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Sample records for dense fibrillar component

  1. Catalytically active telomerase holoenzyme is assembled in the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus during S phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hoon; Lee, Yang Sin; Jeong, Sun Ah; Khadka, Prabhat; Roth, Jürgen; Chung, In Kwon

    2014-02-01

    The maintenance of human telomeres requires the ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase, which is composed of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), telomerase RNA component, and several additional proteins for assembly and activity. Telomere elongation by telomerase in human cancer cells involves multiple steps including telomerase RNA biogenesis, holoenzyme assembly, intranuclear trafficking, and telomerase recruitment to telomeres. Although telomerase has been shown to accumulate in Cajal bodies for association with telomeric chromatin, it is unclear where and how the assembly and trafficking of catalytically active telomerase is regulated in the context of nuclear architecture. Here, we show that the catalytically active holoenzyme is initially assembled in the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus during S phase. The telomerase RNP is retained in nucleoli through the interaction of hTERT with nucleolin, a major nucleolar phosphoprotein. Upon association with TCAB1 in S phase, the telomerase RNP is transported from nucleoli to Cajal bodies, suggesting that TCAB1 acts as an S-phase-specific holoenzyme component. Furthermore, depletion of TCAB1 caused an increase in the amount of telomerase RNP associated with nucleolin. These results suggest that the TCAB1-dependent trafficking of telomerase to Cajal bodies occurs in a step separate from the holoenzyme assembly in nucleoli. Thus, we propose that the dense fibrillar component is the provider of active telomerase RNP for supporting the continued proliferation of cancer and stem cells.

  2. Immunohistochemical evaluation of fibrillar components of the extracellular matrix of transversalis fascia and anterior abdominal rectus sheath in men with inguinal hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério De Oliveira Gonçalves

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the role of fibrillar extracellular matrix components in the pathogenesis of inguinal hernias. METHODS: samples of the transverse fascia and of the anterior sheath of the rectus abdominis muscle were collected from 40 men aged between 20 and 60 years with type II and IIIA Nyhus inguinal hernia and from 10 fresh male cadavers (controls without hernia in the same age range. The staining technique was immunohistochemistry for collagen I, collagen III and elastic fibers; quantification of fibrillar components was performed with an image analysis processing software. RESULTS: no statistically significant differences were found in the amount of elastic fibers, collagen I and collagen III, and the ratio of collagen I / III among patients with inguinal hernia when compared with subjects without hernia. CONCLUSION: the amount of fibrillar extracellular matrix components did not change in patients with and without inguinal hernia.

  3. Ribosomal Genes in Focus: New Transcripts Label the Dense Fibrillar Components and Form Clusters Indicative of "Christmas Trees" in situ

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karel Koberna; Jan Malínský; Artem Pliss; Martin Mas̆ata; Jaromíra Vec̆er̆ová; Markéta Fialová; Jan Bednár; Ivan Ras̆ka

    2002-01-01

    ... localization of these genes. Detailed analyses of HeLa cell nucleoli include direct localization of ribosomal genes by in situ hybridization and their indirect localization via nascent ribosomal transcript mappings...

  4. Kinetic theory of self-diffusion in a moderately dense one-component plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttorp, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    A microscopic description of self-diffusion in a moderately dense classical one-component plasma is given on the basis of renormalized kinetic theory. The effects of close binary collisions and of collective interactions in the plasma are taken into account through the use of a composite memory kern

  5. Unified Concept of Effective One Component Plasma for Hot Dense Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clérouin, Jean; Arnault, Philippe; Ticknor, Christopher; Kress, Joel D; Collins, Lee A

    2016-03-18

    Orbital-free molecular dynamics simulations are used to benchmark two popular models for hot dense plasmas: the one component plasma (OCP) and the Yukawa model. A unified concept emerges where an effective OCP (EOCP) is constructed from the short-range structure of the plasma. An unambiguous ionization and the screening length can be defined and used for a Yukawa system, which reproduces the long-range structure with finite compressibility. Similarly, the dispersion relation of longitudinal waves is consistent with the screened model at vanishing wave number but merges with the OCP at high wave number. Additionally, the EOCP reproduces the overall relaxation time scales of the correlation functions associated with ionic motion. In the hot dense regime, this unified concept of EOCP can be fruitfully applied to deduce properties such as the equation of state, ionic transport coefficients, and the ion feature in x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

  6. A unified concept of effective one component plasma for hot dense plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Clérouin, Jean; Ticknor, Christopher; Kress, Joel D; Collins, Lee A

    2016-01-01

    Orbital-free molecular dynamics simulations are used to benchmark two popular models for hot dense plasmas: the one component plasma (OCP) and the Yukawa model. A unified concept emerges where an effective OCP (eOCP) is constructed from the short-range structure of the plasma. An unambiguous ionization and the screening length can be defined and used for a Yukawa system, which reproduces the long range structure with finite compressibility. Similarly, the dispersion relation of longitudinal waves is consistent with the screened model at vanishing wavenumber but merges with the OCP at high wavenumber. Additionally, the eOCP reproduces the overall relaxation timescales of the correlation functions associated with ionic motion. In the hot dense regime, this unified concept of eOCP can be fruitfully applied to deduce properties such as the equation of state, ionic transport coefficients, and the ion feature in x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

  7. Molecular Gels Materials with Self-Assembled Fibrillar Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Richard G

    2006-01-01

    Molecular gels and fibrillar networks – a comprehensive guide to experiment and theory Molecular Gels: Materials with Self-Assembled Fibrillar Networks provides a comprehensive treatise on gelators, especially low molecular-mass gelators (LMOGs), and the properties of their gels. The structures and modes of formation of the self-assembled fibrillar networks (SAFINs) that immobilize the liquid components of the gels are discussed experimentally and theoretically. The spectroscopic, rheological, and structural features of the different classes of LMOGs are also presented. Many examples of the application of the principal analytical techniques for investigation of molecular gels (including SANS, SAXS, WAXS, UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and CD spectroscopies, scanning electron, transmission electron and optical microscopies, and molecular modeling) are presented didactically and in-depth, as are several of the theories of the stages of aggregation of individual LMOG molecules leading to SAFINs. Several actua...

  8. Fibrillar films obtained from sodium soap fibers and polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawko, Scott A; Schmidt, Christine E

    2011-08-01

    An objective of tissue engineering is to create synthetic polymer scaffolds with a fibrillar microstructure similar to the extracellular matrix. Here, we present a novel method for creating polymer fibers using the layer-by-layer method and sacrificial templates composed of sodium soap fibers. Soap fibers were prepared from neutralized fatty acids using a sodium chloride crystal dissolution method. Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) of polystyrene sulfonate and polyallylamine hydrochloride were deposited onto the soap fibers, crosslinked with glutaraldehyde, and then the soap fibers were leached with warm water and ethanol. The morphology of the resulting PEM structures was a dense network of fibers surrounded by a nonfibrillar matrix. Microscopy revealed that the PEM fibers were solid structures, presumably composed of polyelectrolytes complexed with residual fatty acids. These fibrillar PEM films were found to support the attachment of human dermal fibroblasts.

  9. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  10. Single-Particle Cryo-EM and 3D Reconstruction of Hybrid Nanoparticles with Electron-Dense Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guimei; Yan, Rui; Zhang, Chuan; Mao, Chengde; Jiang, Wen

    2015-10-01

    Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), accompanied with 3D reconstruction, is a broadly applicable tool for the structural characterization of macromolecules and nanoparticles. Recently, the cryo-EM field has pushed the limits of this technique to higher resolutions and samples of smaller molecular mass, however, some samples still present hurdles to this technique. Hybrid particles with electron-dense components, which have been studied using single-particle cryo-EM yet with limited success in 3D reconstruction due to the interference caused by electron-dense elements, constitute one group of such challenging samples. To process such hybrid particles, a masking method is developed in this work to adaptively remove pixels arising from electron-dense portions in individual projection images while maintaining maximal biomass signals for subsequent 2D alignment, 3D reconstruction, and iterative refinements. As demonstrated by the success in 3D reconstruction of an octahedron DNA/gold hybrid particle, which has been previously published without a 3D reconstruction, the devised strategy that combines adaptive masking and standard single-particle 3D reconstruction approach has overcome the hurdle of electron-dense elements interference, and is generally applicable to cryo-EM structural characterization of most, if not all, hybrid nanomaterials with electron-dense components.

  11. Cyanoacetylene in IC 342: An Evolving Dense Gas Component with Starburst Age

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, David S; Schinnerer, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We present the first images of the J=5-4 and J=16-15 lines of the dense gas tracer, cyanoacetylene, HC_3N, in an external galaxy. The central 200 pc of the nearby star-forming spiral galaxy, IC 342, was mapped using the VLA and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. HC_3N(5-4) line emission is found across the nuclear mini-spiral, but is very weak towards the starburst site, the location of the strongest mid-IR and radio emission. The J=16-15 and 10-9 lines are also faint near the large HII region complex, but are brighter relative to the 5-4 line, consistent with higher excitation. The brightest HC_3N emission is located in the northern arm of the nuclear minispiral, 100 pc away from the radio/IR source to the southwest of the nucleus. This location appears less affected by ultraviolet radiation, and may represent a more embedded, earlier stage of star formation. HC_3N excitation temperatures are consistent with those determined from C^{18}O; the gas is dense, 10^{4-5}/cc, and cool, T_K ~< 40 K. So as to not...

