads to an effective pattern of frequency-dependent selection (or unstable internal equilibrium at one half frequency) that causes an accumulation of high-frequency polymorphic sites. We reproduce the known uptick occurring for recurrent hitchhiking (genetic draft) as well as rapid adaptation, and (in the future) generalize the shape of the high-frequency tail to other scenarios that are dominated by jackpot events, such as frequent range expansions. We also tackle (in the future) the inverse approach to use the high-frequency uptick for learning about the tail of the offspring number distribution. Positively selected alleles need to surpass, typically, an u NSF Career Award (PoLS), NIH NIGMS R01, Simons Foundation.

  3. Frequency dependent magneto-transport in charge transfer Co(II) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Bikash Kumar; Saha, Shyamal K., E-mail: cnssks@iacs.res.in

    2014-09-01

    A charge transfer chelated system containing ferromagnetic metal centers is the ideal system to investigate the magneto-transport and magneto-dielectric effects due to the presence of both electronic as well as magnetic properties and their coupling. Magneto-transport properties in materials are usually studied through dc charge transport under magnetic field. As frequency dependent conductivity is an essential tool to understand the nature of carrier wave, its spatial extension and their mutual interaction, in the present work, we have investigated frequency dependent magneto-transport along with magnetization behavior in [Co{sub 2}(II)-(5-(4-PhMe)-1,3,4-oxadiazole-H{sup +}-2-thiolate){sub 5}](OAc){sub 4} metal complex to elucidate the nature of above quantities and their response under magnetic field in the transport property. We have used the existing model for ac conduction incorporating the field dependence to explain the frequency dependent magneto-transport. It is seen that the frequency dependent magneto-transport could be well explained using the existing model for ac conduction. -Highlights: • Chelated Co(II) complex is synthesized for magneto-transport applications. • Frequency dependent magneto-transport and magnetization behavior are studied. • Nature of carrier wave, its spatial extension is investigated under magnetic field. • Existing model for ac conduction is used with magnetic field dependence.

  4. Frequency dependence of coherently amplified two-photon emission from hydrogen molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hideaki; Miyamoto, Yuki; Hiraki, Takahiro; Masuda, Takahiko; Sasao, Noboru; Uetake, Satoshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Koji; Yoshimura, Motohiko

    2017-12-01

    We investigate how the efficiency of coherently amplified two-photon emission depends on the frequency of one of the two emitted photons, namely the signal photon. This is done over the wavelength range of 5.048-10.21 μ m by using the vibrational transition of parahydrogen. The efficiency increases with the frequency of the signal photon. Considering experimental errors, our results are consistent with the theoretical prediction for the present experimental conditions. This study is an experimental demonstration of the frequency dependence of coherently amplified two-photon emission, and also presents its potential as a light source.

  5. Electron Density Profile Data Contains Virtual Height/Frequency Pairs from a Profile or Profiles (Composite Months) of Ionograms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Electron Density Profile, N(h), data set contains both individual profiles and composite months. The data consist of virtual height/frequency pairs from a...

  6. Anisotropy of the apparent frequency dependence of backscatter in formalin fixed human myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C S; Verdonk, E D; Wickline, S A; Perez, J E; Miller, J G

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of the frequency dependence of ultrasonic backscatter are presented for specific angles of insonification for regions of infarcted and noninfarcted human myocardium. A 5-MHz transducer was used to insonify cylindrical cores taken from 7 noninfarcted regions and 12 infarcted regions of the left ventricular free wall of 6 formalin-fixed human hearts explanted because of ischemic cardiomyopathy. The dependence of apparent (uncompensated for diffraction effects and attenuation) backscatter on frequency was approximated by a power-law dependence, magnitude of B(f)2 = afn. Under ideal conditions in a lossless medium, the effect of not compensating for the effects of diffraction and attenuation leads to the value of n to be 2.0 for Rayleigh scatterers while the frequency dependence of the fully compensated backscatter coefficient would be f4. The value of n was determined over the frequency range, 3-7 MHz. Both nonifarcted and infarcted myocardium exhibited anisotropy of the frequency dependence of backscatter, with maxima occurring at angles that were perpendicular to the predominant myofiber direction and minima when parallel to the fibers. Perpendicular insonification yielded results for n of 1.8 +/- 0.1 for noninfarcted myocardium and 1.2 +/- 0.1 for infarcted myocardium while parallel insonification yielded results of 0.4 +/- 0.1 for noninfarcted and 0.0 +/- 0.1 for infarcted myocardium. The functional form of the angle-dependent backscatter is similar for both noninfarcted and infarcted myocardium, although the frequency dependence is clearly different for both tissue states for all angles of insonification. The results of this study indicate that the anisotropy of the frequency dependence of backscatter may play a significant role in ultrasonic imaging and is an important consideration for ultrasonic tissue characterization in myocardium.

  7. Density-dependent intraspecific aggression regulates survival in northern Yellowstone wolves (Canis lupus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubaynes, Sarah; MacNulty, Daniel R; Stahler, Daniel R; Quimby, Kira A; Smith, Douglas W; Coulson, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the population dynamics of top-predators is essential to assess their impact on ecosystems and to guide their management. Key to this understanding is identifying the mechanisms regulating vital rates. Determining the influence of density on survival is necessary to understand the extent to which human-caused mortality is compensatory or additive. In wolves (Canis lupus), empirical evidence for density-dependent survival is lacking. Dispersal is considered the principal way in which wolves adjust their numbers to prey supply or compensate for human exploitation. However, studies to date have primarily focused on exploited wolf populations, in which density-dependent mechanisms are likely weak due to artificially low wolf densities. Using 13 years of data on 280 collared wolves in Yellowstone National Park, we assessed the effect of wolf density, prey abundance and population structure, as well as winter severity, on age-specific survival in two areas (prey-rich vs. prey-poor) of the national park. We further analysed cause-specific mortality and explored the factors driving intraspecific aggression in the prey-rich northern area of the park. Overall, survival rates decreased during the study. In northern Yellowstone, density dependence regulated adult survival through an increase in intraspecific aggression, independent of prey availability. In the interior of the park, adult survival was less variable and density-independent, despite reduced prey availability. There was no effect of prey population structure in northern Yellowstone, or of winter severity in either area. Survival was similar among yearlings and adults, but lower for adults older than 6 years. Our results indicate that density-dependent intraspecific aggression is a major driver of adult wolf survival in northern Yellowstone, suggesting intrinsic density-dependent mechanisms have the potential to regulate wolf populations at high ungulate densities. When low prey availability or high

  8. Peculiarities of frequency dependence of type 3 solar radio bursts duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsybko, Ya.G.

    1989-01-01

    From the averaged data of type 3 bursts at the fixed frequencies in the range 12.5-25 MHz and out of this limit it is concluded that there exist two branges of the burst duration dependence on the frequency. This splitting allows to distinguish bursts occurring at the fundamental and the second harmonics of the plasma frequency decreasing with height in the solar corona. The type 3b radiation is characterized by a separate diagram of the mean duration versus frequency of the stria-bursts at the fundamental harmonic

  9. Density-dependent seedling mortality varies with light availability and species abundance in wet and dry Hawaiian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith Inman-Narahari; Rebecca Ostertag; Stephen P. Hubbell; Christian P. Giardina; Susan Cordell; Lawren Sack; Andrew MacDougall

    2016-01-01

    Conspecific density may contribute to patterns of species assembly through negative density dependence (NDD) as predicted by the Janzen-Connell hypothesis, or through facilitation (positive density dependence; PDD). Conspecific density effects are expected to be more negative in darker and wetter environments due to higher pathogen abundance and...

  10. A hybrid transport-diffusion Monte Carlo method for frequency-dependent radiative-transfer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Densmore, Jeffery D.; Thompson, Kelly G.; Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations in optically thick media. In DDMC, particles take discrete steps between spatial cells according to a discretized diffusion equation. Each discrete step replaces many smaller Monte Carlo steps, thus improving the efficiency of the simulation. In this paper, we present an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold, as optical thickness is typically a decreasing function of frequency. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo, which results in a hybrid transport-diffusion scheme. With a set of frequency-dependent test problems, we confirm the accuracy and increased efficiency of our new DDMC method.

  11. Characterization of frequency-dependent glass transition temperature by Vogel-Fulcher relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yu; Jin Li

    2008-01-01

    The complex mechanical modulus of polymer and polymer based composite materials showed a frequency-dependent behaviour during glass transition relaxation, which was historically modelled by the Arrhenius equation. However, this might not be true in a broad frequency domain based on the experience from the frequency dependence of the complex dielectric permittivity, which resulted from the same glass transition relaxation as for the complex mechanical modulus. Considering a good correspondence between dielectric and mechanical relaxation during glass transition, the Vogel-Fulcher relationship, previously proposed for the frequency dependence of dielectric permittivity, is introduced for that of the mechanical modulus; and the corresponding static glass transition temperature (T f ) was first determined for polymer and polymer based composite materials. (fast track communication)

  12. On the role of minority carriers in the frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Paul; Wagemans, W.; Verhoeven, Wouter; van der Heijden, E.H.M.; Kemerink, M.; Koopmans, B.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we investigate the frequency dependence of organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) both in small molecule-based (Alq3) and polymer (PPV derivative) materials, and investigate its thickness dependence. For all devices, we observed a strong decrease in magnetoconductance (MC) with increasing

  13. Frequency dependent loss analysis and minimization of system losses in switchmode audio power amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamauchi, Akira; Knott, Arnold; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, frequency dependent losses in switch-mode audio power amplifiers are analyzed and a loss model is improved by taking the voltage dependence of the parasitic capacitance of MOSFETs into account. The estimated power losses are compared to the measurement and great accuracy is achieved...

  14. Density functional theory for prediction of far-infrared vibrational frequencies: molecular crystals of astrophysical interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, C.; Auchettl, R.; Appadoo, D. R. T.; Robertson, E. G.

    2017-11-01

    Solid-state density functional theory code has been implemented for the structure optimization of crystalline methanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid and for the calculation of infrared frequencies. The results are compared to thin film spectra obtained from low-temperature experiments performed at the Australian Synchrotron. Harmonic frequency calculations of the internal modes calculated at the B3LYP-D3/m-6-311G(d) level shows higher deviation from infrared experiment than more advanced theory applied to the gas phase. Importantly for the solid-state, the simulation of low-frequency molecular lattice modes closely resembles the observed far-infrared features after application of a 0.92 scaling factor. This allowed experimental peaks to be assigned to specific translation and libration modes, including acetaldehyde and acetic acid lattice features for the first time. These frequency calculations have been performed without the need for supercomputing resources that are required for large molecular clusters using comparable levels of theory. This new theoretical approach will find use for the rapid characterization of intermolecular interactions and bonding in crystals, and the assignment of far-infrared spectra for crystalline samples such as pharmaceuticals and molecular ices. One interesting application may be for the detection of species of prebiotic interest on the surfaces of Kuiper-Belt and Trans-Neptunian Objects. At such locations, the three small organic molecules studied here could reside in their crystalline phase. The far-infrared spectra for their low-temperature solid phases are collected under planetary conditions, allowing us to compile and assign their most intense spectral features to assist future far-infrared surveys of icy Solar system surfaces.

  15. Effects of hepatocyte growth factor on glutathione synthesis, growth, and apoptosis is cell density-dependent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Heping; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Xia Meng; Lu, Shelly C.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatocyte mitogen that exerts opposing effects depending on cell density. Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in mammalian cells that modulates growth and apoptosis. We previously showed that GSH level is inversely related to cell density of hepatocytes and is positively related to growth. Our current work examined whether HGF can modulate GSH synthesis in a cell density-dependent manner and how GSH in turn influence HGF's effects. We found HGF treatment of H4IIE cells increased cell GSH levels only under subconfluent density. The increase in cell GSH under low density was due to increased transcription of GSH synthetic enzymes. This correlated with increased protein levels and nuclear binding activities of c-Jun, c-Fos, p65, p50, Nrf1 and Nrf2 to the promoter region of these genes. HGF acts as a mitogen in H4IIE cells under low cell density and protects against tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-induced apoptosis by limiting JNK activation. However, HGF is pro-apoptotic under high cell density and exacerbates TNFα-induced apoptosis by potentiating JNK activation. The increase in cell GSH under low cell density allows HGF to exert its full mitogenic effect but is not necessary for its anti-apoptotic effect

  16. Frequency dependence of the radiative decay rate of excitons in self-assembled quantum dots: Experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Johansen, Jeppe; Kristensen, Philip Trøst

    2009-01-01

    We analyze time-resolved spontaneous emission from excitons confined in self-assembled InAs quantum dots placed at various distances to a semiconductor-air interface. The modification of the local density of optical states due to the proximity of the interface enables unambiguous determination...... furthermore discuss three models of quantum dot strain and compare the measured wave-function overlap to these models. The observed frequency dependence of the wave-function overlap can be understood qualitatively in terms of the different compressibility of electrons and holes originating from...

  17. Monitoring Voltage-Dependent Charge Displacement of Shaker B-IR K+ Ion Channels Using Radio Frequency Interrogation

    OpenAIRE

    Dharia, Sameera; Rabbitt, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Here we introduce a new technique that probes voltage-dependent charge displacements of excitable membrane-bound proteins using extracellularly applied radio frequency (RF, 500 kHz) electric fields. Xenopus oocytes were used as a model cell for these experiments, and were injected with cRNA encoding Shaker B-IR (ShB-IR) K(+) ion channels to express large densities of this protein in the oocyte membranes. Two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) was applied to command whole-cell membrane potential a...

  18. Grain size dependence of the critical current density in YBa2Cu3Ox superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwabara, M.; Shimooka, H.

    1989-01-01

    The grain size dependence of the critical current density in bulk single-phase YBa 2 Cu 3 O x ceramics was investigated. The grain size of the materials was changed to range approximately from 1.0 to 25 μm by changing the conditions of power processing and sintering, associated with an increase in the sintered density of the materials with increasing grain size. The critical current density has been found to exhibit a significant grain size dependence, changing from 880 A/cm 2 to a value of 100 A/cm 2 with a small increase in the average grain size from 1.2 to 2.0 μm. This seems to provide information about the nature of the weak link between superconducting grains which might govern the critical current density of the materials

  19. Quasiparticle density of states in a half metal in the presence of odd-frequency Cooper pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asano, Yasuhiro; Yokoyama, Takehito; Tanaka, Yukio; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch

    2008-01-01

    We study the local density of states in a half metal sandwiched by the two superconductors. The spin-flip scattering at the junction interface opens the Josephson channels of the odd-frequency spin-triplet s-wave Cooper pairs. The penetration of the odd-frequency pairs enhances the quasiparticle

  20. Density-dependent selection on mate search and evolution of Allee effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berec, Luděk; Kramer, Andrew M; Bernhauerová, Veronika; Drake, John M

    2018-01-01

    Sexually reproducing organisms require males and females to find each other. Increased difficulty of females finding mates as male density declines is the most frequently reported mechanism of Allee effects in animals. Evolving more effective mate search may alleviate Allee effects, but may depend on density regimes a population experiences. In particular, high-density populations may evolve mechanisms that induce Allee effects which become detrimental when populations are reduced and maintained at a low density. We develop an individual-based, eco-genetic model to study how mating systems and fitness trade-offs interact with changes in population density to drive evolution of the rate at which males or females search for mates. Finite mate search rate triggers Allee effects in our model and we explore how these Allee effects respond to such evolution. We allow a population to adapt to several population density regimes and examine whether high-density populations are likely to reverse adaptations attained at low densities. We find density-dependent selection in most of scenarios, leading to search rates that result in lower Allee thresholds in populations kept at lower densities. This mainly occurs when fecundity costs are imposed on mate search, and provides an explanation for why Allee effects are often observed in anthropogenically rare species. Optimizing selection, where the attained trait value minimizes the Allee threshold independent of population density, depended on the trade-off between search and survival, combined with monogamy when females were searching. Other scenarios led to runaway selection on the mate search rate, including evolutionary suicide. Trade-offs involved in mate search may thus be crucial to determining how density influences the evolution of Allee effects. Previous studies did not examine evolution of a trait related to the strength of Allee effects under density variation. We emphasize the crucial role that mating systems, fitness

  1. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y., E-mail: thuzhangyu@foxmail.com; Huang, S. L., E-mail: huangsling@tsinghua.edu.cn; Wang, S.; Zhao, W. [State Key Laboratory of Power Systems, Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-05-15

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert–Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  2. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Huang, S. L.; Wang, S.; Zhao, W.

    2016-01-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert–Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of <1% and thus can act as a universal time-of-flight extraction method for narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

  3. Time-frequency energy density precipitation method for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Huang, S L; Wang, S; Zhao, W

    2016-05-01

    The time-of-flight of the Lamb wave provides an important basis for defect evaluation in metal plates and is the input signal for Lamb wave tomographic imaging. However, the time-of-flight can be difficult to acquire because of the Lamb wave dispersion characteristics. This work proposes a time-frequency energy density precipitation method to accurately extract the time-of-flight of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals in metal plates. In the proposed method, a discrete short-time Fourier transform is performed on the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals to obtain the corresponding discrete time-frequency energy density distribution. The energy density values at the center frequency for all discrete time points are then calculated by linear interpolation. Next, the time-domain energy density curve focused on that center frequency is precipitated by least squares fitting of the calculated energy density values. Finally, the peak times of the energy density curve obtained relative to the initial pulse signal are extracted as the time-of-flight for the narrowband Lamb wave detection signals. An experimental platform is established for time-of-flight extraction of narrowband Lamb wave detection signals, and sensitivity analysis of the proposed time-frequency energy density precipitation method is performed in terms of propagation distance, dispersion characteristics, center frequency, and plate thickness. For comparison, the widely used Hilbert-Huang transform method is also implemented for time-of-flight extraction. The results show that the time-frequency energy density precipitation method can accurately extract the time-of-flight with relative error of wave detection signals.

  4. Postnatal development of depth-dependent collagen density in ovine articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kranenbarg Sander

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Articular cartilage (AC is the layer of tissue that covers the articulating ends of the bones in diarthrodial joints. Adult AC is characterised by a depth-dependent composition and structure of the extracellular matrix that results in depth-dependent mechanical properties, important for the functions of adult AC. Collagen is the most abundant solid component and it affects the mechanical behaviour of AC. The current objective is to quantify the postnatal development of depth-dependent collagen density in sheep (Ovis aries AC between birth and maturity. We use Fourier transform infra-red micro-spectroscopy to investigate collagen density in 48 sheep divided over ten sample points between birth (stillborn and maturity (72 weeks. In each animal, we investigate six anatomical sites (caudal, distal and rostral locations at the medial and lateral side of the joint in the distal metacarpus of a fore leg and a hind leg. Results Collagen density increases from birth to maturity up to our last sample point (72 weeks. Collagen density increases at the articular surface from 0.23 g/ml ± 0.06 g/ml (mean ± s.d., n = 48 at 0 weeks to 0.51 g/ml ± 0.10 g/ml (n = 46 at 72 weeks. Maximum collagen density in the deeper cartilage increases from 0.39 g/ml ± 0.08 g/ml (n = 48 at 0 weeks to 0.91 g/ml ± 0.13 g/ml (n = 46 at 72 weeks. Most collagen density profiles at 0 weeks (85% show a valley, indicating a minimum, in collagen density near the articular surface. At 72 weeks, only 17% of the collagen density profiles show a valley in collagen density near the articular surface. The fraction of profiles with this valley stabilises at 36 weeks. Conclusions Collagen density in articular cartilage increases in postnatal life with depth-dependent variation, and does not stabilize up to 72 weeks, the last sample point in our study. We find strong evidence for a valley in collagen densities near the articular surface that is present in the youngest

  5. Hot-electron-assisted femtochemistry at surfaces: A time-dependent density functional theory approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, Jeppe; Rubio, Angel; Olsen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Using time-evolution time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the adiabatic local-density approximation, we study the interactions between single electrons and molecular resonances at surfaces. Our system is a nitrogen molecule adsorbed on a ruthenium surface. The surface is modele...... resonance and the lowering of the resonance energy due to an image charge effect. Finally we apply the TDDFT procedure to only consider the decay of molecular excitations and find that it agrees quite well with the width of the projected density of Kohn-Sham states....

  6. First density profile measurements using frequency modulation of the continuous wave reflectometry on JETa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, L.; Cupido, L.; Sirinelli, A.; Manso, M. E.; Jet-Efds Contributors

    2008-10-01

    We present the main design options and implementation of an X-mode reflectometer developed and successfully installed at JET using an innovative approach. It aims to prove the viability of measuring density profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution using broadband reflectometry operating in long and complex transmission lines. It probes the plasma with magnetic fields between 2.4 and 3.0 T using the V band [~(0-1.4)×1019 m-3]. The first experimental results show the high sensitivity of the diagnostic when measuring changes in the plasma density profile occurring ITER relevant regimes, such as ELMy H-modes. The successful demonstration of this concept motivated the upgrade of the JET frequency modulation of the continuous wave (FMCW) reflectometry diagnostic, to probe both the edge and core. This new system is essential to prove the viability of using the FMCW reflectometry technique to probe the plasma in next step devices, such as ITER, since they share the same waveguide complexity.

  7. Optical Absorption in Molecular Crystals from Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-23

    Our approach represents a full solid-state calculation, allowing for polarization ef- fects while still capable of capturing inter-molecular dis...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0030 Optical absorption in molecular crystals from time-dependent density functional theory Leeor Kronik WEIZMANN INSTITUTE OF...from time-dependent density functional theory 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-15-1-0290 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S

  8. Probing the density dependence of the symmetry potential in intermediate-energy heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qingfeng; Li Zhuxia; Soff, Sven; Gupta, Raj K; Bleicher, Marcus; Stoecker, Horst

    2005-01-01

    Based on the ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics model, the effects of the density-dependent symmetry potential for baryons and of the Coulomb potential for produced mesons are investigated for neutron-rich heavy ion collisions at intermediate energies. The calculated results of the Δ - /Δ ++ and π - /π + production ratios show a clear beam-energy dependence on the density-dependent symmetry potential, which is stronger for the π - /π + ratio close to the pion production threshold. The Coulomb potential of the mesons changes the transverse momentum distribution of the π - /π + ratio significantly, though it alters only slightly the π - and π + total yields. The π - yields, especially at midrapidity or at low transverse momenta and the π - /π + ratios at low transverse momenta are shown to be sensitive probes of the density-dependent symmetry potential in dense nuclear matter. The effect of the density-dependent symmetry potential on the production of both K 0 and K + mesons is also investigated

  9. Frequency and Temperature Dependence of Electrical Breakdown at 21, 30, and 39GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, H. H.; Döbert, S.; Wilson, I.; Wuensch, W.

    2003-06-01

    A TeV-range e+e- linear collider has emerged as one of the most promising candidates to extend the high energy frontier of experimental elementary particle physics. A high accelerating gradient for such a collider is desirable to limit its overall length. Accelerating gradient is mainly limited by electrical breakdown, and it has been generally assumed that this limit increases with increasing frequency for normal-conducting accelerating structures. Since the choice of frequency has a profound influence on the design of a linear collider, the frequency dependence of breakdown has been measured using six exactly scaled single-cell cavities at 21, 30, and 39GHz. The influence of temperature on breakdown behavior was also investigated. The maximum obtainable surface fields were found to be in the range of 300 to 400 MV/m for copper, with no significant dependence on either frequency or temperature.

  10. Frequency and Temperature Dependence of Electrical Breakdown at 21, 30 and 39 GHz

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Hans Heinrich; Wilson, Ian H; Wuensch, Walter

    2003-01-01

    A TeV-range e+e- linear collider has emerged as one of the most promising candidates to extend the high energy frontier of experimental elementary particle physics. A high accelerating gradient for such a collider is desirable to limit its overall length. Accelerating gradient is mainly limited by electrical breakdown, and it has been generally assumed that this limit increases with increasing frequency for normal-conducting accelerating structures. Since the choice of frequency has a profound influence on the design of a linear collider, the frequency dependence of breakdown has been measured using six exactly scaled single-cell cavities at 21, 30, and 39 GHz. The influence of temperature on breakdown behavior was also investigated. The maximum obtainable surface fields were found to be in the range of 300 to 400 MV/m for copper, with no significant dependence on either frequency or temperature.

  11. Effects of Frequency Dependence of the External Quantum Efficiency of Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, Sandheep; Aranda, Clara; Boix, Pablo P; Anta, Juan A; Bisquert, Juan; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà

    2018-06-07

    Perovskite solar cells are known to show very long response time scales, on the order of milliseconds to seconds. This generates considerable doubt over the validity of the measured external quantum efficiency (EQE) and consequently the estimation of the short-circuit current density. We observe a variation as high as 10% in the values of the EQE of perovskite solar cells for different optical chopper frequencies between 10 and 500 Hz, indicating a need to establish well-defined protocols of EQE measurement. We also corroborate these values and obtain new insights regarding the working mechanisms of perovskite solar cells from intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy measurements, identifying the evolution of the EQE over a range of frequencies, displaying a singular reduction at very low frequencies. This reduction in EQE is ascribed to additional resistive contributions hindering charge extraction in the perovskite solar cell at short-circuit conditions, which are delayed because of the concomitant large low-frequency capacitance.

  12. Relativistic Random-Phase Approximation with Density-dependent Meson-nucleon Couplings at Finite Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Y.; Paar, N.; Vretenar, D.; Meng, J.

    2009-01-01

    The fully self-consistent relativistic random-phase approximation (RRPA) framework based on effective interactions with a phenomenological density dependence is extended to finite temperatures. The RRPA configuration space is built from the spectrum of single-nucleon states at finite temperature obtained by the temperature dependent relativistic mean field (RMF-T) theory based on effective Lagrangian with density dependent meson-nucleon vertex functions. As an illustration, the dependence of binding energy, radius, entropy and single particle levels on temperature for spherical nucleus 2 08P b is investigated in RMF-T theory. The finite temperature RRPA has been employed in studies of giant monopole and dipole resonances, and the evolution of resonance properties has been studied as a function of temperature. In addition, exotic modes of excitation have been systematically explored at finite temperatures, with an emphasis on the case of pygmy dipole resonances.(author)

  13. Isoscalar giant resonances and Landau parameters with density-dependent effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Michio; Ando, Kazuhiko

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relations between the Landau parameters and the isoscalar giant (quadrupole- and monopole-) resonance energies by using general density-dependent interactions. In the limit of infinite nuclear matter, the isoscalar giant quadrupole energy is shown to depend not only on the effective mass but also on the Landau parameter F 2 . Collective energies of the isoscalar giant resonances are calculated for 16 O and 40 Ca with four different effective interactions, G-0, B1, SII and SV, by using the scaling- and constrained Hartree-Fock-methods. It is shown that the dependence of the collective energies on the effective interactions is essentially determined by the Landau parameters. The G-0 force is found to be most successful in reproducing the giant resonance energies. Validity of the RPA-moment theorems is examined for the case of local density-dependent interactions. (author)

  14. Parental care masks a density-dependent shift from cooperation to competition among burying beetle larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Matthew; Jarrett, Benjamin J M; Kilner, Rebecca M

    2015-04-01

    Studies of siblings have focused mainly on their competitive interactions and to a lesser extent on their cooperation. However, competition and cooperation are at opposite ends on a continuum of possible interactions and the nature of these interactions may be flexible with ecological factors tipping the balance toward competition in some environments and cooperation in others. Here we show that the presence of parental care and the density of larvae on the breeding carcass change the outcome of sibling interactions in burying beetle broods. With full parental care there was a strong negative relationship between larval density and larval mass, consistent with sibling competition for resources. In the absence of care, initial increases in larval density had beneficial effects on larval mass but further increases in larval density reduced larval mass. This likely reflects a density-dependent shift between cooperation and competition. In a second experiment, we manipulated larval density and removed parental care. We found that the ability of larvae to penetrate the breeding carcass increased with larval density and that feeding within the carcass resulted in heavier larvae than feeding outside the carcass. However, larval density did not influence carcass decay. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. Stimulus-dependent modulation of spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in the rat visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liangming; Liu, Yadong; Gui, Jianjun; Li, Ming; Hu, Dewen

    2014-08-06

    Research on spontaneous low-frequency oscillations is important to reveal underlying regulatory mechanisms in the brain. The mechanism for the stimulus modulation of low-frequency oscillations is not known. Here, we used the intrinsic optical imaging technique to examine stimulus-modulated low-frequency oscillation signals in the rat visual cortex. The stimulation was presented monocularly as a flashing light with different frequencies and intensities. The phases of low-frequency oscillations in different regions tended to be synchronized and the rhythms typically accelerated within a 30-s period after stimulation. These phenomena were confined to visual stimuli with specific flashing frequencies (12.5-17.5 Hz) and intensities (5-10 mA). The acceleration and synchronization induced by the flashing frequency were more marked than those induced by the intensity. These results show that spontaneous low-frequency oscillations can be modulated by parameter-dependent flashing lights and indicate the potential utility of the visual stimulus paradigm in exploring the origin and function of low-frequency oscillations.

