WorldWideScience

Sample records for densities angular velocities

  1. The integration of angular velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Boyle, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A common problem in physics and engineering is determination of the orientation of an object given its angular velocity. When the direction of the angular velocity changes in time, this is a nontrivial problem involving coupled differential equations. Several possible approaches are examined, along with various improvements over previous efforts. These are then evaluated numerically by comparison to a complicated but analytically known rotation that is motivated by the important astrophysical problem of precessing black-hole binaries. It is shown that a straightforward solution directly using quaternions is most efficient and accurate, and that the norm of the quaternion is irrelevant. Integration of the generator of the rotation can also be made roughly as efficient as integration of the rotation. Both methods will typically be twice as efficient naive vector- or matrix-based methods. Implementation by means of standard general-purpose numerical integrators is stable and efficient, so that such problems can ...

  2. Non-Colinearity of Angular Velocity and Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the principles, construction, and operation of an apparatus which serves to demonstrate the non-colinearity of the angular velocity and momentum vectors as well as the inertial tensors. Applications of the apparatus to teaching of advanced undergraduate mechanics courses are recommended. (CC)

  3. Angular velocity response of nanoparticles dispersed in liquid crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pin-Chun; Shih, Wen-Pin

    2013-06-01

    A hybrid material of nanoparticles dispersed in liquid crystal changed capacitance after spinning beyond threshold angular velocity. Once the centrifugal force of nanoparticles overcomes the attractive force between liquid crystals, the nanoparticles begin to move. The order of highly viscous liquid crystals is disturbed by the nanoparticles' penetrative movement, and the dielectric constant of the liquid crystal cell changes as a result. We found that the angular velocity response of nanoparticles dispersed in liquid crystal with higher working temperature and nanoparticles' density provided higher sensitivity. The obtained results are important for the continuous improvement of liquid-crystal-based inertial sensors or nano-viscometers.

  4. A neural circuit for angular velocity computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel B Snider

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly-tunable wing-steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuro-mechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob.

  5. Angular velocity and centripetal acceleration relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Martín; Cabeza, Cecilia; Marti, Arturo C.; Vogt, Patrik; Kuhn, Jochen

    2014-05-01

    During the last few years, the growing boom of smartphones has given rise to a considerable number of applications exploiting the functionality of the sensors incorporated in these devices. A sector that has unexpectedly taken advantage of the power of these tools is physics teaching, as reflected in several recent papers. In effect, the use of smartphones has been proposed in several physics experiments spanning mechanics, electromagnetism, optics, oscillations, and waves, among other subjects. Although mechanical experiments have received considerable attention, most of them are based on the use of the accelerometer. An aspect that has received less attention is the use of rotation sensors or gyroscopes. An additional advance in the use of these devices is given by the possibility of obtaining data using the accelerometer and the gyroscope simultaneously. The aim of this paper is to consider the relation between the centripetal acceleration and the angular velocity. Instead of using a formal laboratory setup, in this experiment a smartphone is attached to the floor of a merry-go-round, found in many playgrounds. Several experiments were performed with the roundabout rotating in both directions and with the smart-phone at different distances from the center. The coherence of the measurements is shown.

  6. Interferometric measurement of the angular velocity of moving humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanzer, Jeffrey A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the measurement of the angular velocity of walking humans using a millimeter-wave correlation interferometer. Measurement of the angular velocity of moving objects is a desirable function in remote sensing applications. Doppler radar sensors are able to measure the signature of moving humans based on micro-Doppler analysis; however, a person moving with little to no radial velocity produces negligible Doppler returns. Measurement of the angular movement of humans can be done with traditional radar techniques, however the process involves either continuous tracking with narrow beamwidth or angle-of-arrival estimation algorithms. A new method of measuring the angular velocity of moving objects using interferometry has recently been developed which measures the angular velocity of an object without tracking or complex processing. The frequency of the interferometer signal response is proportional to the angular velocity of the object as it passes through the interferometer beam pattern. In this paper, the theory of the interferometric measurement of angular velocity is covered and simulations of the response of a walking human are presented. Simulations are produced using a model of a walking human to show the significant features associated with the interferometer response, which may be used in classification algorithms.

  7. Demonstrating the Direction of Angular Velocity in Circular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircioglu, Salih; Yurumezoglu, Kemal; Isik, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Rotational motion is ubiquitous in nature, from astronomical systems to household devices in everyday life to elementary models of atoms. Unlike the tangential velocity vector that represents the instantaneous linear velocity (magnitude and direction), an angular velocity vector is conceptually more challenging for students to grasp. In physics…

  8. Alignment of angular velocity sensors for a vestibular prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DiGiovanna Jack

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vestibular prosthetics transmit angular velocities to the nervous system via electrical stimulation. Head-fixed gyroscopes measure angular motion, but the gyroscope coordinate system will not be coincident with the sensory organs the prosthetic replaces. Here we show a simple calibration method to align gyroscope measurements with the anatomical coordinate system. We benchmarked the method with simulated movements and obtain proof-of-concept with one healthy subject. The method was robust to misalignment, required little data, and minimal processing.

  9. Adaptive Neural Network Controller for Thermogenerator Angular Velocity Stabilization System

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical and simulation approach for the selection of activation functions for the class of neural network controllers for ship’s thermogenerator angular velocity stabilization system. Such systems can be found in many ships. A Lyapunov-like stability analysis is performed in order to obtain a weight update law. A number of simulations were performed to find the best activation function using integral error criteria and statistical T-tests.

  10. Weakly nonlinear density-velocity relation

    CERN Document Server

    Chodorowski, M J; Chodorowski, Michal J; Lokas, Ewa L

    1996-01-01

    We rigorously derive weakly nonlinear relation between cosmic density and velocity fields up to third order in perturbation theory. The density field is described by the mass density contrast, \\de. The velocity field is described by the variable \\te proportional to the velocity divergence, \\te = - f(\\Omega)^{-1} H_0^{-1} \

  11. ROTATING RINDLER SPACE TIME WITH CONSTANT ANGULAR VELOCITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG YONG-CHENG

    2000-01-01

    A new space time metric is derived from Kerr metric if its mass and location approach to infinite in an appropriate way. The new space-time is an infinitesimal neighborhood nearby one of the two horizon poles of an infinite Kerr black hole. In other words, it is the second order infinitesimal neighborhood nearby one of the two horizon poles of a Kerr black hole. It is fiat and has event horizon and infinite red shift surface. We prove that it is a rotating Rindler space time with constant angular velocity.

  12. Angular momentum of disc galaxies with a lognormal density distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Marr, John Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Whilst most galaxy properties scale with galaxy mass, similar scaling relations for angular momentum are harder to demonstrate. A lognormal (LN) density distribution for disc mass provides a good overall fit to the observational data for disc rotation curves for a wide variety of galaxy types and luminosities. In this paper, the total angular momentum J and energy $\\vert{}$E$\\vert{}$ were computed for 38 disc galaxies from the published rotation curves and plotted against the derived disc masses, with best fit slopes of 1.683$\\pm{}$0.018 and 1.643$\\pm{}$0.038 respectively, using a theoretical model with a LN density profile. The derived mean disc spin parameter was $\\lambda{}$=0.423$\\pm{}$0.014. Using the rotation curve parameters V$_{max}$ and R$_{max}$ as surrogates for the virial velocity and radius, the virial mass estimator $M_{disc}\\propto{}R_{max}V_{max}^2$ was also generated, with a log-log slope of 1.024$\\pm{}$0.014 for the 38 galaxies, and a proportionality constant ${\\lambda{}}^*=1.47\\pm{}0.20\\time...

  13. Angular velocity integration in a fly heading circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Evans, Daniel; Wegener, Stephanie; Rouault, Hervé; Franconville, Romain; Wolff, Tanya; Seelig, Johannes D; Druckmann, Shaul; Jayaraman, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Many animals maintain an internal representation of their heading as they move through their surroundings. Such a compass representation was recently discovered in a neural population in the Drosophila melanogaster central complex, a brain region implicated in spatial navigation. Here, we use two-photon calcium imaging and electrophysiology in head-fixed walking flies to identify a different neural population that conjunctively encodes heading and angular velocity, and is excited selectively by turns in either the clockwise or counterclockwise direction. We show how these mirror-symmetric turn responses combine with the neurons’ connectivity to the compass neurons to create an elegant mechanism for updating the fly’s heading representation when the animal turns in darkness. This mechanism, which employs recurrent loops with an angular shift, bears a resemblance to those proposed in theoretical models for rodent head direction cells. Our results provide a striking example of structure matching function for a broadly relevant computation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23496.001 PMID:28530551

  14. Changing law of launching pitching angular velocity of rotating missile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Guang; Xu Bin; Jiao Xiaojuan; Zhen Tiesheng

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide accurate launching pitching angular velocity (LPAV) for the exterior trajectory optimization design, multi-flexible body dynamics (MFBD) technology is presented to study the changing law of LPAV of the rotating missile based on spiral guideway. An MFBD virtual prototype model of the rotating missile launching system is built using multi-body dynamics modeling technology based on the built flexible body models of key components and the special force model. The built model is verified with the frequency spectrum analysis. With the flexible body contact theory and nonlinear theory of MFBD technology, the research is conducted on the influence of a series of factors on LPAV, such as launching angle change, clearance between launching canister and missile, thrust change, thrust eccentricity and mass eccentricity, etc. Through this research, some useful values of the key design parameters which are difficult to be measured in physical tests are obtained. Finally, a simplified mathematical model of the changing law of LPAV is presented through fitting virtual test results using the linear regression method and verified by physical flight tests. The research results have important significance for the exterior trajectory optimization design.

  15. Nuclear Level Density with Non-zero Angular Momentum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.N. Behkami; M. Gholami; M. Kildir; M. Soltani

    2006-01-01

    The statistical properties of interacting fermions have been studied for various angular momentum with the inclusion of pairing interaction. The dependence of the critical temperature on angular momentum for several nuclei,have been studied. The yrast energy as a function of angular momentum for 28 Si and 24Mg nuclei have been calculated up to 60.0 MeV of excitation energy. The computed limiting angular momenta are compared with the experimental results for 26Al produced by 12C + 14N reaction. The relevant nuclear level densities for non-zero angular momentum have been computed for 44Ti and l36Ba nuclei. The results are compared with their corresponding values obtained from the approximateformulas.

  16. Task Space Angular Velocity Blending for Real-Time Trajectory Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Richard A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The invention is embodied in a method of controlling a robot manipulator moving toward a target frame F(sub 0) with a target velocity v(sub 0) including a linear target velocity v and an angular target velocity omega(sub 0) to smoothly and continuously divert the robot manipulator to a subsequent frame F(sub 1) by determining a global transition velocity v(sub 1), the global transition velocity including a linear transition velocity v(sub 1) and an angular transition velocity omega(sub 1), defining a blend time interval 2(tau)(sub 0) within which the global velocity of the robot manipulator is to be changed from a global target velocity v(sub 0) to the global transition velocity v(sub 1) and dividing the blend time interval 2(tau)(sub 0) into discrete time segments (delta)t. During each one of the discrete time segments delta t of the blend interval 2(tau)(sub 0), a blended global velocity v of the manipulator is computed as a blend of the global target velocity v(sub 0) and the global transition velocity v(sub 1), the blended global velocity v including a blended angular velocity omega and a blended linear velocity v, and then, the manipulator is rotated by an incremental rotation corresponding to an integration of the blended angular velocity omega over one discrete time segment (delta)t.

  17. Static and dynamic characteristics of angular velocity and acceleration transducers based on optical tunneling effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busurin, V. I.; Korobkov, V. V.; Htoo Lwin, Naing; Tuan, Phan Anh

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical and experimental analysis of quasi-linear conversion function of angular velocity and acceleration microoptoelectromechnical (MOEM) transducers based on optical tunneling effect (OTE) are conducted. Equivalent oscillating circuit is developed and dynamic characteristics of angular velocity and acceleration MOEM-transducers are investigated.

  18. A Vector Measurement-based Angular Velocity Estimation Scheme for Maneuvering Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sujang; Bang, Hyochoong; Leeghim, Henzeh

    2017-09-01

    A new practical approach to estimate the body angular velocity of maneuvering spacecraft using only vector measurements is presented. Several algorithms have been introduced in previous studies to estimate the angular velocity directly from vector measurements at two time instants. However, these direct methods are based on the constant angular velocity assumption, and estimation results may be invalid for attitude maneuvers. In this paper, an estimation scheme to consider attitude disturbances and control torques is proposed. The effects of angular velocity variation on estimation results are quantitatively evaluated, and an algorithm to minimize estimation errors is designed by selecting the optimal time interval between vector measurements. Without losing the simplicity of direct methods, the design parameters of the algorithm are restricted to the expected covariance of disturbances and the maximum angular acceleration. By applying the proposed estimation scheme, gyroscopes can be directly replaced by attitude sensors such as star trackers.

  19. Quantitative measurement of the orbital angular momentum density of light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we derive expressions for the orbital angular momentum (OAM) density of light, for both symmetric and nonsymmetric optical fields, that allow a direct comparison between theory and experiment. We present a simple method for measuring...

  20. Quantitatively measuring the orbital angular momentum density of light : Presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Although many techniques are efficient at measuring optical orbital angular momentum (OAM), they do not allow one to obtain a quantitative measurement for the OAM density across an optical field and instead only measure its global OAM. Numerous...

  1. The Relationship between Pedal Force and Crank Angular Velocity in Sprint Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbert, Maarten Frank; Casius, L J Richard; Van Soest, Arthur J

    2016-05-01

    Relationships between tangential pedal force and crank angular velocity in sprint cycling tend to be linear. We set out to understand why they are not hyperbolic, like the intrinsic force-velocity relationship of muscles. We simulated isokinetic sprint cycling at crank angular velocities ranging from 30 to 150 rpm with a forward dynamic model of the human musculoskeletal system actuated by eight lower extremity muscle groups. The input of the model was muscle stimulation over time, which we optimized to maximize average power output over a cycle. Peak tangential pedal force was found to drop more with crank angular velocity than expected based on intrinsic muscle properties. This linearizing effect was not due to segmental dynamics but rather due to active state dynamics. Maximizing average power in cycling requires muscles to bring their active state from as high as possible during shortening to as low as possible during lengthening. Reducing the active state is a relatively slow process, and hence must be initiated a certain amount of time before lengthening starts. As crank angular velocity goes up, this amount of time corresponds to a greater angular displacement, so the instant of switching off extensor muscle stimulation must occur earlier relative to the angle at which pedal force was extracted for the force-velocity relationship. Relationships between pedal force and crank angular velocity in sprint cycling do not reflect solely the intrinsic force-velocity relationship of muscles but also the consequences of activation dynamics.

  2. Energy and angular momentum densities of stationary gravity fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lynden-Bell, D; Bicak, Jiri; 10.1103/PhysRevD.75.024040

    2009-01-01

    We give physical explanations of explicit invariant expressions for the energy and angular momentum densities of gravitational fields in stationary space-times. These expressions involve non-locally defined conformal factors. In certain coordinates these become locally defined in terms of the metric. These results are derived via expressions for total gravitational potential energy from the difference between the total energy and the mechanical energy. The latter involves kinetic energy seen in the frame of static observers. When in the axially symmetric case we consider zero angular momentum observers (who move orthogonally to surfaces of constant time), we find that the angular momentum they attribute to the gravitational field is solely due to their motion.

  3. Measurements of electron density profiles using an angular filter refractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberberger, D., E-mail: dhab@lle.rochester.edu; Ivancic, S.; Hu, S. X.; Boni, R.; Barczys, M.; Craxton, R. S.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A novel diagnostic technique, angular filter refractometry (AFR), has been developed to characterize high-density, long-scale-length plasmas relevant to high-energy-density physics experiments. AFR measures plasma densities up to 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3} with a 263-nm probe laser and is used to study the plasma expansion from CH foil and spherical targets that are irradiated with ∼9 kJ of ultraviolet (351-nm) laser energy in a 2-ns pulse. The data elucidate the temporal evolution of the plasma profile for the CH planar targets and the dependence of the plasma profile on target radius for CH spheres.

  4. Modelling the maximum voluntary joint torque/angular velocity relationship in human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeadon, Maurice R; King, Mark A; Wilson, Cassie

    2006-01-01

    The force exerted by a muscle is a function of the activation level and the maximum (tetanic) muscle force. In "maximum" voluntary knee extensions muscle activation is lower for eccentric muscle velocities than for concentric velocities. The aim of this study was to model this "differential activation" in order to calculate the maximum voluntary knee extensor torque as a function of knee angular velocity. Torque data were collected on two subjects during maximal eccentric-concentric knee extensions using an isovelocity dynamometer with crank angular velocities ranging from 50 to 450 degrees s(-1). The theoretical tetanic torque/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a four parameter function comprising two rectangular hyperbolas while the activation/angular velocity relationship was modelled using a three parameter function that rose from submaximal activation for eccentric velocities to full activation for high concentric velocities. The product of these two functions gave a seven parameter function which was fitted to the joint torque/angular velocity data, giving unbiased root mean square differences of 1.9% and 3.3% of the maximum torques achieved. Differential activation accounts for the non-hyperbolic behaviour of the torque/angular velocity data for low concentric velocities. The maximum voluntary knee extensor torque that can be exerted may be modelled accurately as the product of functions defining the maximum torque and the maximum voluntary activation level. Failure to include differential activation considerations when modelling maximal movements will lead to errors in the estimation of joint torque in the eccentric phase and low velocity concentric phase.

  5. ANGULAR VELOCITY AND CORIOLIS EFFECT IN TIME-DEPENDENT QUANTUM MECHANICAL SU2 ROTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN HONG-YI; SUN MING-ZHAI

    2001-01-01

    Starting from a time-dependent rotation U (t) in SU2 group element space, we derive its corresponding quantum mechanical dynamic Coriolis term and the relationship between U (t) and rotational angular velocity. Throughout our discussion, the technique of integration within an ordered product of operators is fully used, which has the advantage that the correspondence between the classical rotation and the quantum rotation is in a transparent fashion. A new angular-velocity formula is also derived.

  6. VELOCITY OF DETONATION OF LOW DENSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Škrlec

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Blasting operations in built-up areas, at short distances from structures, impose new requirements on blasting techniques and properties of explosives in order to mitigate seismic effect of blasting. Explosives for civil uses are mixtures of different chemical composition of explosive and/or non-explosive substances. Chemical and physical properties, along with means of initiation, environment and the terms of application define detonation and blasting parameters of a particular type of the explosive for civil uses. Velocity of detonation is one of the most important measurable characteristics of detonation parameters which indirectly provide information about the liberated energy, quality of explosives and applicability for certain purposes. The level of shock effect of detonated charge on the rock, and therefore the level of seismic effect in the area, depends on the velocity of detonation. Since the velocity of detonation is proportional to the density of an explosive, the described research is carried out in order to determine the borderline density of the mixture of an emulsion explosive with expanded polystyrene while achieving stable detonation, and to determine the dependency between the velocity of detonation and the density of mixture (the paper is published in Croatian.

  7. A methodologic approach for normalizing angular work and velocity during isotonic and isokinetic eccentric training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhem, Gaël; Cornu, Christophe; Guével, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Resistance exercise training commonly is performed against a constant external load (isotonic) or at a constant velocity (isokinetic). Researchers comparing the effectiveness of isotonic and isokinetic resistance-training protocols need to equalize the mechanical stimulus (work and velocity) applied. To examine whether the standardization protocol could be adjusted and applied to an eccentric training program. Controlled laboratory study. Controlled research laboratory. Twenty-one sport science male students (age = 20.6 ± 1.5 years, height = 178.0 ± 4.0 cm, mass = 74.5 ± 9.1 kg). Participants performed 9 weeks of isotonic (n = 11) or isokinetic (n = 10) eccentric training of knee extensors that was designed so they would perform the same amount of angular work at the same mean angular velocity. Angular work and angular velocity. The isotonic and isokinetic groups performed the same total amount of work (-185.2 ± 6.5 kJ and -184.4 ± 8.6 kJ, respectively) at the same angular velocity (21 ± 1°/s and 22°/s, respectively) with the same number of repetitions (8.0 and 8.0, respectively). Bland-Altman analysis showed that work (bias = 2.4%) and angular velocity (bias = 0.2%) were equalized over 9 weeks between the modes of training. The procedure developed allows angular work and velocity to be standardized over 9 weeks of isotonic and isokinetic eccentric training of the knee extensors. This method could be useful in future studies in which researchers compare neuromuscular adaptations induced by each type of training mode with respect to rehabilitating patients after musculoskeletal injury.

  8. Diffusion and butterfly velocity at finite density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chao; Kim, Keun-Young

    2017-06-01

    We study diffusion and butterfly velocity ( v B ) in two holographic models, linear axion and axion-dilaton model, with a momentum relaxation parameter ( β) at finite density or chemical potential ( μ). Axion-dilaton model is particularly interesting since it shows linear- T -resistivity, which may have something to do with the universal bound of diffusion. At finite density, there are two diffusion constants D ± describing the coupled diffusion of charge and energy. By computing D ± exactly, we find that in the incoherent regime ( β/T ≫ 1 , β/μ ≫ 1) D + is identified with the charge diffusion constant ( D c ) and D - is identified with the energy diffusion constant ( D e ). In the coherent regime, at very small density, D ± are `maximally' mixed in the sense that D +( D -) is identified with D e ( D c ), which is opposite to the case in the incoherent regime. In the incoherent regime D e ˜ C - ℏv B 2 / k B T where C - = 1 /2 or 1 so it is universal independently of β and μ. However, {D}_c˜ {C}+\\hslash {v}{^B}^2/{k}_BT where C + = 1 or β 2 /16 π 2 T 2 so, in general, C + may not saturate to the lower bound in the incoherent regime, which suggests that the characteristic velocity for charge diffusion may not be the butterfly velocity. We find that the finite density does not affect the diffusion property at zero density in the incoherent regime.

  9. Satellite Angular Velocity Estimation Based on Star Images and Optical Flow Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarmine Fasano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An optical flow-based technique is proposed to estimate spacecraft angular velocity based on sequences of star-field images. It does not require star identification and can be thus used to also deliver angular rate information when attitude determination is not possible, as during platform de tumbling or slewing. Region-based optical flow calculation is carried out on successive star images preprocessed to remove background. Sensor calibration parameters, Poisson equation, and a least-squares method are then used to estimate the angular velocity vector components in the sensor rotating frame. A theoretical error budget is developed to estimate the expected angular rate accuracy as a function of camera parameters and star distribution in the field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is tested by using star field scenes generated by a hardware-in-the-loop testing facility and acquired by a commercial-off-the shelf camera sensor. Simulated cases comprise rotations at different rates. Experimental results are presented which are consistent with theoretical estimates. In particular, very accurate angular velocity estimates are generated at lower slew rates, while in all cases the achievable accuracy in the estimation of the angular velocity component along boresight is about one order of magnitude worse than the other two components.

  10. Mechanical and biomechanical analysis of a linear piston design for angular-velocity-based orthotic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward D. Lemaire, PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A linear piston hydraulic angular-velocity-based control knee joint was designed for people with knee-extensor weakness to engage knee-flexion resistance when knee-flexion angular velocity reaches a preset threshold, such as during a stumble, but to otherwise allow free knee motion. During mechanical testing at the lowest angular-velocity threshold, the device engaged within 2 degrees knee flexion and resisted moment loads of over 150 Nm. The device completed 400,000 loading cycles without mechanical failure or wear that would affect function. Gait patterns of nondisabled participants were similar to normal at walking speeds that produced below-threshold knee angular velocities. Fast walking speeds, employed purposely to attain the angular-velocity threshold and cause knee-flexion resistance, reduced maximum knee flexion by approximately 25 degrees but did not lead to unsafe gait patterns in foot ground clearance during swing. In knee collapse tests, the device successfully engaged knee-flexion resistance and stopped knee flexion with peak knee moments of up to 235.6 Nm. The outcomes from this study support the potential for the linear piston hydraulic knee joint in knee and knee-ankle-foot orthoses for people with lower-limb weakness.

  11. Mechanical and biomechanical analysis of a linear piston design for angular-velocity-based orthotic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Edward D; Samadi, Reza; Goudreau, Louis; Kofman, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A linear piston hydraulic angular-velocity-based control knee joint was designed for people with knee-extensor weakness to engage knee-flexion resistance when knee-flexion angular velocity reaches a preset threshold, such as during a stumble, but to otherwise allow free knee motion. During mechanical testing at the lowest angular-velocity threshold, the device engaged within 2 degrees knee flexion and resisted moment loads of over 150 Nm. The device completed 400,000 loading cycles without mechanical failure or wear that would affect function. Gait patterns of nondisabled participants were similar to normal at walking speeds that produced below-threshold knee angular velocities. Fast walking speeds, employed purposely to attain the angular-velocity threshold and cause knee-flexion resistance, reduced maximum knee flexion by approximately 25 degrees but did not lead to unsafe gait patterns in foot ground clearance during swing. In knee collapse tests, the device successfully engaged knee-flexion resistance and stopped knee flexion with peak knee moments of up to 235.6 Nm. The outcomes from this study support the potential for the linear piston hydraulic knee joint in knee and knee-ankle-foot orthoses for people with lower-limb weakness.

  12. Relationship between the size of a camphor-driven rotor and its angular velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyano, Yuki; Gryciuk, Marian; Skrobanska, Paulina; Malecki, Maciej; Sumino, Yutaka; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Gorecki, Jerzy

    2017-07-01

    We consider a rotor made of two camphor disks glued below the ends of a plastic stripe. The disks are floating on a water surface and the plastic stripe does not touch the surface. The system can rotate around a vertical axis located at the center of the stripe. The disks dissipate camphor molecules. The driving momentum comes from the nonuniformity of surface tension resulting from inhomogeneous surface concentration of camphor molecules around the disks. We investigate the stationary angular velocity as a function of rotor radius ℓ . For large ℓ the angular velocity decreases for increasing ℓ . At a specific value of ℓ the angular velocity reaches its maximum and, for short ℓ it rapidly decreases. Such behavior is confirmed by a simple numerical model. The model also predicts that there is a critical rotor size below which it does not rotate. Within the introduced model we analyze the type of this bifurcation.

  13. Angular velocity estimation based on star vector with improved current statistical model Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Niu, Yanxiong; Lu, Jiazhen; Zhang, He

    2016-11-20

    Angular velocity information is a requisite for a spacecraft guidance, navigation, and control system. In this paper, an approach for angular velocity estimation based merely on star vector measurement with an improved current statistical model Kalman filter is proposed. High-precision angular velocity estimation can be achieved under dynamic conditions. The amount of calculation is also reduced compared to a Kalman filter. Different trajectories are simulated to test this approach, and experiments with real starry sky observation are implemented for further confirmation. The estimation accuracy is proved to be better than 10-4  rad/s under various conditions. Both the simulation and the experiment demonstrate that the described approach is effective and shows an excellent performance under both static and dynamic conditions.

  14. A Missile-Borne Angular Velocity Sensor Based on Triaxial Electromagnetic Induction Coils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to solve the problem of the limited measuring range for angular motion parameters of high-speed rotating projectiles in the field of guidance and control, a self-adaptive measurement method for angular motion parameters based on the electromagnetic induction principle is proposed. First, a framework with type bent “I-shape” is used to design triaxial coils in a mutually orthogonal way. Under the condition of high rotational speed of a projectile, the induction signal of the projectile moving across a geomagnetic field is acquired by using coils. Second, the frequency of the pulse signal is adjusted self-adaptively. Angular velocity and angular displacement are calculated in the form of periodic pulse counting and pulse accumulation, respectively. Finally, on the basis of that principle prototype of the sensor is researched and developed, performance of measuring angular motion parameters are tested on the sensor by semi-physical and physical simulation experiments, respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the sensor has a wide measuring range of angular velocity from 1 rps to 100 rps with a measurement error of less than 0.3%, and the angular displacement measurement error is lower than 0.2°. The proposed method satisfies measurement requirements for high-speed rotating projectiles with an extremely high dynamic range of rotational speed and high precision, and has definite value to engineering applications in the fields of attitude determination and geomagnetic navigation.

  15. Resolving Two Dimensional Angular Velocity within a Rotary Tumbler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminiak, Nathaniel; Helminiak, David; Cariapa, Vikram; Borg, John

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a horizontally oriented cylindrical tumbler, filled at variable depth with cylindrical media, was rotated at various constant speeds. A monoplane layer of media was photographed with a high-speed camera and images were post processed with Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) algorithms in order to resolve both the translational and rotational flow fields. Although the translational velocity fields have been well characterized, contemporary resources enabled the ability to expand upon and refine data regarding rotational characteristics of particles within a rotary tumbler. The results indicate that particles rotate according to intermittent no-slip interactions between the particles and solid body rotation. Particles within the bed, not confined to solid body rotation, exhibited behavior indicative of gearing between particles; each reacting to the tangential component of contact forming rotation chains. Furthermore, it was observed that solid body interactions corresponded to areas of confined motion, as areas of high interaction dissuaded no-slip rotation, while areas of developing flow tended towards no-slip rotation. Special thanks to: NASA Wisconsin Space Grant Consortium Program as well as Marquette University OPUS College of Engineering.

  16. Gasflow style level posture sensor and angular velocity gyroscope assembled inertial sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The compensational loop consisting of a gasflow style angular velocity gyroscope and gasflow level posture sensor is proposed to improve the signal of gasflow style tilt. This compensational loop could remove acceleration interfere from the signal of tilt. This assembled gasflow type inertial sensor not only measures static state angular, but also restrains the acceleration which interferes the output signal of level posture sensor in dynamic situations. Therefore, the precision of outputs signal increases greatly. Moreover, the output signal includes the angle velocity signal.

  17. A probability density function of liftoff velocities in mixed-size wind sand flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the discrete element method(DEM) ,employing the diameter distribution of natural sands sampled from the Tengger Desert,a mixed-size sand bed was produced and the particle-bed collision was simulated in the mixed-size wind sand movement. In the simulation,the shear wind velocity,particle diameter,incident velocity and incident angle of the impact sand particle were given the same values as the experimental results. After the particle-bed collision,we collected all the initial velocities of rising sand particles,including the liftoff angular velocities,liftoff linear velocities and their horizontal and vertical components. By the statistical analysis on the velocity sample for each velocity component,its probability density functions were obtained,and they are the functions of the shear wind velocity. The liftoff velocities and their horizontal and vertical components are distributed as an exponential density function,while the angular velocities are distributed as a normal density function.

  18. Hamstrings to quadriceps peak torque ratios diverge between sexes with increasing isokinetic angular velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Timothy E; Myer, Gregory D; Zazulak, Bohdanna T

    2008-09-01

    Our purpose was to determine if females demonstrate decreased hamstrings to quadriceps peak torque (H/Q) ratios compared to males and if H/Q ratios increase with increased isokinetic velocity in both sexes. Maturation disproportionately increases hamstrings peak torque at high velocity in males, but not females. Therefore, we hypothesised that mature females would demonstrate decreased H/Q ratios compared to males and the difference in H/Q ratio between sexes would increase as isokinetic velocity increased. Studies that analysed the H/Q ratio with gravity corrected isokinetic strength testing reported between 1967 and 2004 were included in our review and analysis. Keywords were hamstrings/quadriceps, isokinetics, peak torque and gravity corrected. Medline and Smart databases were searched combined with cross-checked bibliographic reference lists of the publications to determine studies to be included. Twenty-two studies were included with a total of 1568 subjects (1145 male, 423 female). Males demonstrated a significant correlation between H/Q ratio and isokinetic velocity (R=0.634, pratio at the lowest angular velocity (47.8+/-2.2% at 30 degrees /s) compared to the highest velocity (81.4+/-1.1% at 360 degrees /s, pratio and isokinetic velocity (R=0.065, p=0.77) or a change in relative hamstrings strength as the speed increased (49.5+/-8.8% at 30 degrees /s; 51.0+/-5.7% at 360 degrees /s, p=0.84). Gender differences in isokinetic H/Q ratios were not observed at slower angular velocities. However, at high knee flexion/extension angular velocities, approaching those that occur during sports activities, significant gender differences were observed in the H/Q ratio. Females, unlike males, do not increase hamstrings to quadriceps torque ratios at velocities that approach those of functional activities.

  19. Discontinuous feedback stabilization of the angular velocity of a rigid body with two control torques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut

    1996-01-01

    There has been much interest over the past decade in the problem of asymptotic stabilization of the angular velocity of a rigid body with only two torque inputs. The smooth feedback laws proposed in the literature provide asymptotic stability with nonexponential convergence rates. This paper propose

  20. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Pasciuto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms.

  1. Measurement and analysis of angular velocity variations of twelve-cylinder diesel engine crankshaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulatović, Ž. M.; Štavljanin, M. S.; Tomić, M. V.; Knežević, D. M.; Biočanin, S. Lj.

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents the procedures for measuring and analyzing the angular velocity variation of twelve-cylinder diesel engine crankshaft on its free end and on the power-output end. In addition, the paper deals with important aspects of the measurement of crankshaft torsional oscillations. The method is based on digital encoders placed at two distances, and one of them is a sensor not inserted directly on the shaft, i.e. a non-contact method with a toothed disc is used. The principle based on toothed disc is also used to measure the actual camshaft angular velocity of in-line compact high-pressure pump the engine is equipped with, and this paper aims to demonstrate the possibility of measuring the actual angular velocity of any rotating shaft in the engine, on which it is physically possible to mount a toothed disc. The method was created completely independently during long-range development and research tests of V46 family engines. This method is specific for its particular adaptability for use on larger engines with extensive vibrations and torsional oscillations. The main purpose of this paper is a practical contribution to all the more interesting research of the use of engine crankshaft angular velocity as a diagnostic tool for identifying the engine irregular running.

  2. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasciuto, Ilaria; Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms.

  3. Nonlinear free vibrations of centrifugally stiffened uniform beams at high angular velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhoucha, F.; Rechak, S.; Duigou, L.; Cadou, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the bending nonlinear free vibrations of a centrifugally stiffened beam with uniform cross-section and constant angular velocity. The nonlinear intrinsic equations of motion used here are geometrically exact and specific to beams exhibiting large amplitude displacements and rotations associated with small strains. Based on the Timoshenko beam model, these equations are derived from Hamilton's principle, in which the warping is considered. All coupling terms are considered including Coriolis terms. The studied beams are isotropic with clamped-free boundary conditions. By combining the Galerkin method with the harmonic balance method, the equations of motion are converted into a quadratic function treated with a continuation method: the Asymptotic Numerical Method, where the generalized displacement vector is presented as a series expansion. While analysing the effect of the angular velocity, we determine the amplitude versus frequency variations which are plotted as backbone curves. Considering the first lagging and flapping modes, the changes in beam behaviour from hardening to softening are investigated and identified as a function of the angular velocity and the effect of shear. Particular attention is paid to high angular velocities for both Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beams and the natural frequencies so obtained are compared with the results available in the literature.

  4. The relationship between consistency of propulsive cycles and maximum angular velocity during wheelchair racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong Tai; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos Dino; Xu, Dali

    2008-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the consistency of wheelchair athletes' upper-limb kinematics in consecutive propulsive cycles and to investigate the relationship between the maximum angular velocities of the upper arm and forearm and the consistency of the upper-limb kinematical pattern. Eleven elite international wheelchair racers propelled their own chairs on a roller while performing maximum speeds during wheelchair propulsion. A Qualisys motion analysis system was used to film the wheelchair propulsive cycles. Six reflective markers placed on the right shoulder, elbow, wrist joints, metacarpal, wheel axis, and wheel were automatically digitized. The deviations in cycle time, upper-arm and forearm angles, and angular velocities among these propulsive cycles were analyzed. The results demonstrated that in the consecutive cycles of wheelchair propulsion the increased maximum angular velocity may lead to increased variability in the upper-limb angular kinematics. It is speculated that this increased variability may be important for the distribution of load on different upper-extremity muscles to avoid the fatigue during wheelchair racing.

  5. Asymmetric Velocity Distributions from Halo Density Profiles in the Eddington Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Vergados

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We show how to obtain the energy distribution f(E in our vicinity starting from WIMP density profiles in a self-consistent way by employing the Eddington approach and adding reasonable angular momentum dependent terms in the expression of the energy. We then show how we can obtain the velocity dispersions and the asymmetry parameter β in terms of the parameters describing the angular momentum dependence. From this expression, for f(E, we proceed to construct an axially symmetric WIMP a velocity distribution, which, for a gravitationally bound system, automatically has a velocity upper bound and is characterized by the same asymmetriy β. This approach is tested and clarified by constructing analytic expressions in a simple model, with adequate structure. We then show how such velocity distributions can be used in determining the event rates, including modulation, in both the standard and the directional WIMP searches.

  6. Crossed molecular beam studies of unimolecular reaction dynamics. [Angular and velocity distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.

    1979-04-01

    The study of seven radical-molecule reactions using the crossed molecular beam technique with supersonic nozzle beams is reported. Product angular and velocity distributions were obtained and compared with statistical calculations in order to identify dynamical features of the reactions. In the reaction of chlorine and fluorine atoms with vinyl bromide, the product energy distributions are found to deviate from predictions of the statistical model. A similar effect is observed in the reaction of chlorine atoms with 1, 2 and 3-bromopropene. The reaction of oxygen atoms with ICl and CF/sub 3/I has been used to obtain an improved value of the IO bond energy, 55.0 +- 2.0 kcal mol/sup -1/. In all reactions studied, the product energy and angular distributions are found to be coupled, and this is attributed to a kinematic effect of the conservation of angular momentum.

  7. Measuring the Direction and Angular Velocity of a Black Hole Accretion Disk via Lagged Interferometric Covariance

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Michael D; Shiokawa, Hotaka; Chael, Andrew A; Doeleman, Sheperd S

    2015-01-01

    We show that interferometry can be applied to study irregular, rapidly rotating structures, as are expected in the turbulent accretion flow near a black hole. Specifically, we analyze the lagged covariance between interferometric baselines of similar lengths but slightly different orientations. We demonstrate that the peak in the lagged covariance indicates the direction and angular velocity of the flow. Importantly, measuring the direction of the flow as clockwise or counterclockwise on the sky breaks a degeneracy in accretion disk inclinations when analyzing time-averaged images alone. We explore the potential efficacy using three-dimensional, general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations, and we highlight several baseline pairs for the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) that are well-suited to this application. These results indicate that the EHT is capable of determining the direction and angular velocity of the emitting material near Sgr A*, even for highly-inclined flows, and they suggest that...

  8. MEASURING THE DIRECTION AND ANGULAR VELOCITY OF A BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISK VIA LAGGED INTERFEROMETRIC COVARIANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael D.; Loeb, Abraham; Shiokawa, Hotaka; Chael, Andrew A.; Doeleman, Sheperd S., E-mail: mjohnson@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    We show that interferometry can be applied to study irregular, rapidly rotating structures, as are expected in the turbulent accretion flow near a black hole. Specifically, we analyze the lagged covariance between interferometric baselines of similar lengths but slightly different orientations. For a flow viewed close to face-on, we demonstrate that the peak in the lagged covariance indicates the direction and angular velocity of the emission pattern from the flow. Even for moderately inclined flows, the covariance robustly estimates the flow direction, although the estimated angular velocity can be significantly biased. Importantly, measuring the direction of the flow as clockwise or counterclockwise on the sky breaks a degeneracy in accretion disk inclinations when analyzing time-averaged images alone. We explore the potential efficacy of our technique using three-dimensional, general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and we highlight several baseline pairs for the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) that are well-suited to this application. These results indicate that the EHT may be capable of estimating the direction and angular velocity of the emitting material near Sgr A*, and they suggest that a rotating flow may even be utilized to improve imaging capabilities.

  9. WIND TURBINE SIMULATION FOR TIME-DEPENDENT ANGULAR VELOCITY, TORQUE, AND POWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YONGHO LEE

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Albeit the prediction of time-dependent properties of wind turbines is not required for common applications, such time-varying properties may play an important role during transient operations occurring due to various reasons. Unlike the conventional numerical simulations of wind turbine rotations that fix the angular velocity to an assumed value, the present work numerically simulates the time-varying turbine rotation in both unsteady and quasi-steady operation regimes, without specifying the angular velocity of the turbine a priori, but by calculating the actual time-dependent angular velocity and aerodynamic torque along with other properties in the course of simulation. In the present work, successful results obtained by an efficient computational fluid dynamics technique are shown, as a demonstration, for a vertical-axis wind turbine with a two-dimensionalSavonius rotor, and the cycle-averaged output powers are compared with experimental power curves and a theory developed on the basis of experimental observations.

  10. Poynting vector and orbital angular momentum density of superpositions of Bessel beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The authors study theoretically the orbital angular momentum (OAM) density in arbitrary scalar optical fields, and outline a simple approach using only a spatial light modulator to measure this density. They demonstrate the theory in the laboratory...

  11. Processing the data of measurements of angular velocity and microaccelerations onboard the Foton-12 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonov, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    The results of reconstruction of uncontrolled rotational motion of the Foton-12 satellite using the measurement data of onboard sensors are presented. This problem has already been solved successfully several years ago. The satellite motion was reconstructed using the data of measuring the Earth's magnetic field. The data of measuring the angular velocity and microaccelerations by the QSAM system were actually not used for this purpose, since these data include a clearly seen additional component whose origin was at that time unclear. This component prevented one from using these data directly for reconstruction of the angular motion. Later it became clear that the additional component was caused by the Earth's magnetic field. Discovery of this fact allowed us to make necessary corrections when processing the QSAM system data and to use them for reconstruction of rotational motion of Foton-12. Below, a modified method of processing the QSAM system data is described together with the results of its application. The main result is obtained by comparing the motion reconstructed from measurements of angular velocity or acceleration with that found by way of processing the measurements of the Earth's magnetic field. Their coincidence turned out to be rather accurate.

  12. Test-retest reliability of lower limb isokinetic endurance in COPD: a comparison of angular velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro F

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fernanda Ribeiro,* Pierre-Alexis Lépine,* Corine Garceau-Bolduc, Valérie Coats, Étienne Allard, François Maltais, Didier Saey Centre de recherche de l’Institut Universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Université Laval, Québec, Canada *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the test-retest reliability of quadriceps isokinetic endurance testing at two knee angular velocities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Methods: After one familiarization session, 14 patients with moderate to severe COPD (mean age 65±4 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 55%±18% predicted performed two quadriceps isokinetic endurance tests on two separate occasions within a 5–7-day interval. Quadriceps isokinetic endurance tests consisted of 30 maximal knee extensions at angular velocities of 90° and 180° per second, performed in random order. Test-retest reliability was assessed for peak torque, muscle endurance, work slope, work fatigue index, and changes in FEV1 for dyspnea and leg fatigue from rest to the end of the test. The intraclass correlation coefficient, minimal detectable change, and limits of agreement were calculated. Results: High test-retest reliability was identified for peak torque and muscle total work at both velocities. Work fatigue index was considered reliable at 90° per second but not at 180° per second. A lower reliability was identified for dyspnea and leg fatigue scores at both angular velocities. Conclusion: Despite a limited sample size, our findings su pport the use of a 30-maximal repetition isokinetic muscle testing procedure at angular velocities of 90° and 180° per second in patients with moderate to severe COPD. Endurance measurement (total isokinetic work at 90° per second was highly reliable, with a minimal detectable change at the 95% confidence level of 10%. Peak torque and fatigue index

  13. Angular velocity of a sphere in a simple shear at small Reynolds number

    CERN Document Server

    Meibohm, J; Rosén, T; Einarsson, J; Lundell, F; Mehlig, B

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the angular dynamics of a small neutrally buoyant sphere in a simple shear. When the effect of fluid inertia is negligible the sphere rotates at half the fluid vorticity. We compute how weak fluid inertia reduces the angular velocity, and find $\\omega_3/s \\sim -{1}/{2} +0.0540\\, {\\rm Re}_{\\rm s}^{3/2}$ where $s$ is the shear rate and ${\\rm Re}_{\\rm s}$ is the shear Reynolds number. This result differs from that derived by Lin et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 44 (1970) 1] who obtained a coefficient roughly three times larger. Our result is in good agreement with those of direct numerical simulations at small but not too small values of ${\\rm Re}_{\\rm }s$.

  14. Calculation of photodetachment cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions of negative ions using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Ning, Chuangang

    2015-10-01

    Recently, the development of photoelectron velocity map imaging makes it much easier to obtain the photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) experimentally. However, explanations of PADs are only qualitative in most cases, and very limited works have been reported on how to calculate PAD of anions. In the present work, we report a method using the density-functional-theory Kohn-Sham orbitals to calculate the photodetachment cross sections and the anisotropy parameter β. The spherical average over all random molecular orientation is calculated analytically. A program which can handle both the Gaussian type orbital and the Slater type orbital has been coded. The testing calculations on Li-, C-, O-, F-, CH-, OH-, NH2-, O2-, and S2- show that our method is an efficient way to calculate the photodetachment cross section and anisotropy parameter β for anions, thus promising for large systems.

  15. The angular magnetothermoelectric power of a charge density wave system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstovska, D.; Choi, E. S.; Steven, E.; Brooks, J. S.

    2012-07-01

    The angular dependence of the magnetothermopower of a charge transfer organic salt α-(ET)2KHg(SCN)4 below (4 K) and above (9 K) the phase transition temperature, Tp = 8 K, and under fields of 15 T and 25 T, below and above the ‘kinkfield’, has been studied. We find that for a longitudinal thermoelectric measurement both an interlayer thermopower (the Seebeck effect), Szz, and a transverse thermopower (the Nernst effect), Syz, exist in all three different B-T phases (the CDW 0, CDW x and metallic states) with large amplitude. Both thermoelectric effects display a resonant-like behavior without a sign reversal at the angles corresponding to angular magnetoresistance oscillation minima and maxima in this compound. The resonant behavior is most evident in the CDW0 state, indicating a mechanism involving the Fermi surface nesting. Angular dependences reveal different behaviors of the thermopower and Nernst effect in the high magnetic field (CDWx) state.

  16. Angular and Linear Velocity Estimation for a Re-Entry Vehicle Using Six Distributed Accelerometers: Theory, Simulation and Feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G

    2003-04-28

    This report describes a feasibility study. We are interested in calculating the angular and linear velocities of a re-entry vehicle using six acceleration signals from a distributed accelerometer inertial measurement unit (DAIMU). Earlier work showed that angular and linear velocity calculation using classic nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) solvers is not practically feasible, due to mathematical and numerical difficulties. This report demonstrates the theoretical feasibility of using model-based nonlinear state estimation techniques to obtain the angular and linear velocities in this problem. Practical numerical and calibration issues require additional work to resolve. We show that the six accelerometers in the DAIMU are not sufficient to provide observability, so additional measurements of the system states are required (e.g. from a Global Positioning System (GPS) unit). Given the constraint that our system cannot use GPS, we propose using the existing on-board 3-axis magnetometer to measure angular velocity. We further show that the six nonlinear ODE's for the vehicle kinematics can be decoupled into three ODE's in the angular velocity and three ODE's in the linear velocity. This allows us to formulate a three-state Gauss-Markov system model for the angular velocities, using the magnetometer signals in the measurement model. This re-formulated model is observable, allowing us to build an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) for estimating the angular velocities. Given the angular velocity estimates from the EKF, the three ODE's for the linear velocity become algebraic, and the linear velocity can be calculated by numerical integration. Thus, we do not need direct measurements of the linear velocity to provide observability, and the technique is mathematically feasible. Using a simulation example, we show that the estimator adds value over the numerical ODE solver in the presence of measurement noise. Calculating the velocities in the

  17. Stability of gyro in a vehicle spinning with uncertain angular velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. N.

    1981-03-01

    An analysis is presented of a single-axis gyroscope mounted in a vehicle that is spinning with uncertain angular velocity about the spin axis of the gyro; the nonlinearity in the equation of motion of the gyro is retained. Using a circle criterion for the absolute stability of the Lure problem, it is shown that the gimbal motion is globally asymptotically stable if the Nyquist plot of the linear transfer function of the gyro lies within a certain disk. An inequality involving the magnitude of the uncertain spin rate and gyro parameters for stability is derived.

  18. Angular dependence of the ultrasonic SH wave velocity in rolled metal sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, C. M.; Proudfoot, G. G.

    THE ULTRASONIC SH wave technique is a promising method for separating out the effects of texture and stress on the ultrasonic velocity, and allows the texture and stress to be determined separately. ALEN and LANGMAN (1985) have reported measurements of the angular dependence of the SH wave velocity in several unstressed rolled metal sheets of aluminium, stainless steel, copper and brass. In this paper neutron diffraction measurements of the texture of several of these sheets are presented, and parameters entering into an expansion of the crystallite orientation distribution function are determined. These are in good agreement with the values obtained by fitting the ultrasonic results to theory. The validity of the first order expression for the effect of texture is assessed, and the contribution due to beam skewing is calculated.

  19. Initial measurements of the angular velocity of walking humans using an active millimeter-wave correlation interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilevu, Kojo S.; Kammerman, Kelly L.; Nanzer, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    The design of a 29.5 GHz experimental active interferometer for the measurement of the angular velocity of moving humans is presented in this paper, as well as initial measurements of walking humans. Measurement of the angular motion of moving objects is a desirable function in remote security sensing applications. Doppler radar sensors are able to measure the signature of moving humans based on micro-Doppler analysis; however, a person moving with little to no radial velocity produces negligible Doppler returns. Measurement of the angular movement of humans can be done with traditional radar techniques however the process involves either continuous tracking with narrow beamwidth or angle-of arrival estimation algorithms. Recently, the authors presented a new method of measuring the angular velocity of moving objects using interferometry. The method measures the angular velocity of an object without tracking or complex processing. The frequency shift imparted on the signal response is proportional to the angular velocity of the object as it passes through the interferometer beam pattern. The experimental system consists of a transmitter and two separate receivers with two widely spaced antennas. The received signals in each of the two channels are downconverted and digitized, and post-processed offline. Initial results of a walking person passing through the interferometer beam pattern are presented, which verify the expected operation of the receiver derived from the initial theory.

  20. Modal decomposition for measuring the orbital angular momentum density of light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel technique to measure the orbital angular momentum (OAM) density of light. The technique is based on modal decomposition, enabling the complete reconstruction of optical fields, including the reconstruction of the beams Poynting...

  1. Understanding redshift space distortions in density-weighted peculiar velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Sugiyama, Naonori S; Spergel, David N

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect measure the density-weighted velocity field, a potentially powerful cosmological probe. This paper presents an analytical method to predict the power spectrum and two-point correlation function of the density-weighted velocity in redshift space, the direct observables in kSZ surveys. We show a simple relation between the density power spectrum and the density-weighted velocity power spectrum that holds for both dark matter and halos. Using this relation, we can then extend familiar perturbation expansion techniques to the kSZ power spectrum. One of the most important features of the density-weighted velocity is the change of the sign of infall velocity at small scales due to the nonlinear redshift space distortion. Our model can explain this characteristic feature without any free parameters. As a result, our results can precisely predict the non-linear behavior of the density-weighted velocity field in redshift space up to $\\sim10\\ h^{-1} {\\rm Mpc}$...

  2. Improved Angular Velocity Estimation Using MEMS Sensors with Applications in Miniature Inertially Stabilized Platforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiaoyao; ZHANG Zhiyong; FAN Dapeng

    2011-01-01

    The performance of any inertially stabilized platform(ISP)is strongly related to the bandwidth and accuracy of the angular velocity signals.This paper discusses the development of an optimal state estimator for sensing inertial velocity using low-cost micro-electro-mechanical systems(MEMS)sensors.A low-bandwidth gyroscope is used alone with two low-performance accelerometers to obtain the estimation.The gyroscope has its own limited dynamics and mainly contributes to the low-frequency components of the estimation.The accelerometers have inherent biases and mainly contribute to the high-frequency components of the estimation.Extensive experimental results show that the state estimator can achieve high-performance signals over a wide range of velocities without drifts in both the t- and s-domains.Furthermore,with applications in miniature inertially stabilized platforms,the control characteristic presents a significantly improvement over the existing methods.The method can be also applied to robotics,attitude estimation,and friction compensation.

  3. Angular velocity variations and stability of spatially explicit prey-predator systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abta, Refael; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2007-05-01

    The linear instability of Lotka-Volterra orbits in the homogenous manifold of a two-patch system is analyzed. The origin of these orbits instability in the absence of prey migration is revealed to be the dependence of the angular velocity on the azimuthal angle; in particular, the system desynchronizes at the exit from the slow part of the trajectory. Using this insight, an analogous model of a two coupled oscillator is presented and shown to yield the same type of linear instability. This enables one to incorporate the linear instability within a recently presented general framework that allows for comparison of all known stabilization mechanisms and for simple classification of observed oscillations.

  4. An Ink-Jet Printed Capacitive Sensor for Angular Position/Velocity Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KRKLJES, D. B.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the prototype of a capacitive angular position/velocity sensor which exploits the advantages of flexible/printed electronics. The sensor belongs to the incremental encoder type with two quadrature channels. Instead of the commonly used structure of planar capacitor, in this paper a cylindrical capacitor structure with digitated electrodes, for both the stator and the rotor, was implemented. The flexible printed electrodes are attached to the inner wall of the stator and to the perimeter of the rotor cylinder. The rotor has no external contacts; electrical connection is established with the stator only. The working principles of the sensor and the signal conditioning circuit were demonstrated through experimental results based on in-house developed mechanical and electronics platforms.

  5. Density dependence of the saturated velocity in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, D. K.

    2016-11-01

    The saturated velocity of a semiconductor is an important measure in bench-marking performance for either logic or microwave applications. Graphene has been of interest for such applications due to its apparently high value of the saturated velocity. Recent experiments have suggested that this value is very density dependent and can even exceed the band limiting Fermi velocity. Some of these measurements have also suggested that the scattering is dominated by the low energy surface polar mode of the SiO2 substrate. Here, we show that the saturated velocity of graphene on SiO2 is relatively independent of the density and that the scattering is dominated by the high energy surface polar mode of the substrate.