  12. Dense Error Correction for Low-Rank Matrices via Principal Component Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ganesh, Arvind; Li, Xiaodong; Candes, Emmanuel J; Ma, Yi

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of recovering a low-rank matrix when some of its entries, whose locations are not known a priori, are corrupted by errors of arbitrarily large magnitude. It has recently been shown that this problem can be solved efficiently and effectively by a convex program named Principal Component Pursuit (PCP), provided that the fraction of corrupted entries and the rank of the matrix are both sufficiently small. In this paper, we extend that result to show that the same convex program, with a slightly improved weighting parameter, exactly recovers the low-rank matrix even if "almost all" of its entries are arbitrarily corrupted, provided the signs of the errors are random. We corroborate our result with simulations on randomly generated matrices and errors.

  13. Bayesian inference of x-ray diffraction spectra from warm dense matter with the one-component-plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clérouin, Jean; Desbiens, Nicolas; Dubois, Vincent; Arnault, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    We show that the Bayesian inference of recently measured x-ray diffraction spectra from laser-shocked aluminum [L. B. Fletcher et al., Nat. Photon. 9, 274 (2015), 10.1038/nphoton.2015.41] with the one-component-plasma (OCP) model performs remarkably well at estimating the ionic density and temperature. This statistical approach requires many evaluations of the OCP static structure factor, which were done using a recently derived analytic fit. The atomic form factor is approximated by an exponential function in the diffraction window of the first peak. The electronic temperature is then estimated from a comparison of this approximated form factor with the electronic structure of an average atom model. Out-of-equilibrium states, with electrons hotter than ions, are diagnosed for the spectra obtained early after the pump, whereas at a late time delay the plasma is at thermal equilibrium. Apart from the present findings, this OCP-based modeling of warm dense matter has an important role to play in the interpretation of x-ray Thomson scattering measurements currently performed at large laser facilities.

  14. Fibrillar Organic Phases And Their Roles In Rigid Biological Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arey, Bruce W.; Park, John J.; Mayer, George

    2015-06-01

    This study focused on determining the presence of organic phases in the siliceous components of rigid marine composites ("glass" sponge spicules), and thereby to clarify how those composites dissipate significant mechanical energy. Through the use of imaging by helium ion microscopy in the examination of the spicules, the organic phase that is present between the layers of hydrated silica was also detected within the silica cylinders of the composite, indicating the existence therein of a network, scaffolding, or other pattern that has not yet been determined. It was concluded that the presence of an interpenetrating network of some kind, and tenacious fibrillar interfaces are responsible for the large energy dissipation in these siliceous composites by viscoelastic processes. This discovery means that future mechanics analyses of such composites, extending to large deformations must consider such interpenetrating phases.

  15. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  16. Influence of collagen source on fibrillar architecture and properties of vitrified collagen membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Shoumyo; Guo, Qiongyu; Garza-Madrid, Marcos; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Duan, Derek; Carbajal, Priscilla; Schein, Oliver; Trexler, Morgana; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    Collagen vitrigel membranes are transparent biomaterials characterized by a densely organized, fibrillar nanostructure that show promise in the treatment of corneal injury and disease. In this study, the influence of different type I collagen sources and processing techniques, including acid-solubilized collagen from bovine dermis (Bov), pepsin-solubilized collagen from human fibroblast cell culture (HuCC), and ficin-solubilized collagen from recombinant human collagen expressed in tobacco leaves (rH), on the properties of the vitrigel membranes was evaluated. Postvitrification carbodiimide crosslinking (CX) was also carried out on the vitrigels from each collagen source, forming crosslinked counterparts BovXL, HuCCXL, and rHXL, respectively. Collagen membrane ultrastructure and biomaterial properties were found to rely heavily on both collagen source and crosslinking. Bov and HuCC samples showed a random fibrillar organization of collagen, whereas rH vitrigels showed remarkable regional fibril alignment. After CX, light transmission was enhanced in all groups. Denaturation temperatures after CX increased in all membranes, of which the highest increase was seen in rH (14.71°C), suggesting improved thermal stability of the collagen fibrils in the membranes. Noncrosslinked rH vitrigels may be reinforced through CX to reach levels of mechanical strength and thermal stability comparable to Bov.

  17. Improved Adhesion and Compliancy of Hierarchical Fibrillar Adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yasong; Gates, Byron D; Menon, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The gecko relies on van der Waals forces to cling onto surfaces with a variety of topography and composition. The hierarchical fibrillar structures on their climbing feet, ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale, are hypothesized to be key elements for the animal to conquer both smooth and rough surfaces. An epoxy-based artificial hierarchical fibrillar adhesive was prepared to study the influence of the hierarchical structures on the properties of a dry adhesive. The presented experiments highlight the advantages of a hierarchical structure despite a reduction of overall density and aspect ratio of nanofibrils. In contrast to an adhesive containing only nanometer-size fibrils, the hierarchical fibrillar adhesives exhibited a higher adhesion force and better compliancy when tested on an identical substrate.

  18. Friction Properties of Bio-mimetic Nano-fibrillar Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shao-Hua; MI Chun-Hui

    2009-01-01

    Nano-fibrillar arrays are fabricated using polystyrene materials. The average diameter of each fiber is about 300 nm.Experiments show that such a fibrillar surface possesses a relatively hydrophobic feature with a water contact angle of 142°.Nanoscale friction properties are mainly focused on.It is found that the friction force of polystyrene nano-fibrillar surfaces is obviously enhanced in contrast to polystyrene smooth surfaces.The apparent coefficient of friction increases with the applied load, but is independent of the scanning speed.An interesting observation is that the friction force increases almost linearly with the real contact area, which abides by the fundamental Bowden-Tabor law of nano-scale friction.

  19. Rational design and nanofabrication of gecko-inspired fibrillar adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shihao; Xia, Zhenhai

    2012-08-20

    Gecko feet integrate many intriguing functions such as strong adhesion, easy detachment, and self-cleaning. Mimicking gecko toe pad structure leads to the development of new types of fibrillar adhesives useful for various applications. In this Concept article, in addition to the design of adhesive mimics by replicating gecko geometric features, we show a new trend of rational design by adding other physical, chemical, and biological principles on to the geometric merits, for enhancing robustness, responsive control, and durability. Current challenges and future directions are highlighted in the design and nanofabrication of biomimetic fibrillar adhesives.

  20. Kinetic theory of time correlation functions for a dense one-component plasma in a magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoolderman, A.J.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    The time-dependent correlations of a one-component plasma in a uniform magnetic field are studied with the help of kinetic theory. The time correlation functions of the particle density, the momentum density, and the kinetic energy density are evaluated for large time intervals. In the collision-dom

  1. Shape distortion and thermo-mechanical properties of dense SOFC components from green tape to sintered body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teocoli, Francesca; Esposito, Vincenzo; Ni, De Wei

    Sintering of ceramic materials is a critical process, especially when the components are shaped as multilayer. Microstructural changes and stresses take place in ceramics as single layer from the green stage to the densification stage, leading to shape distortion, delamination and cracks. The cha...... was carried out by thermo-mechanical analysis (TMA). The results from the different techniques were found complementary and viscous behavior of the layered ceramics was verified....

  2. Soft grippers using micro-fibrillar adhesives for transfer printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sukho; Sitti, Metin

    2014-07-23

    The adhesive characteristics of fibrillar adhesives on a soft deformable membrane are reported. A soft gripper with an inflatable membrane covered by elastomer mushroom-shaped microfibers have a superior conformation to non-planar 3D part geometries, enabling the transfer printing of various parts serially or in parallel.

  3. Properties of Fibrillar Protein Assemblies and their Percolating Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, C.

    2004-01-01

    Properties of Fibrillar Protein Assemblies and their Percolating Networks. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, The Netherlands Keywords: bovine serum albumin, complex fluids, excluded volume, fibrils, gels, innovation, b-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin, percolation, proteins, rheology, rheo-optics, self-ass

  4. Differential Relationships of Reactive Astrocytes and Microglia to Fibrillar Amyloid Deposits in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Muzikansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2013-01-01

    While it is clear that astrocytes and microglia cluster around dense-core amyloid plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD), whether they are primarily attracted to amyloid deposits or are just reacting to plaque-associated neuritic damage remains elusive. We postulate that astrocytes and microglia may differentially respond to fibrillar amyloid β (Aβ). Therefore, we quantified the size distribution of dense-core Thioflavin-S (ThioS)-positive plaques in the temporal neocortex of 40 AD patients and the microglial and astrocyte responses in their vicinity (≤50 μm), and performed correlations between both measures. As expected, both astrocytes and microglia were clearly spatially associated with ThioS-positive plaques (p = 0.0001, ≤50 μm vs. >50 μm from their edge), but their relationship to ThioS-positive plaque size differed; larger ThioS-positive plaques were associated with more surrounding activated microglia (p = 0.0026), but this effect was not observed with reactive astrocytes. Microglial response to dense-core plaques appears to be proportional to their size, which we postulate reflects a chemotactic effect of Aβ. By contrast, plaque-associated astrocytic response does not correlate with plaque size and seems to parallel the behavior of plaque-associated neuritic damage. PMID:23656989

  5. Dynamic properties of the energy loss of multi-MeV charged particles traveling in two-component warm dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhen-Guo; Wang, Zhigang; Li, Meng-Lei; Li, Da-Fang; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping

    2016-12-01

    The energy loss of multi-MeV charged particles moving in two-component warm dense plasmas (WDPs) is studied theoretically beyond the random-phase approximation. The short-range correlations between particles are taken into account via dynamic local field corrections (DLFC) in a Mermin dielectric function for two-component plasmas. The mean ionization states are obtained by employing the detailed configuration accounting model. The Yukawa-type effective potential is used to derive the DLFC. Numerically, the DLFC are obtained via self-consistent iterative operations. We find that the DLFC are significant around the maximum of the stopping power. Furthermore, by using the two-component extended Mermin dielectric function model including the DLFC, the energy loss of a proton with an initial energy of ˜15 MeV passing through a WDP of beryllium with an electronic density around the solid value ne≈3 ×1023cm-3 and with temperature around ˜40 eV is estimated numerically. The numerical result is reasonably consistent with the experimental observations [A. B. Zylsta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 215002 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.215002]. Our results show that the partial ionization and the dynamic properties should be of importance for the stopping of charged particles moving in the WDP.