  16. The Frequency-dependent Damping of Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves in a Sunspot Umbral Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Jess, D. B. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Doorsselaere, T. Van [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Verth, G. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Morton, R. J. [Department of Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering, Northumbria University, Ellison Building, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Fedun, V. [Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2RC), School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Christian, D. J., E-mail: krishna.prasad@qub.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2017-09-20

    High spatial and temporal resolution images of a sunspot, obtained simultaneously in multiple optical and UV wavelengths, are employed to study the propagation and damping characteristics of slow magnetoacoustic waves up to transition region heights. Power spectra are generated from intensity oscillations in sunspot umbra, across multiple atmospheric heights, for frequencies up to a few hundred mHz. It is observed that the power spectra display a power-law dependence over the entire frequency range, with a significant enhancement around 5.5 mHz found for the chromospheric channels. The phase difference spectra reveal a cutoff frequency near 3 mHz, up to which the oscillations are evanescent, while those with higher frequencies propagate upward. The power-law index appears to increase with atmospheric height. Also, shorter damping lengths are observed for oscillations with higher frequencies suggesting frequency-dependent damping. Using the relative amplitudes of the 5.5 mHz (3 minute) oscillations, we estimate the energy flux at different heights, which seems to decay gradually from the photosphere, in agreement with recent numerical simulations. Furthermore, a comparison of power spectra across the umbral radius highlights an enhancement of high-frequency waves near the umbral center, which does not seem to be related to magnetic field inclination angle effects.

  17. Native birds and alien insects: spatial density dependence in songbird predation of invading oak gallwasps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Schönrogge

    Full Text Available Revealing the interactions between alien species and native communities is central to understanding the ecological consequences of range expansion. Much has been learned through study of the communities developing around invading herbivorous insects. Much less, however, is known about the significance of such aliens for native vertebrate predators for which invaders may represent a novel food source. We quantified spatial patterns in native bird predation of invading gall-inducing Andricus wasps associated with introduced Turkey oak (Quercus cerris at eight sites across the UK. These gallwasps are available at high density before the emergence of caterpillars that are the principle spring food of native insectivorous birds. Native birds showed positive spatial density dependence in gall attack rates at two sites in southern England, foraging most extensively on trees with highest gall densities. In a subsequent study at one of these sites, positive spatial density dependence persisted through four of five sequential week-long periods of data collection. Both patterns imply that invading galls are a significant resource for at least some native bird populations. Density dependence was strongest in southern UK bird populations that have had longest exposure to the invading gallwasps. We hypothesise that this pattern results from the time taken for native bird populations to learn how to exploit this novel resource.

  18. Natural excitation orbitals from linear response theories : Time-dependent density functional theory, time-dependent Hartree-Fock, and time-dependent natural orbital functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Meer, R.; Gritsenko, O. V.; Baerends, E. J.

    2017-01-01

    Straightforward interpretation of excitations is possible if they can be described as simple single orbital-to-orbital (or double, etc.) transitions. In linear response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT), the (ground state) Kohn-Sham orbitals prove to be such an orbital basis. In

  19. Density dependence of avian clutch size in resident and migrant species: is there a constraint on the predictability of competitor density?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C.

    2000-01-01

    The presence of density dependence of clutch size is tested in 57 long-term population studies of 10 passerine bird species. In about half of the studies of tit species Parus spp. density dependence of clutch size was found, while none was found in studies of two flycatcher species Ficedula spp. One

  20. Permanence for a Delayed Nonautonomous SIR Epidemic Model with Density-Dependent Birth Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yingke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on some well-known SIR models, a revised nonautonomous SIR epidemic model with distributed delay and density-dependent birth rate was considered. Applying some classical analysis techniques for ordinary differential equations and the method proposed by Wang (2002, the threshold value for the permanence and extinction of the model was obtained.

  1. Tables of density dependent effective interactions between 122 and 800 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dortmans, P.J.; Amos, K.

    1996-01-01

    Coordinate space density dependent effective nucleon-nucleon interaction based upon half-off-shell t and g-matrices are presented. These interactions are based upon the Paris interactions and are presented over a range of energies. 5 refs., 8 tabs

  2. Exponential Extinction of Nicholson's Blowflies System with Nonlinear Density-Dependent Mortality Terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new generalized Nicholson’s blowflies system with patch structure and nonlinear density-dependent mortality terms. Under appropriate conditions, we establish some criteria to guarantee the exponential extinction of this system. Moreover, we give two examples and numerical simulations to demonstrate our main results.

  3. Time-dependent density-functional theory in the projector augmented-wave method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Michael; Häkkinen, Hannu; Lehtovaara, Lauri

    2008-01-01

    We present the implementation of the time-dependent density-functional theory both in linear-response and in time-propagation formalisms using the projector augmented-wave method in real-space grids. The two technically very different methods are compared in the linear-response regime where we...

  4. Vibrationally resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy with time-dependent density functional based tight binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruger, R.; Niehaus, T.; van Lenthe, E.; Heine, T.; Visscher, L.

    2016-01-01

    We report a time-dependent density functional based tight-binding (TD-DFTB) scheme for the calculation of UV/Vis spectra, explicitly taking into account the excitation of nuclear vibrations via the adiabatic Hessian Franck-Condon method with a harmonic approximation for the nu- clear wavefunction.

  5. Bayesian inference on the effect of density dependence and weather on a guanaco population from Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zubillaga, Maria; Skewes, Oscar; Soto, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that drive population dynamics is fundamental for management of wild populations. The guanaco (Lama guanicoe) is one of two wild camelid species in South America. We evaluated the effects of density dependence and weather variables on population regulation based...

  6. Demonstrating the Temperature Dependence of Density via Construction of a Galilean Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Marie A.; Padgett, Lea W.; Padgett, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    A method for the construction of a Galilean thermometer out of common chemistry glassware is described. Students in a first-semester physical chemistry (thermodynamics) class can construct the Galilean thermometer as an investigation of the thermal expansivity of liquids and the temperature dependence of density. This is an excellent first…

  7. BONE-DENSITY IN NON-INSULIN-DEPENDENT DIABETES-MELLITUS - THE ROTTERDAM STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDAELE, PLA; STOLK, RP; BURGER, H; ALGRA, D; GROBBEE, DE; HOFMAN, A; BIRKENHAGER, JC; POLS, HAP

    1995-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relation between noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and bone mineral density at the lumbar spine and hip. Design: Population-based study with a cross-sectional survey, Setting: A district of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Participants: 5931 residents (2481 men, 3450

  8. Dynamical Analysis of Density-dependent Selection in a Discrete one-island Migration Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Roberds; James F. Selgrade

    2000-01-01

    A system of non-linear difference equations is used to model the effects of density-dependent selection and migration in a population characterized by two alleles at a single gene locus. Results for the existence and stability of polymorphic equilibria are established. Properties for a genetically important class of equilibria associated with complete dominance in...

  9. The ideal free distribution as an evolutionarily stable state in density-dependent population games

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cressman, R.; Křivan, Vlastimil

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 8 (2010), s. 1231-1242 ISSN 0030-1299 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100070601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : density-dependent population games Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.393, year: 2010

  10. Temperature and carrier-density dependence of Auger and radiative recombination in nitride optoelectronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Yan, Qimin; Steiauf, Daniel; Van de Walle, Chris G

    2013-01-01

    Nitride light-emitting diodes are a promising solution for efficient solid-state lighting, but their performance at high power is affected by the efficiency-droop problem. Previous experimental and theoretical work has identified Auger recombination, a three-particle nonradiative carrier recombination mechanism, as the likely cause of the droop. In this work, we use first-principles calculations to elucidate the dependence of the radiative and Auger recombination rates on temperature, carrier density and quantum-well confinement. Our calculated data for the temperature dependence of the recombination coefficients are in good agreement with experiment and provide further validation on the role of Auger recombination in the efficiency reduction. Polarization fields and phase-space filling negatively impact device efficiency because they increase the operating carrier density at a given current density and increase the fraction of carriers lost to Auger recombination. (paper)

  11. Spatially heterogeneous dynamics investigated via a time-dependent four-point density correlation function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacevic, N.; Starr, F. W.; Schrøder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    correlation function g4(r,t) and corresponding "structure factor" S4(q,t) which measure the spatial correlations between the local liquid density at two points in space, each at two different times, and so are sensitive to dynamical heterogeneity. We study g4(r,t) and S4(q,t) via molecular dynamics......Relaxation in supercooled liquids above their glass transition and below the onset temperature of "slow" dynamics involves the correlated motion of neighboring particles. This correlated motion results in the appearance of spatially heterogeneous dynamics or "dynamical heterogeneity." Traditional...... two-point time-dependent density correlation functions, while providing information about the transient "caging" of particles on cooling, are unable to provide sufficiently detailed information about correlated motion and dynamical heterogeneity. Here, we study a four-point, time-dependent density...

  12. Temperature-dependent surface density of alkylthiol monolayers on gold nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuepeng; Lu, Pin; Zhai, Hua; Wu, Yucheng

    2018-03-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to study the surface density of passivating monolayers of alkylthiol chains on gold nanocrystals at temperatures ranging from 1 to 800 K. The results show that the surface density of alkylthiol monolayer reaches a maximum value at near room temperature (200-300 K), while significantly decreases with increasing temperature in the higher temperature region (> 300 {{K}}), and slightly decreases with decreasing temperature at low temperature (< 200 {{K}}). We find that the temperature dependence of surface ligand density in the higher temperature region is attributed to the substantial ligand desorption induced by the thermal fluctuation, while that at low temperature results from the reduction in entropy caused by the change in the ordering of passivating monolayer. These results are expected helpful to understand the temperature-dependent surface coverage of gold nanocrystals.

  13. Time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems interacting with cavity photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokatly, I V

    2013-06-07

    Time-dependent (current) density functional theory for many-electron systems strongly coupled to quantized electromagnetic modes of a microcavity is proposed. It is shown that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic (current) density and the expectation values of photonic coordinates. The Kohn-Sham system is constructed, which allows us to calculate the above basic variables by solving self-consistent equations for noninteracting particles. We suggest possible approximations for the exchange-correlation potentials and discuss implications of this approach for the theory of open quantum systems. In particular we show that it naturally leads to time-dependent density functional theory for systems coupled to the Caldeira-Leggett bath.

  14. Frequency-dependent changes in sensorimotor and pain affective systems induced by empathy for pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Yoshimasa; Ogata, Katsuya; Hoka, Sumio; Tobimatsu, Shozo

    2017-01-01

    Empathy for pain helps us to understand the pain of others indirectly. To better comprehend the processing of empathic pain, we report the frequency-dependent modulation of cortical oscillations induced by watching movies depicting pain using high-density electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG), and motor evoked potentials (MEP). Event-related desynchronization of EEG and MEG was assessed while participants viewed videos of painful (needle) or neutral (cotton swab) situations. The amplitudes of MEPs were also compared between the needle and cotton swab conditions. The degree of suppression in α/β band power was significantly increased, whereas that of γ band power was significantly decreased, in the needle condition compared with the cotton swab condition. EEG revealed that significant differences in α/β band were distributed in the right frontocentral and left parietooccipital regions, whereas significant γ band differences were distributed predominantly over the right hemisphere, which were confirmed by source estimation using MEG. There was a significant positive correlation between the difference in γ power of the two conditions and the visual analog scale subjective rating of aversion, but not in the α/β band. The amplitude of MEPs decreased in the needle condition, which confirmed the inhibition of the primary motor cortex. MEP suppression supports that modulation of cortical oscillations by viewing movies depicting pain involves sensorimotor processing. Our results suggest that α/β oscillations underlie the sensory qualities of others' pain, whereas the γ band reflects the cognitive aspect. Therefore, α/β and γ band oscillations are differentially involved in empathic pain processing under the condition of motor cortical suppression.

  15. Theory of sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of adsorbed molecules using the density matrix method-broadband vibrational sum-frequency generation and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonn, M; Ueba, H; Wolf, M

    2005-01-01

    A generalized theory of frequency- and time-resolved vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy of adsorbates at surfaces is presented using the density matrix formalism. Our theoretical treatment is specifically aimed at addressing issues that accompany the relatively novel SFG approach using broadband infrared pulses. The ultrashort duration of these pulses makes them ideally suited for time-resolved investigations, for which we present a complete theoretical treatment. A second key characteristic of these pulses is their large bandwidth and high intensity, which allow for highly non-linear effects, including vibrational ladder climbing of surface vibrations. We derive general expressions relating the density matrix to SFG spectra, and apply these expressions to specific experimental results by solving the coupled optical Bloch equations of the density matrix elements. Thus, we can theoretically reproduce recent experimentally demonstrated hot band SFG spectra using femtosecond broadband infrared excitation of carbon monoxide (CO) on a Ru(001) surface

  16. Changes in seasonal climate outpace compensatory density-dependence in eastern brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassar, Ronald D.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Nislow, Keith H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how multiple extrinsic (density-independent) factors and intrinsic (density-dependent) mechanisms influence population dynamics has become increasingly urgent in the face of rapidly changing climates. It is particularly unclear how multiple extrinsic factors with contrasting effects among seasons are related to declines in population numbers and changes in mean body size and whether there is a strong role for density-dependence. The primary goal of this study was to identify the roles of seasonal variation in climate driven environmental direct effects (mean stream flow and temperature) versus density-dependence on population size and mean body size in eastern brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). We use data from a 10-year capture-mark-recapture study of eastern brook trout in four streams in Western Massachusetts, USA to parameterize a discrete-time population projection model. The model integrates matrix modeling techniques used to characterize discrete population structures (age, habitat type and season) with integral projection models (IPMs) that characterize demographic rates as continuous functions of organismal traits (in this case body size). Using both stochastic and deterministic analyses we show that decreases in population size are due to changes in stream flow and temperature and that these changes are larger than what can be compensated for through density-dependent responses. We also show that the declines are due mostly to increasing mean stream temperatures decreasing the survival of the youngest age class. In contrast, increases in mean body size over the same period are the result of indirect changes in density with a lesser direct role of climate-driven environmental change.

  17. Density Dependence of Particle Transport in ECH Plasmas of the TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, V. I.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Guasp, J.; Herranz, J.; Estrada, T.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.A.; Velasco, J.L.; Reynolds, J.M.; Ferreira, J.A.; Tafalla, D.; Castejon, F.; Salas, A.

    2009-05-21

    We present the experimental dependence of particle transport on average density in electron cyclotron heated (ECH) hydrogen plasmas of the TJ-II stellarator. The results are based on: (I) electron density and temperature data from Thomson Scattering and reflectometry diagnostics; (II) a transport model that reproduces the particle density profiles in steady state; and (III) Eirene, a code for neutrals transport that calculates the particle source in the plasma from the particle confinement time and the appropriate geometry of the machine/plasma. After estimating an effective particle diffusivity and the particle confinement time, a threshold density separating qualitatively and quantitatively different plasma transport regimes is found. The poor confinement times found below the threshold are coincident with the presence of ECH-induced fast electron losses and a positive radial electric field all over the plasma. (Author) 40 refs.

  18. Is contextual-potentiated eating dependent on caloric density of food?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Fernández-Aranda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One experiment tested whether a specific context could elicit eating in rats as a result of Pavlovian conditioning and whether this effect depended on the caloric density of food. Thirty two deprived rats experienced two contexts. They had access to food in context A, but no food was available in context B. During conditioning, half of the animals received high density caloric food (HD groups whereas the other half, low density caloric food (LD groups. Then, half of the rats in each type of food group was tested in context A and the other half in context B. The results demonstrated an effect of context conditioning only in HD groups. These findings suggest the relevance of both contextual conditioning and caloric density of food in eating behaviour. Implications for the aetiology of binge eating will be discussed.

  19. Frequency dependence of quantum path interference in non-collinear high-order harmonic generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Shi-Yang; He Xin-Kui; Teng Hao; Ye Peng; Wang Li-Feng; He Peng; Wei Zhi-Yi

    2016-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) driven by two non-collinear beams including a fundamental and its weak second harmonic is numerically studied. The interference of harmonics from adjacent electron quantum paths is found to be dependent on the relative delay of the driving pulse, and the dependences are different for different harmonic orders. This frequency dependence of the interference is attributed to the spatial frequency chirp in the HHG beam resulting from the harmonic dipole phase, which in turn provides a potential way to gain an insight into the generation of high-order harmonics. As an example, the intensity dependent dipole phase coefficient α is retrieved from the interference fringe. (paper)

  20. On Strong Positive Frequency Dependencies of Quality Factors in Local-Earthquake Seismic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Igor B.; Jhajhria, Atul; Deng, Wubing

    2018-03-01

    Many observations of seismic waves from local earthquakes are interpreted in terms of the frequency-dependent quality factor Q( f ) = Q0 f^{η } , where η is often close to or exceeds one. However, such steep positive frequency dependencies of Q require careful analysis with regard to their physical consistency. In particular, the case of η = 1 corresponds to frequency-independent (elastic) amplitude decays with time and consequently requires no Q-type attenuation mechanisms. For η > 1, several problems with physical meanings of such Q-factors occur. First, contrary to the key premise of seismic attenuation, high-frequency parts of the wavefield are enhanced with increasing propagation times relative to the low-frequency ones. Second, such attenuation cannot be implemented by mechanical models of wave-propagating media. Third, with η > 1, the velocity dispersion associated with such Q(f) occurs over unrealistically short frequency range and has an unexpected oscillatory shape. Cases η = 1 and η > 1 are usually attributed to scattering; however, this scattering must exhibit fortuitous tuning into the observation frequency band, which appears unlikely. The reason for the above problems is that the inferred Q values are affected by the conventional single-station measurement procedure. Both parameters Q 0 and are apparent, i.e., dependent on the selected parameterization and inversion method, and they should not be directly attributed to the subsurface. For η ≈ 1, parameter Q 0 actually describes the frequency-independent amplitude decay in access of some assumed geometric spreading t -α , where α is usually taken equal one. The case η > 1 is not allowed physically and could serve as an indicator of problematic interpretations. Although the case 0 < η < 1 is possible, its parameters Q 0 and may also be biased by the measurement procedure. To avoid such difficulties of Q-based approaches, we recommend measuring and interpreting the amplitude-decay rates

  1. Visuomotor Entrainment and the Frequency-Dependent Response of Walking Balance to Perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Jason R; Francis, Carrie; Allen, Matt; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-08-26

    Visuomotor entrainment, or the synchronization of motor responses to visual stimuli, is a naturally emergent phenomenon in human standing. Our purpose was to investigate the prevalence and resolution of visuomotor entrainment in walking and the frequency-dependent response of walking balance to perturbations. We used a virtual reality environment to manipulate optical flow in ten healthy young adults during treadmill walking. A motion capture system recorded trunk, sacrum, and heel marker trajectories during a series of 3-min conditions in which we perturbed a virtual hallway mediolaterally with systematic changes in the driving frequencies of perceived motion. We quantified visuomotor entrainment using spectral analyses and balance deficits using trunk sway, gait variability, and detrended fluctuation analyses (DFA). ML kinematics were highly sensitive to visual perturbations, and instinctively synchronized (i.e., entrained) to a broad range of driving frequencies of perceived ML motion. However, the influence of visual perturbations on metrics of walking balance was frequency-dependent and governed by their proximity to stride frequency. Specifically, we found that a driving frequency nearest to subjects' average stride frequency uniquely compromised trunk sway, gait variability, and step-to-step correlations. We conclude that visuomotor entrainment is a robust and naturally emerging phenomenon during human walking, involving coordinated and frequency-dependent adjustments in trunk sway and foot placement to maintain balance at the whole-body level. These findings provide mechanistic insight into how the visuomotor control of walking balance is disrupted by visual perturbations and important reference values for the emergence of balance deficits due to age, injury, or disease.

  2. Numerical Study of Frequency-dependent Seismoelectric Coupling in Partially-saturated Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djuraev Ulugbek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The seismoelectric phenomenon associated with propagation of seismic waves in fluid-saturated porous media has been studied for many decades. The method has a great potential to monitor subsurface fluid saturation changes associated with production of hydrocarbons. Frequency of the seismic source has a significant impact on measurement of the seismoelectric effects. In this paper, the effects of seismic wave frequency and water saturation on the seismoelectric response of a partially-saturated porous media is studied numerically. The conversion of seismic wave to electromagnetic wave was modelled by extending the theoretically developed seismoelectric coupling coefficient equation. We assumed constant values of pore radius and zeta-potential of 80 micrometers and 48 microvolts, respectively. Our calculations of the coupling coefficient were conducted at various water saturation values in the frequency range of 10 kHz to 150 kHz. The results show that the seismoelectric coupling is frequency-dependent and decreases exponentially when frequency increases. Similar trend is seen when water saturation is varied at different frequencies. However, when water saturation is less than about 0.6, the effect of frequency is significant. On the other hand, when the water saturation is greater than 0.6, the coupling coefficient shows monotonous trend when water saturation is increased at constant frequency.

  3. Dependence of the colored frequency noise in spin torque oscillators on current and magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Anders; Bonetti, Stefano; Sani, Sohrab R.; Majid Mohseni, S.; Persson, Johan; Chung, Sunjae; Amir Hossein Banuazizi, S.; Iacocca, Ezio; Östling, Mikael; Åkerman, Johan; Gunnar Malm, B.

    2014-03-01

    The nano-scale spin torque oscillator (STO) is a compelling device for on-chip, highly tunable microwave frequency signal generation. Currently, one of the most important challenges for the STO is to increase its longer-time frequency stability by decreasing the 1/f frequency noise, but its high level makes even its measurement impossible using the phase noise mode of spectrum analyzers. Here, we present a custom made time-domain measurement system with 150 MHz measurement bandwidth making possible the investigation of the variation of the 1/f as well as the white frequency noise in a STO over a large set of operating points covering 18-25 GHz. The 1/f level is found to be highly dependent on the oscillation amplitude-frequency non-linearity and the vicinity of unexcited oscillation modes. These findings elucidate the need for a quantitative theoretical treatment of the low-frequency, colored frequency noise in STOs. Based on the results, we suggest that the 1/f frequency noise possibly can be decreased by improving the microstructural quality of the metallic thin films.

  4. Dependence of the colored frequency noise in spin torque oscillators on current and magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, Anders; Sani, Sohrab R.; Chung, Sunjae; Amir Hossein Banuazizi, S.; Östling, Mikael; Gunnar Malm, B.; Bonetti, Stefano; Majid Mohseni, S.; Persson, Johan; Iacocca, Ezio; Åkerman, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The nano-scale spin torque oscillator (STO) is a compelling device for on-chip, highly tunable microwave frequency signal generation. Currently, one of the most important challenges for the STO is to increase its longer-time frequency stability by decreasing the 1/f frequency noise, but its high level makes even its measurement impossible using the phase noise mode of spectrum analyzers. Here, we present a custom made time-domain measurement system with 150 MHz measurement bandwidth making possible the investigation of the variation of the 1/f as well as the white frequency noise in a STO over a large set of operating points covering 18–25 GHz. The 1/f level is found to be highly dependent on the oscillation amplitude-frequency non-linearity and the vicinity of unexcited oscillation modes. These findings elucidate the need for a quantitative theoretical treatment of the low-frequency, colored frequency noise in STOs. Based on the results, we suggest that the 1/f frequency noise possibly can be decreased by improving the microstructural quality of the metallic thin films

  5. Knock-on type exchange and the density dependence of an effective interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeukenne, J.P.; Mahaux, C.

    1981-01-01

    We investigate the origin of the density-dependence of the strength of an effective interaction previously derived from a Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculation of the optical-model potential in nuclear matter. From the analysis of a model based on the Hartree-Fock approximation and on a Yukawa interaction with a Majorana exchange component, we study to what extent this dependence derives from the momentum-dependence of the exchange contribution of the knock-on type. The model is also used to discuss zero-range pseudopotential methods for including this knock-on contribution. (orig.)

  6. Optimization of human corneal endothelial cell culture: density dependency of successful cultures in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peh, Gary S L; Toh, Kah-Peng; Ang, Heng-Pei; Seah, Xin-Yi; George, Benjamin L; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2013-05-03

    Global shortage of donor corneas greatly restricts the numbers of corneal transplantations performed yearly. Limited ex vivo expansion of primary human corneal endothelial cells is possible, and a considerable clinical interest exists for development of tissue-engineered constructs using cultivated corneal endothelial cells. The objective of this study was to investigate the density-dependent growth of human corneal endothelial cells isolated from paired donor corneas and to elucidate an optimal seeding density for their extended expansion in vitro whilst maintaining their unique cellular morphology. Established primary human corneal endothelial cells were propagated to the second passage (P2) before they were utilized for this study. Confluent P2 cells were dissociated and seeded at four seeding densities: 2,500 cells per cm2 ('LOW'); 5,000 cells per cm2 ('MID'); 10,000 cells per cm2 ('HIGH'); and 20,000 cells per cm2 ('HIGH(×2)'), and subsequently analyzed for their propensity to proliferate. They were also subjected to morphometric analyses comparing cell sizes, coefficient of variance, as well as cell circularity when each culture became confluent. At the two lower densities, proliferation rates were higher than cells seeded at higher densities, though not statistically significant. However, corneal endothelial cells seeded at lower densities were significantly larger in size, heterogeneous in shape and less circular (fibroblastic-like), and remained hypertrophic after one month in culture. Comparatively, cells seeded at higher densities were significantly homogeneous, compact and circular at confluence. Potentially, at an optimal seeding density of 10,000 cells per cm2, it is possible to obtain between 10 million to 25 million cells at the third passage. More importantly, these expanded human corneal endothelial cells retained their unique cellular morphology. Our results demonstrated a density dependency in the culture of primary human corneal endothelial

  7. GENERAL APROACH TO MODELING NONLINEAR AMPLITUDE AND FREQUENCY DEPENDENT HYSTERESIS EFFECTS BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Heine; Markus Plagemann

    2014-01-01

    A detailed description of the rubber parts’ properties is gaining in importance in the current simulation models of multi-body simulation. One application example is a multi-body simulation of the washing machine movement. Inside the washing machine, there are different force transmission elements, which consist completely or partly of rubber. Rubber parts or, generally, elastomers usually have amplitude-dependant and frequency-dependent force transmission properties. Rheological models are u...

  8. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for functionals of the time-dependent nuclide density field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.L.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1978-04-01

    An approach to extend the present ORNL sensitivity program to include functionals of the time-dependent nuclide density field is developed. An adjoint equation for the nuclide field was derived previously by using generalized perturbation theory; the present derivation makes use of a variational principle and results in the same equation. The physical significance of this equation is discussed and compared to that of the time-dependent neutron adjoint equation. Computational requirements for determining sensitivity profiles and uncertainties for functionals of the time-dependent nuclide density vector are developed within the framework of the existing FORSS system; in this way the current capability is significantly extended. The development, testing, and use of an adjoint version of the ORIGEN isotope generation and depletion code are documented. Finally, a sample calculation is given which estimates the uncertainty in the plutonium inventory at shutdown of a PWR due to assumed uncertainties in uranium and plutonium cross sections. 8 figures, 4 tables

  9. Time dependent density functional theory of light absorption in dense plasmas: application to iron-plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimaldi, F.; Grimaldi-Lecourt, A.; Dharma-Wardana, M.W.C.

    1986-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a simple time-dependent calculation of the light absorption cross section for a strongly coupled partially degenerate plasma so as to transcend the usual single-particle picture. This is achieved within the density functional theory (DFT) of plasmas by generalizing the method given by Zangwill and Soven for atomic calculations at zero temperature. The essential feature of the time dependent DFT is the correct treatment of the relaxation of the system under the external field. Exploratory calculations for a Fe-plasma at 100 eV show new features in the absorption cross section which are absent in the usual single particle theory. These arise from inter-shell correlations, channel mixing and self-energy effects. These many-body effects introduce significant modifications to the radiative properties of plasmas and are shown to be efficiently calculable by time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT)

  10. Time dependent density functional theory of light absorption in dense plasmas: application to iron-plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimaldi, F.; Grimaldi-Lecourt, A.; Dharma-Wardana, M.W.C.