  6. Density Models for Velocity Analysis of Jet Impinged CEDM Missile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Won Ho; Kang, Tae Kyo; Cho, Yeon Ho; Chang, Sang Gyoon; Lee, Dae Hee [KEPCO EnC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    A control element drive mechanism (CEDM) can be a potential missile in the reactor head area during one of the postulated accidents. The CEDM is propelled by the high speed water jet discharged from a broken upper head nozzle. The jet expansion models to predict the missile velocity have been investigated by Kang et al. The previous work of Kang et al. showed a continuous increase in missile velocity as the CEDM missile travels. But it is not natural in that two phase flow from the nozzle break exit tends to disperse and the thrust force on the missile decreases along the distance of the travel. The jet flow also interacts with the air surrounding itself. Therefore, the density change has to be included in the estimation of the missile velocity. In this paper, two density change models of the water jet are introduced for the jet expansion models along with the distance from the nozzle break location. The first one is the direct approximation model. Two density approximation models are introduced to predict the CEDM missile velocity. For each model, the effects of the expanded jet area were included as the area ratio to the exit nozzle area. In direct approximation model, the results have showed rapid decrease in both density and missile velocity. In pressure approach model, the density change is assumed perfectly proportional to the pressure change, and the results showed relatively smooth change in both density and missile velocity comparing to the direct approximation model. Using the model developed by Kang et al.., the maximum missile velocity is about 4 times greater comparing to the pressure approach model since the density is constant as the jet density at the nozzle exit in their model. Pressure approach model has benefits in that this model adopted neither curve fitting nor extrapolation unlike the direct approximation model, and included the effects of density change which are not considered in the model developed by Kang et al. So, this model is

  7. The weakly non-linear density-velocity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Michal J.; Lokas, Ewa L.

    1997-05-01

    We rigorously derive up to third order in perturbation theory the weakly non-linear relation between the cosmic density and velocity fields. The density field is described by the mass density contrast, delta. The velocity field is described by the variable theta proportional to the velocity divergence, theta=-f (Omega)^-1H ^-1_0∇. v, where f (Omega)~=Omega^0.6, Omega is the cosmological density parameter and H_0 is the Hubble constant. Our calculations show that mean delta given theta is a third-order polynomial in theta, --_theta=a _1theta+a_2(theta ^2-sigma^2_theta)+ a_3theta^3. This result constitutes an extension of the formula --_theta=theta+a _2(theta^2-sigma^2 _theta) found by Bernardeau which involved second-order perturbative solutions. Third-order perturbative corrections introduce the cubic term. They also, however, cause the coefficient a_1 to depart from unity, in contrast with the linear theory prediction. We compute the values of the coefficients a_p for scale-free power spectra, as well as for standard cold dark matter (CDM), for Gaussian smoothing. The coefficients obey a hierarchy a_3Ganon et al. The results provide a method for breaking the Omega-bias degeneracy in comparisons of cosmic density and velocity fields such as IRAS-potent.

  8. The Poynting vector and angular momentum density of Swallowtail-Gauss beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ke; Lu, Gang; Zhong, Xianqiong

    2017-08-01

    We propose a finite-energy Swallowtail-Gauss (SG) beam, which can be considered as the sum of two Half-Swallowtail-Gauss beams (i.e. HSG- and HSG+ beams). The SG, HSG- and HSG+ beams can all be generated by encoding the amplitude and phase of their Fourier spectrums onto a spatial light modulator. Based on the Collins integral formula, the Poynting vectors and angular momentum densities of the SG, HSG- and HSG+ beams passing through free space, focus system and chiral medium are numerically investigated, respectively. The results show that the SG, HSG- and HSG+ beam evolve into the intensity patterns with curved tails in the focal plane, and the direction of curved tails can be controlled by varying the transverse scaling lengths. This makes it possible to push or pull micro-particles along the intensity channels due to the flowage of Poynting vector in different directions. In the chiral medium, the evolution of left circular polarized (LCP) beam with tails is earlier than that of right circular polarized (RCP) beam, which is attributed to the faster phase velocities of LCP beam. The SG, HSG- and HSG+ beams are expected to act as alternative beams in term of guiding or manipulating micro-particles, which are useful for pushing or pulling micro-particles along controlled intensity channels.

  9. Calculation of photodetachment cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions of negative ions using density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuan [Department of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ning, Chuangang, E-mail: ningcg@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Physics, State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing (China)

    2015-10-14

    Recently, the development of photoelectron velocity map imaging makes it much easier to obtain the photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) experimentally. However, explanations of PADs are only qualitative in most cases, and very limited works have been reported on how to calculate PAD of anions. In the present work, we report a method using the density-functional-theory Kohn-Sham orbitals to calculate the photodetachment cross sections and the anisotropy parameter β. The spherical average over all random molecular orientation is calculated analytically. A program which can handle both the Gaussian type orbital and the Slater type orbital has been coded. The testing calculations on Li{sup −}, C{sup −}, O{sup −}, F{sup −}, CH{sup −}, OH{sup −}, NH{sub 2}{sup −}, O{sub 2}{sup −}, and S{sub 2}{sup −} show that our method is an efficient way to calculate the photodetachment cross section and anisotropy parameter β for anions, thus promising for large systems.

  10. Velocity statistics from spectral line data effects of density-velocity correlations, magnetic field, and shear

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, A; Pogosyan, D; Cho, J; Esquivel, Alejandro; Cho, Jungyeon

    2003-01-01

    In a previous work Lazarian and Pogosyan suggested a technique to extract velocity and density statistics, of interstellar turbulence, by means of analysing statistics of spectral line data cubes. In this paper we test that technique, by studying the effect of correlation between velocity and density fields, providing a systematic analysis of the noise, and exploring the effect of a linear shear. We make use of both compressible MHD simulations and synthetic data to emulate spectroscopic observations. With such synthetic spectroscopic data, we studied anisotropies of the two point statistics and related those anisotropies with the magnetic field direction. This presents a new technique for magnetic field studies. The results show that the velocity and density spectral indices measured are consistent with the analytical predictions. We identified the dominant source of error with the limited number of data points along a given line of sight. We argue that in real observations the number of emmiting elements is...

  11. Reference-free method for forming a three-dimensional image and determining the angular velocity of a remote object

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandrosov, V. I.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a reference-free method for forming a three-dimensional image and for determining the angular velocity of a remote nonplanar object. The method is based on probing an object by laser radiation with a coherence length that is smaller or larger than the size of the object and on the use of

  12. Knee Muscle Strength at Varying Angular Velocities and Associations with Gross Motor Function in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hseih-Ching; Shen, I-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of muscle strength at different angular velocities and gross motor functions in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study included 33 ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-15 years and 15 children with normal development. Children with CP were categorized into level I (n =…

  13. Knee Muscle Strength at Varying Angular Velocities and Associations with Gross Motor Function in Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Hseih-Ching; Shen, I-Hsuan; Chen, Chung-Yao; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chung, Chia-Ying

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of muscle strength at different angular velocities and gross motor functions in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). This study included 33 ambulatory children with spastic CP aged 6-15 years and 15 children with normal development. Children with CP were categorized into level I (n =…

  14. The Roles of the Horizontal Component of the Earth's Angular Velocity in Nonhydrostatic Linear Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Akira

    2003-04-01

    Roles of the horizontal component of the earth's rotation, which is neglected traditionally in atmospheric and oceanographic models, are studied through the normal mode analysis of a compressible and stratified model on a tangent plane in the domain that is periodic in the zonal and meridional directions but bounded at the top and bottom. As expected, there exist two distinct kinds of acoustic and buoyancy oscillations that are modified by the earth's rotation. When the cos(latitude) Coriolis terms are included, there exists another kind of wave oscillation whose frequencies are very close to the inertial frequency, 2 sin(latitude), where is the earth's angular velocity.The objective of this article is to clarify the circumstance in which a distinct kind of wave oscillation emerges whose frequencies are very close to the inertial frequency. Because this particular kind of normal mode appears only due to the presence of boundary conditions in the vertical, it may be appropriate to call these waves boundary-induced inertial (BII) modes as demonstrated through the normal mode analyses of a homogeneous and incompressible model and a Boussinesq model with thermal stratification. Thus, it can be understood that the BII modes can coexist with the acoustic and inertio-gravity modes when the effect of compressibility is added to the effects of buoyancy and complete Coriolis force in the compressible, stratified, and rotating model.

  15. Measurement of the orbital angular momentum density of light by modal decomposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a versatile method for the measurement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) density of an optical field. By performing a modal decomposition with digital holograms, we reconstruct the full optical field from a small set of single...

  16. Measuring the orbital angular momentum density for a superposition of Bessel beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To measure the Orbital Angular Momentum (OAM) density of superposition fields two steps are needed: generation and measurement. An azimuthally-varying phase (bounded by a ring-slit) placed in the spatial frequency domain produces a higher...

  17. The Hatteras Front: August 2004 velocity and density structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savidge, Dana K.; Austin, Jay A.

    2007-07-01

    The Hatteras Front is a persistent mesoscale cross-shelf oriented front off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. It is the boundary between relatively cool, fresh Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf waters and warmer, saltier shelf waters of the South Atlantic Bight, which both converge along-shelf upon Cape Hatteras year round. The Frontal Interaction Near Cape Hatteras (FINCH) project was conducted in 2004-2005 to intensively sample the Hatteras Front with shipboard ADCP and undulating towed CTD. This paper documents velocity and density structures associated with the cross-shelf oriented zone of Hatteras Front during the August 2004 field season. Property gradients across the Hatteras Front are large, with temperature (T) and salinity (S) differences of ˜4-6°C, 2-5 psu, respectively over distances of 1-2 km. The T and S are not completely compensating, and a strong density (ρ) gradient also exists, with Δρ of ˜2 kg/m3 across a gentler 10 km wide front. The density gradient results in a steric sea-level height gradient of ˜1-2 cm across the Front, which is in approximate geostrophic balance with a surface intensified jet, directed shoreward along the cross-shelf oriented Front. The velocity is sheared with depth at 3.0 × 10-2 to 5.0 × 10-2 s-1 in the upper 5 m of the jet; a rate consistent with the density gradient according to the thermal wind relationship. Shoreward transport of ˜4.8 × 104 m3/s results from the surface intensified jet. The structure of the velocity field associated with the Hatteras Front resembles that of a slope-controlled buoyant plume, as described by Lentz and Helfrich (2002). Velocity and density structures are similar during both advancing (southwestward) and retreating (northeastward) motion of the Front.

  18. Molecular beam studies of unimolecular reactions: Cl, F + C/sub 2/H/sub 3/Br. [Angular and velocity distributions, mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.; Coggiola, M.J.; Lee, Y.T.

    1978-12-01

    Several methods currently used to study unimolecular decomposition in molecular beams are discussed. Experimental product angular and velocity distributions obtained for the reaction of F, Cl with C/sub 2/H/sub 3/Br are presented. The mechanism by which conservation of angular momemtum can cause coupling of the product angular and velocity distributions in dissociation of long-lived complexes is introduced. 14 references.

  19. Conformal Transformations, Rotating String and Effects of angular velocity on Accelerating Quark-Antiquark pair in $AdS_3$

    CERN Document Server

    Sadeghi, Jafar

    2015-01-01

    In order to study quark and anti-quark interaction, one should consider all effects of the medium in motion of the pair. Because the pair, is not produced at rest in QGP. So the velocity of the pair, has some effects on its interactions that should be taken into account. In this paper we apply some conformal transformations for a rotat- ing string dual to a rotating heavy quark in $AdS_3$ which construct an accelerating string dual to an accelerating quark and anti-quark pair. So, we can have a comparison between when pair has angular velocity or not. Then we can study effects of angular velocity on the accelerating quark and anti-quark which are constructed by performing special con- formal transformations, conformal SO(2,2) transformation and particular $SL(2;R)_L$ and $SL(2;R)_R$ transformation. The accelerating quark and anti-quark show different behavior with increasing in angular velocity. With useful numerical solutions we show that quark and anti-quark can deccelerate to achieve each other or accelera...

  20. Relative infaunal bivalve density assessed from split beam echosounder angular information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noela Sánchez-Carnero

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Management of shellfish resources requires a spatial approach where mapping is a key tool. Acoustic techniques have been rarely used to map infaunal organisms with a patchy distribution. We propose and test the use of split-beam echosounder angular information to assess razor shell presence and relative density. Our statistical approach combines textural analysis of angular echograms, standard unsupervised multivariate methods and hierarchical classification through dendrograms to identify groups of locations with similar clam densities. The statistical analyses show that the classification is consistent with groundtruthing data and that results are insensitive to boat motion or seabed granulometry. The method developed here constitutes a promising tool for assessing the relative density of razor clam grounds.

  1. The Study of Cobb Angular Velocity in Cervical Spine during Dynamic Extension-Flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dong; Hu, Zhihao; Yuan, Wen

    2016-04-01

    A kinematic study of cervical spine. The aim of the study was to confirm the interesting manifestation observed in the dynamic images of the cervical spine movement from full-extension to full-flexion. To further explore the fine motion of total process of cervical spine movement with the new concept of Cobb angular velocity (CAV). Traditionally range of motion (ROM) is used to describe the cervical spine movement from extension to flexion. It is performed with only end position radiographs. However, these radiographs fail to explain how the elaborate movement happens. The dynamic images of the cervical spine movement from full-extension to full-flexion of 12 asymptomatic subjects were collected. After transforming these dynamic images to static lateral radiographs, we overlapped C7 cervical vertebrae of each subject and divided the total process of cervical spine movement into five equal partitions. Finally, CAV values from C2/3 to C6/7 were measured and analyzed. A broken line graph was created based on the data of CAV values. A simple motion process was observed in C2/3 and C3/4 segments. The motion processes of C4/5 and C5/6 segments exhibited a more complex track of "N" and "W" than the other segments. The peak CAV values of C4/5 and C5/6 were significantly greater than the other segments. From C2/3 to C6/7, the peak CAV value appeared in sequence. The intervertebral movements of cervical spine did not take a uniform motion form when the cervical spine moved from full-extension to full-flexion. From C2/3 to C6/7, the peak CAV value appeared in order. The C4/5 and C5/6 segments exhibited more complex kinematic characteristics in sagittal movement. This leads to C4/5 and C5/6 more vulnerable to injury and degeneration. We had a hypothesis that there was a positive correlation between injury/degeneration and complexity of intervertebral movement in the view of CAV. N/A.

  2. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, David; Hansen, Lars N; Ben Britton, T; Wilkinson, Angus J

    2016-09-01

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation.

  3. Dark Matter Halos: Velocity Anisotropy -- Density Slope Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Zait, Amir; Shlosman, Isaac

    2007-01-01

    Dark matter (DM) halos formed in CDM cosmologies seem to be characterized by a power law phase-space density profile. The density of the DM halos is often fitted by the NFW profile but a better fit is provided by the Sersic fitting formula. These relations are empirically derived from cosmological simulations of structure formation but have not yet been explained on a first principle basis. Here we solve the Jeans equation under the assumption of a spherical DM halo in dynamical equilibrium, that obeys a power law phase space density and either the NFW-like or the Sersic density profile. We then calculate the velocity anisotropy, beta(r), analytically. Our main result is that for the NFW-like profile the beta - gamma relation is not a linear one (where gamma is the logarithmic derivative of the density rho[r]). The shape of beta(r) depends mostly on the ratio of the gravitational to kinetic energy within the NFW scale radius R_s. For the Sersic profile a linear beta - gamma relation is recovered, and in parti...

  4. Energy-momentum and angular momentum densities in gauge theories of gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Kawai, Toshiharu

    2000-01-01

    In the $\\bar{\\mbox{\\rm Poincar\\'{e}}}$ gauge theory of gravity, which has been formulated on the basis of a principal fiber bundle over the space-time manifold having the covering group of the proper orthochronous Poincar\\'{e} group as the structure group, we examine the tensorial properties of the dynamical energy-momentum density ${}^{G}{\\mathbf T}_{k}{}^{\\mu}$ and the ` ` spin" angular momentum density ${}^{G}{\\mathbf S}_{kl}{}^{\\mu}$ of the gravitational field. They are both space-time ve...

  5. Isokinetic hamstrings-to-quadriceps peak torque ratio: the influence of sport modality, gender, and angular velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marilia Dos Santos; De Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Koffes, Fabiana De Carvalho; Mascarin, Naryana Cristina; Benedito-Silva, Ana Amélia; Da Silva, Antonio Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine differences in hamstrings-to-quadriceps (H/Q) peak torque ratios evaluated at different angular velocities between men and women who participate in judo, handball or soccer. A total of 166 athletes, including 58 judokas (26 females and 32 males), 39 handball players (22 females and 17 males), and 69 soccer players (17 females and 52 males), were evaluated using an isokinetic dynamometer. The H/Q isokinetic peak torque ratios were calculated at angular velocities of 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ and 5.23 rad · s⁻¹. In the analysis by gender, female soccer players produced lower H/Q peak torque ratios at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ than males involved in the same sport. However, when H/Q peak torque ratio was assessed at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹, there were no significant differences between the sexes. In the analysis by sport, there were no differences among females at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹. In contrast, male soccer players had significantly higher H/Q peak torque ratios than judokas (66 ± 12% vs. 57 ± 14%, respectively). Female handball players produced significantly lower peak torque ratios at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹ than judokas or soccer players, whereas males presented no ratio differences among sports At 5.23 rad · s⁻¹. In the analysis by velocity, women's muscular ratios assessed at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ were significantly lower than at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹ for all sports; among men, only judokas presented lower ratios at 1.05 rad · s⁻¹ than at 5.23 rad · s⁻¹. The present results suggest that sport modality and angular velocity influence the isokinetic strength profiles of men and women.

  6. The velocity-density relation in the spherical model

    CERN Document Server

    Bilicki, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    We study the cosmic velocity-density relation using the spherical collapse model (SCM) as a proxy to non-linear dynamics. Although the dependence of this relation on cosmological parameters is known to be weak, we retain the density parameter Omega_m in SCM equations, in order to study the limit Omega_m -> 0. We show that in this regime the considered relation is strictly linear, for arbitrary values of the density contrast, on the contrary to some claims in the literature. On the other hand, we confirm that for realistic values of Omega_m the exact relation in the SCM is well approximated by the classic formula of Bernardeau (1992), both for voids (delta<0) and for overdensities up to delta ~ 3. Inspired by this fact, we find further analytic approximations to the relation for the whole range delta from -1 to infinity. Our formula for voids accounts for the weak Omega_m-dependence of their maximal rate of expansion, which for Omega_m < 1 is slightly smaller that 3/2. For positive density contrasts, we ...

  7. Density profiles of dark matter halos with anisotropic velocity tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Hiotelis, N

    2002-01-01

    We present density profiles, that are solutions of the spherical Jeans equation, derived under the following two assumptions: (i) the coarse grained phase-density follows a power-law of radius, rho/(sigma^3) proportional to r^{-alpha}, and (ii) the velocity anisotropy parameter is given by the relation beta_a(r) = beta_1 + 2 beta_2 {(r/r_*)/(1+(r/r_*)^2)} where beta_1, beta_2 are parameters and r_* equals twice the virial radius, r_{vir}, of the system. These assumptions are well motivated by the results of N-body simulations. Density profiles have increasing logarithmic slopes gamma, defined by gamma = - {(d ln rho)/(d ln r)}. The values of gamma at r = 10^{-2.5}r_{vir}, a distance where the systems could be resolved by large N-body simulations, lie in the range 1. - 1.6. These inner values of gamma increase for increasing beta_1 and for increasing concentration of the system. On the other hand, slopes at r = r_{vir} lie in the range 2.42 - 3.82. A model density profile that fits well the results at radial d...

  8. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Radial Velocity Generation for Extending Bandwidth of Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor at Low Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Ji

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The magnetohydrodynamics angular rate sensor (MHD ARS has received much attention for its ultra-low noise in ultra-broad bandwidth and its impact resistance in harsh environments; however, its poor performance at low frequency hinders its work in long time duration. The paper presents a modified MHD ARS combining Coriolis with MHD effect to extend the measurement scope throughout the whole bandwidth, in which an appropriate radial flow velocity should be provided to satisfy simplified model of the modified MHD ARS. A method that can generate radial velocity by an MHD pump in MHD ARS is proposed. A device is designed to study the radial flow velocity generated by the MHD pump. The influence of structure and physical parameters are studied by numerical simulation and experiment of the device. The analytic expression of the velocity generated by the energized current drawn from simulation and experiment are consistent, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method generating radial velocity. The study can be applied to generate and control radial velocity in modified MHD ARS, which is essential for the two effects combination throughout the whole bandwidth.

  9. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Radial Velocity Generation for Extending Bandwidth of Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor at Low Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yue; Li, Xingfei; Wu, Tengfei; Chen, Cheng

    2015-12-15

    The magnetohydrodynamics angular rate sensor (MHD ARS) has received much attention for its ultra-low noise in ultra-broad bandwidth and its impact resistance in harsh environments; however, its poor performance at low frequency hinders its work in long time duration. The paper presents a modified MHD ARS combining Coriolis with MHD effect to extend the measurement scope throughout the whole bandwidth, in which an appropriate radial flow velocity should be provided to satisfy simplified model of the modified MHD ARS. A method that can generate radial velocity by an MHD pump in MHD ARS is proposed. A device is designed to study the radial flow velocity generated by the MHD pump. The influence of structure and physical parameters are studied by numerical simulation and experiment of the device. The analytic expression of the velocity generated by the energized current drawn from simulation and experiment are consistent, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method generating radial velocity. The study can be applied to generate and control radial velocity in modified MHD ARS, which is essential for the two effects combination throughout the whole bandwidth.

  10. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Radial Velocity Generation for Extending Bandwidth of Magnetohydrodynamic Angular Rate Sensor at Low Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yue; Li, Xingfei; Wu, Tengfei; Chen, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamics angular rate sensor (MHD ARS) has received much attention for its ultra-low noise in ultra-broad bandwidth and its impact resistance in harsh environments; however, its poor performance at low frequency hinders its work in long time duration. The paper presents a modified MHD ARS combining Coriolis with MHD effect to extend the measurement scope throughout the whole bandwidth, in which an appropriate radial flow velocity should be provided to satisfy simplified model of the modified MHD ARS. A method that can generate radial velocity by an MHD pump in MHD ARS is proposed. A device is designed to study the radial flow velocity generated by the MHD pump. The influence of structure and physical parameters are studied by numerical simulation and experiment of the device. The analytic expression of the velocity generated by the energized current drawn from simulation and experiment are consistent, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method generating radial velocity. The study can be applied to generate and control radial velocity in modified MHD ARS, which is essential for the two effects combination throughout the whole bandwidth. PMID:26694393

  11. Internal wave pressure, velocity, and energy flux from density perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Allshouse, Michael R; Morrison, Philip J; Swinney, Harry L

    2016-01-01

    Determination of energy transport is crucial for understanding the energy budget and fluid circulation in density varying fluids such as the ocean and the atmosphere. However, it is rarely possible to determine the energy flux field $\\mathbf{J} = p \\mathbf{u}$, which requires simultaneous measurements of the pressure and velocity perturbation fields, $p$ and $\\mathbf{u}$. We present a method for obtaining the instantaneous $\\mathbf{J}(x,z,t)$ from density perturbations alone: a Green's function-based calculation yields $p$, and $\\mathbf{u}$ is obtained by integrating the continuity equation and the incompressibility condition. We validate our method with results from Navier-Stokes simulations: the Green's function method is applied to the density perturbation field from the simulations, and the result for $\\mathbf{J}$ is found to agree typically to within $1\\%$ with $\\mathbf{J}$ computed directly using $p$ and $ \\mathbf{u}$ from the Navier-Stokes simulation. We also apply the Green's function method to densit...

  12. Influence of the magnus force on the motion of a spherical solid with a large angular velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, V. A.; Solomenko, A. D.; Yatsenko, V. P.

    1993-09-01

    The influence of the initial angular velocity imparted by an electric motor to a spherical solid on its deviation from the vertical in fall is investigated experimentally. Values of the coefficient CM in the formula for the Magnus force at which the trajectories of sphere motion are in agreement with the experimental data are found by calculation. It is established that as the Reynolds number Reω grows the coefficient CM decreases; with Reω˜3·104 CM is 10% of the quantity C{M/0} found by Rubinov and Keller for small Reynolds numbers.

  13. Becoming angular momentum density flow through nonlinear mass transfer into a gravitating spheroidal body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krot, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    A statistical theory for a cosmological body forming based on the spheroidal body model has been proposed in the works [1]-[4]. This work studies a slowly evolving process of gravitational condensation of a spheroidal body from an infinitely distributed gas-dust substance in space. The equation for an initial evolution of mass density function of a gas-dust cloud is considered here. It is found this equation coincides completely with the analogous equation for a slowly gravitational compressed spheroidal body [5]. A conductive flow in dissipative systems was investigated by I. Prigogine in his works (see, for example, [6], [7]). As it has been found in [2], [5], there exists a conductive antidiffusion flow in a slowly compressible gravitating spheroidal body. Applying the equation of continuity to this conductive flow density we obtain a linear antidiffusion equation [5]. However, if an intensity of conductive flow density increases sharply then the linear antidiffusion equation becomes a nonlinear one. Really, it was pointed to [6] analogous linear equations of diffusion or thermal conductivity transform in nonlinear equations respectively. In this case, the equation of continuity describes a nonlinear mass flow being a source of instabilities into a gravitating spheroidal body because the gravitational compression factor G is a function of not only time but a mass density. Using integral substitution we can reduce a nonlinear antidiffusion equation to the linear antidiffusion equation relative to a new function. If the factor G can be considered as a specific angular momentum then the new function is an angular momentum density. Thus, a nonlinear momentum density flow induces a flow of angular momentum density because streamlines of moving continuous substance come close into a gravitating spheroidal body. Really, the streamline approach leads to more tight interactions of "liquid particles" that implies a superposition of their specific angular momentums. This

  14. Energy flux density and angular momentum density of Pearcey-Gauss vortex beams in the far field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, K.; Lu, G.; Zhong, X.

    2017-02-01

    The longitudinal and transverse energy flux density (EFD) and angular momentum density (AMD) of a Pearcey-Gauss vortex beam in the far field are studied using the vector angular spectrum representation and stationary phase method, where the influence of topological charge, noncanonical strength and off-axis distance of the embedded optical vortex on far-field vectorial structures of the corresponding beam is emphasized. For comparison, the EFD and AMD of the Pearcey-Gauss beam with non-vortex in the far field are also discussed. The results show that the longitudinal EFDs of the Pearcey-Gauss vortex beam exhibit parabolic patterns, and the number of parabolic dark zones equals the absolute value of topological charge of the embedded optical vortex in the input plane. While for the Pearcey-Gauss beam, the dark zones are not found owing to the non-vortex in the input plane. The motion of zero-intensity spot of whole beam appears by varying the off-axis distance. Noncanonical strength and off-axis distance both can adjust the magnitudes and directions of transverse EFD and control the spatial energy distributions of longitudinal EFD, but not change the net AMD.

  15. Imaging density and seismic velocities in the Eastern Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Nienke; Gokhberg, Alexey; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The Mediterranean domain is a geologically complicated region, a result of its complex tectonic and geodynamic evolution. Our understanding of it draws from surface geology, modeling and imaging of the subsurface. Here, we present the first results of seismic waveform inversion of the Eastern Mediterranean region. While computationally much more expensive than more traditional ray-based imaging methods, the advantage of waveform tomography lies in its ability to incorporate in a consistent manner all the information in seismograms - not just the arrivals of certain, specified phases. As a result, body and multimode surface waves, source effects, frequency-dependence, wavefront healing, anisotropy and attenuation are naturally and coherently incorporated. This not only allows us to image P- and S-wave velocity jointly for the crust and mantle, but also makes it possible to put additional constraints on density that ray tomography cannot provide. This is of special interest because heterogeneities in density drive geodynamics, and the combined knowledge of all parameters would help to distinguish between thermal and compositional effects in the subsurface, where no direct measurements can be made. Our tomography makes use of a multi-scale approach, initially using only the very lowest frequency signals of periods of around 100-150 seconds which corresponds to structures of 200 km size in the crust. Slowly, higher-frequency data is added as the model is updated and more of the data is explained by it. Our ultimate aim is to go down to periods of 10 seconds, which corresponds to structures of about 15 km size in the crust to 25 km in the mantle. Only those parts of the seismograms are used in which data and synthetics are similar enough to allow for meaningful comparison. As iterations progress and synthetics become more similar to the data, more parts of the seismogram can be included. Resolution of the final model is assessed using a resolution analysis strategy

  16. Azimuthal velocity profiles in Rayleigh-stable Taylor-Couette flow and implied axial angular momentum transport

    CERN Document Server

    Nordsiek, Freja; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Lathrop, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    Azimuthal velocity profiles were measured in a Taylor-Couette apparatus, which has been used as a model of stellar and planetary accretion disks. The apparatus has a cylinder radius ratio of $\\eta = 0.7158$, an aspect-ratio of $\\Gamma = 11.74$, and axial boundaries attached to the outer cylinder --- known to have significant Ekman pumping. We investigated angular momentum transport and Ekman pumping in the Rayleigh-stable regime. The regime is linearly stable and is characterized by radially increasing specific angular momentum. We measured several Rayleigh-stable profiles for shear Reynolds numbers $Re_S \\sim O\\left(10^5\\right) \\,$, both for $\\Omega_i > \\Omega_o > 0$ (quasi-Keplerian regime) and $\\Omega_o > \\Omega_i > 0$ (sub-rotating regime) where $\\Omega_{i,o}$ is the inner/outer cylinder rotation rate. None of the velocity profiles matched the non-vortical laminar Taylor-Couette profile. The deviation from that profile increased as solid-body rotation was approached at fixed $Re_S$. Flow super-rotation, a...

  17. EMRI corrections to the angular velocity and redshift factor of a mass in circular orbit about a Kerr black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Abhay G; Keidl, Tobias S

    2012-01-01

    This is the first of two papers on computing the self-force in a radiation gauge for a particle moving in circular, equatorial orbit about a Kerr black hole. In the EMRI (extreme-mass-ratio inspiral) framework, with mode-sum renormalization, we compute the renormalized value of the quantity $h_{\\alpha\\beta}u^\\alpha u^\\beta$, gauge-invariant under gauge transformations generated by a helically symmetric gauge vector; and we find the related order $\\frak{m}$ correction to the particle's angular velocity at fixed renormalized redshift (and to its redshift at fixed angular velocity). The radiative part of the perturbed metric is constructed from the Hertz potential which is extracted from the Weyl scalar by an algebraic inversion\\cite{sf2}. We then write the spin-weighted spheroidal harmonics as a sum over spin-weighted spherical harmonics and use mode-sum renormalization to find the renormalization coefficients by matching a series in $L=\\ell+1/2$ to the large-$L$ behavior of the expression for $H := \\frac12 h_{...

  18. Older men are more fatigable than young when matched for maximal power and knee extension angular velocity is unconstrained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Brian H; Power, Geoffrey A; Paturel, Justin R; Rice, Charles L

    2015-06-01

    The underlying factors related to the divergent findings of age-related fatigue for dynamic tasks are not well understood. The purpose here was to investigate age-related fatigability and recovery between a repeated constrained (isokinetic) and an unconstrained velocity (isotonic) task, in which participants performed fatiguing contractions at the velocity (isokinetic) or resistance (isotonic) corresponding with maximal power. To compare between tasks, isotonic torque-power relationships were constructed prior to and following both fatiguing tasks and during short-term recovery. Contractile properties were recorded from 9 old (~75 years) and 11 young (~25 years) men during three testing sessions. In the first session, maximal power was assessed, and sessions 2 and 3 involved an isokinetic or an isotonic concentric fatigue task performed until maximal power was reduced by 40 %. Compared with young, the older men performed the same number of contractions to task failure for the isokinetic task (~45 contractions), but 20 % fewer for the isotonic task (p contraction strength, angular velocity, and power were reduced by ~30, ~13, and ~25 %, respectively, immediately following task failure, and only isometric torque was not recovered fully by 10 min. In conclusion, older men are more fatigable than the young when performing a repetitive maximal dynamic task at a relative resistance (isotonic) but not an absolute velocity (isokinetic), corresponding to maximal power.

  19. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, David, E-mail: davidwa@earth.ox.ac.uk [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Hansen, Lars N. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Ben Britton, T. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Royal School of Mines, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (<0.01°) than conventional EBSD (~0.5°), allowing very low dislocation densities to be analysed. We develop the application of HR-EBSD to olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation. - Highlights: • Lattice orientation gradients in olivine were measured using HR-EBSD. • The limited number of olivine slip systems enable simple least squares inversion for GND

  20. High-Q microsphere resonators for angular velocity sensing in gyroscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Panlong [Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science and Dynamic Measurement, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030051 (China); School of Science, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Zheng, Yongqiu [Science and Technology on Electronic Test and Measurement Laboratory, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Yan, Shubin, E-mail: shubin-yan@nuc.edu.cn; Xue, Chenyang, E-mail: xuechenyang@nuc.edu.cn; Liu, Jun, E-mail: liuj@nuc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Instrumentation Science and Dynamic Measurement, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Science and Technology on Electronic Test and Measurement Laboratory, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Wang, Wanjun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2015-02-09

    A resonator gyroscope based on the Sagnac effect is proposed using a core unit that is generated by water-hydrogen flame melting. The relationship between the quality factor Q and diameter D is revealed. The Q factor of the spectral lines of the microsphere cavity coupling system, which uses tapered fibers, is found to be 10{sup 6} or more before packaging with a low refractive curable ultraviolet polymer, although it drops to approximately 10{sup 5} after packaging. In addition, a rotating test platform is built, and the transmission spectrum and discriminator curves of a microsphere cavity with Q of 3.22×10{sup 6} are measured using a semiconductor laser (linewidth less than 1 kHz) and a real-time proportional-integral circuit tracking and feedback technique. Equations fitting the relation between the voltage and angular rotation rate are obtained. According to the experimentally measured parameters, the sensitivity of the microsphere-coupled system can reach 0.095{sup ∘}/s.

  1. On the initial- and boundary-value problem for 2D micropolar equations with only angular velocity dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiu, Quansen; Liu, Jitao; Wu, Jiahong; Yu, Huan

    2017-10-01

    This paper focuses on the initial- and boundary-value problem for the two-dimensional micropolar equations with only angular velocity dissipation in a smooth bounded domain. The aim here is to establish the global existence and uniqueness of solutions by imposing natural boundary conditions and minimal regularity assumptions on the initial data. Besides, the global solution is shown to possess higher regularity when the initial datum is more regular. To obtain these results, we overcome two main difficulties: one due to the lack of full dissipation and one due to the boundary conditions. In addition to the global regularity problem, we also examine the large time behavior of solutions and obtain explicit decay rates.

  2. Multi Point Velocity, Density and Temperature Measurements using LITA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Laser induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a nonintrusive, transient-grating optical technique that provides simultaneous high-accuracy measurements of velocity,...

  3. Effect of Dissipation, Angular Momentum and Velocity Along the Fission Direction on the Production of Heavy Neck Fragments During Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanez, R.; de Souza, R. T.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Davin, B.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Viola, V. E., Jr.; Cârjan, N.

    1998-04-01

    We have coupled the Los Alamos finite range dynamical model of fission with a Coulomb trajectory model in order to understand recently observed trends in experimental measurements of neck emission during fission. In the reaction of 22 A MeV ^12C and ^232Th a significant yield of relatively heavy neck fragments (Z=9-13), which originate from peripheral collisions, was observed. Within the macroscopic model we study the effect of dissipation, angular momentum and an initial velocity along the fission direction on the formation of a third middle fragment. As compared to binary fission, ternary fission is associated with a more elongated scission configuration. Following scission, a classical Coulomb trajectory model is used to calculate the final kinetic energies of the fragments given the breakup geometry, and the radial and rotational velocities of the fission fragments as predicted by the macroscopic model. The calculated final kinetic energies are compared to the measured kinetic energies of the experimentally observed neck fragments.

  4. Indirect perturbation influence of planets on the variation of the instantaneous angular velocity of the rigid Earth in the lunar-solar gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-Sen

    2017-08-01

    The differential equation and its solution for indirect influence of the planetary perturbation on the variation of the rotational angular velocity of the rigid Earth in the lunar-solar gravitational field are obtained by using Euler's dynamic equations. The theoretical results show that the angular velocity of the Earth varies with the periodic and mixed periodic variation under the lunar and solar gravitational field due to the planetary perturbation on the Earth orbit. The numerical results for the amplitudes of the periodic terms and the coefficient of the mixed periodic terms are presented.

  5. Reverse propagation and negative angular momentum density flux of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial fractional Bessel vortex beam of progressive waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2016-09-01

    Energy and angular momentum flux density characteristics of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial vector Bessel vortex beam of fractional order are examined based on the dual-field method for the generation of symmetric electric and magnetic fields. Should some conditions determined by the polarization state, the half-cone angle as well as the beam-order (or topological charge) be met, the axial energy and angular momentum flux densities vanish (representing Poynting singularities), before they become negative. These negative counterintuitive properties suggest retrograde (negative) propagation as well as a rotation reversal of the angular momentum with respect to the beam handedness. These characteristics of nondiffracting nonparaxial Bessel fractional vortex beams of progressive waves open new capabilities in optical tractor beam tweezers, optical spanners, invisibility cloaks, optically engineered metamaterials, and other applications.

  6. Estimation of C*-Integral for Radial Cracks in Annular Discs under Constant Angular Velocity and Internal Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Gowhari-Anaraki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The finite element method has been used to predict the creep rupture parameter, C*-Integral for single and double-edge cracks in eight annular rotating discs under constant angular velocity with and without internal pressure. In this study, a new dimensionless creeping crack configuration factor, Q* has been introduced. Power law creeping finite element analyses have been performed and the results are presented in the form of Q* for a wide range of components and crack geometry parameters. These parameters are chosen to be representative of typical practical situations and have been determined from evidence presented in the open literature. The extensive range of Q* obtained from the analyses are then used to obtain equivalent prediction equations using a statistical multiple non-linear regression model. The predictive equations for Q*, can also be used easily to calculate the C*-Integral values for extensive range of geometric parameters. The C*-Integral values obtained from predictive equations were also compared with those obtained from reference stress method (RSM. Finally, creep zone growth behavior was studied in the component during transient time.

  7. Adaptive angular-velocity Vold-Kalman filter order tracking - Theoretical basis, numerical implementation and parameter investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, M.-Ch.; Chu, W.-Ch.; Le, Duc-Do

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents an alternative Vold-Kalman filter order tracking (VKF_OT) method, i.e. adaptive angular-velocity VKF_OT technique, to extract and characterize order components in an adaptive manner for the condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. The order/spectral waveforms to be tracked can be recursively solved by using Kalman filter based on the one-step state prediction. The paper comprises theoretical derivation of computation scheme, numerical implementation, and parameter investigation. Comparisons of the adaptive VKF_OT scheme with two other ones are performed through processing synthetic signals of designated order components. Processing parameters such as the weighting factor and the correlation matrix of process noise, and data conditions like the sampling frequency, which influence tracking behavior, are explored. The merits such as adaptive processing nature and computation efficiency brought by the proposed scheme are addressed although the computation was performed in off-line conditions. The proposed scheme can simultaneously extract multiple spectral components, and effectively decouple close and crossing orders associated with multi-axial reference rotating speeds.

  8. Equilibrium Points and Related Periodic Motions in the Restricted Three-Body Problem with Angular Velocity and Radiation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Perdios

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a modification of the restricted three-body problem in which the angular velocity variation is considered in the case where the primaries are sources of radiation. In particular, the existence and stability of its equilibrium points in the plane of motion of the primaries are studied. We find that this problem admits the well-known five planar equilibria of the classical problem with the difference that the corresponding collinear points may be stable depending on the parameters of the problem. For all planar equilibria, sufficient parametric conditions for their stability have been established which are used for the numerical determination of the stability regions in various parametric planes. Also, for certain values of the parameters of the problem for which the equilibrium points are stable, the short and long period families have been computed. To do so, semianalytical expressions have been found for the determination of appropriate initial conditions. Special attention has been given to the continuation of the long period family, in the case of the classical restricted three-body problem, where we show numerically that periodic orbits of the short period family, which are bifurcation points with the long period family, are connected through the characteristic curve of the long period family.

  9. Effects of beam velocity and density on an ion-beam pulse moving in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xiao-ying; Zhao, Yong-tao; Qi, Xin; Yang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    The wakefield and stopping power of an ion-beam pulse moving in magnetized plasmas are investigated by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The effects of beam velocity and density on the wake and stopping power are discussed. In the presence of magnetic field, it is found that beside the longitudinal conversed V-shaped wakes, the strong whistler wave are observed when low-density and low-velocity pulses moving in plasmas. The corresponding stopping powers are enhanced due to the drag of these whistler waves. As beam velocities increase, the whistler waves disappear, and only are conversed V-shape wakes observed. The corresponding stopping powers are reduced compared with these in isotropic plasmas. When high-density pulses transport in the magnetized plasmas, the whistler waves are greatly inhibited for low-velocity pulses and disappear for high-velocity pulses. Additionally, the magnetic field reduces the stopping powers for all high-density cases.

  10. Experimental study of the velocity of density currents in convergent and divergent channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasan Torabi POUDEH; Samad EMAMGHOLIZADEH; Manoocher Fathi-MOGHADAM

    2014-01-01

    The head velocity of the density current in the convergent and divergent channel is a key parameter for evaluating the extent to which suspended material travels, and for determining the type and distribution of sediment in the water body. This study experimentally evaluated the effects of the reach degree of convergence and divergence on the head velocity of the density current. Experiments were conducted in the flume with 6.0 m long, 0.72 m width and 0.6 m height. The head velocity was measured at three convergent degrees (-8o;-12o;-26o), at three divergent degrees (8o; 12o; 26o) and two slopes (0.009, 0.016) for various discharges. The measured head velocity of the density current is compared with the head velocity of the density current in the constant cross section channel. Based on non-dimensional and statistical analysis, relations as linear multiple regression are offered for predicting head velocity of the density current in the convergent, divergent and constant cross section channel. Also the results of this research show that for the same slope and discharge, the head velocity of the density current in the convergent and divergent channel are greater and less than the head velocity of the constant cross section, respectively.

  11. Power Stroke Angular Velocity Profiles of Archaeal A-ATP Synthase Versus Thermophilic and Mesophilic F-ATP Synthase Molecular Motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielaff, Hendrik; Martin, James; Singh, Dhirendra; Biuković, Goran; Grüber, Gerhard; Frasch, Wayne D

    2016-12-02

    The angular velocities of ATPase-dependent power strokes as a function of the rotational position for the A-type molecular motor A3B3DF, from the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase, and the thermophilic motor α3β3γ, from Geobacillus stearothermophilus (formerly known as Bacillus PS3) F-ATP synthase, are resolved at 5 μs resolution for the first time. Unexpectedly, the angular velocity profile of the A-type was closely similar in the angular positions of accelerations and decelerations to the profiles of the evolutionarily distant F-type motors of thermophilic and mesophilic origins, and they differ only in the magnitude of their velocities. M. mazei A3B3DF power strokes occurred in 120° steps at saturating ATP concentrations like the F-type motors. However, because ATP-binding dwells did not interrupt the 120° steps at limiting ATP, ATP binding to A3B3DF must occur during the catalytic dwell. Elevated concentrations of ADP did not increase dwells occurring 40° after the catalytic dwell. In F-type motors, elevated ADP induces dwells 40° after the catalytic dwell and slows the overall velocity. The similarities in these power stroke profiles are consistent with a common rotational mechanism for A-type and F-type rotary motors, in which the angular velocity is limited by the rotary position at which ATP binding occurs and by the drag imposed on the axle as it rotates within the ring of stator subunits.

  12. Dynamical density fluctuations of superfluids near the critical velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yusuke; Watabe, Shohei

    2010-07-16

    We propose a stability criterion of superfluids in condensed Bose-Einstein systems, which incorporates the spectral function or the autocorrelation function of the local density. Within the Gross-Pitaevskii-Bogoliubov theory, we demonstrate the validity of our criterion for the soliton-emission instability, with use of explicit forms of zero modes of the Bogoliubov equation and a dynamical scaling near the saddle-node bifurcation. We also show that the criterion is applicable to the Landau phonon instability and the Landau roton instability within the single-mode approximation.

  13. Waves in cell monolayer without proliferation: density determines cell velocity and wave celerity

    CERN Document Server

    Tlili, S; Li, B; Cardoso, O; Ladoux, B; Delanoë-Ayari, H; Graner, F

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migration contributes to morphogenesis, wound healing or tumor metastasis. Culturing epithelial monolayers on a substrate is an in vitro configuration suitable to quantitatively characterize such tissue migration by measuring cell velocity, density and cell-substrate interaction force. Inhibiting cell division, we limit cell density increase and favor steady cell migration, while by using long narrow strips we stabilise the migrating front shape, so that we observe migration over a day or more. In the monolayer bulk, the cell velocity is a function of the cell density, namely it increases as a linear function of the cell radius. At least ten periods of propagating velocity waves are detected with a high signal-to-noise ratio, enabling for their quantitative spatio-temporal analysis. Cell density displays waves, in phase opposition with the velocity, as predicted by mass conservation; similarly, cell-substrate force appear to display small amplitude waves, in phase quadrature with respect to ve...

  14. Shock wave velocity and shock pressure for low density powders : A novel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijken, D.K.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new mod

  15. SHOCK-WAVE VELOCITY AND SHOCK PRESSURE FOR LOW-DENSITY POWDERS - A NOVEL-APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKEN, DK; DEHOSSON, JTM

    1994-01-01

    A novel approach is presented to predict the shock wave velocity as well as the shock wave pressure in powder materials. It is shown that the influence of the specific volume behind the shock wave on shock wave velocity and shock pressure decreases with decreasing initial powder density. The new mod

  16. The impact of stellar feedback on the density and velocity structure of the interstellar medium

    OpenAIRE

    Grisdale, Kearn; Agertz, Oscar; Romeo, Alessandro B.; Renaud, Florent; Read, Justin I.

    2016-01-01

    We study the impact of stellar feedback in shaping the density and velocity structure of neutral hydrogen (HI) in disc galaxies. For our analysis, we carry out $\\sim 4.6$pc resolution $N$-body+adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hydrodynamic simulations of isolated galaxies, set up to mimic a Milky Way (MW), and a Large and Small Magellanic Cloud (LMC, SMC). We quantify the density and velocity structure of the interstellar medium using power spectra and compare the simulated galaxies to observed ...

  17. Density, Velocity and Ionization Structure in Accretion-Disc Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Long, Knox

    2004-01-01

    This was a project to exploit the unique capabilities of FUSE to monitor variations in the wind- formed spectral lines of the luminous, low-inclination, cataclysmic variables(CV) -- RW Sex. (The original proposal contained two additional objects but these were not approved.) These observations were intended to allow us to determine the relative roles of density and ionization state changes in the outflow and to search for spectroscopic signatures of stochastic small-scale structure and shocked gas. By monitoring the temporal behavior of blue-ward extended absorption lines with a wide range of ionization potentials and excitation energies, we proposed to track the changing physical conditions in the outflow. We planned to use a new Monte Carlo code to calculate the ionization structure of and radiative transfer through the CV wind. The analysis therefore was intended to establish the wind geometry, kinematics and ionization state, both in a time-averaged sense and as a function of time.

  18. Linear and angular momentum of electromagnetic fields generated by an arbitrary distribution of charge and current densities at rest

    CERN Document Server

    Thidé, B; Then, H; Tamburini, F

    2010-01-01

    Starting from Stratton-Panofsky-Phillips-Jefimenko equations for the electric and magnetic fields generated by completely arbitrary charge and current density distributions at rest, we derive far-zone approximations for the fields, containing all components, dominant as well as sub-dominant. Using these approximate formulas, we derive general formulas for the total electromagnetic linear momentum and angular momentum, valid at large distances from arbitrary, non-moving charge and current sources.

  19. A simplified technique for determining the rotational motion of a satellite based on the onboard measurements of the angular velocity and magnetic field of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrashkin, V. I.; Voronov, K. E.; Piyakov, I. V.; Puzin, Yu. Ya.; Sazonov, V. V.; Syomkin, N. D.; Chebukov, S. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    The mathematical model, which allowed us to reconstruct the rotational motion of the Bion M-1 and Foton M-4 satellites by processing the measurements of onboard magnetometers and the angular velocity sensor, is sufficiently detailed and accurate. If we slightly lower the requirements for accuracy and transfer to a rougher model, i.e., we will not update the biases in measurements of the angular velocity component, then the measurement processing technique can be significantly simplified. The volume of calculations in minimizing the functional of the least-square technique is reduced; the most complicated part of calculations is performed using the standard procedure of computational linear algebra. This simplified technique is described below, and the examples of its application for reconstructing the rotational motion of the Foton M-4 satellite are presented. A noticeable distinction in the reconstructions of motion, constructed by simplified and more exact techniques, is revealed in processing the measurements over time intervals longer than 4 hours.

  20. Improving Recording Density of All-Optical Magnetic Storage by Using High-Pass Angular Spectrum Filters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG You-Yi; ZHANG Yao-Ju

    2009-01-01

    A new design is presented to improve the magnetic recording density in all-optical magnetic storage.By using the high numerical lens with a high-pass angular spectrum filter, circularly polarized laser pulses are focused into the magneto-optic film with the perpendicular anisotropy.Magnetization of the film is induced by the inverse Faraday effect.As the obstructed angle of the filter increases the magnetic recording density increases evidently.The magnetization intensity and the sidelobe effect are also discussed.

  1. Characterizing high-velocity angular vestibulo-ocular reflex function in service members post-blast exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Matthew R; Shelhamer, Mark J; Schubert, Michael C

    2011-02-01

    Blasts (explosions) are the most common mechanism of injury in modern warfare. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and dizziness are common sequelae associated with blasts, and many service members (SMs) report symptoms worsen with activity. The purpose of this study was to measure angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gain (aVOR) of blast-exposed SMs with TBI during head impulse testing. We also assessed their symptoms during exertion. Twenty-four SMs recovering from TBI were prospectively assigned to one of two groups based on the presence or absence of dizziness. Wireless monocular scleral search coil and rate sensor were used to characterize active and passive yaw and pitch head and eye rotations. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to monitor symptoms during fast walking/running. For active yaw head impulses, aVOR gains were significantly lower in the symptomatic group (0.79 ± 0.15) versus asymptomatic (0.87 ± 0.18), but not for passive head rotation. For pitch head rotation, the symptomatic group had both active (0.915 ± 0.24) and passive (0.878 ± 0.22) aVOR gains lower than the asymptomatic group (active 1.03 ± 0.27, passive 0.97 ± 0.23). Some SMs had elevated aVOR gain. VAS scores for all symptoms were highest during exertion. Our data suggest symptomatic SMs with TBI as a result of blast have varied aVOR gain during high-velocity head impulses and provide compelling evidence of pathology affecting the vestibular system. Potential loci of injury in this population include the following: disruption of pathways relaying vestibular efference signals, differential destruction of type I vestibular hair cells, or selective damage to irregular afferent pathways-any of which may explain the common discrepancy between reports of vestibular-like symptoms and laboratory testing results. Significantly reduced pitch aVOR in symptomatic SMs and peak symptom severity during exertional testing support earlier findings in the chronic blast-exposed active duty SMs.

  2. Effects of density, velocity gradient, and compressibility on side-jet formation in round jets with variable density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Akinori

    2013-11-01

    When a low density gas compared with the ambient gas is discharged from a round nozzle, side jets that are radial ejections of jet fluid are generated at the initial region of the jet. The density ratio between the jet fluid and the ambient fluid is a main parameter for the side-jet formation. Since the side-jet formation is also related to the instability of shear layer, it depends on the velocity gradient of the shear layer in the jet. The velocity gradient is evaluated by a ratio of the momentum thickness and the nozzle diameter at the nozzle exit. Compressibility suppresses the instability and the generation of the side jets. The compressibility is evaluated by a Mach number, which is a ratio defined by an issuing velocity of the jet and a sound velocity in the ambient fluid. Influence of these three parameters on the side-jet formation was examined experimentally. The density ratio and momentum thickness ratio were varied from 0.14 to 1.53, and from 14 to 155, respectively. The Mach number was varied to 0.7. Existence of side jets was confirmed by flow visualization using a laser sheet. Domains for the side-jet formation by the density ratio, the momentum thickness ratio, and the Mach number were determined.

  3. Gas density fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: clumping factor and velocity power spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Arevalo, P.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2015-05-20

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analysed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 7 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10–30 kpc within radii of 30–220 kpc from the cluster centre. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90–140 km s-1 on ~20–30 kpc scales and 70–100 km s-1 on smaller scales ~7–10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum (PS) is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the PS of the density fluctuations is lower than 7–8 per cent for radii ~30–220 kpc from the centre, leading to a density bias of less than 3–4 per cent in the cluster core. Uncertainties of the analysis are examined and discussed. Future measurements of the gas velocities with the Astro-H, Athena and Smart-X observatories will directly measure the gas density–velocity perturbation relation and further reduce systematic uncertainties in this analysis.

  4. Correlation of densities with shear wave velocities and SPT N values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, P.; Uday, Anjali; Moustafa, Sayed S. R.; Al-Arifi, Nassir S. N.

    2016-06-01

    Site effects primarily depend on the shear modulus of subsurface layers, and this is generally estimated from the measured shear wave velocity (V s) and assumed density. Very rarely, densities are measured for amplification estimation because drilling and sampling processes are time consuming and expensive. In this study, an attempt has been made to derive the correlation between the density (dry and wet density) and V s/SPT (standard penetration test) N values using measured data. A total of 354 measured V s and density data sets and 364 SPT N value and density data sets from 23 boreholes have been used in the study. Separate relations have been developed for all soil types as well as fine-grained and coarse-grained soil types. The correlations developed for bulk density were compared with the available data and it was found that the proposed relation matched well with the existing data. A graphical comparison and validation based on the consistency ratio and cumulative frequency curves was performed and the newly developed relations were found to demonstrate good prediction performance. An attempt has also been made to propose a relation between the bulk density and shear wave velocity applicable for a wide range of soil and rock by considering data from this study as well as that of previous studies. These correlations will be useful for predicting the density (bulk and dry) of sites having measured the shear wave velocity and SPT N values.

  5. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  6. Angular dependence of critical current density and magnetoresistance of sputtered high-T{sub c}-films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geerkens, A.; Frenck, H.J.; Ewert, S. [Technical Univ. of Cottbus (Germany)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The angular dependence of the critical current density and the magnetoresistance of high-T{sub c}-films in high and low magnetic fields and for different temperatures were measured to investigate the flux pinning and the superconducting properties. A comparison of the results for the different superconductors shows their increasing dependence on the angle {Theta} between the magnetic field and the c-axis of the film due to the anisotropy of the chosen superconductor. Furthermore the influence of the current direction to the {Theta}-rotation plane is discussed.