  6. Dense Breasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also appear white on mammography, they can be hidden by or within dense breast tissue. Other imaging ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  7. Evaluation of Nanoparticle Tracking for Characterization of Fibrillar Protein Aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dennis T; Lu, Xiaomeng; Fan, Yamin; Murphy, Regina M

    2014-04-01

    Amyloidogenesis is the process of formation of protein aggregates with fibrillar morphology. Because amyloidogenesis is linked to neurodegenerative disease, there is interest in understanding the mechanism of fibril growth. Kinetic models of amyloidogenesis require data on the number concentration and size distribution of aggregates, but this information is difficult to obtain using conventional methods. Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) is a relatively new technique that may be uniquely suited for obtaining these data. In NTA, the two-dimensional (2-D) trajectory of individual particles is tracked, from which the diffusion coefficient, and, hence, hydrodynamic radius is obtained. Here we examine the validity of NTA in tracking number concentration and size of DNA, as a model of a fibrillar macromolecule. We use NTA to examine three amyloidogenic materials: beta-amyloid, transthyretin, and polyglutamine-containing peptides. Our results are instructive in demonstrating the advantages and some limitations of single-particle diffusion measurements for investigating aggregation in protein systems.

  8. A design methodology for biologically inspired dry fibrillar adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksak, Burak

    Realization of the unique aspects of gecko adhesion and incorporating these aspects into a comprehensive design methodology is essential to enable fabrication of application oriented gecko-inspired dry fibrillar adhesives. To address the need for such a design methodology, we propose a fibrillar adhesion model that evaluates the effect of fiber dimensions and material on adhesive performance of fiber arrays. A fibrillar adhesion model is developed to predict the adhesive characteristics of an array of fibrillar structures, and quantify the effect of fiber length, radius, spacing, and material. Photolithography techniques were utilized to fabricate elastomer microfiber arrays. Fibers that are fabricated from stiff SU-8 photoresist are used to fabricate a flexible negative mold that facilitates fabrication of fiber arrays from various elastomers with high yield. The tips of the cylindrical fibers are modified to mushroom-like tip shapes. Adhesive strengths in excess of 100 kPa is obtained with mushroom tipped elastomer microfibers. Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) are utilized as enhanced friction materials by partially embedding inside soft polyurethanes. Friction coefficients up to 1 were repeatedly obtained from the resulting VACNF composite structures. A novel fabrication method is used to attach Poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) molecular brush-like structures on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). These brushes are grown on unstructured PDMS and PDMS fibers with mushroom tips. Pull-off force is enhanced by up to 7 times with PBA brush grafted micro-fiber arrays over unstructured PDMS substrate. Adhesion model, initially developed for curved smooth surfaces, is extended to self-affine fractal surfaces to better reflect the adhesion performance of fiber arrays on natural surfaces. Developed adhesion model for fiber arrays is used in an optimization scheme which estimates optimal design parameters to obtain maximum adhesive strength on a given

  9. Crystalline fibrillar gel formation in aqueous surfactant-antioxidant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Linet Rose; Tata, B V R; Sreejith, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) is a well-known cationic surfactant capable to micellize into diverse morphologies in aqueous medium. We observed the formation of an opaque gel state from aqueous CTAB solution in the presence of the aromatic additive, para-coumaric acid (PCA). Optical microscopic images revealed the presence of large fibrils in the system at room temperature. Gel nature of the fibrils was confirmed by rheological measurements. Presence of interstitial water in the fibrils was recognized with Raman spectroscopy. On heating the sample above 30 (°) C, the fibrillar gel state changes to a transparent liquid state with Newtonian flow properties. Dynamic light scattering study hinted the presence of small micelles in the solution above 30 (°) C. Thus the system showed a temperature-dependent structural transition from opaque water-swollen gel to transparent micellar liquid. The formation of water-swollen fibrillar network is attributed to surfactant-additive intermolecular interactions in aqueous medium. Transition to micelle phase above 30 (°) C is related to Kraft transition which is observed at significantly lower temperature for CTAB in the absence of PCA. The structural features of PCA play a key role in promoting fibrillar network formation and elevating the Kraft transition in aqueous solution of CTAB.

  10. Protein Fibrillar Hydrogels for three-Dimensional Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein self-assembly into highly ordered fibrillar aggregates has attracted increasing attention over recent years, due primarily to its association with disease states such as Alzheimer's. More recently, however, research has focused on understanding the generic behavior of protein self-assembly where fibrillation is typically induced under harsh conditions of low pH and/or high temperature. Moreover the inherent properties of these fibrils, including their nanoscale dimension, environmental responsiveness, and biological compatibility, are attracting substantial interest for exploiting these fibrils for the creation of new materials. Here we will show how protein fibrils can be formed under physiological conditions and their subsequent gelation driven using the ionic strength of cell culture media while simultaneously incorporating cells homogeneously throughout the gel network. The fibrillar and elastic nature of the gel have been confirmed using cryo-transmission electron microscopy and oscillatory rheology, respectively; while cell culture work shows that our hydrogels promote cell spreading, attachment, and proliferation in three dimensions.

  11. Role of fibrillar Tenascin-C in metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Chen, Zhiyu; Chen, Ming; Li, Dajiang; Li, Zhihua; Xiong, Yan; Dong, Jiahong; Li, Xiaowu

    2009-04-01

    Interaction of cancer cells with stroma cells facilitates tumor progression by rebuilding the existing extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment. In the tumor, upregulation of Tenascin-C (Tn-C) expression potentially can alter tumor behavior. However, the molecular mechanisms by which tumor-stroma interactions affect the tumor microenvironment have not been well characterized. In this study, we analyzed the expression of fibrillar Tn-C (fTn-C) in human metastatic pancreatic cancers. After co-culturing two pancreatic cancer cell lines, highly metastatic BxPc3 cells and non-metastatic PaCa2 cells, with stromal fibroblasts (SF), we evaluated the roles of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activation and SF in promoting Tn-C organization. Next, we evaluated whether fibrillar Tn-C promotes pancreatic cancer cell movement using cell adhesion and migration assays. Finally, we observed the relationship between MMP-2 activation and fTn-C formation in vivo by injecting the BxPc3 and PaCa2 cells into nude mice. We found that fTn-C was increased in metastatic pancreatic cancer. The fTn-C expression correlated with MMP-2 activity. In the in vitro co-culture, fTn-C organization was found only in BxPc3/SF co-cultures, and required the participation of active MMP-2. The fTn-C reduced cell adhesion and promote pancreatic cancer cell migration by decreasing the adhesive interactions between integrin alpha6beta1 and the ECM. The in vivo tumorigenesis analysis showed that the fTn-C formation and active MMP-2 were significantly increased in the BxPc3 tumors, compared to the PaCa2 tumors. These results demonstrate that Tn-C deposition into the ECM requires participation of active MMP-2 and SF. The deposited Tn-C could promote pancreatic cancer progression.

  12. Modulation of the gelation efficiency of fibrillar and spherical aggregates by means of thiolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munialo, Claire D; de Jongh, Harmen H J; Broersen, Kerensa; van der Linden, Erik; Martin, Anneke H

    2013-11-27

    Fibrillar and spherical aggregates were prepared from whey protein isolate (WPI). These aggregates were thiolated to a substantial degree to observe any impact on functionality. Sulfur-containing groups were introduced on these aggregates which could be converted to thiol groups by deblocking. Changes on a molecular and microstructural level were studied using tryptophan fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, and particle size analysis. The average size (nm) of spherical aggregates increased from 38 to 68 nm (blocked variant) and 106 nm (deblocked variant) after thiolation, whereas the structure of fibrillar aggregates was not affected. Subsequently, gels containing these different aggregates were prepared. Rheological measurements showed that thiolation decreased the gelation concentration and increased gel strength for both WPI fibrillar and spherical aggregates. This effect was more pronounced upon thiolation of preformed fibrillar aggregates. The findings suggest that thiolation at a protein aggregate level is a promising strategy to increase gelation efficiency.

  13. Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Tot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique case of metaplastic breast carcinoma with an epithelial component showing tumoral necrosis and neuroectodermal stromal component is described. The tumor grew rapidly and measured 9 cm at the time of diagnosis. No lymph node metastases were present. The disease progressed rapidly and the patient died two years after the diagnosis from a hemorrhage caused by brain metastases. The morphology and phenotype of the tumor are described in detail and the differential diagnostic options are discussed.