    1985-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a simple time-dependent calculation of the light absorption cross section for a strongly coupled partially degenerate plasma so as to transcend the usual single-particle picture. This is achieved within the density functional theory (DFT) of plasmas by generalizing the method given by Zangwill and Soven for atomic calculations at zero temperature. The essential feature of the time dependent DFT is the correct treatment of the relaxation of the system under the external field. Exploratory calculations for an Fe-plasma at 100 eV show new features in the absorption cross section which are absent in the usual single particle theory. These arise from inter-shell correlations, channel mixing and self-energy effects. These many-body effects introduce significant modifications to the radiative properties of plasma and are shown to be efficiently calculable by time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT)

  11. The impacts of marijuana dispensary density and neighborhood ecology on marijuana abuse and dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Christina; Freisthler, Bridget; Ponicki, William R.; Gaidus, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background As an increasing number of states liberalize cannabis use and develop laws and local policies, it is essential to better understand the impacts of neighborhood ecology and marijuana dispensary density on marijuana use, abuse, and dependence. We investigated associations between marijuana abuse/dependence hospitalizations and community demographic and environmental conditions from 2001–2012 in California, as well as cross-sectional associations between local and adjacent marijuana dispensary densities and marijuana hospitalizations. Methods We analyzed panel population data relating hospitalizations coded for marijuana abuse or dependence and assigned to residential ZIP codes in California from 2001 through 2012 (20,219 space-time units) to ZIP code demographic and ecological characteristics. Bayesian space-time misalignment models were used to account for spatial variations in geographic unit definitions over time, while also accounting for spatial autocorrelation using conditional autoregressive priors. We also analyzed cross-sectional associations between marijuana abuse/dependence and the density of dispensaries in local and spatially adjacent ZIP codes in 2012. Results An additional one dispensary per square mile in a ZIP code was cross-sectionally associated with a 6.8% increase in the number of marijuana hospitalizations (95% credible interval 1.033, 1.105) with a marijuana abuse/dependence code. Other local characteristics, such as the median household income and age and racial/ethnic distributions, were associated with marijuana hospitalizations in cross-sectional and panel analyses. Conclusions Prevention and intervention programs for marijuana abuse and dependence may be particularly essential in areas of concentrated disadvantage. Policy makers may want to consider regulations that limit the density of dispensaries. PMID:26154479

  12. Low-frequency (0.7-7.4 mHz geomagnetic field fluctuations at high latitude: frequency dependence of the polarization pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cafarella

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A statistical analysis of the polarization pattern of low-frequency geomagnetic field fluctuations (0.7-7.4 mHz covering the entire 24-h interval was performed at the Antarctic station Terra Nova Bay (80.0°S geomagnetic latitude throughout 1997 and 1998. The results show that the polarization pattern exhibits a frequency dependence, as can be expected from the frequency dependence of the latitude where the coupling between the magnetospheric compressional mode and the field line resonance takes place. The polarization analysis of single pulsation events shows that wave packets with different polarization sense, depending on frequency, can be simultaneously observed.

  13. The role of age, gender, mood states and exercise frequency on exercise dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sebastiano; Hausenblas, Heather A; Oliva, Patrizia; Cuzzocrea, Francesca; Larcan, Rosalba

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of our study was to explore the prevalence, and the role of mood, exercise frequency, age, and gender differences of exercise dependence. Regular exercisers (N = 409) completed a socio-demographic questionnaire, the Exercise Dependence Scale, and the Profile of Mood States. For data analyses, the participants were stratified for sex and age (age ranges = young adults: 18-24 years, adults: 25-44 years, and middle-aged adults: 45-64 years). We found that: (a) 4.4% of the participants were classified as at-risk for exercise dependence; (b) the men and the two younger groups (i.e., young adults and adults) had higher exercise dependence scores; and (c) age, gender, exercise frequency, and mood state were related to exercise dependence. Our results support previous research on the prevalence of exercise dependence and reveal that adulthood may be the critical age for developing exercise dependence. These findings have practical implication for identifying individuals at-risk for exercise dependence symptoms, and may aid in targeting and guiding the implementation of prevention program for adults.

  14. Negative frequency-dependent selection between Pasteuria penetrans and its host Meloidogyne arenaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    In negative frequency-dependant selection (NFDS), parasite genotypes capable of infecting the numerically dominant host genotype are favored, while host genotypes resistant to the dominant parasite genotype are favored, creating a cyclical pattern of resistant genotypes in the host population and, a...

  15. On the frequency dependence of the magnetic permeability of FeHfO thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, P.J.H.; Rulkens, B.

    1998-01-01

    The frequency dependence of the magnetic permeability as well as of the electrical impedance have been investigated for soft-magnetic granular FeHfO thin films. The impedance measurements indicate that capacitive effects resulting from the inhomogeneous structure of the layers are of no importance

  16. Ecological genetics of the Bromus tectorum (Poaceae) - Ustilago Bullata (Ustilaginaceae): A role for frequency dependent selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan E. Meyer; David L. Nelson; Suzette Clement; Alisa Ramakrishnan

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary processes that maintain genetic diversity in plants are likely to include selection imposed by pathogens. Negative frequency-dependent selection is a mechanism for maintenance of resistance polymorphism in plant - pathogen interactions. We explored whether such selection operates in the Bromus tectorum - Ustilago bullata pathosystem. Gene-for-gene...

  17. Frequency dependence of anomalous transport in field theory and holography⋆,⋆⋆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megías Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the frequency dependence of anomalous transport coefficients for a relativistic gas of free chiral fermions and for a strongly coupled conformal field theory with holographic dual. We perform the computation by using the Kubo formulae for- malism, and compare with a hydrodynamic calculation of two point functions. Some implications for heavy ion physics are discussed.

  18. An analysis of boundary-effects in obtaining the frequency dependent specific heat by effusivity measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tage Emil; Behrens, Claus

    The frequency dependent specific heat is a significant response function characterizing the glass transition. Contrary to the dielectric response it is not easily measured over many decades. The introduction of the 3-omega method, where the temperature oscillations at a planar oscillatoric heat g...

  19. How to include frequency dependent complex permeability Into SPICE models to improve EMI filters design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixdenier, Fabien; Yade, Ousseynou; Martin, Christian; Bréard, Arnaud; Vollaire, Christian

    2018-05-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) filters design is a rather difficult task where engineers have to choose adequate magnetic materials, design the magnetic circuit and choose the size and number of turns. The final design must achieve the attenuation requirements (constraints) and has to be as compact as possible (goal). Alternating current (AC) analysis is a powerful tool to predict global impedance or attenuation of any filter. However, AC analysis are generally performed without taking into account the frequency-dependent complex permeability behaviour of soft magnetic materials. That's why, we developed two frequency-dependent complex permeability models able to be included into SPICE models. After an identification process, the performances of each model are compared to measurements made on a realistic EMI filter prototype in common mode (CM) and differential mode (DM) to see the benefit of the approach. Simulation results are in good agreement with the measured ones especially in the middle frequency range.

  20. Quorum sensing and density-dependent dispersal in an aquatic model system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Fellous

    Full Text Available Many organisms use cues to decide whether to disperse or not, especially those related to the composition of their environment. Dispersal hence sometimes depends on population density, which can be important for the dynamics and evolution of sub-divided populations. But very little is known about the factors that organisms use to inform their dispersal decision. We investigated the cues underlying density-dependent dispersal in inter-connected microcosms of the freshwater protozoan Paramecium caudatum. In two experiments, we manipulated (i the number of cells per microcosm and (ii the origin of their culture medium (supernatant from high- or low-density populations. We found a negative relationship between population density and rates of dispersal, suggesting the use of physical cues. There was no significant effect of culture medium origin on dispersal and thus no support for chemical cues usage. These results suggest that the perception of density - and as a result, the decision to disperse - in this organism can be based on physical factors. This type of quorum sensing may be an adaptation optimizing small scale monitoring of the environment and swarm formation in open water.

  1. Detection of density-dependent effects on caribou numbers from a series of census data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Messier

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to review and discuss the applicability of statistical procedures for the detection of density dependence based on a series of annual or multi-annual censuses. Regression models for which the statistic value under the null hypothesis of density independence is set a priori (slope = 0 or 1, generate spurious indications of density dependence. These tests are inappropriate because low sample sizes, high variance, and sampling error consistently bias the slope when applied to a finite number of population estimates. Two distribution-free tests are reviewed for which the rejection region for the hypothesis of density independence is derived intrinsically from the data through a computer-assisted permutation process. The "randomization test" gives the best results as the presence of a pronounced trend in the sequence of population estimates does not affect test results. The other non-parametric test, the "permutation test", gives reliable results only if the population fluctuates around a long-term equilibrium density. Both procedures are applied to three sets of data (Pukaskwa herd, Avalon herd, and a hypothetical example that represent quite divergent population trajectories over time.

  2. Density dependence of SOL power width in ASDEX upgrade L-Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sieglin

    2017-08-01

    A recent study [4] with an open divertor configuration found an asymmetry of the power fall-off length between inner and outer target with a smaller power fall-off length λq,i on the inner divertor target. Measurements with a closed divertor configuration find a similar asymmetry for low recycling divertor conditions. It is found, in the experiment, that the in/out asymmetry λq,i/λq,o is strongly increasing with increasing density. Most notably the heat flux density at the inner divertor target is reducing with increasing λq,i whilst the total power onto each divertor target stays constant. It is found that λq,o exhibits no significant density dependence for hydrogen and deuterium but increases with about the square root of the electron density for helium. The difference between H,D and He could be due to the different recycling behaviour in the divertor. These findings may help current modelling attempts to parametrize the density dependence of the widening of the power channel and thus allow for detailed comparison to both divertor effects like recycling or increased upstream SOL cross field transport.

  3. Investigation of scaling laws in frequency-dependent minor hysteresis loops for ferromagnetic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, S.; Tsukidate, S.; Kamada, Y.; Kikuchi, H.; Ohtani, T.

    2012-01-01

    Scaling laws in dynamical magnetic minor hysteresis loops have been investigated in the magnetizing frequency range of 0.05-300 Hz for various steels including Cr-Mo-V steel subjected to creep, cold rolled steels, and plastically deformed Ni. Although scaling laws in the medium magnetization range found previously fail in the high magnetization frequency regime owing to a significant contribution of eddy currents, a scaling power law of the relation between remanence and remanence work of minor loops, associated with a constant exponent of approximately 1.9, holds true in a very low magnetization regime, irrespective of magnetization frequency and investigated materials. The coefficient of the law is proportionally related to Vickers hardness over the wide frequency range. These observations demonstrate that the scaling analysis of dynamical minor loops enables us to evaluate materials degradation in a short measurement time with low measurement field and high sensitivity to defect density. - Highlights: → We performed hysteresis scaling for dynamical minor loops in ferromagnetic steels. → An universal scaling power law with an exponent of 1.9 was observed. → Coefficient of the scaling law reflects defect density due to creep and deformation. → This method is useful for on-line non-destructive evaluation.

  4. Input-dependent frequency modulation of cortical gamma oscillations shapes spatial synchronization and enables phase coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark; Hadjipapas, Avgis; Peter, Alina; van der Eerden, Jan; De Weerd, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Fine-scale temporal organization of cortical activity in the gamma range (∼25-80Hz) may play a significant role in information processing, for example by neural grouping ('binding') and phase coding. Recent experimental studies have shown that the precise frequency of gamma oscillations varies with input drive (e.g. visual contrast) and that it can differ among nearby cortical locations. This has challenged theories assuming widespread gamma synchronization at a fixed common frequency. In the present study, we investigated which principles govern gamma synchronization in the presence of input-dependent frequency modulations and whether they are detrimental for meaningful input-dependent gamma-mediated temporal organization. To this aim, we constructed a biophysically realistic excitatory-inhibitory network able to express different oscillation frequencies at nearby spatial locations. Similarly to cortical networks, the model was topographically organized with spatially local connectivity and spatially-varying input drive. We analyzed gamma synchronization with respect to phase-locking, phase-relations and frequency differences, and quantified the stimulus-related information represented by gamma phase and frequency. By stepwise simplification of our models, we found that the gamma-mediated temporal organization could be reduced to basic synchronization principles of weakly coupled oscillators, where input drive determines the intrinsic (natural) frequency of oscillators. The gamma phase-locking, the precise phase relation and the emergent (measurable) frequencies were determined by two principal factors: the detuning (intrinsic frequency difference, i.e. local input difference) and the coupling strength. In addition to frequency coding, gamma phase contained complementary stimulus information. Crucially, the phase code reflected input differences, but not the absolute input level. This property of relative input-to-phase conversion, contrasting with latency codes

  5. A Holling Type II Pest and Natural Enemy Model with Density Dependent IPM Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resource limitations and density dependent releasing of natural enemies during the pest control and integrated pest management will undoubtedly result in nonlinear impulsive control. In order to investigate the effects of those nonlinear control strategies on the successful pest control, we have proposed a pest-natural enemy system concerning integrated pest management with density dependent instant killing rate and releasing rate. In particular, the releasing rate depicts how the number of natural enemy populations released was guided by their current density at the fixed moment. The threshold condition which ensures the existence and global stability of pest-free periodic solution has been discussed first, and the effects of key parameters on the threshold condition reveal that reducing the pulse period does not always benefit pest control; that is, frequent releasing of natural enemies may not be beneficial to the eradication of pests when the density dependent releasing method has been implemented. Moreover, the forward and backward bifurcations could occur once the pest-free periodic solution becomes unstable, and the system could exist with very complex dynamics. All those results confirm that the control actions should be carefully designed once the nonlinear impulsive control measures have been taken for pest management.

  6. A consumer-resource approach to the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L

    2010-05-01

    Like predation and competition, mutualism is now recognized as a consumer-resource (C-R) interaction, including, in particular, bi-directional (e.g., coral, plant-mycorrhizae) and uni-directional (e.g., ant-plant defense, plant-pollinator) C-R mutualisms. Here, we develop general theory for the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism based on the C-R mechanism of interspecific interaction. To test the influence of C-R interactions on the dynamics and stability of bi- and uni-directional C-R mutualisms, we developed simple models that link consumer functional response of one mutualistic species with the resources supplied by another. Phase-plane analyses show that the ecological dynamics of C-R mutualisms are stable in general. Most transient behavior leads to an equilibrium of mutualistic coexistence, at which both species densities are greater than in the absence of interactions. However, due to the basic nature of C-R interactions, certain density-dependent conditions can lead to C-R dynamics characteristic of predator-prey interactions, in which one species overexploits and causes the other to go extinct. Consistent with empirical phenomena, these results suggest that the C-R interaction can provide a broad mechanism for understanding density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism. By unifying predation, competition, and mutualism under the common ecological framework of consumer-resource theory, we may also gain a better understanding of the universal features of interspecific interactions in general.

  7. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajaj, Sanyam, E-mail: bajaj.10@osu.edu; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M. [Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, Andover, Massachusetts 01810 (United States); Khurgin, Jacob [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  8. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10 7  cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10 11  cm −2 . An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs

  9. A consumer-resource approach to the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2010-01-01

    Like predation and competition, mutualism is now recognized as a consumer resource (C-R) interaction, including, in particular, bi-directional (e.g., coral, plant- mycorrhizae) and uni-directional (e.g., ant-plant defense, plant-pollinator) C-R mutualisms. Here, we develop general theory for the density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism based on the C-R mechanism of interspecific interaction. To test the influence of C-R interactions on the dynamics and stability of bi- and uni-directional C-R mutualisms, we developed simple models that link consumer functional response of one mutualistic species with the resources supplied by another. Phase-plane analyses show that the ecological dynamics of C-R mutualisms are stable in general. Most transient behavior leads to an equilibrium of mutualistic coexistence, at which both species densities are greater than in the absence of interactions. However, due to the basic nature of C-R interactions, certain density-dependent conditions can lead to C-R dynamics characteristic of predator-prey interactions, in which one species overexploits and causes the other to go extinct. Consistent with empirical phenomena, these results suggest that the C-R interaction can provide a broad mechanism for understanding density-dependent population dynamics of mutualism. By unifying predation, competition, and mutualism under the common ecological framework of consumer-resource theory, we may also gain a better understanding of the universal features of interspecific interactions in general.

  10. Dispersal, density dependence, and population dynamics of a fungal microbe on leaf surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Scott T; Ives, Anthony R; Nordheim, Erik V; Andrews, John H

    2007-06-01

    Despite the ubiquity and importance of microbes in nature, little is known about their natural population dynamics, especially for those that occupy terrestrial habitats. Here we investigate the dynamics of the yeast-like fungus Aureobasidium pullulans (Ap) on apple leaves in an orchard. We asked three questions. (1) Is variation in fungal population density among leaves caused by variation in leaf carrying capacities and strong density-dependent population growth that maintains densities near carrying capacity? (2) Do resident populations have competitive advantages over immigrant cells? (3) Do Ap dynamics differ at different times during the growing season? To address these questions, we performed two experiments at different times in the growing season. Both experiments used a 2 x 2 factorial design: treatment 1 removed fungal cells from leaves to reveal density-dependent population growth, and treatment 2 inoculated leaves with an Ap strain engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP), which made it possible to track the fate of immigrant cells. The experiments showed that natural populations of Ap vary greatly in density due to sustained differences in carrying capacities among leaves. The maintenance of populations close to carrying capacities indicates strong density-dependent processes. Furthermore, resident populations are strongly competitive against immigrants, while immigrants have little impact on residents. Finally, statistical models showed high population growth rates of resident cells in one experiment but not in the other, suggesting that Ap experiences relatively "good" and "bad" periods for population growth. This picture of Ap dynamics conforms to commonly held, but rarely demonstrated, expectations of microbe dynamics in nature. It also highlights the importance of local processes, as opposed to immigration, in determining the abundance and dynamics of microbes on surfaces in terrestrial systems.

  11. Staurosporine Inhibits Frequency-Dependent Myofilament Desensitization in Intact Rabbit Cardiac Trabeculae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth D. Varian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofilament calcium sensitivity decreases with frequency in intact healthy rabbit trabeculae and associates with Troponin I and Myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation. We here tested whether serine-threonine kinase activity is primarily responsible for this frequency-dependent modulations of myofilament calcium sensitivity. Right ventricular trabeculae were isolated from New Zealand White rabbit hearts and iontophoretically loaded with bis-fura-2. Twitch force-calcium relationships and steady state force-calcium relationships were measured at frequencies of 1 and 4 Hz at 37 °C. Staurosporine (100 nM, a nonspecific serine-threonine kinase inhibitor, or vehicle (DMSO was included in the superfusion solution before and during the contractures. Staurosporine had no frequency-dependent effect on force development, kinetics, calcium transient amplitude, or rate of calcium transient decline. The shift in the pCa50 of the force-calcium relationship was significant from 6.05±0.04 at 1 Hz versus 5.88±0.06 at 4 Hz under control conditions (vehicle, P<0.001 but not in presence of staurosporine (5.89±0.08 at 1 Hz versus 5.94±0.07 at 4 Hz, P=NS. Phosphoprotein analysis (Pro-Q Diamond stain confirmed that staurosporine significantly blunted the frequency-dependent phosphorylation at Troponin I and Myosin light chain-2. We conclude that frequency-dependent modulation of calcium sensitivity is mediated through a kinase-specific effect involving phosphorylation of myofilament proteins.

  12. Modeling of frequency-dependent negative differential capacitance in InGaAs/InP photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yidong; Chen, Jun; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xiangyang

    2018-03-01

    The negative differential capacitance (NDC) of p-i-n InGaAs/InP photodetector has been clearly observed, and the small signal model of frequency-dependent NDC is established, based on the accumulation and emission of electrons at the p-InP/i-InGaAs interface. The NDC phenomenon is contributed by the additional capacitance (CT), which is caused by the charging-discharging process in the p-InP/i-InGaAs interface. It is found that the NDC becomes more obvious with decreasing frequency, which is consistent with the conclusion of the experiment. It is proved that the probability of electron capture/escape in the p-i interface is affected by frequency. Therefore, the smaller frequency applied, the higher additional capacitance is obtained.

  13. Isotope effect with energy-dependent density of states and impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.J.; Carbotte, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    We have calculated the total isotope coefficient β in a model where there is energy-dependent structure in the electronic density of states. We model the structure with a simple Lorentzian. In our calculation, doping has the effect of shifting the Fermi level and broadening the structure in the density of states. We have treated the dopants both as normal and as magnetic impurities. The asymmetry observed in the experimental data is found in our results. However, the complete range of values observed is difficult to reproduce. We question also whether the shifts in Fermi level required in such models are reasonable

  14. Excitation dependence of resonance line self-broadening at different atomic densities

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hebin; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2009-01-01

    We study the dipole-dipole spectral broadening of a resonance line at high atomic densities when the self-broadening dominates. The selective reflection spectrum of a weak probe beam from the interface of the cell window and rubidium vapor are recorded in the presence of a far-detuned pump beam. The excitation due to the pump reduces the self-broadening. We found that the self-broadening reduction dependence on the pump power is atomic density independent. These results provide experimental e...

  15. Dependence of inhomogeneous vibrational linewidth broadening on attractive forces from local liquid number densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, S.M.; Harris, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    The dependence of inhomogeneous vibrational linewidth broadening on attractive forces form slowly varying local liquid number densities is examined. The recently developed Schweizer--Chandler theory of vibrational dephasing is used to compute absolute inhomogeneous broadening linewidths. The computed linewidths are compared to measured inhomogeneous broadening linewidths determined using picosecond vibrational dephasing experiments. There is a similarity between correlations of the Schweizer--Chandler and George--Auweter--Harris predicted inhomogeneous broadening linewidths and the measured inhomogeneous broadening linewidths. For the methyl stretches under investigation, this correspondence suggests that the width of the number density distribution in the liquid determines the relative inhomogeneous broadening magnitudes

  16. Multi-configuration time-dependent density-functional theory based on range separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fromager, E.; Knecht, S.; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    Multi-configuration range-separated density-functional theory is extended to the time-dependent regime. An exact variational formulation is derived. The approximation, which consists in combining a long-range Multi-Configuration- Self-Consistent Field (MCSCF) treatment with an adiabatic short...... (srGGA) approximations. As expected, when modeling long-range interactions with the MCSCF model instead of the adiabatic Buijse-Baerends density-matrix functional as recently proposed by Pernal [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 184105 (2012)10.1063/1.4712019], the description of both the 1D doubly-excited state...

  17. Temperature- and density-dependent x-ray scattering in a low-Z plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.T.

    1976-06-01

    A computer program is described which calculates temperature- and density-dependent differential and total coherent and incoherent x-ray scattering cross sections for a low-Z scattering medium. Temperature and density are arbitrary within the limitations of the validity of local thermodynamic equilbrium, since ionic populations are calculated under this assumption. Scattering cross sections are calculated in the form factor approximation. The scattering medium may consist of any mixure of elements with Z less than or equal to 8, with this limitation imposed by the availability of atomic data

  18. Frequency-dependent transient response of an oscillating electrically actuated droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dash, S; Kumari, N; Garimella, S V

    2012-01-01

    The transient response of a millimeter-sized sessile droplet under electrical actuation is experimentally investigated. Under dc actuation, the droplet spreading rate increases as the applied voltage is increased due to the higher electrical forces induced. At sufficiently high dc voltages, competition between the electrical actuation force, droplet inertia, the retarding surface tension force and contact line friction leads to droplet oscillation. The timescale for the droplet to attain its maximum wetted diameter during step actuation is analyzed. Systematic experiments are conducted over a frequency range of 5–200 Hz and actuation voltages of 40–80 V rms to determine the dependence of droplet oscillation on these parameters. The response of the droplet to different actuation frequencies and voltages is determined in terms of its contact angle and contact radius variation. The frequency of the driving force (equal to twice the frequency of the applied electrical signal) determines the mode of oscillation of the droplet which, together with its resonance characteristics, governs whether the droplet contact angle and contact radius vary in phase or out of phase with each other. In addition to the primary frequency response at the electrical forcing frequency, the droplet oscillation exhibits sub-harmonic oscillation at half of the forcing frequency that is attributed to the parametric nature of the electrical force acting on the triple contact line of the droplet. (paper)

  19. Correlation between radiographic analysis of alveolar bone density around dental implant and resonance frequency of dental implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prawoko, S. S.; Nelwan, L. C.; Odang, R. W.; Kusdhany, L. S.

    2017-08-01

    The histomorphometric test is the gold standard for dental implant stability quantification; however, it is invasive, and therefore, it is inapplicable to clinical patients. Consequently, accurate and objective alternative methods are required. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and digital radiographic analysis are noninvasive methods with excellent objectivity and reproducibility. To analyze the correlation between the radiographic analysis of alveolar bone density around a dental implant and the resonance frequency of the dental implant. Digital radiographic images for 35 samples were obtained, and the resonance frequency of the dental implant was acquired using Osstell ISQ immediately after dental implant placement and on third-month follow-up. The alveolar bone density around the dental implant was subsequently analyzed using SIDEXIS-XG software. No significant correlation was reported between the alveolar bone density around the dental implant and the resonance frequency of the dental implant (r = -0.102 at baseline, r = 0.146 at follow-up, p > 0.05). However, the alveolar bone density and resonance frequency showed a significant difference throughout the healing period (p = 0.005 and p = 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: Digital dental radiographs and Osstell ISQ showed excellent objectivity and reproducibility in quantifying dental implant stability. Nonetheless, no significant correlation was observed between the results obtained using these two methods.

  20. Density dependence governs when population responses to multiple stressors are magnified or mitigated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Emma E; Essington, Timothy E; Halpern, Benjamin S

    2017-10-01

    Population endangerment typically arises from multiple, potentially interacting anthropogenic stressors. Extensive research has investigated the consequences of multiple stressors on organisms, frequently focusing on individual life stages. Less is known about population-level consequences of exposure to multiple stressors, especially when exposure varies through life. We provide the first theoretical basis for identifying species at risk of magnified effects from multiple stressors across life history. By applying a population modeling framework, we reveal conditions under which population responses from stressors applied to distinct life stages are either magnified (synergistic) or mitigated. We find that magnification or mitigation critically depends on the shape of density dependence, but not the life stage in which it occurs. Stressors are always magnified when density dependence is linear or concave, and magnified or mitigated when it is convex. Using Bayesian numerical methods, we estimated the shape of density dependence for eight species across diverse taxa, finding support for all three shapes. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  1. Assessment of the effect of three-dimensional mantle density heterogeneity on earth rotation in tidal frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanbo; Chao, Benjamin F; Sun, Wenke; Kuang, Weijia

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we report the assessment of the effect of the three-dimensional (3D) density heterogeneity in the mantle on Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP) (i.e., the polar motion, or PM, and the length of day, or LOD) in the tidal frequencies. The 3D mantle density model is estimated based upon a global S-wave velocity tomography model (S16U6L8) and the mineralogical knowledge derived from laboratory experiment. The lateral density variation is referenced against the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM). Using this approach the effects of the heterogeneous mantle density variation in all three tidal frequencies (zonal long periods, tesseral diurnal, and sectorial semidiurnal) are estimated in both PM and LOD. When compared with mass or density perturbations originated on the earth's surface such as the oceanic and barometric changes, the heterogeneous mantle only contributes less than 10% of the total variation in PM and LOD in tidal frequencies. Nevertheless, including the 3D variation of the density in the mantle into account explained a substantial portion of the discrepancy between the observed signals in PM and LOD extracted from the lump-sum values based on continuous space geodetic measurement campaigns (e.g., CONT94) and the computed contribution from ocean tides as predicted by tide models derived from satellite altimetry observations (e.g., TOPEX/Poseidon). In other word, the difference of the two, at all tidal frequencies (long-periods, diurnals, and semi-diurnals) contains contributions of the lateral density heterogeneity of the mantle. Study of the effect of mantle density heterogeneity effect on torque-free earth rotation may provide useful constraints to construct the Reference Earth Model (REM), which is the next major objective in global geophysics research beyond PREM.

  2. GENERAL APROACH TO MODELING NONLINEAR AMPLITUDE AND FREQUENCY DEPENDENT HYSTERESIS EFFECTS BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Heine

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A detailed description of the rubber parts’ properties is gaining in importance in the current simulation models of multi-body simulation. One application example is a multi-body simulation of the washing machine movement. Inside the washing machine, there are different force transmission elements, which consist completely or partly of rubber. Rubber parts or, generally, elastomers usually have amplitude-dependant and frequency-dependent force transmission properties. Rheological models are used to describe these properties. A method for characterization of the amplitude and frequency dependence of such a rheological model is presented within this paper. Within this method, the used rheological model can be reduced or expanded in order to illustrate various non-linear effects. An original result is given with the automated parameter identification. It is fully implemented in Matlab. Such identified rheological models are intended for subsequent implementation in a multi-body model. This allows a significant enhancement of the overall model quality.