  7. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  8. Probability density of the orbital angular momentum mode of Hankel-Bessel beams in an atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Liu, Xiaojun; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yixin; Zhao, Fengsheng

    2014-04-07

    We develop a novel model of the probability density of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes for Hankel-Bessel beams in paraxial turbulence channel based on the Rytov approximation. The results show that there are multi-peaks of the mode probability density along the radial direction. The peak position of the mode probability density moves to beam center with the increasing of non-Kolmogorov turbulence-parameters and the generalized refractive-index structure parameters and with the decreasing of OAM quantum number, propagation distance and wavelength of the beams. Additionally, larger OAM quantum number and smaller non-Kolmogorov turbulence-parameter can be selected in order to obtain larger mode probability density. The probability density of the OAM mode crosstalk is increasing with the decreasing of the quantum number deviation and the wavelength. Because of the focusing properties of Hankel-Bessel beams in turbulence channel, compared with the Laguerre-Gaussian beams, Hankel-Bessel beams are a good light source for weakening turbulence spreading of the beams and mitigating the effects of turbulence on the probability density of the OAM mode.

  9. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Dynamic Temperature, Velocity, and Density Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy R.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chi-Jen

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 16 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in an air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 16 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. A low speed heated jet is used to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations and an acoustically excited nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements. Power spectral density calculations of the property fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are presented. Temperature fluctuation results are compared with constant current anemometry measurements and velocity fluctuation results are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements at the same locations.

  10. Collective estimation of multiple bivariate density functions with application to angular-sampling-based protein loop modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Maadooliat, Mehdi

    2015-10-21

    This paper develops a method for simultaneous estimation of density functions for a collection of populations of protein backbone angle pairs using a data-driven, shared basis that is constructed by bivariate spline functions defined on a triangulation of the bivariate domain. The circular nature of angular data is taken into account by imposing appropriate smoothness constraints across boundaries of the triangles. Maximum penalized likelihood is used to fit the model and an alternating blockwise Newton-type algorithm is developed for computation. A simulation study shows that the collective estimation approach is statistically more efficient than estimating the densities individually. The proposed method was used to estimate neighbor-dependent distributions of protein backbone dihedral angles (i.e., Ramachandran distributions). The estimated distributions were applied to protein loop modeling, one of the most challenging open problems in protein structure prediction, by feeding them into an angular-sampling-based loop structure prediction framework. Our estimated distributions compared favorably to the Ramachandran distributions estimated by fitting a hierarchical Dirichlet process model; and in particular, our distributions showed significant improvements on the hard cases where existing methods do not work well.

  11. Older men are more fatigable than young when matched for maximal power and knee extension angular velocity is unconstrained

    OpenAIRE

    Brian H. Dalton; Geoffrey A Power; Paturel, Justin R.; Rice, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    The underlying factors related to the divergent findings of age-related fatigue for dynamic tasks are not well understood. The purpose here was to investigate age-related fatigability and recovery between a repeated constrained (isokinetic) and an unconstrained velocity (isotonic) task, in which participants performed fatiguing contractions at the velocity (isokinetic) or resistance (isotonic) corresponding with maximal power. To compare between tasks, isotonic torque–power relationships were...

  12. Correlation of seismic wave velocities with fracture densities: Implications for the critical zone in mountain watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, M. P.; Holbrook, W. S.; Flinchum, B. A.; Pasquet, S.

    2016-12-01

    Despite increasing scientific interest in the critical zone, the accurate determination of fracture density in the subsurface remains difficult as access and costs can prohibit ground-truthing through drilling. A more precise characterization of the fracturing process provides critical insight in to subsurface structures. This is particularly important in determining the point at which protolithic rock becomes fractured bedrock and then degrades to soil through the process of weathering. We studied outcrops in the Laramie Range of southeastern Wyoming were studied and fracture densities were correlated with seismic pressure (P) wave velocities. We used the Differential Effective Medium (DEM) rock physics model to validate our findings and provide a more robust characterization of the role of P-wave velocities acquired on outcrops play in critical zone science. This approach marks a significant departure from previous research, which has not applied P-wave fracture relationships in outcrops onto the critical zone for subsurface characterization. We compared our results with borehole data to establish a relationship between surface outcrops and subsurface rock structures. We found a clear, inverse relationship between a decrease in P-wave velocity and an increase in fracture density consistent with borehole data in the studied area. Our findings suggest that outcrops can be used to determine fracture density in the critical zone. We show that the use of seismic refraction surveys on outcrops provides a non-invasive, highly transferrable method through which we can predict fracturing densities in the subsurface.

  13. Gas Density Fluctuations in the Perseus Cluster: Clumping Factor and Velocity Power Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuravleva, I; Arevalo, P; Schekochihin, A A; Allen, S W; Fabian, A C; Forman, W R; Sanders, J S; Simionescu, A; Sunyaev, R; Vikhlinin, A; Werner, N

    2015-01-01

    X-ray surface brightness fluctuations in the core of the Perseus Cluster are analyzed, using deep observations with the Chandra observatory. The amplitude of gas density fluctuations on different scales is measured in a set of radial annuli. It varies from 8 to 12 per cent on scales of ~10-30 kpc within radii of 30-160 kpc from the cluster center and from 9 to 7 per cent on scales of ~20-30 kpc in an outer, 60-220 kpc annulus. Using a statistical linear relation between the observed amplitude of density fluctuations and predicted velocity, the characteristic velocity of gas motions on each scale is calculated. The typical amplitudes of the velocity outside the central 30 kpc region are 90-140 km/s on ~20-30 kpc scales and 70-100 km/s on smaller scales ~7-10 kpc. The velocity power spectrum is consistent with cascade of turbulence and its slope is in a broad agreement with the slope for canonical Kolmogorov turbulence. The gas clumping factor estimated from the power spectrum of the density fluctuations is low...

  14. Azimuthal velocity profiles in Rayleigh-stable Taylor–Couette flow and implied axial angular momentum transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordsiek, F.; Huisman, S.G.; Veen, van der R.C.A.; Sun, C.; Lohse, D.; Lathrop, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    We present azimuthal velocity profiles measured in a Taylor–Couette apparatus, which has been used as a model of stellar and planetary accretion disks. The apparatus has a cylinder radius ratio of ${\\it\\eta}=0.716$η=0.716, an aspect ratio of ${\\it\\Gamma}=11.74$Γ=11.74, and the plates closing the cyl

  15. Joint probability density function modeling of velocity and scalar in turbulence with unstructured grids

    CERN Document Server

    Bakosi, J; Boybeyi, Z

    2010-01-01

    In probability density function (PDF) methods a transport equation is solved numerically to compute the time and space dependent probability distribution of several flow variables in a turbulent flow. The joint PDF of the velocity components contains information on all one-point one-time statistics of the turbulent velocity field, including the mean, the Reynolds stresses and higher-order statistics. We developed a series of numerical algorithms to model the joint PDF of turbulent velocity, frequency and scalar compositions for high-Reynolds-number incompressible flows in complex geometries using unstructured grids. Advection, viscous diffusion and chemical reaction appear in closed form in the PDF formulation, thus require no closure hypotheses. The generalized Langevin model (GLM) is combined with an elliptic relaxation technique to represent the non-local effect of walls on the pressure redistribution and anisotropic dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy. The governing system of equations is solved fully...

  16. Evolution of density and velocity profiles of dark matter and dark energy in spherical voids

    CERN Document Server

    Novosyadlyj, Bohdan; Kulinich, Yurij

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of cosmological perturbations which leads to the formation of large isolated voids in the Universe. We assume that initial perturbations are spherical and all components of the Universe (radiation, matter and dark energy) are continuous media with perfect fluid energy-momentum tensors, which interact only gravitationally. Equations of the evolution of perturbations for every component in the comoving to cosmological background reference frame are obtained from equations of energy and momentum conservation and Einstein's ones and are integrated numerically. Initial conditions are set at the early stage of evolution in the radiation-dominated epoch, when the scale of perturbation is much larger than the particle horizon. Results show how the profiles of density and velocity of matter and dark energy are formed and how they depend on parameters of dark energy and initial conditions. In particular, it is shown that final matter density and velocity amplitudes change within range $\\sim$4-7...

  17. Non-zero density-velocity consistency relations for large scale structures

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, Luca Alberto; Valageas, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We present exact kinematic consistency relations for cosmological structures that do not vanish at equal times and can thus be measured in surveys. These rely on cross-correlations between the density and velocity, or momentum, fields. Indeed, the uniform transport of small-scale structures by long wavelength modes, which cannot be detected at equal times by looking at density correlations only, gives rise to a shift in the amplitude of the velocity field that could be measured. These consistency relations only rely on the weak equivalence principle and Gaussian initial conditions. They remain valid in the non-linear regime and for biased galaxy fields. They can be used to constrain non-standard cosmological scenarios or the large-scale galaxy bias.

  18. Power spectral density of velocity fluctuations estimated from phase Doppler data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA and its modifications such as PhaseDoppler Particle Anemometry (P/DPA is point-wise method for optical nonintrusive measurement of particle velocity with high data rate. Conversion of the LDA velocity data from temporal to frequency domain – calculation of power spectral density (PSD of velocity fluctuations, is a non trivial task due to nonequidistant data sampling in time. We briefly discuss possibilities for the PSD estimation and specify limitations caused by seeding density and other factors of the flow and LDA setup. Arbitrary results of LDA measurements are compared with corresponding Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA data in the frequency domain. Slot correlation (SC method implemented in software program Kern by Nobach (2006 is used for the PSD estimation. Influence of several input parameters on resulting PSDs is described. Optimum setup of the software for our data of particle-laden air flow in realistic human airway model is documented. Typical character of the flow is described using PSD plots of velocity fluctuations with comments on specific properties of the flow. Some recommendations for improvements of future experiments to acquire better PSD results are given.

  19. On density and velocity fields and $\\beta$ from the IRAS PSCz survey

    CERN Document Server

    Schmoldt, I M; Saha, P; Branchini, E; Efstathiou, G P; Frenk, C S; Keeble, O; Maddox, S J; McMahon, R; Oliver, S; Rowan-Robinson, M; Saunders, W J; Sutherland, W J; Tadros, H; White, S D M; Schmoldt, Inga M.; Saar, Veikko; Saha, Prasenjit

    1999-01-01

    We present a version of the Fourier Bessel method first introduced by Fisher et al (1994) and Zaroubi et al (1994) with two extensions: (a) we amend the formalism to allow a generic galaxy weight which can be constant rather than the more conventional overweighting of galaxies at high distances, and (b) we correct for the masked zones by extrapolation of Fourier Bessel modes rather than by cloning from the galaxy distribution in neighbouring regions. We test the procedure extensively on N-body simulations and find that it gives generally unbiased results but that the reconstructed velocities tend to be overpredicted in high-density regions. Applying the formalism to the PSZz redshift catalog, we find that beta = 0.7 +/- 0.5 from a comparison of the reconstructed Local Group velocity to the CMB dipole. From an anisotropy test of the velocity field, we find that beta = 1 CDM models models normalized to the current cluster abundance can be excluded with 90% confidence. The density and velocity fields reconstruct...

  20. The impact of stellar feedback on the density and velocity structure of the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisdale, Kearn; Agertz, Oscar; Romeo, Alessandro B.; Renaud, Florent; Read, Justin I.

    2017-04-01

    We study the impact of stellar feedback in shaping the density and velocity structure of neutral hydrogen (H I) in disc galaxies. For our analysis, we carry out ∼4.6 pc resolution N-body+adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic simulations of isolated galaxies, set up to mimic a Milky Way and a Large and Small Magellanic Cloud. We quantify the density and velocity structure of the interstellar medium using power spectra and compare the simulated galaxies to observed H I in local spiral galaxies from THINGS (The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey). Our models with stellar feedback give an excellent match to the observed THINGS H I density power spectra. We find that kinetic energy power spectra in feedback-regulated galaxies, regardless of galaxy mass and size, show scalings in excellent agreement with supersonic turbulence (E(k) ∝ k-2) on scales below the thickness of the H I layer. We show that feedback influences the gas density field, and drives gas turbulence, up to large (kpc) scales. This is in stark contrast to density fields generated by large-scale gravity-only driven turbulence. We conclude that the neutral gas content of galaxies carries signatures of stellar feedback on all scales.

  1. Hole boring velocity measurements in near critical density plasmas by a CO2 laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Tochitsky, Sergei; Pigeon, Jeremy; Joshi, Chan

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of plasma dynamics during the interaction of a high-power laser pulse with an above critical density plasma is important for understanding absorption, transport and particle acceleration mechanisms. An important process that affects these mechanisms is hole boring occurring at the critical density because of the radiation pressure of the laser pulse. Yet, no systematic measurements of the hole boring velocity's (vhb) dependence on laser intensity (I) have been made. In this talk, we present experimental results of vhb in near critical density plasmas produced by CO2 laser as a function of I in the range of 1*1015 to 1.6*1016 W/cm2. A novel four frame Mach-Zehnder interferometer using a 1 ps, 532 nm probe laser pulse was developed to record the evolution of the plasma density profile and the motion of the near critical density layer. Using this diagnostic, we observed the motion of the steepened plasma profile due to the incident, time-structured CO2 laser pulse. Experimental results show the hole boring velocity increases from 0.004c to 0.007c as the laser intensity is increased from 1*1015 to 1.6*1016 W/cm2. This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-92-ER40727, NSF grant PHY-0936266 at UCLA.

  2. Regression relationships of landing height with ground reaction forces, knee flexion angles, angular velocities and joint powers during double-leg landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeow, C H; Lee, Peter V S; Goh, James C H

    2009-10-01

    Ground reaction forces (GRF), knee flexion angles, angular velocities and joint powers are unknown at large landing heights, which are infeasible for laboratory testing. However, this information is important for understanding lower extremity injury mechanisms. We sought to determine regression relationships of landing height with these parameters during landing so as to facilitate estimation of these parameters at large landing heights. Five healthy male subjects performed landing tasks from heights of 0.15-1.05 m onto a force-plate. Motion capture system was used to obtain knee flexion angles during landing via passive markers placed on the lower body. An iterative regression model, involving simple linear/exponential/natural logarithmic functions, was used to fit regression equations to experimental data. Peak GRF followed an exponential regression relationship (R(2)=0.90-0.99, p<0.001; power=0.987-0.998). Peak GRF slope and impulse also had an exponential relationship (R(2)=0.90-0.96, p<0.001; power=0.980-0.997 and R(2)=0.90-0.99, p<0.001; power=0.990-1.000 respectively) with landing height. Knee flexion angle at initial contact and at peak GRF had an inverse-exponential regression relationship (R(2)=0.81-0.99, p<0.001-p=0.006; power=0.834-0.978 and R(2)=0.84-0.97, p<0.001-p=0.004; power=0.873-0.999 respectively). There was also an inverse-exponential relationship between peak knee flexion angular velocity and landing height (R(2)=0.86-0.96, p<0.001; power=0.935-0.994). Peak knee joint power demonstrated a substantial linear relationship (R(2)=0.98-1.00, p<0.001; power=0.990-1.000). The parameters analyzed in this study are highly dependent on landing height. The exponential increase in peak GRF parameters and the relatively slower increase in knee flexion angles, angular velocities and joint power may synergistically lead to an exacerbated lower extremity injury risk at large landing heights.

  3. The Surface Density Profile of the Galactic Disk from the Terminal Velocity Curve

    CERN Document Server

    McGaugh, Stacy S

    2015-01-01

    The mass distribution of the Galactic disk is constructed from the terminal velocity curve and the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation. Mass models numerically quantifying the detailed surface density profiles are tabulated. For $R_0 = 8$ kpc, the models have stellar mass $5 < M_* < 6 \\times 10^{10}$ M$_{\\odot}$, scale length $2.0 \\le R_d \\le 2.9$ kpc, LSR circular velocity $222 \\le \\Theta_0 \\le 233$ km s$^{-1}$, and solar circle stellar surface density $34 \\le \\Sigma_d(R_0) \\le 61$ M$_{\\odot}$ pc$^{-2}$. The present inter-arm location of the solar neighborhood may have a somewhat lower stellar surface density than average for the solar circle. The Milky Way appears to be a normal spiral galaxy that obeys scaling relations like the Tully-Fisher relation, the size-mass relation, and the disk maximality-surface brightness relation. The stellar disk is maximal, and the spiral arms are massive. The bumps and wiggles in the terminal velocity curve correspond to known spiral features (e.g., the Centaurus A...

  4. The role of riparian vegetation density, channel orientation and water velocity in determining river temperature dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Grace; Malcolm, Iain A.; Sadler, Jonathan P.; Hannah, David M.

    2017-10-01

    A simulation experiment was used to understand the importance of riparian vegetation density, channel orientation and flow velocity for stream energy budgets and river temperature dynamics. Water temperature and meteorological observations were obtained in addition to hemispherical photographs along a ∼1 km reach of the Girnock Burn, a tributary of the Aberdeenshire Dee, Scotland. Data from nine hemispherical images (representing different uniform canopy density scenarios) were used to parameterise a deterministic net radiation model and simulate radiative fluxes. For each vegetation scenario, the effects of eight channel orientations were investigated by changing the position of north at 45° intervals in each hemispheric image. Simulated radiative fluxes and observed turbulent fluxes drove a high-resolution water temperature model of the reach. Simulations were performed under low and high water velocity scenarios. Both velocity scenarios yielded decreases in mean (≥1.6 °C) and maximum (≥3.0 °C) temperature as canopy density increased. Slow-flowing water resided longer within the reach, which enhanced heat accumulation and dissipation, and drove higher maximum and lower minimum temperatures. Intermediate levels of shade produced highly variable energy flux and water temperature dynamics depending on the channel orientation and thus the time of day when the channel was shaded. We demonstrate that in many reaches relatively sparse but strategically located vegetation could produce substantial reductions in maximum temperature and suggest that these criteria are used to inform future river management.

  5. The influence of velocity and density ratio on the dynamics of spatially developing mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strykowski, P. J.; Niccum, D. L.

    1992-04-01

    The dynamics of countercurrent mixing is examined in the shear layer of an axisymmetric jet. Experiments were designed to establish conditions of absolute instability in a spatially developing shear layer and to document how the instability influences the jet development. By applying suction around the jet periphery, shear-layer velocity ratios R greater than 1 could be studied. Here, R=(U1-U2)/(U1+U2), where U1 is the velocity of the forward jet stream and U2 is the velocity of the counterflowing stream created by suction. The density ratio S=ρ1/ρ2 of the mixing layer was also varied to determine the stability boundary in the S-R plane. The density of the forward stream ρ1 was increased by adding sulfur hexafluoride to the air jet, which provided density ratios between 1 and 5.1. Hot-wire anemometry and flow visualization revealed that a global transition occurs when conditions of absolute instability are established in the jet shear layers. One consequence of this transition is an abrupt decrease in the jet spread rate. The experimentally determined transition between globally stable and globally unstable flow regimes in the S-R plane agrees quite well with predictions of the convective/absolute instability boundary based on the linear stability theory [Pavithran and Redekopp, Phys. Fluids A 1, 1736 (1989)].

  6. Independent constraints on local non-Gaussianity from the peculiar velocity and density fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Yin-Zhe; Scott, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Primordial, non-Gaussian perturbations can generate scale-dependent bias in the galaxy distribution. This in turn will modify correlations between galaxy positions and peculiar velocities at late times, since peculiar velocities reflect the underlying matter distribution, whereas galaxies are a biased tracer of the same. We study this effect, and show that non-Gaussianity can be constrained by comparing the observed peculiar velocity field to a model velocity field reconstructed from the galaxy density field assuming linear bias. The amplitude of the spatial correlations in the residual map obtained after subtracting one velocity field from the other is directly proportional to the strength of the primordial non-Gaussianity. We construct the corresponding likelihood function use it to constrain the amplitude of the linear flow $\\beta$ and the amplitude of local non-Gaussianity $f^{NL}_{local}$. Applying our method to two observational data sets, the Type-Ia supernovae (A1SN) and Spiral Field \\textit{I}-band (...

  7. Observations of the temperature, density and velocity structure of the solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, Steven Neil

    1994-01-01

    The solar corona exists at a temperature of over 106 K while the underlying visible surface, the photosphere, is much cooler, about 6,000K. How this tenuous outer layer can be many orders of magnitude hotter than the photosphere is one of the principal enigmas of solar physics. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain coronal heating, but none have been completely successful in accounting for its observed characteristics. It is the purpose of this thesis to present observations of both the large scale velocity structure and the small scale density and temperature structure of the quiet corona which will constrain theories of coronal heating. Spatially resolved spectra of the solar corona were obtained in the extreme ultraviolet during a sounding rocket experiment on June 20, 1989. In order to obtain an accurate photometric calibration of the spectrometer, we developed a new technique using a synchrotron radiation source operated by the National Institute for Standards and Technology. With this calibration, along with the high spectral resolution and on-board wavelength calibration capability of the payload, we were able to develop a detailed picture of the density and velocity structure of a portion of the solar corona. Data from the sounding rocket experiment were then compared to white light observations made by the Mk-3 coronagraph operated by the High Altitude Observatory at Mauna Loa. The white light continuum intensity of the solar corona is proportional to the mean electron density along the line of sight, whereas the emission line intensity is proportional to the average value of the electron density squared. By comparing these two data sets, we find that the density irregularity factor is close to unity for the quiet corona. The irregularity analysis in this thesis is the first to consider the possibility of a non-isothermal corona. We also find that the systematic velocity structure seen in the transition region is not present in the solar corona.

  8. Mass, velocity anisotropy, and pseudo phase-space density profiles of Abell 2142

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, E.; Biviano, A.; Mamon, G. A.

    2014-06-01

    Aims: We aim to compute the mass and velocity anisotropy profiles of Abell 2142 and, from there, the pseudo phase-space density profile Q(r) and the density slope - velocity anisotropy β - γ relation, and then to compare them with theoretical expectations. Methods: The mass profiles were obtained by using three techniques based on member galaxy kinematics, namely the caustic method, the method of dispersion-kurtosis, and MAMPOSSt. Through the inversion of the Jeans equation, it was possible to compute the velocity anisotropy profiles. Results: The mass profiles, as well as the virial values of mass and radius, computed with the different techniques agree with one another and with the estimates coming from X-ray and weak lensing studies. A combined mass profile is obtained by averaging the lensing, X-ray, and kinematics determinations. The cluster mass profile is well fitted by an NFW profile with c = 4.0 ± 0.5. The population of red and blue galaxies appear to have a different velocity anisotropy configuration, since red galaxies are almost isotropic, while blue galaxies are radially anisotropic, with a weak dependence on radius. The Q(r) profile for the red galaxy population agrees with the theoretical results found in cosmological simulations, suggesting that any bias, relative to the dark matter particles, in velocity dispersion of the red component is independent of radius. The β - γ relation for red galaxies matches the theoretical relation only in the inner region. The deviations might be due to the use of galaxies as tracers of the gravitational potential, unlike the non-collisional tracer used in the theoretical relation.

  9. The impact of stellar feedback on the density and velocity structure of the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Grisdale, Kearn; Romeo, Alessandro B; Renaud, Florent; Read, Justin I

    2016-01-01

    We study the role of stellar feedback in shaping the density and velocity structure of neutral hydrogen (HI) in disc galaxies. For our analysis, we carry out $\\sim 4.6$ pc resolution $N$-body+adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) hydrodynamic simulations of isolated galaxies, set up to mimic a Milky Way (MW), and a Large and Small Magellanic Cloud (LMC, SMC). We quantify the density and velocity structure of the interstellar medium using power spectra and compare the simulated galaxies to observed HI in local spiral galaxies from THINGS (The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey). We find that observed HI density power spectra is only reproduced by simulations with efficient stellar feedback, which influences the gas density field up to large (kpc) scales. Furthermore, the kinetic energy power spectra in feedback regulated galaxies, regardless of galaxy mass and size, show scalings in excellent agreement with super-sonic turbulence ($E(k)\\propto k^{-2})$ on scales below the thickness of the HI layer. This is in stark contrast to ...

  10. Graphene, a material for high temperature devices; intrinsic carrier density, carrier drift velocity, and lattice energy

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Yan; Wang, Li; Jin, Kuijuan; Wang, Wenzhong

    2016-01-01

    Heat has always been a killing matter for traditional semiconductor machines. The underlining physical reason is that the intrinsic carrier density of a device made from a traditional semiconductor material increases very fast with a rising temperature. Once reaching a temperature, the density surpasses the chemical doping or gating effect, any p-n junction or transistor made from the semiconductor will fail to function. Here, we measure the intrinsic Fermi level (|E_F|=2.93k_B*T) or intrinsic carrier density (n_in=3.87*10^6 cm^-2 K^-2*T^2), carrier drift velocity, and G mode phonon energy of graphene devices and their temperature dependencies up to 2400 K. Our results show intrinsic carrier density of graphene is an order of magnitude less sensitive to temperature than those of Si or Ge, and reveal the great potentials of graphene as a material for high temperature devices. We also observe a linear decline of saturation drift velocity with increasing temperature, and identify the temperature coefficients of ...

  11. Velocity of density shifts in Finnish landbird species depends on their migration ecology and body mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välimäki, Kaisa; Lindén, Andreas; Lehikoinen, Aleksi

    2016-05-01

    A multitude of studies confirm that species have changed their distribution ranges towards higher elevations and towards the poles, as has been predicted by climate change forecasts. However, there is large interspecific variation in the velocity of range shifts. From a conservation perspective, it is important to understand which factors explain variation in the speed and the extent of range shifts, as these might be related to the species' extinction risk. Here, we study shifts in the mean latitude of occurrence, as weighted by population density, in different groups of landbirds using 40 years of line transect data from Finland. Our results show that the velocity of such density shifts differed among migration strategies and increased with decreasing body size of species, while breeding habitat had no influence. The slower velocity of large species could be related to their longer generation time and lower per capita reproduction that can decrease the dispersal ability compared to smaller species. In contrast to some earlier studies of range margin shifts, resident birds and partial migrants showed faster range shifts, while fully migratory species were moving more slowly. The results suggest that migratory species, especially long-distance migrants, which often show decreasing population trends, might also have problems in adjusting their distribution ranges to keep pace with global warming.

  12. Mass, velocity anisotropy and pseudo phase space density profiles of Abell 2142

    CERN Document Server

    Munari, Emiliano; Mamon, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Aim: We aim to compute the mass and velocity anisotropy profiles of Abell 2142 and, from there, the pseudo phase space density profile $Q(r)$ and the density slope - velocity anisotropy $\\beta - \\gamma$ relation, and compare them with theoretical expectations. Methods: The mass profiles have been obtained by using three techniques based on member galaxy kinematics, namely the caustic method, the method of Dispersion - Kurtosis and MAMPOSSt. Through the inversion of the Jeans equation it has been possible to compute the velocity anisotropy profiles. Results: The mass profiles, as well as the virial values of mass and radius, computed with the different techniques are in agreement with one another and with the estimates coming from X-ray and weak lensing studies. A concordance mass profile is obtained by averaging the lensing, X-ray and kinematics determinations. The cluster mass profile is well fit by an NFW profile with $c=4.0 \\pm 0.5$. The population of red and blue galaxies appear to have a different veloci...

  13. 3D Velocity and Density Reconstructions of the Local Universe with Cosmicflows-1

    CERN Document Server

    Courtois, Helene M; Tully, R Brent; Gottlober, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the local peculiar velocity field based on the Wiener Filter reconstruction method. We used our currently available catalog of distance measurements containing 1,797 galaxies within 3000 km/s: Cosmicflows-1. The Wiener Filter method is used to recover the full 3D peculiar velocity field from the observed map of radial velocities and to recover the underlying linear density field. The velocity field within a data zone of 3000 km/s is decomposed into a local component that is generated within the data zone and a tidal one that is generated by the mass distribution outside that zone. The tidal component is characterized by a coherent flow toward the Norma-Hydra-Centaurus (Great Attractor) region while the local component is dominated by a flow toward the Virgo Cluster and away from the Local Void. A detailed analysis shows that the local flow is predominantly governed by the Local Void and the Virgo Cluster plays a lesser role. The analysis procedure was tested against a mock c...

  14. Velocity-density correlations from the cosmicflows-3 distance catalogue and the 2MASS Redshift Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusser, Adi

    2017-09-01

    The peculiar velocity of a mass tracer is on average aligned with the dipole modulation of the surrounding mass density field. We present a first measurement of the correlation between radial peculiar velocities of objects in the cosmicflows-3 catalogue and the dipole moment of the 2MRS galaxy distribution in concentric spherical shells centred on these objects. Limiting the analysis to cosmicflows-3 objects with distances of 100h-1 Mpc, the correlation function is detected at a confidence level of ≳ 4σ. The measurement is found consistent with the standard ΛCDM model at the ≲ 1.7σ level. We formally derive the constraints 0.32 confidence level) or equivalently 0.34 type of correlations.

  15. Compositional trends among Kaapvaal Craton garnet peridotite xenoliths and their effects on seismic velocity and density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt, Derek; Lesher, Charles

    2010-01-01

    garnet and clinopyroxene enrichment. Using the parameterization of Schutt and Lesher (2006) we show that at cratonic mantle temperatures and pressures, orthopyroxene enrichment results in little change in bulk density (ρbulk) and shear-wave velocity (VS), but decreases compressional wave velocities (VP...... and clinopyroxene enrichment possibly as a consequence of melt infiltration. More than half of the mineral mode variance among Kaapvaal Craton xenoliths can be accounted for by opx enrichment. Melt depletion effects can account for as much as 30% of the variance, while less than 20% of the variance is associated......) and VP/VS. In contrast, melt depletion has little effect on VP, but leads to an increase in VS and a decrease in ρbulk and VP/VS. Garnet (gt) and clinopyroxene (cpx) enrichment cause an increase in ρbulk, VP, VS, and VP/VS. The isolation of the major contributions to xenolith compositional variations...

  16. Mapping Metal-Enriched High Velocity Clouds to Very Low HI Column Densities

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, C W; Masiero, J R; Churchill, Chris; Charlton, Jane

    2001-01-01

    Our galaxy is the nearest known quasar absorption line system, and it uniquely provides us with an opportunity to probe multiple lines of sight through the same galaxy. This is essential for our interpretations of the complex kinematic profiles seen in the MgII absorption due to lines of sight through intermediate redshift galaxies. The Milky Way halo has never been probed for high velocity clouds below the 21-cm detection threshold of N(HI)~10^18 cm-2. Through a survey of MgII absorption looking toward the brightest AGNs and quasars, it will be possible to reach down a few orders of magnitude in HI column density. The analogs to the high velocity components of the MgII absorption profiles due to intermediate redshift galaxies should be seen. We describe a program we are undertaking, and present some preliminary findings.

  17. A microscopic "social norm" model to obtain realistic macroscopic velocity and density pedestrian distributions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Zanlungo

    Full Text Available We propose a way to introduce in microscopic pedestrian models a "social norm" in collision avoiding and overtaking, i.e. the tendency, shared by pedestrians belonging to the same culture, to avoid collisions and perform overtaking in a preferred direction. The "social norm" is implemented, regardless of the specific collision avoiding model, as a rotation in the perceived velocity vector of the opponent at the moment of computation of the collision avoiding strategy, and justified as an expectation that the opponent will follow the same "social norm" (for example a tendency to avoid on the left and overtake on the right, as proposed in this work for Japanese pedestrians. By comparing with real world data, we show that the introduction of this norm allows for a better reproduction of macroscopic pedestrian density and velocity patterns.

  18. Cosmological Density and Power Spectrum from Peculiar Velocities Nonlinear Corrections and PCA

    CERN Document Server

    Silberman, L; Eldar, A; Zehavi, I

    2001-01-01

    we allow for nonlinear effects in the likelihood analysis of galaxy peculiar velocities, and obtain ~35%-lower values for the cosmological density parameter and for the amplitude of mass-density fluctuations. The power spectrum in the linear regime is assumed to be a flat LCDM model (h=0.65, n=1, COBE) with only Om_m as a free parameter. Since the likelihood is driven by the nonlinear regime, we "break" the power spectrum at k_b=0.2 h/Mpc and fit a power law at k>k_b. This allows for independent matching of the nonlinear behavior and an unbiased fit in the linear regime. The analysis assumes Gaussian fluctuations and errors, and a linear relation between velocity and density. Tests using mock catalogs that properly simulate nonlinear effects demonstrate that this procedure results in a reduced bias and a better fit. We find for the Mark3 and SFI data Om_m=0.32+-0.06 and 0.37+-0.09 respectively, with sigma_8*Om_m^0.6 =0.49+-0.06 and 0.63+-0.08, in agreement with constraints from other data. The quoted 90% erro...

  19. Velocity-tunable slow beams of cold O2 in a single spin-rovibronic state with full angular-momentum orientation by multistage Zeeman deceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederkehr, A. W.; Schmutz, H.; Motsch, M.; Merkt, F.

    2012-08-01

    Cold samples of oxygen molecules in supersonic beams have been decelerated from initial velocities of 390 and 450 m s-1 to final velocities in the range between 150 and 280 m s-1 using a 90-stage Zeeman decelerator. (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced-multiphoton-ionization (REMPI) spectra of the 3sσ g 3Π g (C) ? two-photon transition of O2 have been recorded to characterize the state selectivity of the deceleration process. The decelerated molecular sample was found to consist exclusively of molecules in the J ‧‧ = 2 spin-rotational component of the X ? ground state of O2. Measurements of the REMPI spectra using linearly polarized laser radiation with polarization vector parallel to the decelerator axis, and thus to the magnetic-field vector of the deceleration solenoids, further showed that only the ? magnetic sublevel of the N‧‧ = 1, J ‧‧ = 2 spin-rotational level is populated in the decelerated sample, which therefore is characterized by a fully oriented total-angular-momentum vector. By maintaining a weak quantization magnetic field beyond the decelerator, the polarization of the sample could be maintained over the 5 cm distance separating the last deceleration solenoid and the detection region.

  20. Amplified spontaneous emission of phonons as a likely mechanism for density-dependent velocity saturation in GaN transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurgin, Jacob B.; Bajaj, Sanyam; Rajan, Siddharth

    2016-09-01

    We show that density-dependent velocity saturation in a GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) can be related to the stimulated emission of longitudinal optical (LO) phonons. As the drift velocity of electrons increases, the drift of the Fermi distribution in reciprocal space results in population inversion and gain for the LO phonons. Once this gain reaches a threshold value, the avalanche-like increase in LO phonon emission causes a rapid loss of electron energy and momentum and leads to drift velocity saturation. Our simple model correctly predicts both the general trend of decreasing saturation velocity with increasing electron density, and the measured experimental values of saturation.

  1. Flow rate of particles through apertures obtained from self-similar density and velocity profiles

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    ‘‘Beverloo’s law’’ is considered as the standard expression to estimate the flow rate of particles through apertures. This relation was obtained by simple dimensional analysis and includes empirical parameters whose physical meaning is poorly justified. In this Letter, we study the density and velocity profiles in the flow of particles through an aperture. We find that, for the whole range of apertures studied, both profiles are self-similar. Hence, by means of the functionality obtained for the...

  2. The MASSIVE Survey - V. Spatially-Resolved Stellar Angular Momentum, Velocity Dispersion, and Higher Moments of the 41 Most Massive Local Early-Type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Melanie; Ma, Chung-Pei; Thomas, Jens; Greene, Jenny E.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Walsh, Jonelle; Ito, Jennifer; Blakeslee, John P.; Janish, Ryan

    2016-09-01

    We present spatially-resolved two-dimensional stellar kinematics for the 41 most massive early-type galaxies (MK ≲ -25.7 mag, stellar mass M★ ≳ 1011.8 M⊙) of the volume-limited (D angular momentum (λ and fast or slow rotator status), velocity dispersion (σ), and higher-order non-Gaussian velocity features (Gauss-Hermite moments h3 to h6). Our sample contains a high fraction (˜80%) of slow and non-rotators with λ ≲ 0.2. When combined with the lower-mass ETGs in the ATLAS3D survey, we find the fraction of slow-rotators to increase dramatically with galaxy mass, reaching ˜50% at MK ˜ -25.5 mag and ˜90% at MK ≲ -26 mag. All of our fast rotators show a clear anti-correlation between h3 and V/σ, and the slope of the anti-correlation is steeper in more round galaxies. The radial profiles of σ show a clear luminosity and environmental dependence: the 12 most luminous galaxies in our sample (MK ≲ -26 mag) are all brightest cluster/group galaxies (except NGC 4874) and all have rising or nearly flat σ profiles, whereas five of the seven "isolated" galaxies are all fainter than MK = -25.8 mag and have falling σ. All of our galaxies have positive average h4; the most luminous galaxies have average h4 ˜ 0.05 while less luminous galaxies have a range of values between 0 and 0.05. Most of our galaxies show positive radial gradients in h4, and those galaxies also tend to have rising σ profiles. We discuss the implications for the relationship among dynamical mass, σ, h4, and velocity anisotropy for these massive galaxies.

  3. Error analysis and compensation of blood viscometer rotating cone angular velocity%血液粘度仪旋转锥体角速度误差分析与补偿

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐俊铨; 田学隆

    2011-01-01

    剪切池内旋转锥体的角速度是新型锥板式血液粘度仪的主要信息源,其精度取决于光电传感器和齿形盘.分析了光电传感器的点光源特性和齿形盘的周期性摆动及其加工精度导致的角度误差.针对锥体角速度的单调递减特性、角度误差在单转内的随机性及整个测量过程中呈周期性,采用有理三次样条插值算法对角速度误差进行补偿.实验结果表明:该方法可提高角速度的测量精度,降低传感器的生产成本.%The angular velocity of rotating cone in shear-pool is the main information source of a cone-plate blood viscometer,and its precision depends on the photoelectric sensor and fluted disc. The error sources of angular velocity device are analyzed, that is, the pointolite characteristic of photoelectric sensor, and the angular error due to the cyclical swing and the machining inaccuracy of fluted disc. Since the cone angular velocity is monotone decreasing and the angular error is random in one cycle but is cyclical variation during the whole detecting process,a rational cubic spline interpolation algorithm is adopted to decrease the angular error. Experimental results show that this method can improve the precision of angular velocity and reduce the production cost of sensor.

  4. Extended clustering analyses to constrain the deflection angular scale and source density of the ultra-high-energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Decerprit, Guillaume; Parizot, Etienne

    2011-01-01

    The search of a clustering signal in the arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) is a standard method to assess the level of anisotropy of the data sets under investigation. Here, we first show how to quantify the sensitivity of a UHECR detector to the detection of anisotropy, and then propose a new method that pushes forward the study of the two-point auto-correlation function, enabling one to put astrophysically meaningful constraints on both the effective UHECR source density and the angular deflections that these charged particles suffer while they propagate through the galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields. We apply the method to simulated data sets obtained under various astrophysical conditions, and show how the input model parameters can be estimated through our analysis, introducing the notion of "clustering similarity" (between data sets), to which we give a precise statistical meaning. We also study how the constraining power of the method is influenced by the size of the ...

  5. Vortex line density in counterflowing He II with laminar and turbulent normal fluid velocity profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Baggaley, A W

    2013-01-01

    Superfluid helium is an intimate mixture of a viscous normal fluid, with continuous vorticity, and an inviscid superfluid, where vorticity is constrained to thin, stable topological defects. One mechanism to generate turbulence in this system is through the application of a heat flux, so called thermal counterflow. Of particular interest is how turbulence in the superfluid responds to both a laminar and turbulent normal fluid in the presence of walls. We model superfluid vortex lines as reconnecting space curves with fixed circulation, and consider both laminar (Poiseuille) and turbulent normal fluid flows in a channel configuration. Using high resolution numerical simulations we show that turbulence in the normal fluid sustains a notably higher vortex line density than a laminar flow with the same mean flow rate. We exam Vinen's relation, $\\sqrt{L}=\\gamma v_{ns}$, between the steady state vortex line density $L$ and the counterflow velocity $v_{ns}$. Our results support the hypothesis that transition to turb...

  6. Evolution of density and velocity profiles of dark matter and dark energy in spherical voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosyadlyj, Bohdan; Tsizh, Maksym; Kulinich, Yurij

    2017-02-01

    We analyse the evolution of cosmological perturbations which leads to the formation of large isolated voids in the Universe. We assume that initial perturbations are spherical and all components of the Universe (radiation, matter and dark energy) are continuous media with ideal fluid energy-momentum tensors, which interact only gravitationally. Equations of the evolution of perturbations for every component in the comoving to cosmological background reference frame are obtained from equations of energy and momentum conservation and Einstein's ones and are integrated numerically. Initial conditions are set at the early stage of evolution in the radiation-dominated epoch, when the scale of perturbation is much larger than the particle horizon. Results show how the profiles of density and velocity of matter and dark energy are formed and how they depend on parameters of dark energy and initial conditions. In particular, it is shown that final matter density and velocity amplitudes change within range ˜4-7 per cent when the value of equation-of-state parameter of dark energy w vary in the range from -0.8 to -1.2, and change within ˜1 per cent only when the value of effective sound speed of dark energy vary over all allowable range of its values.

  7. Phonon Density of States and Sound Velocities of an Iron-Nickel Alloy at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Murphy, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Seismological and cosmochemical studies suggest Earth's core is primarily composed of iron with ~5 to 10 wt% nickel and some light elements [e.g., 1]. Therefore, understanding the behavior of Fe-Ni alloys at high pressure is important for interpreting seismic data and for modeling the interior of the Earth. While many studies have investigated the properties of pure Fe at high pressure, the elastic and vibrational properties of Fe-Ni alloys at high pressure are not well known. We measured sound velocities and thermodynamic properties of 95%-enriched 57Fe alloyed with 10 wt% Ni at high-pressures in a Ne pressure medium. Measurements of high statistical quality were performed with nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) at 3ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source [e.g., 2 & 3]. The sample volume was determined at each compression point with in-line x-ray diffraction at 3ID-B before and after each NRIXS measurement. In this contribution, we will present derived partial phonon density of states, Debye sound velocities, and compressional and shear sound velocities for Fe0.9-Ni0.1 at high-pressures. [1] McDonough, W.F. (2004): Compositional Model for the Earth's Core. Elsevier Ltd., Oxford. [2] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Melting and thermal pressure of hcp-Fe from the phonon density of states, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2011.07.001. [3] Murphy, C.A., J.M. Jackson, W. Sturhahn, and B. Chen (2011): Grüneisen parameter of hcp-Fe to 171 GPa, Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2011GL049531.

  8. Induced Compression of White Dwarfs by Angular Momentum Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Boshkayev, Kuantay; Ruffini, Remo; Zhami, Bakytzhan

    2016-01-01

    We investigate isolated sub- and super-Chandrasekhar white dwarfs which lose angular momentum through magnetic dipole braking. We construct constant rest mass sequences by fulfilling all stability criteria of rotating configurations and show how the main structure of white dwarfs such as the central density, mean radius and angular velocity change with time. We explicitly demonstrate that all isolated white dwarfs regardless of their masses, by angular momentum loss, shrink and increase their central density. We also analyze the effects of the structure parameters on the evolution timescale both in the case of constant magnetic field and constant magnetic flux.

  9. Experimental study of stratified jet by simultaneous measurements of velocity and density fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Duo; Chen, Jun

    2012-07-01

    Stratified flows with small density difference commonly exist in geophysical and engineering applications, which often involve interaction of turbulence and buoyancy effect. A combined particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) system is developed to measure the velocity and density fields in a dense jet discharged horizontally into a tank filled with light fluid. The illumination of PIV particles and excitation of PLIF dye are achieved by a dual-head pulsed Nd:YAG laser and two CCD cameras with a set of optical filters. The procedure for matching refractive indexes of two fluids and calibration of the combined system are presented, as well as a quantitative analysis of the measurement uncertainties. The flow structures and mixing dynamics within the central vertical plane are studied by examining the averaged parameters, turbulent kinetic energy budget, and modeling of momentum flux and buoyancy flux. At downstream, profiles of velocity and density display strong asymmetry with respect to its center. This is attributed to the fact that stable stratification reduces mixing and unstable stratification enhances mixing. In stable stratification region, most of turbulence production is consumed by mean-flow convection, whereas in unstable stratification region, turbulence production is nearly balanced by viscous dissipation. Experimental data also indicate that at downstream locations, mixing length model performs better in mixing zone of stable stratification regions, whereas in other regions, eddy viscosity/diffusivity models with static model coefficients represent effectively momentum and buoyancy flux terms. The measured turbulent Prandtl number displays strong spatial variation in the stratified jet.

  10. Two is better than one: joint statistics of density and velocity in concentric spheres as a cosmological probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, C.; Codis, S.; Hahn, O.; Pichon, C.; Bernardeau, F.

    2017-08-01

    The analytical formalism to obtain the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of spherically averaged cosmic densities and velocity divergences in the mildly non-linear regime is presented. A large-deviation principle is applied to those cosmic fields assuming their most likely dynamics in spheres is set by the spherical collapse model. We validate our analytical results using state-of-the-art dark matter simulations with a phase-space resolved velocity field finding a 2 per cent level agreement for a wide range of velocity divergences and densities in the mildly non-linear regime (∼10 Mpc h-1 at redshift zero), usually inaccessible to perturbation theory. From the joint PDF of densities and velocity divergences measured in two concentric spheres, we extract with the same accuracy velocity profiles and conditional velocity PDF subject to a given over/underdensity that are of interest to understand the non-linear evolution of velocity flows. Both PDFs are used to build a simple but accurate maximum likelihood estimator for the redshift evolution of the variance of both the density and velocity divergence fields, which have smaller relative errors than their sample variances when non-linearities appear. Given the dependence of the velocity divergence on the growth rate, there is a significant gain in using the full knowledge of both PDFs to derive constraints on the equation of state-of-dark energy. Thanks to the insensitivity of the velocity divergence to bias, its PDF can be used to obtain unbiased constraints on the growth of structures (σ8, f) or it can be combined with the galaxy density PDF to extract bias parameters.

  11. WESTERBORK OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS - THE DATA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP

    1991-01-01

    The results of Westerbork * observations of small-scale structure in high-velocity clouds (HVCs) at 1' angular and 1 km s-1 velocity resolution are presented in the form of a table of observational parameters, maps of hydrogen column density, velocity-right ascension cuts, and histograms of the line

  12. The density and velocity of plasma bullets propagating along one dielectric tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longfei Ji

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study shows that the propagation of plasma bullets along one dielectric tube is strongly affected by many discharge parameters, such as the waveform of applied voltage (AC or pulsed DC, peak voltage, He flow rate, and the frequency of AC voltage. Analysis indicates that the density and velocity of plasma bullets are mainly determined by the electric field at the front of plasma bullets. These discharge parameters may significantly influence the distribution of plasma potential along the tube, thus control the electric field at the front of plasma bullets and their propagation. An increase in the pulsed DC voltage with its rise time of <40-50 ns can lead to an obvious improvement in the electric field at the front of plasma bullets, resulting in generation of a plasma in the high density gas and a fast propagation of plasma bullets. He flowing through the tube can contribute to the surface diffusion of charged species, and greatly increase the electric field at the front of plasma bullets. During the propagation of plasma bullets, their density is decreased due to the surface recombination of charged species, such as electrons and ions.

  13. Two is better than one: joint statistics of density and velocity in concentric spheres as a cosmological probe

    CERN Document Server

    Uhlemann, Cora; Hahn, Oliver; Pichon, Christophe; Bernardeau, Francis

    2016-01-01

    The analytical formalism to obtain the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of spherically-averaged cosmic densities and velocity divergences in the mildly non-linear regime is presented. A large-deviation principle is applied to those cosmic fields assuming their most likely dynamics in spheres is set by the spherical collapse model. We validate our analytical results using state-of-the-art dark matter simulations with a phase-space resolved velocity field finding a 2% percent level agreement for a wide range of velocity divergences and densities in the mildly nonlinear regime (~10Mpc/h at redshift zero), usually inaccessible to perturbation theory. From the joint PDF of densities and velocity divergences measured in two concentric spheres, we extract with the same accuracy velocity profiles and conditional velocity PDF subject to a given over/under-density which are of interest to understand the non-linear evolution of velocity flows. Both PDFs are used to build a simple but accurate maximum likelihood...

  14. Evolution of density and velocity profiles of matter in large voids

    CERN Document Server

    Tsizh, Maksym

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of cosmological perturbations which leads to the formation of large voids in the distribution of galaxies. We assume that perturbations are spherical and all components of the Universe - radiation, matter and dark energy - are continuous media with ideal fluid energy-momentum tensors, which interact only gravitationally. Equations of the evolution of perturbations in the comoving to cosmological background reference frame for every component are obtained from equations of conservation and Einstein's ones and are integrated by modified Euler method. Initial conditions are set at the early stage of evolution in the radiation-dominated epoch, when the scale of perturbation is mush larger than the particle horizon. Results show how the profiles of density and velocity of matter in spherical voids with different overdensity shells are formed.

  15. Evolution of density and velocity profiles of matter in large voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsizh, M.; Novosyadlyj, B.

    2016-09-01

    We analyse the evolution of cosmological perturbations which leads to the formation of large voids in the distribution of galaxies. We assume that perturbations are spherical and all components of the Universe - radiation, matter and dark energy - are continuous media with ideal fluid energy-momentum tensors, which interact only gravitationally. Equations of the evolution of perturbations in the comoving to cosmological background reference frame for every component are obtained from equations of conservation and Einstein's ones and are integrated by modified Euler method. Initial conditions are set at the early stage of evolution in the radiation-dominated epoch, when the scale of perturbation is mush larger than the particle horizon. Results show how the profiles of density and velocity of matter in spherical voids with different overdensity shells are formed.

  16. Flow Rate of Particles through Apertures Obtained from Self-Similar Density and Velocity Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Alvaro; Zuriguel, Iker; Maza, Diego

    2012-06-01

    “Beverloo’s law” is considered as the standard expression to estimate the flow rate of particles through apertures. This relation was obtained by simple dimensional analysis and includes empirical parameters whose physical meaning is poorly justified. In this Letter, we study the density and velocity profiles in the flow of particles through an aperture. We find that, for the whole range of apertures studied, both profiles are self-similar. Hence, by means of the functionality obtained for them the mass flow rate is calculated. The comparison of this expression with the Beverloo’s one reveals some differences which are crucial to understanding the mechanism that governs the flow of particles through orifices.

  17. Scaling of maximum probability density functions of velocity and temperature increments in turbulent systems

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Y X; Zhou, Q; Qiu, X; Shang, X D; Lu, Z M; Liu, and Y L

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new way to estimate the scaling parameter of a self-similar process by considering the maximum probability density function (pdf) of tis increments. We prove this for $H$-self-similar processes in general and experimentally investigate it for turbulent velocity and temperature increments. We consider turbulent velocity database from an experimental homogeneous and nearly isotropic turbulent channel flow, and temperature data set obtained near the sidewall of a Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection cell, where the turbulent flow is driven by buoyancy. For the former database, it is found that the maximum value of increment pdf $p_{\\max}(\\tau)$ is in a good agreement with lognormal distribution. We also obtain a scaling exponent $\\alpha\\simeq 0.37$, which is consistent with the scaling exponent for the first-order structure function reported in other studies. For the latter one, we obtain a scaling exponent $\\alpha_{\\theta}\\simeq0.33$. This index value is consistent with the Kolmogorov-Ob...

  18. Characterization of size, anisotropy, and density heterogeneity of nanoparticles by sedimentation velocity

    KAUST Repository

    Demeler, Borries

    2014-08-05

    A critical problem in materials science is the accurate characterization of the size dependent properties of colloidal inorganic nanocrystals. Due to the intrinsic polydispersity present during synthesis, dispersions of such materials exhibit simultaneous heterogeneity in density ρ, molar mass M, and particle diameter d. The density increments ∂ρ/∂d and ∂ρ/∂M of these nanoparticles, if known, can then provide important information about crystal growth and particle size distributions. For most classes of nanocrystals, a mixture of surfactants is added during synthesis to control their shape, size, and optical properties. However, it remains a challenge to accurately determine the amount of passivating ligand bound to the particle surface post synthesis. The presence of the ligand shell hampers an accurate determination of the nanocrystal diameter. Using CdSe and PbS semiconductor nanocrystals, and the ultrastable silver nanoparticle (M4Ag 44(p-MBA)30), as model systems, we describe a Custom Grid method implemented in UltraScan-III for the characterization of nanoparticles and macromolecules using sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation. We show that multiple parametrizations are possible, and that the Custom Grid method can be generalized to provide high resolution composition information for mixtures of solutes that are heterogeneous in two out of three parameters. For such cases, our method can simultaneously resolve arbitrary two-dimensional distributions of hydrodynamic parameters when a third property can be held constant. For example, this method extracts partial specific volume and molar mass from sedimentation velocity data for cases where the anisotropy can be held constant, or provides anisotropy and partial specific volume if the molar mass is known. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  19. Mixing properties of coaxial jets with large velocity ratios and large inverse density ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander Schumaker, S.; Driscoll, James F.

    2012-05-01

    An experimental study was conducted to better understand the mixing properties of coaxial jets as several parameters were systematically varied, including the velocity ratio, density ratio, and the Reynolds number. Diameters of the inner and outer jet were also varied. Coaxial jets are commonly used to mix fluids due to the simplicity of their geometry and the rapid mixing that they provide. A measure of the overall mixing efficiency is the stoichiometric mixing length (Ls), which is the distance along the jet centerline where the two fluids have mixed to some desired concentration, which was selected to be the stoichiometric concentration for H2/O2 and CH4/O2 in this case. For 56 cases, the profiles of mean mixture fraction, rms mixture fraction fluctuations (unmixedness), and Ls were measured using acetone planar laser induced fluorescence diagnostics. Results were compared to three mixing models. The entrainment model of Villermaux and Rehab showed good agreement with the data, indicating that the proper non-dimensional scaling parameter is the momentum flux ratio M. The work extends the existing database of coaxial jet scalar mixing properties because it considers the specific regime of large values of both the velocity ratio and the inverse density ratio, which is the regime in which rocket injectors operate. Also the work focuses on the mixing up to Ls where previous work focused on the mixing up to the end of the inner core. The Reynolds numbers achieved for a number of cases were considerably larger than previous gas mixing studies, which insures that the jet exit boundary conditions are fully turbulent.

  20. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations.

  1. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bowin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4 E+27 kgm2s−1. Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates. Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth. The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant velocity on the crests of convection cells driven by rising heat. These results imply that spreading centers are primarily passive reactive

  2. Experimental Study on Angular Velocity Calibration of Mpu-6050 6-axis Motion Sensor%Mpu-6050型6轴运动传感器角速度标定实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓敏; 赵云伟; 刘洪波

    2015-01-01

    To get the tri-axial angular velocity performance of the Mpu-6050 6-axis motion sensor,the sensor calibration experiments are done on the self-made sensor calibration experiment apparatus by the servo motor. The angular velocity measurements of sensor and samples are acquired and then they are linear fitted. Furthermore, the empirical formula of angular velocity is established which laid a good foundation for application of flexible pneumatic robot hand.%为了获得Mpu-6050型6轴运动传感器的三轴角速度性能,在自制的传感器标定实验装置上,利用伺服电机进行了传感器标定实验。获得了传感器角速度测量值与采样值的关系及测量范围。并进行了线性拟合,建立了传感器输出角速度的经验公式,为该传感器在气动柔性机械手中的应用奠定了基础。

  3. Control of high velocity lithosphere roots on crustal scale density variations seen in Gondwana reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitenberg, C. F.; Mariani, P.