  14. Aβ peptide fibrillar architectures controlled by conformational constraints of the monomer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Brännström

    Full Text Available Anomalous self-assembly of the Aβ peptide into fibrillar amyloid deposits is strongly correlated with the development of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ fibril extension follows a template guided "dock and lock" mechanism where polymerisation is catalysed by the fibrillar ends. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR and quenched hydrogen-deuterium exchange NMR (H/D-exchange NMR, we have analysed the fibrillar structure and polymerisation properties of both the highly aggregation prone Aβ1-40 Glu22Gly (Aβ(40Arc and wild type Aβ1-40 (Aβ(40WT. The solvent protection patterns from H/D exchange experiments suggest very similar structures of the fibrillar forms. However, through cross-seeding experiments monitored by SPR, we found that the monomeric form of Aβ(40WT is significantly impaired to acquire the fibrillar architecture of Aβ(40Arc. A detailed characterisation demonstrated that Aβ(40WT has a restricted ability to dock and isomerise with high binding affinity onto Aβ(40Arc fibrils. These results have general implications for the process of fibril assembly, where the rate of polymerisation, and consequently the architecture of the formed fibrils, is restricted by conformational constraints of the monomers. Interestingly, we also found that the kinetic rate of fibril formation rather than the thermodynamically lowest energy state determines the overall fibrillar structure.

  15. Elongated fibrillar structure of a streptococcal adhesin assembled by the high-affinity association of [alpha]- and PPII-helices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Manisha H.; Robinette, Rebekah A.; Crowley, Paula J.; Michalek, Suzanne; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion (Cornell); (UAB); (Florida)

    2010-08-18

    Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein adhesin that interacts with salivary components within the salivary pellicle. AgI/II contributes to virulence and has been studied as an immunological and structural target, but a fundamental understanding of its underlying architecture has been lacking. Here we report a high-resolution (1.8 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the A{sub 3}VP{sub 1} fragment of S. mutans AgI/II that demonstrates a unique fibrillar form (155 {angstrom}) through the interaction of two noncontiguous regions in the primary sequence. The A{sub 3} repeat of the alanine-rich domain adopts an extended {alpha}-helix that intertwines with the P{sub 1} repeat polyproline type II (PPII) helix to form a highly extended stalk-like structure heretofore unseen in prokaryotic or eukaryotic protein structures. Velocity sedimentation studies indicate that full-length AgI/II that contains three A/P repeats extends over 50 nanometers in length. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that the high-affinity association between the A{sub 3} and P{sub 1} helices is enthalpically driven. Two distinct binding sites on AgI/II to the host receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG) were identified by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The current crystal structure reveals that AgI/II family proteins are extended fibrillar structures with the number of alanine- and proline-rich repeats determining their length.

  16. Trans-cellular propagation of Tau aggregation by fibrillar species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kfoury, Najla; Holmes, Brandon B; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M; Diamond, Marc I

    2012-06-01

    Aggregation of the microtubule associated protein Tau is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia. In Alzheimer disease, Tau pathology spreads progressively throughout the brain, possibly along existing neural networks. However, it is still unclear how the propagation of Tau misfolding occurs. Intriguingly, in animal models, vaccine-based therapies have reduced Tau and synuclein pathology by uncertain mechanisms, given that these proteins are intracellular. We have previously speculated that trans-cellular propagation of misfolding could be mediated by a process similar to prion pathogenesis, in which fibrillar Tau aggregates spread pathology from cell to cell. However, there has been little evidence to demonstrate true trans-cellular propagation of Tau misfolding, in which Tau aggregates from one cell directly contact Tau protein in the recipient cell to trigger further aggregation. Here we have observed that intracellular Tau fibrils are directly released into the medium and then taken up by co-cultured cells. Internalized Tau aggregates induce fibrillization of intracellular Tau in these naive recipient cells via direct protein-protein contact that we demonstrate using FRET. Tau aggregation can be amplified across several generations of cells. An anti-Tau monoclonal antibody blocks Tau aggregate propagation by trapping fibrils in the extracellular space and preventing their uptake. Thus, propagation of Tau protein misfolding among cells can be mediated by release and subsequent uptake of fibrils that directly contact native protein in recipient cells. These results support the model of aggregate propagation by templated conformational change and suggest a mechanism for vaccine-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Trans-cellular Propagation of Tau Aggregation by Fibrillar Species*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kfoury, Najla; Holmes, Brandon B.; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    Aggregation of the microtubule associated protein Tau is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia. In Alzheimer disease, Tau pathology spreads progressively throughout the brain, possibly along existing neural networks. However, it is still unclear how the propagation of Tau misfolding occurs. Intriguingly, in animal models, vaccine-based therapies have reduced Tau and synuclein pathology by uncertain mechanisms, given that these proteins are intracellular. We have previously speculated that trans-cellular propagation of misfolding could be mediated by a process similar to prion pathogenesis, in which fibrillar Tau aggregates spread pathology from cell to cell. However, there has been little evidence to demonstrate true trans-cellular propagation of Tau misfolding, in which Tau aggregates from one cell directly contact Tau protein in the recipient cell to trigger further aggregation. Here we have observed that intracellular Tau fibrils are directly released into the medium and then taken up by co-cultured cells. Internalized Tau aggregates induce fibrillization of intracellular Tau in these naive recipient cells via direct protein-protein contact that we demonstrate using FRET. Tau aggregation can be amplified across several generations of cells. An anti-Tau monoclonal antibody blocks Tau aggregate propagation by trapping fibrils in the extracellular space and preventing their uptake. Thus, propagation of Tau protein misfolding among cells can be mediated by release and subsequent uptake of fibrils that directly contact native protein in recipient cells. These results support the model of aggregate propagation by templated conformational change and suggest a mechanism for vaccine-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22461630

  18. Interference effects in the long-time tail of the velocity auto-correlation function for a dense one-component plasma in a magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttorp, L.G.; Schoolderman, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The long-time behaviour of the velocity autocorrelation function that describes the motion of a tagged particle through a one-component plasma in a uniform magnetic field has been determined with the use of mode-coupling theory. The long-time tail depends on the orientation of the velocity with resp

  19. Nano-TiCl4/SiO2: An efficient heterogeneous solid acid catalyst for the one pot cascade five-component synthesis of densely functionalized tetrahydropyridines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abdolhamid Bamoniri; Bi Bi Fatemeh Mirjalili; Reza Tarazian

    2015-05-01

    Nano-TiCl4/SiO2 was found to be an inexpensive and efficient heterogeneous solid acid catalyst for the synthesis of one-pot cascade synthesis of highly functionalized asymmetric tetrahydropyridines from the five-component condensation reaction of the para-substituted anilines and aromatic aldehydes with ethyl acetoacetate under thermal conditions. Novel methodology, environmentally benign conditions, clean protocol, easy work-up and high yields are the important advantages of this protocol. The products were characterized using physical and spectroscopic data such as FT-IR, 1H-NMR and in some cases 13C-NMR and CHN analysis.

  20. Dense topological spaces and dense continuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldwoah, Khaled A.

    2013-09-01

    There are several attempts to generalize (or "widen") the concept of topological space. This paper uses equivalence relations to generalize the concept of topological space via the concept of equivalence relations. By the generalization, we can introduce from particular topology on a nonempty set X many new topologies, we call anyone of these new topologies a dense topology. In addition, we formulate some simple properties of dense topologies and study suitable generalizations of the concepts of limit points, closeness and continuity, as well as Jackson, Nörlund and Hahn dense topologies.

  1. Non-fibrillar amyloid-{beta} peptide reduces NMDA-induced neurotoxicity, but not AMPA-induced neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niidome, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: tniidome@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Neuroscience for Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Goto, Yasuaki; Kato, Masaru; Wang, Pi-Lin [Department of Neuroscience for Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Goh, Saori; Tanaka, Naoki [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Akaike, Akinori [Department of Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kihara, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Hachiro [Department of Neuroscience for Drug Discovery, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2009-09-04

    Amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) is thought to be linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies suggest that A{beta} has important physiological roles in addition to its pathological roles. We recently demonstrated that A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, but the relationship between A{beta}42 assemblies and their neuroprotective effects remains largely unknown. In this study, we prepared non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 based on the results of the thioflavin T assay, Western blot analysis, and atomic force microscopy, and examined the effects of non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Non-fibrillar A{beta}42, but not fibrillar A{beta}42, protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, non-fibrillar A{beta}42 decreased both neurotoxicity and increases in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), but not by {alpha}-amino-3-hydrozy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA). Our results suggest that non-fibrillar A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity through regulation of the NMDA receptor.

  2. Pathological tendons maintain sufficient aligned fibrillar structure on ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docking, S I; Cook, J

    2016-06-01

    Structural disorganization in the tendon is associated with tendinopathy, with little research investigating whether disorganization overwhelms the overall structural integrity of the tendon. This study investigated the mean cross-sectional area (CSA) of aligned fibrillar structure as detected by ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC) in the pathological and normal Achilles and patellar tendons. Ninety-one participants had their Achilles and/or patellar tendons scanned using UTC to capture a three-dimensional image of the tendon and allow a semi-quantification of the echopattern. The mean CSA of aligned fibrillar structure (echo type I + II) and disorganized structure (echo type III + IV) was calculated based on UTC algorithms. Each tendon was classified as either pathological or normal based solely on gray-scale ultrasound. The mean CSA of aligned fibrillar structure was significantly greater (P ≤ 0.001) in the pathological tendon compared with the normal tendon, despite the pathological tendon containing greater amounts of disorganized structure (P ≤ 0.001). A significant relationship was observed between the mean CSA of disorganized structure and anteroposterior diameter of the Achilles (R(2)  = 0.587) and patellar (R(2)  = 0.559) tendons. This study is the first to show that pathological tendons have sufficient levels of aligned fibrillar structure. Pathological tendons may compensate for areas of disorganization by increasing in tendon thickness. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Modulation of the Gelation Efficiency of Fibrillar and Spherical Aggregates by Means of Thiolation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munialo, C.D.; Jongh, H.H.J. de; Broersen, K.; Linden, E. van der; Martin, A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrillar and spherical aggregates were prepared from whey protein isolate (WPI). These aggregates were thiolated to a substantial degree to observe any impact on functionality. Sulfur-containing groups were introduced on these aggregates which could be converted to thiol groups by deblocking. Chang

  4. Modulation of the Gelation Efficiency of Fibrillar and Spherical Aggregates by Means of Thiolation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munialo, C.D.; Jongh, H.H.J. de; Broersen, K.; Linden, E. van der; Martin, A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrillar and spherical aggregates were prepared from whey protein isolate (WPI). These aggregates were thiolated to a substantial degree to observe any impact on functionality. Sulfur-containing groups were introduced on these aggregates which could be converted to thiol groups by deblocking. Chang

  5. Strain Stiffening of Fibrillar Collagen during Individual and Collective Cell Migration Identified by AFM Nanoindentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helvert, S. van; Friedl, P.