  3. The Grid Density Dependence of the Unsteady Pressures of the J-2X Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmauch, Preston B.

    2011-01-01

    The J-2X engine was originally designed for the upper stage of the cancelled Crew Launch Vehicle. Although the Crew Launch Vehicle was cancelled the J-2X engine, which is currently undergoing hot-fire testing, may be used on future programs. The J-2X engine is a direct descendent of the J-2 engine which powered the upper stage during the Apollo program. Many changes including a thrust increase from 230K to 294K lbf have been implemented in this engine. As part of the design requirements, the turbine blades must meet minimum high cycle fatigue factors of safety for various vibrational modes that have resonant frequencies in the engine's operating range. The unsteady blade loading is calculated directly from CFD simulations. A grid density study was performed to understand the sensitivity of the spatial loading and the magnitude of the on blade loading due to changes in grid density. Given that the unsteady blade loading has a first order effect on the high cycle fatigue factors of safety, it is important to understand the level of convergence when applying the unsteady loads. The convergence of the unsteady pressures of several grid densities will be presented for various frequencies in the engine's operating range.

  4. Density-Dependent Spacing Behaviour and Activity Budget in Pregnant, Domestic Goats (Capra hircus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vas, Judit; Andersen, Inger Lise

    2015-01-01

    Very little is known about the spacing behaviour in social groups of domestic goats (Capra hircus) in the farm environment. In this experiment, we studied interindividual distances, movement patterns and activity budgets in pregnant goats housed at three different densities. Norwegian dairy goats were kept in stable social groups of six animals throughout pregnancy at 1, 2 or 3 m2 per individual and their spacing behaviours (i.e., distance travelled, nearest and furthest neighbour distance) and activity budgets (e.g., resting, feeding, social activities) were monitored. Observations were made in the first, second and last thirds of pregnancy in the mornings, at noon and in the afternoons of each of these phases (4.5 hours per observation period). The findings show that goats held at animal densities of 2 and 3 m2 moved longer distances when they had more space per animal and kept larger nearest and furthest neighbour distances when compared to the 1 m2 per animal density. Less feeding activity was observed at the high animal density compared to the medium and low density treatments. The phase of gestation also had an impact on almost all behavioural variables. Closer to parturition, animals moved further distances and the increase in nearest and furthest neighbour distance was more pronounced at the lower animal densities. During the last period of gestation, goats spent less time feeding and more on resting, social behaviours and engaging in other various activities. Our data suggest that more space per goat is needed for goats closer to parturition than in the early gestation phase. We concluded that in goats spacing behaviour is density-dependent and changes with stages of pregnancy and activities. Finally, the lower density allowed animals to express individual preferences regarding spacing behaviour which is important in ensuring good welfare in a farming situation.

  5. Density-Dependent Spacing Behaviour and Activity Budget in Pregnant, Domestic Goats (Capra hircus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Vas

    Full Text Available Very little is known about the spacing behaviour in social groups of domestic goats (Capra hircus in the farm environment. In this experiment, we studied interindividual distances, movement patterns and activity budgets in pregnant goats housed at three different densities. Norwegian dairy goats were kept in stable social groups of six animals throughout pregnancy at 1, 2 or 3 m2 per individual and their spacing behaviours (i.e., distance travelled, nearest and furthest neighbour distance and activity budgets (e.g., resting, feeding, social activities were monitored. Observations were made in the first, second and last thirds of pregnancy in the mornings, at noon and in the afternoons of each of these phases (4.5 hours per observation period. The findings show that goats held at animal densities of 2 and 3 m2 moved longer distances when they had more space per animal and kept larger nearest and furthest neighbour distances when compared to the 1 m2 per animal density. Less feeding activity was observed at the high animal density compared to the medium and low density treatments. The phase of gestation also had an impact on almost all behavioural variables. Closer to parturition, animals moved further distances and the increase in nearest and furthest neighbour distance was more pronounced at the lower animal densities. During the last period of gestation, goats spent less time feeding and more on resting, social behaviours and engaging in other various activities. Our data suggest that more space per goat is needed for goats closer to parturition than in the early gestation phase. We concluded that in goats spacing behaviour is density-dependent and changes with stages of pregnancy and activities. Finally, the lower density allowed animals to express individual preferences regarding spacing behaviour which is important in ensuring good welfare in a farming situation.

  6. Density-Dependent Spacing Behaviour and Activity Budget in Pregnant, Domestic Goats (Capra hircus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vas, Judit; Andersen, Inger Lise

    2015-01-01

    Very little is known about the spacing behaviour in social groups of domestic goats (Capra hircus) in the farm environment. In this experiment, we studied interindividual distances, movement patterns and activity budgets in pregnant goats housed at three different densities. Norwegian dairy goats were kept in stable social groups of six animals throughout pregnancy at 1, 2 or 3 m2 per individual and their spacing behaviours (i.e. distance travelled, nearest and furthest neighbour distance) and activity budgets (e.g. resting, feeding, social activities) were monitored. Observations were made in the first, second and last thirds of pregnancy in the mornings, at noon and in the afternoons of each of these phases (4.5 hours per observation period). The findings show that goats held at animal densities of 2 and 3 m2 moved longer distances when they had more space per animal and kept larger nearest and furthest neighbour distances when compared to the 1 m2 per animal density. Less feeding activity was observed at the high animal density compared to the medium and low density treatments. The phase of gestation also had an impact on almost all behavioural variables. Closer to parturition, animals moved further distances and the increase in nearest and furthest neighbour distance was more pronounced at the lower animal densities. During the last period of gestation, goats spent less time feeding and more on resting, social behaviours and engaging in other various activities. Our data suggest that more space per goat is needed for goats closer to parturition than in the early gestation phase. We concluded that in goats spacing behaviour is density-dependent and changes with stages of pregnancy and activities. Finally, the lower density allowed animals to express individual preferences regarding spacing behaviour which is important in ensuring good welfare in a farming situation. PMID:26657240

  7. High-frequency spin-dependent tunnelling in magnetic nanocomposites: Magnetorefractive effect and magnetoimpedance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, Alexander [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: granov@magn.ru; Kozlov, Andrey [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Nedukh, Sergey [Institute of Radiophysics and Electronics NAS of Ukraine, Kharkov 61085 (Ukraine); Tarapov, Sergey [Institute of Radiophysics and Electronics NAS of Ukraine, Kharkov 61085 (Ukraine)

    2005-07-15

    Since the dielectric permittivity is linear with frequency-dependent conductivity, high-frequency properties for any kind of magnetic materials with the high magnetoresistance depend on magnetization. It manifests as magnetorefractive effect (MRE) in the infrared region of spectrum and as magnetoimpedance (MI) in the frequency range between radio and microwaves. The main mechanism of both MRE and MI in nanocomposites with tunnel-type magnetoresistance is high-frequency spin-dependent tunnelling. We report on recent results of theoretical and experimental investigations of MRE and MI in nanocomposites Co{sub 51.5}Al{sub 19.5}O{sub 29}, Co{sub 50.2}Ti{sub 9.1}O{sub 40.7}, Co{sub 52.3}Si{sub 12.2}O{sub 35.5} and (Co{sub 0,4}Fe{sub 0,6}){sub 48}(MgF){sub 52}. Most of the obtained experimental data for MRE and MI are consistent with the theory based on considering the tunnel junction between adjacent granules in percolation cluster as a capacitor.

  8. Extended exergy concept to facilitate designing and optimization of frequency-dependent direct energy conversion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijewardane, S.; Goswami, Yogi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Proved exergy method is not adequate to optimize frequency-dependent energy conversion. • Exergy concept is modified to facilitate the thermoeconomic optimization of photocell. • The exergy of arbitrary radiation is used for a practical purpose. • The utility of the concept is illustrated using pragmatic examples. - Abstract: Providing the radiation within the acceptable (responsive) frequency range(s) is a common method to increase the efficiency of the frequency-dependent energy conversion systems, such as photovoltaic and nano-scale rectenna. Appropriately designed auxiliary items such as spectrally selective thermal emitters, optical filters, and lenses are used for this purpose. However any energy conversion method that utilizes auxiliary components to increase the efficiency of a system has to justify the potential cost incurred by those auxiliary components through the economic gain emerging from the increased system efficiency. Therefore much effort should be devoted to design innovative systems, effectively integrating the auxiliary items and to optimize the system with economic considerations. Exergy is the widely used method to design and optimize conventional energy conversion systems. Although the exergy concept is used to analyze photovoltaic systems, it has not been used effectively to design and optimize such systems. In this manuscript, we present a modified exergy method in order to effectively design and economically optimize frequency-dependent energy conversion systems. Also, we illustrate the utility of this concept using examples of thermophotovoltaic, Photovoltaic/Thermal and concentrated solar photovoltaic

  9. Influence of Gaussian white noise on the frequency-dependent linear polarizability of doped quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Linear polarizability of quantum dot has been studied. • Quantum dot is doped with a repulsive impurity. • The polarizabilities are frequency-dependent. • Influence of Gaussian white noise has been monitored. • Noise exploited is of additive and multiplicative nature. - Abstract: We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent linear (α xx and α yy ) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. The dopant impurity potential chosen assumes Gaussian form. The study principally puts emphasis on investigating the role of noise on the polarizability components. In view of this we have exploited Gaussian white noise containing additive and multiplicative characteristics (in Stratonovich sense). The frequency-dependent polarizabilities are studied by exposing the doped dot to a periodically oscillating external electric field of given intensity. The oscillation frequency, confinement potentials, dopant location, and above all, the noise characteristics tune the linear polarizability components in a subtle manner. Whereas the additive noise fails to have any impact on the polarizabilities, the multiplicative noise influences them delicately and gives rise to additional interesting features

  10. Nitric oxide donors enhance the frequency dependence of dopamine release in nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Henrike; Threlfell, Sarah; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2011-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is critically involved in normal as well as maladaptive motivated behaviors including drug addiction. Whether the striatal neuromodulator nitric oxide (NO) influences DA release in NAc is unknown. We investigated whether exogenous NO modulates DA transmission in NAc core and how this interaction varies depending on the frequency of presynaptic activation. We detected DA with cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes in mouse NAc in slices following stimuli spanning a full range of DA neuron firing frequencies (1-100 Hz). NO donors 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1) or z-1-[N-(3-ammoniopropyl)-N-(n-propyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (PAPA/NONOate) enhanced DA release with increasing stimulus frequency. This NO-mediated enhancement of frequency sensitivity of DA release was not prevented by inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), DA transporters, or large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, and did not require glutamatergic or GABAergic input. However, experiments to identify whether frequency-dependent NO effects were mediated via changes in powerful acetylcholine-DA interactions revealed multiple components to NO modulation of DA release. In the presence of a nicotinic receptor antagonist (dihydro-β-erythroidine), NO donors increased DA release in a frequency-independent manner. These data suggest that NO in the NAc can modulate DA release through multiple GC-independent neuronal mechanisms whose net outcome varies depending on the activity in DA neurons and accumbal cholinergic interneurons. In the presence of accumbal acetylcholine, NO promotes the sensitivity of DA release to presynaptic activation, but with reduced acetylcholine input, NO will promote DA release in an activity-independent manner through a direct action on dopaminergic terminals.

  11. Laboratory calibration of density-dependent lines in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gu, M. F.; Desai, P.; Bitter, M.; Roquemore, L.; Reinke, M. L.

    2012-05-01

    We have been making spectral measurements in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) from different laboratory sources in order to investigate the electron density dependence of various astrophysically important emission lines and to test the atomic models underlying the diagnostic line ratios. The measurement are being performed at the Livermore EBIT-I electron beam ion trap, the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton, and the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, which together span an electron density of four orders of magnitude and which allow us to test the various models at high and low density limits. Here we present measurements of Fe XXII and Ar XIV, which include new data from an ultra high resolution (λ/Δλ >4000) spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility. We found good agreement between the measurements and modeling calculations for Fe XXII, but poorer agreement for Ar XIV.

  12. Refitting density dependent relativistic model parameters including Center-of-Mass corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avancini, Sidney S.; Marinelli, Jose R.; Carlson, Brett Vern

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Relativistic mean field models have become a standard approach for precise nuclear structure calculations. After the seminal work of Serot and Walecka, which introduced a model Lagrangian density where the nucleons interact through the exchange of scalar and vector mesons, several models were obtained through its generalization, including other meson degrees of freedom, non-linear meson interactions, meson-meson interactions, etc. More recently density dependent coupling constants were incorporated into the Walecka-like models, which are then extensively used. In particular, for these models a connection with the density functional theory can be established. Due to the inherent difficulties presented by field theoretical models, only the mean field approximation is used for the solution of these models. In order to calculate finite nuclei properties in the mean field approximation, a reference set has to be fixed and therefore the translational symmetry is violated. It is well known that in such case spurious effects due to the center-of-mass (COM) motion are present, which are more pronounced for light nuclei. In a previous work we have proposed a technique based on the Pierls-Yoccoz projection operator applied to the mean-field relativistic solution, in order to project out spurious COM contributions. In this work we obtain a new fitting for the density dependent parameters of a density dependent hadronic model, taking into account the COM corrections. Our fitting is obtained taking into account the charge radii and binding energies for He 4 , O 16 , Ca 40 , Ca 48 , Ni 56 , Ni 68 , Sn 100 , Sn 132 and Pb 208 . We show that the nuclear observables calculated using our fit are of a quality comparable to others that can be found in the literature, with the advantage that now a translational invariant many-body wave function is at our disposal. (author)

  13. High-frequency emissions during the propagation of an electron beam in a high-density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalita and Tripathi, V.K.

    1988-01-01

    A relativistic annular electron beam passing through a high-density plasma excites Langmuir waves via Cerenkov interaction. The Langmuir waves are backscattered off ions via nonlinear ion Landau damping. At moderately high amplitudes these waves are parametrically up-converted by the beam into high-frequency electromagnetic radiation, as observed in some recent experiments. A nonlocal theory of this process is developed in a cylindrical geometry. It is seen that the growth rate of the Langmuir wave scales as one-third power of beam density. The growth rate of parametric instability scales as one-fourth power of beam density and the square root of beam thickness

  14. Disentangling the effects of climate, density dependence, and harvest on an iconic large herbivore's population dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koons, David; Colchero, Fernando; Hersey, Kent

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relative effects of climate, harvest, and density dependence on population dynamics is critical for guiding sound population management, especially for ungulates in arid and semi-arid environments experiencing climate change. To address these issues for bison in southern Utah, we...... than precipitation and other temperature-related variables (model weight > 3 times more than that for other climate variables). Although we hypothesized that harvest is the primary driving force of bison population dynamics in southern Utah, our elasticity analysis indicated that changes in early...... spring temperature could have a greater ‘relative effect’ on equilibrium abundance than either harvest or the strength of density dependence. Our findings highlight the utility of incorporating elasticity analyses into state-space population models, and the need to include climatic processes in wildlife...

  15. Dependence of the electrical properties of defective single-walled carbon nanotubes on the vacancy density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yu-Pin; Tien Li-Gan; Tsai Chuen-Horng; Lee Ming-Hsien; Li Feng-Yin

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between the electric properties and the vacancy density in single-walled carbon nanotubes has been investigated from first principles as well as the dependence of the influencing range of a vacancy in the nanotube on the nanotube chirality. Compared with the long-range interaction of the vacancies in a single-walled carbon nanotube with non-zero chiral angle, a much shorter interaction was found between vacancies in a zigzag single-walled carbon nanotube. In this study, we investigated the bandstructure fluctuations caused by the nanotube strain, which depends on both the vacancy density and the tube chirality. These theoretical results provide new insight to understand the relationship between the local deformation of a defective single-walled carbon nanotube and its measurable electronic properties. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  16. Contact area affects frequency-dependent responses to vibration in the peripheral vascular and sensorineural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnak, Kristine; Miller, G R; Waugh, Stacey

    2018-01-01

    Repetitive exposure to hand-transmitted vibration is associated with development of peripheral vascular and sensorineural dysfunctions. These disorders and symptoms associated with it are referred to as hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS). Although the symptoms of the disorder have been well characterized, the etiology and contribution of various exposure factors to development of the dysfunctions are not well understood. Previous studies performed using a rat-tail model of vibration demonstrated that vascular and peripheral nervous system adverse effects of vibration are frequency-dependent, with vibration frequencies at or near the resonant frequency producing the most severe injury. However, in these investigations, the amplitude of the exposed tissue was greater than amplitude typically noted in human fingers. To determine how contact with vibrating source and amplitude of the biodynamic response of the tissue affects the risk of injury occurring, this study compared the influence of frequency using different levels of restraint to assess how maintaining contact of the tail with vibrating source affects the transmission of vibration. Data demonstrated that for the most part, increasing the contact of the tail with the platform by restraining it with additional straps resulted in an enhancement in transmission of vibration signal and elevation in factors associated with vascular and peripheral nerve injury. In addition, there were also frequency-dependent effects, with exposure at 250 Hz generating greater effects than vibration at 62.5 Hz. These observations are consistent with studies in humans demonstrating that greater contact and exposure to frequencies near the resonant frequency pose the highest risk for generating peripheral vascular and sensorineural dysfunction.

  17. Frequency-Dependent Altered Functional Connections of Default Mode Network in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjun Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with the progressive dysfunction of cognitive ability. Previous research has indicated that the default mode network (DMN is closely related to cognition and is impaired in Alzheimer’s disease. Because recent studies have shown that different frequency bands represent specific physiological functions, DMN functional connectivity studies of the different frequency bands based on resting state fMRI (RS-fMRI data may provide new insight into AD pathophysiology. In this study, we explored the functional connectivity based on well-defined DMN regions of interest (ROIs from the five frequency bands: slow-5 (0.01–0.027 Hz, slow-4 (0.027–0.073 Hz, slow-3 (0.073–0.198 Hz, slow-2 (0.198–0.25 Hzs and standard low-frequency oscillations (LFO (0.01–0.08 Hz. We found that the altered functional connectivity patterns are mainly in the frequency band of slow-5 and slow-4 and that the decreased connections are long distance, but some relatively short connections are increased. In addition, the altered functional connections of the DMN in AD are frequency dependent and differ between the slow-5 and slow-4 bands. Mini-Mental State Examination scores were significantly correlated with the altered functional connectivity patterns in the slow-5 and slow-4 bands. These results indicate that frequency-dependent functional connectivity changes might provide potential biomarkers for AD pathophysiology.

  18. Molecular Structure And Vibrational Frequencies of Tetrafluoro isophthalonitrile By Hartree-Fock And Density Functional Theory Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayikoglu, A.

    2008-01-01

    The molecular structure, vibrational frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments of tetrafluoro isophthalonitrile (TFPN) in the ground state have been calculated using the Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional methods (B3LYP) with 6-311++G (d, p) basis set. The calculations were utilized in the CS symmetry of TFPN. The obtained vibrational frequencies and optimized geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) were seen to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The comparison of the observed and calculated results showed that the B3LYP method is superior to the HF method for both the vibrational frequencies and geometric parameters

  19. Remarks on time-dependent [current]-density functional theory for open quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen-Zhou, Joel; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-08-14

    Time-dependent [current]-density functional theory for open quantum systems (OQS) has emerged as a formalism that can incorporate dissipative effects in the dynamics of many-body quantum systems. Here, we review and clarify some formal aspects of these theories that have been recently questioned in the literature. In particular, we provide theoretical support for the following conclusions: (1) contrary to what we and others had stated before, within the master equation framework, there is in fact a one-to-one mapping between vector potentials and current densities for fixed initial state, particle-particle interaction, and memory kernel; (2) regardless of the first conclusion, all of our recently suggested Kohn-Sham (KS) schemes to reproduce the current and particle densities of the original OQS, and in particular, the use of a KS closed driven system, remains formally valid; (3) the Lindblad master equation maintains the positivity of the density matrix regardless of the time-dependence of the Hamiltonian or the dissipation operators; (4) within the stochastic Schrödinger equation picture, a one-to-one mapping from stochastic vector potential to stochastic current density for individual trajectories has not been proven so far, except in the case where the vector potential is the same for every member of the ensemble, in which case, it reduces to the Lindblad master equation picture; (5) master equations may violate certain desired properties of the density matrix, such as positivity, but they remain as one of the most useful constructs to study OQS when the environment is not easily incorporated explicitly in the calculation. The conclusions support our previous work as formally rigorous, offer new insights into it, and provide a common ground to discuss related theories.

  20. Effect of frequency on amplitude-dependent internal friction in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Naoki; Atsumi, Tomohiro; Nishino, Yoichi

    2006-01-01

    Amplitude-dependent internal friction (ADIF) was measured in a polycrystalline niobium using four modes of flexural vibration from the fundamental to the third-order resonance at room temperature. The ADIF was detected in each vibration mode. The internal-friction versus strain-amplitude curve of the ADIF shifted to a larger strain-amplitude range as frequency increased. The stress-strain curves were derived from the ADIF data, and the microplastic flow stress defined as the stress required to produce a plastic strain of 1 x 10 -9 was read from the stress-strain curves. It was found that the microplastic flow stress was proportional to the frequency

  1. Effect of neutron flux on the frequency dependencies of electrical conductivity of silicon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huseynov, E.; Garibli, A., E-mail: elchin.huse@yahoo.com [National Nuclear Research Center, Department of Nanotechnology and Radiation Material Science, 1073, Inshaatchilar pr. 4, Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2016-11-01

    It has been reviewed the frequency dependencies of electrical conductivity of nanoparticles affected by neutron flux at different times and initial state, at various constant temperatures such as 100, 200, 300 and 400 K. Measurements have been carried out at each temperature at the different 97 values of frequency in the 1 Hz - 1 MHz range. From interdependence between real and imaginary parts of electrical conductivity it has been determined the type of conductivity. Moreover, in the work it is given the mechanism of electrical conductivity according to the obtained results. (Author)

  2. Parton densities in quantum chromodynamics. Gauge invariance, path-dependence, and Wilson lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherednikov, Igor O.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to give a systematic pedagogical exposition of the quantitative analysis of Wilson lines and gauge-invariant correlation functions in quantum chromodynamics. Using techniques from the previous volume (Wilson Lines in Quantum Field Theory, 2014), an ab initio methodology is developed and practical tools for its implementation are presented. Emphasis is put on the implications of gauge invariance and path-dependence properties of transverse-momentum dependent parton density functions. The latter are associated with the QCD factorization approach to semi-inclusive hadronic processes, studied at currently operating and planned experimental facilities.

  3. Parton densities in quantum chromodynamics. Gauge invariance, path-dependence, and Wilson lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherednikov, Igor O. [Antwerpen Univ. (Belgium). Dept. Fysica; Veken, Frederik F. van der [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this book is to give a systematic pedagogical exposition of the quantitative analysis of Wilson lines and gauge-invariant correlation functions in quantum chromodynamics. Using techniques from the previous volume (Wilson Lines in Quantum Field Theory, 2014), an ab initio methodology is developed and practical tools for its implementation are presented. Emphasis is put on the implications of gauge invariance and path-dependence properties of transverse-momentum dependent parton density functions. The latter are associated with the QCD factorization approach to semi-inclusive hadronic processes, studied at currently operating and planned experimental facilities.

  4. Temperature-dependence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product in Metallization Lines: A Revisit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duryat, Rahmat Saptono; Kim, Choong-Un

    2016-01-01

    One of the important phenomena in Electromigration (EM) is Blech Effect. The existence of Threshold Current Density-Length Product or EM Threshold has such fundamental and technological consequences in the design, manufacture, and testing of electronics. Temperature-dependence of Blech Product had been thermodynamically established and the real behavior of such interconnect materials have been extensively studied. The present paper reviewed the temperature-dependence of EM threshold in metallization lines of different materials and structure as found in relevant published articles. It is expected that the reader can see a big picture from the compiled data, which might be overlooked when it was examined in pieces. (paper)

  5. Dependence of critical current density on crystalline direction in thin YBCO films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paturi, P.; Peurla, M.; Raittila, J.

    2005-01-01

    The dependence of critical current density (J(c)) on the angle between the current direction and the (100) direction in the ab-plane of thin YBCO films deposited on (001)-SrTiO3 from natiocrystalline and microcrystalline targets is studied using magneto-optical microscopy. In the films made from...... the nanocrystalline target it is found that J(c) does not depend on the angle whereas J(c) decreases with increasing angle in the films made from the microcrystalline target. The films were characterized by detailed X-ray diffraction measurements. The findings are explained in terms of a network of planar defects...

  6. Density dependence of electron mobility in the accumulation mode for fully depleted SOI films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumova, O. V., E-mail: naumova@isp.nsc.ru; Zaitseva, E. G.; Fomin, B. I.; Ilnitsky, M. A.; Popov, V. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The electron mobility µ{sub eff} in the accumulation mode is investigated for undepleted and fully depleted double-gate n{sup +}–n–n{sup +} silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET). To determine the range of possible values of the mobility and the dominant scattering mechanisms in thin-film structures, it is proposed that the field dependence of the mobility µ{sub eff} be replaced with the dependence on the density N{sub e} of induced charge carriers. It is shown that the dependences µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) can be approximated by the power functions µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) ∝ N{sub e}{sup -n}, where the exponent n is determined by the chargecarrier scattering mechanism as in the mobility field dependence. The values of the exponent n in the dependences µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) are determined when the SOI-film mode near one of its surfaces varies from inversion to accumulation. The obtained results are explained from the viewpoint of the electron-density redistribution over the SOI-film thickness and changes in the scattering mechanisms.

  7. Temperature dependence of mode conversion in warm, unmagnetized plasmas with a linear density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Dae Jung; Lee, Dong-Hun [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kihong [Division of Energy Systems Research, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    We study theoretically the linear mode conversion between electromagnetic waves and Langmuir waves in warm, stratified, and unmagnetized plasmas, using a numerically precise calculation based on the invariant imbedding method. We verify that the principle of reciprocity for the forward and backward mode conversion coefficients holds precisely regardless of temperature. We also find that the temperature dependence of the mode conversion coefficient is substantially stronger than that previously reported. Depending on the wave frequency and the incident angle, the mode conversion coefficient is found to increase or decrease with the increase of temperature.

  8. On the numerical simulation of population dynamics with density-dependent migrations and the Allee effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweilam, H N; Khader, M M; Al-Bar, F R

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the variational iteration method (VIM) and the Adomian decomposition method (ADM) are presented for the numerical simulation of the population dynamics model with density-dependent migrations and the Allee effects. The convergence of ADM is proved for the model problem. The results obtained by these methods are compared to the exact solution. It is found that these methods are always converges to the right solutions with high accuracy. Furthermore, VIM needs relative less computational work than ADM

  9. Cell-density-dependent lysis and sporulation of Myxococcus xanthus in agarose microbeads.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbluh, A; Nir, R; Sahar, E; Rosenberg, E

    1989-01-01

    Vegetative cells of Myxococcus xanthus were immobilized in 25-microns-diameter agarose microbeads and incubated in either growth medium or sporulation buffer. In growth medium, the cells multiplied, glided to the periphery, and then filled the beads. In sporulation buffer, up to 90% of the cells lysed and ca. 50% of the surviving cells formed resistant spores. A strong correlation between sporulation and cell lysis was observed; both phenomena were cell density dependent. Sporulation proficie...

  10. The importance of spatial models for estimating the strength of density dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorson, James T.; Skaug, Hans J.; Kristensen, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    the California Coast. In this case, the nonspatial model estimates implausible oscillatory dynamics on an annual time scale, while the spatial model estimates strong autocorrelation and is supported by model selection tools. We conclude by discussing the importance of improved data archiving techniques, so...... that spatial models can be used to re-examine classic questions regarding the presence and strength of density dependence in wild populations Read More: http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/14-0739.1...

  11. Optical properties of Al nanostructures from time dependent density functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2016-04-05

    The optical properties of Al nanostructures are investigated by means of time dependent density functional theory, considering chains of varying length and ladders/stripes of varying aspect ratio. The absorption spectra show redshifting for increasing length and aspect ratio. For the chains the absorption is dominated by HOMO → LUMO transitions, whereas ladders and stripes reveal more complex spectra of plasmonic nature above a specific aspect ratio.