    2015-12-01

    The GOCE gravity field is globally homogeneous at the resolution of about 80km or better allowing for the first time to identify tectonic structures at continental scale. The large scale structures are presumably controlled by the rheology of the underlying crust down to the base of the lithosphere. Seismic tomography identifies the presence of the deep lithosphere roots by increased velocity. The joint analysis of the tomography results and the GOCE gravity reveals that at global scale the two data have some common patterns. The correlations are enhanced by applying geodynamic plate reconstructions to the GOCE gravity field and to the tomography models which places today's observed fields at the Gondwana pre-breakup position. There are several examples for which it is found that the deep lithospheric roots, as those found below cratons, control the position of the positive gravity values outboard of the deep roots. This could be explained by the deep lithospheric roots focusing asthenospheric upwelling outboard of the root protecting the overlying craton from magmatic intrusions. Over several of the deep roots the gravity is systematically negative, which could be due to a compositional effect, with deep roots of increased velocity having reduced density. The study is carried out globally, with focus on the African and South American continents. The background for the study can be found in the following publications where the techniques which have been used are described: Braitenberg, C., Mariani, P. and De Min, A. (2013). The European Alps and nearby orogenic belts sensed by GOCE, Boll. Bollettino di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata, 54(4), 321-334. doi:10.4430/bgta0105 Braitenberg, C. and Mariani, P. (2015). Geological implications from complete Gondwana GOCE-products reconstructions and link to lithospheric roots. Proceedings of 5th International GOCE User Workshop, 25 - 28 November 2014. Braitenberg, C. (2015). Exploration of tectonic structures with GOCE in

  4. The spatial and velocity bias of linear density peaks and proto-haloes in the LCDM cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Elia, Anna; Porciani, Cristiano

    2011-01-01

    We use high resolution N-body simulations to investigate the Lagrangian bias of cold dark matter haloes within the LCDM cosmology. Our analysis focuses on "proto-haloes", which we identify in the simulation initial conditions with the subsets of particles belonging to individual redshift-zero haloes. We then calculate the number-density and velocity-divergence fields of proto-haloes and estimate their auto spectral densities. We also measure the corresponding cross spectral densities with the linear matter distribution. We use our results to test a Lagrangian-bias model presented by Desjacques and Sheth which is based on the assumption that haloes form out of local density maxima of a specific height. Our comparison validates the predicted functional form for the scale-dependence of the bias for both the density and velocity fields. We also show that the bias coefficients are accurately predicted for the velocity divergence. On the contrary, the theoretical values for the density bias parameters do not accura...

  5. The relation between gas density and velocity power spectra in galaxy clusters: qualitative treatment and cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuravleva, I; Schekochihin, A A; Lau, E T; Nagai, D; Gaspari, M; Allen, S W; Nelson, K; Parrish, I J

    2014-01-01

    We address the problem of evaluating the power spectrum of the velocity field of the ICM using only information on the plasma density fluctuations, which can be measured today by Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories. We argue that for relaxed clusters there is a linear relation between the rms density and velocity fluctuations across a range of scales, from the largest ones, where motions are dominated by buoyancy, down to small, turbulent scales: $(\\delta\\rho_k/\\rho)^2 = \\eta_1^2 (V_{1,k}/c_s)^2$, where $\\delta\\rho_k/\\rho$ is the spectral amplitude of the density perturbations at wave number $k$, $V_{1,k}^2=V_k^2/3$ is the mean square component of the velocity field, $c_s$ is the sound speed, and $\\eta_1$ is a dimensionless constant of order unity. Using cosmological simulations of relaxed galaxy clusters, we calibrate this relation and find $\\eta_1\\approx 1 \\pm 0.3$. We argue that this value is set at large scales by buoyancy physics, while at small scales the density and velocity power spectra are proporti...

  6. Laboratory observations of velocity and density fields in the entrance of a harbor on a stratified tidal river

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langendoen, E.J.; Karelse, M.

    1990-01-01

    Detailed measurements are presented of velocity and density fields in the entrance of a model harbor on a stratified tidal river. Three geometries of the harbor entrance were examined, (1) a harbor with its length axis perpendicular to the river and an entrance width of 1 m, (2) as (1) but with an

  7. Density and P-wave velocity structure beneath the Paraná Magmatic Province: Refertilization of an ancient lithospheric mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Carlos; Ussami, Naomi; Ritsema, Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    We estimate density and P-wave velocity perturbations in the mantle beneath the southeastern South America plate from geoid anomalies and P-wave traveltime residuals to constrain the structure of the lithosphere underneath the Paraná Magmatic Province (PMP) and conterminous geological provinces. Our analysis shows a consistent correlation between density and velocity anomalies. The P-wave speed and density are 1% and 15 kg/m3 lower, respectively, in the upper mantle under the Late Cretaceous to Cenozoic alkaline provinces, except beneath the Goiás Alkaline Province (GAP), where density (+20 kg/m3) and velocity (+0.5%) are relatively high. Underneath the PMP, the density is higher by about 50 kg/m3 in the north and 25 kg/m3 in the south, to a depth of 250 - 300 km. These values correlate with high-velocity perturbations of +0.5% and +0.3%, respectively. Profiles of density perturbation versus depth in the upper mantle are different for the PMP and the adjacent Archean São Francisco (SFC) and Amazonian (AC) cratons. The Paleoproterozoic PMP basement has a high-density root. The density is relatively low in the SFC and AC lithospheres. A reduction of density is a typical characteristic of chemically depleted Archean cratons. A more fertile Proterozoic and Phanerozoic subcontinental lithospheric mantle has a higher density, as deduced from density estimates of mantle xenoliths of different ages and composition. In conjunction with Re-Os isotopic studies of the PMP basalts, chemical and isotopic analyses of peridodite xenoliths from the GAP in the northern PMP, and electromagnetic induction experiments of the PMP lithosphere, our density and P-wave speed models suggest that the densification of the PMP lithosphere and flood basalt generation are related to mantle refertilization. Metasomatic refertilization resulted from the introduction of asthenospheric components from the mantle wedge above Proterozoic subduction zones, which surrounded the Paraná lithosphere

  8. Sound velocities of bridgmanite from density of states determined by nuclear inelastic scattering and first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, Catherine; Caracas, Razvan; Glazyrin, Konstantin; Potapkin, Vasily; Kantor, Anastasia; Sinmyo, Ryosuke; Prescher, Clemens; Kupenko, Ilya; Chumakov, Aleksandr; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2016-12-01

    Sound velocities of bridgmanite measured in the laboratory are a key to deciphering the composition of the lower mantle. Here, we report Debye sound velocities determined using nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) for one majorite composition (Mg0.82Fe0.18SiO3) and five bridgmanite compositions (Mg0.82Fe0.18SiO3, Mg0.86Fe0.14Si0.98Al0.02O3, Mg0.88Fe0.12SiO3, Mg0.6Fe0.4Si0.63Al0.37O3, Mg0.83Fe0.15Si0.98Al0.04O3) measured in a diamond anvil cell at pressures up to 89 GPa at room temperature. Debye sound velocities for majorite determined from NIS are consistent with literature data from Brillouin scattering and ultrasonics, while Debye sound velocities for bridgmanite are significantly lower than literature values from the same methods. We calculated partial and total density of states (DOS) for MgSiO3 and FeSiO3 bridgmanite using density functional theory and demonstrate that Debye sound velocities calculated from the reduced DOS using the same approach as for the experimental data (i.e., the limit of D(E)/E2 as energy goes to zero) give the same sound velocities for each phase irrespective of which partial DOS is used. In addition, we show that Debye sound velocities calculated using this approach are consistent with values obtained from the calculation of the full elastic tensor. Comparison of the calculated DOS with the one obtained from NIS indicates that the experimental DOS has enhanced intensity at low energies that leads to a different slope of the DOS and hence a lower sound velocity. This effect is present in all of the bridgmanite samples examined in this study.

  9. How the Density Environment Changes the Influence of the Dark Matter–Baryon Streaming Velocity on Cosmological Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamical effect of the relative velocity between dark matter and baryonic fluids, which remained supersonic after the epoch of recombination. The impact of this supersonic motion on the formation of cosmological structures was first formulated by Tseliakhovich & Hirata, in terms of the linear theory of small-scale fluctuations coupled to large-scale, relative velocities in mean-density regions. In their formalism, they limited the large-scale density environment to be that of the global mean density. We improve on their formulation by allowing variation in the density environment as well as the relative velocities. This leads to a new type of coupling between large-scale and small-scale modes. We find that the small-scale fluctuation grows in a biased way: faster in the overdense environment and slower in the underdense environment. We also find that the net effect on the global power spectrum of the density fluctuation is to boost its overall amplitude from the prediction by Tseliakhovich & Hirata. Correspondingly, the conditional mass function of cosmological halos and the halo bias parameter are both affected in a similar way. The discrepancy between our prediction and that of Tseliakhovich & Hirata is significant, and therefore, the related cosmology and high-redshift astrophysics should be revisited. The mathematical formalism of this study can be used for generating cosmological initial conditions of small-scale perturbations in generic, overdense (underdense) background patches.

  10. How Density Environment Changes the Influence of the Dark Matter-Baryon Streaming Velocity on the Cosmological Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamical effect of relative velocities between dark matter and baryonic fluids, which remained supersonic after the epoch of recombination. The impact of this supersonic motion on the formation of cosmological structures was first formulated by Tseliakhovich & Hirata (2010), in terms of the linear theory of small-scale fluctuations coupled to large-scale, relative velocities in mean-density regions. In their formalism, they limited the large-scale density environment to be those of the global mean density. We improve on their formulation by allowing variation in the density environment as well as the relative velocities. This leads to a new type of coupling between large-scale and small-scale modes. We find that the small-scale fluctuation grows in a biased way: faster in the overdense environment and slower in the underdense environment. We also find that the net effect on the global power spectrum of the density fluctuation is to boost its overall amplitude from the prediction by Tseliakho...

  11. Density and velocity relationships for digital sonic and density logs from coastal Washington and laboratory measurements of Olympic Peninsula mafic rocks and greywackes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Christensen, Nikolas I.

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional velocity models for the basins along the coast of Washington and in Puget Lowland provide a means for better understanding the lateral variations in strong ground motions recorded there. We have compiled 16 sonic and 18 density logs from 22 oil test wells to help us determine the geometry and physical properties of the Cenozoic basins along coastal Washington. The depth ranges sampled by the test-well logs fall between 0.3 and 2.1 km. These well logs sample Quaternary to middle Eocene sedimentary rocks of the Quinault Formation, Montesano Formation, and Hoh rock assemblage. Most (18 or 82%) of the wells are from Grays Harbor County, and many of these are from the Ocean City area. These Grays Harbor County wells sample the Quinault Formation, Montesano Formation, and frequently bottom in the Hoh rock assemblage. These wells show that the sonic velocity and density normally increase significantly across the contacts between the Quinault or the Montesano Formations and the Hoh rock assemblage. Reflection coefficients calculated for vertically traveling compressional waves from the average velocities and densities for these units suggest that the top of the Hoh rock assemblage is a strong reflector of downward-propagating seismic waves: these reflection coefficients lie between 11 and 20%. Thus, this boundary may reflect seismic energy upward and trap a substantial portion of the seismic energy generated by future earthquakes within the Miocene and younger sedimentary basins found along the Washington coast. Three wells from Jefferson County provide data for the Hoh rock assemblage for the entire length of the logs. One well (Eastern Petroleum Sniffer Forks #1), from the Forks area in Clallam County, also exclusively samples the Hoh rock assemblage. This report presents the locations, elevations, depths, stratigraphic, and other information for all the oil test wells, and provides plots showing the density and sonic velocities as a function of depth

  12. Velocity of detonation at any initial density without using heat of formation of explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Mofrad, Reza Teimuri; Alamdari, Reza Fareghi; Moghadas, Mohammad Hassan; Mostofizadeh, Ali Reza; Sadeghi, Hossein

    2006-10-11

    The simplest method is introduced for reliable estimating the detonation velocity of large class of CHNO explosives based elemental composition and specific structural groups. There is no need to use heat of formation and the other experimental data for calculation of detonation velocity in the new procedure. Only elemental composition and the number of special structural groups without using heat of formation of explosive is sufficient for reliable desk calculation of detonation velocity. The results show good agreement with experimental values with respect to computed results obtained by complex computer code using BKWS and BKWR equations of state. Predicted velocities of detonation have root-mean-square (rms) percent deviation of 2.2, 5.9 and 5.3 from experimental data for new method, BKWS and BKWR equations of state, respectively.

  13. Use of PASCO Optical-sensors to Measure Angular Velocity and Acceleration of the Disc%用PASCO光传感器测量圆盘转动速度和加速度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余剑敏; 钟健松; 魏健宁; 谌庆春; 吴米贵

    2011-01-01

    This article describes using PASCO optical-sensors in real time measurement of angular velocity and angular acceleration of the circular disc,and makes the circular disc rotational speed and acceleration measurements.The experimental design,measurement sciences,accurate and reliable data,reference to reality.%介绍了利用PASCO光传感器实时测量圆盘的角速度与角加速度,进而实现对圆盘转动速度、加速度的测量。实验设计合理,测量方法科学,数据精确可靠,对现实应用有借鉴作用。

  14. Increase of the Density, Temperature and Velocity of Plasma Jets driven by a Ring of High Energy Laser Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Wen; Fatenejad, Milad; Lamb, Donald Q; Grosskopf, Michael; Park, Hye-Sook; Remington, Bruce; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic plasma outflows driven by multi-beam, high-energy lasers, such as Omega and NIF, have been and will be used as platforms for a variety of laboratory astrophysics experiments. Here we propose a new way of launching high density and high velocity, plasma jets using multiple intense laser beams in a hollow ring formation. We show that such jets provide a more flexible and versatile platform for future laboratory astrophysics experiments. Using high resolution hydrodynamic simulations, we demonstrate that the collimated jets can achieve much higher density, temperature and velocity when multiple laser beams are focused to form a hollow ring pattern at the target, instead of focused onto a single spot. We carried out simulations with different ring radii and studied their effects on the jet properties. Implications for laboratory collisionless shock experiments are discussed.

  15. Stereoscopy of dust density waves under microgravity: Velocity distributions and phase-resolved single-particle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himpel, Michael, E-mail: himpel@physik.uni-greifswald.de; Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André [Institute of Physics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Bockwoldt, Tim; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Ole Menzel, Kristoffer [ABB Switzerland Ltd, Corporate Research Center, 5405 Dättwil (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on dust-density waves have been performed in dusty plasmas under the microgravity conditions of parabolic flights. Three-dimensional measurements of a dust density wave on a single particle level are presented. The dust particles have been tracked for many oscillation periods. A Hilbert analysis is applied to obtain trajectory parameters such as oscillation amplitude and three-dimensional velocity amplitude. While the transverse motion is found to be thermal, the velocity distribution in wave propagation direction can be explained by harmonic oscillations with added Gaussian (thermal) noise. Additionally, it is shown that the wave properties can be reconstructed by means of a pseudo-stroboscopic approach. Finally, the energy dissipation mechanism from the kinetic oscillation energy to thermal motion is discussed and presented using phase-resolved analysis.

  16. Increase of the Density, Temperature and Velocity of Plasma Jets driven by a Ring of High Energy Laser Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Wen; Liang, Edison P.; Fatenejad, Milad; Lamb, Donald Q.; Grosskopf, Michael; Park, Hye-Sook; Remington, Bruce; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic plasma outflows driven by multi-beam, high-energy lasers, such as Omega and NIF, have been and will be used as platforms for a variety of laboratory astrophysics experiments. Here we propose a new way of launching high density and high velocity, plasma jets using multiple intense laser beams in a hollow ring formation. We show that such jets provide a more flexible and versatile platform for future laboratory astrophysics experiments. Using high resolution hydrodynamic simulations,...

  17. A high speed data acquisition system for the analysis of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations at transonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clukey, Steven J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1988-01-01

    The use of a high-speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) to measure simultaneously velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations is described. The DDAS is used to automate the acquisition of hot-wire calibration data. The data acquisition, data handling, and data reporting techiques used by DDAS are described. Sample data are used to compare results obtained with the DDAS with those obtained from the FM tape and post-test digitization method.

  18. The Effect of Atmospheric Cooling on Vertical Velocity Dispersion and Density Distribution of Brown Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Russell E., Jr.; Thorman, Paul A.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Cohen, Seth H.; Hathi, Nimish P.; Holwerda, Benne W.; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Pirzkal, Nor; Windhorst, Rogier A.; Young, Erick

    2017-09-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation designed to predict the vertical velocity dispersion of brown dwarfs in the Milky Way. We show that since these stars are constantly cooling, the velocity dispersion has a noticeable trend with the spectral type. With realistic assumptions for the initial mass function, star formation history, and the cooling models, we show that the velocity dispersion is roughly consistent with what is observed for M dwarfs, decreases to cooler spectral types, and increases again for the coolest types in our study (∼T9). We predict a minimum in the velocity dispersions for L/T transition objects, however, the detailed properties of the minimum predominately depend on the star formation history. Since this trend is due to brown dwarf cooling, we expect that the velocity dispersion as a function of spectral type should deviate from the constancy around the hydrogen-burning limit. We convert from velocity dispersion to vertical scale height using standard disk models and present similar trends in disk thickness as a function of spectral type. We suggest that future, wide-field photometric and/or spectroscopic missions may collect sizable samples of distant (∼ 1 kpc) dwarfs that span the hydrogen-burning limit. As such, we speculate that such observations may provide a unique way of constraining the average spectral type of hydrogen burning. Support for program #13266 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under the NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  19. Si iv Column Densities Predicted from Non-Equilibrium Ionization Simulations of Turbulent Mixing Layers and High-Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kwak, Kyujin; Henley, David B

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of the Si iv ions in turbulent mixing layers (TMLs) between hot and cool gas and in cool high-velocity clouds (HVCs) that travel through a hot halo, complementing the C iv, N v, and O vi predictions in Kwak & Shelton, Kwak et al., and Henley et al. We find that the Si iv ions are most abundant in regions where the hot and cool gases first begin to mix or where the mixed gas has cooled significantly. The predicted column densities of high velocity Si iv and the predicted ratios of Si iv to C iv and O vi found on individual sightlines in our HVC simulations are in good agreement with observations of high velocity gas. Low velocity Si iv is also seen in the simulations, as a result of decelerated gas in the case of the HVC simulations and when looking along directions that pass perpendicular to the direction of motion in the TML simulations. The ratios of low velocity Si iv to C iv and O vi in the TML simulations are in good agreement with those recorded for Milky Way halo gas, while t...

  20. The nearby spiral density-wave structure of the Galaxy: line-of-sight and longitudinal velocities of 223 Cepheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griv, Evgeny; Hou, Li-Gang; Jiang, Ing-Guey; Ngeow, Chow-Choong

    2017-02-01

    The data of 223 stars within 4 kpc from the Sun and 400 pc from the plane are collected from Melnik et al., who listed photometric distances and velocities of 674 long-period Cepheids in the disc of our Galaxy. Both line-of-sight and transverse along the Galactic longitude velocities of the selected stars are analysed on the assumption that the system is the subject to Lin-Shu-type moderately unstable, low-amplitude, tightly wound and rigidly rotating density waves. Minimization of the least-squares estimator S of measured and modelled velocities of stars was performed in the geometrical parameters of waves. The wave structures defined from the two independent samples of velocities are nearly similar. Different radial scales (wavelengths) of velocity inhomogeneity of about 1, 2 and 4 kpc, which do not depend on the number of spiral arms m, were found. But for now it is unclear if one can identify these scales as fully independent global modes of collective oscillations or they are Fourier harmonics of a single wave, or they just reveal the segments of large-scale Orion, Sagittarius and Perseus arms. The dominant mode is the one-armed wave for the main minimum of all S considered. However, because the S values for fits with m = 1-4 are almost equal the latter conclusion must be regarded as tentative until more extensive data are available. High-precision Gaia observations could reveal in the near future whether the wave-like velocity fluctuations near the Sun reported here do indeed exist.

  1. Density structure of the cratonic mantle in Southern Africa. 2. Correlations with kimberlite distribution, seismic velocities, and Moho sharpness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Vinnik, Lev

    2016-01-01

    across) lowdensity (down to 3.34 g/cm3) and high-density (up to 3.41 g/cm3) anomalies. High (3.40–3.42 g/cm3) mantle densities beneath the Eastern Cape Fold belt require the presence of a significant amount of eclogite in the mantle, such as associated with subducted oceanic slabs. We find a strong...... the composition and rheology of the lithospheric mantle to make it unfavorable for consequent kimberlite eruptions. (5) Density anomalies in the lithospheric mantle show inverse correlation with seismic Vp, Vs velocities at 100–150 km depth. However, this correlation is weaker than reported in experimental...

  2. The effect of baryons on redshift space distortions and cosmic density and velocity fields in the EAGLE simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hellwing, Wojciech A; Frenk, Carlos S; Theuns, Tom; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G; Crain, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    We use the EAGLE galaxy formation simulation to study the effects of baryons on the power spectrum of the total matter and dark matter distributions and on the velocity fields of dark matter and galaxies. On scales $k\\geq \\sim4{h\\,{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}}$ the effect of baryons on the amplitude of the total-matter power spectrum is greater than $1\\%$. The back-reaction of baryons affects the density field of the dark matter at the level of $\\sim3\\%$ on scales of $1\\leq k/({h\\,{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}})\\leq 5$. The dark matter velocity divergence power spectrum at $k\\leq \\sim0.5{h\\,{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}}$ is changed by less than $1\\%$. The 2D redshift-space power spectrum is affected at the level of $\\sim6\\%$ at $k_\\perp\\geq \\sim1{h\\,{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}}$, but for $k_\\perp\\leq 0.4{h\\,{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}}$ the amplitude differs by less than $1\\%$. We report vanishingly small baryonic velocity bias for haloes: the peculiar velocities of haloes with with $M_{200}>3\\times10^{11}{{\\rm M}_{\\odot}}$ (hosting galaxies with $M_{*}>10^9{{\\rm M}_{\\odot}}$)...

  3. A comparison between the patella and the calcaneus using ultrasound velocity and attenuation as predictors of bone mineral density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S. M.; Davis, J.

    1997-10-01

    The bone mineral density (BMD), ultrasound velocity (UV) and attenuation were examined in sixteen matched sets of human patellae and calcanei. For the sixteen calcanei, BMD was strongly correlated with all ultrasound parameters. Calcaneal UV appeared to be inferior to attenuation in the ability to predict BMD. For the sixteen patellae, the average UV was found to be greater in the superior/inferior direction than in the anterior/posterior and medial/lateral directions. It was found that patella BMD was significantly correlated with each of three directional ultrasound velocities. The relationship between BMD and ultrasound attenuation parameters was not significant in the patella. A comparative study of the two different bone sets demonstrated that the BMDs of the patella and calcaneus were significantly correlated with each other. Ultrasound velocity of calcaneus, measured in the medial/lateral direction, was not significantly associated with any of three directional ultrasound velocities in the patella. Similarly, ultrasound attenuation parameters of calcaneus were not significantly correlated with those of patella. The present study also demonstrated evidence that when predicting BMDs at their respective sites using ultrasound, the calcaneus appeared to be superior to the patella.

  4. Hip and knee joints are more stabilized than driven during the stance phase of gait: an analysis of the 3D angle between joint moment and joint angular velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, R; Cheze, L

    2008-08-01

    Joint power is commonly used in orthopaedics, ergonomics or sports analysis but its clinical interpretation remains controversial. Some basic principles on muscle actions and energy transfer have been proposed in 2D. The decomposition of power on 3 axes, although questionable, allows the same analysis in 3D. However, these basic principles have been widely criticized, mainly because bi-articular muscles must be considered. This requires a more complex computation in order to determine how the individual muscle force contributes to drive the joint. Conversely, with simple 3D inverse dynamics, the analysis of both joint moment and angular velocity directions is essential to clarify when the joint moment can contribute or not to drive the joint. The present study evaluates the 3D angle between the joint moment and the joint angular velocity and investigates when the hip, knee and ankle joints are predominantly driven (angle close to 0 degrees and 180 degrees ) or stabilized (angle close to 90 degrees ) during gait. The 3D angle curves show that the three joints are never fully but only partially driven and that the hip and knee joints are mainly stabilized during the stance phase. The notion of stabilization should be further investigated, especially for subjects with motion disorders or prostheses.

  5. Potential, velocity, and density fields from redshift-distance samples: Application - Cosmography within 6000 kilometers per second

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertschinger, Edmund; Dekel, Avishai; Faber, Sandra M.; Dressler, Alan; Burstein, David

    1990-01-01

    A potential flow reconstruction algorithm has been applied to the real universe to reconstruct the three-dimensional potential, velocity, and mass density fields smoothed on large scales. The results are shown as maps of these fields, revealing the three-dimensional structure within 6000 km/s distance from the Local Group. The dominant structure is an extended deep potential well in the Hydra-Centaurus region, stretching across the Galactic plane toward Pavo, broadly confirming the Great Attractor (GA) model of Lynden-Bell et al. (1988). The Local Supercluster appears to be an extended ridge on the near flank of the GA, proceeding through the Virgo Southern Extension to the Virgo and Ursa Major clusters. The Virgo cluster and the Local Group are both falling toward the bottom of the GA potential well with peculiar velocities of 658 + or - 121 km/s and 565 + or - 125 km/s, respectively.

  6. Rotation angles and angular velocities study of pebble-shaped fuel element based on a detection system%球形燃料元件累积旋转角度和角速度问题研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵颖; 朱兴望; 曲世祥; 陈堃

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR), most often used in Generation IV high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor, employs pebble-shaped fuel elements. As pebbles flow through the reactor, they will slide and rotate against each other and the wall, causing generation of graphite dust.Purpose:This study aims to investigate the rotation angles and angular velocities of pebble-shaped fuel elements (PSFE). Methods: The rotation angle and angular velocity were studied by using a simulated transparent cylinder to replace the reactor core. A pebble-shaped detection system is employed to test the angular velocities and accumulated rotation angles of PSFEs with wireless interface. The generation of graphite particles by rotational abrasion was also studied.Results:The experimental results show that the initial seeding position has influence on rotation angles and angular velocities. The distribution of rotation angles and angular velocities from the center to the wall can be described as an inverted V-type distribution. The calculation results show that wear mass by rotation accounts for 11%?27% of the total graphite dust.Conclusion: Sliding abrasion is stronger than rotation abrasion in general, graphite generation tends to be overestimated if we only take sliding abrasion into consideration and ignore rotation abrasion.%球床堆采用球形燃料元件,其在循环过程中存在滚动磨损以及滑动磨损并产生石墨粉尘.本文借助一种球形无线探测系统量化了角速度及累计旋转角度,并量化了滚动磨损对石墨粉尘产生的影响.实验结果表明,累计旋转角度和角速度与初始径向位置有关,随着初始径向位置由里向外,呈V字型分布,与仓筒边壁接触的球累计旋转角度和角速度远大于其他位置,边壁滚动效应显著.计算结果表明,滚动磨损对石墨粉尘产生量的贡献在11%?27%,且靠近仓筒边壁处该百分比高于其他位置,边壁效应明显.一般情况下,滚动磨

  7. A new method of measuring the peculiar velocity power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Juszkiewicz, R; Feldman, H A; Zhang, Pengjie; Stebbins, Albert; Juszkiewicz, Roman; Feldman, Hume

    2004-01-01

    We show that by directly correlating the cluster kinetic Sunyaev Zeldovich (KSZ) flux, the cluster peculiar velocity power spectrum can be measured to $\\sim 10%$ accuracy by future large sky coverage KSZ surveys. This method is almost free of systemics entangled in the usual velocity inversion method. The direct correlation brings extra information of density and velocity clustering. We utilize these information to construct two indicators of the Hubble constant and comoving angular distance and propose a novel method to constrain cosmology.

  8. Particle Size, Number Density, And Velocity Measurements In A 2800 K Combustion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, W. M.; Schwartz, F. A.; Stallings, E. S.; Belz, R. A.

    1983-10-01

    Particle size and velocity measurements have been obtained in a low-speed (6 to 10 m/s), 2800 K combustor 30 cm in diameter. The measurements were obtained using a particle-sizing interferometer coupled to a 0.5 m spectrometer for background light rejection from radiant particles. Results obtained for the combustion of powdered coke clearly indicate the capabilities of this type of instrument to estimate combustor efficiency as a function of temperature. Comparison of the optically sampled measurements with other sampling techniques shows reasonable agreement.

  9. The Velocity and Density Distribution of Earth-Intersecting Meteoroids: Implications for Environment Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, A. V.; Brown, P. G.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Moser, D. E.; Blaauw, R. C.; Cooke, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Meteoroids are known to damage spacecraft: they can crater or puncture components, disturb a spacecraft's attitude, and potentially create secondary electrical effects. Because the damage done depends on the speed, size, density, and direction of the impactor, accurate environment models are critical for mitigating meteoroid-related risks. Yet because meteoroid properties are derived from indirect observations such as meteors and impact craters, many characteristics of the meteoroid environment are uncertain. In this work, we present recent improvements to the meteoroid speed and density distributions. Our speed distribution is derived from observations made by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar. These observations are de-biased using modern descriptions of the ionization efficiency. Our approach yields a slower meteoroid population than previous analyses (see Fig. 1 for an example) and we compute the uncertainties associated with our derived distribution. We adopt a higher fidelity density distribution than that used by many older models. In our distribution, meteoroids with TJ less than 2 are assigned to a low-density population, while those with TJ greater than 2 have higher densities (see Fig. 2). This division and the distributions themselves are derived from the densities reported by Kikwaya et al. These changes have implications for the environment: for instance, the helion/antihelion sporadic sources have lower speeds than the apex and toroidal sources and originate from high-T(sub J) parent bodies. Our on-average slower and denser distributions thus imply that the helion and antihelion sources dominate the meteoroid environment even more completely than previously thought. Finally, for a given near-Earth meteoroid cratering rate, a slower meteoroid population produces a comparatively higher rate of satellite attitude disturbances.

  10. Turbulence induced collisional velocities and density enhancements: large inertial range results from shell models

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    To understand the earliest stages of planet formation, it is crucial to be able to predict the rate and the outcome of dust grains collisions, be it sticking and growth, bouncing, or fragmentation. The outcome of such collisions depends on the collision speed, so we need a solid understanding of the rate and velocity distribution of turbulence-induced dust grain collisions. The rate of the collisions depends both on the speed of the collisions and the degree of clustering experienced by the dust grains, which is a known outcome of turbulence. We evolve the motion of dust grains in simulated turbulence, an approach that allows a large turbulent inertial range making it possible to investigate the effect of turbulence on meso-scale grains (millimeter and centimeter). We find three populations of dust grains: one highly clustered, cold and collisionless; one warm; and the third "hot". Our results can be fit by a simple formula, and predict both significantly slower typical collisional velocities for a given turb...

  11. The effect of baryons on redshift space distortions and cosmic density and velocity fields in the EAGLE simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Schaller, Matthieu; Frenk, Carlos S.; Theuns, Tom; Schaye, Joop; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.

    2016-09-01

    We use the Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments (EAGLE) galaxy formation simulation to study the effects of baryons on the power spectrum of the total matter and dark matter distributions and on the velocity fields of dark matter and galaxies. On scales k ≳ 4 h Mpc-1 the effect of baryons on the amplitude of the total matter power spectrum is greater than 1 per cent. The back-reaction of baryons affects the density field of the dark matter at the level of ˜3 per cent on scales of 1 ≤ k/( h Mpc-1) ≤ 5. The dark matter velocity divergence power spectrum at k ≲ 0.5 h Mpc-1 is changed by less than 1 per cent. The 2D redshift space power spectrum is affected at the level of ˜6 per cent at |k|≳ 1 h Mpc^{-1} (for μ > 0.5), but for |k|≤ 0.4 h Mpc^{-1} it differs by less than 1 per cent. We report vanishingly small baryonic velocity bias for haloes: the peculiar velocities of haloes with M200 > 3 × 1011 M⊙ (hosting galaxies with M* > 109 M⊙) are affected at the level of at most 1 km s-1, which is negligible for 1 per cent-precision cosmology. We caution that since EAGLE overestimates cluster gas fractions it may also underestimate the impact of baryons, particularly for the total matter power spectrum. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that for theoretical modelling of redshift space distortions and galaxy velocity-based statistics, baryons and their back-reaction can be safely ignored at the current level of observational accuracy. However, we confirm that the modelling of the total matter power spectrum in weak lensing studies needs to include realistic galaxy formation physics in order to achieve the accuracy required in the precision cosmology era.

  12. Some influences of approximate values for velocity, density and total temperature sensitivities on hot wire anemometer results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.

    1986-01-01

    There is a renewed interest in hot wire anemometry at transonic speeds. Recent results were published which indicate that at transonic speeds a heated wire is sensitive only to mass flow and total temperature, results similar to those obtained for supersonic flows. Other results were obtained to show that the sensitivity is a function of velocity, density, and total temperature, results in agreement with many of those obtained in the 1950s. An analysis of anemometry results was made to evaluate possible errors when various assumptions were made concerning the sensitivity of a heated wire to fluid flow variables.

  13. Measurement of inflight shell areal density perturbations in NIF capsule implosions near peak velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, B. A.; Pickworth, L.; Smalyuk, V.; Macphee, A.; Scott, H. A.; Robey, H.; Barrios, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    Quantitative measurements of shell-RhoR perturbations in capsules near peak implosion velocity (PV) are challenging. An external backlighter samples both sides of the shell, unless a re-entrant cone is used (potentially perturbing implosion). Emission from the hot core, after shock-stagnation and prior to PV, has been used as a self-backlighter, providing a means to sample one side of the capsule. Adding high-Z gas (~ 1% Ar) to the capsule fill in Symcaps (4He), has produced a continuum backlighter with significant increase in emission at photon energies ~ 8 keV over nominal fills. From images of the transmitted self-emission, above and below the K-edge of an internally doped Cu layer, we infer the growth at PV of imposed perturbations (100 nm amplitude, mode 40). Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Ultramassive dense early-type galaxies: velocity dispersions and number density evolution since z=1.6

    CERN Document Server

    Gargiulo, A; Tamburri, S; Lonoce, I; Ciocca, F

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the mass assembly history of ultramassive (Mstar > 10^11Msun) dense (Sigma = Mstar/(2*pi*Re^2) > 2500 Msun/pc^2) early-type galaxies (ETGs) over the last 9 Gyr. We have traced the evolution of the number density rho of ultramassive dense ETGs and have compared their structural (effective radius Re and stellar mass Mstar) and dynamical (velocity dispersion sigma_e) parameters over the redshift range 0 = 1.4, or that, if a significant fraction of them evolves in size, new ultramassive dense ETGs must form at z < 1.5 to maintain their number density almost constant. The difficulty into identify good progenitors for these new dense ETGs at z < 1.5, and the stellar populations properties of local ultramassive dense ETGs point toward the first hypothesis.

  15. Ejecta velocity distribution of impact craters formed on quartz sand: Effect of projectile density on crater scaling law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujido, Sayaka; Arakawa, Masahiko; Suzuki, Ayako I.; Yasui, Minami

    2015-12-01

    In order to clarify the effects of projectile density on ejecta velocity distributions for a granular target, impact cratering experiments on a quartz sand target were conducted by using eight types of projectiles with different densities ranging from 11 g cm-3 to 1.1 g cm-3, which were launched at about 200 m s-1 from a vertical gas gun at Kobe University. The scaling law of crater size, the ejection angle of ejecta grains, and the angle of the ejecta curtain were also investigated. The ejecta velocity distribution obtained from each projectile was well described by the π-scaling theory of v0/√{gR} =k2(x0/R)-1/μ, where v0, g, R and x0 are the ejection velocity, gravitational acceleration, crater radius and ejection position, respectively, and k2 and μ are constants mostly depending on target material properties (Housen, K.R., Holsapple, K.A. [2011]. Icarus 211, 856-875). The value of k2 was found to be almost constant at 0.7 for all projectiles except for the nylon projectile, while μ increased with the projectile density, from 0.43 for the low-density projectile to 0.6-0.7 for the high-density projectile. On the other hand, the π-scaling theory for crater size gave a μ value of 0.57, which was close to the average of the μ values obtained from ejecta velocity distributions. The ejection angle, θ, of each grain decreased slightly with distance, from higher than 45° near the impact point to 30-40° at 0.6 R. The ejecta curtain angle is controlled by the two elementary processes of ejecta velocity distribution and ejection angle; it gradually increased from 52° to 63° with the increase of the projectile density. The comparison of our experimental results with the theoretical model of the crater excavation flow known as the Z-model revealed that the relationship between μ and θ obtained by our experiments could not be described by the Z-model (Maxwell, D.E. [1977]. In: Roddy, D.J., Pepin, R.O., Merrill, R.B. (Eds.), Impact and Explosion Cratering

  16. Long-time behavior of the velocity autocorrelation function at low densities and near the critical point of simple fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, R F A; Ould-Kaddour, F; Levesque, D

    2006-07-01

    Numerous theoretical and numerical works have been devoted to the study of the algebraic decrease at large times of the velocity autocorrelation function of particles in a fluid. The derivation of this behavior, the so-called long-time tail, generally based on linearized hydrodynamics, makes no reference to any specific characteristic of the particle interactions. However, in the literature doubts have been expressed about the possibility that by numerical simulations the long-time tail can be observed in the whole fluid phase domain of systems in which the particles interact by soft-core and attractive pair potentials. In this work, extensive and accurate molecular-dynamics simulations establish that the predicted long-time tail of the velocity autocorrelation function exists in a low-density fluid of particles interacting by a soft-repulsive potential and near the liquid-gas critical point of a Lennard-Jones system. These results contribute to the confirmation that the algebraic decay of the velocity autocorrelation function is universal in these fluid systems.

  17. P-wave velocity and density structure beneath Mt. Vesuvius: a magma body in the upper edifice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Capuano

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution image of the compressional wave velocity and density structure in the shallow edifice of Mount Vesuvius has been derived from simultaneous inversion of travel times and hypocentral parameters of local earthquakes and from gravity inversion. The robustness of the tomography solution has been improved by adding to the earthquake data a set of land based shots, used for constraining the travel time residuals. The results give a high resolution image of the P-wave velocity structure with details down to 300-500 m. The relocated local seismicity appears to extend down to 5 km depth below the central crater, distributed into two clusters, and separated by an anomalously high Vp region positioned at around 1 km depth. A zone with high Vp/Vs ratio in the upper layers is interpreted as produced by the presence of intense fluid circulation alternatively to the interpretation in terms of a small magma chamber inferred by petrologic studies. In this shallower zone the seismicity has the minimum energy, whilst most of the high-energy quakes (up to Magnitude 3.6 occur in the cluster located at greater depth. The seismicity appears to be located along almost vertical cracks, delimited by a high velocity body located along past intrusive body, corresponding to remnants of Mt. Somma. In this framework a gravity data inversion has been performed to study the shallower part of the volcano. Gravity data have been inverted using a method suitable for the application to scattered data in presence of relevant topography based on a discretization of the investigated medium performed by establishing an approximation of the topography by a triangular mesh. The tomography results, the retrieved density distribution, and the pattern of relocated seismicity exclude the presence of significant shallow magma reservoirs close to the central conduit. These should be located at depth higher than that of the base of the hypocenter volume, as evidenced by

  18. Visualizing density perturbations in the capsule shell in NIF implosions near peak velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickworth, L. A.; Hammel, B. A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Macphee, A.; Scott, H. A.; Robey, H. F.; Field, J.; Barrios, M.; Regan, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    Engineering features on the capsule (surface roughness, support structures, etc.) can introduce outer surface perturbations that are ultimately detrimental to the performance of the capsule. Recent experiments have assessed minimal support structures and alternate pulse shapes using a re-entrant cone and back lighter that is perturbing to the implosion below radii of 500 μ m. Emission from the hot core, after shock-stagnation and prior to peak velocity (PV), has been used as a self-backlighter, providing a means to sample one side of the capsule at smaller radii. Adding high-Z gas ( 1 % Ar) to the capsule fill in Symcaps (4He), has produced a continuum backlighter with significant increase in emission at hv 8 keV over nominal fills. High-resolution imaging diagnostics with photon energy selectivity form 2D images of the transmitted self-emission, above and below the K-edge of an internally doped Cu layer. We can infer from these images the growth at PV of outer surface perturbations. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-697620.

  19. Induced Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  20. The MASSIVE Survey - V. Spatially-Resolved Stellar Angular Momentum, Velocity Dispersion, and Higher Moments of the 41 Most Massive Local Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Veale, Melanie; Thomas, Jens; Greene, Jenny E; McConnell, Nicholas J; Walsh, Jonelle; Ito, Jennifer; Blakeslee, John P; Janish, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    We present spatially-resolved two-dimensional stellar kinematics for the 41 most massive early-type galaxies (MK ~ 10^11.8 Msun) of the volume-limited (D ; the most luminous galaxies have ~ 0.05 while less luminous galaxies have a range of values between 0 and 0.5. Most of our galaxies show positive radial gradients in h4, and those galaxies also tend to have rising sigma profiles. We discuss the implications for the relationship among dynamical mass, sigma, h4, and velocity anisotropy for these massive galaxies.

  1. The internal solar angular velocity: Theory, observations and relationship to solar magnetic fields; Proceedings of the Eighth Summer Symposium, Sunspot, NM, Aug. 11-14, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durney, Bernard R.; Sofia, Sabatino

    The conference presents papers on observations of solar p-mode rotational splittings, observations of surface velocity fields, the equatorial rotation rate in the solar convective zone, chromospheric activity in open clusters, and solar rotation variations from sunspot group statistics. Other topics include adiabatic nonradial oscillations of a differentially rotating star, a spherical harmonic decomposition technique for analyzing steady photospheric flows, turbulent transport in the radiative zone of a rotating star, and the generation of magnetic fields in the sun. Consideration is also given to magnetic fields and the rotation of the solar convection zone, the hydrostatic adjustment time of the solar subconvective layer, models for a differentially rotating solar-convection zone, and horizontal Reynolds stress and the radial rotation law of the sun.

  2. Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  3. Phonon Density of States and Sound Velocities of Magnesiow?stite in Earth's Lower Mantle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, J; Jacosben, S D; Sturhahn, W; Jackson, J; Zhao, J; Yoo, C

    2006-01-20

    The partial phonon densities of states of iron in magnesiowuestite [(Mg{sub 0.75},Fe{sub 0.25})O] have been measured by nuclear inelastic X-ray scattering up to 109 GPa. Compressional and shear wave velocities, shear moduli, and their pressure derivatives increase significantly across the spin-pairing transition of iron in (Mg{sub 0.75},Fe{sub 0.25})O at approximately 50 GPa. The effects of the transition on the elastic properties of (Mg,Fe)O at lower-mantle pressures are in contrast to what was predicted by studying MgO and high-spin magnesiowuestite, and need to be considered in future geophysical modeling of the lower mantle. The transition also affects other thermodynamic properties of magnesiowuestite under high pressures.

  4. Density of states and dynamical crossover in a dense fluid revealed by exponential mode analysis of the velocity autocorrelation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellissima, S.; Neumann, M.; Guarini, E.; Bafile, U.; Barocchi, F.

    2017-01-01

    Extending a preceding study of the velocity autocorrelation function (VAF) in a simulated Lennard-Jones fluid [Phys. Rev. E 92, 042166 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.042166] to cover higher-density and lower-temperature states, we show that the recently demonstrated multiexponential expansion method allows for a full account and understanding of the basic dynamical processes encompassed by a fundamental quantity as the VAF. In particular, besides obtaining evidence of a persisting long-time tail, we assign specific and unambiguous physical meanings to groups of exponential modes related to the longitudinal and transverse collective dynamics, respectively. We have made this possible by consistently introducing the interpretation of the VAF frequency spectrum as a global density of states in fluids, generalizing a solid-state concept, and by giving to specific spectral components, obtained through the VAF exponential expansion, the corresponding meaning of partial densities of states relative to specific dynamical processes. The clear identification of a high-frequency oscillation of the VAF with the near-top excitation frequency in the dispersion curve of acoustic waves is a neat example of the power of the method. As for the transverse mode contribution, its analysis turns out to be particularly important, because the multiexponential expansion reveals a transition marking the onset of propagating excitations when the density is increased beyond a threshold value. While this finding agrees with the recent literature debating the issue of dynamical crossover boundaries, such as the one identified with the Frenkel line, we can add detailed information on the modes involved in this specific process in the domains of both time and frequency. This will help obtain a still missing full account of transverse dynamics, in both its nonpropagating and propagating aspects which are linked through dynamical transitions depending on both the thermodynamic states and the excitation

  5. Angular momentum of sound pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2006-07-05

    Three-dimensionally localized acoustic pulses in an isotropic fluid medium necessarily have transverse components of momentum density. Those with an azimuthal component of momentum density can carry angular momentum. The component of total pulse angular momentum along the direction of the total momentum is an invariant (constant in time and independent of choice of origin). The pulse energy, momentum and angular momentum are evaluated analytically for a family of localized solutions of the wave equation. In the limit where the pulses have many oscillations within their spatial extent ([Formula: see text], where k is the wavenumber and a determines the size of a pulse), the energy, momentum and angular momentum are consistent with a multiphonon representation of the pulse, each phonon having energy [Formula: see text], momentum [Formula: see text] and angular momentum [Formula: see text] (with integer m).

  6. Ultramassive dense early-type galaxies: Velocity dispersions and number density evolution since z = 1.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, A.; Saracco, P.; Tamburri, S.; Lonoce, I.; Ciocca, F.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We investigate the stellar mass assembly history of ultramassive (M⋆ ≳ 1011M⊙) dense (Σ = M⋆/2πRe2> 2500M⊙ pc-2) early-type galaxies (ETGs, elliptical and spheroidal galaxies) selected on basis of visual classification over the last 9 Gyr. Methods: We traced the evolution of the comoving number density ρ of ultramassive dense ETGs and compared their structural (effective radius Re and stellar mass M⋆) and dynamical (velocity dispersion σe) parameters over the redshift range 0 advantage of the COSMOS spectroscopic survey to probe the intermediate redshift range [0.2-1.0]. We derived the number density of ultramassive dense local ETGs from the SDSS sample taking all of the selection bias affecting the spectroscopic sample into account. To compare the dynamical and structural parameters, we collected a sample of 11 ultramassive dense ETGs at 1.2 measurements are available. For four of these ETGs (plus one at z = 1.91), we present previously unpublished estimates of velocity dispersion, based on optical VLT-FORS2 spectra. We probe the intermediate redshift range (0.2 ≲ z ≲ 0.9) and the local Universe with different ETGs samples. Results: We find that the comoving number density of ultramassive dense ETGs evolves with z as ρ(z) ∝ (1 + z)0.3 ± 0.8 implying a decrease of ~25% of the population of ultramassive dense ETGs since z = 1.6. By comparing the structural and dynamical properties of high-z ultramassive dense ETGs over the range 0 ≲ z < 1.6 in the [Re, M⋆, σe] plane, we find that all of the ETGs of the high-z sample have counterparts with similar properties in the local Universe. This implies either that the majority (~70%) of ultramassive dense ETGs already completed the assembly and shaping at ⟨ z ⟩ = 1.4, or that, if a significant portion of dense ETGs evolves in size, new ultramassive dense ETGs must form at z < 1.5 to maintain their number density at almost constant. The difficulty in identify good progenitors for these

  7. Conservation of orbital angular momentum in air core optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Gregg, P; Ramachandran, S

    2014-01-01

    Light's orbital angular momentum (OAM) is a conserved quantity in cylindrically symmetric media; however, it is easily destroyed by free-space turbulence or fiber bends, because anisotropic perturbations impart angular momentum. We observe the conservations of OAM even in the presence of strong bend perturbations, with fibers featuring air cores that appropriately sculpt the modal density of states. In analogy to the classical reasoning for the enhanced stability of spinning tops with increasing angular velocity, these states' lifetimes with OAM magnitude. Consequently, contrary to convention wisdom that ground states of systems are the most stable, OAM longevity in air-core fiber increases with mode order. Aided by conservation of this fundamental quantity, we demonstrate fiber propagation of 12 distinct higher-order OAM modes, of which 8 remain low-loss and >98% pure from near-degenerate coupling after km-length propagation. The first realization of long-lived higher-order OAM states, thus far posited to ex...

  8. 应用于四旋翼无人机角速度估计的几何滑模观测器设计%Geometric sliding mode observer design with application to angular velocity estimation of quadrotor UAV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安宏雷; 李杰; 王剑; 王建文; 马宏绪

    2013-01-01

    Traditional quaternion-based sliding mode observer for angular velocity estimating has to introduce the process of mandatory rescaling which affects the tracking performance of the observer algorithm.In this work,a sliding mode observer design framework is proposed, based on the Lie group method of numerical integration on manifolds for angular velocity estimation of quadrotor attitude.The algorithm constructs sliding mode feedback in the space of equivalent Lie algebra of homogeneous manifolds on the basis of equivariant mapping ideological.It avoids the complexity of constructing sliding mode feedback in homogeneous space directly,and eliminates the process of mandatory rescaling which is required by the traditional methods in each integration step.The simulation results show that the algorithm of geometric sliding mode observer is effective.%对四旋翼无人机的角速度进行估计时,传统的基于单位四元数的滑模观测器需要引入强制比例重调,因而影响了跟踪精度。提出一种基于数值积分的李群方法的滑模观测器设计框架。该算法基于等变映射思想,在齐性流形空间的等价李代数空间中设计滑模反馈,从而避免了直接在流形空间中设计反馈的复杂性,并消除了传统方法在每个积分步骤中强制加入的比例重调,提高了观测器的跟踪性能。仿真结果表明,几何滑模观测器算法可以有效地对四旋翼无人机的角速度进行估计。

  9. Thermoelastic properties of liquid Fe-C revealed by sound velocity and density measurements at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Yuta; Terasaki, Hidenori; Urakawa, Satoru; Takubo, Yusaku; Kuwabara, Soma; Kishimoto, Shunpachi; Watanuki, Tetsu; Machida, Akihiko; Katayama, Yoshinori; Kondo, Tadashi

    2016-11-01

    Carbon is one of the possible light elements in the cores of the terrestrial planets. The P wave velocity (VP) and density (ρ) are important factors for estimating the chemical composition and physical properties of the core. We simultaneously measured the VP and ρ of Fe-3.5 wt % C up to 3.4 GPa and 1850 K by using ultrasonic pulse-echo method and X-ray absorption methods. The VP of liquid Fe-3.5 wt % C decreased linearly with increasing temperature at constant pressure. The addition of carbon decreased the VP of liquid Fe by about 2% at 3 GPa and 1700 K and decreased the Fe density by about 2% at 2 GPa and 1700 K. The bulk modulus of liquid Fe-C and its pressure (P) and temperature (T) effects were precisely determined from directly measured ρ and VP data to be K0,1700 K = 83.9 GPa, dKT/dP = 5.9(2), and dKT/dT = -0.063 GPa/K. The addition of carbon did not affect the isothermal bulk modulus (KT) of liquid Fe, but it decreased the dK/dT of liquid Fe. In the ρ-VP relationship, VP increases linearly with ρ and can be approximated as VP (m/s) = -6786(506) + 1537(71) × ρ (g/cm3), suggesting that Birch's law is valid for liquid Fe-C at the present P-T conditions. Our results imply that at the conditions of the lunar core, the elastic properties of an Fe-C core are more affected by temperature than those of Fe-S core.

  10. Effects of Angular Momentum on Halo Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Lentz, Erik W; Rosenberg, Leslie J

    2016-01-01

    The near universality of DM halo density profiles provided by N-body simulations has proven to be robust against changes in total mass density, power spectrum, and some forms of initial velocity dispersion. In this letter we study the effects of coherently spinning up an isolated DM-only progenitor on halo structure. Halos with spins within several standard deviations of the simulated mean ($\\lambda \\lesssim 0.20$) produce profiles with negligible deviations from the universal form. Only when the spin becomes quite large ($\\lambda \\gtrsim 0.20$) do departures become evident. The angular momentum distribution also exhibits a near universal form, which is also independent of halo spin up to $\\lambda \\lesssim 0.20$. A correlation between these epidemic profiles and the presence of a strong bar in the virialized halo is also observed. These bar structures bear resemblance to the radial orbit instability in the rotationless limit.

  11. Optical angular momentum in dispersive media

    CERN Document Server

    Philbin, T G

    2012-01-01

    The angular momentum density and flux of light in a dispersive, rotationally symmetric medium are derived from Noether's theorem. Optical angular momentum in a dispersive medium has no simple relation to optical linear momentum, even if the medium is homogeneous. A circularly polarized monochromatic beam in a homogeneous, dispersive medium carries a spin angular momentum per unit energy of $\\pm\\omega^{-1}$, as in vacuum. This result demonstrates the non-trivial interplay of dispersive contributions to optical angular momentum and energy.

  12. NIHAO project II: Halo shape, phase-space density and velocity distribution of dark matter in galaxy formation simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Butsky, Iryna; Dutton, Aaron A; Wang, Liang; Stinson, Greg S; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W; Wadsley, James

    2015-01-01

    We show the effect of galaxy formation on the dark matter (DM) distribution across a wide range of halo masses. We focus on how baryon physics changes the dark matter halo shape, the so called "pseudo phase-space density distribution" and the velocity distribution within the virial radius, Rvir and in the solar neighborhood. This study is based on the NIHAO galaxy formation simulations, a large suite of cosmological zoom-in simulations. The galaxies reproduce key properties of observed galaxies, and hence offer unique insight into how baryons change the dark matter morphology and kinematics. When compared to dark matter only simulations, the NIHAO haloes have similar shapes at Rvir, but are substantially rounder inside ~0.1 Rvir. In DM-only simulations the inner halo has a minor-to-major axis ratio of c/a~0.5. In hydro simulations c/a increases with halo mass and integrated star formation efficiency, reaching ~0.8 at the Milky Way mass, reconciling a long-standing conflict between observations and DM only sim...