    2016-01-01

    The multistep process of cell migration requires cells to dynamically couple to extracellular interfaces and generate traction force or friction for displacement of the cell body. When deformed, biopolymer networks, including fibrillar collagen and fibrin, undergo a nonlinear elasticity change that

  6. Specific fluorescent detection of fibrillar α-synuclein using mono- and trimethine cyanine dyes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkova, K.D.; Kovalska, V.B.; Balanda, A.O.; Losytskyy, M.Yu; Golub, A.G.; Vermeij, R.J.; Subramaniam, V.; Tolmachev, O.I.; Yarmoluk, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    With the aim of searching of novel amyloid-specific fluorescent probes the ability of series of mono- and trimethine cyanines based on benzothiazole, pyridine and quinoline heterocycle end groups to recognize fibrillar formations of α-synuclein (ASN) was studied. For the first time it was revealed t

  7. Hierarchical model of fibrillar collagen distribution for polarization-resolved SHG microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuer, Adam E.; Akens, Margarete K.; Krouglov, Serguei; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Wilson, Brian C.; Whyne, Cari M.; Barzda, Virginijus

    2013-02-01

    A hierarchical model of the organization of fibrillar collagen is developed and its implications on polarization-resolved second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are investigated. A "ground-up" approach is employed to develop the theory for understanding of the origin of SHG from fibrillar collagen. The effects of fibril ultrastructure and fibril macroscopic organization on the second-order polarization properties of fibrillar collagen are presented in conjunction with recent ab initio results performed on a collagen triple-helix model (-GLY-PRO-HYP-)n. Various tissues containing fibrillar collagen are quantified using a polarization-resolved SHG technique, termed polarization-in, polarization-out (PIPO) and interpreted in light of the aforementioned theory. The method involves varying the incident laser polarization, while monitoring the SHG intensity through an analyzer. From the SHG polarization data the orientation of the fibers, in biological tissue, can be deduced. Unique PIPO signatures are observed for different rat tissues and interpreted in terms of the collagen composition, fibril ultrastructure, and macroscopic organization. Similarities and discrepancies in the second-order polarization properties of different collagen types and ultrastructures will be presented. PIPO SHG microscopy shows promise in its ability to quantify the organization of collagen in various tissues. The ability to characterize the structure of collagen in various tissue microenvironments will aid in the study of numerous collagen related biological process, including tissue diseases, wound repair, and tumor development and progression.

  8. Dense with Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletras, Anthony H.; Ingkanisorn, W. Patricia; Mancini, Christine; Arai, Andrew E.

    2005-09-01

    Displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) with a low encoding strength phase-cycled meta-DENSE readout and a two fold SENSE acceleration ( R = 2) is described. This combination reduces total breath-hold times for increased patient comfort during cardiac regional myocardial contractility studies. Images from phantoms, normal volunteers, and a patient are provided to demonstrate the SENSE-DENSE combination of methods. The overall breath-hold time is halved while preserving strain map quality.

  9. Resolving the Large Scale Spectral Variability of the Luminous Seyfert 1 Galaxy 1H 0419-577: Evidence for a New Emission Component and Absorption by Cold Dense Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounds, K. A.; Reeves, J. N.; Page, K. L.; OBrien, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    An XMM-Newton observation of the luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0419-577 in September 2002, when the source was in an extreme low-flux state, found a very hard X-ray spectrum at 1-10 keV with a strong soft excess below -1 keV. Comparison with an earlier XMM-Newton observation when 1H 0419-577 was X-ray bright indicated the dominant spectral variability was due to a steep power law or cool Comptonised thermal emission. Four further XMM-Newton observations, with 1H 0419-577 in intermediate flux states, now support that conclusion, while we also find the variable emission component in intermediate state difference spectra to be strongly modified by absorption in low ionisation matter. The variable soft excess then appears to be an artefact of absorption of the underlying continuum while the core soft emission can be attributed to re- combination in an extended region of more highly ionised gas. We note the wider implications of finding substantial cold dense matter overlying (or embedded in) the X-ray continuum source in a luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy.

  10. Resolving the large scale spectral variability of the luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0419-577: Evidence for a new emission component and absorption by cold dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Pounds, K A; Page, K L; O'Brien, P T

    2004-01-01

    An XMM-Newton observation of the luminous Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0419-577 in September 2002, when the source was in an extreme low-flux state, found a very hard X-ray spectrum at 1-10 keV with a strong soft excess below ~1 keV. Comparison with an earlier XMM-Newton observation when 1H 0419-577 was `X-ray bright' indicated the dominant spectral variability was due to a steep power law or cool Comptonised thermal emission. Four further XMM-Newton observations, with 1H 0419-577 in intermediate flux states, now support that conclusion, while we also find the variable emission component in intermediate state difference spectra to be strongly modified by absorption in low ionisation matter. The variable `soft excess' then appears to be an artefact of absorption of the underlying continuum while the `core' soft emission can be attributed to recombination in an extended region of more highly ionised gas. We note the wider implications of finding substantial cold dense matter overlying (or embedded in) the X-ray continuu...

  11. Atoms in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  12. Quantum dense key distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Degiovanni, I P; Castelletto, S; Rastello, M L; Bovino, F A; Colla, A M; Castagnoli, G C

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a new protocol for quantum dense key distribution. This protocol embeds the benefits of a quantum dense coding and a quantum key distribution and is able to generate shared secret keys four times more efficiently than BB84 one. We hereinafter prove the security of this scheme against individual eavesdropping attacks, and we present preliminary experimental results, showing its feasibility.

  13. Mechanics of load-drag-unload contact cleaning of gecko-inspired fibrillar adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusomwan, Uyiosa A; Sitti, Metin

    2014-10-14

    Contact self-cleaning of gecko-inspired synthetic adhesives with mushroom-shaped tips has been demonstrated recently using load-drag-unload cleaning procedures similar to that of the natural animal. However, the underlying mechanics of contact cleaning has yet to be fully understood. In this work, we present a detailed experiment of contact self-cleaning that shows that rolling is the dominant mechanism of cleaning for spherical microparticle contaminants, during the load-drag-unload procedure. We also study the effect of dragging rate and normal load on the particle rolling friction. A model of spherical particle rolling on an elastomer fibrillar adhesive interface is developed and agrees well with the experimental results. This study takes us closer to determining design parameters for achieving self-cleaning fibrillar adhesives.

  14. Hierarchical Formation of Fibrillar and Lamellar Self-Assemblies from Guanosine-Based Motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Neviani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we investigate the supramolecular polymerizations of two lipophilic guanosine derivatives in chloroform by light scattering technique and TEM experiments. The obtained data reveal the presence of several levels of organization due to the hierarchical self-assembly of the guanosine units in ribbons that in turn aggregate in fibrillar or lamellar soft structures. The elucidation of these structures furnishes an explanation to the physical behaviour of guanosine units which display organogelator properties.

  15. Improved Bio-inspired Artificial Gecko Adhesive by Using Hierarchical Fibrillar Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yasong

    2014-01-01

    Geckos are well known for being rapid climbers that have long existed in nature. The reversible and reusable adhesive on their feet intrigues scientists to explore a bio-mimetic adhesive, which inherits the adhesion properties of the gecko’s adhesives. Recent advances in electron microscopy reveal the secret of gecko’s climbing ability: there are hierarchical fibrillar structures branching from the skin of their climbing feet. Sizes of these hierarchical fibrils range from micrometer to nanom...