  12. On the frequency dependence of the otoacoustic emission latency in hypoacoustic and normal ears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisto, R.; Moleti, A.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the otoacoustic emission (OAE) latency of adult subjects have been obtained, as a function of frequency, by means of wavelet time-frequency analysis based on the iterative application of filter banks. The results are in agreement with previous OAE latency measurements by Tognola et al. [Hear. Res. 106, 112-122 (1997)], as regards both the latency values and the frequency dependence, and seem to be incompatible with the steep 1/f law that is predicted by scale-invariant full cochlear models. The latency-frequency relationship has been best fitted to a linear function of the cochlear physical distance, using the Greenwood map, and to an exponential function of the cochlear distance, for comparison with derived band ABR latency measurements. Two sets of ears [94 audiometrically normal and 42 impaired with high-frequency (f>3 kHz) hearing loss] have been separately analyzed. Significantly larger average latencies were found in the impaired ears in the mid-frequency range. Theoretical implications of these findings on the transmission of the traveling wave are discussed.

  13. Study of the ion density of a radio-frequency plasma using electrostatic probes and focussed microwave interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Cao, L.; Gagne, R.R.J.

    1976-01-01

    In order to verify experimentally and compare recent ion theories for cylindrical electrostatic probes, the ion density in a radio-frequency plasma was evaluated from V-I curves by means of six different theories. At low pressures, the theories of Bernstein and Rabinowitz, of Lam and Laframboise, give values of density which differ respectively by 20, 25 and 30% compared with the values obtained using a 10GHz focussed microwave interferometer. At the continuum limit, The Schulz and Brown's, and Su and Kiel's theories give density values which disagree respectively by 55 and 20%, compared with the values obtained by microwaves. For pressures varying from 0.05 to 3mmHg, the decrease of ion current, as predicted theorically by Waymouth, was observed. The density perturbation near the probe was found to be a dominant factor affecting the precision of density measurements, for pressures up to 2mmHg at least for our experimental conditions [fr

  14. Deriving the coronal hole electron temperature: electron density dependent ionization / recombination considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, John Gerard; Perez-Suarez, David; Singh, Avninda; Chapman, Steven; Bryans, Paul; Summers, Hugh; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of appropriate theoretically derived line ratios with observational data can yield estimates of a plasma's physical parameters, such as electron density or temperature. The usual practice in the calculation of the line ratio is the assumption of excitation by electrons/protons followed by radiative decay. Furthermore, it is normal to use the so-called coronal approximation, i.e. one only considers ionization and recombination to and from the ground-state. A more accurate treatment is to include ionization/recombination to and from metastable levels. Here, we apply this to two lines from adjacent ionization stages, Mg IX 368 A and Mg X 625 A, which has been shown to be a very useful temperature diagnostic. At densities typical of coronal hole conditions, the difference between the electron temperature derived assuming the zero density limit compared with the electron density dependent ionization/recombination is small. This, however, is not the case for flares where the electron density is orders of magnitude larger. The derived temperature for the coronal hole at solar maximum is around 1.04 MK compared to just below 0.82 MK at solar minimum.

  15. An investigation on the bone density of patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yan; Huang Zhaomin; Meng Quanfei; Da Rengrong; Zhang Suidong; Weng Jianping

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the morbidity and pattern of osteoporosis in the patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Methods: Bone density of lumbar vertebra, hip and whole body were measured in 48 patients with NIDDM and in 35 health people aged 30-35 years. All the patients were diagnosed by the standards introduced by the WHO committee in 1985. Outcome were measured by using t text, analysis of variance and coefficient of multiple correlation. Results: Bone density decreased in all the 48 patients with NIDDM, in which 25 (52.1%) patients were diagnosed as osteoporosis. In the patients with NIDDM and osteoporosis, there was a higher rate of the decrease of the bone density of hip (14.1% in male and 15.6% in female respectively) than that of lumbar vertebra. Conclusions: There is a higher morbidity of osteoporosis in the patients with NIDDM. The loss of the bone density might start at the hip. The bone mineral content of whole body lose markedly. And the longer the NIDDM and the menopause exist, the more obvious the decrease of the bone density is. The mechanism of the phenomena is considered as a result of not only the increased loss of calcium and absorption of the bone tissue induced by the secondary hyperparathyroidism, but also the decreased level of the serum insulin-like growth factor, which inhibits the bone formation

  16. Unified analytical expressions for calculating resonant frequencies, transimpedances, and equivalent input noise current densities of tuned receiver front ends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qing Zhong

    1992-01-01

    Unified analytical expressions have been derived for calculating the resonant frequencies, transimpedance and equivalent input noise current densities of the four most widely used tuned optical receiver front ends built with FETs and p-i-n diodes. A more accurate FET model has been used to improve...

  17. The density of states for almost periodic Schroedinger operators and the frequency module: a counter-example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellissard, J.

    1981-07-01

    We exhibit an example of a one-dimensional discrete Schroedinger operator with an almost periodic potential for which the steps of the density of states do not belong to the frequency module. This example is suggested by the K-theory

  18. Critical frequency and maximum electron density of F2 region over four stations in the North American sector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ezquer, R. G.; Cabrera, M. A.; López, J. L.; Albornoz, M. R.; Mosert, M.; Marcó, P.; Burešová, Dalia

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 4 (2011), s. 420-429 ISSN 1364-6826 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Ionosphere * F2 region * Critical frequency * Electron density * Model Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.596, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682610002786

  19. Word Recognition and Nonword Repetition in Children with Language Disorders: The Effects of Neighborhood Density, Lexical Frequency, and Phonotactic Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispens, Judith; Baker, Anne; Duinmeijer, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of neighborhood density (ND) and lexical frequency on word recognition and the effects of phonotactic probability (PP) on nonword repetition (NWR) were examined to gain insight into processing at the lexical and sublexical levels in typically developing (TD) children and children with developmental language problems. Method:…

  20. Power spectral density and scaling exponent of high frequency global solar radiation sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calif, Rudy; Schmitt, François G.; Huang, Yongxiang

    2013-04-01

    invariance: Iq(f) ~ f-?(q) , ?(q) is the scaling exponent. This allows to characterize the scaling behavior of a process: fractal or multifractal with intermittent properties. For q = 2, the Hilbert spectrum is defined. In this work, The data are collected at the University site of Guadeloupe, an island in the West Indies, located at 16°15 N latitude 60°30 W longitude. Our measurements sampled at 1 Hz were performed during one year period. The analyzed data present a power spectral density E(f) displaying a power law of the form E(f) ~ f-β with 1.6 ˜ β ˜ 2.2 for frequencies f ˜ 0.1 Hz, corresponding to time scales T × 10 s. Furthermore, global solar radiation data possesses multifractal properties. For comparison, other multifractal analysis techniques such as structure functions, MDFA, wavelet leaders are also used. This preliminary work set the basis for further investigation dedicated to simulate and forecast a sequence of solar energy fluctuation under different meteorological conditions, in the multifractal framework.

  1. Frequency-dependent effects of background noise on subcortical response timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, A; Parbery-Clark, A; Skoe, E; Kraus, N

    2011-12-01

    The addition of background noise to an auditory signal delays brainstem response timing. This effect has been extensively documented using manual peak selection. Peak picking, however, is impractical for large-scale studies of spectrotemporally complex stimuli, and leaves open the question of whether noise-induced delays are frequency-dependent or occur across the frequency spectrum. Here we use an automated, objective method to examine phase shifts between auditory brainstem responses to a speech sound (/da/) presented with and without background noise. We predicted that shifts in neural response timing would also be reflected in frequency-specific phase shifts. Our results indicate that the addition of background noise causes phase shifts across the subcortical response spectrum (70-1000 Hz). However, this noise-induced delay is not uniform such that some frequency bands show greater shifts than others: low-frequency phase shifts (300-500 Hz) are largest during the response to the consonant-vowel formant transition (/d/), while high-frequency shifts (720-1000 Hz) predominate during the response to the steady-state vowel (/a/). Most importantly, phase shifts occurring in specific frequency bands correlate strongly with shifts in the latencies of the predominant peaks in the auditory brainstem response, while phase shifts in other frequency bands do not. This finding confirms the validity of phase shift detection as an objective measure of timing differences and reveals that this method detects noise-induced shifts in timing that may not be captured by traditional peak latency measurements. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of the parametric proper generalized decomposition to the frequency-dependent calculation of the impedance of an AC line with rectangular conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sancarlos-González Abel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AC lines of industrial busbar systems are usually built using conductors with rectangular cross sections, where each phase can have several parallel conductors to carry high currents. The current density in a rectangular conductor, under sinusoidal conditions, is not uniform. It depends on the frequency, on the conductor shape, and on the distance between conductors, due to the skin effect and to proximity effects. Contrary to circular conductors, there are not closed analytical formulas for obtaining the frequency-dependent impedance of conductors with rectangular cross-section. It is necessary to resort to numerical simulations to obtain the resistance and the inductance of the phases, one for each desired frequency and also for each distance between the phases’ conductors. On the contrary, the use of the parametric proper generalized decomposition (PGD allows to obtain the frequency-dependent impedance of an AC line for a wide range of frequencies and distances between the phases’ conductors by solving a single simulation in a 4D domain (spatial coordinates x and y, the frequency and the separation between conductors. In this way, a general “virtual chart” solution is obtained, which contains the solution for any frequency and for any separation of the conductors, and stores it in a compact separated representations form, which can be easily embedded on a more general software for the design of electrical installations. The approach presented in this work for rectangular conductors can be easily extended to conductors with an arbitrary shape.

  3. Application of the parametric proper generalized decomposition to the frequency-dependent calculation of the impedance of an AC line with rectangular conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancarlos-González, Abel; Pineda-Sanchez, Manuel; Puche-Panadero, Ruben; Sapena-Bano, Angel; Riera-Guasp, Martin; Martinez-Roman, Javier; Perez-Cruz, Juan; Roger-Folch, Jose

    2017-12-01

    AC lines of industrial busbar systems are usually built using conductors with rectangular cross sections, where each phase can have several parallel conductors to carry high currents. The current density in a rectangular conductor, under sinusoidal conditions, is not uniform. It depends on the frequency, on the conductor shape, and on the distance between conductors, due to the skin effect and to proximity effects. Contrary to circular conductors, there are not closed analytical formulas for obtaining the frequency-dependent impedance of conductors with rectangular cross-section. It is necessary to resort to numerical simulations to obtain the resistance and the inductance of the phases, one for each desired frequency and also for each distance between the phases' conductors. On the contrary, the use of the parametric proper generalized decomposition (PGD) allows to obtain the frequency-dependent impedance of an AC line for a wide range of frequencies and distances between the phases' conductors by solving a single simulation in a 4D domain (spatial coordinates x and y, the frequency and the separation between conductors). In this way, a general "virtual chart" solution is obtained, which contains the solution for any frequency and for any separation of the conductors, and stores it in a compact separated representations form, which can be easily embedded on a more general software for the design of electrical installations. The approach presented in this work for rectangular conductors can be easily extended to conductors with an arbitrary shape.

  4. Experimental examination of intraspecific density-dependent competition during the breeding period in monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D T Tyler Flockhart

    Full Text Available A central goal of population ecology is to identify the factors that regulate population growth. Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus in eastern North America re-colonize the breeding range over several generations that result in population densities that vary across space and time during the breeding season. We used laboratory experiments to measure the strength of density-dependent intraspecific competition on egg laying rate and larval survival and then applied our results to density estimates of wild monarch populations to model the strength of density dependence during the breeding season. Egg laying rates did not change with density but larvae at high densities were smaller, had lower survival, and weighed less as adults compared to lower densities. Using mean larval densities from field surveys resulted in conservative estimates of density-dependent population reduction that varied between breeding regions and different phases of the breeding season. Our results suggest the highest levels of population reduction due to density-dependent intraspecific competition occur early in the breeding season in the southern portion of the breeding range. However, we also found that the strength of density dependence could be almost five times higher depending on how many life-stages were used as part of field estimates. Our study is the first to link experimental results of a density-dependent reduction in vital rates to observed monarch densities in the wild and show that the effects of density dependent competition in monarchs varies across space and time, providing valuable information for developing robust, year-round population models in this migratory organism.

  5. Frequency-dependent changes in sensorimotor and pain affective systems induced by empathy for pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoyama Y

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yoshimasa Motoyama,1,2,* Katsuya Ogata,1,* Sumio Hoka,2 Shozo Tobimatsu1 1Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurological Institute, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Empathy for pain helps us to understand the pain of others indirectly. To better comprehend the processing of empathic pain, we report the frequency-dependent modulation of cortical oscillations induced by watching movies depicting pain using high-density electroencephalography (EEG, magnetoencephalography (MEG, and motor evoked potentials (MEP. Methods: Event-related desynchronization of EEG and MEG was assessed while participants viewed videos of painful (needle or neutral (cotton swab situations. The amplitudes of MEPs were also compared between the needle and cotton swab conditions.Results: The degree of suppression in α/β band power was significantly increased, whereas that of γ band power was significantly decreased, in the needle condition compared with the cotton swab condition. EEG revealed that significant differences in α/β band were distributed in the right frontocentral and left parietooccipital regions, whereas significant γ band differences were distributed predominantly over the right hemisphere, which were confirmed by source estimation using MEG. There was a significant positive correlation between the difference in γ power of the two conditions and the visual analog scale subjective rating of aversion, but not in the α/β band. The amplitude of MEPs decreased in the needle condition, which confirmed the inhibition of the primary motor cortex.Conclusion: MEP suppression supports that modulation of cortical oscillations by viewing movies depicting pain involves sensorimotor processing. Our results suggest that α/β oscillations underlie the sensory qualities of others’ pain, whereas the γ band

  6. Time-domain representation of frequency-dependent foundation impedance functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safak, E.

    2006-01-01

    Foundation impedance functions provide a simple means to account for soil-structure interaction (SSI) when studying seismic response of structures. Impedance functions represent the dynamic stiffness of the soil media surrounding the foundation. The fact that impedance functions are frequency dependent makes it difficult to incorporate SSI in standard time-history analysis software. This paper introduces a simple method to convert frequency-dependent impedance functions into time-domain filters. The method is based on the least-squares approximation of impedance functions by ratios of two complex polynomials. Such ratios are equivalent, in the time-domain, to discrete-time recursive filters, which are simple finite-difference equations giving the relationship between foundation forces and displacements. These filters can easily be incorporated into standard time-history analysis programs. Three examples are presented to show the applications of the method.

  7. Hydrogen-enhanced fatigue crack growth in steels and its frequency dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Hisao; Takakuwa, Osamu; Yamabe, Junichiro; Matsuoka, Saburo

    2017-07-28

    In the context of the fatigue life design of components, particularly those destined for use in hydrogen refuelling stations and fuel cell vehicles, it is important to understand the hydrogen-induced, fatigue crack growth (FCG) acceleration in steels. As such, the mechanisms for acceleration and its influencing factors are reviewed and discussed in this paper, with a special focus on the peculiar frequency dependence of the hydrogen-induced FCG acceleration. Further, this frequency dependence is debated by introducing some potentially responsible elements, along with new experimental data obtained by the authors.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Real-time correction of tsunami site effect by frequency-dependent tsunami-amplification factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsushima, H.

    2017-12-01

    For tsunami early warning, I developed frequency-dependent tsunami-amplification factor and used it to design a recursive digital filter that can be applicable for real-time correction of tsunami site response. In this study, I assumed that a tsunami waveform at an observing point could be modeled by convolution of source, path and site effects in time domain. Under this assumption, spectral ratio between offshore and the nearby coast can be regarded as site response (i.e. frequency-dependent amplification factor). If the amplification factor can be prepared before tsunamigenic earthquakes, its temporal convolution to offshore tsunami waveform provides tsunami prediction at coast in real time. In this study, tsunami waveforms calculated by tsunami numerical simulations were used to develop frequency-dependent tsunami-amplification factor. Firstly, I performed numerical tsunami simulations based on nonlinear shallow-water theory from many tsuanmigenic earthquake scenarios by varying the seismic magnitudes and locations. The resultant tsunami waveforms at offshore and the nearby coastal observing points were then used in spectral-ratio analysis. An average of the resulted spectral ratios from the tsunamigenic-earthquake scenarios is regarded as frequency-dependent amplification factor. Finally, the estimated amplification factor is used in design of a recursive digital filter that can be applicable in time domain. The above procedure is applied to Miyako bay at the Pacific coast of northeastern Japan. The averaged tsunami-height spectral ratio (i.e. amplification factor) between the location at the center of the bay and the outside show a peak at wave-period of 20 min. A recursive digital filter based on the estimated amplification factor shows good performance in real-time correction of tsunami-height amplification due to the site effect. This study is supported by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) KAKENHI grant 15K16309.

  9. Rolling estimations of long range dependence volatility for high frequency S&P500 index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Chin Wen; Pei, Tan Pei

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluates the time-varying long range dependence behaviors of the S&P500 volatility index using the modified rescaled adjusted range (R/S) statistic. For better computational result, a high frequency rolling bipower variation realized volatility estimates are used to avoid possible abrupt jump. The empirical analysis findings allow us to understand better the informationally market efficiency before and after the subprime mortgage crisis.

  10. Compensating Level-Dependent Frequency Representation in Auditory Cortex by Synaptic Integration of Corticocortical Input.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max F K Happel

    Full Text Available Robust perception of auditory objects over a large range of sound intensities is a fundamental feature of the auditory system. However, firing characteristics of single neurons across the entire auditory system, like the frequency tuning, can change significantly with stimulus intensity. Physiological correlates of level-constancy of auditory representations hence should be manifested on the level of larger neuronal assemblies or population patterns. In this study we have investigated how information of frequency and sound level is integrated on the circuit-level in the primary auditory cortex (AI of the Mongolian gerbil. We used a combination of pharmacological silencing of corticocortically relayed activity and laminar current source density (CSD analysis. Our data demonstrate that with increasing stimulus intensities progressively lower frequencies lead to the maximal impulse response within cortical input layers at a given cortical site inherited from thalamocortical synaptic inputs. We further identified a temporally precise intercolumnar synaptic convergence of early thalamocortical and horizontal corticocortical inputs. Later tone-evoked activity in upper layers showed a preservation of broad tonotopic tuning across sound levels without shifts towards lower frequencies. Synaptic integration within corticocortical circuits may hence contribute to a level-robust representation of auditory information on a neuronal population level in the auditory cortex.

  11. Frequency and temperature dependent dielectric properties of TiO2-V2O5 nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Apurba; Roy, Atanu; De, Sayan; Chatterjee, Souvik; Das, Sachindranath

    2018-03-01

    In this manuscript, we have reported the crystal structure, dielectric response, and transport phenomenon of TiO2-V2O5 nanocomposites. The nanocomposites were synthesized using a sol-gel technique having different molar ratios of Ti:V (10:10, 10:15, and 10:20). The phase composition and the morphology have been studied using X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscope, respectively. The impedance spectroscopy studies of the three samples over a wide range of temperature (50 K-300 K) have been extensively described using the internal barrier layer capacitor model. It is based on the contribution of domain and domain boundary, relaxations of the materials, which are the main crucial factors for the enhancement of the dielectric response. The frequency dependent ac conductivity of the ceramics strongly obeys the well-known Jonscher's power law, and it has been clearly explained using the theory of jump relaxation model. The temperature dependent bulk conductivity is fairly recognized to the variable-range hopping of localized polarons. The co-existence of mixed valence state of Ti ions (Ti3+ and Ti4+) in the sample significantly contributes to the change of dielectric property. The overall study of dielectric response explains that the dielectric constant and the dielectric loss are strongly dependent on temperature and frequency and decrease with an increase of frequency as well as temperature.

  12. Dependence of the critical current density on the history of magnetic field and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuepfer, H.

    1976-08-01

    The dependence of the volume pinning force on different paths taken to arrive at a state (H,T) is investigated. The local magnetic induction is measured by means of an ac technique on samples with different Hsub(c), kappa, pinning centres and densities. Line pinning and a distorted flux line lattice are properties of those samples which show the above mentioned history dependence. Using the model of E.J. Kramer it is deduced the reason of the history effect is the dependence of the shear modulus on the defect structure of the flux line lattice. The differences occur in the lower field region and are also observed in materials with kappa approximately = 40 and large volume pinning forces. (orig.) [de

  13. Stocking density affects the growth performance of broilers in a sex-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuowei, S; Yan, L; Yuan, L; Jiao, H; Song, Z; Guo, Y; Lin, H

    2011-07-01

    The effects of stocking density, sex, and dietary ME concentration on live performance, footpad burns, and leg weakness of broilers were investigated. A total of 876 male and 1,020 female 1-d-old chicks were placed in 24 pens to simulate final stocking density treatments of 26 kg (LSD; 10 males or 12 females/m(2)) and 42 kg (HSD; 16 males or 18 females/m(2)) of BW/m(2) floor space. Two series of experimental diets with a 150 kcal/kg difference in ME concentration (2,800, 2,900, and 3,000 or 2,950, 3,050, and 3,150 kcal of ME/kg) were compared in a 3-phase feeding program. The HSD treatment significantly decreased BW gain and feed conversion ratio (FCR). The HSD chickens consumed less feed by 35 d of age; thereafter, the reverse was true. Male chickens had significantly higher feed intake (FI), BW gain, and FCR compared with females. A significant interaction was found of stocking density and age for FI, BW gain, and FCR. Compared with LSD treatment, HSD broilers had a higher FI and a lower FCR from 36 to 42 d of age. Stocking density, sex, and age had a significant interaction for BW gain and FCR. Female broilers had worse BW gain and FCR when stocked at high density from 36 to 42 d of age. Stocking density had no significant influence on breast, thigh, or abdominal fat yield. Female broilers had significantly higher breast yield and abdominal fat. Male broilers and HSD treatment had high footpad burn and gait scores. A low ME diet increased footpad burn score but had no effect on gait score. The result indicated that stocking density had a more severe effect on the growth of male broilers before 35 d of age. Female broilers need more space than males at similar BW per square meter near marketing age. The incidence and severity of leg weakness are associated with sex, diet, and stocking density. This result suggests that the deteriorated effect of high stocking density is sex and age dependent.

  14. Viscoelastic characterization of compacted pharmaceutical excipient materials by analysis of frequency-dependent mechanical relaxation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, K.; Mousavi, S.; Lundberg, B.; Strømme, M.

    2005-09-01

    A newly developed method for determining the frequency-dependent complex Young's modulus was employed to analyze the mechanical response of compacted microcrystalline cellulose, sorbitol, ethyl cellulose and starch for frequencies up to 20 kHz. A Debye-like relaxation was observed in all the studied pharmaceutical excipient materials and a comparison with corresponding dielectric spectroscopy data was made. The location in frequency of the relaxation peak was shown to correlate to the measured tensile strength of the tablets, and the relaxation was interpreted as the vibrational response of the interparticle hydrogen and van der Waals bindings in the tablets. Further, the measured relaxation strength, holding information about the energy loss involved in the relaxation processes, showed that the weakest material in terms of tensile strength, starch, is the material among the four tested ones that is able to absorb the most energy within its structure when exposed to external perturbations inducing vibrations in the studied frequency range. The results indicate that mechanical relaxation analysis performed over relatively broad frequency ranges should be useful for predicting material properties of importance for the functionality of a material in applications such as, e.g., drug delivery, drug storage and handling, and also for clarifying the origin of hitherto unexplained molecular processes.

  15. Strong orientation dependence of surface mass density profiles of dark haloes at large scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osato, Ken; Nishimichi, Takahiro; Oguri, Masamune; Takada, Masahiro; Okumura, Teppei

    2018-06-01

    We study the dependence of surface mass density profiles, which can be directly measured by weak gravitational lensing, on the orientation of haloes with respect to the line-of-sight direction, using a suite of N-body simulations. We find that, when major axes of haloes are aligned with the line-of-sight direction, surface mass density profiles have higher amplitudes than those averaged over all halo orientations, over all scales from 0.1 to 100 Mpc h-1 we studied. While the orientation dependence at small scales is ascribed to the halo triaxiality, our results indicate even stronger orientation dependence in the so-called two-halo regime, up to 100 Mpc h-1. The orientation dependence for the two-halo term is well approximated by a multiplicative shift of the amplitude and therefore a shift in the halo bias parameter value. The halo bias from the two-halo term can be overestimated or underestimated by up to {˜ } 30 per cent depending on the viewing angle, which translates into the bias in estimated halo masses by up to a factor of 2 from halo bias measurements. The orientation dependence at large scales originates from the anisotropic halo-matter correlation function, which has an elliptical shape with the axis ratio of ˜0.55 up to 100 Mpc h-1. We discuss potential impacts of halo orientation bias on other observables such as optically selected cluster samples and a clustering analysis of large-scale structure tracers such as quasars.

  16. Density-dependent reduction and induction of milkweed cardenolides by a sucking insect herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, John W; Malcolm, Stephen B

    2004-03-01

    The effect of aphid population size on host-plant chemical defense expression and the effect of plant defense on aphid population dynamics were investigated in a milkweed-specialist herbivore system. Density effects of the aposematic oleander aphid, Aphis nerii, on cardenolide expression were measured in two milkweed species, Asclepias curassavica and A. incarnata. These plants vary in constitutive chemical investment with high mean cardenolide concentration in A. curassavica and low to zero in A. incarnata. The second objective was to determine whether cardenolide expression in these two host plants impacts mean A. nerii colony biomass (mg) and density. Cardenolide concentration (microgram/g) of A. curassavica in both aphid-treated leaves and opposite, herbivore-free leaves decreased initially in comparison with aphid-free controls, and then increased significantly with A. nerii density. Thus, A. curassavica responds to aphid herbivory initially with density-dependent phytochemical reduction, followed by induction of cardenolides to concentrations above aphid-free controls. In addition, mean cardenolide concentration of aphid-treated leaves was significantly higher than that of opposite, herbivore-free leaves. Therefore, A. curassavica induction is strongest in herbivore-damage tissue. Conversely, A. incarnata exhibited no such chemical response to aphid herbivory. Furthermore, neither host plant responded chemically to herbivore feeding duration time (days) or to the interaction between herbivore initial density and feeding duration time. There were also no significant differences in mean colony biomass or population density of A. nerii reared on high cardenolide (A. curassavica) and low cardenolide (A. incarnata) hosts.

  17. Temperature Dependence on Density, Viscosity, and Electrical Conductivity of Ionic Liquid 1-Ethyl-3-Methylimidazolium Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengguo Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids are considered environmentally friendly media for various industrial applications. Basic data on physicochemical properties are significant for a new material, in terms of developing its potential applications. In this work, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium fluoride ([EMIm]F ionic liquid was synthesized via an anion metathesis process. Physical properties including the density, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and thermal stability of the product were measured. The results show that the density of [EMIm]F decreases linearly with temperature increases, while dynamic viscosity decreases rapidly below 320 K and the temperature dependence of electrical conductivity is in accordance with the VFT (Vogel–Fulcher–Tammann equation. The temperature dependence of the density, conductivity, and viscosity of [EMIm]F can be expressed via the following equations: ρ = 1.516 − 1.22 × 10−3 T, σm = 4417.1exp[−953.17/(T − 166.65] and η = 2.07 × 10−7exp(−5.39 × 104/T, respectively. [EMIm]F exhibited no clear melting point. However, its glass transition point and decomposition temperature are −71.3 °C and 135 °C, respectively.

  18. Predator effects on reef fish settlement depend on predator origin and recruit density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkwitt, Cassandra E

    2017-04-01

    During major life-history transitions, animals often experience high mortality rates due to predation, making predator avoidance particularly advantageous during these times. There is mixed evidence from a limited number of studies, however, regarding how predator presence influences settlement of coral-reef fishes and it is unknown how other potentially mediating factors, including predator origin (native vs. nonnative) or interactions among conspecific recruits, mediate the non-consumptive effects of predators on reef fish settlement. During a field experiment in the Caribbean, approximately 52% fewer mahogany snapper (Lutjanus mahogoni) recruited to reefs with a native predator (graysby grouper, Cephalopholis cruentata) than to predator-free control reefs and reefs with an invasive predator (red lionfish, Pterois volitans) regardless of predator diet. These results suggest that snapper recruits do not recognize nonnative lionfish as a threat. However, these effects depended on the density of conspecific recruits, with evidence that competition may limit the response of snapper to even native predators at the highest recruit densities. In contrast, there was no effect of predator presence or conspecific density on the recruitment of bicolor damselfish (Stegastes partitus). These context-dependent responses of coral-reef fishes to predators during settlement may influence individual survival and shape subsequent population and community dynamics. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  19. Efficiency of vibrational sounding in parasitoid host location depends on substrate density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, S; Samietz, J; Dorn, S

    2003-10-01

    Parasitoids of concealed hosts have to drill through a substrate with their ovipositor for successful parasitization. Hymenopteran species in this drill-and-sting guild locate immobile pupal hosts by vibrational sounding, i.e., echolocation on solid substrate. Although this host location strategy is assumed to be common among the Orussidae and Ichneumonidae there is no information yet whether it is adapted to characteristics of the host microhabitat. This study examined the effect of substrate density on responsiveness and host location efficiency in two pupal parasitoids, Pimpla turionellae and Xanthopimpla stemmator (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae), with different host-niche specialization and corresponding ovipositor morphology. Location and frequency of ovipositor insertions were scored on cylindrical plant stem models of various densities. Substrate density had a significant negative effect on responsiveness, number of ovipositor insertions, and host location precision in both species. The more niche-specific species X. stemmator showed a higher host location precision and insertion activity. We could show that vibrational sounding is obviously adapted to the host microhabitat of the parasitoid species using this host location strategy. We suggest the attenuation of pulses during vibrational sounding as the energetically costly limiting factor for this adaptation.