  13. A Role for Improved Angular Observations in Geosynchronous Orbit Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabol, Christopher Andrew

    1998-12-01

    The goal of this thesis is to show that improved angular observations can aid in the determination of satellite position and velocity in the geosynchronous orbit regime. Raven is a new sensor being developed by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory which should allow for angular observations of satellites to be made with a standard deviation of 1 arcsecond (which maps into approximately 170 meters at geosynchronous altitude); this is an order of magnitude improvement over traditional angular observation techniques and represents state of the art accuracy of angular observations for geosynchronous orbit determination work. Simulation studies are undertaken to show that these angular observations can be used in the orbit determination process both as the only cracking data source and as a supplement to other tracking data sources such as radar and radio transponder ranges. Results from the radio transponder range analysis are extended to cover Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Global Positioning System (GPS) observation types as well. The studies target both space surveillance and owner/operator mission support aspects of orbit determination although the emphasis will be on mission support satellite operations. Parameters varied in the simulation studies include the number of observing stations, the density of the angular observations, and the number of nights of optical tracking. The data simulations are calibrated based on real data results from a geosynchronous satellite to ensure the integrity of the simulations and the accuracy of the results. The studies show that including the improved angular observations with traditional high accuracy range observations produces a significant improvement in orbit determination accuracy over the range observations alone. The studies also show single site geosynchronous orbit determination is an attractive alternative when combining improved angular and high accuracy range observations.

  14. Improvement in White Matter Tract Reconstruction with Constrained Spherical Deconvolution and Track Density Mapping in Low Angular Resolution Data: A Pediatric Study and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Toselli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionDiffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI allows noninvasive investigation of brain structure in vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is a frequently used application of DW-MRI that assumes a single main diffusion direction per voxel, and is therefore not well suited for reconstructing crossing fiber tracts. Among the solutions developed to overcome this problem, constrained spherical deconvolution with probabilistic tractography (CSD-PT has provided superior quality results in clinical settings on adult subjects; however, it requires particular acquisition parameters and long sequences, which may limit clinical usage in the pediatric age group. The aim of this work was to compare the results of DTI with those of track density imaging (TDI maps and CSD-PT on data from neonates and children, acquired with low angular resolution and low b-value diffusion sequences commonly used in pediatric clinical MRI examinations.Materials and methodsWe analyzed DW-MRI studies of 50 children (eight neonates aged 3–28 days, 20 infants aged 1–8 months, and 22 children aged 2–17 years acquired on a 1.5 T Philips scanner using 34 gradient directions and a b-value of 1,000 s/mm2. Other sequence parameters included 60 axial slices; acquisition matrix, 128 × 128; average scan time, 5:34 min; voxel size, 1.75 mm × 1.75 mm × 2 mm; one b = 0 image. For each subject, we computed principal eigenvector (EV maps and directionally encoded color TDI maps (DEC-TDI maps from whole-brain tractograms obtained with CSD-PT; the cerebellar-thalamic, corticopontocerebellar, and corticospinal tracts were reconstructed using both CSD-PT and DTI. Results were compared by two neuroradiologists using a 5-point qualitative score.ResultsThe DEC-TDI maps obtained presented higher anatomical detail than EV maps, as assessed by visual inspection. In all subjects, white matter (WM tracts were successfully reconstructed using both

  15. Joint Inversion of Geoid Anomaly and Teleseismic P-Wave Delay Times: Modeling Density and Velocity Perturbations Beneath the Parana Magmatic Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, C. A. M.; Ussami, N.; Ritsema, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Parana Magmatic Province (PMP) is one of the largest continental igneous provinces (LIP) on Earth. It is well dated at 133 Ma preceding the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, but the causative geodynamic processes are still poorly understood. Although a low-velocity anomaly has been imaged by seismic tomography in the northeast region of the PMP and interpreted as a fossil conduct of a mantle plume that is related to the flood basalt eruptions, geochemical data indicate that such magmatism is caused by the melting of a heterogeneous and enriched lithospheric mantle with no deep plume participation. Models of density perturbations in the upper mantle estimated from joint inversion of geoid anomalies and P-wave delay times will offer important constraints on mantle dynamics. A new generation of accurate global geopotential models derived from satellite-missions (e.g. GRACE, GOCE) allows us to estimate density distribution within the Earth from geoid inversion. In order to obtain the residual geoid anomaly related to the density structure of the mantle, we use the EGM2008 model removing estimated geoid perturbations owing to variations in crustal structure (i.e., topographical masses, Moho depth, thickness of sediments and basalts). Using a spherical-Earth approximation, the density model space is represented by a set of tesseroids and the velocity model is parameterized in nodes of a spherical grid where cubic B-splines are utilized as an interpolation function. To constrain the density inversion, we add more than 10,000 manually picked teleseismic P-wave delay times. During the inversion procedure, density and P-wave velocity are linked through the optimization of a constant linear factor correlating density and velocity perturbation. Such optimization will be performed using a probability density function (PDF) [Tarantola, 2005]. We will present the preliminary results of this joint inversion scheme and hypothesize on the geodynamic processes responsible for

  16. Optical Momentum, Spin, and Angular Momentum in Dispersive Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y.; Bekshaev, Aleksandr Y.; Nori, Franco

    2017-08-01

    We examine the momentum, spin, and orbital angular momentum of structured monochromatic optical fields in dispersive inhomogeneous isotropic media. There are two bifurcations in this general problem: the Abraham-Minkowski dilemma and the kinetic (Poynting-like) versus canonical (spin-orbital) pictures. We show that the kinetic Abraham momentum describes the energy flux and group velocity of the wave in the medium. At the same time, we introduce novel canonical Minkowski-type momentum, spin, and orbital angular momentum densities of the field. These quantities exhibit fairly natural forms, analogous to the Brillouin energy density, as well as multiple advantages as compared with previously considered formalisms. As an example, we apply this general theory to inhomogeneous surface plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves at a metal-vacuum interface and show that SPPs carry a "supermomentum," proportional to the wave vector kp>ω /c , and a transverse spin, which can change its sign depending on the frequency ω .

  17. 不同角速度下自行车运动员膝关节肌力特征的研究%Study on Characteristics of Knee Muscle Strength of Cyclist under Different Angular Velocities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武晓莉

    2011-01-01

    方法:利用CONTREX等速肌力测试与训练系统,以180°/s、120°/s、60°/s3种角速度对苏州市自行车训练队26名运动员右腿膝关节进行等速向心屈伸测试。目的:分析自行车运动员不同角速度下等速向心收缩与膝关节肌肌力的关系及肌力特征。结果:1、屈伸肌峰力矩随速度的增加呈减小趋势。2、到达峰力矩的时间随测试速度的增加而缩短。且男女运动员在180°/s与120°/s组间均无显著差异。3、膝关节相对平均功率伸肌均大于屈肌,120°/ts时,屈伸肌的相对平均功率最大。4、屈伸肌比在64.8%~70.6%内,有随速度增加而增加的趋势。结论:以60°/s的角速度训练肌肉最大力量效果更明显;爆发力在120°/s时训练效果最佳;屈/伸肌比值(H/Q)在正常范围内,但低于优秀运动员(优秀运动员可达80%以上)。%Methods: Using of CONTREX Isokinetic testing and training system, with 180 °/s, 120 °/s, 60 °/s 3 species angular velocity, the right knee flexion and extension isokinetic of 26 cyclists from Suzhou cycling team is tested. Objective: To analyze the cyclist under different velocity isokinetic concentric contraction and the relationship between knee muscle strength and muscle characteristics. Results: 1 ) Muscle flexion and extension peak torque increased with a decreasing trend rate. 2)The time to reach peak torque increase with test speed reduced. And male and female athletes in the 180 °/s and 120 °/s were not significantly different between groups. 3) The relative average power of knee extensor were greater than flexor, 120 °/s, the flexor, extensor maximum relative average power. 4) Extensors and flexors than in the 64.8% 70.6%, the rate has increased with the trend. Conclusion : 60 °/s angular velocity of the maximum muscle strength training effect was more obvious ; explosive at 120 °/s when the training is

  18. Velocity and density scaling at the outlet of a silo and its role in the expression of the mass flow rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, D.; Janda, A.; Rubio-Largo, S. M.; Zuriguel, I.; Hidalgo, R. C.

    2013-06-01

    The role of density and velocity profiles in the flow of particles through apertures has been recently put on evidence in a two-dimensional experiment (Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 248001). For the whole range of apertures studied, both velocity and density profiles are selfsimilar and the obtained scaling functions allow to derive the relevant scales of the problem. Indeed, by means of the functionality obtained for these profiles, an exact expression for the mass flow rate was proposed. Such expression showed a perfect agreement with the experiential data. In this work, we generalize this study to the three dimensional case. We perform numerical simulations of a 3D silo in which the velocity and volume fraction profiles are determined. Both profiles shows that the scaling obtained for 2D can be generalized to the 3D case. Finally, the scaling of the mass flow rate with the outlet radius is discussed.

  19. Comparison of Anger camera and BGO mosaic position-sensitive detectors for `Super ACAR`. Precision electron momentum densities via angular correlation of annihilation radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, A.P. Jr. [Bell Labs. Murray Hill, NJ (United States); West, R.N.; Hyodo, Toshio

    1997-03-01

    We discuss the relative merits of Anger cameras and Bismuth Germanate mosaic counters for measuring the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation at a facility such as the proposed Positron Factory at Takasaki. The two possibilities appear equally cost effective at this time. (author)

  20. Low density lipoprotein cholesterol level inversely correlated with coronary flow velocity reserve in patients with Type 2 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yu; Jiang-Li Han; Li-Yun He; Xin-Heng Feng; Wei-Hong Li; Jie-Ming Mao; Wei Gao; Guang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the association of coronary artery endothelial function and plasma levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Methods We investigated 90 participants from our institution between October 2007 to March 2010: non-DM (n = 60) and DM (n = 30). As an indicator of coronary endothelial dysfunction, we used non-invasive Doppler echocardiography to quantify coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) in the distal part of the left descending artery after rest and after intravenous adenosine administration. Results Plasma level of LDL-C was significantly higher in patients with DM than in non-DM (3.21 0.64 vs. 2.86 0.72 mmo/L, P < 0.05), but HDL-C level did not differ between the groups (1.01 0.17 vs. 1.05 0.19 mmo/L). Furthermore, the CFVR value was lower in DM patients than non-diabetics (2.45±0.62 vs. 2.98±0.68, P < 0.001). Plasma levels of LDL-C were negatively correlated with CFVR in all subjects (r = 0.35, P < 0.001; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.52 -C0.15) and in the non-DM (r = 0.29, P < 0.05; 95% CI: 0.51–0.05), with an even stronger negative correlation in the DM group (r = 0.42, P < 0.05; 95% CI: 0.68 –0.06). Age (β = 0.019, s = 0.007, sβ = 0.435, 95% CI: 0.033 –0.005, P = 0.008), LDL-C (β = 0.217, s = 0.105, sβ = 0.282, 95% CI: 0.428 –0.005, P = 0.045) remained independently correlated with CFVR in the DM group. However, we found no correlation between HDL-C level and CFVR in any group. Conclusions Diabetes may contribute to coronary artery disease (CAD) by inducing dysfunction of the coronary artery endothelium. Increased LDL-C level may adversely impair coronary endothelial function in DM. HDL-C may lose its endothelial-protective effects, in part as a result of pathological conditions, especially under abnormal glucose metabolism.

  1. Electrodialytic remediation of harbour sediment in suspension - Evaluation of effects induced by changes in stirring velocity and current density on heavy metal removal and pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2009-01-01

    Electrodialytic remediation was used to remove heavy metals from a suspension of dredged harbour sediment. The studied metals Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd are normally strongly bound in anoxic sediment. Six electrodialytic laboratory remediation experiments were made, lasting 14 days and under oxic conditions....... The influence on the metal removal was investigated by changing current densities and stirring velocity of the sediment suspension. Using a current density of 1.0 mA/cm2 gave the highest metal removal. The sediment suspension was partly oxidised when mixed into a suspension for the electrodialytic remediation...... experiments and was further oxidised during the experiments. Even at low stirring velocities, oxic conditions were obtained. The metal removal was dependent on the achieved pH in the sediment and the highest metal removal and corresponding low pH was obtained by using a current density of 1.0 mA/cm2...

  2. Angular vibration measurement using grating and laser interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Peng, Jun

    2006-06-01

    Primary angular acceleration calibration standard is developed by CIMM to generate standard rotational angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration, which are traceable to the International System of Units (SI). It can be used to calibrate angular transducers, i.e. angular accelerometer, angular velocity transducer, and rotational angle transducer to obtain amplitude sensitivity and phase shift by sinusoidal vibration. The measurement systems based on grating and laser interferometers are introduced in this paper. The measurement system based on PXI bus instrument is used to control the angular exciter, measure the output signal of the laser interferometers and the transducer to be calibrated synchronously. The methods for calculating the amplitude and phase of sinusoidal angular movement are investigated and high performance has been achieved. It shows the standard can be used in angular movement calibration in the frequency range from 0.1Hz to 200Hz.

  3. The role of angular momentum conservation law in statistical mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Dubrovskii

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the limits of Khinchin ideas [A.Y. Khinchin, Mathematical Foundation of Statistical Mechanics. NY, Ed. Dover, 1949] the importance of momentum and angular momentum conservation laws was analyzed for two cases: for uniform magnetic field and when magnetic field is absent. The law of momentum conservation does not change the density of probability distribution in both cases, just as it is assumed in the conventional theory. It is shown that in systems where the kinetic energy depends only on particle momenta canonically conjugated with Cartesian coordinates being their diagonal quadric form,the angular momentum conservation law changes the density of distribution of the system only in case the full angular momentum of a system is not equal to zero. In the gas of charged particles in a uniform magnetic field the density of distribution also varies if the angular momentum is zero [see Dubrovskii I.M., Condensed Matter Physics, 2206, 9, 23]. Two-dimensional gas of charged particles located within a section of an endless strip filled with gas in magnetic field is considered. Under such conditions the angular momentum is not conserved. Directional particle flows take place close to the strip boundaries, and, as a consequence, the phase trajectory of the considered set of particles does not remain within the limited volume of the phase space. In order to apply a statistical thermodynamics method, it was suggested to consider near-boundary trajectories relative to a reference system that moves uniformly. It was shown that if the diameter of an orbit having average thermal energy is much smaller than a strip width, the corrections to thermodynamic functions are small depending on magnetic field. Only the average velocity of near-boundary particles that form near-boundary electric currents creating the paramagnetic moment turn out to be essential.

  4. Charge density deposited in silicon by high velocity heavy ions. Densite de charges deposees par des ions lourds a haute vitesse dans le silicium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidiella, G.; Patin, Y. (CEA Centre d' Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (FR)); Touati, A. (Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (FR))

    1989-12-01

    For high velocity collisions, Doubly Differential Cross Sections for target ionisation (the main primary process), are well described by a recent refined theory. This allows ab initio calculation of the structure of the energy deposition in the incident ion track. Such a calculation first developed for radiobiological purpose has been applied to the case of a silicium target. Charge density profiles for various ions are presented here.

  5. Density, porosity, mineralogy, and internal structure of cosmic dust and alteration of its properties during high velocity atmospheric entry

    CERN Document Server

    Kohout, T; Suuronen, J -P; Rochette, P; Hutzler, A; Gattacceca, J; Skála, D D Badjukov R; Böhmová, V; Čuda, J

    2014-01-01

    X-ray microtomography (XMT), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetic hysteresis measurements were used to determine micrometeorite internal structure, mineralogy, crystallography, and physical properties at ~{\\mu}m resolution. The study samples include unmelted, partially melted (scoriaceous) and completely melted (cosmic spherules) micrometeorites. This variety not only allows comparison of the mineralogy and porosity of these three micrometeorite types, but also reveals changes in meteoroid properties during atmospheric entry at various velocities. At low entry velocities, meteoroids do not melt, and their physical properties do not change. The porosity of unmelted micrometeorites varies considerably (0-12%) with one friable example having porosity around 50%. At higher velocities, the range of meteoroid porosity narrows, but average porosity increases (to 16-27%) due to volatile evaporation and partial melting (scoriaceous phase). Metal distribution seems to be mostly unaffected at this stage. At even higher ...

  6. Simultaneously measuring thickness, density, velocity and attenuation of thin layers using V(z,t) data from time-resolved acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Bai, Xiaolong; Yang, Keji; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2015-02-01

    To meet the need of efficient, comprehensive and automatic characterization of the properties of thin layers, a nondestructive method using ultrasonic testing to simultaneously measure thickness, density, sound velocity and attenuation through V(z,t) data, recorded by time-resolved acoustic microscopy is proposed. The theoretical reflection spectrum of the thin layer at normal incidence is established as a function of three dimensionless parameters. The measured reflection spectrum R(θ,ω) is obtained from V(z,t) data and the measured thickness is derived from the signals when the lens is focused on the front and back surface of the thin layer, which are picked up from the V(z,t) data. The density, sound velocity and attenuation are then determined by the measured thickness and inverse algorithm utilizing least squares method to fit the theoretical and measured reflection spectrum at normal incidence. It has the capability of simultaneously measuring thickness, density, sound velocity and attenuation of thin layer in a single V(z,t) acquisition. An example is given for a thin plate immersed in water and the results are satisfactory. The method greatly simplifies the measurement apparatus and procedures, which improves the efficiency and automation for simultaneous measurement of basic mechanical and geometrical properties of thin layers.

  7. Development of a Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Time-Resolved Gas Flow Velocity, Temperature, and Density Measurements in Aerodynamic Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2007-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultiplier tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. An acoustically driven nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements, and an asymmetric oscillating counterflow with unequal enthalpies is studied to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations. Velocity fluctuations are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements and temperature fluctuations are compared with constant current anemometry measurements at the same locations. Time-series and power spectra of the temperature and velocity measurements are presented. A numerical simulation of the light scattering and detection process was developed and compared with experimental data for future use as an experiment design tool.

  8. Comparison of H-mode plasma simulations using toroidal velocity models depending on plasma current density and ion temperature in presence of an ITB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonyarit Chatthong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Two different approaches for predicting plasma toroidal velocity (v are developed and used in self-consistent simulations of H-mode plasmas with the presence of ITB using BALDUR integrated predictive modelling code. In the first approach, the toroidal velocity depends on the plasma current density; while in the second approach the toroidal velocity is directly proportional to the ion temperature. The profile of v is used to calculate the ExB flow shear which is a main mechanism for plasma transport suppression, leading to the ITB formation. In all simulations, the core transport model is a combination of NCLASS neoclassical transport and semi-empirical Mixed Bohm/gyro-Bohm model that includes the ITB effects. The boundary condition is set at top of the pedestal and is estimated using a pedestal model based on a combination of magnetic and flow shear stabilization pedestal width scaling and an infinite-n ballooning pressure gradient. Two toroidal velocity models are used to simulate the time evolution of plasma temperature and density profiles of 10 JET discharges. The root mean square error (RMSE is used to compare simulation results of those 10 JET discharges with experimental data. It is found that RMSE of Ti , Te , ne are 28.1%, 31.8%, and 15.0% for the first toroidal velocity model and 25.5%, 30.2%, and 15.1% for the second toroidal velocity model, respectively. Furthermore, this suite of codes is used to predict the ITER performance under standard type I ELMy H-mode. It is found that the simulation yields formation of a narrow ITB near r/a = 0.7 in the simulation using the current density dependent model and a wide ITB from r/a = 0.5 to 0.8 in the simulation using the ion temperature dependent model. The average of central ion temperature, total fusion power output and alpha power are predicted to be 36 keV, 159 MW and 492 MW for the current density dependent model and 49 keV, 218 MW and 786 MW for the ion temperature dependent

  9. The space density of primordial gas clouds near galaxies and groups and their relation to galactic high-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, MA; Briggs, FH

    2000-01-01

    The Arecibo H I Strip Survey probed the halos of similar to 300 cataloged galaxies and the environments of similar to 14 groups with sensitivity to neutral hydrogen masses greater than or equal to 10(7) M-circle dot. The survey detected no objects with properties resembling the high-velocity clouds

  10. Sorting and quantifying orbital angular momentum of laser beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel tool for sorting the orbital angular momentum and to determine the orbital angular momentum density of laser beams, which is based on the use of correlation filters....

  11. Statistical mechanics of collisionless orbits. IV. Distribution of angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Liliya L R; Wojtak, Radoslaw

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown in previous work that DARKexp, which is a theoretically derived, maximum entropy, one shape parameter model for isotropic collisionless systems, provides very good fits to simulated and observed dark-matter halos. Specifically, it fits the energy distribution, N(E), and the density profiles, including the central cusp. Here, we extend DARKexp N(E) to include the distribution in angular momentum, L^2, for spherically symmetric systems. First, we argue, based on theoretical, semi-analytical, and simulation results, that while dark-matter halos are relaxed in energy, they are not nearly as relaxed in angular momentum, which precludes using maximum entropy to uniquely derive N(E,L^2). Instead, we require that when integrating N(E,L^2) over squared angular momenta one retrieves the DARKexp N(E). Starting with a general expression for N(E,L^2) we show how the distribution of particles in L^2 is related to the shape of the velocity distribution function, VDF, and velocity anisotropy profile, \\beta(...

  12. An Estimate of Solar Wind Density and Velocity Profiles in a Coronal Hole and a Coronal Streamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzold, M.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Bird, M. K.

    1996-01-01

    Using the total electron content data obtained by the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment (SCE) during the first solar conjunction in summer 1991, two data sets were selected, one associated with a coronal hole and the other associated with coronal streamer crossings. In order to determine coronal streamer density profiles, the electron content of the tracking passes embedded in a coronal streamer were corrected for the contributions from coronal hole densities.

  13. Magnetized galactic halos and velocity lags

    CERN Document Server

    Henriksen, Richard N

    2016-01-01

    We present an analytic model of a magnetized galactic halo surrounding a Mestel gravitating disc. The magnetic field is taken to be in energy equipartition with the pressure dominant rotating halo gas ({\\it not} with the cosmic rays), and the whole system is in a steady state. A more flexible `anisotropic equipartition' model is also explored. A definite pressure law is required to maintain the equilibrium, but the halo density is constant. The velocity/magnetic system is scale-free. The objective is to find the rotational velocity lag in such a halo. The magnetic field is not force-free so that angular momentum may be transported from the halo to the intergalactic medium. We find that the `X'-shaped structure observed for halo magnetic fields can be obtained together with a simple analytic formula for the rate of decline of the velocity with height $z$. The formula also predicts the change in lag with radius, $r$.

  14. Maximum tunneling velocities in symmetric double well potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Manz, Jörn; Schmidt, Burkhard; Yang, Yonggang

    2014-01-01

    We consider coherent tunneling of one-dimensional model systems in non-cyclic or cyclic symmetric double well potentials. Generic potentials are constructed which allow for analytical estimates of the quantum dynamics in the non-relativistic deep tunneling regime, in terms of the tunneling distance, barrier height and mass (or moment of inertia). For cyclic systems, the results may be scaled to agree well with periodic potentials for which semi-analytical results in terms of Mathieu functions exist. Starting from a wavepacket which is initially localized in one of the potential wells, the subsequent periodic tunneling is associated with tunneling velocities. These velocities (or angular velocities) are evaluated as the ratio of the flux densities versus the probability densities. The maximum velocities are found under the top of the barrier where they scale as the square root of the ratio of barrier height and mass (or moment of inertia), independent of the tunneling distance. They are applied exemplarily to ...

  15. Estimation of femoral bone density from trabecular direct wave and cortical guided wave ultrasound velocities measured at the proximal femur in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkmann, Reinhard; Dencks, Stefanie; Bremer, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) of the proximal femur is a predictor of hip fracture risk. We developed a Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) scanner for measurements at this site with similar performance (FemUS). In this study we tested if ultrasound velocities of direct waves through trabecular bone...... echoes reflected from the skin of the leg to yield speed-of-sound (SOS) of different wave components. Data were cross-calibrated and pooled (62 women). Bivariate correlations and a multivariate model were calculated for the estimation of femur BMD. BMD correlated both with trabecular and cortical SOS...

  16. CCharge-multiplicity dependence of single-particle transverse-rapidity $\\bf y_t$ and pseudorapidity $\\bf \\eta$ densities and 2D angular correlations from 200 GeV $p$-$p$ collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Trainor, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    An established phenomenology and theoretical interpretation of $p$-$p$ collision data at lower collision energies should provide a reference for $p$-$p$ and other collision systems at higher energies, against which claims of novel physics may be tested. The description of $p$-$p$ collisions at the relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) has remained incomplete even as claims for collectivity and other novelties in data from smaller systems at the large hadron collider (LHC) have emerged recently. In this study we report the charge-multiplicity dependence of two-dimensional (2D) angular correlations and of single-particle (SP) densities on transverse rapidity $y_t$ and pseudorapidity $\\eta$ from 200 GeV $p$-$p$ collisions. We define a comprehensive and self-consistent two-component (soft + hard) model (TCM) for hadron production and report a significant $p$-$p$ nonjet (NJ) quadrupole component as a third (angular-correlation) component. Our results have implications for $p$-$p$ centrality, the underlying event ...

  17. Space density distribution of galaxies in the absolute magnitude - rotation velocity plane: a volume-complete Tully-Fisher relation from CALIFA stellar kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekeraité, S.; Walcher, C. J.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Garcia Lorenzo, B.; Lyubenova, M.; Sánchez, S. F.; Spekkens, K.; van de Ven, G.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Catalán-Torrecilla, C.; García-Benito, R.

    2016-10-01

    We measured the distribution in absolute magnitude - circular velocity space for a well-defined sample of 199 rotating galaxies of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area Survey (CALIFA) using their stellar kinematics. Our aim in this analysis is to avoid subjective selection criteria and to take volume and large-scale structure factors into account. Using stellar velocity fields instead of gas emission line kinematics allows including rapidly rotating early-type galaxies. Our initial sample contains 277 galaxies with available stellar velocity fields and growth curve r-band photometry. After rejecting 51 velocity fields that could not be modelled because of the low number of bins, foreground contamination, or significant interaction, we performed Markov chain Monte Carlo modelling of the velocity fields, from which we obtained the rotation curve and kinematic parameters and their realistic uncertainties. We performed an extinction correction and calculated the circular velocity vcirc accounting for the pressure support of a given galaxy. The resulting galaxy distribution on the Mr-vcirc plane was then modelled as a mixture of two distinct populations, allowing robust and reproducible rejection of outliers, a significant fraction of which are slow rotators. The selection effects are understood well enough that we were able to correct for the incompleteness of the sample. The 199 galaxies were weighted by volume and large-scale structure factors, which enabled us to fit a volume-corrected Tully-Fisher relation (TFR). More importantly, we also provide the volume-corrected distribution of galaxies in the Mr-vcirc plane, which can be compared with cosmological simulations. The joint distribution of the luminosity and circular velocity space densities, representative over the range of -20 > Mr > -22 mag, can place more stringent constraints on the galaxy formation and evolution scenarios than linear TFR fit parameters or the luminosity function alone. Galaxies main

  18. NIHAO project II: halo shape, phase-space density and velocity distribution of dark matter in galaxy formation simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsky, Iryna; Macciò, Andrea V.; Dutton, Aaron A.; Wang, Liang; Obreja, Aura; Stinson, Greg S.; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W.; Wadsley, James

    2016-10-01

    We use the NIHAO (Numerical Investigation of Hundred Astrophysical Objects) cosmological simulations to study the effects of galaxy formation on key properties of dark matter (DM) haloes. NIHAO consists of ≈90 high-resolution smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that include (metal-line) cooling, star formation, and feedback from massive stars and supernovae, and cover a wide stellar and halo mass range: 106 ≲ M*/M⊙ ≲ 1011(109.5 ≲ Mhalo/M⊙ ≲ 1012.5). When compared to DM-only simulations, the NIHAO haloes have similar shapes at the virial radius, Rvir, but are substantially rounder inside ≈0.1Rvir. In NIHAO simulations, c/a increases with halo mass and integrated star formation efficiency, reaching ˜0.8 at the Milky Way mass (compared to 0.5 in DM-only), providing a plausible solution to the long-standing conflict between observations and DM-only simulations. The radial profile of the phase-space Q parameter (ρ/σ3) is best fit with a single power law in DM-only simulations, but shows a flattening within ≈0.1Rvir for NIHAO for total masses M > 1011 M⊙. Finally, the global velocity distribution of DM is similar in both DM-only and NIHAO simulations, but in the solar neighbourhood, NIHAO galaxies deviate substantially from Maxwellian. The distribution is more symmetric, roughly Gaussian, with a peak that shifts to higher velocities for Milky Way mass haloes. We provide the distribution parameters which can be used for predictions for direct DM detection experiments. Our results underline the ability of the galaxy formation processes to modify the properties of DM haloes.

  19. The relation between gas density and velocity power spectra in galaxy clusters: high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations and the role of conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspari, M; Nagai, D; Lau, E T; Zhuravleva, I

    2014-01-01

    Exploring the ICM power spectrum can help us to probe the physics of galaxy clusters. Using high-resolution 3D plasma simulations, we study the statistics of the velocity field and its relation with the thermodynamic perturbations. The normalization of the ICM spectrum (density, entropy, or pressure) is linearly tied to the level of large-scale motions, which excite both gravity and sound waves due to stratification. For low 3D Mach number M~0.25, gravity waves mainly drive entropy perturbations, traced by preferentially tangential turbulence. For M>0.5, sound waves start to significantly contribute, passing the leading role to compressive pressure fluctuations, associated with isotropic turbulence (or a slight radial bias). Density and temperature fluctuations are then characterized by the dominant process: isobaric (low M), adiabatic (high M), or isothermal (strong conduction). Most clusters reside in the intermediate regime, showing a mixture of gravity and sound waves, hence drifting towards isotropic vel...

  20. Analytic representations of high-altitude auroral H^+ and O^+ densities, flow velocities and temperatures in terms of drivers for incorporation into global magnetospheric models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, James; Zeng, Wen

    2008-10-01

    As new methods of describing multiple fluid species and other advances enhance the capability of global magnetospheric models to simulate the dynamics of multiple ion species, they also allow more accurate incorporation of ionospheric plasma outflows as source populations into these large scale models. Here, we shall describe the distilled results of numerous physics-based simulations of ionospheric plasma outflows influenced by auroral driving agents in terms of compact analytic expressions in terms of precipitation electron energy flux levels, characteristic energy levels of the precipitating electrons, the peak spectral wave densities for low-frequency electrostatic waves which transversely heat ionospheric ions, and solar zenith angle. The simulations are conducted with the UT Arlington Dynamic Fluid Kinetic (DyFK) ionospheric plasma transport code. We present these analytic expressions for ionospheric origin O^+ and H^+ densities, temperatures and field-aligned flow velocities at the 3 RE altitude inner boundaries of typical magnetospheric models.

  1. Angular Rate Sensor Joint Kinematics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory W. Hall

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available High speed rotary motion of complex joints were quantified with triaxial angular rate sensors. Angular rate sensors were mounted to rigid links on either side of a joint to measure angular velocities about three orthogonal sensor axes. After collecting the data, the angular velocity vector of each sensor was transformed to local link axes and integrated to obtain the incremental change in angular position for each time step. Using the angular position time histories, a transformation matrix between the reference frame of each link was calculated. Incremental Eulerian rotations from the transformation matrix were calculated using an axis system defined for the joint. Summation of the incremental Eulerian rotations produced the angular position of the joint in terms of the standard axes. This procedure is illustrated by applying it to joint motion of the ankle, the spine, and the neck of crash dummies during impact tests. The methodology exhibited an accuracy of less than 5% error, improved flexibility over photographic techniques, and the ability to examine 3-dimensional motion.

  2. Mathematical modeling of velocity and number density profiles of particles across the flame propagation through a micro-iron dust cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidabadi, Mehdi; Haghiri, Ali; Rahbari, Alireza

    2010-04-15

    In this study, an attempt has been made to analytically investigate the concentration and velocity profiles of particles across flame propagation through a micro-iron dust cloud. In the first step, Lagrangian particle equation of motion during upward flame propagation in a vertical duct is employed and then forces acting upon the particle, such as thermophoretic force (resulted from the temperature gradient), gravitation and buoyancy are introduced; and consequently, the velocity profile as a function of the distance from the leading edge of the combustion zone is extracted. In the resumption, a control volume above the leading edge of the combustion zone is considered and the change in the particle number density in this control volume is obtained via the balance of particle mass fluxes passing through it. This study explains that the particle concentration at the leading edge of the combustion zone is more than the particle agglomeration in a distance far from the flame front. This increase in the particle aggregation above the combustion zone has a remarkable effect on the lower flammability limits of combustible particle cloud. It is worth noticing that the velocity and particle concentration profiles show a reasonable compatibility with the experimental data.

  3. CLASH-VLT: The mass, velocity-anisotropy, and pseudo-phase-space density profiles of the z=0.44 galaxy cluster MACS 1206.2-0847

    CERN Document Server

    Biviano, A; Balestra, I; Mercurio, A; Girardi, M; Nonino, M; Grillo, C; Scodeggio, M; Lemze, D; Kelson, D; Umetsu, K; Postman, M; Zitrin, A; Czoske, O; Ettori, S; Lombardi, M; Maier, C; Medezinski, E; Mei, S; Presotto, V; Tozzi, P; Ziegler, B; Annunziatella, M; Bartelmann, M; Benitez, N; Bradley, L; Brescia, M; Broadhurst, T; Coe, D; Demarco, R; Donahue, M; Ford, H; Gobat, R; Graves, G; Koekemoer, A; Kuchner, U; Melchior, P; Meneghetti, M; Merten, J; Moustakas, L; Munari, E; Regos, E; Sartoris, B; Seitz, S; Zheng, W

    2013-01-01

    We use an unprecedented data-set of about 600 redshifts for cluster members, obtained as part of a VLT/VIMOS large programme, to constrain the mass profile of the z=0.44 cluster MACS J1206.2-0847 over the radial range 0-5 Mpc (0-2.5 virial radii) using the MAMPOSSt and Caustic methods. We then add external constraints from the gravitational lensing analysis of Umetsu et al. (2012). We invert the Jeans equation to obtain the velocity-anisotropy profiles of cluster members. With the mass-density and velocity-anisotropy profiles we then obtain the first determination of a cluster pseudo-phase-space density profile. The kinematics and lensing determinations of the cluster mass profile are in excellent agreement. This is very well fitted by a NFW model with mass M200=(1.4 +- 0.2) 10^15 Msun and concentration c200=6 +- 1, only slightly higher than theoretical expectations. Other mass profile models also provide acceptable fits to our data, of (slightly) lower (Burkert, Hernquist, and Softened Isothermal Sphere) or ...

  4. Comparison of size, terminal fall velocity, and density of bighead carp, silver carp, and grass carp eggs for use in drift modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Amy E.; Garcia, Tatiana; Chapman, Duane C.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive Asian carp established in the United States spawn in the turbulent water of rivers, and their eggs and early larvae develop while drifting in the current. The eggs, which are believed to perish if they settle before hatching, are slightly denser than water and are held in suspension by water turbulence. It is possible to use egg drift modeling to assess the capability of a river to support the survival of Asian carp eggs. Detection of spawning and estimation of egg abundance in the drift are typically assessed by ichthyoplankton trawls. Correct sampling design and interpretation of trawl data require knowledge of the vertical distribution of eggs in the drift, which can be accomplished with particle transport models. Data that are required to populate models of egg drift and vertical distribution include physical properties of assessed rivers and information on egg size, density, and terminal fall velocity, but data on these egg characteristics have not been previously available. Physical characteristics of the eggs are presented as a function of postfertilization time. We recorded mean egg diameter and terminal fall velocity for eggs from each Asian carp species during the first 5 h of development and at approximately 12 and 22 h postfertilization. Eggs of all species reached their maximum size before 4 h. Water-hardened eggs of Silver Carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix and Grass Carp Ctenopharyngodon idella were similarly sized in our trials, and water-hardened eggs of Bighead Carp H. nobilis were the largest. After water hardening, Silver Carp eggs sank slowest, and Bighead Carp eggs sank fastest. For a given species, smaller-diameter eggs generally had faster terminal fall velocities and higher specific gravity than larger eggs. We provide regression models of egg density and diameter for all three species, discuss usage of these data in modeling the drift and dispersion of Asian carp eggs, and discuss implications for egg sampling design.

  5. Multi-Sensor Core Logger (MSCL) P-wave velocity, gamma-ray density, and magnetic susceptibility whole-core logs of sediment cores collected in 2009 offshore from Palos Verdes, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release includes Multi-Sensor Core Logger (MSCL) P-wave velocity, gamma-ray density, and magnetic susceptibility whole-core logs of sediment...

  6. Professional AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Karpov, Valeri

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive guide to AngularJS, Google's open-source client-side framework for app development. Most of the existing guides to AngularJS struggle to provide simple and understandable explanations for more advanced concepts. As a result, some developers who understand all the basic concepts of AngularJS struggle when it comes to building more complex real-world applications. Professional AngularJS provides a thorough understanding of AngularJS, covering everything from basic concepts, such as directives and data binding, to more advanced concepts like transclusion, build systems, and auto

  7. Effects of density and force discretizations on spurious velocities in lattice Boltzmann equation for two-phase flows

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2014-04-28

    Spurious current emerging in the vicinity of phase interfaces is a well-known disadvantage of the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) for two-phase flows. Previous analysis shows that this unphysical phenomenon comes from the force imbalance at discrete level inherited in LBE (Guo et al 2011 Phys. Rev. E 83 036707). Based on the analysis of the LBE free of checkerboard effects, in this work we further show that the force imbalance is caused by the different discretization stencils: the implicit one from the streaming process and the explicit one from the discretization of the force term. Particularly, the total contribution includes two parts, one from the difference between the intrinsically discretized density (or ideal gas pressure) gradient and the explicit ones in the force term, and the other from the explicit discretized chemical potential gradients in the intrinsically discretized force term. The former contribution is a special feature of LBE which was not realized previously.

  8. Compensating effect of sap velocity for stand density leads to uniform hillslope-scale forest transpiration across a steep valley cross-section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Maik; Hassler, Sibylle; Blume, Theresa; Weiler, Markus; Hildebrandt, Anke; Guderle, Marcus; Schymanski, Stan; Kleidon, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Roberts (1983) found that forest transpiration is relatively uniform across different climatic conditions and suggested that forest transpiration is a conservative process compensating for environmental heterogeneity. Here we test this hypothesis at a steep valley cross-section composed of European Beech in the Attert basin in Luxemburg. We use sapflow, soil moisture, biometric and meteorological data from 6 sites along a transect to estimate site scale transpiration rates. Despite opposing hillslope orientation, different slope angles and forest stand structures, we estimated relatively similar transpiration responses to atmospheric demand and seasonal transpiration totals. This similarity is related to a negative correlation between sap velocity and site-average sapwood area. At the south facing sites with an old, even-aged stand structure and closed canopy layer, we observe significantly lower sap velocities but similar stand-average transpiration rates compared to the north-facing sites with open canopy structure, tall dominant trees and dense understorey. This suggests that plant hydraulic co-ordination allows for flexible responses to environmental conditions leading to similar transpiration rates close to the water and energy limits despite the apparent heterogeneity in exposition, stand density and soil moisture. References Roberts, J. (1983). Forest transpiration: A conservative hydrological process? Journal of Hydrology 66, 133-141.

  9. Direct Measurements of the Spatial and Velocity Dependence of the Ion Density Fluctuation Spectrum of a Laboratory Plasma with Two Independent LIF Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Sean; Berumen, Jorge; Chu, Feng; Hood, Ryan; Skiff, Fred

    2014-10-01

    By using two independently tunable lasers, each with its own collection optics and Ar II LIF transition scheme, we are able to investigate plasma ion density fluctuations as a function of not only spatial scales but also as a function of ion velocities as sampled on different points of a single Doppler-broadened spectral emission line. We do this by measuring the two point correlation C (x , v ,x' ,v' , τ) = t . With the current system, the two carriages determine x and x', while the velocities selected by each laser determine v and v'. Using the two lasers to make two point correlations in phase space demonstrates effects that are not fully understood. In this experiment, we explore the striking difference in correlations when, in the past, the particle orbits overlap in space versus when they do not overlap. This is performed on a small cylindrical laboratory plasma with n ~109 cm-3 , Te ~ 5 eV, Ti ~ 0 . 06 , and a 1 kG axial magnetic field. LIF is performed on ions at two locations aligned with the magnetic field line with a viewing volume comparable to the size of the Larmor radius. Results and interpretations from these experiments are presented and discussed. DOE Grant DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  10. On Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinger, J.

    1952-01-26

    The commutation relations of an arbitrary angular momentum vector can be reduced to those of the harmonic oscillator. This provides a powerful method for constructing and developing the properties of angular momentum eigenvectors. In this paper many known theorems are derived in this way, and some new results obtained. Among the topics treated are the properties of the rotation matrices; the addition of two, three, and four angular momenta; and the theory of tensor operators.

  11. Transverse and longitudinal angular momenta of light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y., E-mail: k.bliokh@gmail.com [Center for Emergent Matter Science, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nonlinear Physics Centre, RSPhysE, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Nori, Franco [Center for Emergent Matter Science, RIKEN, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Physics Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2015-08-26

    We review basic physics and novel types of optical angular momentum. We start with a theoretical overview of momentum and angular momentum properties of generic optical fields, and discuss methods for their experimental measurements. In particular, we describe the well-known longitudinal (i.e., aligned with the mean momentum) spin and orbital angular momenta in polarized vortex beams. Then, we focus on the transverse (i.e., orthogonal to the mean momentum) spin and orbital angular momenta, which were recently actively discussed in theory and observed in experiments. First, the recently-discovered transverse spin  angular momenta appear in various structured fields: evanescent waves, interference fields, and focused beams. We show that there are several kinds of transverse spin angular momentum, which differ strongly in their origins and physical properties. We describe extraordinary features of the transverse optical spins and overview recent experiments. In particular, the helicity-independent transverse spin inherent in edge evanescent waves offers robust spin–direction coupling at optical interfaces (the quantum spin Hall effect of light). Second, we overview the transverse orbital angular momenta of light, which can be both extrinsic and intrinsic. These two types of the transverse orbital angular momentum are produced by spatial shifts of the optical beams (e.g., in the spin Hall effect of light) and their Lorentz boosts, respectively. Our review is underpinned by a unified theory of the angular momentum of light based on the canonical momentum and spin densities, which avoids complications associated with the separation of spin and orbital angular momenta in the Poynting picture. It allows us to construct a comprehensive classification of all known optical angular momenta based on their key parameters and main physical properties.

  12. Measuring angular diameter distances of strong gravitational lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Jee, Inh; Suyu, Sherry H

    2014-01-01

    The distance-redshift relation plays a fundamental role in constraining cosmological models. In this paper, we show that measurements of positions and time delays of strongly lensed images of a background galaxy, as well as those of the velocity dispersion and mass profile of a lens galaxy, can be combined to extract the angular diameter distance of the lens galaxy. Physically, as the velocity dispersion and the time delay give a gravitational potential ($GM/r$) and a mass ($GM$) of the lens, respectively, dividing them gives a physical size ($r$) of the lens. Comparing the physical size with the image positions of a lensed galaxy gives the angular diameter distance to the lens. A mismatch between the exact locations at which these measurements are made can be corrected by measuring a local slope of the mass profile. We expand on the original idea put forward by Paraficz and Hjorth, who analyzed singular isothermal lenses, by allowing for an arbitrary slope of a power-law spherical mass density profile, an ex...

  13. Angular momentum in QGP holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett McInnes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The quark chemical potential is one of the fundamental parameters describing the quark–gluon plasma produced by sufficiently energetic heavy-ion collisions. It is not large at the extremely high temperatures probed by the LHC, but it plays a key role in discussions of the beam energy scan programmes at the RHIC and other facilities. On the other hand, collisions at such energies typically (that is, in peripheral collisions give rise to very high values of the angular momentum density. Here we explain that holographic estimates of the quark chemical potential of a rotating sample of plasma can be very considerably improved by taking the angular momentum into account.

  14. Phonons with orbital angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayub, M. K. [Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Shahdra Valley Road, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics, Shahdra Valley Road, Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Mendonca, J. T. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-10-15

    Ion accoustic waves or phonon modes are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collissionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann electrons and inertial ions. For this purpose, we have employed the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of ion density perturbations and discussed its Gaussian beam and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is presented, allowing to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. The energy flux due to phonons is also calculated and the corresponding OAM is derived. Numerically, it is shown that the parameters such as azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and beam waist, strongly modify the profiles of the phonon LG potential. The present results should be helpful in understanding the phonon mode excitations produced by Brillouin backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  15. Sound Velocities and Density of (Mg0.65, Fe0.35)O ferropericlase up to 1.4 Mbar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhang, D.; Zhao, J.; Murphy, C. A.; Wicks, J. K.

    2010-12-01

    The Earth’s lower mantle accounts for more than half of the mass and volume of the planet. Iron is the most abundant transition-metal in the lower mantle, and it is hosted mainly by silicate perovskite, post-perovskite and ferropericlase. The spin-pairing transitions of iron from high-spin (HS) to low-spin (LS) state in ferropericlase have been recognized to affect the density and sound velocities of this second most abundant lower mantle phase (e.g. Speziale et al., 2005; Lin et al., 2005; Lin et al., 2006; Crowhurst et al., 2008; Marquardt et al., 2009; Zhuravlev et al., 2009). High-pressure and high-temperature physical properties of ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O with various iron content are of significant importance for interpreting the seismological structure of the lower mantle in terms of compositional variations and for geodynamic modeling (e.g. Bower et al., 2009). We have determined the elastic and vibrational properties of (Mg0.65Fe0.35)O up to 1.4 Mbar at 300 K using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) and in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in diamond anvil cell at Sector 3 of Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. (Mg0.65Fe0.35)O contains the amount of iron within the estimated range expected for a “pyrolite” lower mantle (e.g. Westrenen et al., 2005; Sinmyo et al., 2008). From the low-energy region of the partial phonon density of states (PDoS), in situ XRD measurements, and our separate equation-of-state study with smaller pressure steps, we derived its shear and compressional velocities up to 1.4 Mbar. From integration of the PDoS, we also obtained Fe-weighted vibrational parameters as a function of pressure for this ferropericlase. Our new data provide fundamental new knowledge about the effects of spin transition and iron content on the density and sound velocities of ferropericlase in a previously uncharted pressure-composition sector. We will synthesize these effects by combining our results with those of

  16. Densities, viscosities, and ultrasonic velocity studies of binary mixtures of trichloromethane with methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, and butan-1-ol at T = (298.15 and 308.15) K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, Ujjan B. [P.G. Department of Physical Chemistry, M.S.G. College, Loknete Vyankatrao Hiray Marg, Malegaon Camp, Maharashtra 423 105 (India); Hiray, Apoorva P. [P.G. Department of Physical Chemistry, M.S.G. College, Loknete Vyankatrao Hiray Marg, Malegaon Camp, Maharashtra 423 105 (India); Sawant, Arun B. [Arts, Science and Commerce College, Nampur 423 204 (India); Hasan, Mehdi [P.G. Department of Physical Chemistry, M.S.G. College, Loknete Vyankatrao Hiray Marg, Malegaon Camp, Maharashtra 423 105 (India)]. E-mail: mihasan@rediffmail.com

    2006-12-15

    Densities, viscosities, and ultrasonic velocities of binary mixtures of trichloromethane with methanol, ethanol, propan-1-ol, and butan-1-ol have been measured over the entire range of composition, at (298.15 and 308.15) K and at atmospheric pressure. From the experimental values of density, viscosity, and ultrasonic velocity, the excess molar volumes (V {sup E}), deviations in viscosity ({delta}{eta}), and deviations in isentropic compressibility ({delta}{kappa} {sub s}) have been calculated. The excess molar volumes, deviations in viscosity and deviations in isentropic compressibility have been fitted to the Redlich-Kister polynomial equation. The Jouyban-Acree model is used to correlate the experimental values of density, viscosity, and ultrasonic velocity.

  17. Configuration of geological domains and geodynamic evolution of the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary off SW Iberia revisited based on seismic velocity and density models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Loriente, Sara; Sallarès, Valentí; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Bartolome, Rafael; Ranero, César

    2015-04-01

    We present a new classification of geological (basement) domains at the Africa-Eurasia plate boundary offshore SW Iberia, together with a regional geodynamic reconstruction spanning from the Mesozoic extension to the Neogene-to-present-day convergence. It is based on seismic velocity and density models along two regional wide-angle seismic transects, one running NW-SE from the Tagus to the Seine abyssal plains, and the other running N-S from S Portugal to the Seine Abyssal Plain, combined with previously available information. The seismic velocity and density structure at the Seine Abyssal Plain and the internal Gulf of Cadiz indicates the presence of a highly heterogeneous oceanic crust, similar to that described in ultra-slow spreading centers, whereas in the Horseshoe and Tagus abyssal plains, the basement structure resembles that of exhumed mantle sections identified in the Northern Atlantic margin. The integration of all this new information allows defining the presence of three oceanic domains off SW Iberia: (1) the Seine Abyssal Plain domain, generated during the first stages of slow seafloor spreading in the NE segment of the Central Atlantic (Early Jurassic); (2) the Gulf of Cadiz domain, made of oceanic crust generated in the Alpine-Tethys spreading system between Iberia and Africa, which was coeval with the formation of the Seine Abyssal Plain domain and lasted up to the North Atlantic continental break-up (Late Jurassic); and (3) the Gorringe Bank domain, mainly made of rocks exhumed from the mantle with little synchronous magmatism, which formed during the first stages of North Atlantic opening (Early Cretaceous). Our models suggest that the Seine Abyssal Plain and Gulf of Cadiz domains are separated by the Lineament South strike-slip fault, whereas the Gulf of Cadiz and Gorringe Bank domains appear to be limited by a deep thrust fault located at the center of the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain, which coincides with the seismicity cluster nucleated in the

  18. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkardt Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of orbital angular momentum based on Wigner distributions are used as a framework to discuss the connection between the Ji definition of the quark orbital angular momentum and that of Jaffe and Manohar. We find that the difference between these two definitions can be interpreted as the change in the quark orbital angular momentum as it leaves the target in a DIS experiment. The mechanism responsible for that change is similar to the mechanism that causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  19. Recurrence of angular cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, S C; Jontell, M; Dahlen, G

    1988-08-01

    The incidence of recurrence of angular cheilitis following a successful antimicrobial treatment was studied in 48 patients. Clinical assessments including a microbial examination were carried out 8 months and 5 yr after termination of treatment. Eighty percent of the patients reported recurrence of their angular cheilitis on one or more occasions during the observation period. Patients with cutaneous disorders associated with dry skin or intraoral leukoplakia had an increased incidence of recrudescence. Neither the presence of denture stomatitis nor the type of microorganisms isolated from the original lesions of angular cheilitis, i.e. Candida albicans and/or Staphylococcus aureus, were associated with the number of recurrences. The present observations indicate that treatment of the majority of patients with angular cheilitis should be considered in a longer perspective than previously supposed, due to the short lasting therapeutic effects of the antimicrobial therapy.

  20. [Malignant angular cheilitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, J; Vázquez, J; Cazenave, A; de la Cruz Mera, A; Argila, F; Aguado, A

    1996-01-01

    A case of chronic angular cheilitis is reported. Candida albicans was isolated repeatedly and the process developed into epitheliomatous carcinoma. The etiopathogenic role of Candida albicans and possible mechanism of action are discussed.

  1. Angular Cheilitis Pada Anak

    OpenAIRE

    Gema Nazriyanti

    2008-01-01

    Angular cheilitis adalah inflamasi akut atau kronis pada sudut mulut yang ditandai dengan adanya flsur-fisur, retak-retak pada sudut bibir, berwarna kemerahan, mengalami ulserasi disertai rasa terbakar, nyeri dan rasa kering pada sudut mulut. Dapat mengenai orang tua, dewasa dan anak-anak. Banyak pendapat yang mengemukakan tentang etiologi dari angular cheilitis, antara lain defisiensi vitamin B kompleks, denture soremouth, defisiensi besi, kebiasaan bernafas melalui mulut, membasahi bib...

  2. Chirality and angular momentum in optical radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, Matt M

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops, in precise quantum electrodynamic terms, photonic attributes of the "optical chirality density", one of several measures long known to be conserved quantities for a vacuum electromagnetic field. The analysis lends insights into some recent interpretations of chiroptical experiments, in which this measure, and an associated chirality flux, have been treated as representing physically distinctive "superchiral" phenomena. In the fully quantized formalism the chirality density is promoted to operator status, whose exploration with reference to an arbitrary polarization basis reveals relationships to optical angular momentum and helicity operators. Analyzing multi-mode beams with complex wave-front structures, notably Laguerre-Gaussian modes, affords a deeper understanding of the interplay between optical chirality and optical angular momentum. By developing theory with due cognizance of the photonic character of light, it emerges that only the spin angular momentum of light is engaged in such...

  3. Electromagnetic Angular Momentum and Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, Kimball A

    2012-01-01

    Recently there have been suggestions that the Lorentz force law is inconsistent with special relativity. This is difficult to understand, since Einstein invented relativity in order to reconcile electrodynamics with mechanics. Here we investigate the momentum of an electric charge and a magnetic dipole in the frame in which both are at rest, and in an infinitesimally boosted frame in which both have a common velocity. We show that for a dipole composed of a magnetic monopole-antimonopole pair the torque is zero in both frames, while if the dipole is a point dipole, the torque is not zero, but is balanced by the rate of change of the angular momentum of the electromagnetic field, so there is no mechanical torque on the dipole.

  4. Relativistic electron ring equilibrium with angular momentum spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croitoru, M.; Grecu, D. (Institutul de Fizica si Inginerie Nucleara, Bucharest (Romania))

    1980-01-01

    The equilibrium properties of a relativistic electron ring are determined by solving in a consistent way the Vlasov-Maxwell equations for a distribution function with an angular momentum spread. In the thin ring approximation there have been deduced general formulae for the electron density and the current density. A general theorem concerning the sharp form in space of the electron density is also obtained for the case of a microcanonical distribution function both in energy and angular momentum.

  5. Measuring the velocity field from type Ia supernovae in an LSST-like sky survey

    CERN Document Server

    Odderskov, Io

    2016-01-01

    With the upcoming sky survey with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope a great sample of type Ia supernovae will be observed, allowing for a precise mapping of the velocity structure of the universe. Since the source of peculiar velocities is variations in the density field, cosmological parameters related to the matter distribution can subsequently be extracted from the velocity power spectrum. One way to quantify this is through the angular power spectrum of radial peculiar velocities on spheres at different redshifts. We investigate how well this observable can be measured, despite the problems caused by areas with no information. To obtain a realistic distribution of supernovae, we create mock supernova catalogs by using a semi-analytical code for galaxy formation on the merger trees extracted from N-body simulations. We measure the cosmic variance in the velocity power spectrum by repeating the procedure many times for differently located observers, and vary different aspects of the analysis, such as the ...