  16. Amphiphilic Beads as Depots for Sustained Drug Release Integrated into Fibrillar Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Mihaila, Silvia M.; Kulkarni, Ashish A.; Patel, Alpesh; Di Luca, Andrea; Reis, Rui L.; Gomes, Manuela E.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Native extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex fibrous structure loaded with bioactive cues that affects the surrounding cells. A promising strategy to mimicking native tissue architecture for tissue engineering applications is to engineer fibrous scaffolds using electrospinning. By loading appropriate bioactive cues within these fibrous scaffolds, various cellular functions such as cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation can be regulated. Here, we report on the encapsulation and sustained release of model hydrophobic drug (dexamethasone (Dex)) within beaded fibrillar scaffold of poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)-poly(butylene terephthalate) (PEOT/PBT), a polyether-ester multiblock copolymer to direct differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The amphiphilic beads act as depots for sustained drug release that is integrated into the fibrillar scaffolds. The entrapment of Dex within the beaded structure results in sustained release of drug over the period of 28 days. This is mainly attributed to the diffusion driven release of Dex from the amphiphilic electrospun scaffolds. In vitro results indicate that hMSCs cultured on Dex containing beaded fibrillar scaffolds exhibit an increase in osteogenic differentiation potential, as evidenced by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, compared to the direct infusion of Dex in culture medium. The formation of mineralized matrix is also significantly enhanced due to the controlled Dex release from the fibrous scaffolds. This approach can be used to engineer scaffolds with appropriate chemical cues to direct tissue regeneration. PMID:24794894

  17. Aggregation behavior of novel heptamethine cyanine dyes upon their binding to native and fibrillar lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vus, Kateryna; Tarabara, Ulyana; Kurutos, Atanas; Ryzhova, Olga; Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya; Gadjev, Nikolai; Deligeorgiev, Todor

    2017-04-05

    Two newly synthesized symmetrical heptamethine cyanine dyes, AK7-5 and AK7-6, absorbing in the region of low autofluorescence of biological samples, have been tested for their ability to detect proteins aggregated into amyloid fibrils. In aqueous solution these probes possess three absorption bands corresponding to the monomer, dimer and H-aggregate species. The association of the dye with fibrillar lysozyme was followed by the enhancement of the monomer band and the reduction of the H-band. The absorption spectra measured at various fibril concentrations were analyzed in terms of the model allowing for the shift of equilibria between various dye species due to the binding of monomers and dimers of AK7-5 and AK7-6 to amyloid fibrils. The association constants and stoichiometries of the dye-fibril complexation have been evaluated. In contrast to fibrillar lysozyme, the native protein brought about strong J-aggregate formation accompanied by a marked drop in the absorbance of the dye monomer species. Quantum chemical calculations and simple docking studies showed that AK7-5 and AK7-6 monomers can bind to the grooves, running parallel to the fibril axis. Due to their ability to distinguish between the native and fibrillar protein states, the novel cyanines are recommended as complementary to existing amyloid markers.

  18. Specific fluorescent detection of fibrillar alpha-synuclein using mono- and trimethine cyanine dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, K D; Kovalska, V B; Balanda, A O; Losytskyy, M Yu; Golub, A G; Vermeij, R J; Subramaniam, V; Tolmachev, O I; Yarmoluk, S M

    2008-02-01

    With the aim of searching of novel amyloid-specific fluorescent probes the ability of series of mono- and trimethine cyanines based on benzothiazole, pyridine and quinoline heterocycle end groups to recognize fibrillar formations of alpha-synuclein (ASN) was studied. For the first time it was revealed that monomethine cyanines can specifically increase their fluorescence in aggregated ASN presence. Dialkylamino-substituted monomethine cyanine T-284 and meso-ethyl-substituted trimethine cyanine SH-516 demonstrated the higher emission intensity and selectivity to aggregated ASN than classic amyloid stain Thioflavin T, and could be proposed as novel efficient fluorescent probes for fibrillar ASN detection. Studies of structure-function dependences have shown that incorporation of amino- or diethylamino- substituents into the 6-position of the benzothiazole heterocycle yields in a appearance of a selective fluorescent response to fibrillar alpha-synuclein presence. Performed calculations of molecular dimensions of studied cyanine dyes gave us the possibility to presume, that dyes bind with their long axes parallel to the fibril axis via insertion into the neat rows (so called 'channels') running along fibril.

  19. Data in support of the identification of neuronal and astrocyte proteins interacting with extracellularly applied oligomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein assemblies by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Redeker, Virginie; Fritz, Nicolas; Pieri, Laura; Almeida, Leandro G; Spolidoro, Maria; Liebmann, Thomas; Bousset, Luc; Renner, Marianne; Léna, Clément; Aperia, Anita; Melki, Ronald; Triller, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is the principal component of Lewy bodies, the pathophysiological hallmark of individuals affected by Parkinson disease (PD). This neuropathologic form of α-syn contributes to PD progression and propagation of α-syn assemblies between neurons. The data we present here support the proteomic analysis used to identify neuronal proteins that specifically interact with extracellularly applied oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn assemblies (conditions 1 and 2, respectively) (doi: 10.15252/embj.201591397[1]). α-syn assemblies and their cellular partner proteins were pulled down from neuronal cell lysed shortly after exposure to exogenous α-syn assemblies and the associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry using a shotgun proteomic-based approach. We also performed experiments on pure cultures of astrocytes to identify astrocyte-specific proteins interacting with oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn (conditions 3 and 4, respectively). For each condition, proteins interacting selectively with α-syn assemblies were identified by comparison to proteins pulled-down from untreated cells used as controls. The mass spectrometry data, the database search and the peak lists have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium database via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PRIDE: PXD002256 to PRIDE: PXD002263 and doi: 10.6019/PXD002256 to 10.6019/PXD002263.

  20. Fibrillar structures formed by covalently bound, short, β-stranded peptides on self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, Jason W; Webb, Lauren J

    2015-03-24

    The ability to maintain or reproduce biomolecular structures on inorganic substrates has the potential to impact diverse fields such as sensing and molecular electronics, as well as the study of biological self-assembly and structure-function relationships. Because the structure and self-assembly of biomolecules are exquisitely sensitive to their local chemical and electrostatic environment, the goal of reproducing or mimicking biological function in an abiological environment, including at a surface, is challenging. However, simple and well-characterized chemical modifications of prepared surfaces can be used to tune surface chemistry, structure, electrostatics, and reactivity of inorganic materials to facilitate biofunctionalization and function. Here, we describe the covalent attachment of 13-residue β-stranded peptides containing alkyne groups to a flat gold surface functionalized with an azide-terminated self-assembled monolayer through a Huisgen cycloaddition, or "click", reaction. The chemical composition and structural morphology of these surfaces were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, grazing incidence angle reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, surface circular dichroism, and atomic force microscopy. The surface-bound β-strands self-assemble into antiparallel β-sheets to form fibrillar structures 24.9 ± 1.6 nm in diameter and 2.83 ± 0.74 nm in height on the reactive surface. The results herein provide a platform for studying and controlling the self-assembly process of biomolecules into larger supermolecular structures while allowing tunable control through chemical functionalization of the surface. Interest in the mechanisms of formation of fibrillar structures has most commonly been associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, but fibrils may actually represent the thermodynamic low-energy conformation of a much larger class of peptides and proteins. The protocol developed here is an

  1. Load sharing in bioinspired fibrillar adhesives with backing layer interactions and interfacial misalignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacca, Mattia; Booth, Jamie A.; Turner, Kimberly L.; McMeeking, Robert M.

    2016-11-01

    Bio-inspired fibrillar adhesives rely on the utilization of short-range intermolecular forces harnessed by intimate contact at fibril tips. The combined adhesive strength of multiple fibrils can only be utilized if equal load sharing (ELS) is obtained at detachment. Previous investigations have highlighted that mechanical coupling of fibrils through a compliant backing layer gives rise to load concentration and the nucleation and propagation of interfacial flaws. However, misalignment of the adhesive and contacting surface has not been considered in theoretical treatments of load sharing with backing layer interactions. Alignment imperfections are difficult to avoid for a flat-on-flat interfacial configuration. In this work we demonstrate that interfacial misalignment can significantly alter load sharing and the kinematics of detachment in a model adhesive system. Load sharing regimes dominated by backing layer interactions and misalignment are revealed, the transition between which is controlled by the misalignment angle, fibril separation, and fibril compliance. In the regime dominated by misalignment, backing layer deformation can counteract misalignment giving rise to improved load sharing when compared to an identical fibrillar array with a rigid backing layer. This result challenges the conventional belief that stiffer (and thinner) backing layers consistently reduce load concentration among fibrils. Finally, we obtain analytically the fibril compliance distribution required to harness backing layer interactions to obtain ELS. Through fibril compliance optimization, ELS can be obtained even with misalignment. However, since misalignment is typically not deterministic, it is of greater practical significance that the array optimized for perfect alignment exhibits load sharing superior to that of a homogeneous array subject to misalignment. These results inform the design of fibrillar arrays with graded compliance capable of exhibiting improved load sharing

  2. Characteristics of a self-assembled fibrillar gel prepared from red stingray collagen

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Inwoo; Osatomi, Kiyoshi; Yoshida, Asami; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Tachibana, Katsuyasu; Oda, Tatsuya; Hara, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    A translucent collagen gel was formed from a transparent acidic solution of red stingray collagen by adjusting to physiological ionic strength and pH in phosphate buffer and then incubating at 25–37°C. During fibril formation from red stingray collagen, the turbidity increased when the NaCl concentration was increased at constant pH and the rate of fibril formation was accelerated by higher pH or lower NaCl concentration. The T m of red stingray collagen fibrillar gel was estimated as 44.3 ±...

  3. Modelling dense relational data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard;

    2012-01-01

    Relational modelling classically consider sparse and discrete data. Measures of influence computed pairwise between temporal sources naturally give rise to dense continuous-valued matrices, for instance p-values from Granger causality. Due to asymmetry or lack of positive definiteness they are no......Relational modelling classically consider sparse and discrete data. Measures of influence computed pairwise between temporal sources naturally give rise to dense continuous-valued matrices, for instance p-values from Granger causality. Due to asymmetry or lack of positive definiteness...... they are not naturally suited for kernel K-means. We propose a generative Bayesian model for dense matrices which generalize kernel K-means to consider off-diagonal interactions in matrices of interactions, and demonstrate its ability to detect structure on both artificial data and two real data sets....

  4. Dense Plasma Focus Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jungman, Gerard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The mechanisms for pinch formation in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices, with the generation of high-energy ions beams and subsequent neutron production over a relatively short distance, are not fully understood. Here we report on high-fidelity 2D and 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the LA-COMPASS code to study the pinch formation dynamics and its associated instabilities and neutron production.