  20. Quantum electrodynamical time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanehpour, Mehdi; Tokatly, Ilya; Nano-Bio Spectroscopy Group; ETSF Scientific Development Centre Team

    2015-03-01

    We present a rigorous formulation of the time-dependent density functional theory for interacting lattice electrons strongly coupled to cavity photons. We start with an example of one particle on a Hubbard dimer coupled to a single photonic mode, which is equivalent to the single mode spin-boson model or the quantum Rabi model. For this system we prove that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic density and the expectation value of the photonic coordinate, provided the initial state and the density satisfy a set of well defined conditions. Then we generalize the formalism to many interacting electrons on a lattice coupled to multiple photonic modes and prove the general mapping theorem. We also show that for a system evolving from the ground state of a lattice Hamiltonian any density with a continuous second time derivative is locally v-representable. Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (Grant No. FIS2013-46159-C3-1-P), Grupos Consolidados UPV/EHU del Gobierno Vasco (Grant No. IT578-13), COST Actions CM1204 (XLIC) and MP1306 (EUSpec).

  1. Frequency and temperature dependence of ferromagnetic linewidth in exchange biased Permalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubitz, P.; Rubinstein, M.; Krebs, J. J.; Cheng, S.-F.

    2001-01-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance linewidths were measured at 9.5 and 35 GHz and in the temperature range from 77 to 350 K for thin Permalloy (Py) films exchange biased by adjacent layers of NiO, CoO, or IrMn. Compared to unoxidized Py alone, for which the linewidth is nearly temperature independent in this range and scales linearly with frequency, exchange biased Py has broader lines with distinctive temperature dependences for each bias material at 9.5 GHz. Different temperature dependences were observed at 35 GHz. Our results are consistent with relaxation related to thermally driven reversal of the antiferromagnetic grains. Intrinsic damping and inhomogeneities also add to the widths. The qualitative features of the temperature and frequency dependences of the linewidths can be described with the usual expression for the slow relaxation linewidth mechanism. The temperature dependence of the relaxation time is taken from Neel's expression for the reversal time using appropriate rate prefactors and activation energies. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  2. Spin-dependent level density in interacting Boson-Fermion-Fermion model of the Odd-Odd Nucleus 196Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabashi, S.; Bekteshi, S.; Ahmetaj, S.; Shaqiri, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The level density of the odd-odd nucleus 196 Au is investigated in the interacting boson-fermion-fermion model (IBFFM) which accounts for collectivity and complex interaction between quasiparticle and collective modes.The IBFFM spin-dependent level densities show high-spin reduction with respect to Bethe formula.This can be well accounted for by a modified spin-dependent level density formula. (authors)

  3. Design of an O-mode frequency modulated reflectometry system for the measurement of Alborz Tokamak plasma density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koohestani, Saeideh [Department of Energy Engineering and physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, 15875-4413, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amrollahi, Reza, E-mail: amrollahi@aut.ac.ir [Department of Energy Engineering and physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, 15875-4413, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradi, Gholamreza [Department of Electrical Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, 15875-4413, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Reflectometry is a common method for plasma diagnostic, in which microwaves are launched into the plasma and reflected at the critical surfaces. Comparing the reflected microwave signals with the launched waves would give rise to the plasma density profiles. In the present study, an ordinary mode (O-mode) frequency modulation (FM) reflectometry system has been designed for the electron density profile measurement of the Alborz Tokamak plasma. This system has been considered to operate at K-band (18–26.5 GHz) frequency range and scan the frequency band between 18 to 26 GHz in 40 μS. The density profile from major radius r = 47.9–51.55 cm can be measured in Alborz Tokamak plasma. Based on the Alborz Tokamak operational conditions, the characteristic frequencies, and some dimensional limitations, all parts of reflectometer have been designed so that an appropriate efficiency with minimum attenuation, especially in transmitting/receiving system would be achieved. A dual antenna and an oversized waveguide of X-band (8–12 GHz) for transmitting and receiving purposes and a balanced detector for absolute phase determination have been utilized. The details of the Alborz Tokamak FM reflectometry components focusing on the antenna and waveguide design and mounting are described in this paper. Additionally, the procedure of plasma profile reconstruction using the system output signal is discussed. This system uses signal phase shift to determine the position of the cutoff layer.

  4. Density-dependent changes in effective area occupied for sea-bottom-associated marine fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorson, James T.; Rindorf, Anna; Gao, Jin

    2016-01-01

    among taxa and regions. The average relationship is weak but significant (0.6% increase in area for a 10% increase in abundance), whereas only a small proportion of species–region combinations show a negative relationship (i.e. shrinking area when abundance increases). Approximately one...... for every 10% abundance increase) followed by Pleuronectiformes and Scorpaeniformes, and the Eastern Bering Sea shows a strong relationship between abundance and area occupied relative to other regions. We conclude that the BM explains a small but important portion of spatial dynamics for sea......The spatial distribution of marine fishes can change for many reasons, including density-dependent distributional shifts. Previous studies show mixed support for either the proportional-density model (PDM; no relationship between abundance and area occupied, supported by ideal-free distribution...

  5. Multicomponent Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Proton and Electron Excitation Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Culpitt, Tanner; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2018-04-05

    The quantum mechanical treatment of both electrons and protons in the calculation of excited state properties is critical for describing nonadiabatic processes such as photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer. Multicomponent density functional theory enables the consistent quantum mechanical treatment of more than one type of particle and has been implemented previously for studying ground state molecular properties within the nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) framework, where all electrons and specified protons are treated quantum mechanically. To enable the study of excited state molecular properties, herein the linear response multicomponent time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is derived and implemented within the NEO framework. Initial applications to FHF - and HCN illustrate that NEO-TDDFT provides accurate proton and electron excitation energies within a single calculation. As its computational cost is similar to that of conventional electronic TDDFT, the NEO-TDDFT approach is promising for diverse applications, particularly nonadiabatic proton transfer reactions, which may exhibit mixed electron-proton vibronic excitations.

  6. Bone mineral density in patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus by dual photon absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, C.H.; Tsou, C.T.; Chen, C.C.; Wang, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) in 38 male patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) was measured by dual photon absorptiometry (DPA) using a M and SE Osteo Tech 300 scanner. The BMD of the second to fourth lumbar vertebrae was measured and the mean density was presented as g cm -2 . The patients were distinguished according to the following three criteria: (1) blood sugar control was good or poor; (2) the duration of diabetes was long or short; (3) renal function was evaluated by effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) as good or poor. The results showed about half the cases of NIDDM had lower BMD. The patients with poor blood sugar control, longer disease duration and poor renal function had lower BMD. However, the difference between any two groups distinguished by the three criteria is not significant. We think that the causes of osteoporosis in patients with NIDDM may not be explained by only a single factor. (author)

  7. Time-dependent current-density functional theory for generalized open quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen-Zhou, Joel; Rodríguez-Rosario, César; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2009-06-14

    In this article, we prove the one-to-one correspondence between vector potentials and particle and current densities in the context of master equations with arbitrary memory kernels, therefore extending time-dependent current-density functional theory (TD-CDFT) to the domain of generalized many-body open quantum systems (OQS). We also analyse the issue of A-representability for the Kohn-Sham (KS) scheme proposed by D'Agosta and Di Ventra for Markovian OQS [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2007, 98, 226403] and discuss its domain of validity. We suggest ways to expand their scheme, but also propose a novel KS scheme where the auxiliary system is both closed and non-interacting. This scheme is tested numerically with a model system, and several considerations for the future development of functionals are indicated. Our results formalize the possibility of practising TD-CDFT in OQS, hence expanding the applicability of the theory to non-Hamiltonian evolutions.

  8. Relativistic mean-field approximation with density-dependent screening meson masses in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Baoxi; Lu, Xiaofu; Shen, Pengnian; Zhao, Enguang

    2003-01-01

    The Debye screening masses of the σ, ω and neutral ρ mesons and the photon are calculated in the relativistic mean-field approximation. As the density of the nucleon increases, all the screening masses of mesons increase. A different result with Brown–Rho scaling is shown, which implies a reduction in the mass of all the mesons in the nuclear matter, except the pion. Replacing the masses of the mesons with their corresponding screening masses in the Walecka-1 model, five saturation properties of the nuclear matter are fixed reasonably, and then a density-dependent relativistic mean-field model is proposed without introducing the nonlinear self-coupling terms of mesons. (author)

  9. Temperature dependent spin momentum densities in Ni-Mn-In alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahuja, B L; Dashora, Alpa; Vadkhiya, L; Heda, N L; Priolkar, K R; Lobo, Nelson; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y; Chakrabarti, Aparna; Singh, Sanjay; Barman, S R

    2010-01-01

    The spin-dependent electron momentum densities in Ni 2 MnIn and Ni 2 Mn 1.4 In 0.6 shape memory alloy using magnetic Compton scattering with 182.2 keV circularly polarized synchrotron radiation are reported. The magnetic Compton profiles were measured at different temperatures ranging between 10 and 300 K. The profiles have been analyzed mainly in terms of Mn 3d electrons to determine their role in the formation of the total spin moment. We have also computed the spin polarized energy bands, partial and total density of states, Fermi surfaces and spin moments using full potential linearized augmented plane wave and spin polarized relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker methods. The total spin moments obtained from our magnetic Compton profile data are explained using both the band structure models. The present Compton scattering investigations are also compared with magnetization measurements.

  10. Effect of deformation and orientation on spin orbit density dependent nuclear potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rajni; Kumar, Raj; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-11-01

    Role of deformation and orientation is investigated on spin-orbit density dependent part VJ of nuclear potential (VN=VP+VJ) obtained within semi-classical Thomas Fermi approach of Skyrme energy density formalism. Calculations are performed for 24-54Si+30Si reactions, with spherical target 30Si and projectiles 24-54Si having prolate and oblate shapes. The quadrupole deformation β2 is varying within range of 0.023 ≤ β2 ≤0.531 for prolate and -0.242 ≤ β2 ≤ -0.592 for oblate projectiles. The spin-orbit dependent potential gets influenced significantly with inclusion of deformation and orientation effect. The spin-orbit barrier and position gets significantly influenced by both the sign and magnitude of β2-deformation. Si-nuclei with β220. The possible role of spin-orbit potential on barrier characteristics such as barrier height, barrier curvature and on the fusion pocket is also probed. In reference to prolate and oblate systems, the angular dependence of spin-orbit potential is further studied on fusion cross-sections.

  11. Dependence of the transference of a reduced eye on frequency of light*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Evans

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In Gaussian optics the transference is a matrix that is a complete representation of the effects of the system on a ray traversing it. Almost all of the familiar optical properties of the system, such asrefractive error and power of the system, can be calculated from the transference. Because of the central importance of the transference it is useful to have some idea of how it depends on the frequencyof light. This paper examines the simplest model eye, the reduced eye. The dependence of the transference is calculated in terms of both frequency andwavelength of light and both dependencies are displayed graphically. The principal matrix logarithms are also calculated and displayed graphically. Chromatic difference in refractive compensation, power and ametropia are obtained for the reduced eye from the transferences.  (S Afr Optom 2011 70(4 149-155

  12. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A; Isborn, Christine M

    2015-12-28

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. In vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  13. Probing the Jet Turnover Frequency Dependence on Mass and Mass Accretion Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerstein, Erica; Gültekin, Kayhan; King, Ashley

    2018-01-01

    We have examined a sample of 15 sub-Eddington supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in a variety of galaxy classifications to further understand the proposed fundamental plane of black hole activity and scaling relations between black hole masses and their radio and X-ray luminosities. This plane describes black holes from stellar-mass to supermassive. The physics probed by these sub-Eddington systems is thought to be a radiatively inefficient, jet-dominated accretion flow. By studying black holes in this regime, we can learn important information on the disk-jet connection for accreting black holes.A key factor in studying the fundamental plane is the turnover frequency — the frequency at which emission transitions from optically thick at lower frequencies to optically thin at higher frequencies. This turnover point can be measured by observing the source in both radio and X-ray. Our project aims to test the dependence of the turnover frequency on mass and mass accretion rate.Radio observations of the sample were obtained using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in the range of 5-40 GHz across four different frequency bands in A configuration to give the highest spatial resolution to focus on the core emission. Our carefully chosen sample of SMBHs with dynamically measured masses consists of two sub-samples: those with approximately constant mass accretion rate (LX/LEdd ~ 10‑7) and those with approximately constant mass (MBH ~ 108 Msun). X-ray data were obtained from archival Chandra observations. To find the turnover frequency, we used Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods to fit two power laws to the radio data and the archival X-ray data. The intersection of the radio and X-ray fits is the turnover frequency.We present the results for both subsamples of SMBHs and their relationship between the turnover frequency and X-ray luminosity, which we take to scale with mass accretion rate, and jet power derived from both radio and X-ray properties.

  14. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory for Open Systems and Its Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuguang; Kwok, YanHo; Chen, GuanHua

    2018-02-20

    Photovoltaic devices, electrochemical cells, catalysis processes, light emitting diodes, scanning tunneling microscopes, molecular electronics, and related devices have one thing in common: open quantum systems where energy and matter are not conserved. Traditionally quantum chemistry is confined to isolated and closed systems, while quantum dissipation theory studies open quantum systems. The key quantity in quantum dissipation theory is the reduced system density matrix. As the reduced system density matrix is an O(M! × M!) matrix, where M is the number of the particles of the system of interest, quantum dissipation theory can only be employed to simulate systems of a few particles or degrees of freedom. It is thus important to combine quantum chemistry and quantum dissipation theory so that realistic open quantum systems can be simulated from first-principles. We have developed a first-principles method to simulate the dynamics of open electronic systems, the time-dependent density functional theory for open systems (TDDFT-OS). Instead of the reduced system density matrix, the key quantity is the reduced single-electron density matrix, which is an N × N matrix where N is the number of the atomic bases of the system of interest. As the dimension of the key quantity is drastically reduced, the TDDFT-OS can thus be used to simulate the dynamics of realistic open electronic systems and efficient numerical algorithms have been developed. As an application, we apply the method to study how quantum interference develops in a molecular transistor in time domain. We include electron-phonon interaction in our simulation and show that quantum interference in the given system is robust against nuclear vibration not only in the steady state but also in the transient dynamics. As another application, by combining TDDFT-OS with Ehrenfest dynamics, we study current-induced dissociation of water molecules under scanning tunneling microscopy and follow its time dependent

  15. Frequency-dependent tACS modulation of BOLD signal during rhythmic visual stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yuhui; Sheng, Jingwei; Bandettini, Peter A; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2018-05-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) has emerged as a promising tool for modulating cortical oscillations. In previous electroencephalogram (EEG) studies, tACS has been found to modulate brain oscillatory activity in a frequency-specific manner. However, the spatial distribution and hemodynamic response for this modulation remains poorly understood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the advantage of measuring neuronal activity in regions not only below the tACS electrodes but also across the whole brain with high spatial resolution. Here, we measured fMRI signal while applying tACS to modulate rhythmic visual activity. During fMRI acquisition, tACS at different frequencies (4, 8, 16, and 32 Hz) was applied along with visual flicker stimulation at 8 and 16 Hz. We analyzed the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal difference between tACS-ON vs tACS-OFF, and different frequency combinations (e.g., 4 Hz tACS, 8 Hz flicker vs 8 Hz tACS, 8 Hz flicker). We observed significant tACS modulation effects on BOLD responses when the tACS frequency matched the visual flicker frequency or the second harmonic frequency. The main effects were predominantly seen in regions that were activated by the visual task and targeted by the tACS current distribution. These findings bridge different scientific domains of tACS research and demonstrate that fMRI could localize the tACS effect on stimulus-induced brain rhythms, which could lead to a new approach for understanding the high-level cognitive process shaped by the ongoing oscillatory signal. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Critique of the foundations of time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirmer, J.; Dreuw, A.

    2007-01-01

    The general expectation that, in principle, the time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) is an exact formulation of the time evolution of an interacting N-electron system is critically reexamined. It is demonstrated that the previous TDDFT foundation, resting on four theorems by Runge and Gross (RG) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 997 (1984)], is invalid because undefined phase factors corrupt the RG action integral functionals. Our finding confirms much of a previous analysis by van Leeuwen [Int. J. Mod. Phys. B 15, 1969 (2001)]. To analyze the RG theorems and other aspects of TDDFT, an utmost simplification of the Kohn-Sham (KS) concept has been introduced, in which the ground-state density is obtained from a single KS equation for one spatial (spinless) orbital. The time-dependent (TD) form of this radical Kohn-Sham (rKS) scheme, which has the same validity status as the ordinary KS version, has proved to be a valuable tool for analysis. The rKS concept is used to clarify also the alternative nonvariational formulation of TD KS theory. We argue that it is just a formal theory, allowing one to reproduce but not predict the time development of the exact density of the interacting N-electron system. Besides the issue of the formal exactness of TDDFT, it is shown that both the static and time-dependent KS linear response equations neglect the particle-particle (p-p) and hole-hole (h-h) matrix elements of the perturbing operator. For a local (multiplicative) operator this does not lead to a loss of information due to a remarkable general property of local operators. Accordingly, no logical inconsistency arises with respect to DFT, because DFT requires any external potential to be local. For a general nonlocal operator the error resulting from the neglected matrix elements is of second order in the electronic repulsion

  17. Pronounced low-frequency vibrational thermal transport in C60 fullerite realized through pressure-dependent molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2017-12-01

    Fullerene condensed-matter solids can possess thermal conductivities below their minimum glassy limit while theorized to be stiffer than diamond when crystallized under pressure. These seemingly disparate extremes in thermal and mechanical properties raise questions into the pressure dependence on the thermal conductivity of C60 fullerite crystals, and how the spectral contributions to vibrational thermal conductivity changes under applied pressure. To answer these questions, we investigate the effect of strain on the thermal conductivity of C60 fullerite crystals via pressure-dependent molecular dynamics simulations under the Green-Kubo formalism. We show that the thermal conductivity increases rapidly with compressive strain, which demonstrates a power-law relationship similar to their stress-strain relationship for the C60 crystals. Calculations of the density of states for the crystals under compressive strains reveal that the librational modes characteristic in the unstrained case are diminished due to densification of the molecular crystal. Over a large compression range (0-20 GPa), the Leibfried-Schlömann equation is shown to adequately describe the pressure dependence of thermal conductivity, suggesting that low-frequency intermolecular vibrations dictate heat flow in the C60 crystals. A spectral decomposition of the thermal conductivity supports this hypothesis.

  18. Research surface resistance of copper normal and abnormal skin-effects depending on the frequency of electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutovyi, V.A.; Komir, A.I.

    2013-01-01

    The results of the frequency dependence of surface resistance of copper in diffuse and specular reflection of electrons from the conductive surface of the high-frequency resonance of the system depending on the frequency of the electromagnetic field in the normal and anomalous skin effect. Found, the surface resistance of copper is reduced by more than 10 times at the temperature of liquid helium, as compared with a surface resistivity at room temperature, at frequencies f ≤ 173 MHz, for diffuse reflection of conduction electrons from the surface of the conductive layer, and the specular reflection - at frequencies f ≤ 346 MHz

  19. Thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon: importance of grain size and frequency-dependent mean free paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaojie; Alaniz, Joseph E; Jang, Wanyoung; Garay, Javier E; Dames, Chris

    2011-06-08

    The thermal conductivity reduction due to grain boundary scattering is widely interpreted using a scattering length assumed equal to the grain size and independent of the phonon frequency (gray). To assess these assumptions and decouple the contributions of porosity and grain size, five samples of undoped nanocrystalline silicon have been measured with average grain sizes ranging from 550 to 64 nm and porosities from 17% to less than 1%, at temperatures from 310 to 16 K. The samples were prepared using current activated, pressure assisted densification (CAPAD). At low temperature the thermal conductivities of all samples show a T(2) dependence which cannot be explained by any traditional gray model. The measurements are explained over the entire temperature range by a new frequency-dependent model in which the mean free path for grain boundary scattering is inversely proportional to the phonon frequency, which is shown to be consistent with asymptotic analysis of atomistic simulations from the literature. In all cases the recommended boundary scattering length is smaller than the average grain size. These results should prove useful for the integration of nanocrystalline materials in devices such as advanced thermoelectrics.

  20. Human Commercial Models' Eye Colour Shows Negative Frequency-Dependent Selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Rodrigues Nogueira Forti

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the eye colour of human commercial models registered in the UK (400 female and 400 male and Brazil (400 female and 400 male to test the hypothesis that model eye colour frequency was the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. The eye colours of the models were classified as: blue, brown or intermediate. Chi-square analyses of data for countries separated by sex showed that in the United Kingdom brown eyes and intermediate colours were significantly more frequent than expected in comparison to the general United Kingdom population (P<0.001. In Brazil, the most frequent eye colour brown was significantly less frequent than expected in comparison to the general Brazilian population. These results support the hypothesis that model eye colour is the result of negative frequency-dependent selection. This could be the result of people using eye colour as a marker of genetic diversity and finding rarer eye colours more attractive because of the potential advantage more genetically diverse offspring that could result from such a choice. Eye colour may be important because in comparison to many other physical traits (e.g., hair colour it is hard to modify, hide or disguise, and it is highly polymorphic.

  1. Circularly polarized harmonic generation by intense bicircular laser pulses: electron recollision dynamics and frequency dependent helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Mauger, François; Yuan, Kai-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations for one and two electron cyclic molecules {{{H}}}nq+ exposed to intense bichromatic circularly polarized laser pulses of frequencies {ω }1 and {ω }2, such that {ω }1/{ω }2={n}1/{n}2 (integer) produce circularly polarized high order harmonics with a cut-off recollision maximum energy at and greater than the linear polarization law (in atomic units) {N}m{ω }1={I}p+3.17{U}p, where I p is the ionization potential and {U}p={(2{E}0)}2/4{ω }2 is the ponderomotive energy defined by the field E 0 (intensity I={{cE}}02/8π ) from each pulse and mean frequency ω =({ω }1+{ω }2)/2 . An electron recollision model in a rotating frame at rotating frequency {{Δ }}ω =({ω }1-{ω }2)/2 predicts this simple result as a result of recollision dynamics in a combination of bichromatic circularly polarized pulses. The harmonic helicities and their intensities are shown to depend on compatible symmetries of the net pulse electric fields with that of the molecules.

  2. Time-dependent density functional calculation of the energy loss of antiprotons colliding with metallic nanoshells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quijada, M.; Borisov, A.G.; Muino, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory is used to study the interaction between antiprotons and metallic nanoshells. The ground state electronic properties of the nanoshell are obtained in the jellium approximation. The energy lost by the antiproton during the collision is calculated and compared to that suffered by antiprotons traveling in metal clusters. The resulting energy loss per unit path length of material in thin nanoshells is larger than the corresponding quantity for clusters. It is shown that the collision process can be interpreted as the antiproton crossing of two nearly bi-dimensional independent metallic systems. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Sequential double excitations from linear-response time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosquera, Martín A.; Ratner, Mark A.; Schatz, George C., E-mail: g-schatz@northwestern.edu [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Chen, Lin X. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2016-05-28

    Traditional UV/vis and X-ray spectroscopies focus mainly on the study of excitations starting exclusively from electronic ground states. However there are many experiments where transitions from excited states, both absorption and emission, are probed. In this work we develop a formalism based on linear-response time-dependent density functional theory to investigate spectroscopic properties of excited states. We apply our model to study the excited-state absorption of a diplatinum(II) complex under X-rays, and transient vis/UV absorption of pyrene and azobenzene.

  4. Stopping of deuterium in warm dense deuterium from Ehrenfest time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magyar, R.J.; Shulenburger, L.; Baczewski, A.D. [Sandia National Laboratories - Multi-scale Physics 1444 MS 1322, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-15

    In these proceedings, we show that time-dependent density functional theory is capable of stopping calculations at the extreme conditions of temperature and pressure seen in warm dense matter. The accuracy of the stopping curves tends to be up to about 20% lower than empirical models that are in use. However, TDDFT calculations are free from fitting parameters and assumptions about the model form of the dielectric function. This work allows the simulation of ion stopping in many materials that are difficult to study experimentally. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Time-dependent density functional theory description of total photoabsorption cross sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Bruno Nunes Cabral; Nascimento, Marco Antonio Chaer; Rocha, Alexandre Braga

    2018-02-01

    The time-dependent version of the density functional theory (TDDFT) has been used to calculate the total photoabsorption cross section of a number of molecules, namely, benzene, pyridine, furan, pyrrole, thiophene, phenol, naphthalene, and anthracene. The discrete electronic pseudo-spectra, obtained in a L2 basis set calculation were used in an analytic continuation procedure to obtain the photoabsorption cross sections. The ammonia molecule was chosen as a model system to compare the results obtained with TDDFT to those obtained with the linear response coupled cluster approach in order to make a link with our previous work and establish benchmarks.

  6. Time-dependent density functional theory for open quantum systems with unitary propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen-Zhou, Joel; Tempel, David G; Rodríguez-Rosario, César A; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2010-01-29

    We extend the Runge-Gross theorem for a very general class of open quantum systems under weak assumptions about the nature of the bath and its coupling to the system. We show that for Kohn-Sham (KS) time-dependent density functional theory, it is possible to rigorously include the effects of the environment within a bath functional in the KS potential. A Markovian bath functional inspired by the theory of nonlinear Schrödinger equations is suggested, which can be readily implemented in currently existing real-time codes. Finally, calculations on a helium model system are presented.

  7. Density-Dependent Conformable Space-time Fractional Diffusion-Reaction Equation and Its Exact Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Kamyar; Mayeli, Peyman; Bekir, Ahmet; Guner, Ozkan

    2018-01-01

    In this article, a special type of fractional differential equations (FDEs) named the density-dependent conformable fractional diffusion-reaction (DDCFDR) equation is studied. Aforementioned equation has a significant role in the modelling of some phenomena arising in the applied science. The well-organized methods, including the \\exp (-φ (\\varepsilon )) -expansion and modified Kudryashov methods are exerted to generate the exact solutions of this equation such that some of the solutions are new and have been reported for the first time. Results illustrate that both methods have a great performance in handling the DDCFDR equation.

  8. Nonadiabatic Dynamics in Single-Electron Tunneling Devices with Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Niklas; Splettstoesser, Janine; Helbig, Nicole

    2018-04-01

    We simulate the dynamics of a single-electron source, modeled as a quantum dot with on-site Coulomb interaction and tunnel coupling to an adjacent lead in time-dependent density-functional theory. Based on this system, we develop a time-nonlocal exchange-correlation potential by exploiting analogies with quantum-transport theory. The time nonlocality manifests itself in a dynamical potential step. We explicitly link the time evolution of the dynamical step to physical relaxation timescales of the electron dynamics. Finally, we discuss prospects for simulations of larger mesoscopic systems.