  6. Optical orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Optical orbital angular momentum’. PMID:28069775

  7. Angular shear plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruda, Mitchell C [Tucson, AZ; Greynolds, Alan W [Tucson, AZ; Stuhlinger, Tilman W [Tucson, AZ

    2009-07-14

    One or more disc-shaped angular shear plates each include a region thereon having a thickness that varies with a nonlinear function. For the case of two such shear plates, they are positioned in a facing relationship and rotated relative to each other. Light passing through the variable thickness regions in the angular plates is refracted. By properly timing the relative rotation of the plates and by the use of an appropriate polynomial function for the thickness of the shear plate, light passing therethrough can be focused at variable positions.

  8. Optical orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Babiker, Mohamed; Padgett, Miles J.

    2017-02-01

    We present a brief introduction to the orbital angular momentum of light, the subject of our theme issue and, in particular, to the developments in the 13 years following the founding paper by Allen et al. (Allen et al. 1992 Phys. Rev. A 45, 8185 (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.45.8185)). The papers by our invited authors serve to bring the field up to date and suggest where developments may take us next. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  9. Energy velocity and group velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宇

    1995-01-01

    A new Lagrangian method for studying the relationship between the energy velocity and the group velocity is described. It is proved that under the usual quasistatic electric field, the energy velocity is identical to the group velocity for acoustic waves in anisotropic piezoelectric (or non-piezoelectric) media.

  10. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nádia Aparecida; Netto, José Fillus

    2014-03-17

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  11. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis

    OpenAIRE

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida Jr, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nadia Aparecida; Netto, Jose Fillus

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  12. Angular Accelerating White Light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Shaping XVI, 958104, San Diego, California, United States, 09 August 2015 Angular Accelerating White Light Angela Dudley*a,b, Christian Vetterc , Alexander Szameitc , and Andrew Forbesa,b a CSIR National Laser Centre, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001...

  13. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall.

  14. Physics-based formula representations of high-latitude ionospheric outflows: H+ and O+ densities, flow velocities, and temperatures versus soft electron precipitation, wave-driven transverse heating, and solar zenith angle effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, J. L.; Zeng, W.

    2009-01-01

    Extensive systematic dynamic fluid kinetic (DyFK) model simulations are conducted to obtain advanced simulation-based formula representations of ionospheric outflow parameters, for possible use by global magnetospheric modelers. Under F10.7 levels of 142, corresponding to solar medium conditions, we obtain the H+ and O+ outflow densities, flow velocities, and perpendicular and parallel temperatures versus energy fluxes and characteristic energies of soft electron precipitation, wave spectral densities of ion transverse wave heating, and F region level solar zenith angle in the high-latitude auroral region. From the results of hundreds of DyFK simulations of auroral outflows for ranges of each of these driving agents, we depict the H+ and O+ outflow density and flow velocity parameters at 3 R E altitude at the ends of these 2-h simulation runs in spectrogram form versus various pairs of these influencing parameters. We further approximate these results by various distilled formula representations for the O+ and H+ outflow velocities, densities, and temperatures at 3 R E altitude, as functions of the above indicated four ``driver'' parameters. These formula representations provide insight into the physics of these driven outflows, and may provide a convenient set of tools to set the boundary conditions for ionospheric plasma sources in global magnetospheric simulations.

  15. Velocity profiles in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Grossmann, Siegfried; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    We derive the velocity profiles in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow for the general case of independently rotating cylinders. The theory is based on the Navier-Stokes equations in the appropriate (cylinder) geometry. In particular, we derive the axial and the angular velocity profiles as functions of distance from the cylinder walls and find that both follow a logarithmic profile, with downwards-bending curvature corrections, which are more pronounced for the angular velocity profile as compared to the axial velocity profile, and which strongly increase with decreasing ratio $\\eta$ between inner and outer cylinder radius. In contrast, the azimuthal velocity does not follow a log-law. We then compare the angular and azimuthal velocity profiles with the recently measured profiles in the ultimate state of (very) large Taylor numbers. Though the {\\em qualitative} trends are the same -- down-bending for large wall distances and (properly shifted and non-dimensionalized) angular velocity profile $\\omega^+(r)$...

  16. Coriolis effects are principally caused by gyroscopic angular acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isu, N; Yanagihara, M; Mikuni, T; Koo, J

    1994-07-01

    A cause of nausea evoked by cross-coupled rotation (termed Coriolis stimulus) was determined. Subjects were provided with two types of cross-coupled rotations: neck-forward flexion (Neck Flx) and upper body-forward flexion (Body Flx) during horizontal whole body rotation at a constant angular velocity. These Coriolis stimuli were given alternatively in an experimental sequence, and the severity of the nausea they evoked was compared by the subjects. The results indicated that the same quality of nausea was evoked by a slightly higher angular velocity during Body Flx (100.5 degrees/s) than during Neck Flx (90 degrees/s). While Body Flx generated Coriolis linear acceleration several times larger than Neck Flx, both the stimuli generated a similar magnitude of gyroscopic angular acceleration in this condition. Therefore, it was inferred that the nausea evoked by a Coriolis stimulus is principally caused by gyroscopic angular acceleration.

  17. Relevance of angular momentum conservation in mesoscale hydrodynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Ingo O; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2007-10-01

    The angular momentum is conserved in fluids with a few exceptions such as ferrofluids. However, it can be violated locally in fluid simulations to reduce computational costs. The effects of this violation are investigated using a particle-based simulation method, multiparticle collision dynamics, which can switch on or off angular-momentum conservation. To this end, we study circular Couette flows between concentric and eccentric cylinders, where nonphysical torques due to the lack of the angular-momentum conservation are found whereas the velocity field is not affected. In addition, in simulations of fluids with different viscosities in contact and star polymers in solvent, incorrect angular velocities occur. These results quantitatively agree with the theoretical predictions based on the macroscopic stress tensor.

  18. Maximum tunneling velocities in symmetric double well potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manz, Jörn [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Laser Spectroscopy, Shanxi University, 92, Wucheng Road, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Institut für Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Schild, Axel [Institut für Chemie und Biochemie, Freie Universität Berlin, Takustr. 3, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Schmidt, Burkhard, E-mail: burkhard.schmidt@fu-berlin.de [Institut für Mathematik, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Yang, Yonggang, E-mail: ygyang@sxu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Laser Spectroscopy, Shanxi University, 92, Wucheng Road, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • Coherent tunneling in one-dimensional symmetric double well potentials. • Potentials for analytical estimates in the deep tunneling regime. • Maximum velocities scale as the square root of the ratio of barrier height and mass. • In chemical physics maximum tunneling velocities are in the order of a few km/s. - Abstract: We consider coherent tunneling of one-dimensional model systems in non-cyclic or cyclic symmetric double well potentials. Generic potentials are constructed which allow for analytical estimates of the quantum dynamics in the non-relativistic deep tunneling regime, in terms of the tunneling distance, barrier height and mass (or moment of inertia). For cyclic systems, the results may be scaled to agree well with periodic potentials for which semi-analytical results in terms of Mathieu functions exist. Starting from a wavepacket which is initially localized in one of the potential wells, the subsequent periodic tunneling is associated with tunneling velocities. These velocities (or angular velocities) are evaluated as the ratio of the flux densities versus the probability densities. The maximum velocities are found under the top of the barrier where they scale as the square root of the ratio of barrier height and mass (or moment of inertia), independent of the tunneling distance. They are applied exemplarily to several prototypical molecular models of non-cyclic and cyclic tunneling, including ammonia inversion, Cope rearrangement of semibullvalene, torsions of molecular fragments, and rotational tunneling in strong laser fields. Typical maximum velocities and angular velocities are in the order of a few km/s and from 10 to 100 THz for our non-cyclic and cyclic systems, respectively, much faster than time-averaged velocities. Even for the more extreme case of an electron tunneling through a barrier of height of one Hartree, the velocity is only about one percent of the speed of light. Estimates of the corresponding time scales for

  19. Progress Toward A Very High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (VERIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korendyke, Clarence M.; Vourlidas, A.; Landi, E.; Seely, J.; Klimchuck, J.

    2007-07-01

    Recent imaging at arcsecond (TRACE) and sub-arcsecond (VAULT) spatial resolution clearly show that structures with fine spatial scales play a key role in the physics of the upper solar atmosphere. Both theoretical and observational considerations point to the importance of small spatial scales, impulsive energy release, strong dynamics, and extreme plasma nonuniformity. Fundamental questions regarding the nature, structure, properties and dynamics of loops and filamentary structures in the upper atmosphere have been raised. To address these questions, we are developing a next generation, VEry high angular Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (VERIS) as a sounding rocket instrument. VERIS will obtain the necessary high spatial resolution, high fidelity measurements of plasma temperatures, densities and velocities. With broad simultaneous temperature coverage, the VERIS observations will directly address unresolved issues relating to interconnections of various temperature solar plasmas. VERIS will provide the first ever subarcsecond spectra of transition region and coronal structures. It will do so with a sufficient spectral resolution of to allow centroided Doppler velocity determinations to better than 3 km/s. VERIS uses a novel two element, normal incidence optical design with highly reflective EUV coatings to access a spectral range with broad temperature coverage (0.03-15 MK) and density-sensitive line ratios. Finally, in addition to the spectra, VERIS will simultaneously obtain spectrally pure slot images (10x150 arcsec) in the +/-1 grating orders, which can be combined to make instantaneous line-of-sight velocity maps with 8km/s accuracy over an unprecedented field of view. The VERIS program is beginning the second year of its three year development cycle. All design activities and reviews are complete. Fabrication of all major components has begun. Brassboard electronics cards have been fabricated, assembled and tested. The paper presents the essential scientific

  20. Localizing the Angular Momentum of Linear Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Butcher, Luke M; Hobson, Michael; 10.1103/PhysRevD.86.084012

    2012-01-01

    In a previous article [Phys. Rev. D 82 104040 (2010)], we derived an energy-momentum tensor for linear gravity that exhibited positive energy density and causal energy flux. Here we extend this framework by localizing the angular momentum of the linearized gravitational field, deriving a gravitational spin tensor which possesses similarly desirable properties. By examining the local exchange of angular momentum (between matter and gravity) we find that gravitational intrinsic spin is localized, separately from orbital angular momentum, in terms of a gravitational spin tensor. This spin tensor is then uniquely determined by requiring that it obey two simple physically motivated algebraic conditions. Firstly, the spin of an arbitrary (harmonic-gauge) gravitational plane wave is required to flow in the direction of propagation of the wave. Secondly, the spin tensor of any transverse-traceless gravitational field is required to be traceless. (The second condition ensures that local field redefinitions suffice to ...

  1. Detection of a spinning object using light's orbital angular momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Martin P J; Speirits, Fiona C; Barnett, Stephen M; Padgett, Miles J

    2013-08-01

    The linear Doppler shift is widely used to infer the velocity of approaching objects, but this shift does not detect rotation. By analyzing the orbital angular momentum of the light scattered from a spinning object, we observed a frequency shift proportional to product of the rotation frequency of the object and the orbital angular momentum of the light. This rotational frequency shift was still present when the angular momentum vector was parallel to the observation direction. The multiplicative enhancement of the frequency shift may have applications for the remote detection of rotating bodies in both terrestrial and astronomical settings.

  2. Quantum Heuristics of Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy-Leblond, Jean-Marc

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the quantization of angular momentum components, Heisenberg-type inequalities for their spectral dispersions, and the quantization of the angular momentum modulus, without using operators or commutation relations. (MLH)

  3. Angular dependence of irreversibility field in Y-123 coated tape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuchi, M.; Otabe, E.S.; Matsushita, T.; Kuga, T.; Inoue, M.; Kiss, T.; Iijima, Y.; Kakimoto, K.; Saitoh, T

    2003-10-15

    It is known that the critical current density vs. field angle of an Y-123 coated tape has a broad peak around the field direction normal to the tape surface. In this work, the angular dependencies of the irreversibility field and the critical current density are analytically investigated using the flux creep-flow theory with an assumption of the angular dependence of flux pinning strength, and these results are compared with the experimental results. The angular dependence of flux pinning strength obtained so as to get a good agreement between the experimental and theoretical results suggests an existence of long pinning centers along the c-axis.

  4. Angular cheilitis after tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, R J; Lau, M; Ell, S R

    1999-08-01

    The operation of tonsillectomy requires the oral cavity to be held open mechanically in an unconscious patient, and intra-oral instrumentation to occur. Angular cheilitis may arise as a result of this after operation. This can cause morbidity and delay the re-establishment of a normal diet. The aim of this study was to identify what factors increase the likelihood of developing this problem postoperatively. Sixty patients were randomly selected in a prospective manner. Preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative variables were recorded. The frequency of development of postoperative angular cheilitis was recorded. The prevalence of the condition was related to the prerecorded variables. Parametric analysis showed that the chance of developing angular cheilitis was directly related to the use of diathermy haemostasis (P = 0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio of developing this complication if diathermy was used is 3.5 (95% confidence intervals 0.99, 12.4) and operation difficulty may also be a relevant variable. No other recorded variables were found to be significant.

  5. 不同角速度下自行车运动员髋关节肌群等速向心收缩的肌力研究%Isokinetic concentric contraction of hip muscle group of cyclists with different angular velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范育飞

    2011-01-01

    With the use of Con -Trex isokinetic strength testing and training system, 13 male cyclists and 13 female cyclists have been tested for their isokinetic concentric contraction of left hip joint with the angular velocity of 180°/s, 120°/s and 60°/ s so as%利用Con—Trex等速肌力测试与训练系统,以180。/s、120。/s、60。/s的3种角速度对13名男子优秀自行车运动员和13名女子优秀自行车运动员左腿髋关节进行等速向心收缩测试。获得了相应的等速向心收缩的伸屈肌峰值力矩、伸屈肌总功、伸屈肌平均功率等指标,并结合项目特点分析各角速度下指标的差异。

  6. The radial velocity dispersion profile of the Galactic halo : constraining the density profile of the dark halo of the Milky Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battaglia, G; Helmi, A; Morrison, H; Harding, P; Olszewski, EW; Mateo, M; Freeman, KC; Norris, J; Shectman, SA

    2005-01-01

    We have compiled a new sample of 240 halo objects with accurate distance and radial velocity measurements, including globular clusters, satellite galaxies, field blue horizontal branch (FHB) stars and red giant stars from the Spaghetti survey. The new data lead to a significant increase in the numbe

  7. The radial velocity dispersion profile of the Galactic halo : constraining the density profile of the dark halo of the Milky Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Battaglia, G; Helmi, A; Morrison, H; Harding, P; Olszewski, EW; Mateo, M; Freeman, KC; Norris, J; Shectman, SA

    2005-01-01

    We have compiled a new sample of 240 halo objects with accurate distance and radial velocity measurements, including globular clusters, satellite galaxies, field blue horizontal branch (FHB) stars and red giant stars from the Spaghetti survey. The new data lead to a significant increase in the numbe

  8. Intracycle Angular Velocity Control of Cross-Flow Turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Strom, Benjamin; Polagye, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Cross-flow turbines, also known as vertical-axis turbines, have numerous features that make them attractive for wind and marine renewable energy. To maximize power output, the turbine blade kinematics may be controlled during the course of the blade revolution, thus optimizing the unsteady fluid dynamic forces. Dynamically pitching the blades, similar to blade control in a helicopter, is an established method. However, this technique adds undesirable mechanical complexity to the turbine, increasing cost and reducing durability. Here we introduce a novel alternative requiring no additional moving parts: we optimize the turbine rotation rate as a function of blade position resulting in motion (including changes in the effective angle of attack) that is precisely timed to exploit unsteady fluid effects. We demonstrate experimentally that this approach results in a 79% increase in power output over industry standard control methods. Analysis of the fluid forcing and blade kinematics show that maximal power is ach...

  9. Angular momentum in cluster Spherical Collapse Model

    CERN Document Server

    Cupani, Guido; Mardirossian, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Our new formulation of the Spherical Collapse Model (SCM-L) takes into account the presence of angular momentum associated with the motion of galaxy groups infalling towards the centre of galaxy clusters. The angular momentum is responsible for an additional term in the dynamical equation which is useful to describe the evolution of the clusters in the non-equilibrium region which is investigated in the present paper. Our SCM-L can be used to predict the profiles of several strategic dynamical quantities as the radial and tangential velocities of member galaxies, and the total cluster mass. A good understanding of the non-equilibrium region is important since it is the natural scenario where to study the infall in galaxy clusters and the accretion phenomena present in these objects. Our results corroborate previous estimates and are in very good agreement with the analysis of recent observations and of simulated clusters.

  10. Angular MET sensor for precise azimuth determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Dmitry; Antonov, Alexander; Krishtop, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes using a MET-based low-noise angular motion sensor to precisely determine azimuth direction in a dynamic-scheme method of measuring Earth's rotation velocity vector. The scheme includes installing a sensor on a rotating platform so that it could scan a space and seek for the position of highest Earth's rotation vector projection on its axis. This method is very efficient provided a low-noise sensor is used. We take a low-cost angular sensor based on MET (molecular electronic transduction) technology. Sensors of this kind were originally developed for the seismic activity monitoring and are well-known for very good noise performance and high sensitivity. This approach, combined with use of special signal processing algorithms, allowed for reaching the accuracy of 0.07° for a measurement time of 200 seconds.

  11. Defining the Spacecraft Angular Position in the Orbital Stabilization Mode from the Angular Rate Sensor Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Oleynik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The spacecraft orientation mode relative to given reference point is implemented using the sensor equipment, which measures the spacecraft angular position relative to given reference coordinate system and the angular rate of the spacecraft rotation relative to inertial space. In case one or another sensor equipment fails, to implement the orientation mode a method for estimating the missing component of the state vector should be developed.This work states a task to estimate a spacecraft angular position vector relative to orbital coordinate system using the measurement readings of an angular rate sensor. This formulation of the research is typically used to build the reserve algorithms of the orbital stabilization.The solution of this problem uses an approach based on the decomposition of the linearized model for the angular motion of the spacecraft and the theory of identification by the method of exact placement of the poles. To maximize the convergence rate of the algorithm we choose a zero of the discrete system eigenvalues.The simulation results proved the efficiency of the resulting algorithm to estimate the angular position of the spacecraft relative to orbital coordinate system. In accordance with the analysis of the computational cost of the algorithm we can conclude that its real-time implementation is possible. This is of great importance when implementing this algorithm in the onboard computer of the spacecraft.This work is a logical continuation of authors’ previous publications. The earlier works investigated the possibility to construct the linear observing devices for nonlinear dynamic systems. There were also solved the problems of building an orbital and inertial orientation, according to the results of a measuring position of the spacecraft relative to specified reference points (Earth, stars when the angular velocity sensor failed.

  12. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. 模拟高空跳伞着陆状态下踝关节动态角速度与垂直反作用力的测定%Measurement of the angular velocity and perpendicular ground reaction force of the ankle joint in parachute landing simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑超; 伍骥; 黄蓉蓉; 崔松超; 文偃伍; 李毅; 吴迪

    2014-01-01

    Objective To measure the angular velocity and perpendicular ground reaction force of the ankle joint under different heights with half-squat jumping in parachute training simulation,providing a reliable experiment basis for the preventing of ankle injury.Methods A total of 18 volunteers participated in this study.The experimental group included 9 male with experience of parachute landing,while the other 9 male without experience of parachute landing were assigned to the control group.Each subject was instructed to jump off a platform with a height of 30 cm and 60 cm and land on a hard surface in a half-squat posture.The dynamic landing process was recorded with a high speed camera and the biomechanical data was collected and analyzed,including perpendicular ground reaction force,angular displacement,velocity and acting time.Results From 30 cm's height,the ankle angular displacement of the control group was significantly larger than the experimental group (25.73°± 8.13° vs 20.05°± 12.27°,P < 0.05).The perpendicular ground reaction force of the control group was significantly smaller than the experimental group (3 372.4±748.6 N vs 5 181.5±1 726.2 N,P < 0.05).The acting time of the control group was significantly longer than the ex perimental group (0.049±0.015 s vs 0.012±0.004 s,P < 0.05).The buffer time of the control group was significantly shorter than the experimental group (1.397±0.746 s vs 1.737±0.451 s,P < 0.05).From 60 cm's height,the ankle angular velocity of the control group was significantly higher than the experimental group (25.45± 15.01 °/s vs 16.51 ±4.18 °/s,P < 0.05).The perpendicular ground reaction force of the control group was significantly smaller than the experimental group (4 616.0±1 124.7 N vs 7 119.5±2 307.4 N,P < 0.05).The acting time of the control group was significantly longer than the experimental group (0.048±0.013 s vs 0.015±0.006 s,P < 0.05).The buffer time of the control group was significantly

  14. AngularJS directives

    CERN Document Server

    Vanston, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This book uses a practical, step-by-step approach, starting with how to build directives from the ground up before moving on to creating web applications comprised of multiple modules all working together to provide the best user experience possible.This book is intended for intermediate JavaScript developers who are looking to enhance their understanding of single-page web application development with a focus on AngularJS and the JavaScript MVC frameworks.It is expected that readers will understand basic JavaScript patterns and idioms and can recognize JSON formatted data.

  15. Improving constraints on the growth rate of structure by modelling the density-velocity cross-correlation in the 6dF Galaxy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Caitlin; Blake, Chris

    2017-10-01

    We present the first simultaneous analysis of the galaxy overdensity and peculiar velocity fields by modelling their cross-covariance. We apply our new maximum-likelihood approach to data from the 6-degree Field Galaxy Survey (6dFGS), which has the largest single collection of peculiar velocities to date. We present a full derivation of the analytic expression for the cross-covariance between the galaxy overdensity and peculiar velocity fields and find direct evidence for a non-zero correlation between the fields on scales up to ∼50 h-1 Mpc. When utilizing the cross-covariance, our measurement of the normalized growth rate of structure is fσ _8(z=0) = 0.424^{+0.067}_{-0.064} (15 per cent precision), and our measurement of the redshift-space distortion parameter is β =0.341^{+0.062}_{-0.058} (18 per cent precision). Both measurements improve by ∼20 per cent compared to only using the autocovariance information. This is consistent with the literature on multiple-tracer approaches, as well as Fisher matrix forecasts and previous analyses of 6dFGS. Our measurement of fσ8 is consistent with the standard cosmological model, and we discuss how our approach can be extended to test alternative models of gravity.

  16. Transverse velocity shifts in protostellar jets: rotation or velocity asymmetries?

    CERN Document Server

    De Colle, Fabio; Riera, Angels

    2016-01-01

    Observations of several protostellar jets show systematic differences in radial velocity transverse to the jet propagation direction, which have been interpreted as evidence of rotation in the jets. In this paper we discuss the origin of these velocity shifts, and show that they could be originated by rotation in the flow, or by side to side asymmetries in the shock velocity, which could be due to asymmetries in the jet ejection velocity/density or in the ambient medium. For typical poloidal jet velocities (~ 100-200 km/s), an asymmetry >~ 10% can produce velocity shifts comparable to those observed. We also present three dimensional numerical simulations of rotating, precessing and asymmetric jets, and show that, even though for a given jet there is a clear degeneracy between these effects, a statistical analysis of jets with different inclination angles can help to distinguish between the alternative origins of transverse velocity shifts. Our analysis indicate that side to side velocities asymmetries could ...

  17. Angular dynamics of small crystals in viscous flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Johan; Einarsson, Jonas; Mehlig, Bernhard

    2016-11-01

    The angular dynamics of a very small ellipsoidal particle in a viscous flow decouples from its translational dynamics, and the particle angular velocity is given by Jeffery's theory. It is known that cuboid particles share these properties. In the literature a special case is most frequently discussed, that of axisymmetric particles, with a continuous rotational symmetry. Here we compute the angular dynamics of crystals that possess a discrete rotational symmetry and certain mirror symmetries, but that do not have a continuous rotational symmetry. We give examples of such particles that nevertheless obey Jeffery's theory. But there are other examples where the angular dynamics is determined by a more general equation of motion. Vetenskapsrådet [Grant Number 2013-3992], Formas [Grant Number 2014-585], "Bottlenecks for particle growth in turbulent aerosols" from the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, Dnr. KAW 2014.0048, MPNS COST Action MP1305 "Flowing matter".

  18. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  19. Long-time tails in angular momentum correlations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowe, C.P.; Frenkel, D.; Masters, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    We compare computer simulation results for the angular velocity autocorrelation function (AVACF) of a colloidal particle with theoretical predictions. We consider both spherical and nonspherical particles in two and three dimensions. The theoretical prediction for the long-time decay of the AVACF in

  20. Ultrasonic velocities, densities, and excess molar volumes of binary mixtures of N,N-dimethyl formamide with methyl acrylate, or ethyl acrylate, or butyl acrylate, or 2-ethyl hexyl acrylate at T = 308.15 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondaiah, M. [Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar 522510, Andhra Pradesh (India); Sravana Kumar, D. [Dr. V.S. Krishna Govt. Degree College, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh (India); Sreekanth, K. [Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar 522510, Andhra Pradesh (India); Krishna Rao, D., E-mail: krdhanekula@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar 522510, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > Positive values of V{sub m}{sup E}, indicate dispersion forces between acrylic esters and DMF. > V{sub m}{sup E} values compared with Redlich-Kister polynomial. > Partial molar volumes data conclude that weak interactions exist in the systems. > Measured velocity values compared with theoretical values obtained by polynomials. - Abstract: Ultrasonic velocities, u, densities, {rho}, of binary mixtures of N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) with methyl acrylate (MA), ethyl acrylate (EA), butyl acrylate (BA), and 2-ethyl hexyl acrylate (EHA), including pure liquids, over the entire composition range have been measured at T = 308.15 K. Using the experimental results, the excess molar volume, V{sub m}{sup E}, partial molar volumes, V-bar {sub m,1}, V-bar{sub m,2}, and excess partial molar volumes, V-bar{sub m,1}{sup E}, V-bar{sub m,2}{sup E} have been calculated. Molecular interactions in the systems have been studied in the light of variation of excess values of calculated properties. The excess properties have been fitted to Redlich-Kister type polynomial and the corresponding standard deviations have been calculated. The positive values of V{sub m}{sup E} indicate the presence of dispersion forces between the DMF and acrylic ester molecules. Further theoretical values of sound velocity in the mixtures have been evaluated using various theories and have been compared with experimental sound velocities to verify the applicability of such theories to the systems studied. Theoretical ultrasonic velocity data have been used to study molecular interactions in the binary systems investigated.

  1. Control of Angular Intervals for Angle-Multiplexed Holographic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Shimidzu, Naoki

    2009-03-01

    In angle-multiplexed holographic memory, the full width at half maximum of the Bragg selectivity curves is dependent on the angle formed between the medium and incident laser beams. This indicates the possibility of high density and high multiplexing number by varying the angular intervals between adjacent holograms. We propose an angular interval scheduling for closely stacking holograms into medium even when the angle range is limited. We obtained bit error rates of the order of 10-4 under the following conditions: medium thickness of 1 mm, laser beam wavelength of 532 nm, and angular multiplexing number of 300.

  2. Demonstrating the Conservation of Angular Momentum Using Model Cars Moving along a Rotating Rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq; Golubovic, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an exciting non-traditional experiment for our introductory physics laboratories to help students to understand the principle of conservation of angular momentum. We used electric toy cars moving along a long rotating rod. As the cars move towards the centre of the rod, the angular velocity of this system increases.…

  3. Mass and Angular Momentum in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Jaramillo, J L

    2010-01-01

    We present an introduction to mass and angular momentum in General Relativity. After briefly reviewing energy-momentum for matter fields, first in the flat Minkowski case (Special Relativity) and then in curved spacetimes with or without symmetries, we focus on the discussion of energy-momentum for the gravitational field. We illustrate the difficulties rooted in the Equivalence Principle for defining a local energy-momentum density for the gravitational field. This leads to the understanding of gravitational energy-momentum and angular momentum as non-local observables that make sense, at best, for extended domains of spacetime. After introducing Komar quantities associated with spacetime symmetries, it is shown how total energy-momentum can be unambiguously defined for isolated systems, providing fundamental tests for the internal consistency of General Relativity as well as setting the conceptual basis for the understanding of energy loss by gravitational radiation. Finally, several attempts to formulate q...

  4. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  5. Angular integrals in d dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somogyi, Gabor

    2011-01-15

    We discuss the evaluation of certain d dimensional angular integrals which arise in perturbative field theory calculations. We find that the angular integral with n denominators can be computed in terms of a certain special function, the so-called H-function of several variables. We also present several illustrative examples of the general result and briefly consider some applications. (orig.)

  6. Velocity centroids as tracers of the turbulent velocity statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A E A

    2004-01-01

    We use the results of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to emulate spectroscopic observations, and produce maps of variations of velocity centroids to study their scaling properties. We compare them with those of the underlying velocity field, and analytic predictions presented in a previous paper (Lazarian & Esquivel 2003). We tested, with success, a criteria for recovering velocity statistics from velocity centroids derived in our previous work. That is, if >> (where S is a 2D map of ``unnormalized'', v velocity, and I integrated intensity map -column density-), then the structure function of the centroids is dominated by the structure function of velocity. We show that it is possible to extract the velocity statistics using centroids for subsonic and mildly supersonic turbulence (e.g. Mach numbers ~2.5). While, towards higher Mach numbers other effects could affect significantly the statistics of centroids.

  7. Phase diagrams, thermodynamic properties and sound velocities derived from a multiple Einstein method using vibrational densities of states: an application to MgO-SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Michael H. G.; Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer; van den Berg, Arie P.

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper, we showed a technique that simplifies Kieffer's lattice vibrational method by representing the vibrational density of states with multiple Einstein frequencies. Here, we show that this technique can be applied to construct a thermodynamic database that accurately represents thermodynamic properties and phase diagrams for substances in the system MgO-SiO2. We extended our technique to derive shear moduli of the relevant phases in this system in pressure-temperature space. For the construction of the database, we used recently measured calorimetric and volumetric data. We show that incorporating vibrational densities of states predicted from ab initio methods into our models enables discrimination between different experimental data sets for heat capacity. We show a general technique to optimize the number of Einstein frequencies in the VDoS, such that thermodynamic properties are affected insignificantly. This technique allows constructing clones of databases from which we demonstrate that the VDoS has a significant effect on heat capacity and entropy, and an insignificant effect on volume properties.

  8. Functional phases and angular momentum characteristics of Tkatchev and Kovacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Gareth; Exell, Timothy A; Manning, Michelle L; Kerwin, David G

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the technical requirements and underlying biomechanics of complex release and re-grasp skills on high bar allows coaches and scientists to develop safe and effective training programmes. The aim of this study was to examine the differences in the functional phases between the Tkatchev and Kovacs skills and to explain how the angular momentum demands are addressed. Images of 18 gymnasts performing 10 Tkatchevs and 8 Kovacs at the Olympic Games were recorded (50 Hz), digitised and reconstructed (3D Direct Linear Transformation). Orientation of the functional phase action, defined by the rapid flexion to extension of the shoulders and extension to flexion of the hips as the performer passed through the lower vertical, along with shoulder and hip angular kinematics, angular momentum and key release parameters (body angle, mass centre velocity and angular momentum about the mass centre and bar) were compared between skills. Expected differences in the release parameters of angle, angular momentum and velocity were observed and the specific mechanical requirement of each skill were highlighted. Whilst there were no differences in joint kinematics, hip and shoulder functional phase were significantly earlier in the circle for the Tkatchev. These findings highlight the importance of the orientation of the functional phase in the preceding giant swing and provide coaches with further understanding of the critical timing in this key phase.

  9. Hypersonic Velocities and Submicrocrack Formation in Ductile Polymers under Uniaxial Tensile Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichijyo, Shiro; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Shirouzu, Shigenori; Matsushige, Kazumi; Takemura, Tetuo

    1984-07-01

    Longitudinal hypersonic sound velocities in two kinds of ductile polymer, polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET), were examined by Brillouin scattering. These two materials exhibited a decrease in hypersonic sound velocity (the softening phenomenon) when stress was applied, but the amount of softening as well as its angular dependence with respect to the stress direction were much smaller than those for a typical brittle polymer, poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Furthermore, a correlation between these acoustic properties and the formation of submicrocracks was demonstrated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements. The difference in the anisotropies in the softening of sound velocity between ductile and brittle polymers is discussed from the viewpoint of the shape and density of the submicrocracks

  10. AngularJS testing cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for developers who have an understanding of the basic principles behind both AngularJS and test-driven development. You, as a developer, are interested in eliminating the fear related to either introducing tests to an existing codebase or starting out testing on a fresh AngularJS application. If you're a team leader or part of a QA team with the responsibility of ensuring full test coverage of an application, then this book is ideal for you to comprehend the full testing scope required by your developers. Whether you're new to or are well versed with AngularJS, this book

  11. Angular processes related to Cauchy random walks

    CERN Document Server

    Cammarota, Valemtina

    2011-01-01

    We study the angular process related to random walks in the Euclidean and in the non-Euclidean space where steps are Cauchy distributed. This leads to different types of non-linear transformations of Cauchy random variables which preserve the Cauchy density. We give the explicit form of these distributions for all combinations of the scale and the location parameters. Continued fractions involving Cauchy random variables are analyzed. It is shown that the $n$-stage random variables are still Cauchy distributed with parameters related to Fibonacci numbers. This permits us to show the convergence in distribution of the sequence to the golden ratio.

  12. Non Axisymmetric Relativistic Wind Accretion with Velocity Gradients onto a Rotating Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz-Osorio, A

    2016-01-01

    We model, for the first time, the Bondi-Hoyle accretion of a fluid with velocity gradients onto a Kerr black hole, by numerically solving the fully relativistic hydrodynamics equations. Specifically, we consider a supersonic ideal gas, which has velocity gradients perpendicular to the relative motion. We measure the mass and specific angular accretion rates to illustrate whether the fluid presents unstable patterns or not. The initial parameters, we consider in this work, are the velocity gradient $\\epsilon_{v}$, the black hole spin $a$, the asymptotic Mach number ${\\cal M}_{\\infty}$ and adiabatic index $\\Gamma$. We show that the flow accretion reaches a fairly stationary regime, unlike in the Newtonian case, where significant fluctuations of the mass and angular momentum accretion rates are found. On the other hand, we consider a special case where both density and velocity gradients of the fluid are taken into account. The spin of the black hole and the asymptotic Newtonian Mach number, for this case, are $...

  13. Visual control of walking velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Matthieu; Morice, Antoine H P; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Montagne, Gilles

    2011-06-01

    Even if optical correlates of self-motion velocity have already been identified, their contribution to the control of displacement velocity remains to be established. In this study, we used a virtual reality set-up coupled to a treadmill to test the role of both Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) and Edge Rate (ER) in the regulation of walking velocity. Participants were required to walk at a constant velocity, corresponding to their preferred walking velocity, while eye height and texture density were manipulated. This manipulation perturbed the natural relationship between the actual walking velocity and its optical specification by GOFR and ER, respectively. Results revealed that both these sources of information are indeed used by participants to control walking speed, as demonstrated by a slowing down of actual walking velocity when the optical specification of velocity by either GOFR or ER gives rise to an overestimation of actual velocity, and vice versa. Gait analyses showed that these walking velocity adjustments result from simultaneous adaptations in both step length and step duration. The role of visual information in the control of self-motion velocity is discussed in relation with other factors.

  14. Toward a self-consistent pressure scale: elastic moduli and equation of state of MgO by simultaneous x-ray density and Brillouin sound velocity measurements at high-pressure high-temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinogeikin, S. V.; Lakshtanov, D. L.; Prakapenka, V. B.; Sanchez-Valle, C.; Wang, J.; Chen, B.; Shen, G.; Bass, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Accurate phase diagrams and PVT equations of state (EOS) of materials strongly depend on the PVT calibrations of standard materials (e.g. MgO, NaCl, Au, Pt), which currently do not predict identical pressures at the same experimental conditions. MgO is commonly used as a pressure standard in a variety of high pressure and high- temperature experiments. Despite being one of the simplest and most studied materials, its accurate EOS is still uncertain, especially at high PT. The direct way of obtaining a self consistent pressure scale is by measuring acoustic velocities (Vp and Vs) and density simultaneously. Such P-V-T-Vp-Vs measurements allow one to determine the pressure directly, without resort to a separate calibration standard. Recently, as part of a major COMPRES initiative, we have constructed a Brillouin spectrometer at GSECARS, APS (13-BM-D) which allows accurate simultaneous sound velocity and lattice parameter measurements at high pressures and high temperatures. Such measurements were performed on single crystal MgO at simultaneously high pressures (up to 30 GPa) and high temperatures (up to 873K) in diamond cells with Ne or Ar as pressure medium. At each PT point we measured the unit cell parameters and the acoustic velocities of MgO in several crystallographic directions, and directly obtained all three single crystal elastic moduli, as well as isotropic adiabatic bulk (KS) and shear (μ) moduli. Unit cell parameters of pressure medium (Ne, Ar) and additional pressure calibrants (Au, Pt, NaCl) were measured at each PT for cross calibration. The results of these experiments and implications for a self consistent P-V-T(-Vp-Vs) pressure scale will be presented and discussed.

  15. Toward a self-consistent pressure scale: elastic moduli and equation of state of MgO and Ringwoodite by simultaneous x-ray density and Brillouin sound velocity measurements at high-pressure high-temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinogeikin, S.; Lakshtanov, D.; Prakapenka, V.; Sanchez-Valle, C.; Wang, J.; Shen, G.; Bass, J.

    2009-05-01

    Accurate phase diagrams and PVT equations of state (EOS) of materials strongly depend on the PVT calibrations of standard materials (e.g. MgO, NaCl, Au, Pt), which currently do not predict identical pressures at the same experimental conditions. MgO is commonly used as a pressure standard in a variety of high pressure and high-temperature experiments. Despite being one of the simplest and most studied materials, its accurate EOS is still uncertain, especially at high PT. The direct way of obtaining a self consistent pressure scale is by measuring acoustic velocities (Vp and Vs) and density simultaneously. Such P-V-T-Vp-Vs measurements allow one to determine the pressure directly, without resort to a separate calibration standard. Recently, as part of a major COMPRES initiative, we have constructed a Brillouin spectrometer at GSECARS, APS (13-BM-D) which allows accurate simultaneous sound velocity and lattice parameter measurements at high pressures and high temperatures. Such measurements were performed on single crystal MgO at simultaneously high pressures (up to 30 GPa) and high temperatures (up to 873K) in diamond cells. At each PT point we measured the unit cell parameters and the acoustic velocities of MgO in several crystallographic directions, and directly obtained all three single crystal elastic moduli, as well as isotropic adiabatic bulk (Ks) and shear (μ) moduli. Unit cell parameters of pressure medium (Ne, Ar) and additional pressure calibrants (Au, Pt, NaCl) were measured at each PT for cross calibration. In addition we demonstrate that successful P-V-T-Vp-Vs measurements can be performed on certain polycrystalline materials, e.g. Ringwoodite (γ-Mg2SiO4). The results of these experiments and implications for a self consistent P-V-T(-Vp-Vs) pressure scale will be presented and discussed.

  16. Inertial Measurements Based Velocity-free Attitude Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Tayebi, A; Benallegue, A

    2012-01-01

    The existing attitude controllers (without angular velocity measurements) involve explicitly the orientation (\\textit{e.g.,} the unit-quaternion) in the feedback. Unfortunately, there does not exist any sensor that directly measures the orientation of a rigid body, and hence, the attitude must be reconstructed using a set of inertial vector measurements as well as the angular velocity (which is assumed to be unavailable in velocity-free control schemes). To overcome this \\textit{circular reasoning}-like problem, we propose a velocity-free attitude stabilization control scheme relying solely on inertial vector measurements. The originality of this control strategy stems from the fact that the reconstruction of the attitude as well as the angular velocity measurements are not required at all. Moreover, as a byproduct of our design approach, the proposed controller does not lead to the unwinding phenomenon encountered in unit-quaternion based attitude controllers.

  17. Identifying galaxy candidates in WSRT HI imaging of ultra-compact high velocity clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Elizabeth A K; Cannon, John M; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) were identified in the ALFALFA HI survey as potential gas-bearing dark matter halos. Here we present higher resolution neutral hydrogen (HI) observations of twelve UCHVCS with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). The UCHVCs were selected based on a combination of size, isolation, large recessional velocity and high column density as the best candidate dark matter halos. The WSRT data were tapered to image the UCHVCs at 210" (comparable to Arecibo) and 105" angular resolution. In a comparison of the single-dish to interferometer data, we find that the line flux recovered in the WSRT observations is comparable to that from the single-dish ALFALFA data. In addition, any structure seen in the ALFALFA data is reproduced in the WSRT maps at the same angular resolution. At 210'" resolution all the sources are generally compact with a smooth HI morphology, as expected from their identification as UCHVCs. At the higher angular resolution, a majority of the source...

  18. Angular response of hot wire probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Mare, L.; Jelly, T. O.; Day, I. J.

    2017-03-01

    A new equation for the convective heat loss from the sensor of a hot-wire probe is derived which accounts for both the potential and the viscous parts of the flow past the prongs. The convective heat loss from the sensor is related to the far-field velocity by an expression containing a term representing the potential flow around the prongs, and a term representing their viscous effect. This latter term is absent in the response equations available in the literature but is essential in representing some features of the observed response of miniature hot-wire probes. The response equation contains only four parameters but it can reproduce, with great accuracy, the behaviour of commonly used single-wire probes. The response equation simplifies the calibration the angular response of rotated slanted hot-wire probes: only standard King’s law parameters and a Reynolds-dependent drag coefficient need to be determined.

  19. Cirrus Crystal Terminal Velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Iaquinta, Jean

    2000-04-01

    Cirrus crystal terminal velocities are of primary importance in determining the rate of transport of condensate from upper- to middle-tropospheric levels and profoundly influence the earth's radiation balance through their effect on the rate of buildup or decay of cirrus clouds. In this study, laboratory and field-based cirrus crystal drag coefficient data, as well as analytical descriptions of cirrus crystal shapes, are used to derive more physically based expressions for the velocities of cirrus crystals than have been available in the past.Polycrystals-often bullet rosettes-are shown to be the dominant crystal types in synoptically generated cirrus, with columns present in varying but relatively large percentages, depending on the cloud. The two critical parameters needed to calculate terminal velocity are the drag coefficient and the ratio of mass to cross-sectional area normal to their fall direction. Using measurements and calculations, it is shown that drag coefficients from theory and laboratory studies are applicable to crystals of the types found in cirrus. The ratio of the mass to area, which is shown to be relatively independent of the number of bullets in the rosette, is derived from an analytic model that represents bullet rosettes containing one to eight bullets in 19 primary geometric configurations. The ratio is also derived for columns. Using this information, a general set of equations is developed to calculate the terminal velocities and masses in terms of the aspect ratio (width divided by length), ice density, and rosette maximum dimension. Simple expressions for terminal velocity and mass as a function of bullet rosette maximum dimension are developed by incorporating new information on bullet aspect ratios.The general terminal velocity and mass relations are then applied to a case from the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Research Experiment (FIRE) 2, when size spectra from a balloon-borne ice crystal

  20. Heat transport in Rayleigh-Bénard convection and angular momentum transport in Taylor-Couette flow: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauckmann, Hannes J.; Eckhardt, Bruno; Schumacher, Jörg

    2017-03-01

    Rayleigh-Bénard convection and Taylor-Couette flow are two canonical flows that have many properties in common. We here compare the two flows in detail for parameter values where the Nusselt numbers, i.e. the thermal transport and the angular momentum transport normalized by the corresponding laminar values, coincide. We study turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in air at Rayleigh number Ra=107 and Taylor-Couette flow at shear Reynolds number ReS=2×104 for two different mean rotation rates but the same Nusselt numbers. For individual pairwise related fields and convective currents, we compare the probability density functions normalized by the corresponding root mean square values and taken at different distances from the wall. We find one rotation number for which there is very good agreement between the mean profiles of the two corresponding quantities temperature and angular momentum. Similarly, there is good agreement between the fluctuations in temperature and velocity components. For the heat and angular momentum currents, there are differences in the fluctuations outside the boundary layers that increase with overall rotation and can be related to differences in the flow structures in the boundary layer and in the bulk. The study extends the similarities between the two flows from global quantities to local quantities and reveals the effects of rotation on the transport.

  1. Kriging Interpolating Cosmic Velocity Field

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Yu; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-01-01

    [abridge] Volume-weighted statistics of large scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in mass-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number $n_k$ of the nearby particles to interpolate and the density $n_P$ of the observed sample are investigated. (1) We find that Kriging induces $1\\%$ and $3\\%$ systematics at $k\\sim 0.1h{\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$ when $n_P\\sim 6\\times 10^{-2} ({\\rm Mpc}/h)^{-3}$ and $n_P\\sim 6\\times 10^{-3} ({\\rm Mpc...

  2. The Origin of Angular Momentum in Dark Matter Halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitvitska, Maya; Klypin, Anatoly A.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Primack, Joel R.; Bullock, James S.

    2002-12-01

    We propose a new explanation for the origin of angular momentum in galaxies and their dark halos, in which the halos obtain their spin through the cumulative acquisition of angular momentum from satellite accretion. In our model, the buildup of angular momentum is a random walk process associated with the mass assembly history of the halo's major progenitor. We assume no correlation between the angular momenta of accreted objects. The main role of tidal torques in this approach is to produce the random tangential velocities of merging satellites. Using the extended Press-Schechter approximation, we calculate the growth of mass, angular momentum, and spin parameter λ for many halos. Our random walk model reproduces the key features of the angular momentum of halos found in ΛCDM N-body simulations: a lognormal distribution in λ with an average of ~0.045 and dispersion σλ=0.56, independent of mass and redshift. The evolution of the spin parameter in individual halos in this model is quite different from the steady increase with time of angular momentum in the tidal torque picture. We find both in N-body simulations and in our random walk model that the value of λ changes significantly with time for a halo's major progenitor. It typically has a sharp increase due to major mergers and a steady decline during periods of gradual accretion of small satellites. The model predicts that, on average, the λ of ~1012 Msolar halos that had major mergers after redshift z=3 should be substantially larger than the λ of those that did not. Perhaps surprisingly, this suggests that halos that host later forming elliptical galaxies should rotate faster than halos of spiral galaxies.

  3. An angular momentum conserving Affine-Particle-In-Cell method

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Chenfanfu; Teran, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We present a new technique for transferring momentum and velocity between particles and grid with Particle-In-Cell (PIC) calculations which we call Affine-Particle-In-Cell (APIC). APIC represents particle velocities as locally affine, rather than locally constant as in traditional PIC. We show that this representation allows APIC to conserve linear and angular momentum across transfers while also dramatically reducing numerical diffusion usually associated with PIC. Notably, conservation is achieved with lumped mass, as opposed to the more commonly used Fluid Implicit Particle (FLIP) transfers which require a 'full' mass matrix for exact conservation. Furthermore, unlike FLIP, APIC retains a filtering property of the original PIC and thus does not accumulate velocity modes on particles as FLIP does. In particular, we demonstrate that APIC does not experience velocity instabilities that are characteristic of FLIP in a number of Material Point Method (MPM) hyperelasticity calculations. Lastly, we demonstrate th...

  4. Instant AngularJS starter

    CERN Document Server

    Menard, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks. This book is written in an easytoread style, with a strong emphasis on realworld, practical examples. Stepbystep explanations are provided for performing important tasks.This book is for web developers familiar with JavascriptIt doesn't cover the history of AngularJS, and it's not a pitch to convince you that AngularJS is the best framework on the entire web. It's a guide to help you learn everything you need to know about AngularJS in as few pa

  5. Angular momentum in human walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Hugh; Popovic, Marko

    2008-02-01

    Angular momentum is a conserved physical quantity for isolated systems where no external moments act about a body's center of mass (CM). However, in the case of legged locomotion, where the body interacts with the environment (ground reaction forces), there is no a priori reason for this relationship to hold. A key hypothesis in this paper is that angular momentum is highly regulated throughout the walking cycle about all three spatial directions [|Lt| approximately 0], and therefore horizontal ground reaction forces and the center of pressure trajectory can be explained predominantly through an analysis that assumes zero net moment about the body's CM. Using a 16-segment human model and gait data for 10 study participants, we found that calculated zero-moment forces closely match experimental values (Rx2=0.91; Ry2=0.90). Additionally, the centroidal moment pivot (point where a line parallel to the ground reaction force, passing through the CM, intersects the ground) never leaves the ground support base, highlighting how closely the body regulates angular momentum. Principal component analysis was used to examine segmental contributions to whole-body angular momentum. We found that whole-body angular momentum is small, despite substantial segmental momenta, indicating large segment-to-segment cancellations ( approximately 95% medio-lateral, approximately 70% anterior-posterior and approximately 80% vertical). Specifically, we show that adjacent leg-segment momenta are balanced in the medio-lateral direction (left foot momentum cancels right foot momentum, etc.). Further, pelvis and abdomen momenta are balanced by leg, chest and head momenta in the anterior-posterior direction, and leg momentum is balanced by upper-body momentum in the vertical direction. Finally, we discuss the determinants of gait in the context of these segment-to-segment cancellations of angular momentum.

  6. Massive star formation by accretion. II. Rotation: how to circumvent the angular momentum barrier?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haemmerlé, L.; Eggenberger, P.; Meynet, G.; Maeder, A.; Charbonnel, C.; Klessen, R. S.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Rotation plays a key role in the star-formation process, from pre-stellar cores to pre-main-sequence (PMS) objects. Understanding the formation of massive stars requires taking into account the accretion of angular momentum during their PMS phase. Aims: We study the PMS evolution of objects destined to become massive stars by accretion, focusing on the links between the physical conditions of the environment and the rotational properties of young stars. In particular, we look at the physical conditions that allow the production of massive stars by accretion. Methods: We present PMS models computed with a new version of the Geneva Stellar Evolution code self-consistently including accretion and rotation according to various accretion scenarios for mass and angular momentum. We describe the internal distribution of angular momentum in PMS stars accreting at high rates and we show how the various physical conditions impact their internal structures, evolutionary tracks, and rotation velocities during the PMS and the early main sequence. Results: We find that the smooth angular momentum accretion considered in previous studies leads to an angular momentum barrier and does not allow the formation of massive stars by accretion. A braking mechanism is needed in order to circumvent this angular momentum barrier. This mechanism has to be efficient enough to remove more than two thirds of the angular momentum from the inner accretion disc. Due to the weak efficiency of angular momentum transport by shear instability and meridional circulation during the accretion phase, the internal rotation profiles of accreting stars reflect essentially the angular momentum accretion history. As a consequence, careful choice of the angular momentum accretion history allows circumvention of any limitation in mass and velocity, and production of stars of any mass and velocity compatible with structure equations.

  7. Velocity profiles in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossmann, S.; Lohse, D.; Sun, C.

    2014-01-01

    We derive the velocity profiles in strongly turbulent Taylor-Couette flow for the general case of independently rotating cylinders. The theory is based on the Navier-Stokes equations in the appropriate (cylinder) geometry. In particular, we derive the axial and the angular velocity profiles as funct

  8. Zebra tape identification for the instantaneous angular speed computation and angular resampling of motorbike valve train measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivola, Alessandro; Troncossi, Marco

    2014-02-01

    An experimental test campaign was performed on the valve train of a racing motorbike engine in order to get insight into the dynamic of the system. In particular the valve motion was acquired in cold test conditions by means of a laser vibrometer able to acquire displacement and velocity signals. The valve time-dependent measurements needed to be referred to the camshaft angular position in order to analyse the data in the angular domain, as usually done for rotating machines. To this purpose the camshaft was fitted with a zebra tape whose dark and light stripes were tracked by means of an optical probe. Unfortunately, both manufacturing and mounting imperfections of the employed zebra tape, resulting in stripes with slightly different widths, precluded the possibility to directly obtain the correct relationship between camshaft angular position and time. In order to overcome this problem, the identification of the zebra tape was performed by means of the original and practical procedure that is the focus of the present paper. The method consists of three main steps: namely, an ad-hoc test corresponding to special operating conditions, the computation of the instantaneous angular speed, and the final association of the stripes with the corresponding shaft angular position. The results reported in the paper demonstrate the suitability of the simple procedure for the zebra tape identification performed with the final purpose to implement a computed order tracking technique for the data analysis.

  9. Angular Momentum in Disk Wind Revealed in the Young Star MWC 349A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Claus, Brian; Watson, Linda; Moran, James

    2017-03-01

    Disk winds are thought to play a critical role in star birth. As winds extract excess angular momentum from accretion disks, matter in the disk can be transported inward to the star to fuel mass growth. However, observational evidence of wind carrying angular momentum has been very limited. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations of the young star MWC 349A in the H26α and H30α recombination lines. The high signal-to-noise ratios made possible by the maser emission process allow us to constrain the relative astrometry of the maser spots to milli-arcsecond precision. Previous observations of the H30α line with the SMA and the Plateau de Bure interferometer (PdBI) showed that masers are distributed in the disk and wind. Our new high-resolution observations of the H26α line reveal differences in spatial distribution from that of the H30α line. H26α line masers in the disk are excited in a thin annulus with a radius of about 25 au, while the H30α line masers are formed in a slightly larger annulus with a radius of 30 au. This is consistent with expectations for maser excitation in the presence of an electron density variation of approximately R ‑4. In addition, the H30α and H26α line masers arise from different parts in the wind. This difference is also expected from maser theory. The wind component of both masers exhibits line-of-sight velocities that closely follow a Keplerian law. This result provides strong evidence that the disk wind extracts significant angular momentum, thereby facilitating mass accretion in the young star.

  10. Gravitomagnetism and Angular Momenta of Black-Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Samuel Berman

    2006-01-01

    We review the energy contents formulae of Kerr-Newman black-holes, where gravitomagnetic energy term comes to play(Berman, 2006; 2006a; 2004). Then, we obtain the angular momenta formulae, which include the gravitomagnetic effect. Three theorems can be enunciated: (1) No black-hole has its energy confined to its interior; (2) Rotating black-holes do not have confined angular momenta; (3) The energy density of a black-hole is not confined to its interior. The difference between our calculation...