  5. Superhydrophobic and oleophilic open-cell foams from fibrillar blends of polypropylene and polytetrafluoroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Ali; Chu, Raymond K M; Lee, Jung H; Park, Chul B

    2014-12-10

    Effective removal of oils from water is of global significance for environmental protection. In this study, we investigate the hydrophobicity and oleophilicity of open-cell polymer foams prepared in a continuous and scalable extrusion process. The material used to prepare the open-cell foams is a fibrillar blend of polypropylene (PP) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the morphology of the PP/PTFE fibrillar blend reveal that the PTFE has a fibrillar morphology in the PP matrix. SEM micrograph of the extruded foam shows the formation of an interconnected open-cell structure. Using nitrogen pycnometry, the open-cell content is estimated to be 97.7%. A typical bulk density of the open-cell foam is measured to be about 0.07 g cm(-3) corresponding to a void fraction of 92%. Thus, a large three-dimensional space is made available for oil storage. A drop of water on the cross-section of the extruded open-cell foam forms a contact angle of 160° suggesting that the open-cell foam exhibits superhydrophobicity. The open-cell foam can selectively absorb various petroleum products, such as octane, gasoline, diesel, kerosene, light crude oil, and heavy crude oil from water and the uptake capacities range from about 5 to 24 g g(-1). The uptake kinetics can be enhanced by exposing the open-cell foam to high intensity ultrasound which increases the surface porosity of the thin, impervious, foam "skin" layer. The reusability of the foam can be improved by using a matrix polymer which demonstrates superior elastic properties and prevents the foams from undergoing a large permanent deformation upon compression to "squeeze out" the oil. For example, when the PP homopolymer matrix is replaced with a PP random copolymer, the permanent deformation for 10 compressive cycles is reduced from about 30% to 10%. To the best of our knowledge, these PP-based open-cell foams outperform PP-based absorbents conventionally used for oil-spill cleanup

  6. Data in support of the identification of neuronal and astrocyte proteins interacting with extracellularly applied oligomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein assemblies by mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amulya Nidhi Shrivastava

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available α-Synuclein (α-syn is the principal component of Lewy bodies, the pathophysiological hallmark of individuals affected by Parkinson disease (PD. This neuropathologic form of α-syn contributes to PD progression and propagation of α-syn assemblies between neurons. The data we present here support the proteomic analysis used to identify neuronal proteins that specifically interact with extracellularly applied oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn assemblies (conditions 1 and 2, respectively (doi: 10.15252/embj.201591397 [1]. α-syn assemblies and their cellular partner proteins were pulled down from neuronal cell lysed shortly after exposure to exogenous α-syn assemblies and the associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry using a shotgun proteomic-based approach. We also performed experiments on pure cultures of astrocytes to identify astrocyte-specific proteins interacting with oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn (conditions 3 and 4, respectively. For each condition, proteins interacting selectively with α-syn assemblies were identified by comparison to proteins pulled-down from untreated cells used as controls. The mass spectrometry data, the database search and the peak lists have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium database via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002256 to PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002263 and doi: 10.6019/http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002256 to 10.6019/http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002263.

  7. Protein Fibrillar Nanopolymers: Molecular-Level Insights into Their Structural, Physical and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusova, Valeriya M.

    2015-09-01

    Amyloid fibrils represent a generic class of mechanically strong and stable biomaterials with extremely advantageous properties. Although amyloids were initially associated only with severe neurological disorders, the role of these structures nowadays is shifting from health debilitating to highly beneficial both in biomedical and technological aspects. Intensive involvement of fibrillar assemblies into the wide range of pathogenic and functional processes strongly necessitate the molecular level characterization of the structural, physical and elastic features of protein nanofibrils. In the present contribution, we made an attempt to highlight the up-to-date progress in the understanding of amyloid properties from the polymer physics standpoint. The fundamental insights into protein fibril behavior are essential not only for development of therapeutic strategies to combat the protein misfolding disorders but also for rational and precise design of novel biodegradable protein-based nanopolymers.

  8. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Anna; Sticht, Heinrich; Horn, Anselm H C

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text]) oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1) elongation of short protofilaments; (2) breakage of large protofilaments; (3) formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4) elongation of protofilament pairs.

  9. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kahler

    Full Text Available Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text] oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1 elongation of short protofilaments; (2 breakage of large protofilaments; (3 formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4 elongation of protofilament pairs.

  10. Microrheological characterization of collagen systems: from molecular solutions to fibrillar gels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Shayegan

    Full Text Available Collagen is the most abundant protein in the extracellular matrix (ECM, where its structural organization conveys mechanical information to cells. Using optical-tweezers-based microrheology, we investigated mechanical properties both of collagen molecules at a range of concentrations in acidic solution where fibrils cannot form and of gels of collagen fibrils formed at neutral pH, as well as the development of microscale mechanical heterogeneity during the self-assembly process. The frequency scaling of the complex shear modulus even at frequencies of ∼10 kHz was not able to resolve the flexibility of collagen molecules in acidic solution. In these solutions, molecular interactions cause significant transient elasticity, as we observed for 5 mg/ml solutions at frequencies above ∼200 Hz. We found the viscoelasticity of solutions of collagen molecules to be spatially homogeneous, in sharp contrast to the heterogeneity of self-assembled fibrillar collagen systems, whose elasticity varied by more than an order of magnitude and in power-law behavior at different locations within the sample. By probing changes in the complex shear modulus over 100-minute timescales as collagen self-assembled into fibrils, we conclude that microscale heterogeneity appears during early phases of fibrillar growth and continues to develop further during this growth phase. Experiments in which growing fibrils dislodge microspheres from an optical trap suggest that fibril growth is a force-generating process. These data contribute to understanding how heterogeneities develop during self-assembly, which in turn can help synthesis of new materials for cellular engineering.

  11. Nonlinear surface dilatational rheology and foaming behavior of protein and protein fibrillar aggregates in the presence of natural surfactant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    The surface and foaming properties of native soy glycinin (11S) and its heat-induced fibrillar aggregates, in the presence of natural surfactant steviol glycoside (STE), were investigated and compared at pH 7.0 to determine the impact of protein structure modification on protein?surfactant interfaci

  12. Warm dense crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Ryan A.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2016-03-01

    The intense femtosecond-scale pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are able to create and interrogate interesting states of matter characterized by long-lived nonequilibrium semicore or core electron occupancies or by the heating of dense phases via the relaxation cascade initiated by the photoelectric effect. We address here the latter case of "warm dense matter" (WDM) and investigate the observable consequences of x-ray heating of the electronic degrees of freedom in crystalline systems. We report temperature-dependent density functional theory calculations for the x-ray diffraction from crystalline LiF, graphite, diamond, and Be. We find testable, strong signatures of condensed-phase effects that emphasize the importance of wide-angle scattering to study nonequilibrium states. These results also suggest that the reorganization of the valence electron density at eV-scale temperatures presents a confounding factor to achieving atomic resolution in macromolecular serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies at XFELs, as performed under the "diffract before destroy" paradigm.

  13. Dense Suspension Splash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wendy; Dodge, Kevin M.; Peters, Ivo R.; Ellowitz, Jake; Klein Schaarsberg, Martin H.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2014-03-01

    Upon impact onto a solid surface at several meters-per-second, a dense suspension plug splashes by ejecting liquid-coated particles. We study the mechanism for splash formation using experiments and a numerical model. In the model, the dense suspension is idealized as a collection of cohesionless, rigid grains with finite surface roughness. The grains also experience lubrication drag as they approach, collide inelastically and rebound away from each other. Simulations using this model reproduce the measured momentum distribution of ejected particles. They also provide direct evidence supporting the conclusion from earlier experiments that inelastic collisions, rather than viscous drag, dominate when the suspension contains macroscopic particles immersed in a low-viscosity solvent such as water. Finally, the simulations reveal two distinct routes for splash formation: a particle can be ejected by a single high momentum-change collision. More surprisingly, a succession of small momentum-change collisions can accumulate to eject a particle outwards. Supported by NSF through its MRSEC program (DMR-0820054) and fluid dynamics program (CBET-1336489).

  14. Dense Axion Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure.If the axion mass energy is $mc^2= 10^{-4}$ eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about $10^{-14} M_\\odot$. We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If $mc^2 = 10^{-4}$ eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mas...

  15. Dense Axion Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-01

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10-14M⊙ if the axion mass is 10-4 eV . We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10-20M⊙ to about M⊙ . If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  16. Dense Axion Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Abhishek; Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. If the axion mass energy is mc2 =10-4 eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about 10-14M⊙ . We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If mc2 =10-4 4 eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mass ranging from about 10-11M⊙ toabout M⊙.