  9. Tuning of gravity-dependent and gravity-independent vertical angular VOR gain changes by frequency of adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushin, Sergei B

    2012-06-01

    The gain of the vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) was adaptively increased and decreased in a side-down head orientation for 4 h in two cynomolgus monkeys. Adaptation was performed at 0.25, 1, 2, or 4 Hz. The gravity-dependent and -independent gain changes were determined over a range of head orientations from left-side-down to right-side-down at frequencies from 0.25 to 10 Hz, before and after adaptation. Gain changes vs. frequency data were fit with a Gaussian to determine the frequency at which the peak gain change occurred, as well as the tuning width. The frequency at which the peak gravity-dependent gain change occurred was approximately equal to the frequency of adaptation, and the width increased monotonically with increases in the frequency of adaptation. The gravity-independent component was tuned to the adaptive frequency of 0.25 Hz but was uniformly distributed over all frequencies when the adaptation frequency was 1-4 Hz. The amplitude of the gravity-independent gain changes was larger after the aVOR gain decrease than after the gain increase across all tested frequencies. For the aVOR gain decrease, the phase lagged about 4° for frequencies below the adaptation frequency and led for frequencies above the adaptation frequency. For gain increases, the phase relationship as a function of frequency was inverted. This study demonstrates that the previously described dependence of aVOR gain adaptation on frequency is a property of the gravity-dependent component of the aVOR only. The gravity-independent component of the aVOR had a substantial tuning curve only at an adaptation frequency of 0.25 Hz.

  10. Frequency Dependencies of the Exchange Spin Wave Reflection Coefficient on a One-Dimensional Magnon Crystal with Complex Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhii O. Reshetniak

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions. It is shown that the frequency dependencies are periodic, points of full transmission and areas, full of reflection. Decreasing exchange parameter value in interface causes the increase of reflectance coefficient. Changing the material parameters we get the necessary intensity value of the reflection coefficient depending on the frequency at a constant value of the external magnetic field.

  11. Signature of magnetic-dependent gapless odd frequency states at superconductor / ferromagnet interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Jason [Department of Materials Science, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge, CB30FS (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    The theory of superconductivity developed by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer (BCS) explains the stabilisation of electron pairs into a spin-singlet, even frequency, state by the formation of an energy gap below which the density of states (DoS) is zero. At a superconductor interface with an inhomogeneous ferromagnet, a gapless odd frequency superconducting state is predicted in which the Cooper pairs are in a spin-triplet state. Although indirect evidence for such a state has been obtained, the gap structure and pairing symmetry have not so far been determined. In this talk I will present scanning tunnelling spectroscopy of Nb superconducting films proximity coupled to epitaxial Ho. These measurements reveal pronounced changes to the Nb sub-gap superconducting DoS on driving the Ho through a metamagnetic transition from a helical antiferromagnetic to a homogeneous ferromagnetic state for which a BCS-like gap is recovered. The results verify odd frequency spin-triplet superconductivity at superconductor / inhomogeneous magnet interfaces.

  12. Optimized Irregular Low-Density Parity-Check Codes for Multicarrier Modulations over Frequency-Selective Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérian Mannoni

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with optimized channel coding for OFDM transmissions (COFDM over frequency-selective channels using irregular low-density parity-check (LDPC codes. Firstly, we introduce a new characterization of the LDPC code irregularity called “irregularity profile.” Then, using this parameterization, we derive a new criterion based on the minimization of the transmission bit error probability to design an irregular LDPC code suited to the frequency selectivity of the channel. The optimization of this criterion is done using the Gaussian approximation technique. Simulations illustrate the good performance of our approach for different transmission channels.

  13. Advancement in the Understanding of the Field and Frequency Dependent Microwave Surface Resistance of Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinello, M. [Fermilab; Aderhold, S. [Fermilab; Chandrasekaran, S. K. [Fermilab; Checchin, M. [Fermilab; Grassellino, A. [Fermilab; Melnychuk, O. [Fermilab; Posen, S. [Fermilab; Romanenko, A. [Fermilab; Sergatskov, D. A. [Fermilab

    2017-07-24

    The radio-frequency surface resistance of niobium resonators is incredibly reduced when nitrogen impurities are dissolved as interstitial in the material, conferring ultra-high Q-factors at medium values of accelerating field. This effect has been observed in both high and low temperature nitrogen treatments. As a matter of fact, the peculiar anti Q-slope observed in nitrogen doped cavities, i.e. the decreasing of the Q-factor with the increasing of the radio-frequency field, come from the decreasing of the BCS surface resistance component as a function of the field. Such peculiar behavior has been considered consequence of the interstitial nitrogen present in the niobium lattice after the doping treatment. The study here presented show the field dependence of the BCS surface resistance of cavities with different resonant frequencies, such as: 650 MHz, 1.3 GHz, 2.6 GHz and 3.9 GHz, and processed with different state-of-the-art surface treatments. These findings show for the first time that the anti Q-slope might be seen at high frequency even for clean Niobium cavities, revealing useful suggestion on the physics underneath the anti Q-slope effect.

  14. Frequency-dependent viscoelastic parameters of mouse brain tissue estimated by MR elastography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, E H; Bayly, P V [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St Louis, 1 Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1185, Saint Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Garbow, J R, E-mail: clayton@wustl.edu, E-mail: garbow@wustl.edu, E-mail: pvb@wustl.edu [Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Washington University in St Louis, 4525 Scott Avenue, Campus Box 8227, Saint Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2011-04-21

    Viscoelastic properties of mouse brain tissue were estimated non-invasively, in vivo, using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) at 4.7 T to measure the dispersive properties of induced shear waves. Key features of this study include (i) the development and application of a novel MR-compatible actuation system which transmits vibratory motion into the brain through an incisor bar, and (ii) the investigation of the mechanical properties of brain tissue over a 1200 Hz bandwidth from 600-1800 Hz. Displacement fields due to propagating shear waves were measured during continuous, harmonic excitation of the skull. This protocol enabled characterization of the true steady-state patterns of shear wave propagation. Analysis of displacement fields obtained at different frequencies indicates that the viscoelastic properties of mouse brain tissue depend strongly on frequency. The average storage modulus (G') increased from approximately 1.6 to 8 kPa over this range; average loss modulus (G'') increased from approximately 1 to 3 kPa. Both moduli were well approximated by a power-law relationship over this frequency range. MRE may be a valuable addition to studies of disease in murine models, and to pre-clinical evaluations of therapies. Quantitative measurements of the viscoelastic parameters of brain tissue at high frequencies are also valuable for modeling and simulation of traumatic brain injury.

  15. Evolution of frequency-dependent mate choice: keeping up with fashion trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokko, Hanna; Jennions, Michael D; Houde, Anne

    2007-05-22

    The diversity of sexual traits favoured by females is enormous and, curiously, includes preferences for males with rare or novel phenotypes. We modelled the evolution of a preference for rarity that yielded two surprising results. First, a Fisherian 'sexy son' effect can boost female preferences to a frequency well above that predicted by mutation-selection balance, even if there are significant mortality costs for females. Preferences do not reach fixation, however, as they are subject to frequency-dependent selection: if choosy females are too common, then rare genotypes in one generation become common, and thus unattractive, in the offspring generation. Nevertheless, even at relatively low frequency, preferences maintain polymorphism in male traits. The second unexpected result is that the preferences can evolve to much higher frequencies if choice is hindered, such that females cannot always express their preferences. Our results emphasize the need to consider feedback where preferences determine the dynamics of male genotypes and vice versa. They also highlight the similarity between the arbitrariness of behavioural norms in models of social evolution with punishment (the so-called 'folk theorem') and the diversity of sexual traits that can be preferred simply because deviating from the norm produces unattractive offspring and is, in this sense, 'punished'.

  16. Frequency Dependent Nudging of Hydrographic Data Into a Numerical Model of the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, K. R.; Wright, D. G.

    2002-12-01

    Nudging is one of the simplest ways of assimilating data into ocean models and it has been used for many years in studies of large-scale ocean circulation. One of its drawbacks is the suppression of eddies when nudging an eddy-permitting ocean model strongly toward an observed seasonal climatology. We propose a straightforward extension of nudging in which the model's climatology, rather than its instantaneous state, is nudged toward the observed seasonal climatology. In effect we propose nudging in specific frequency bands that are centered on the discrete frequencies evident in the observed climatology (e.g. 0, 1/12 and 1/6 cycles per month). This extension of conventional nudging allows the difference between the observed and modeled climatologies arbitrarily to be made small while allowing variations outside the selected frequency bands to evolve freely. We show how the method can be implemented efficiently in complex models using a Kalman filter and also discuss the benefits of spatially smoothing the nudges. We conclude with a demonstration of frequency dependent nudging using a 1/3 degree model of the North Atlantic.

  17. Frequency Dependence of Electrical Parameters of an Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Composite Based Humidity Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Akram

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study highlights the interdependence of ambient humidity levels on the electrical parameters of organic-inorganic hybrid composite based humidity sensor at varied AC frequencies of input signal. Starting from the bottom, the layer stack of the fabricated humidity sensor was 200-nm silver (Ag thin film and 4 μm spun-coated PEPC+NiPC+Cu2O active layer. Silver thin films were deposited by thermal evaporator on well cleaned microscopic glass slides, which served as a substrate. Conventional optical lithography procedure was adapted to define pairs of silver-silver surface electrodes with two sorts of configurations, i.e., interdigitated and rectangular. Humidity-sensitive layers of organic-inorganic composite were then spun-cast upon the channel between the silver electrodes. The changes in relative humidity levels induced variation in capacitance and impedance of the sensors. These variations in electrical parameters of sensors were also found to be highly dependent upon frequency of input AC signal. Our findings reveal that the organic-inorganic composite shows higher humidity sensitivity at smaller orders of frequency. This finding is in accordance with the established fact that organic semiconductors-based devices are not applicable for high frequency applications due to their lower charge carrier mobility values. Two distinct geometries of semiconducting medium between the silver electrodes were investigated to optimize the sensing parameters of the humidity sensor. Furthermore, the effect of temperature change on the resistance of organic composite has also been studied.

  18. Redshift space correlations and scale-dependent stochastic biasing of density peaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjacques, Vincent; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the redshift space correlation function and the power spectrum of density peaks of a Gaussian random field. Our derivation, which is valid on linear scales k≲0.1hMpc-1, is based on the peak biasing relation given by Desjacques [Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998, 78, 103503 (2008)10.1103/PhysRevD.78.103503]. In linear theory, the redshift space power spectrum is Ppks(k,μ)=exp⁡(-f2σvel2k2μ2)[bpk(k)+bvel(k)fμ2]2Pδ(k), where μ is the angle with respect to the line of sight, σvel is the one-dimensional velocity dispersion, f is the growth rate, and bpk(k) and bvel(k) are k-dependent linear spatial and velocity bias factors. For peaks, the value of σvel depends upon the functional form of bvel. When the k dependence is absent from the square brackets and bvel is set to unity, the resulting expression is assumed to describe models where the bias is linear and deterministic, but the velocities are unbiased. The peak model is remarkable because it has unbiased velocities in this same sense—peak motions are driven by dark matter flows—but, in order to achieve this, bvel must be k dependent. We speculate that this is true in general: k dependence of the spatial bias will lead to k dependence of bvel even if the biased tracers flow with the dark matter. Because of the k dependence of the linear bias parameters, standard manipulations applied to the peak model will lead to k-dependent estimates of the growth factor that could erroneously be interpreted as a signature of modified dark energy or gravity. We use the Fisher formalism to show that the constraint on the growth rate f is degraded by a factor of 2 if one allows for a k-dependent velocity bias of the peak type. Our analysis also demonstrates that the Gaussian smoothing term is part and parcel of linear theory. We discuss a simple estimate of nonlinear evolution and illustrate the effect of the peak bias on the redshift space multipoles. For k≲0.1hMpc-1, the peak bias is deterministic but k

  19. Hydrodynamic perspective on memory in time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, M.; Kuemmel, S.

    2009-01-01

    The adiabatic approximation of time-dependent density-functional theory is studied in the context of nonlinear excitations of two-electron singlet systems. We compare the exact time evolution of these systems to the adiabatically exact one obtained from time-dependent Kohn-Sham calculations relying on the exact ground-state exchange-correlation potential. Thus, we can show under which conditions the adiabatic approximation breaks down and memory effects become important. The hydrodynamic formulation of quantum mechanics allows us to interpret these results and relate them to dissipative effects in the Kohn-Sham system. We show how the breakdown of the adiabatic approximation can be inferred from the rate of change of the ground-state noninteracting kinetic energy.

  20. Parameter dependences of the separatrix density in nitrogen seeded ASDEX Upgrade H-mode discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, A.; Sun, H. J.; Eich, T.; Carralero, D.; Hobirk, J.; Scarabosio, A.; Siccinio, M.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2018-04-01

    The upstream separatrix electron density is an important interface parameter for core performance and divertor power exhaust. It has been measured in ASDEX Upgrade H-mode discharges by means of Thomson scattering using a self-consistent estimate of the upstream electron temperature under the assumption of Spitzer-Härm electron conduction. Its dependence on various plasma parameters has been tested for different plasma conditions in H-mode. The leading parameter determining n e,sep was found to be the neutral divertor pressure, which can be considered as an engineering parameter since it is determined mainly by the gas puff rate and the pumping speed. The experimentally found parameter dependence of n e,sep, which is dominated by the divertor neutral pressure, could be approximately reconciled by 2-point modelling.

  1. Frequency-dependence of mating success in Poeciliopsis monacha (Pisces, Cyprinodontiformes reproductive complex, Sonora, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Neuza Rejane Wille

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A diversity of all-female fishes of the genus Poeciliopsis coexists with their sexual ancestor species in streams of western Mexico. All-females are hybrids that depend on the sperm of paternal species to reproduce. Rare-female advantage is one of several hypotheses that attempt to explain how the diversity of all-female biotypes is maintained within the Poeciliopsis reproductive complexes. According to this hypothesis, the uncommon all-female biotype has a mating advantage over the common ones and has been maintained by a dynamic equilibrium process. In the P. monacha reproductive complex at Arroyo de los Platanos the density of two all-female biotypes (P. 2monacha-lucida I and II varies across pools. The objective of this study was to analyse fecundity and mating success of females from this arroyo to test the hypothesis. Female mating success was inversely correlated to their density, supporting this hypothesis.

  2. Dependence of exponents on text length versus finite-size scaling for word-frequency distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Álvaro; Font-Clos, Francesc

    2017-08-01

    Some authors have recently argued that a finite-size scaling law for the text-length dependence of word-frequency distributions cannot be conceptually valid. Here we give solid quantitative evidence for the validity of this scaling law, using both careful statistical tests and analytical arguments based on the generalized central-limit theorem applied to the moments of the distribution (and obtaining a novel derivation of Heaps' law as a by-product). We also find that the picture of word-frequency distributions with power-law exponents that decrease with text length [X. Yan and P. Minnhagen, Physica A 444, 828 (2016), 10.1016/j.physa.2015.10.082] does not stand with rigorous statistical analysis. Instead, we show that the distributions are perfectly described by power-law tails with stable exponents, whose values are close to 2, in agreement with the classical Zipf's law. Some misconceptions about scaling are also clarified.

  3. Planck intermediate results. XXII. Frequency dependence of thermal emission from Galactic dust in intensity and polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J. F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.

    2015-01-01

    )% from 353 to 70 GHz. We discuss this result within the context of existing dust models. The decrease in p could indicate differences in polarization efficiency among components of interstellar dust (e.g., carbon versus silicate grains). Our observational results provide inputs to quantify and optimize......Planck has mapped the intensity and polarization of the sky at microwave frequencies with unprecedented sensitivity. We use these data to characterize the frequency dependence of dust emission. We make use of the Planck 353 GHz I, Q, and U Stokes maps as dust templates, and cross-correlate them...... of the cosmic microwave background. We use a mask that focuses our analysis on the diffuse interstellar medium at intermediate Galactic latitudes. We determine the spectral indices of dust emission in intensity and polarization between 100 and 353 GHz, for each sky patch. Both indices are found to be remarkably...

  4. Frequency-dependant homogenized properties of composite using spectral analysis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Amor, M; Ben Ghozlen, M H; Lanceleur, P

    2010-01-01

    An inverse procedure is proposed to determine the material constants of multilayered composites using a spectral analysis homogenization method. Recursive process gives interfacial displacement perpendicular to layers in term of deepness. A fast-Fourier transform (FFT) procedure has been used in order to extract the wave numbers propagating in the multilayer. The upper frequency bound of this homogenization domain is estimated. Inside the homogenization domain, we discover a maximum of three planes waves susceptible to propagate in the medium. A consistent algorithm is adopted to develop an inverse procedure for the determination of the materials constants of multidirectional composite. The extracted wave numbers are used as the inputs for the procedure. The outputs are the elastic constants of multidirectional composite. Using this method, the frequency dependent effective elastic constants are obtained and example for [0/90] composites is given.

  5. Effect of frequency on amplitude-dependent internal friction in niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, Naoki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: ide@nitech.ac.jp; Atsumi, Tomohiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nishino, Yoichi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2006-12-20

    Amplitude-dependent internal friction (ADIF) was measured in a polycrystalline niobium using four modes of flexural vibration from the fundamental to the third-order resonance at room temperature. The ADIF was detected in each vibration mode. The internal-friction versus strain-amplitude curve of the ADIF shifted to a larger strain-amplitude range as frequency increased. The stress-strain curves were derived from the ADIF data, and the microplastic flow stress defined as the stress required to produce a plastic strain of 1 x 10{sup -9} was read from the stress-strain curves. It was found that the microplastic flow stress was proportional to the frequency.

  6. Symmetries and invariants of the oscillator and envelope equations with time-dependent frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The single-particle dynamics in a time-dependent focusing field is examined. The existence of the Courant-Snyder invariant, a fundamental concept in accelerator physics, is fundamentally a result of the corresponding symmetry admitted by the harmonic oscillator equation with linear time-dependent frequency. It is demonstrated that the Lie algebra of the symmetry group for the oscillator equation with time-dependent frequency is eight dimensional, and is composed of four independent subalgebras. A detailed analysis of the admitted symmetries reveals a deeper connection between the nonlinear envelope equation and the oscillator equation. A general theorem regarding the symmetries and invariants of the envelope equation, which includes the existence of the Courant-Snyder invariant as a special case, is demonstrated. As an application to accelerator physics, the symmetries of the envelope equation enable a fast numerical algorithm for finding matched solutions without using the conventional iterative Newton’s method, where the envelope equation needs to be numerically integrated once for every iteration, and the Jacobi matrix needs to be calculated for the envelope perturbation.

  7. Generalized expressions for variations in critical frequencies, electron densities and altitudes of the ionospheric layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njau, E.C.

    1990-12-01

    We develop generalized mathematical expressions for time and space variations of peak electron densities of the ionospheric D, E, F1 and F2 layers as well as corresponding variations in the altitudes of the electron density peaks in each of these layers. On the basis of the Chapman characteristics of the E and F1 layers and other techniques, a generalized expression is developed for the electron density height profile of each of the four ionospheric layers. Consequently a generalized mathematical expression is developed for the entire electron density height profile of the whole ionosphere as a function of time, latitude and longitude. The latter mathematical expression may be used to compute or predict ionospheric parameters associated with ratio and satellite communications. Finally we show that some well documented equations on ionospheric parameters are simplified (or approximated) versions of some of our mathematical expressions. (author). 29 refs

  8. The Road to Language Learning Is Not Entirely Iconic: Iconicity, Neighborhood Density, and Frequency Facilitate Acquisition of Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Naomi K; Pyers, Jennie E

    2017-07-01

    Iconic mappings between words and their meanings are far more prevalent than once estimated and seem to support children's acquisition of new words, spoken or signed. We asked whether iconicity's prevalence in sign language overshadows two other factors known to support the acquisition of spoken vocabulary: neighborhood density (the number of lexical items phonologically similar to the target) and lexical frequency. Using mixed-effects logistic regressions, we reanalyzed 58 parental reports of native-signing deaf children's productive acquisition of 332 signs in American Sign Language (ASL; Anderson & Reilly, 2002) and found that iconicity, neighborhood density, and lexical frequency independently facilitated vocabulary acquisition. Despite differences in iconicity and phonological structure between signed and spoken language, signing children, like children learning a spoken language, track statistical information about lexical items and their phonological properties and leverage this information to expand their vocabulary.

  9. Temporal evolution of electron density in a low pressure pulsed two-frequency (60 MHz/2 MHz) capacitively coupled plasma discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirse, N; Ellingboe, A R; Jeon, M H; Yeom, G Y

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved electron density, n e , is measured in a low pressure pulsed two-frequency capacitively coupled plasma discharge sustained in Ar and in Ar/CF 4 /O 2 (80 : 10 : 10) gas mixture using a floating resonance hairpin probe. The top electrode is powered by 60 MHz in pulse mode and the bottom electrode is powered by 2 MHz in continuous wave mode. The dependence of time-resolved n e on the low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) power levels, operating gas pressure, pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and duty cycle are investigated. It is found that the steady state n e in the long on-phase is greatly influenced by the HF power level and slightly affected by the LF power level in both Ar and Ar/CF 4 /O 2 plasma. The decay time of n e is slow (∼30–90 µs) in the case of Ar plasma and strongly depends on the LF power level, whereas in the case of Ar/CF 4 /O 2 gas mixture it is very fast (∼15 µs) and marginally dependent on LF power level. In Ar plasma the steady state n e is increasing with a rise in operating gas pressure, however, in Ar/CF 4 /O 2 plasma it first increases with gas pressure reaching to the maximum (at 20 mTorr) value and then decreases. The pressure dependence of decay time constant mimics the pressure variation of steady state n e . Furthermore, it is observed that the on-phase electron density is greatly affected by changing the PRF and duty cycle. This effect is more prominent in Ar/CF 4 /O 2 plasma when compared to Ar discharge. In addition, n e is observed to overshoot the steady state densities in the beginning of the on-phase in Ar/CF 4 /O 2 gas mixture, but this effect is either small or absent in the case of Ar plasma. (paper)

  10. Monitoring voltage-dependent charge displacement of Shaker B-IR K+ ion channels using radio frequency interrogation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera Dharia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Here we introduce a new technique that probes voltage-dependent charge displacements of excitable membrane-bound proteins using extracellularly applied radio frequency (RF, 500 kHz electric fields. Xenopus oocytes were used as a model cell for these experiments, and were injected with cRNA encoding Shaker B-IR (ShB-IR K(+ ion channels to express large densities of this protein in the oocyte membranes. Two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC was applied to command whole-cell membrane potential and to measure channel-dependent membrane currents. Simultaneously, RF electric fields were applied to perturb the membrane potential about the TEVC level and to measure voltage-dependent RF displacement currents. ShB-IR expressing oocytes showed significantly larger changes in RF displacement currents upon membrane depolarization than control oocytes. Voltage-dependent changes in RF displacement currents further increased in ShB-IR expressing oocytes after ∼120 µM Cu(2+ addition to the external bath. Cu(2+ is known to bind to the ShB-IR ion channel and inhibit Shaker K(+ conductance, indicating that changes in the RF displacement current reported here were associated with RF vibration of the Cu(2+-linked mobile domain of the ShB-IR protein. Results demonstrate the use of extracellular RF electrodes to interrogate voltage-dependent movement of charged mobile protein domains--capabilities that might enable detection of small changes in charge distribution associated with integral membrane protein conformation and/or drug-protein interactions.

  11. Monitoring voltage-dependent charge displacement of Shaker B-IR K+ ion channels using radio frequency interrogation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharia, Sameera; Rabbitt, Richard D

    2011-02-28

    Here we introduce a new technique that probes voltage-dependent charge displacements of excitable membrane-bound proteins using extracellularly applied radio frequency (RF, 500 kHz) electric fields. Xenopus oocytes were used as a model cell for these experiments, and were injected with cRNA encoding Shaker B-IR (ShB-IR) K(+) ion channels to express large densities of this protein in the oocyte membranes. Two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) was applied to command whole-cell membrane potential and to measure channel-dependent membrane currents. Simultaneously, RF electric fields were applied to perturb the membrane potential about the TEVC level and to measure voltage-dependent RF displacement currents. ShB-IR expressing oocytes showed significantly larger changes in RF displacement currents upon membrane depolarization than control oocytes. Voltage-dependent changes in RF displacement currents further increased in ShB-IR expressing oocytes after ∼120 µM Cu(2+) addition to the external bath. Cu(2+) is known to bind to the ShB-IR ion channel and inhibit Shaker K(+) conductance, indicating that changes in the RF displacement current reported here were associated with RF vibration of the Cu(2+)-linked mobile domain of the ShB-IR protein. Results demonstrate the use of extracellular RF electrodes to interrogate voltage-dependent movement of charged mobile protein domains--capabilities that might enable detection of small changes in charge distribution associated with integral membrane protein conformation and/or drug-protein interactions.

  12. Wavelet-based linear-response time-dependent density-functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Bhaarathi; Genovese, Luigi; Casida, Mark E.; Deutsch, Thierry; Burchak, Olga N.; Philouze, Christian; Balakirev, Maxim Y.

    2012-06-01

    Linear-response time-dependent (TD) density-functional theory (DFT) has been implemented in the pseudopotential wavelet-based electronic structure program BIGDFT and results are compared against those obtained with the all-electron Gaussian-type orbital program DEMON2K for the calculation of electronic absorption spectra of N2 using the TD local density approximation (LDA). The two programs give comparable excitation energies and absorption spectra once suitably extensive basis sets are used. Convergence of LDA density orbitals and orbital energies to the basis-set limit is significantly faster for BIGDFT than for DEMON2K. However the number of virtual orbitals used in TD-DFT calculations is a parameter in BIGDFT, while all virtual orbitals are included in TD-DFT calculations in DEMON2K. As a reality check, we report the X-ray crystal structure and the measured and calculated absorption spectrum (excitation energies and oscillator strengths) of the small organic molecule N-cyclohexyl-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)imidazo[1, 2-a]pyridin-3-amine.

  13. Determining the von Mises stress power spectral density for frequency domain fatigue analysis including out-of-phase stress components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonte, M. H. A.; de Boer, A.; Liebregts, R.

    2007-04-01

    This paper provides a new formula to take into account phase differences in the determination of an equivalent von Mises stress power spectral density (PSD) from multiple random inputs. The obtained von Mises PSD can subsequently be used for fatigue analysis. The formula was derived for use in the commercial vehicle business and was implemented in combination with Finite Element software to predict and analyse fatigue failure in the frequency domain.

  14. Mapping of trap densities and hotspots in pentacene thin-film transistors by frequency-resolved scanning photoresponse microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermeier, Christian; Fiebig, Matthias; Nickel, Bert

    2013-10-25

    Frequency-resolved scanning photoresponse microscopy of pentacene thin-film transistors is reported. The photoresponse pattern maps the in-plane distribution of trap states which is superimposed by the level of trap filling adjusted by the gate voltage of the transistor. Local hotspots in the photoresponse map thus indicate areas of high trap densities within the pentacene thin film. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH 8 Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Density dependence drives habitat production and survivorship of Acropora cervicornis used for restoration on a Caribbean coral reef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C Ladd

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCoral restoration is gaining traction as a viable strategy to help restore degraded reefs. While the nascent field of coral restoration has rapidly progressed in the past decade, significant knowledge gaps remain regarding the drivers of restoration success that may impede our ability to effectively restore coral reef communities. Here, we conducted a field experiment to investigate the influence of coral density on the growth, habitat production, and survival of corals outplanted for restoration. We used nursery-raised colonies of Acropora cervicornis to experimentally establish populations of corals with either 3, 6, 12, or 24 corals within 4m2 plots, generating a gradient of coral densities ranging from 0.75 corals m-2 to 12 corals m-2. After 13 months we found that density had a significant effect on the growth, habitat production, and survivorship of restored corals. We found that coral survivorship increased as colony density decreased. Importantly, the signal of density dependent effects was context dependent. Our data suggest that positive density dependent effects influenced habitat production at densities of 3 corals m-2, but further increases in density resulted in negative density dependent effects with decreasing growth and survivorship of corals. These findings highlight the importance of density dependence for coral restoration planning and demonstrate the need to evaluate the influence of density for other coral species used for restoration. Further work focused on the mechanisms causing density dependence such as increased herbivory, rapid disease transmission, or altered predation rates are important next steps to advance our ability to effectively restore coral reefs.

  16. A unified dislocation density-dependent physical-based constitutive model for cold metal forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacht, K.; Motaman, A. H.; Prahl, U.; Bleck, W.