  11. Olympic Wrestling and Angular Momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carle, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Reported is the use of a wrestling photograph in a noncalculus introductory physics course. The photograph presents a maneuver that could serve as an example for a discussion on equilibrium, forces, torque, and angular motion. Provided are some qualitative thoughts as well as quantitative calculations. (YP)

  12. Characterization of the Bell-Shaped Vibratory Angular Rate Gyro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfang Fan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The bell-shaped vibratory angular rate gyro (abbreviated as BVG is a novel shell vibratory gyroscope, which is inspired by the Chinese traditional bell. It sensitizes angular velocity through the standing wave precession effect. The bell-shaped resonator is a core component of the BVG and looks like the millimeter-grade Chinese traditional bell, such as QianLong Bell and Yongle Bell. It is made of Ni43CrTi, which is a constant modulus alloy. The exciting element, control element and detection element are uniformly distributed and attached to the resonator, respectively. This work presents the design, analysis and experimentation on the BVG. It is most important to analyze the vibratory character of the bell-shaped resonator. The strain equation, internal force and the resonator's equilibrium differential equation are derived in the orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. When the input angular velocity is existent on the sensitive axis, an analysis of the vibratory character is performed using the theory of thin shells. On this basis, the mode shape function and the simplified second order normal vibration mode dynamical equation are obtained. The coriolis coupling relationship about the primary mode and secondary mode is established. The methods of the signal processing and control loop are presented. Analyzing the impact resistance property of the bell-shaped resonator, which is compared with other shell resonators using the Finite Element Method, demonstrates that BVG has the advantage of a better impact resistance property. A reasonable means of installation and a prototypal gyro are designed. The gyroscopic effect of the BVG is characterized through experiments. Experimental results show that the BVG has not only the advantages of low cost, low power, long work life, high sensitivity, and so on, but, also, of a simple structure and a better impact resistance property for low and medium angular velocity measurements.

  13. Reconstruction of density and wave velocity from reflection and transmission data%利用透射和反射数据反演声波传播的介质密度和波速

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏京勋; 刘继军

    2005-01-01

    研究点源作用下线性波动方程多个系数的反演问题,其中介质密度ρ(z) 和波速c(z)为待求量.通过波动方程的特征理论,利用点源产生的反射数据和透射数据,建立了同时反演密度ρ(z)和波速c(z)的封闭积分系统.与已有的结果相比,本文求解反问题是直接在深度变量z而非传输时间变量x下进行的,因此更有助于结果的物理解释.%Consider an inverse problem of reconstructing the coefficient in a linear wave equation on an inhomogeneous slab with density ρ(z) and wave velocity c(z).The inversion input information is the reflection and transmission data corresponding to a point source.By applying the characteristic theory for hyperbolic equations,we establish an integral system from which ρ(z) and c(z) can be recovered simultaneously.In contrast to some known results,our inverse approach is carried out for depth variable,rather than for travel-time variable.Therefore inversion results in this paper are more appropriate for the physical interpretation of a medium slab.

  14. New relativistic Hamiltonian: the angular magnetoelectric coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, Charles; Mondal, Ritwik; Berritta, Marco; Dkhil, Brahim; Singh, Surendra; Oppeneer, Peter M.; Bellaiche, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    Spin-Orbit Coupling (SOC) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in the spintronics area, as it plays a major role in allowing for enhancing many well-known phenomena, such as the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the Rashba effect, etc. However, the usual expression of the SOC interaction ħ/4m2c2 [E×p] • σ (1) where p is the momentum operator, E the electric field, σ the vector of Pauli matrices, breaks the gauge invariance required by the electronic Hamiltonian. On the other hand, very recently, a new phenomenological interaction, coupling the angular momentum of light and magnetic moments, has been proposed based on symmetry arguments: ξ/2 [r × (E × B)] M, (2) with M the magnetization, r the position, and ξ the interaction strength constant. This interaction has been demonstrated to contribute and/or give rise, in a straightforward way, to various magnetoelectric phenomena,such as the anomalous Hall effect (AHE), the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), the planar Hall effect and Rashba-like effects, or the spin-current model in multiferroics. This last model is known to be the origin of the cycloidal spin arrangement in bismuth ferrite for instance. However, the coupling of the angular momentum of light with magnetic moments lacked a fundamental theoretical basis. Starting from the Dirac equation, we derive a relativistic interaction Hamiltonian which linearly couples the angular momentum density of the electromagnetic (EM) field and the electrons spin. We name this coupling the Angular MagnetoElectric (AME) coupling. We show that in the limit of uniform magnetic field, the AME coupling yields an interaction exactly of the form of Eq. (2), thereby giving a firm theoretical basis to earlier works. The AME coupling can be expressed as: ξ [E × A] • σ (3) with A being the vector potential. Interestingly, the AME coupling was shown to be complementary to the traditional SOC, and together they restore the gauge invariance of the

  15. Angular Spacing Control for Segmented Data Pages in Angle-Multiplexed Holographic Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Nobuhiro; Muroi, Tetsuhiko; Ishii, Norihiko; Kamijo, Koji; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Shimidzu, Naoki; Ando, Toshio; Masaki, Kazuyoshi; Shimizu, Takehiro

    2011-09-01

    To improve the recording density of angle-multiplexed holographic memory, it is effective to increase the numerical aperture of the lens and to shorten the wavelength of the laser source as well as to increase the multiplexing number. The angular selectivity of a hologram, which determines the multiplexing number, is dependent on the incident angle of not only the reference beam but also the signal beam to the holographic recording medium. The actual signal beam, which is a convergent or divergent beam, is regarded as the sum of plane waves that have different propagation directions, angular selectivities, and optimal angular spacings. In this paper, focusing on the differences in the optimal angular spacing, we proposed a method to control the angular spacing for each segmented data page. We investigated the angular selectivity of a hologram and crosstalk for segmented data pages using numerical simulation. The experimental results showed a practical bit-error rate on the order of 10-3.

  16. The large-scale angular correlations in CMB temperature maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bernui, A

    2005-01-01

    Observations show that the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) contains tiny variations at the 10^{-5} level around its black-body equilibrium temperature. The detection of these temperature fluctuations provides to modern Cosmology evidence for the existence of primordial density perturbations that seeded all the structures presently observed. The vast majority of the cosmological information is contained in the 2-point temperature function, which measures the angular correlation of these temperature fluctuations distributed on the celestial sphere. Here we study such angular correlations using a recently introduced statistic-geometrical method. Moreover, we use Monte Carlo simulated CMB temperature maps to show the equivalence of this method with the 2-point temperature function (best known as the 2-Point Angular Correlation Function). We also investigate here the robustness of this new method under possible divisions of the original catalog-data in sub-catalogs. Finally, we show some applications of this new...

  17. Probing angular momentum coherence in a twin-atom interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    de Carvalho, Carlos R; Impens, François; Robert, J; Medina, Aline; Zappa, F; Faria, N V de Castro

    2014-01-01

    We propose to use a double longitudinal Stern-Gerlach atom interferometer in order to investigate quantitatively the angular momentum coherence of molecular fragments. Assuming that the dissociated molecule has a null total angular momentum, we investigate the propagation of the corresponding atomic fragments in the apparatus. We show that the envisioned interferometer enables one to distinguish unambiguously a spin-coherent from a spin-incoherent dissociation, as well as to estimate the purity of the angular momentum density matrix associated with the fragments. This setup, which may be seen as an atomic analogue of a twin-photon interferometer, can be used to investigate the suitability of molecule dissociation processes -- such as the metastable hydrogen atoms H($2^2 S$)-H($2^2 S$) dissociation - for coherent twin-atom optics.

  18. Kriging interpolating cosmic velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Jing, Yipeng; Zhang, Pengjie

    2015-10-01

    Volume-weighted statistics of large-scale peculiar velocity is preferred by peculiar velocity cosmology, since it is free of the uncertainties of galaxy density bias entangled in observed number density-weighted statistics. However, measuring the volume-weighted velocity statistics from galaxy (halo/simulation particle) velocity data is challenging. Therefore, the exploration of velocity assignment methods with well-controlled sampling artifacts is of great importance. For the first time, we apply the Kriging interpolation to obtain the volume-weighted velocity field. Kriging is a minimum variance estimator. It predicts the most likely velocity for each place based on the velocity at other places. We test the performance of Kriging quantified by the E-mode velocity power spectrum from simulations. Dependences on the variogram prior used in Kriging, the number nk of the nearby particles to interpolate, and the density nP of the observed sample are investigated. First, we find that Kriging induces 1% and 3% systematics at k ˜0.1 h Mpc-1 when nP˜6 ×1 0-2(h-1 Mpc )-3 and nP˜6 ×1 0-3(h-1 Mpc )-3 , respectively. The deviation increases for decreasing nP and increasing k . When nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 , a smoothing effect dominates small scales, causing significant underestimation of the velocity power spectrum. Second, increasing nk helps to recover small-scale power. However, for nP≲6 ×1 0-4(h-1 Mpc )-3 cases, the recovery is limited. Finally, Kriging is more sensitive to the variogram prior for a lower sample density. The most straightforward application of Kriging on the cosmic velocity field does not show obvious advantages over the nearest-particle method [Y. Zheng, P. Zhang, Y. Jing, W. Lin, and J. Pan, Phys. Rev. D 88, 103510 (2013)] and could not be directly applied to cosmology so far. However, whether potential improvements may be achieved by more delicate versions of Kriging is worth further investigation.

  19. Angular Momentum of Twisted Radiation from an Electron in Spiral Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Katoh, M; Kawaguchi, H; Tsuchiya, K; Ohmi, K; Kaneyasu, T; Taira, Y; Hosaka, M; Mochihashi, A; Takashima, Y

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrate for the first time that a single free electron in circular/spiral motion emits twisted photons carrying well defined orbital angular momentum along the axis of the electron circulation, in adding to spin angular momentum. We show that, when the electron velocity is relativistic, the radiation field contains harmonic components and the photons of l-th harmonic carry lhbar total angular momentum for each. This work indicates that twisted photons are naturally emitted by free electrons and more ubiquitous in laboratories and in nature than ever been thought.

  20. Angular Motion Estimation Using Dynamic Models in a Gyro-Free Inertial Measurement Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otmar Loffeld

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we summarize the results of using dynamic models borrowed from tracking theory in describing the time evolution of the state vector to have an estimate of the angular motion in a gyro-free inertial measurement unit (GF-IMU. The GF-IMU is a special type inertial measurement unit (IMU that uses only a set of accelerometers in inferring the angular motion. Using distributed accelerometers, we get an angular information vector (AIV composed of angular acceleration and quadratic angular velocity terms. We use a Kalman filter approach to estimate the angular velocity vector since it is not expressed explicitly within the AIV. The bias parameters inherent in the accelerometers measurements’ produce a biased AIV and hence the AIV bias parameters are estimated within an augmented state vector. Using dynamic models, the appended bias parameters of the AIV become observable and hence we can have unbiased angular motion estimate. Moreover, a good model is required to extract the maximum amount of information from the observation. Observability analysis is done to determine the conditions for having an observable state space model. For higher grades of accelerometers and under relatively higher sampling frequency, the error of accelerometer measurements is dominated by the noise error. Consequently, simulations are conducted on two models, one has bias parameters appended in the state space model and the other is a reduced model without bias parameters.

  1. Optimal simulations of ultrasonic fields produced by large thermal therapy arrays using the angular spectrum approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaozheng; McGough, Robert J

    2009-05-01

    The angular spectrum approach is evaluated for the simulation of focused ultrasound fields produced by large thermal therapy arrays. For an input pressure or normal particle velocity distribution in a plane, the angular spectrum approach rapidly computes the output pressure field in a three dimensional volume. To determine the optimal combination of simulation parameters for angular spectrum calculations, the effect of the size, location, and the numerical accuracy of the input plane on the computed output pressure is evaluated. Simulation results demonstrate that angular spectrum calculations performed with an input pressure plane are more accurate than calculations with an input velocity plane. Results also indicate that when the input pressure plane is slightly larger than the array aperture and is located approximately one wavelength from the array, angular spectrum simulations have very small numerical errors for two dimensional planar arrays. Furthermore, the root mean squared error from angular spectrum simulations asymptotically approaches a nonzero lower limit as the error in the input plane decreases. Overall, the angular spectrum approach is an accurate and robust method for thermal therapy simulations of large ultrasound phased arrays when the input pressure plane is computed with the fast nearfield method and an optimal combination of input parameters.

  2. AngularJS test-driven development

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This book is for developers who want to learn about AngularJS development by applying testing techniques. You are assumed to have a basic knowledge and understanding of HTML, JavaScript, and AngularJS.

  3. Large-scale power-spectrum from peculiar velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Kolatt, T S; Kolatt, Tsafrir; Dekel, Avishai

    1995-01-01

    The power spectrum (PS) of {\\it mass} density fluctuations, in the range 0.05 \\leq k \\leq 0.2 \\ihmpc, is derived from the Mark III catalog of peculiar velocities of galaxies, independent of ``biasing". It is computed from the density field as recovered by POTENT with Gaussian smoothing of 12\\hmpc, within a sphere of radius \\sim 60 \\hmpc about the Local Group. The density is weighted inversely by the errors. The PS is corrected for the effects of smoothing, random errors, and sparse sampling within a finite volume, using mock catalogs that mimic in detail the Mark III catalog and the dynamics of our cosmological neighborhood. The mock catalogs are also used for error analysis. The value of the mass PS at k = 0.1 \\ihmpc is (4.6 \\pm 1.4) \\times 10^3 \\Omega^{-1.2} \\3hmpc, and the local logarithmic slope is -1.45 \\pm 0.5. This translates to \\sigma_8 \\Omega^{0.6} \\simeq 0.7-0.8, depending on where the PS peak is. Direct comparisons of the mass PS with the galaxy PS derived from different redshift and angular survey...

  4. Magnetogasdynamic shock wave generated by a moving piston in a rotational axisymmetric isothermal flow of perfect gas with variable density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.

    2011-05-01

    The propagation of a strong cylindrical shock wave in an ideal gas with azimuthal magnetic field, and with or without axisymmetric rotational effects, is investigated. The shock wave is driven out by a piston moving with time according to power law. The ambient medium is assumed to have radial, axial and azimuthal component of fluid velocities. The fluid velocities, the initial density and the initial magnetic field of the ambient medium are assumed to be varying and obey power laws. Solutions are obtained, when the flow between the shock and the piston is isothermal. The gas is assumed to have infinite electrical conductivity and the angular velocity of the ambient medium is assumed to be decreasing as the distance from the axis increases. It is expected that such an angular velocity may occur in the atmospheres of rotating planets and stars. The shock wave moves with variable velocity and the total energy of the wave is non-constant. The effects of variation of the initial density and the Alfven-Mach number on the flow-field are obtained. A comparison is also made between rotating and non-rotating cases.

  5. AngularJS web application development

    CERN Document Server

    Darwin, Peter Bacon

    2013-01-01

    The book will be a step-by-step guide showing the readers how to build a complete web app with AngularJSJavaScript developers who want to learn AngularJS for developing web apps. Knowledge of JavaScript and HTML is expected. No knowledge of AngularJS is required.

  6. Statistics of Centroids of Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, A

    2009-01-01

    We review the use of velocity centroids statistics to recover information of interstellar turbulence from observations. Velocity centroids have been used for a long time now to retrieve information about the scaling properties of the turbulent velocity field in the interstellar medium. We show that, while they are useful to study subsonic turbulence, they do not trace the statistics of velocity in supersonic turbulence, because they are highly influenced by fluctuations of density. We show also that for sub-Alfv\\'enic turbulence (both supersonic and subsonic) two-point statistics (e.g. correlation functions or power-spectra) are anisotropic. This anisotropy can be used to determine the direction of the mean magnetic field projected in the plane of the sky.

  7. Angular Momentum Transport in Quasi-Keplerian Accretion Disks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prasad Subramanian; B. S. Pujari; Peter A. Becker

    2004-03-01

    We reexamine arguments advanced by Hayashi & Matsuda (2001), who claim that several simple, physically motivated derivations based on mean free path theory for calculating the viscous torque in a quasi-Keplerian accretion disk yield results that are inconsistent with the generally accepted model. If correct, the ideas proposed by Hayashi & Matsuda would radically alter our understanding of the nature of the angular momentum transport in the disk, which is a central feature of accretion disk theory. However, in this paper we point out several fallacies in their arguments and show that there indeed exists a simple derivation based on mean free path theory that yields an expression for the viscous torque that is proportional to the radial derivative of the angular velocity in the accretion disk, as expected. The derivation is based on the analysis of the epicyclic motion of gas parcels in adjacent eddies in the disk.

  8. Optical angular momentum in classical electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2017-06-01

    Invoking Maxwell’s classical equations in conjunction with expressions for the electromagnetic (EM) energy, momentum, force, and torque, we use a few simple examples to demonstrate the nature of the EM angular momentum. The energy and the angular momentum of an EM field will be shown to have an intimate relationship; a source radiating EM angular momentum will, of necessity, pick up an equal but opposite amount of mechanical angular momentum; and the spin and orbital angular momenta of the EM field, when absorbed by a small particle, will be seen to elicit different responses from the particle.

  9. Dependency injection with AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Knol, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This book is a practical, hands-on approach to using dependency injection and implementing test-driven development using AngularJS. Dependency Injection with AngularJS is aimed at developers who are aware of AngularJS but need to get started with using it in real life applications. Also, developers who want to get into test-driven development with AngularJS can use this book as practical guide. Even if you know about dependency injection, it can serve as a good reference on how it is used within AngularJS. Readers are expected to have some experience with JavaScript.

  10. Laboratory modeling of standing shocks and radiatively cooled jets with angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Ampleford, D J; Ciardi, A; Bland, S N; Bott, S C; Hall, G N; Naz, N; Jennings, C A; Sherlock, M; Chittenden, J P; Palmer, J B A; Frank, A; Blackman, E

    2007-01-01

    The first laboratory astrophysics experiments to produce a radiatively cooled plasma jet with dynamically significant angular momentum are discussed. A new configuration of wire array z-pinch, the twisted conical wire array, is used to produce convergent plasma flows each rotating about the central axis. Collision of the flows produces a standing shock and jet that each have supersonic azimuthal velocities. By varying the twist angle of the array, the rotation velocity of the system can be controlled, with jet rotation velocities ~18% of the propagation velocity directly measured.

  11. Optical refraction in silver: counterposition, negative phase velocity and orthogonal phase velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, Qaisar A [Department of Electronics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Mackay, Tom G [School of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Lakhtakia, Akhlesh, E-mail: nqaisar@yahoo.com, E-mail: T.Mackay@ed.ac.uk, E-mail: akhlesh@psu.edu [NanoMM-Nanoengineered Metamaterials Group, Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Complex behaviour associated with metamaterials can arise even in commonplace isotropic dielectric materials. We demonstrate how silver, for example, can support negative phase velocity and counterposition, but not negative refraction, at optical frequencies. The transition from positive to negative phase velocity is not accompanied by remarkable changes in the Abraham and Minkowski momentum densities. In particular, orthogonal phase velocity is associated with nonzero Abraham and Minkowski momentum densities.

  12. AngularJS lietotnes migrācija uz Angular

    OpenAIRE

    Andrucis, Edgars

    2017-01-01

    Darbā tiek aprakstītas un apkopotas dažādas stratēģijas un pieejas “AngularJS” projektu migrācijai uz jauno “Angular” ietvaru. Tai skaitā dažādi migrāciju priekšdarbi un stratēģijas, kā lielā sprādziena migrācijas stratēģija un inkrementālā migrācijas stratēģija. Šīs stratēģijas tiek novērtētas aprakstot to trūkumus un priekšrocības. Balstoties uz tā, darba autors veica tīmekļa pieteikumu formu “AngularJS” lietotnes migrāciju uz jauno “Angular” ietvaru. Pēc kā tas novērtēja apkopoto informāci...

  13. The cosmic web and the orientation of angular momenta

    CERN Document Server

    Libeskind, Noam I; Knebe, Alexander; Steinmetz, Matthias; Gottlöber, Stefan; Metuki, Ofer; Yepes, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    We use a 64$h^{-1}$Mpc dark matter (DM) only cosmological simulation to examine the large scale orientation of haloes and substructures with respect the cosmic web. A web classification scheme based on the velocity shear tensor is used to assign to each halo in the simulation a web type: knot, filament, sheet or void. Using $\\sim10^6$ haloes that span ~3 orders of magnitude in mass the orientation of the halo's spin and the orbital angular momentum of subhaloes with respect to the eigenvectors of the shear tensor is examined. We find that the orbital angular momentum of subhaloes tends to align with the intermediate eigenvector of the velocity shear tensor for all haloes in knots, filaments and sheets. This result indicates that the kinematics of substructures located deep within the virialized regions of a halo is determined by its infall which in turn is determined by the large scale velocity shear, a surprising result given the virilaized nature of haloes. The non-random nature of subhalo accretion is thus...

  14. Two-axis angular effector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Robinett, III, Rush D. (Tijeras, NM); Phelan, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Van Zuiden, Don M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation.

  15. Two-axis angular effector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, M.R.; Robinett, R.D. III; Phelan, J.R.; Zuiden, D.M. Van

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors is described. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation. 11 figs.

  16. The tetrahexahedric angular Calogero model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Francisco [Centro de Estudios Científicos (CECs),Casilla 1468, Valdivia (Chile); Institut für Theoretische Physik and Riemann Center for Geometry and Physics,Leibniz Universität Hannover,Appelstraße 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Lechtenfeld, Olaf [Institut für Theoretische Physik and Riemann Center for Geometry and Physics,Leibniz Universität Hannover,Appelstraße 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2015-10-28

    The spherical reduction of the rational Calogero model (of type A{sub n−1} and after removing the center of mass) is considered as a maximally superintegrable quantum system, which describes a particle on the (n−2)-sphere subject to a very particular potential. We present a detailed analysis of the simplest non-separable case, n=4, whose potential is singular at the edges of a spherical tetrahexahedron. A complete set of independent conserved charges and of Hamiltonian intertwiners is constructed, and their algebra is elucidated. They arise from the ring of polynomials in Dunkl-deformed angular momenta, by classifying the subspaces invariant and antiinvariant under all Weyl reflections, respectively.

  17. Variable Distance Angular Symbology Reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F., Jr. (Inventor); Corder, Eric L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A variable distance angular symbology, reader utilizes at least one light source to direct light through a beam splitter and onto a target. A target may be angled relative to the impinging light beam up to and maybe even greater than 45deg. A reflected beam from the target passes through the beam splitter and is preferably directed 90deg relative to the light source through a telecentric lens to a scanner which records an image of the target such as a direct part marking code.

  18. In vivo maximal fascicle-shortening velocity during plantar flexion in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauraix, Hugo; Nordez, Antoine; Guilhem, Gaël; Rabita, Giuseppe; Dorel, Sylvain

    2015-12-01

    Interindividual variability in performance of fast movements is commonly explained by a difference in maximal muscle-shortening velocity due to differences in the proportion of fast-twitch fibers. To provide a better understanding of the capacity to generate fast motion, this study aimed to 1) measure for the first time in vivo the maximal fascicle-shortening velocity of human muscle; 2) evaluate the relationship between angular velocity and fascicle-shortening velocity from low to maximal angular velocities; and 3) investigate the influence of musculo-articular features (moment arm, tendinous tissues stiffness, and muscle architecture) on maximal angular velocity. Ultrafast ultrasound images of the gastrocnemius medialis were obtained from 31 participants during maximal isokinetic and light-loaded plantar flexions. A strong linear relationship between fascicle-shortening velocity and angular velocity was reported for all subjects (mean R(2) = 0.97). The maximal shortening velocity (V(Fmax)) obtained during the no-load condition (NLc) ranged between 18.8 and 43.3 cm/s. V(Fmax) values were very close to those of the maximal shortening velocity (V(max)), which was extrapolated from the F-V curve (the Hill model). Angular velocity reached during the NLc was significantly correlated with this V(Fmax) (r = 0.57; P < 0.001). This finding was in agreement with assumptions about the role of muscle fiber type, whereas interindividual comparisons clearly support the fact that other parameters may also contribute to performance during fast movements. Nevertheless, none of the biomechanical features considered in the present study were found to be directly related to the highest angular velocity, highlighting the complexity of the upstream mechanics that lead to maximal-velocity muscle contraction.

  19. Angular dynamics of a small particle in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Candelier, F; Mehlig, B

    2016-01-01

    We compute the angular dynamics of a neutrally buoyant nearly spherical particle immersed in an unsteady fluid. We assume that the particle is small, that its translational slip velocity is negligible, and that unsteady and convective inertia are small perturbations. We derive an approximation for the torque on the particle that determines the first inertial corrections to Jeffery's equation. These corrections arise as a consequence of local vortex stretching, and can be substantial in turbulence where local vortex stretching is strong and closely linked to the irreversibility of turbulence.

  20. Angular Rate Optimal Design for the Rotary Strapdown Inertial Navigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the characteristics of high precision for a long duration, the rotary strapdown inertial navigation system (RSINS has been widely used in submarines and surface ships. Nowadays, the core technology, the rotating scheme, has been studied by numerous researchers. It is well known that as one of the key technologies, the rotating angular rate seriously influences the effectiveness of the error modulating. In order to design the optimal rotating angular rate of the RSINS, the relationship between the rotating angular rate and the velocity error of the RSINS was analyzed in detail based on the Laplace transform and the inverse Laplace transform in this paper. The analysis results showed that the velocity error of the RSINS depends on not only the sensor error, but also the rotating angular rate. In order to minimize the velocity error, the rotating angular rate of the RSINS should match the sensor error. One optimal design method for the rotating rate of the RSINS was also proposed in this paper. Simulation and experimental results verified the validity and superiority of this optimal design method for the rotating rate of the RSINS.

  1. Research on the Low Detonation Velocity Explosives Containing Nitroesters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Some explosive mixtures detonating at low velocity were experimentally investigated. Detonation velocity and critical diameter were measured for mixtures,being different in composition and density. An attempt of physical and chemical interpretation of results obtained is also included.

  2. Heat transport in Rayleigh-Benard convection and angular momentum transport in Taylor-Couette flow: a comparative study

    CERN Document Server

    Brauckmann, Hannes; Schumacher, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Rayleigh-Benard convection and Taylor-Couette flow are two canonical flows that have many properties in common. We here compare the two flows in detail for parameter values where the Nusselt numbers, i.e. the thermal transport and the angular momentum transport normalized by the corresponding laminar values, coincide. We study turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection in air at Rayleigh number Ra=1e7 and Taylor-Couette flow at shear Reynolds number Re_S=2e4 for two different mean rotation rates but the same Nusselt numbers. For individual pairwise related fields and convective currents, we compare the probability density functions normalized by the corresponding root mean square values and taken at different distances from the wall. We find one rotation number for which there is very good agreement between the mean profiles of the two corresponding quantities temperature and angular momentum. Similarly, there is good agreement between the fluctuations in temperature and velocity components. For the heat and angula...

  3. Velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Li-yun; WENG Xu-dan; LI Qing-ding

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the velocity anticipation in the optimal velocity model (OVM) is investigated.The driver adjusts the velocity of his vehicle by the desired headway,which depends on both instantaneous headway and relative velocity.The effect of relative velocity is measured by a sensitivity function.A specific form of the sensitivity function is supposed and the involved parameters are determined by the both numerical simulation and empirical data.It is shown that inclusion of velocity anticipation enhances the stability of traffic flow.Numerical simulations show a good agreement with empirical data.This model provides a better description of real traffic,including the acceleration process from standing states and the deceleration process approaching a stopped car.

  4. Transverse and longitudinal angular momenta of light

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y

    2015-01-01

    We review basic physics and novel types of optical angular momentum. We start with a theoretical overview of momentum and angular momentum properties of generic optical fields, and discuss methods for their experimental measurements. In particular, we describe the well-known longitudinal (i.e., aligned with the mean momentum) spin and orbital angular momenta in polarized vortex beams. Then, we focus on the transverse (i.e., orthogonal to the mean momentum) spin and orbital angular momenta, which were recently actively discussed in theory and observed in experiments. First, the recently-discovered transverse spin angular momenta appear in various structured fields: evanescent waves, interference fields, and focused beams. We show that there are several kinds of transverse spin angular momentum, which differ strongly in their origins and physical properties. We describe extraordinary features of the transverse optical spins and overview recent experiments. In particular, the helicity-independent transverse spin...

  5. A demonstration of the conservation of the orbital angular momentum of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizza, Leonardo J.; Mayochi, Mariano G.; Ciocci Brazzano, Ligia; Pedrosa, Susana E.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a simple but quantitative experiment to demonstrate the conservation of angular momentum. We measure the correlation of the apparent radius and angular velocity of the Sun with respect to the stars, due to the conservation of the angular momentum of Earth in its orbit. We also determine the direction of Earth's angular momentum vector and show that it is conserved. The experiment can be performed using a small telescope and a digital camera. It is conceptually simple, allowing students to get direct physical insight from the data. The observations are performed near the resolution limit imposed by the atmosphere, and in the presence of strong competing effects. These effects necessitate a careful experimental setup and allow students to improve their skills in experimentation.

  6. Possibilities to identify engine combustion model parameters by analysis of the instantaneous crankshaft angular speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Slobodan J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, novel method for obtaining information about combustion process in individual cylinders of a multi-cylinder Spark Ignition Engine based on instantaneous crankshaft angular velocity is presented. The method is based on robust box constrained Levenberg-Marquardt minimization of nonlinear Least Squares given for measured and simulated instantaneous crankshaft angular speed which is determined from the solution of the engine dynamics torque balance equation. Combination of in-house developed comprehensive Zero-Dimensional Two-Zone SI engine combustion model and analytical friction loss model in angular domain have been applied to provide sensitivity and error analysis regarding Wiebe combustion model parameters, heat transfer coefficient and compression ratio. The analysis is employed to evaluate the basic starting assumption and possibility to provide reliable combustion analysis based on instantaneous engine crankshaft angular speed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. NPEE-290025 and TR-14074

  7. Models of Angular Momentum Input to a Circumterrestrial Swarm from Encounters with Heliocentric Planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D. R.; Greenberg, R.; Hebert, F.

    1985-01-01

    Models of lunar origin in which the Moon accretes in orbit about the Earth from material approaching the Earth from heliocentric orbits must overcome a fundamental problem: the approach orbits of such material would be, in the simplest approximation, equally likely to be prograde or retrograde about the Earth, with the result that accretion of such material adds mass but not angular momentum to circumterrestrial satellites. Satellite orbits would then decay due to the resulting drag, ultimately impacting onto the Earth. One possibility for adding both material and angular momentum to Earth orbit is investigated: imbalance in the delivered angular momentum between pro and retrograde Earth passing orbits which arises from the three body dynamics of planetesimals approaching the Earth from heliocentric space. In order to study angular momentum delivery to circumterrestrial satellites, the near Earth velocities were numerically computed as a function of distance from the Earth for a large array of orbits systematically spanning heliocentric phase space.

  8. Angular distributions as lifetime probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Grossman, Yuval [Department of Physics, LEPP, Cornell University,Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    If new TeV scale particles are discovered, it will be important to determine their width. There is, however, a problematic region, where the width is too small to be determined directly, and too large to generate a secondary vertex. For a collection of colored, spin polarized particles, hadronization depolarizes the particles prior to their decay. The amount of depolarization can be used to probe the lifetime in the problematic region. In this paper we apply this method to a realistic scenario of a top-like particle that can be produced at the LHC. We study how depolarization affects the angular distributions of the decay products and derive an equation for the distributions that is sensitive to the lifetime.

  9. Angular Distributions as Lifetime Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Dror, Jeff Asaf

    2013-01-01

    If new TeV scale particles are discovered, it will be important to determine their width. There is, however, a problematic region, where the width is too small to be determined directly, and too large to generate a secondary vertex. For a collection of colored, spin polarized particles, hadronization depolarizes the particles prior to their decay. The amount of depolarization can be used to probe the lifetime in the problematic region. In this paper we apply this method to a realistic scenario of a top-like particle that can be produced at the LHC. We study how depolarization affects the angular distributions of the decay products and derive an equation for the distributions that is sensitive to the lifetime.

  10. Oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Victoria; Fazel, Nasim

    2010-01-01

    Candidiasis, an often encountered oral disease, has been increasing in frequency. Most commonly caused by the overgrowth of Candida albicans, oral candidiasis can be divided into several categories including acute and chronic forms, and angular cheilitis. Risk factors for the development of oral candidiasis include immunosuppression, wearing of dentures, pharmacotherapeutics, smoking, infancy and old age, endocrine dysfunction, and decreased salivation. Oral candidiasis may be asymptomatic. More frequently, however, it is physically uncomfortable, and the patient may complain of burning mouth, dysgeusia, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss, leading to nutritional deficiency and impaired quality of life. A plethora of antifungal treatments are available. The overall prognosis of oral candidiasis is good, and rarely is the condition life threatening with invasive or recalcitrant disease.

  11. Chirality and the angular momentum of light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robert P.; Götte, Jörg B.; Barnett, Stephen M.; Yao, Alison M.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality is exhibited by objects that cannot be rotated into their mirror images. It is far from obvious that this has anything to do with the angular momentum of light, which owes its existence to rotational symmetries. There is nevertheless a subtle connection between chirality and the angular momentum of light. We demonstrate this connection and, in particular, its significance in the context of chiral light-matter interactions. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  12. Management of angular cheilitis for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajriani Fajriani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Angular cheilitis is one type of oral soft tissue disease that can occur in both children and adults, the condition is characterized by cracks and inflammation in both corners of the mouth. Although this disease does not cause severe disruption but quite disturbing activity and also one's physical appearance. Angular cheilitis light will disappear on their own over time.Severe conditions that can cause pain and bleading. aims to give feedback on peers about managment angular cheilitis in children.

  13. The difficulty of measuring orbital angular momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Preece

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Light can carry angular momentum as well as energy and momentum; the transfer of this angular momentum to an object results in an optical torque. The development of a rotational analogue to the force measurement capability of optical tweezers is hampered by the difficulty of optical measurement of orbital angular momentum. We present an experiment with encouraging results, but emphasise the difficulty of the task.

  14. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Zhao; Hao Feng

    2015-01-01

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it h...

  15. Magnetic Modulation of Stellar Angular Momentum Loss

    CERN Document Server

    Garraffo, Cecilia; Cohen, Ofer

    2014-01-01

    Angular Momentum Loss is important for understanding astrophysical phenomena such as stellar rotation, magnetic activity, close binaries, and cataclysmic variables. Magnetic breaking is the dominant mechanism in the spin down of young late-type stars. We have studied angular momentum loss as a function of stellar magnetic activity. We argue that the complexity of the field and its latitudinal distribution are crucial for angular momentum loss rates. In this work we discuss how angular momentum is modulated by magnetic cycles, and how stellar spin down is not just a simple function of large scale magnetic field strength.

  16. A neural circuit architecture for angular integration in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jonathan; Adachi, Atsuko; Shah, Kunal K; Hirokawa, Jonathan D; Magani, Pablo S; Maimon, Gaby

    2017-06-01

    Many animals keep track of their angular heading over time while navigating through their environment. However, a neural-circuit architecture for computing heading has not been experimentally defined in any species. Here we describe a set of clockwise- and anticlockwise-shifting neurons in the Drosophila central complex whose wiring and physiology provide a means to rotate an angular heading estimate based on the fly's angular velocity. We show that each class of shifting neurons exists in two subtypes, with spatiotemporal activity profiles that suggest different roles for each subtype at the start and end of tethered-walking turns. Shifting neurons are required for the heading system to properly track the fly's heading in the dark, and stimulation of these neurons induces predictable shifts in the heading signal. The central features of this biological circuit are analogous to those of computational models proposed for head-direction cells in rodents and may shed light on how neural systems, in general, perform integration.

  17. Angular Momentum in the Formation of Disk Galaxies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Zhi-Jian; SHU Cheng-Gang

    2004-01-01

    @@ Within the current framework of disk galaxy formation, we discuss the resulted surface-density profiles according to the theoretical angular momentum distributions (AMDs) presented by Bullock et al. [Astrophys. J.555 (2001) 240(B01)] for the ACDM cosmology in both spherical and cylindric coordinates. It is found that the derived surface density distribution of a disk in the outer region is in general similar to an exponential disk for both the theoretical AMDs. In the central region, the results from both the theoretical AMDs are inconsistent with observations whatever the disk bar-instability is taken into account or not. The cylindric form of the theoretical AMD leads to the bar-instability more easily for a give galaxy than that for spherical AMD, which could result in a more massive bulge. After comparing the model predictions with our Milky Way galaxy, we find that the theoretical AMDs predict larger mass fractions of baryons with low angular momentum than the observed ones, which would lead to the disk sizes to be smaller. Two possible processes which could solve the angular momentum problem are discussed.

  18. Tracing sunspot groups to determine angular momentum transfer on the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Sudar, D; Ruždjak, D; Brajša, R; Wöohl, H

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to investigate Reynolds stresses and to check if it is plausible that they are responsible for angular momentum transfer toward the solar equator. We also analysed meridional velocity, rotation velocity residuals and correlation between the velocities. We used sunspot groups position measurements from GPR (Greenwich Photographic Result) and SOON/USAF/NOAA (Solar Observing Optical Network/United States Air Force/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) databases covering the period from 1878 until 2011. In order to calculate velocities we used daily motion of sunspot groups. The sample was also limited to $\\pm$58\\degr in Central Meridian Distance (CMD) in order to avoid solar limb effects. We mainly investigated velocity patterns depending on solar cycle phase and latitude. We found that meridional motion of sunspot groups is toward the centre of activity from all available latitudes and in all phases of the solar cycle. The range of meridional velocities is $\\pm10$ m s$^{-1}$...

  19. Astrometric radial velocities. I. Non-spectroscopic methods for measuring stellar radial velocity

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    High-accuracy astrometry permits the determination of not only stellar tangential motion, but also the component along the line-of-sight. Such non-spectroscopic (i.e. astrometric) radial velocities are independent of stellar atmospheric dynamics, spectral complexity and variability, as well as of gravitational redshift. Three methods are analysed: (1) changing annual parallax, (2) changing proper motion and (3) changing angular extent of a moving group of stars. All three have significant pot...

  20. Helicon modes in uniform plasmas. III. Angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Urrutia, J. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1547 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Helicons are electromagnetic waves with helical phase fronts propagating in the whistler mode in magnetized plasmas and solids. They have similar properties to electromagnetic waves with angular momentum in free space. Helicons are circularly polarized waves carrying spin angular momentum and orbital angular momentum due to their propagation around the ambient magnetic field B{sub 0}. These properties have not been considered in the community of researchers working on helicon plasma sources, but are the topic of the present work. The present work focuses on the field topology of helicons in unbounded plasmas, not on helicon source physics. Helicons are excited in a large uniform laboratory plasma with a magnetic loop antenna whose dipole axis is aligned along or across B{sub 0}. The wave fields are measured in orthogonal planes and extended to three dimensions (3D) by interpolation. Since density and B{sub 0} are uniform, small amplitude waves from loops at different locations can be superimposed to generate complex antenna patterns. With a circular array of phase shifted loops, whistler modes with angular and axial wave propagation, i.e., helicons, are generated. Without boundaries radial propagation also arises. The azimuthal mode number m can be positive or negative while the field polarization remains right-hand circular. The conservation of energy and momentum implies that these field quantities are transferred to matter which causes damping or reflection. Wave-particle interactions with fast electrons are possible by Doppler shifted resonances. The transverse Doppler shift is demonstrated. Wave-wave interactions are also shown by showing collisions between different helicons. Whistler turbulence does not always have to be created by nonlinear wave-interactions but can also be a linear superposition of waves from random sources. In helicon collisions, the linear and/or orbital angular momenta can be canceled, which results in a great variety of field

  1. An angular acceleration sensor inspired by the vestibular system with a fully circular fluid-channel and thermal read-out

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenesteijn, Jarno; Droogendijk, H.; de Boer, Meint J.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on an angular accelerometer based on the semicircular channels of the vestibular system. The accelerometer consists of a water-filled circular tube, wherein the fluid flow velocity is measured thermally as a representation for the external angular acceleration. Measurements show a linear

  2. Analogies between optical and quantum mechanical angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhuis, Gerard

    2017-02-01

    The insight that a beam of light can carry orbital angular momentum (AM) in its propagation direction came up in 1992 as a surprise. Nevertheless, the existence of momentum and AM of an electromagnetic field has been well known since the days of Maxwell. We compare the expressions for densities of AM in general three-dimensional modes and in paraxial modes. Despite their classical nature, these expressions have a suggestive quantum mechanical appearance, in terms of linear operators acting on mode functions. In addition, paraxial wave optics has several analogies with real quantum mechanics, both with the wave function of a free quantum particle and with a quantum harmonic oscillator. We discuss how these analogies can be applied. This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'.

  3. Photonic-phononic orbital angular momentum in Brillouin parametric conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhihan; Mu, Chunyuan; Li, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) is a fundamental photonic degree of freedom, showed by Allen and co-workers. Its most attractive feature is an inherently infinite dimensionality, which in recent years has obtained several ground-breaking demonstrations for high information-density communication and processing, both in classical and quantum. Here, by seeking the reason for photonic OAM non-conservation in stimulated Brillouin amplification, we report the first demonstration of the evolution law for OAM in Brillouin process. The parameter of OAM can conveniently transfer between the phonons and different polarized photons due to the photonic spin angular momentum conservation. Our results have revealed a parametric conversion mechanism of Brillouin process for Photonic-phononic OAM, demonstrated the role of phononic OAM and the vortex acoustic wave in this process, and suggested this mechanism may find important applications in OAM-based information communication and processing.

  4. Human skeletal muscle fibre types and force: velocity properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntosh, B R; Herzog, W; Suter, E; Wiley, J P; Sokolosky, J

    1993-01-01

    It has been reported that there is a relationship between power output and fibre type distribution in mixed muscle. The strength of this relationship is greater in the range of 3-8 rad.s-1 during knee extension compared to slower or faster angular knee extensor speeds. A mathematical model of the force: velocity properties of muscle with various combinations of fast- and slow-twitch fibres may provide insight into why specific velocities may give better predictions of fibre type distribution. In this paper, a mathematical model of the force:velocity relationship for mixed muscle is presented. This model demonstrates that peak power and optimal velocity should be predictive of fibre distribution and that the greatest fibre type discrimination in human knee extensor muscles should occur with measurement of power output at an angular velocity just greater than 7 rad.s-1. Measurements of torque:angular velocity relationships for knee extension on an isokinetic dynamometer and fibre type distribution in biopsies of vastus lateralis muscles were made on 31 subjects. Peak power and optimal velocity were determined in three ways: (1) direct measurement, (2) linear regression, and (3) fitting to the Hill equation. Estimation of peak power and optimal velocity using the Hill equation gave the best correlation with fibre type distribution (r < 0.5 for peak power or optimal velocity and percentage of fast-twitch fibres). The results of this study confirm that prediction of fibre type distribution is facilitated by measurement of peak power at optimal velocity and that fitting of the data to the Hill equation is a suitable method for evaluation of these parameters.

  5. Angular Momentum Distribution in the Transverse Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Adhikari, Lekha

    2016-01-01

    Several possibilities to relate the $t$-dependence of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) to the distribution of angular momentum in the transverse plane are discussed. Using a simple spectator model we demonstrate that non of them correctly describes the orbital angular momentum distribution that for a longitudinally polarized nucleon obtained directly from light-front wavefunctions.

  6. Responsive web design with AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Sandeep Kumar

    2014-01-01

    If you are an AngularJS developer who wants to learn about responsive web application development, this book is ideal for you. Responsive Web Design with AngularJS is intended for web developers or designers with a basic knowledge of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

  7. Quantum Correlation Coefficients for Angular Coherent States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei; HE Yan; GUO Hao

    2009-01-01

    Quantum covariance and correlation coefficients of angular or SU(2) coherent states are directly calculated for all irreducible unitary representations.These results explicitly verify that the angular coherent states minimize the Robertson-Schrodinger uncertainty relation for all spins, which means that they are the so-called intelligent states.The same results can be obtained by the Schwinger representation approach.

  8. Accelerated rotation with orbital angular momentum modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A 91, 043821 (2015) Accelerated rotation with orbital angular momentum modes Christian Schulze, Filippus S. Roux, Angela Dudley, Ronald Rop, Michael Duparr´e, and Andrew Forbes Abstract: We introduce a class of light field that angularly...

  9. The Orbital Angular Momentum Sum Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Fatma; Burkardt, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    As an alternative to the Ji sum rule for the quark angular momentum, a sum rule for the quark orbital angular momentum, based on a twist-3 generalized parton distribution, has been suggested. We study the validity of this sum rule in the context of scalar Yukawa interactions as well as in QED for an electron.

  10. Angular Momentum Eigenstates for Equivalent Electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, E. R.; Calvert, J. B.

    1981-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods for adding angular momenta and for finding angular momentum eigenstates for systems of equivalent electrons are developed. Several different common representations are used in specific examples. The material is suitable for a graduate course in quantum mechanics. (SK)

  11. Extending Velocity Channel Analysis for Studying Turbulence Anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Kandel, Dinesh; Pogosyan, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    We extend the analysis of the fluctuations in the velocity slices of Position-Position- Velocity (PPV) spectroscopic data from Doppler broadened lines, i.e. Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) introduced by Lazarian & Pogosyan (2000), to study anisotropy of the underlying velocity and density turbulence statistics that arises from the presence of magnetic field. In particular, we study analytically how the measurable anisotropy of the statistics of the channel map fluctuations changes with the thickness of velocity channels. In agreement with the earlier VCA studies we find that the anisotropy of the thick channels reflects the anisotropy of the density field, while the relative contribution of density and velocity fluctuations to the thin velocity channels depends on the density spectral slope. We show that the anisotropies arising from Alfven, slow and fast modes are different, in particular, the anisotropy in PPV created by fast modes is opposite to that created by Alfven and slow modes and this can be use...

  12. Physical Angular Momentum Separation for QED

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Weimin

    2016-01-01

    We study the non-uniqueness problem of the gauge-invariant angular momentum separation for the case of QED, which stems from the recent controversy concerning the proper definitions of the orbital angular momentum and spin operator of the individual parts of a gauge field system. For the free quantum electrodynamics without matter, we show that the basic requirement of Euclidean symmetry selects a unique physical angular momentum separation scheme from the multitude of the possible angular momentum separation schemes constructed using the various Gauge Invariant Extentions. Based on these results, we propose a set of natural angular momentum separation schemes for the case of interacting QED by invoking the formalism of asymptotic fields. Some perspectives on such a problem for the case of QCD are briefly discussed.

  13. Does high harmonic generation conserve angular momentum?

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Avner; Diskin, Tzvi; Sidorenko, Pavel; Cohen, Oren

    2013-01-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is a unique and useful process in which infrared or visible radiation is frequency up converted into the extreme ultraviolet and x ray spectral regions. As a parametric process, high harmonic generation should conserve the radiation energy, momentum and angular momentum. Indeed, conservation of energy and momentum have been demonstrated. Angular momentum of optical beams can be divided into two components: orbital and spin (polarization). Orbital angular momentum is assumed to be conserved and recently observed deviations were attributed to propagation effects. On the other hand, conservation of spin angular momentum has thus far never been studied, neither experimentally nor theoretically. Here, we present the first study on the role of spin angular momentum in extreme nonlinear optics by experimentally generating high harmonics of bi chromatic elliptically polarized pump beams that interact with isotropic media. While observing that the selection rules qualitatively correspond...

  14. On the angular distribution of IceCube high-energy events

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, R de la Fuente

    2015-01-01

    The detection of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin by the IceCube neutrino observatory in Antarctica has opened a unique window to the cosmos that may help to probe both the distant Universe and our cosmic backyard. The arrival directions of these high-energy events have been interpreted as uniformly distributed on the celestial sphere. Here, we revisit the topic of the putative isotropic angular distribution of these events applying Monte Carlo techniques to investigate a possible anisotropy. A modest evidence for anisotropy is found. An excess of events appears projected towards a section of the Local Void, where the density of galaxies with radial velocities below 3000 km/s is rather low, suggesting that this particular group of somewhat clustered sources are located either very close to the Milky Way or perhaps beyond 40 Mpc. The results of further analyses of the subsample of southern hemisphere events favour an origin at cosmological distances with the arrival directions of ...

  15. A framework for simulating ultrasound imaging based on first order nonlinear pressure–velocity relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yigang; Fan, Rui; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging framework modeled with the first order nonlinear pressure–velocity relations (NPVR) based simulation and implemented by a half-time staggered solution and pseudospectral method is presented in this paper. The framework is capable of simulating linear and nonlinear ultrasound...... propagation and reflections in a heterogeneous medium with different sound speeds and densities. It can be initialized with arbitrary focus, excitation and apodization for multiple individual channels in both 2D and 3D spatial fields. The simulated channel data can be generated using this framework......, and ultrasound image can be obtained by beamforming the simulated channel data. Various results simulated by different algorithms are illustrated for comparisons. The root mean square (RMS) errors for each compared pulses are calculated. The linear propagation is validated by an angular spectrum approach (ASA...

  16. High-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, BP; vanWoerden, H

    1997-01-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) consist of neutral hydrogen (HI) at velocities incompatible with a simple model of differential galactic rotation; in practice one uses \\v(LSR)\\ greater than or equal to 90 km/s to define HVCs. This review describes the main features of the sky and velocity distributions,

  17. Transverse Spectral Velocity Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    A transverse oscillation (TO)-based method for calculating the velocity spectrum for fully transverse flow is described. Current methods yield the mean velocity at one position, whereas the new method reveals the transverse velocity spectrum as a function of time at one spatial location. A convex...

  18. Extension of the angular spectrum method to calculate pressure from a spherically curved acoustic source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Urvi; Christensen, Douglas A

    2011-11-01

    The angular spectrum method is an accurate and computationally efficient method for modeling acoustic wave propagation. The use of the typical 2D fast Fourier transform algorithm makes this a fast technique but it requires that the source pressure (or velocity) be specified on a plane. Here the angular spectrum method is extended to calculate pressure from a spherical transducer-as used extensively in applications such as magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery-to a plane. The approach, called the Ring-Bessel technique, decomposes the curved source into circular rings of increasing radii, each ring a different distance from the intermediate plane, and calculates the angular spectrum of each ring using a Fourier series. Each angular spectrum is then propagated to the intermediate plane where all the propagated angular spectra are summed to obtain the pressure on the plane; subsequent plane-to-plane propagation can be achieved using the traditional angular spectrum method. Since the Ring-Bessel calculations are carried out in the frequency domain, it reduces calculation times by a factor of approximately 24 compared to the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld method and about 82 compared to the Field II technique, while maintaining accuracies of better than 96% as judged by those methods for cases of both solid and phased-array transducers.

  19. Novel Detection of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-16

    Spreeuw, J. P . Woerdman, “ Orbital angular momentum of light and the transformation of Laguerre-Gaussian laser modes,” Phys. Rev. A, 45(11), 8185-8189...AFRL-RD-PS- AFRL-RD-PS TR-2014-0045 TR-2014-0045 Novel Detection of Optical Orbital Angular Momentum David Voelz Klipsch... Orbital Angular Momentum FA9451-13-1-0261 GR0004113 David Voelz Klipsch School of ECE New Mexico State University MSC 3-O, PO Box 30001 Las Cruces, NM

  20. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF PARTICLE FLYING VELOCITY IN HIGH VELOCITY OXYGEN FUEL SPRAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhiping; Dong Zujue; Huo Shubin

    2000-01-01

    Based on gas dynamics,thermodynamics,fluid dynamics of multiphase systems and other theories,the dynamic analyses of the particle flying velocity in a high velocity oxygen fuel spray (HVOF) is accomplished.The relationships between the flying velocity of a particle and the flying time or flying length,particle size,hot gas velocity,and pressure or density of the gas are proposed.Meanwhile,the influences of the velocity and mass rate of flow of the flame gas of a HVOF gun,and particle size on the particle flying velocity are discussed in detail.The dynamic pressure concept is introduced to express the flow capacity of hot gas of a HVOF gun,and the relationship between the dynamic pressure of a HVOF gun and the velocity of a particle for depositing is presented.

  1. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum in the MIT Bag Model

    CERN Document Server

    Courtoy, A

    2016-01-01

    We present the results for the Generalized Transverse Momentum Distribution related to quark Orbital Angular Momentum, {\\it i.e.} $F_{14}$, in the MIT bag model. This model has been modified to include the Peierls--Yoccoz projection to restore translational invariance. Such a modification allows to fulfill more satisfactorily basic sum rules, that would otherwise be less elegantly carried out with the original version. Using the same model, we have calculated the twist-$3$ GPD that corresponds to Orbital Angular Momentum \\`a la Ji, through the Penttinen--Polyakov--Shuvaev--Strikman sum rule. Recently, a new relation between the two definitions of the quark Orbital Angular Momentum at the density level has been proposed, which we illustrate here within the model. The sum rule is fulfilled. Still within the framework of the MIT bag model, we analyze the Wandzura--Wilczek expression for the GPD of interest. The genuine quark-gluon contribution is evaluated directly thanks to the equation of motion of the bag, wh...

  2. Fission fragment angular distributions in pre-actinide nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tathagata; Nath, S.; Jhingan, A.; Kaur, Gurpreet; Dubey, R.; Yadav, Abhishek; Laveen, P. V.; Shamlath, A.; Shareef, M.; Gehlot, J.; Saneesh, N.; Prasad, E.; Sugathan, P.; Pal, Santanu

    2016-10-01

    measured σfis and predictions of SM indicated the presence of NCNF in at least four systems, when shell effects, both in the level density and the fission barrier, were included in the calculation. Conclusions: Systematic SM analysis of measured fission angular anisotropies and σfis confirmed the onset of NCNF in pre-actinide nuclei. Discrepancies between results about the degree of its influence on complete fusion, as deduced from various experimental probes, remain challenges to be solved. Complete measurement of all signatures of NCNF for many systems and preferably a dynamical description of the collisions between projectile and target nuclei are warranted for a deeper understanding.

  3. A stochastic differential equation framework for the turbulent velocity field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    We discuss a stochastic differential equation, as a modelling framework for the turbulent velocity field, that is capable of capturing basic stylized facts of the statistics of velocity increments. In particular, we focus on the evolution of the probability density of velocity increments...

  4. Building disc structure and galaxy properties through angular momentum: The DARK SAGE semi-analytic model

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, Adam R H; Mutch, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    We present the new semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution, DARK SAGE, a heavily modified version of the publicly available SAGE code. The model is designed for detailed evolution of galactic discs. We evolve discs in a series of annuli with fixed specific angular momentum, which allows us to make predictions for the radial and angular-momentum structure of galaxies. Most physical processes, including all channels of star formation and associated feedback, are performed in these annuli. We present the surface density profiles of our model spiral galaxies, both as a function of radius and specific angular momentum, and find the discs naturally build a pseduobulge-like component. Our main results are focussed on predictions relating to the integrated mass--specific angular momentum relation of stellar discs. The model produces a distinct sequence between these properties in remarkable agreement with recent observational literature. We investigate the impact Toomre disc instabilities have on shaping this sequenc...

  5. Gravitational waves carrying orbital angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo

    2015-01-01

    Spinorial formalism is used to map every electromagnetic wave into the gravitational wave (within the linearized gravity). In this way we can obtain the gravitational counterparts of Bessel, Laguerre-Gauss, and other light beams carrying orbital angular momentum.

  6. Radiofrequency encoded angular-resolved light scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buckley, Brandon W.; Akbari, Najva; Diebold, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    The sensitive, specific, and label-free classification of microscopic cells and organisms is one of the outstanding problems in biology. Today, instruments such as the flow cytometer use a combination of light scatter measurements at two distinct angles to infer the size and internal complexity...... of cells at rates of more than 10,000 per second. However, by examining the entire angular light scattering spectrum it is possible to classify cells with higher resolution and specificity. Current approaches to performing these angular spectrum measurements all have significant throughput limitations...... Encoded Angular-resolved Light Scattering (REALS), this technique multiplexes angular light scattering in the radiofrequency domain, such that a single photodetector captures the entire scattering spectrum from a particle over approximately 100 discrete incident angles on a single shot basis. As a proof...

  7. Amplitude damping channel for orbital angular momentum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the pioneering work on the entanglement of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light, much attention has been devoted to the subject, with particular attention into the quantum aspects of information processing using OAM. Furthermore...

  8. Fuzzy Logic Velocity Control of a Biped Robot Locomotion and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Ankarali

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, fuzzy logic velocity control of a biped robot to generate gait is studied. The system considered in this study has six degrees of freedom with hip, knee and ankle joints. The joint angular positions are determined utilizing the Cartesian coordinate information of the joints obtained by using camera captured data of the motion. The first derivatives of the calculated joint angular positions are applied as the reference angular velocity input to the fuzzy controllers of the joint servomotors to generate a gait motion. The assumed motion for the biped robot is horizontal walking on a flat surface. The actuated joints are hip, knee and ankle joints which are driven by DC servomotors. The calculated angular velocities of the joints from camera captured motion data are utilized to get the driving velocity functions of the model as sine functions. These functions are applied to the fuzzy controller as the reference angular velocity inputs. The control signals produced by the fuzzy controllers are applied to the servomotors and then the response of the servomotor block is introduced as an input to the SimMechanics model of the biped robot. The simulation results are provided which evaluate the effectiveness of the fuzzy logic controller on joint velocities to generate gait motion.

  9. Fat mass measured by DXA varies with scan velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Eva; Petersen, Liselotte; Kreutzer, Martin

    2002-01-01

    To study the influence of scan velocities of DXA on the measured size of fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral content and density, and total body weight.......To study the influence of scan velocities of DXA on the measured size of fat mass, lean body mass, bone mineral content and density, and total body weight....

  10. Mastering AngularJD for .NET developers

    CERN Document Server

    Majid, Mohammad Wadood

    2015-01-01

    This book is envisioned for traditional developers and programmers who want to develop client-side applications using the AngularJS framework and ASP.NET Web API 2 with Visual Studio. .NET developers who have already built web applications or web services and who have a fundamental knowledge of HTML, JavaScript, and CSS and want to explore single-page applications will also find this guide useful. Basic knowledge of AngularJS would be helpful.

  11. Generalized Uncertainty Principle and Angular Momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Bosso, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Various models of quantum gravity suggest a modification of the Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle, to the so-called Generalized Uncertainty Principle, between position and momentum. In this work we show how this modification influences the theory of angular momentum in Quantum Mechanics. In particular, we compute Planck scale corrections to angular momentum eigenvalues, the Hydrogen atom spectrum, the Stern-Gerlach experiment and the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. We also examine effects of the Generalized Uncertainty Principle on multi-particle systems.

  12. Angular distribution in complex oscillation theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shengjian

    2005-01-01

    Let f1 and f2 be two linearly independent solutions of the differential equation f" + Af =0,where A is an entire function.Set E-f1f2.In this paper,we shall study the angular distribution of E and establish a relation between zero accumulation rays and Borel directions of E.Consequently we can obtain some results in the complex differential equation by using known results in angular distribution theory of meromorphic functions.

  13. Rate of change of angular bearing as the relevant property in a horizontal interception task during locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Matthieu; Musch, Eliane; Thiery, Evert; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2002-12-01

    The authors ran 3 experiments to investigate how catchers deal with the horizontal component of the ball's trajectory in an interception task during locomotion. The experiments were built upon the finding that velocity adaptations are based upon changes in the horizontal angular position or velocity of the ball with respect to the observer (M. Lenoir, M. Janssens, E. Musch, E. Thiery, J. Uyttenhove, 1999) a potential underlying information source for that strategy is described. In Experiment 1, actor (N = 10 participants)and ball approached each other along the legs of a V-shaped track. When the velocity and the initial angular bearing of the ball were varied, the observed behavior fitted with nulling the horizontal angular velocity of the ball: A positive or negative angular velocity was compensated by a velocity change. Evidence was obtained that those adaptations are modulated by a critical change in, rather than by a critical state of, the environment-actor system. In Experiment 2, the distance between the head and an artificial end-effector was varied. Irrespective of that distance, participants (N = 7) accelerated and decelerated in order to keep the angular velocity of the ball with respect to the end-effector close to constant. The ecological relevance of that constant bearing angle strategy was confirmed in Experiment 3: Participants (N = 7) in that experiment freely ran to catch fly balls. The present results support the concept that one can explain with a limited number of control variables an actor's behavior in an interception task during self-motion.

  14. Angular momentum flux of nonparaxial acoustic vortex beams and torques on axisymmetric objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L

    2011-12-01

    An acoustic vortex in an inviscid fluid and its radiation torque on an axisymmetric absorbing object are analyzed beyond the paraxial approximation to clarify an analogy with an optical vortex. The angular momentum flux density tensor from the conservation of angular momentum is used as an efficient description of the transport of angular momentum. Analysis of a monochromatic nonparaxial acoustic vortex beam indicates that the local ratio of the axial (or radial) flux density of axial angular momentum to the axial (or radial) flux density of energy is exactly equal to the ratio of the beam's topological charge l to the acoustic frequency ω. The axial radiation torque exerted by the beam on an axisymmetric object centered on the beam's axis due to the transfer of angular momentum is proportional to the power absorbed by the object with a factor l/ω, which can be understood as a result of phonon absorption from the beam. Depending on the vortex's helicity, the torque is parallel or antiparallel to the beam's axis.

  15. Geometric absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konz, C.; Benford, Gregory

    2003-10-01

    Circularly polarized electromagnetic fields carry both energy and angular momentum. We investigate the conditions under which a circularly polarized wave field transfers angular momentum to a perfectly conducting macroscopic object, using exact electromagnetic wave theory in a steady-state calculation. We find that axisymmetric perfect conductors cannot absorb or radiate angular momentum when illuminated. However, any asymmetry allows absorption. A rigorous, steady-state solution of the boundary value problem for the reflection from a perfectly conducting infinite wedge shows that waves convey angular momentum at the edges of asymmetries. Conductors can also radiate angular momentum, so their geometric absorption coefficient for angular momentum can be negative. Such absorption or radiation depends solely on the specific geometry of the conductor. The geometric absorption coefficient can be as high as 0.8, and the coefficient for radiation can be -0.4, larger than typical material absorption coefficients. We apply the results to recent experiments which spun roof-shaped aluminum sheets with polarized microwave beams. Applications of geometric, instead of material, absorption can be quite varied. Though experiments testing these ideas will be simpler at microwavelengths, the ideas work for optical ones as well.

  16. Partial angular coherence and the angular Schmidt spectrum of entangled two-photon fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Anand Kumar; Boyd, Robert W. [Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Agarwal, Girish S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    We study partially coherent fields that have a coherent-mode representation in the orbital-angular-momentum-mode basis. For such fields, we introduce the concepts of the angular coherence function and the coherence angle. Such fields are naturally produced by the process of parametric down-conversion--a second-order nonlinear optical process in which a pump photon breaks up into two entangled photons, known as the signal and idler photons. We show that the angular coherence functions of the signal and idler fields are directly related to the angular Schmidt (spiral) spectrum of the down-converted two-photon field and thus that the angular Schmidt spectrum can be measured directly by measuring the angular coherence function of either the signal or the idler field, without requiring coincidence detection.

  17. Interstellar cloud structure: The statistics of centroid velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, V; Lazarian, A; Stutzki, J

    2006-01-01

    The investigation of the statistical properties of maps of line centroids has been used for almost 50 years, but there is still no general agreement on their interpretation. We try to quantify which properties of underlying turbulent velocity fields can be derived from centroid velocity maps, and we test conditions under which the scaling behaviour of the centroid velocities matches the scaling of the three-dimensional velocity field. Using fractal cloud models we study systematically the relation between three-dimensional density and velocity fields and the statistical properties of the produced line centroid maps. We put special attention to cases with large density fluctuations resembling supersonic interstellar turbulence. Starting from the Delta-variance analysis we derive a new tool to compute the scaling behaviour of the three-dimensional velocity field from observed intensity and centroid velocity maps. We provide two criteria to decide whether the information from the centroid velocities directly ref...

  18. Subluminal velocity of OAM-carrying beam

    CERN Document Server

    Bareza, Nestor D

    2015-01-01

    We report a consequence of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a beam to its group velocity. We calculate the group velocity $v_g$ of Laguerre-Gauss beam ($\\emph{LG}$) with $\\ell$ and at $p=0$. The $v_g$ reduction of $\\emph{LG}$ beam even in free space is observed to have dependence on both orbital or winding number $\\ell$ and the beam's divergence $\\theta_0$. We found that light possessing higher $\\ell$ travels relatively slower than that with lower $\\ell$ values. This suggests that light of different OAM separate in the temporal domain along propagation and it is an added effect to the dispersion due to field confinement. Our results are useful for treating information embedded in light with OAM from astronomical sources and/or data transmission in free space.

  19. Effect of Coulomb friction on orientational correlation and velocity distribution functions in a sheared dilute granular gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta; Alam, Meheboob

    2011-08-01

    From particle simulations of a sheared frictional granular gas, we show that the Coulomb friction can have dramatic effects on orientational correlation as well as on both the translational and angular velocity distribution functions even in the Boltzmann (dilute) limit. The dependence of orientational correlation on friction coefficient (μ) is found to be nonmonotonic, and the Coulomb friction plays a dual role of enhancing or diminishing the orientational correlation, depending on the value of the tangential restitution coefficient (which characterizes the roughness of particles). From the sticking limit (i.e., with no sliding contact) of rough particles, decreasing the Coulomb friction is found to reduce the density and spatial velocity correlations which, together with diminished orientational correlation for small enough μ, are responsible for the transition from non-gaussian to gaussian distribution functions in the double limit of small friction (μ→0) and nearly elastic particles (e→1). This double limit in fact corresponds to perfectly smooth particles, and hence the maxwellian (gaussian) is indeed a solution of the Boltzmann equation for a frictional granular gas in the limit of elastic collisions and zero Coulomb friction at any roughness. The high-velocity tails of both distribution functions seem to follow stretched exponentials even in the presence of Coulomb friction, and the related velocity exponents deviate strongly from a gaussian with increasing friction.

  20. Tracing extended low-velocity shocks through SiO emission - Case study of the W43-MM1 ridge

    CERN Document Server

    Louvet, F; Nguyen-Luong, Q; Lesaffre, P; Duarte-Cabral, A; Maury, A; Schneider, N; Hill, T; Schilke, P; Gueth, F

    2016-01-01

    Previous literature suggests that the densest structures in the interstellar medium form through colliding flows but patent evidence of this process is still missing. Recent literature proposes using SiO line emission to trace low-velocity shocks associated with cloud formation through collision. In this paper we investigate the bright and extended SiO(2-1) emission observed along the $\\sim$5 pc-long W43-MM1 ridge to determine its origin. We use high-angular resolution images of the SiO(2-1) and HCN(1-0) emission lines obtained with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer and combined with data from the IRAM/30m radiotelescope. These data are complemented by an Herschel column density map of the region. We perform spectral analysis of SiO and HCN emission line profiles to identify protostellar outflows and spatially disentangle two velocity components associated with low- and high-velocity shocks. Then, we compare the low-velocity shock component to a dedicated grid of 1D radiative shock models. We find that ...

  1. Radial velocity moments of dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Wojtak, R; Gottlöber, S; Mamon, G A; Wojtak, Radoslaw; Lokas, Ewa L.; Gottloeber, Stefan; Mamon, Gary A.

    2005-01-01

    Using cosmological N-body simulations we study the radial velocity distribution in dark matter haloes focusing on the lowest-order even moments, dispersion and kurtosis. We determine the properties of ten massive haloes in the simulation box approximating their density distribution by the NFW formula characterized by the virial mass and concentration. We also calculate the velocity anisotropy parameter of the haloes and find it mildly radial and increasing with distance from the halo centre. The radial velocity dispersion of the haloes shows a characteristic profile with a maximum, while the radial kurtosis profile decreases with distance starting from a value close to Gaussian near the centre. We therefore confirm that dark matter haloes possess intrinsically non-Gaussian, flat-topped velocity distributions. We find that the radial velocity moments of the simulated haloes are very well reproduced by the solutions of the Jeans equations obtained for the halo parameters with the anisotropy measured in the simu...

  2. Influence of tungsten fiber's slow drift on the measurement of G with angular acceleration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Wu, Wei-Huang; Xue, Chao; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Zhan, Wen-Ze; Wu, Jun-Fei; Milyukov, Vadim

    2016-08-01

    In the measurement of the gravitational constant G with angular acceleration method, the equilibrium position of torsion pendulum with tungsten fiber undergoes a linear slow drift, which results in a quadratic slow drift on the angular velocity of the torsion balance turntable under feedback control unit. The accurate amplitude determination of the useful angular acceleration signal with known frequency is biased by the linear slow drift and the coupling effect of the drifting equilibrium position and the room fixed gravitational background signal. We calculate the influences of the linear slow drift and the complex coupling effect on the value of G, respectively. The result shows that the bias of the linear slow drift on G is 7 ppm, and the influence of the coupling effect is less than 1 ppm.

  3. Anharmonic propagation of two-dimensional beams carrying orbital angular momentum in a harmonic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiqi; Liu, Xing; Belić, Milivoj R; Zhong, Weiping; Wen, Feng; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2015-08-15

    We analytically and numerically investigate an anharmonic propagation of two-dimensional beams in a harmonic potential. We pick noncentrosymmetric beams of common interest that carry orbital angular momentum. The examples studied include superposed Bessel-Gauss (BG), Laguerre-Gauss (LG), and circular Airy (CA) beams. For the BG beams, periodic inversion, phase transition, and rotation with periodic angular velocity are demonstrated during propagation. For the LG and CA beams, periodic inversion and variable rotation are still there but not the phase transition. On the whole, the "center of mass" and the orbital angular momentum of a beam exhibit harmonic motion, but the motion of the beam intensity distribution in detail is subject to external and internal torques and forces, causing it to be anharmonic. Our results are applicable to other superpositions of finite circularly asymmetric beams.

  4. Velocity selective optical pumping

    OpenAIRE

    Aminoff, C. G.; Pinard, M.

    1982-01-01

    We consider optical pumping with a quasi monochromatic tunable light beam, in the low intensity limit where a rate equation regime is obtained The velocity selective optical pumping (V.S.O.P.) introduces a correlation between atomic velocity and internal variables in the ground (or metastable) state. The aim of this article is to evaluate these atomic observables (orientation, alignment, population) as a function of velocity, using a phenomenological description of the relaxation effect of co...

  5. Spin O decay angular distribution for interfering mesons in electroproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funsten, H.; Gilfoyle, G.

    1994-04-01

    Self analyzing meson electroproduction experiments are currently being planned for the CEBAF CLAS detector. These experiments deduce the spin polarization of outgoing unstable spin s (?)0 mesons from their decay angular distribution, W({theta},{psi}). The large angular acceptance of the CLAS detector permits kinematic tracking of a sufficient number of these events to accurately determine electroproduction amplitudes from the deduced polarization. Maximum polarization information is obtained from W({theta},{psi}) for decay into spin 0 daughters. The helicity of the decaying meson is transferred to the daughter`s relative orbital angular momentum m-projection; none is {open_quotes}absorbed{close_quotes} into daughter helicities. The decaying meson`s helicity maximally appears in W({theta},{psi}). W({theta},{psi}) for spin 0 daughters has been derived for (1) vector meson electroproduction and (2) general interfering mesons produced by incident pions. This paper derives W({theta},{psi}) for electroproduction of two interfering mesons that decay into spin 0 daughters. An application is made to the case of interfering scalar and vector mesons. The derivation is an extension of work by Schil using the general decay formalism of Martin. The expressions can be easily extended to the case of N interfering mesons since interference occurs pairwise in the observable W ({theta},{psi}), a quadratic function of the meson amplitudes. The derivation uses the virtual photon density matrix of Schil which is transformed by a meson electroproduction transition operator, T. The resulting density matrix for the interfering mesons is then converted into a corresponding statistical tensor and contracted into the efficiency tensor for spin 0 daughters.

  6. Angular distribution of ions and extreme ultraviolet emission in laser-produced tin droplet plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hong; Duan, Lian; Lan, Hui [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wang, Xinbing, E-mail: xbwang@hust.edu.cn; Chen, Ziqi; Zuo, Duluo [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Lu, Peixiang [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-05-21

    Angular-resolved ion time-of-flight spectra as well as extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser-produced tin droplet plasma are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Tin droplets with a diameter of 150 μm are irradiated by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The ion time-of-flight spectra measured from the plasma formed by laser irradiation of the tin droplets are interpreted in terms of a theoretical elliptical Druyvesteyn distribution to deduce ion density distributions including kinetic temperatures of the plasma. The opacity of the plasma for extreme ultraviolet radiation is calculated based on the deduced ion densities and temperatures, and the angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is expressed as a function of the opacity using the Beer–Lambert law. Our results show that the calculated angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Wave mediated angular momentum transport in astrophysical boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Hertfelder, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Context. Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized stars leads to the formation of a boundary layer (BL) where the gas loses its excess kinetic energy and settles onto the star. There are still many open questions concerning the BL, for instance the transport of angular momentum (AM) or the vertical structure. Aims. It is the aim of this work to investigate the AM transport in the BL where the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is not operating owing to the increasing angular velocity $\\Omega(r)$ with radius. We will therefore search for an appropriate mechanism and examine its efficiency and implications. Methods. We perform 2D numerical hydrodynamical simulations in a cylindrical coordinate system $(r, \\varphi)$ for a thin, vertically inte- grated accretion disk around a young star. We employ a realistic equation of state and include both cooling from the disk surfaces and radiation transport in radial and azimuthal direction. The viscosity in the disk is treated by the {\\alpha}-model; in the BL there is no v...

  8. On the Angular Width of Diffractive Beam in Anisotropic Media

    CERN Document Server

    Lock, Edwin H

    2011-01-01

    2-D diffraction patterns arising in the far-field region were investigated theoretically for the case, when the plane wave with non collinear group and phase velocities is incident on the wide slit in opaque screen with arbitrary orientation. This investigation was carried out by consideration as an example of magnetostatic surface wave diffraction in tangentially magnetized ferrite slab. It was deduced the universal analytical formula, which one can use to calculate the angular width of diffractive beam in any 2-D anisotropic geometries for the waves of various nature. It was shown, that in 2-D anisotropic geometries this width may be not only more or less then the value L/D (L - wavelength of incident wave, D - length of slit), but it also may be equal to zero in certain conditions.

  9. Angularly Deformed Special Relativity and its Results for Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Glinka, Lukasz Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the deformed Special Relativity, which leads to an essentially new theoretical context of quantum mechanics, is presented. The formulation of the theory arises from a straightforward analogy with the Special Relativity, but its foundations are laid through the hypothesis on breakdown of the velocity-momentum parallelism which affects onto the Einstein equivalence principle between mass and energy of a relativistic particle. Furthermore, the derivation is based on the technique of an eikonal equation whose well-confirmed physical role lays the foundations of both optics and quantum mechanics. As a result, we receive the angular deformation of Special Relativity which clearly depicts the new deformation-based theoretical foundations of physics, and, moreover, offers both constructive and consistent phenomenological discussion of the theoretical issues such like imaginary mass and formal superluminal motion predicted in Special Relativity for this case. In the context of the relativistic theory, p...

  10. Rotational Angles and Velocities During Down the Line and Diagonal Across Court Volleyball Spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R. Brown

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The volleyball spike is an explosive movement that is frequently used to end a rally and earn a point. High velocity spikes are an important skill for a successful volleyball offense. Although the influence of vertical jump height and arm velocity on spiked ball velocity (SBV have been investigated, little is known about the relationship of shoulder and hip angular kinematics with SBV. Other sport skills, like the baseball pitch share similar movement patterns and suggest trunk rotation is important for such movements. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of both shoulder and hip angular kinematics with ball velocity during the volleyball spike. Methods: Fourteen Division I collegiate female volleyball players executed down the line (DL and diagonally across-court (DAC spikes in a laboratory setting to measure shoulder and hip angular kinematics and velocities. Each spike was analyzed using a 10 Camera Raptor-E Digital Real Time Camera System.  Results: DL SBV was significantly greater than for DAC, respectively (17.54±2.35 vs. 15.97±2.36 m/s, p<0.05.  The Shoulder Hip Separation Angle (S-HSA, Shoulder Angular Velocity (SAV, and Hip Angular Velocity (HAV were all significantly correlated with DAC SBV. S-HSA was the most significant predictor of DAC SBV as determined by regression analysis.  Conclusions: This study provides support for a relationship between a greater S-HSA and SBV. Future research should continue to 1 examine the influence of core training exercise and rotational skill drills on SBV and 2 examine trunk angular velocities during various types of spikes during play.

  11. Velocity condensation for magnetotactic bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Rupprecht, Jean-Francois; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic swimmers tend to align along magnetic field lines against stochastic reorientations. We show that the swimming strategy, e.g. active Brownian motion versus run-and-tumble dynamics, strongly affects the orientation statistics. The latter can exhibit a velocity condensation whereby the alignment probability density diverges. As a consequence, we find that the swimming strategy affects the nature of the phase transition to collective motion, indicating that L\\'evy run-and-tumble walks can outperform active Brownian processes as strategies to trigger collective behavior.

  12. Detection of a dearth of stars with zero angular momentum in the solar neighbourhood

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Jason A S; Carlberg, Raymond G

    2016-01-01

    We report on the detection in the combined $Gaia$-DR1/RAVE data of a lack of disk stars in the solar neighbourhood with velocities close to zero angular momentum. We propose that this may be caused by the scattering of stars with very low angular momentum onto chaotic, halo-type orbits when they pass through the Galactic nucleus. We model the effect in a Milky-Way like potential and fit the resulting model directly to the data, finding a likelihood ($\\sim2.7\\sigma$) of a dip in the distribution. Using this effect, we can make a dynamical measurement of the Solar rotation velocity around the Galactic center: $v_{\\odot}=239\\pm9$ km s$^{-1}$. Combined with the measured proper motion of Sgr A$^*$, this measurement gives a measurement of the distance to the Galactic centre: $R_0=7.9\\pm0.3$ kpc.

  13. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  14. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  15. Ultrafast angular momentum transfer in multisublattice ferrimagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeard, N; López-Flores, V; Halté, V; Hehn, M; Stamm, C; Pontius, N; Beaurepaire, E; Boeglin, C

    2014-03-11

    Femtosecond laser pulses can be used to induce ultrafast changes of the magnetization in magnetic materials. However, one of the unsolved questions is that of conservation of the total angular momentum during the ultrafast demagnetization. Here we report the ultrafast transfer of angular momentum during the first hundred femtoseconds in ferrimagnetic Co0.8Gd0.2 and Co0.74Tb0.26 films. Using time-resolved X-ray magnetic circular dichroism allowed for time-resolved determination of spin and orbital momenta for each element. We report an ultrafast quenching of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy and show that at early times the demagnetization in ferrimagnetic alloys is driven by the local transfer of angular momenta between the two exchange-coupled sublattices while the total angular momentum stays constant. In Co0.74Tb0.26 we have observed a transfer of the total angular momentum to an external bath, which is delayed by ~150 fs.

  16. An orbital angular momentum spectrometer for electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Tyler; Grillo, Vincenzo; McMorran, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of techniques for preparation of free-electron and neutron orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, a basic follow-up question emerges: how do we measure the orbital angular momentum state distribution in matter waves? Control of both the energy and helicity of light has produced a range of spectroscopic applications, including molecular fingerprinting and magnetization mapping. Realization of an analogous dual energy-OAM spectroscopy with matter waves demands control of both initial and final energy and orbital angular momentum states: unlike for photons, final state post-selection is necessary for particles that cannot be annihilated. We propose a magnetic field-based mechanism for quantum non-demolition measurement of electron OAM. We show that OAM-dependent lensing is produced by an operator of form U =exp iLzρ2/ℏb2 where ρ =√{x2 +y2 } is the radial position operator, Lz is the orbital angular momentum operator along z, and b is the OAM dispersion length. We can physically realize this operator as a term in the time evolution of an electron in magnetic round lens. We discuss prospects and practical challenges for implementation of a lensing orbital angular momentum measurement. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), under the Early Career Research Program Award # DE-SC0010466.

  17. Building disc structure and galaxy properties through angular momentum: the DARK SAGE semi-analytic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Adam R. H.; Croton, Darren J.; Mutch, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    We present the new semi-analytic model of galaxy evolution, DARK SAGE, a heavily modified version of the publicly available SAGE code. The model is designed for detailed evolution of galactic discs. We evolve discs in a series of annuli with fixed specific angular momentum, which allows us to make predictions for the radial and angular-momentum structure of galaxies. Most physical processes, including all channels of star formation and associated feedback, are performed in these annuli. We present the surface density profiles of our model spiral galaxies, both as a function of radius and specific angular momentum, and find that the discs naturally build a pseudo-bulge-like component. Our main results are focused on predictions relating to the integrated mass-specific angular momentum relation of stellar discs. The model produces a distinct sequence between these properties in remarkable agreement with recent observational literature. We investigate the impact Toomre disc instabilities have on shaping this sequence and find they are crucial for regulating both the mass and spin of discs. Without instabilities, high-mass discs would be systematically deficient in specific angular momentum by a factor of ˜2.5, with increased scatter. Instabilities also appear to drive the direction in which the mass-spin sequence of spiral galaxy discs evolves. With them, we find galaxies of fixed mass have higher specific angular momentum at later epochs.

  18. Data-oriented development with AngularJS

    CERN Document Server

    Waikar, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    This book helps beginner-level AngularJS developers organize AngularJS applications by discussing important AngularJS concepts and best practices. If you are an experienced AngularJS developer but haven't written directives or haven't created custom HTML controls before, then this book is ideal for you.

  19. Angular momentum transport in the magnetospheres of cataclysmic variable accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koen, C.

    1986-12-01

    The theory of stellar magnetic braking is applied to circumstellar discs. The focus is concentrated on cataclysmic variable stars but results apply to any disc in which the rotational velocity is Keplerian. Calculations are done for two magnetic field configurations and numerical results given for a range of physical parameter values. It is found that magnetic processes could be efficient in the removal of angular momentum from such systems.

  20. High velocity collisions of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald F.; Mattson, William D.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are a unique class of material with highly functionalizable surfaces and exciting applications. With a large surface-to-volume ratio and potentially high surface tension, shocked nanoparticles might display unique materials behavior. Using density functional theory, we have simulated high-velocity NP collisions under a variety of conditions. NPs composed of diamond-C, cubic-BN, and diamond-Si were considered with particle sizes up to 3.5 nm diameter. Additional simulations involved NPs that were destabilized by incorporating internal strain. The initial spherical NP structures were carved out of bulk crystals while the NPs with internal strain were constructed as a dense core (compressive strain) encompassed by a thin shell (tensile strain). Both on-axis and off-axis collisions were simulated at 10 km/s relative velocity. The amount of internal strain was artificially increased by creating a dense inner core with bond lengths compressed up to 8%. Collision dynamics, shock propagation, and fragmentation will be analyzed, but the simulation are ongoing and results are not finalized. The effect of material properties, internal strain, and collision velocity will be discussed.

  1. Angular momentum transfer in incomplete fusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B S Tomar; K Surendra Babu; K Sudarshan; R Tripathi; A Goswami

    2005-02-01

    Isomeric cross-section ratios of evaporation residues formed in 12C+93Nb and 16O + 89Y reactions were measured by recoil catcher technique followed by off-line -ray spectrometry in the beam energy range of 55.7-77.5 MeV for 12C and 68-81 MeV for 16O. The isomeric cross-section ratios were resolved into that for complete and incomplete fusion reactions. The angular momentum of the intermediate nucleus formed in incomplete fusion was deduced from the isomeric cross-section ratio by considering the statistical de-excitation of the incompletely fused composite nucleus. The data show that incomplete fusion is associated with angular momenta slightly smaller than critical angular momentum for complete fusion, indicating the deeper interpenetration of projectile and target nuclei than that in peripheral collisions.

  2. Surface angular momentum of light beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornigotti, Marco; Aiello, Andrea

    2014-03-24

    Traditionally, the angular momentum of light is calculated for "bullet-like" electromagnetic wave packets, although in actual optical experiments "pencil-like" beams of light are more commonly used. The fact that a wave packet is bounded transversely and longitudinally while a beam has, in principle, an infinite extent along the direction of propagation, renders incomplete the textbook calculation of the spin/orbital separation of the angular momentum of a light beam. In this work we demonstrate that a novel, extra surface part must be added in order to preserve the gauge invariance of the optical angular momentum per unit length. The impact of this extra term is quantified by means of two examples: a Laguerre-Gaussian and a Bessel beam, both circularly polarized.

  3. Physics from Angular Projection of Rectangular Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Ashmeet

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a mathematical model for the angular projection of a rectangular arrangement of points in a grid. This simple, yet interesting problem, has both a scholarly value and applications for data extraction techniques to study the physics of various systems. Our work can interest undergraduate students to understand subtle points in the angular projection of a grid and describes various quantities of interest in the projection with completeness and sufficient rigour. We show that for certain angular ranges, the projection has non-distinctness, and calculate the details of such angles, and correspondingly, the number of distinct points and the total projected length. We focus on interesting trends obtained for the projected length of the grid elements and present a simple application of the model to determine the geometry of an unknown grid whose spatial extensions are known, using measurement of the grid projection at two angles only. Towards the end, our model is shown to have potential ap...

  4. Angular momentum transport in protostellar discs

    CERN Document Server

    Salmeron, Roberto Aureliano; Wardle, M; Salmeron, Raquel; Konigl, Arieh; Wardle, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Angular momentum transport in protostellar discs can take place either radially, through turbulence induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI), or vertically, through the torque exerted by a large-scale magnetic field that threads the disc. Using semi-analytic and numerical results, we construct a model of steady-state discs that includes vertical transport by a centrifugally driven wind as well as MRI-induced turbulence. We present approximate criteria for the occurrence of either one of these mechanisms in an ambipolar diffusion-dominated disc. We derive ``strong field'' solutions in which the angular momentum transport is purely vertical and ``weak field'' solutions that are the stratified-disc analogues of the previously studied MRI channel modes; the latter are transformed into accretion solutions with predominantly radial angular-momentum transport when we implement a turbulent-stress prescription based on published results of numerical simulations. We also analyze ``intermediate field strength'...

  5. Signal processing related to the vestibulo-ocular reflex during combined angular rotation and linear translation of the head

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, R. A.; Chen-Huang, C.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The contributions of vestibular nerve afferents and central vestibular pathways to the angular (AVOR) and linear (LVOR) vestibulo-ocular reflex were studied in squirrel monkeys during fixation of near and far targets. Irregular vestibular afferents did not appear to be necessary for the LVOR, since when they were selectively silenced with galvanic currents the LVOR was essentially unaffected during both far- and near-target viewing. The linear translation signals generated by secondary AVOR neurons in the vestibular nuclei were, on average, in phase with head velocity, inversely related to viewing distance, and were nearly as strong as AVOR-related signals. We suggest that spatial-temporal transformation of linear head translation signals to angular eye velocity commands is accomplished primarily by the addition of viewing distance multiplied, centrally integrated, otolith regular afferent signals to angular VOR pathways.

  6. The magnetic field generated by an electron bound in angular-momentum eigenstates

    CERN Document Server

    Ayuel, K

    1999-01-01

    The magnetic field generated by an electron bound in a spherically symmetric potential is calculated for eigenstates of the orbital and total angular momentum. General expressions are presented for the current density in such states and the magnetic field is calculated through the vector potential, which is obtained from the current density by direct integration. The method is applied to the hydrogen atom, for which we reproduce and extend known results.

  7. Ghost Imaging Using Orbital Angular Momentum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵生妹; 丁建; 董小亮; 郑宝玉

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel encoding scheme in a ghost-imaging system using orbital angular momentum. In the signal arm, object spatial information is encoded as a phase matrix. For an N-grey-scale object, different phase matrices, varying from 0 to K with increment n/N, are used for different greyscales, and then they are modulated to a signal beam by a spatial light modulator. According to the conservation of the orbital angular momentum in the ghost imaging system, these changes will give different coincidence rates in measurement, and hence the object information can be extracted in the idler arm. By simulations and experiments, the results show that our scheme can improve the resolution of the image effectively. Compared with another encoding method using orbital angular momentum, our scheme has a better performance for both characters and the image object.%We present a novel encoding scheme in a ghost-imaging system using orbital angular momentum.In the signal arm,object spatial information is encoded as a phase matrix.For an N-grey-scale object,different phase matrices,varying from 0 to π with increment π/N,are used for different greyscales,and then they are modulated to a signal beam by a spatial light modulator.According to the conservation of the orbital angular momentum in the ghost imaging system,these changes will give different coincidence rates in measurement,and hence the object information can be extracted in the idler arm.By simulations and experiments,the results show that our scheme can improve the resolution of the image effectively.Compared with another encoding method using orbital angular momentum,our scheme has a better performance for both characters and the image object.

  8. Orbital angular momentum in the nucleons

    CERN Document Server

    Lorcé, Cédric

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, it has been realized that the orbital angular momentum of partons inside the nucleon plays a major role. It contributes significantly to nucleon properties and is at the origin of many asymmetries observed in spin physics. It is therefore of paramount importance to determine this quantity if we want to understand the nucleon internal structure and experimental observables. This triggered numerous discussions and controversies about the proper definition of orbital angular momentum and its extraction from experimental data. We summarize the present situation and discuss recent developments in this field.

  9. Concepts of radial and angular kinetic energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder; Schleich, W.P.

    2002-01-01

    We consider a general central-field system in D dimensions and show that the division of the kinetic energy into radial and angular parts proceeds differently in the wave-function picture and the Weyl-Wigner phase-space picture, Thus, the radial and angular kinetic energies are different quantiti...... in the two pictures, containing different physical information, but the relation between them is well defined. We discuss this relation and illustrate its nature by examples referring to a free particle and to a ground-state hydrogen atom....

  10. Angular momentum and the electromagnetic top

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GIANFRANCO SPAVIERI; GEORGE T GILLIES

    2016-08-01

    The electric charge–magnetic dipole interaction is considered. If $\\Gamma_{\\rm em}$ is the electromagnetic and $\\Gamma_{\\rm mech}$ the mechanical angular momentum, the conservation law for the total angular momentum $\\Gamma_{\\rm tot}$ holds: $\\Gamma_{\\rm tot}$ =$\\Gamma_{\\rm em}$ + $\\Gamma_{\\rm mech}$ = ${\\rm const.}$, but when the dipole moment varies with time, $\\Gamma_{\\rm mech}$ is not conserved. We show that the non-conserved $\\Gamma_{\\rm mech}$ of such a macroscopic isolated system might be experimentally observable. With advanced technology, the strength of the interaction hints to the possibility of novel applications for gyroscopes, such as the electromagnetic top.

  11. On the vector model of angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, Peeter

    2016-09-01

    Instead of (or in addition to) the common vector diagram with cones, we propose to visualize the peculiarities of quantum mechanical angular momentum by a completely quantized 3D model. It spotlights the discrete eigenvalues and noncommutativity of components of angular momentum and corresponds to outcomes of measurements—real or computer-simulated. The latter can be easily realized by an interactive worksheet of a suitable program package of algebraic calculations. The proposed complementary method of visualization helps undergraduate students to better understand the counterintuitive properties of this quantum mechanical observable.

  12. Angular gyrus syndrome mimicking depressive pseudodementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaratnam, Nages; Phan, Tai Anh; Barnett, Claire; Ibrahim, Neamat

    2002-09-01

    A 67-year-old left-handed woman with a diagnosis of pseudodementia was being treated for depression with little benefit. Neuropsychological evaluations revealed features of angular gyrus syndrome, namely, agraphia, alexia, Gerstmann's syndrome and behavioural manifestations such as depression, poor memory, frustration and irritability. A computed tomographic scan showed a right occipito-temporal infarction, which had occurred 18 months earlier. The patient demonstrated aspects of language dysfunction associated with the syndrome and showed reversed lateralization of cerebral functions. Recognizing and distinguishing between angular gyrus syndrome and depression is important because the appropriate therapies differ. The use of the term pseudodementia can be misleading.

  13. (AJST) ON THE PRESSURE VELOCITY AND TEMPERATURE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the pressure and fluid velocity are average over the ... describing the flow are sets of nonlinear first-order ... resemble those of the one-dimensional gas dynamics. [5]. .... blood constituents (solid corpuscles and plasma) flow ... where ρ is the varying fluid density, u axial fluid ..... (1989): Biofluid mechanics, Annual review fluid.

  14. Torsion as a source of expansion in a Bianchi type-I universe in the self-consistent Einstein-Cartan theory of a perfect fluid with spin density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradas, James C.; Fennelly, Alphonsus J.; Smalley, Larry L.

    1987-01-01

    It is shown that a generalized (or 'power law') inflationary phase arises naturally and inevitably in a simple (Bianchi type-I) anisotropic cosmological model in the self-consistent Einstein-Cartan gravitation theory with the improved stress-energy-momentum tensor with the spin density of Ray and Smalley (1982, 1983). This is made explicit by an analytical solution of the field equations of motion of the fluid variables. The inflation is caused by the angular kinetic energy density due to spin. The model further elucidates the relationship between fluid vorticity, the angular velocity of the inertially dragged tetrads, and the precession of the principal axes of the shear ellipsoid. Shear is not effective in damping the inflation.

  15. Superluminal Recession Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, T M; Davis, Tamara M.; Lineweaver, Charles H.

    2000-01-01

    Hubble's Law, v=HD (recession velocity is proportional to distance), is a theoretical result derived from the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric. v=HD applies at least as far as the particle horizon and in principle for all distances. Thus, galaxies with distances greater than D=c/H are receding from us with velocities greater than the speed of light and superluminal recession is a fundamental part of the general relativistic description of the expanding universe. This apparent contradiction of special relativity (SR) is often mistakenly remedied by converting redshift to velocity using SR. Here we show that galaxies with recession velocities faster than the speed of light are observable and that in all viable cosmological models, galaxies above a redshift of three are receding superluminally.

  16. The Velocity Campaign for Ignition on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Debra

    2011-10-01

    Achieving ignition requires a high velocity implosion since the energy required for ignition scales like 1/v8. Beyond ignition, a higher velocity produces more robust performance, which will be useful for applications of ignition. In the velocity campaign, we will explore three methods for increasing implosion velocity: increased laser power and energy, optimized hohlraum and capsule materials, and optimized capsule thickness. The main issue with increasing the laser power and energy is the way in which LPI (laser plasma interactions) and hot electron preheat will change as we increase the laser power. Based on scalings from previous data and theory, we expect to couple 80-85% of 1.5 MJ at 475-500 TW. We can also increase the velocity by optimizing the hohlraum and capsule materials. In this campaign, we will explore depleted uranium hohlraums to reduce wall loss and optimize the capsule dopant by replacing the germanium dopant with silicon. Those two changes are expected to increase velocity by 6-7%. Finally, we will optimize the capsule thickness. The optimal capsule thickness is a trade-off between velocity and mix. A thinner capsule has higher velocity, but is more susceptible to mix of the ablator material into the hotspot due to hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by ablation surface imperfections. Once we have achieved adequate capsule areal density, we will optimize the velocity/mix trade off by varying the capsule thickness. We will also make direct measure of Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth by backlighting the growth of engineered features on the surface of the capsule. This will allow us to benchmark our models of mix. In this paper, we will describe the designs and experimental results of the velocity campaign. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. The validity of high-pass angular spectrum filter in solid immersion lens system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Chong-Wei; Dai Yu-Xing

    2005-01-01

    The focal field of a solid immersion lens (SIL) system with a high-pass angular spectrum filter is calculated by using a vector method. Numerical results show that for a radially (azimuthally) polarized input field, a high-pass angular spectrum filter can reduce the light-spot (dark-spot) size of the SIL system. For a linearly polarized input field,however, the focal field cannot be optimized and the optical storage density of the SIL system cannot be improved by using a simple high-pass filter, either.

  18. Di-jet production and angular correlations in DIS at NLO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalilian-Marian Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Angular correlations are a sensitive probe of the dynamics of QCD at high energy. In particular azimuthal angular correlations between two hadrons produced in Deeply Inelastic Scattering (DIS of a virtual photon on a hadron or nucleus offer the best environment in which to investigate high gluon density (gluon saturation effects expected to arise at small x. Here we give a progress report on our derivation of Next to Leading Order (NLO corrections to di-jet (di-hadron production in DIS.

  19. Negative intensity patches in angular variations of CMB as a probe of the period of reionization

    OpenAIRE

    Doroshkevich, A.; Dubrovich, V.

    2001-01-01

    The observational tests for the period of reionization of the universe are discussed. We show that this period can be observed as {\\it negative} intensity patches of the CMB radiation with the amplitude $\\delta T/T\\sim 10^{-5}$ and the angular sizes $\\theta_T\\sim$10 angular seconds in range of the wavelength 0.1 cm$\\leq\\lambda\\leq$1 cm. The expected number density and frequency dependence of the amplitude permit to recognize this effect and to discriminate it from the noise. This method appli...

  20. Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Jose; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the development of new hurricane wind sensor (Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) which is designed to withstand winds of up to three hundred miles an hour. The proposed Extreme Velocity Wind Sensor contains no moveable components that would be exposed to extreme wind conditions. Topics covered include: need for new hurricane wind sensor, conceptual design, software applications, computational fluid dynamic simulations of design concept, preliminary performance tests, and project status.

  1. Transport velocities of coal and sand particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adanez, J. (Inst. de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain)); Diego, L.F. de (Inst. de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain)); Gayan, P. (Inst. de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain))

    1993-10-01

    Transport velocities of narrow cut sizes of coarse particles of sand and coal were determined at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. These velocities were obtained by four different methods previously utilized by other authors with fine particles. The four methods tested gave good predictions of the transport velocities. The method based on the measurement of the time required for all the solids to leave the bed without feeding in any fresh solid is specially interesting because of its rapidity and simplicity. The determined transport velocities were strongly dependent on the solid particle size and density. The experimental values were fitted to an equation which fitted both the experimental results obtained in this work and other published results obtained with fine particles. (orig.)

  2. Effect of Reduced Stiffness Dance Flooring on Lower Extremity Joint Angular Trajectories During a Ballet Jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, James; Brummel, Sara; Newman, Mary; Scott, Shannon; Reinagel, Matthew; Smith, Jennifer

    2015-09-01

    We carried out a study to investigate how low stiffness flooring may help prevent overuse injuries of the lower extremity in dancers. It was hypothesized that performing a ballet jump (sauté) on a reduced stiffness dance floor would decrease maximum joint flexion angles and negative angular velocities at the hips, knees, or ankles compared to performing the same jump on a harder floor. The participants were 15 young adult female dancers (age range 18 to 28, mean = 20.89 ± 2.93 years) with at least 5 years of continuous ballet experience and without history of serious lower body injury, surgery, or recent pain. They performed sautés on a (low stiffness) Harlequin ® WoodSpring Floor and on a vinyl-covered hardwood on concrete floor. Maximum joint flexion angles and negative velocities at bilateral hips, knees, and ankles were measured with the "Ariel Performance Analysis System" (APAS). Paired one-tailed t-tests yielded significant decreases in maximum knee angle (average decrease = 3.4° ± 4.2°, p = 0.026) and angular negative velocity of the ankles (average decrease = 18.7°/sec ± 27.9°/sec, p = 0.009) with low stiffness flooring. If the knee angle is less acute, then the length of the external knee flexion moment arm will also be shorter and result in a smaller external knee flexion moment, given an equal landing force. Also, high velocities of eccentric muscle contraction, which are necessary to control negative angular velocity of the ankle joint, are associated with higher risk of musculotendinous injury. Hence, our findings indicate that reduced floor stiffness may indeed help decrease the likelihood of lower extremity injuries.

  3. γ - γ Angular Correlation Measurements With GRIFFIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Andrew; Griffin Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    When an excited nuclear state emits successive γ-rays causing a γ - γ cascade an anisotropy is found in the spatial distribution of γ2 with respect to γ1. Defining the direction of γ1 as the z-axis, the intermediate level, in general will have an uneven distribution of m-states. This causes an anisotropy in the angular correlation of the second γ-ray with respect to the first. These angular correlations are expressed by the W (θ) that depends on numerical coefficients described by the sequence of spin-parity values for the nuclear states involved, the multipolarities and mixing ratios. Angular correlations can be used for the assignment of spins and parities for the nuclear states, and thus provide a powerful means to elucidate the structure of nuclei far from stability through β - γ - γ coincidence measurements. In order to explore the sensitivity of the new 16 clover-detector GRIFFIN γ-ray spectrometer at TRIUMF-ISAC to such γ - γ angular correlations, and to optimize its performance for these measurements we have studied a well known γ - γ cascade from 60Co decay through both experimental measurements and Geant4 simulation. Results will be shown in this talk. Work supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the National Research Council of Canada.

  4. A new method for angular displacement measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caini Zhang(张彩妮); Xiangzhao Wang(王向朝)

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new method for angular displacement measurements that is based on a Fabry-Perot inter-ferometer. A measurement accuracy of 10-s rad is obtained by use of the sinusoidal phase modulatinginterferometry. Another Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to obtain the key initial angle of incidence.

  5. Optical angular momentum conversion in a nanoslit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chimento, P.F.; Alkemade, P.F.A.; T Hooft, G.W.; Eliel, E.R.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate partial conversion of circularly polarized light into orbital angular momentum-carrying vortex light with opposite-handed circular polarization. This conversion is accomplished in a novel manner using the birefringent properties of a circular subwavelength slit in a thin metal film. O

  6. Wigner Functions and Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Asmita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wigner distributions contain combined position and momentum space information of the quark distributions and are related to both generalized parton distributions (GPDs and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs. We report on a recent model calculation of the Wigner distributions for the quark and their relation to the orbital angular momentum.

  7. Critical gravitational collapse with angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Gundlach, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We derive a theoretical model of mass and angular momentum scaling in type-II critical collapse with rotation. We focus on the case where the critical solution has precisely one, spherically symmetric, unstable mode. We demonstrate excellent agreement with numerical results for critical collapse of a rotating radiation fluid, which falls into this case.

  8. ANGULAR MOMENTUM ACQUISITION IN GALAXY HALOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Kyle R. [Department of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, California Baptist University, 8432 Magnolia Ave., Riverside, CA 92504 (United States); Brooks, Alyson M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bullock, James S. [Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Maller, Ariyeh H. [Department of Physics, New York City College of Technology, 300 Jay St., Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Diemand, Juerg [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, 8057, Zurich (Switzerland); Wadsley, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Main Street West, Hamilton L85 4M1 (Canada); Moustakas, Leonidas A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2013-05-20

    We use high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to study the angular momentum acquisition of gaseous halos around Milky-Way-sized galaxies. We find that cold mode accreted gas enters a galaxy halo with {approx}70% more specific angular momentum than dark matter averaged over cosmic time (though with a very large dispersion). In fact, we find that all matter has a higher spin parameter when measured at accretion than when averaged over the entire halo lifetime, and is well characterized by {lambda} {approx} 0.1, at accretion. Combined with the fact that cold flow gas spends a relatively short time (1-2 dynamical times) in the halo before sinking to the center, this naturally explains why cold flow halo gas has a specific angular momentum much higher than that of the halo and often forms ''cold flow disks.'' We demonstrate that the higher angular momentum of cold flow gas is related to the fact that it tends to be accreted along filaments.

  9. On the quantisation of the angular momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, V B

    1994-01-01

    When a hydrogen-like atom is treated as a two dimensional system whose configuration space is multiply connected, then in order to obtain the same energy spectrum as in the Bohr model the angular momentum must be half-integral.

  10. Angular and linear momentum of excited ferromagnets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, P.; Kamra, A.; Cao, Y.; Bauer, G.E.W.

    2013-01-01

    The angular momentum vector of a Heisenberg ferromagnet with isotropic exchange interaction is conserved, while under uniaxial crystalline anisotropy the projection of the total spin along the easy axis is a constant of motion. Using Noether's theorem, we prove that these conservation laws persist i

  11. Angular-momentum-bearing modes in fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, L.G.; Peaslee, G.F.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1989-03-01

    The angular-momentum-bearing degrees of freedom involved in the fission process are identified and their influence on experimental observables is discussed. The excitation of these modes is treated in the ''thermal'' limit, and the resulting distributions of observables are calculated. Experiments demonstrating the role of these modes are presented and discussed. 61 refs., 12 figs.

  12. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s−2. Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability.

  13. A Novel Permanent Magnetic Angular Acceleration Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hao; Feng, Hao

    2015-07-03

    Angular acceleration is an important parameter for status monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotary machinery. Therefore, we developed a novel permanent magnetic angular acceleration sensor, which is without rotation angle limitations and could directly measure the instantaneous angular acceleration of the rotating system. The sensor rotor only needs to be coaxially connected with the rotating system, which enables convenient sensor installation. For the cup structure of the sensor rotor, it has a relatively small rotational inertia. Due to the unique mechanical structure of the sensor, the output signal of the sensor can be directed without a slip ring, which avoids signal weakening effect. In this paper, the operating principle of the sensor is described, and simulated using finite element method. The sensitivity of the sensor is calibrated by torsional pendulum and angle sensor, yielding an experimental result of about 0.88 mV/(rad·s(-2)). Finally, the angular acceleration of the actual rotating system has been tested, using both a single-phase asynchronous motor and a step motor. Experimental result confirms the operating principle of the sensor and indicates that the sensor has good practicability.

  14. Measuring angular diameters of extended sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, PAM

    2000-01-01

    When measuring diameters of partially resolved sources like planetary nebulae, H II regions or galaxies, often a technique called Gaussian deconvolution is used. This technique yields a Gaussian diameter, which subsequently has to be multiplied by a conversion factor to obtain the true angular

  15. Oral medicine in practice: angular cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamey, P J; Lewis, M A

    1989-07-08

    In a series of twelve articles the authors aim to cover the more common oral medicine problems likely to be encountered in dental practice. Whenever possible, clinical photographs have been used to illustrate important points, and the text is deliberately succinct and without references. In the first article, the pathogenesis, investigation and management of angular cheilitis is reviewed.

  16. Realization of a 5-axis NURBS Interpolation with Controlled Angular Velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuan; LI Hui; WANG Yongzhang

    2012-01-01

    5-axis machine tool plays an important role in high-speed and high-precision computer numerical control (CNC) machining of workpieces with complex shapes.A non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) interpolation format for 5-axis machining is proposed to adapt to the high speed machining (HSM).With this interpolation format,angles between orientation vectors are chosen as parameters of orientation B-spline constructed by an open controller to achieve reasonable orientation vectors in real-time interpolation process.Coordinated motion between linear axes and rotary axes is achieved by building a polynomial spline which relates interpolation arc lengths of position spline to angles of orientation spline.Algorithm routine of this interpolation format and its realization methods in the supported controller are discussed in detail.Finally,performance of the proposed NURBS interpolation format is demonstrated by a practical example.

  17. Soft Neurological Signs in Childhood by Measurement of Arm Movements Using Acceleration and Angular Velocity Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Kaneko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Soft neurological signs (SNS are evident in the motor performance of children and disappear as the child grows up. Therefore SNS are used as criteria for evaluating age-appropriate development of neurological function. The aim of this study was to quantify SNS during arm movement in childhood. In this study, we focused on pronation and supination, which are arm movements included in the SNS examination. Two hundred and twenty-three typically developing children aged 4–12 years (107 boys, 116 girls and 18 adults aged 21–26 years (16 males, two females participated in the experiment. To quantify SNS during pronation and supination, we calculated several evaluation index scores: bimanual symmetry, compliance, postural stability, motor speed and mirror movement. These index scores were evaluated using data obtained from sensors attached to the participants’ hands and elbows. Each score increased as age increased. Results obtained using our system showed developmental changes that were consistent with criteria for SNS. We were able to successfully quantify SNS during pronation and supination. These results indicate that it may be possible to use our system as quantitative criteria for evaluating development of neurological function.

  18. Heat Transfer Through A Rotating Ball Bearing At Low Angular Velocities

    OpenAIRE

    Isert, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Bearings are commonly used in mechanical systems when there are rotating parts in the system. For bearings that run at speeds above about 1000 revolutions per minute, such as those used in aircraft turbines, machining tools, and automotive engines, it is important to take into account the heat transfer through the bearing system due to friction. Heat transfer is generally not considered for applications where the bearing is rotating at low speeds, such as clocks and bicycles. However, for cer...

  19. Helioseismic Constraints on the Gradient of Angular Velocity at the Base of the Solar Convection Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosovichev, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    The layer of transition from the nearly rigid rotation of the radiative interior to the latitudinal differential rotation of the convection zone plays a significant role in the internal dynamics of the Sun. Using rotational splitting coefficients of the p-mode frequencies, obtained during 1986-1990 at the Big Bear Solar Observatory, we have found that the thickness of the transitional layer is 0.09 +/- 0.04 solar radii (63 +/- 28 Mm), and that most of the transition occurs beneath the adiabatically stratified part of the convection zone, as suggested by the dynamo theories of the 22 yr solar activity cycle.

  20. Reconstructing the three-dimensional local dark matter velocity distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Kavanagh, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    Directionally sensitive dark matter (DM) direct detection experiments present the only way to observe the full three-dimensional velocity distribution of the Milky Way halo local to Earth. In this work we compare methods for extracting information about the local DM velocity distribution from a set of recoil directions and energies in a range of hypothetical directional and non-directional experiments. We compare a model independent empirical parameterisation of the velocity distribution based on an angular discretisation with a model dependent approach which assumes knowledge of the functional form of the distribution. The methods are tested under three distinct halo models which cover a range of possible phase space structures for the local velocity distribution: a smooth Maxwellian halo, a tidal stream and a debris flow. In each case we use simulated directional data to attempt to reconstruct the shape and parameters describing each model as well as the DM particle properties. We find that the empirical pa...