    2017-10-01

    Dislocation-density-dependent physical-based constitutive models of metal plasticity while are computationally efficient and history-dependent, can accurately account for varying process parameters such as strain, strain rate and temperature; different loading modes such as continuous deformation, creep and relaxation; microscopic metallurgical processes; and varying chemical composition within an alloy family. Since these models are founded on essential phenomena dominating the deformation, they have a larger range of usability and validity. Also, they are suitable for manufacturing chain simulations since they can efficiently compute the cumulative effect of the various manufacturing processes by following the material state through the entire manufacturing chain and also interpass periods and give a realistic prediction of the material behavior and final product properties. In the physical-based constitutive model of cold metal plasticity introduced in this study, physical processes influencing cold and warm plastic deformation in polycrystalline metals are described using physical/metallurgical internal variables such as dislocation density and effective grain size. The evolution of these internal variables are calculated using adequate equations that describe the physical processes dominating the material behavior during cold plastic deformation. For validation, the model is numerically implemented in general implicit isotropic elasto-viscoplasticity algorithm as a user-defined material subroutine (UMAT) in ABAQUS/Standard and used for finite element simulation of upsetting tests and a complete cold forging cycle of case hardenable MnCr steel family.

  17. Exact-exchange time-dependent density-functional theory for static and dynamic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, So; Ivanov, Stanislav; Bartlett, Rodney J.; Grabowski, Ireneusz

    2005-01-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) employing the exact-exchange functional has been formulated on the basis of the optimized-effective-potential (OEP) method of Talman and Shadwick for second-order molecular properties and implemented into a Gaussian-basis-set, trial-vector algorithm. The only approximation involved, apart from the lack of correlation effects and the use of Gaussian-type basis functions, was the consistent use of the adiabatic approximation in the exchange kernel and in the linear response function. The static and dynamic polarizabilities and their anisotropy predicted by the TDDFT with exact exchange (TDOEP) agree accurately with the corresponding values from time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory, the exact-exchange counterpart in the wave function theory. The TDOEP is free from the nonphysical asymptotic decay of the exchange potential of most conventional density functionals or from any other manifestations of the incomplete cancellation of the self-interaction energy. The systematic overestimation of the absolute values and dispersion of polarizabilities that plagues most conventional TDDFT cannot be seen in the TDOEP

  18. Colony Development and Density-Dependent Processes in Breeding Grey Herons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Shirai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The density-dependent processes that limit the colony size of colonially breeding birds such as herons and egrets remain unclear, because it is difficult to monitor colonies from the first year of their establishment, and the most previous studies have considered mixed-species colonies. In the present study, single-species colonies of the Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea were observed from the first year of their establishment for 16 years in suburban Tokyo. Colony size increased after establishment, illustrating a saturation curve. The breeding duration (days from nest building to fledging by a pair increased, but the number of fledglings per nest decreased, with colony size. The reproductive season in each year began earlier, and there was greater variation in the timing of individual breeding when the colony size was larger. The prolonged duration until nestling feeding by early breeders of the colony suggests that herons at the beginning of the new breeding season exist in an unsteady state with one another, likely owing to interactions with immigrant individuals. Such density-dependent interference may affect reproductive success and limit the colony size of Grey Herons.

  19. Relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation theory and applications to atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parpia, F.Z.

    1984-01-01

    A time-dependent linear-response theory appropriate to the relativistic local-density approximation (RLDA) to quantum electrodynamics (QED) is developed. The resulting theory, the relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation (RTDLDA) is specialized to the treatment of electric excitations in closed-shell atoms. This formalism is applied to the calculation of atomic photoionization parameters in the dipole approximation. The static-field limit of the RTDLDA is applied to the calculation of dipole polarizabilities. Extensive numerical calculations of the photoionization parameters for the rare gases neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, and for mercury from the RTDLDA are presented and compared in detail with the results of other theories, in particular the relativistic random-phase approximation (RRPA), and with experimental measurements. The predictions of the RTDLDA are comparable with the RRPA calculations made to date. This is remarkable in that the RTDLDA entails appreciably less computational effort. Finally, the dipole polarizabilities predicted by the static-field RTDLDA are compared with other determinations of these quantities. In view of its simplicity, the static-field RTDLDA demonstrates itself to be one of the most powerful theories available for the calculation of dipole polarizabilities

  20. Ecological change points: The strength of density dependence and the loss of history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponciano, José M; Taper, Mark L; Dennis, Brian

    2018-05-01

    Change points in the dynamics of animal abundances have extensively been recorded in historical time series records. Little attention has been paid to the theoretical dynamic consequences of such change-points. Here we propose a change-point model of stochastic population dynamics. This investigation embodies a shift of attention from the problem of detecting when a change will occur, to another non-trivial puzzle: using ecological theory to understand and predict the post-breakpoint behavior of the population dynamics. The proposed model and the explicit expressions derived here predict and quantify how density dependence modulates the influence of the pre-breakpoint parameters into the post-breakpoint dynamics. Time series transitioning from one stationary distribution to another contain information about where the process was before the change-point, where is it heading and how long it will take to transition, and here this information is explicitly stated. Importantly, our results provide a direct connection of the strength of density dependence with theoretical properties of dynamic systems, such as the concept of resilience. Finally, we illustrate how to harness such information through maximum likelihood estimation for state-space models, and test the model robustness to widely different forms of compensatory dynamics. The model can be used to estimate important quantities in the theory and practice of population recovery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of the effect of three-dimensional mantle density heterogeneity on Earth rotation in tidal frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanbo Liu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report the assessment of the effect of the three-dimensional (3D density heterogeneity in the mantle on Earth orientation parameters (EOP (i.e., the polar motion, or PM, and the length of day, or LOD in the tidal frequencies. The 3D mantle density model is estimated based upon a global S-wave velocity tomography model (S16U6L8 and the mineralogical knowledge derived from laboratory experiment. The lateral density variation is referenced against the preliminary reference earth model (PREM. Using this approach the effects of the heterogeneous mantle density variation in all three tidal frequencies (zonal long periods, tesseral diurnal, and sectorial semidiurnal are estimated in both PM and LOD. When compared with mass or density perturbations originated on the Earth's surface such as the oceanic and barometric changes, the heterogeneous mantle contributes less than 10% of the total variation in PM and LOD in tidal frequencies. However, this is the gap that has not been explained to close the gap of the observation and modeling in PM and LOD. By computing the PM and LOD caused by 3D heterogeneity of the mantle during the period of continuous space geodetic measurement campaigns (e.g., CONT94 and the contribution from ocean tides as predicted by tide models derived from satellite altimetry observations (e.g., TOPEX/Poseidon in the same period, we got the lump-sum values of PM and LOD. The computed total effects and the observed PM and LOD are generally agree with each other. In another word, the difference of the observed PM and LOD and the model only considering ocean tides, at all tidal frequencies (long periods, diurnals, and semidiurnals contains the contributions of the lateral density heterogeneity of the mantle. Study of the effect of mantle density heterogeneity effect on torque-free Earth rotation may provide useful constraints to construct the reference earth model (REM, which is the next major objective in global

  2. Time and frequency-dependent modulation of local field potential synchronization by deep brain stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton B McCracken

    Full Text Available High-frequency electrical stimulation of specific brain structures, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS, is an effective treatment for movement disorders, but mechanisms of action remain unclear. We examined the time-dependent effects of DBS applied to the entopeduncular nucleus (EP, the rat homolog of the internal globus pallidus, a target used for treatment of both dystonia and Parkinson's disease (PD. We performed simultaneous multi-site local field potential (LFP recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats to assess the effects of high-frequency (HF, 130 Hz; clinically effective, low-frequency (LF, 15 Hz; ineffective and sham DBS delivered to EP. LFP activity was recorded from dorsal striatum (STR, ventroanterior thalamus (VA, primary motor cortex (M1, and the stimulation site in EP. Spontaneous and acute stimulation-induced LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed at baseline, and after 30, 60, and 90 minutes of stimulation. HF EP DBS produced widespread alterations in spontaneous and stimulus-induced LFP oscillations, with some effects similar across regions and others occurring in a region- and frequency band-specific manner. Many of these changes evolved over time. HF EP DBS produced an initial transient reduction in power in the low beta band in M1 and STR; however, phase synchronization between these regions in the low beta band was markedly suppressed at all time points. DBS also enhanced low gamma synchronization throughout the circuit. With sustained stimulation, there were significant reductions in low beta synchronization between M1-VA and STR-VA, and increases in power within regions in the faster frequency bands. HF DBS also suppressed the ability of acute EP stimulation to induce beta oscillations in all regions along the circuit. This dynamic pattern of synchronizing and desynchronizing effects of EP DBS suggests a complex modulation of activity along cortico-BG-thalamic circuits underlying the therapeutic

  3. Calculation and applications of the frequency dependent neutron detector response functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dam, H.; Van Hagen, T.H.J.J. der; Hoogenboom, J.E.; Keijzer, J.

    1994-01-01

    The theoretical basis is presented for the evaluation of the frequency dependent function that enables to calculate the response of a neutron detector to parametric fluctuations ('noise') or oscillations in reactor core. This function describes the 'field view' of a detector and can be calculated with a static transport code under certain conditions which are discussed. Two applications are presented: the response of an ex-core detector to void fraction fluctuations in a BWR and of both in and ex-core detectors to a rotating neutron absorber near or inside a research reactor core. (authors). 7 refs., 4 figs

  4. Determination of ferroelectric contributions to electromechanical response by frequency dependent piezoresponse force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Daehee; Park, Seongjae; Varenyk, Olexandr V; Lee, Shinbuhm; Lee, Ho Nyung; Morozovska, Anna N; Kim, Yunseok

    2016-07-28

    Hysteresis loop analysis via piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is typically performed to probe the existence of ferroelectricity at the nanoscale. However, such an approach is rather complex in accurately determining the pure contribution of ferroelectricity to the PFM. Here, we suggest a facile method to discriminate the ferroelectric effect from the electromechanical (EM) response through the use of frequency dependent ac amplitude sweep with combination of hysteresis loops in PFM. Our combined study through experimental and theoretical approaches verifies that this method can be used as a new tool to differentiate the ferroelectric effect from the other factors that contribute to the EM response.

  5. A note on the physical interpretation of frequency dependent boundary conditions in a digital waveguide mesh

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escolano-Carrasco, José; Jacobsen, Finn

    2007-01-01

    Digital waveguide mesh (DWM) is a popular method for time domain modelling of sound fields. DWM consists of a recursive digital filter structure where a D'Alembert solution of the wave equation is propagated. One of the attractive characteristics of this method is related to the simplicity...... model of the boundary does not agree with the behaviour of a locally reacting surface, and this can give rise to contradictions in the physical interpretation of the reflected sound field. This paper analyses the behaviour of frequency dependent boundary conditions in DWM in order to obtain a physical...

  6. Frequency of vaginal conditional-pathogenic microflora dependency from age in conditions of normocenosis and disbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gruzevsky, A. A.; Zyablitsev, S. V.; Chernobrivtsev, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    Gruzevsky A. A., Zyablitsev S. V., Chernobrivtsev P. A. Frequency of vaginal conditional-pathogenic microflora dependency from age in conditions of normocenosis and disbiosis. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2017;7(2):509-522. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.399315 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/4360 The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education parametric evaluation. Part B item 1223 (...

  7. Monitoring cure of composite resins using frequency dependent electromagnetic sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.; Hoff, M. S.; Loos, A. C.; Freeman, W. T., Jr.; Eichinger, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    A nondestructive in situ measurement technique has been developed for monitoring and measuring the cure processing properties of composite resins. Frequency dependent electromagnetic sensors (FDEMS) were used to directly measure resin viscosity during cure. The effects of the cure cycle and resin aging on the viscosity during cure were investigated using the sensor. Viscosity measurements obtained using the sensor are compared with the viscosities calculated by the Loos-Springer cure process model. Good overall agreement was obtained except for the aged resin samples.

  8. Pressure-Dependent Electronic and Transport Properties of Bulk Platinum Oxide by Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansara, Shivam; Gupta, Sanjeev K.; Sonvane, Yogesh; Nekrasov, Kirill A.; Kichigina, Natalia V.

    2018-02-01

    The structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of bulk platinum oxide (PtO) at compressive pressures in the interval from 0 GPa to 35 GPa are investigated using the density functional theory. The calculated electronic band structure of PtO shows poor metallicity at very low density of states on the Fermi level. However, the hybrid pseudopotential calculation yielded 0.78 eV and 1.30 eV direct band and indirect gap, respectively. Importantly, our results predict that PtO has a direct band gap within the framework of HSE06, and it prefers equally zero magnetic order at different pressures. In the Raman spectra, peaks are slightly shifted towards higher frequency with the decrease in pressure. We have also calculated the thermoelectric properties, namely the electronic thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity, with respect to temperature and thermodynamic properties such as entropy, specific heat at constant volume, enthalpy and Gibbs free energy with respect to pressure. The result shows that PtO is a promising candidate for use as a catalyst, in sensors, as a photo-cathode in water electrolysis, for thermal decomposition of inorganic salt and fuel cells.

  9. Herbivore-specific, density-dependent induction of plant volatiles: honest or "cry wolf" signals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Shiojiri

    Full Text Available Plants release volatile chemicals upon attack by herbivorous arthropods. They do so commonly in a dose-dependent manner: the more herbivores, the more volatiles released. The volatiles attract predatory arthropods and the amount determines the probability of predator response. We show that seedlings of a cabbage variety (Brassica oleracea var. capitata, cv Shikidori also show such a response to the density of cabbage white (Pieris rapae larvae and attract more (naive parasitoids (Cotesia glomerata when there are more herbivores on the plant. However, when attacked by diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella larvae, seedlings of the same variety (cv Shikidori release volatiles, the total amount of which is high and constant and thus independent of caterpillar density, and naive parasitoids (Cotesia vestalis of diamondback moth larvae fail to discriminate herbivore-rich from herbivore-poor plants. In contrast, seedlings of another cabbage variety of B. oleracea (var. acephala: kale respond in a dose-dependent manner to the density of diamondback moth larvae and attract more parasitoids when there are more herbivores. Assuming these responses of the cabbage cultivars reflect behaviour of at least some genotypes of wild plants, we provide arguments why the behaviour of kale (B. oleracea var acephala is best interpreted as an honest signaling strategy and that of cabbage cv Shikidori (B. oleracea var capitata as a "cry wolf" signaling strategy, implying a conflict of interest between the plant and the enemies of its herbivores: the plant profits from being visited by the herbivore's enemies, but the latter would be better off by visiting other plants with more herbivores. If so, evolutionary theory on alarm signaling predicts consequences of major interest to students of plant protection, tritrophic systems and communication alike.

  10. Correlated electron dynamics and memory in time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is an exact reformulation of the time-dependent many-electron Schroedinger equation, where the problem of many interacting electrons is mapped onto the Kohn-Sham system of noninteracting particles which reproduces the exact electronic density. In the Kohn-Sham system all non-classical many-body effects are incorporated in the exchange-correlation potential which is in general unknown and needs to be approximated. It is the goal of this thesis to investigate the connection between memory effects and correlated electron dynamics in strong and weak fields. To this end one-dimensional two-electron singlet systems are studied. At the same time these systems include the onedimensional helium atom model, which is an established system to investigate the crucial effects of correlated electron dynamics in external fields. The studies presented in this thesis show that memory effects are negligible for typical strong field processes. Here the approximation of the spatial nonlocality is of primary importance. For the photoabsorption spectra on the other hand the neglect of memory effects leads to qualitative and quantitative errors, which are shown to be connected to transitions of double excitation character. To develop a better understanding of the conditions under which memory effects become important quantum fluid dynamics has been found to be especially suitable. It represents a further exact reformulation of the quantum mechanic many-body problem which is based on hydrodynamic quantities such as density and velocity. Memory effects are shown to be important whenever the velocity field develops strong gradients and dissipative effects contribute. (orig.)

  11. Correlated electron dynamics and memory in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, Mark

    2009-07-28

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is an exact reformulation of the time-dependent many-electron Schroedinger equation, where the problem of many interacting electrons is mapped onto the Kohn-Sham system of noninteracting particles which reproduces the exact electronic density. In the Kohn-Sham system all non-classical many-body effects are incorporated in the exchange-correlation potential which is in general unknown and needs to be approximated. It is the goal of this thesis to investigate the connection between memory effects and correlated electron dynamics in strong and weak fields. To this end one-dimensional two-electron singlet systems are studied. At the same time these systems include the onedimensional helium atom model, which is an established system to investigate the crucial effects of correlated electron dynamics in external fields. The studies presented in this thesis show that memory effects are negligible for typical strong field processes. Here the approximation of the spatial nonlocality is of primary importance. For the photoabsorption spectra on the other hand the neglect of memory effects leads to qualitative and quantitative errors, which are shown to be connected to transitions of double excitation character. To develop a better understanding of the conditions under which memory effects become important quantum fluid dynamics has been found to be especially suitable. It represents a further exact reformulation of the quantum mechanic many-body problem which is based on hydrodynamic quantities such as density and velocity. Memory effects are shown to be important whenever the velocity field develops strong gradients and dissipative effects contribute. (orig.)

  12. Analysis of frequency-dependent series resistance and interface states of In/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si (MIS) structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkan Selcuk, A. [Department of Nuclear Electronics and Instrumentation, Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06983 Saray, Ankara (Turkey); Tugluoglu, N. [Department of Nuclear Electronics and Instrumentation, Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06983 Saray, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ntuglu@taek.gov.tr; Karadeniz, S.; Bilge Ocak, S. [Department of Nuclear Electronics and Instrumentation, Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center, 06983 Saray, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-11-15

    In this work, the investigation of the interface state density and series resistance from capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/{omega}-V) characteristics in In/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structures with thin interfacial insulator layer have been reported. The thickness of SiO{sub 2} film obtained from the measurement of the oxide capacitance corrected for series resistance in the strong accumulation region is 220 A. The forward and reverse bias C-V and G/{omega}-V characteristics of MIS structures have been studied at the frequency range 30 kHz-1 MHz at room temperature. The frequency dispersion in capacitance and conductance can be interpreted in terms of the series resistance (R{sub s}) and interface state density (D{sub it}) values. Both the series resistance R{sub s} and density of interface states D{sub it} are strongly frequency-dependent and decrease with increasing frequency. The distribution profile of R{sub s}-V gives a peak at low frequencies in the depletion region and disappears with increasing frequency. Experimental results show that the interfacial polarization contributes to the improvement of the dielectric properties of In/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si MIS structures. The interface state density value of In/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si MIS diode calculated at strong accumulation region is 1.11x10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} at 1 MHz. It is found that the calculated value of D{sub it} ({approx}10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2}) is not high enough to pin the Fermi level of the Si substrate disrupting the device operation.

  13. The Frequency-Dependent Aerobic Exercise Effects of Hypothalamic GABAergic Expression and Cardiovascular Functions in Aged Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A decline in cardiovascular modulation is a feature of the normal aging process and associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs such as hypertension and stroke. Exercise training is known to promote cardiovascular adaptation in young animals and positive effects on motor and cognitive capabilities, as well as on brain plasticity for all ages in mice. Here, we examine the question of whether aerobic exercise interventions may impact the GABAergic neurons of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN in aged rats which have been observed to have a decline in cardiovascular integration function. In the present study, young (2 months and old (24 months male Wistar rats were divided into young control (YC, old sedentary, old low frequency exercise (20 m/min, 60 min/day, 3 days/week, 12 weeks and old high frequency exercise (20 m/min, 60 min/day, 5 days/week, 12 weeks. Exercise training indexes were obtained, including resting heart rate (HR, blood pressure (BP, plasma norepinephrine (NE, and heart weight (HW-to-body weight (BW ratios. The brain was removed and processed according to the immunofluorescence staining and western blot used to analyze the GABAergic terminal density, the proteins of GAD67, GABAA receptor and gephyrin in the PVN. There were significant changes in aged rats compared with those in the YC. Twelve weeks aerobic exercise training has volume-dependent ameliorated effects on cardiovascular parameters, autonomic nervous activities and GABAergic system functions. These data suggest that the density of GABAergic declines in the PVN is associated with imbalance in autonomic nervous activities in normal aging. Additionally, aerobic exercise can rescue aging-related an overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system and induces modifications the resting BP and HR to lower values via improving the GABAergic system in the PVN.

  14. The Frequency-Dependent Aerobic Exercise Effects of Hypothalamic GABAergic Expression and Cardiovascular Functions in Aged Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Ziqi; Cai, Jiajia; Gu, Boya; Lv, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Li

    2017-01-01

    A decline in cardiovascular modulation is a feature of the normal aging process and associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) such as hypertension and stroke. Exercise training is known to promote cardiovascular adaptation in young animals and positive effects on motor and cognitive capabilities, as well as on brain plasticity for all ages in mice. Here, we examine the question of whether aerobic exercise interventions may impact the GABAergic neurons of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in aged rats which have been observed to have a decline in cardiovascular integration function. In the present study, young (2 months) and old (24 months) male Wistar rats were divided into young control (YC), old sedentary, old low frequency exercise (20 m/min, 60 min/day, 3 days/week, 12 weeks) and old high frequency exercise (20 m/min, 60 min/day, 5 days/week, 12 weeks). Exercise training indexes were obtained, including resting heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), plasma norepinephrine (NE), and heart weight (HW)-to-body weight (BW) ratios. The brain was removed and processed according to the immunofluorescence staining and western blot used to analyze the GABAergic terminal density, the proteins of GAD67, GABAA receptor and gephyrin in the PVN. There were significant changes in aged rats compared with those in the YC. Twelve weeks aerobic exercise training has volume-dependent ameliorated effects on cardiovascular parameters, autonomic nervous activities and GABAergic system functions. These data suggest that the density of GABAergic declines in the PVN is associated with imbalance in autonomic nervous activities in normal aging. Additionally, aerobic exercise can rescue aging-related an overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system and induces modifications the resting BP and HR to lower values via improving the GABAergic system in the PVN. PMID:28713263

  15. The effects of density dependent resource limitation on size of wild reindeer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogland, Terje

    1983-11-01

    A density-dependent decrement in size for wild reindeer from 12 different Norwegian herds at 16 different densities was shown using lower jawbone-length as the criterion of size. This criterion was tested and found to adequately predict body size of both bucks and does. Lactation in does did not affect jaw length but significantly affected dressed weights.A decrement in the size of does as a result of gross density was found. This size decrement was further analysed in relation to the habitat densities in winter (R 2 =0.85) and in summer (R 2 =0.75) separately, in order to estimate the relative effects of each factor. For herds with adequate food in winter (no signs of overgrazing of lichens) density in relation to summer habitat and mires yielded the highest predictive power in a multiple regression. For herds with adequate summer pastures, densities per winter habitat and lichen volumes showed likewise a highly significant correlation. The inclusion of the lichen volume data in the regression increased its predictive power. The major effect of resource limitation was to delay the time of calving because a maternal carry-over effect allowed the calf a shorter period of growth to be completed during its first summer. Neonate size at birth was highly correlated with maternal size regardless of the mean calving date although the latter was significantly delayed for small-sized does in food resource-limited herds. Likewise the postnatal growth rate of all calves were not significantly different during 50 days postpartum regardless of maternal conditions in winter feeding. The summer growth rates of bucks ≧1 year did not vary significantly between herds. The age of maturity of food resource-limited does was delayed by one year and growth ceased after the initiation of reproduction. This shows that under conditions of limited resources the does with delayed births of calves allocated less energy to body growth simply because they had less time to replenish body

  16. Dependency of irradiation damage density on tritium migration behaviors in Li2TiO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Toda, Kensuke; Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Tritium migration behaviors in Li 2 TiO 3 with the increase of irradiation damage density were investigated by means of electron spin resonance and thermal desorption spectroscopy. The irradiation damages of F + -centers and O − -centers were formed by neutron irradiation, and their damage densities were increased with increasing neutron fluence. Tritium release temperature was clearly shifted toward higher temperature side with increasing neutron fluence, i.e. increasing damage density. The rate determining process for tritium release was also clearly changed depending on the damage density. Tritium release was mainly controlled by tritium diffusion process in crystalline grain of Li 2 TiO 3 at lower neutron fluence. The apparent tritium diffusivity was reduced as the damage density in Li 2 TiO 3 increased due to the introduction of tritium trapping/detrapping sites for diffusing tritium. Then, tritium trapping/detrapping processes began to control the overall tritium release with further damage introductions as the amount of tritium trapping sites increased enough to trap most of tritium in Li 2 TiO 3 . The effects of water vapor in purge gas on tritium release behaviors were also investigated. It was considered that hydrogen isotopes in purge gas would be dissociated and adsorbed on the surface of Li 2 TiO 3 . Then, hydrogen isotopes diffused inward Li 2 TiO 3 would occupy the tritium trapping sites before diffusing tritium reaches to these sites, promoting apparent tritium diffusion consequently. Kinetics analysis of tritium release for highly damaged Li 2 TiO 3 showed that the rate determining process of tritium release was the detrapping process of tritium formed as hydroxyl groups. The rate of tritium detrapping as hydroxyl groups was determined by the kinetic analysis, and was comparable to tritium release kinetics for Li 2 O, LiOH and Li 4 TiO 4 . The dangling oxygen atoms (O − -centers) formed by neutron irradiation would contribute strongly on the

  17. The dependence of the counting efficiency of Marinelli beakers for environmental samples on the density of the samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfassi, Z.B.; Lavi, N.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the density of the radioactive material packed in a Marinelli beaker on the counting efficiency was studied. It was found that for all densities (0.4-1.7g/cm 3) studied the counting efficiency (ε) fits the linear log-log dependence on the photon energy (E) above 200keV, i.e. obeying the equation ε=αE β (α, β-parameters). It was found that for each photon energy the counting efficiency is linearly dependent on the density (ρ) of the matrix. ε=a-bρ (a, b-parameters). The parameters of the linear dependence are energy dependent (linear log-log dependence), leading to a final equation for the counting efficiency of Marinelli beaker involving both density of the matrix and the photon energy: ε=α 1 .E β 1 -α 2 E β 2 ρ

  18. Time-dependent internal density functional theory formalism and Kohn-Sham scheme for self-bound systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messud, Jeremie

    2009-01-01

    The stationary internal density functional theory (DFT) formalism and Kohn-Sham scheme are generalized to the time-dependent case. It is proven that, in the time-dependent case, the internal properties of a self-bound system (such as an atomic nuclei or a helium droplet) are all defined by the internal one-body density and the initial state. A time-dependent internal Kohn-Sham scheme is set up as a practical way to compute the internal density. The main difference from the traditional DFT formalism and Kohn-Sham scheme is the inclusion of the center-of-mass correlations in the functional.

  19. Mathematical modelling of frequency-dependent hysteresis and energy loss of FeBSiC amorphous alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koprivica, Branko; Milovanovic, Alenka; Mitrovic, Nebojsa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a novel mathematical model of frequency-dependent magnetic hysteresis. The major hysteresis loop in this model is represented by the ascending and descending curve over an arctangent function. The parameters of the hysteresis model have been calculated from a measured hysteresis loop of the FeBSiC amorphous alloy sample. A number of measurements have been performed with this sample at different frequencies of the sinusoidal excitation magnetic field. A variation of the coercive magnetic field with the frequency has been observed and used in the modelling of frequency-dependent hysteresis with the proposed model. A comparison between measured and modelled hysteresis loops has been presented. Additionally, the areas of the obtained hysteresis loops, representing the energy loss per unit volume, have been calculated and the dependence of the energy loss on the frequency is shown. Furthermore, two models of the frequency dependence of the coercivity and two models of the energy loss separation have been used for fitting the experimental and simulation results. The relations between these models and their parameters have been observed and analysed. Also, the relations between parameters of the hysteresis model and the parameters of the energy loss separation models have been analysed and discussed. - Highlights: • A mathematical model of frequency-dependent hysteresis is proposed. • Dependence of coercivity and energy loss per unit volume on frequency is modelled. • Equivalence between models and relation between model parameters are presented.

  20. Unusual polarity-dependent patterns in a bent-core nematic liquid crystal under low-frequency ac field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ying; Zhou, Meng-jie; Xu, Ming-Ya; Salamon, Péter; Éber, Nándor; Buka, Ágnes

    2015-04-01

    Electric-field-induced patterns of diverse morphology have been observed over a wide frequency range in a recently synthesized bent-core nematic (BCN) liquid crystal. At low frequencies (up to ∼25 Hz), the BCN exhibited unusual polarity-dependent patterns. When the amplitude of the ac field was enhanced, these two time-asymmetrical patterns turned into time-symmetrical prewavylike stripes. At ac frequencies in the middle-frequency range (∼50-3000 Hz), zigzag patterns were detected whose obliqueness varied with the frequency. Finally, if the frequency was increased above 3 kHz, the zigzag pattern was replaced by another, prewavylike pattern, whose threshold voltage depended on the frequency; however, the wave vector did not. For a more complete characterization, material parameters such as elastic constants, dielectric permittivities, and the anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility were also determined.