  17. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  18. Hyperons in dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dapo, Haris

    2009-01-28

    The hyperon-nucleon YN low momentum effective interaction (V{sub low} {sub k}) allows for an extensive study of the behavior of hyperons in dense matter, together with an investigation of effects of the presence of hyperons on dense matter. The first step towards this goal is the construction of the matrix elements for the hyperon-nucleon low momentum potential. In order to assess the different properties of hyperons within these potentials we calculate the hyperon single-particle potentials in the Hartree-Fock approximation for all of the interactions. Their dependence on both momentum and density, is studied. The single-particle potentials are then used to determine the chemical potential of hyperons in neutron stars. For nucleonic properties, the nucleon-nucleon V{sub low} {sub k} can be used with the caveat that the calculation of the ground-state energy of symmetric nuclear matter does not correctly reproduce the properties of matter at saturation. With the nucleon-nucleon V{sub low} {sub k} one is unable to reach the densities needed for the calculation of neutron star masses. To circumvent this problem we use two approaches: in the first one, we parametrize the entire nucleonic sector. In the second one, we replace only the three-body force. The former will enable us to study neutron star masses, and the latter for studying the medium's response to the external probe. In this thesis we take the external probe to be the neutrino. By combining this parametrization with the YN V{sub low} {sub k} potential, we calculate the equation of state of equilibrated matter. Performing the calculation in the Hartree-Fock approximation at zero temperature, the concentrations of all particles are calculated. From these we can ascertain at which densities hyperons appear for a wide range of parameters. Finally, we calculate the masses of neutron stars with these concentrations. For the calculation of the medium's response to an external probe, we replace the three

  19. Changes of surface structure and elemental composition of components of deuterium high-pressure chamber with Pd rod inside irradiated with 10-MeV γ-quanta in dense deuterium gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didyk, A. Yu.; Wiśniewski, R.; Wilczynska-Kitowska, T.

    2013-12-01

    This work is a continuation and addition to Ref. [1], which presents results on studies of the surface and elemental compositions of a Pd rod and brass screw for the collection of nuclear and chemical reaction products in a deuterium high-pressure chamber (DHPC) under irradiation with γ-quanta with an energy of 10 MeV for 18 h at the MT-25 electron accelerator at a beam current of 11-13 μA. The DHPC is filled with 1.2-kbar molecular deuterium in which a Pd rod saturated with deuterium is loaded. After irradiation, the elemental compositions of other surfaces of all DHPC elements, which are inside the DHPC in dense deuterium, are studied using an electron scanning microscope and X-ray microprobe analysis. It is established that all surfaces, including the surface of a high-purity palladium rod (99.995%), are covered with a partly homogeneous layer of large microparticles of lead. Also, light elements such as 6C, 8O, 11Na, 12Mg, 13Al, 14Si, 22Ti, 25Mn, 26Fe, 29Cu, and 30Zn and heavy metals such as 47Ag, 73Ta, 74W, 78Pt, 79Au, and 82Pb are observed. Possible processes that can cause the anomalies observed in the new synthesized elements are briefly discussed.

  20. Structure and developmental expression of a sea urchin fibrillar collagen gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, M; Ramirez, F; Suzuki, H R; Solursh, M; Gambino, R

    1989-12-01

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones that specify a Paracentrotus lividus procollagen chain. The cDNAs code for 160 uninterrupted Gly-Xaa-Yaa triplets and a 252-amino acid carboxyl propeptide. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences indicated that the sea urchin polypeptide exhibits structural features that are characteristic of the fibril-forming class of collagen molecules. Partial characterization of two genomic recombinants revealed that the 3' end of the echinoid gene displays a complex organization that closely resembles that of a prototypical vertebrate fibrillar collagen gene. In situ and Northern (RNA) blot hybridizations established the size, time of appearance, and tissue distribution of the collagen transcripts in the developing sea urchin embryo. Collagen mRNA, approximately equal to 6 kilobases in size, is first detected in the forming primary mesenchyme cells of late blastulae where it progressively accumulates until the free swimming/feeding pluteus larval stage. Interestingly, collagen transcripts are also detected in the forming secondary mesenchyme cells of late gastrulae, and by the prism stage, their derivatives appear to be the most intensively labeled cells.

  1. Fibrillar organization in tendons: A pattern revealed by percolation characteristics of the respective geometric network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Andres Dos Santos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the tendon is composed by collagen fibrils of various sizes connected between them through molecular cross-links, it sounds logical to model it via a heterogeneous network of fibrils. Using cross sectional images, that network is operatively inferred from the respective Gabriel graph of the fibril mass centers. We focus on network percolation characteristics under an ordered activation of fibrils (progressive recruitment going from the smallest to the largest fibril. Analyses of percolation were carried out on a repository of images of digital flexor tendons obtained from samples of lizards and frogs. Observed percolation thresholds were compared against values derived from hypothetical scenarios of random activation of nodes. Strikingly, we found a significant delay for the occurrence of percolation in actual data. We interpret this finding as the consequence of some non-random packing of fibrillar units into a size-constrained geometric pattern. We erect an ideal geometric model of balanced interspersion of polymorphic units that accounts for the delayed percolating instance. We also address the circumstance of being percolation curves mirrored by the empirical curves of stress-strain obtained from the same studied tendons. By virtue of this isomorphism, we hypothesize that the inflection points of both curves are different quantitative manifestations of a common transitional process during mechanical load transference.

  2. Fibrillar disruption by AC electric field induced oscillation: A case study with human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Shubhatam; Chakraborty, Monojit; Goley, Snigdha; Dasgupta, Swagata; DasGupta, Sunando

    2017-07-01

    The effect of oscillation induced by a frequency-dependent alternating current (AC) electric field to dissociate preformed amyloid fibrils has been investigated. An electrowetting-on-dielectric type setup has been used to apply the AC field of varying frequencies on preformed fibrils of human serum albumin (HSA). The disintegration potency has been monitored by a combination of spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The experimental results suggest that the frequency of the applied AC field plays a crucial role in the disruption of preformed HSA fibrils. The extent of stress generated inside the droplet due to the application of the AC field at different frequencies has been monitored as a function of the input frequency of the applied AC voltage. This has been accomplished by assessing the morphology deformation of the oscillating HSA fibril droplets. The shape deformation of the oscillating droplets is characterized using image analysis by measuring the dynamic changes in the shape dependent parameters such as contact angle and droplet footprint radius and the amplitude. It is suggested that the cumulative effects of the stress generated inside the HSA fibril droplets due to the shape deformation induced hydrodynamic flows and the torque induced by the intrinsic electric dipoles of protein due to their continuous periodic realignment in presence of the AC electric field results in the destruction of the fibrillar species. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Hierarchical macroscopic fibrillar adhesives: in situ study of buckling and adhesion mechanisms on wavy substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christina T; Kroner, Elmar; Fleck, Norman A; Arzt, Eduard

    2015-12-01

    Nature uses hierarchical fibrillar structures to mediate temporary adhesion to arbitrary substrates. Such structures provide high compliance such that the flat fibril tips can be better positioned with respect to asperities of a wavy rough substrate. We investigated the buckling and adhesion of hierarchically structured adhesives in contact with flat smooth, flat rough and wavy rough substrates. A macroscopic model for the structural adhesive was fabricated by molding polydimethylsiloxane into pillars of diameter in the range of 0.3-4.8 mm, with up to three different hierarchy levels. Both flat-ended and mushroom-shaped hierarchical samples buckled at preloads one quarter that of the single level structures. We explain this behavior by a change in the buckling mode; buckling leads to a loss of contact and diminishes adhesion. Our results indicate that hierarchical structures can have a strong influence on the degree of adhesion on both flat and wavy substrates. Strategies are discussed that achieve highly compliant substrates which adhere to rough substrates.

  4. From the Cover: Shape insensitive optimal adhesion of nanoscale fibrillar structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huajian; Yao, Haimin

    2004-05-01

    Gecko and many insects have adopted nanoscale fibrillar structures on their feet as adhesion devices. Here, we consider adhesion between a single fiber and a substrate by van der Waals or electrostatic interactions. For a given contact area A, the theoretical pull-off force of the fiber is thA where th is the theoretical strength of adhesion. We show that it is possible to design an optimal shape of the tip of the fiber to achieve the theoretical pull-off force. However, such design tends to be unreliable at the macroscopic scale because the pull-off force is sensitive to small variations in the tip shape. We find that a robust design of shape-insensitive optimal adhesion becomes possible only when the diameter of the fiber is reduced to length scales on the order of 100 nm. In general, optimal adhesion could be achieved by a combination of size reduction and shape optimization. The smaller the size, the less important the shape. At large contact sizes, optimal adhesion could still be achieved if the shape can be manufactured to a sufficiently high precision. The robust design of optimal adhesion at nanoscale provides a plausible explanation for the convergent evolution of hairy attachment systems in biology.

  5. Identifying structural features of fibrillar islet amyloid polypeptide using site-directed spin labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Sajith A; Langen, Ralf

    2004-11-12

    Pancreatic amyloid deposits, composed primarily of the 37-residue islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), are a characteristic feature found in more than 90% of patients with type II diabetes. Although IAPP amyloid deposits are associated with areas of pancreatic islet beta-cell dysfunction and depletion and are thought to play a role in disease, their structure is unknown. We used electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to analyze eight spin-labeled derivatives of IAPP in an effort to determine structural features of the peptide. In solution, all eight derivatives gave rise to electron paramagnetic resonance spectra with sharp lines indicative of rapid motion on the sub-nanosecond time scale. These spectra are consistent with a rapidly tumbling and highly dynamic peptide. In contrast, spectra for the fibrillar form exhibit reduced mobility and the presence of strong intermolecular spin-spin interactions. The latter implies that the peptide subunits are ordered and that the same residues from neighboring peptides are in close proximity to one another. Our data are consistent with a parallel arrangement of IAPP peptides within the amyloid fibril. Analysis of spin label mobility indicates a high degree of order throughout the peptide, although the N-terminal region is slightly less ordered. Possible similarities with respect to the domain organization and parallelism of Alzheimer's amyloid beta peptide fibrils are discussed.

  6. The process of EDC-NHS cross-linking of reconstituted collagen fibres increases collagen fibrillar order and alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Shepherd

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the production of collagen fibre bundles through a multi-strand, semi-continuous extrusion process. Cross-linking using an EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropylcarbodiimide, NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide combination was considered. Atomic Force Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy focused on how cross-linking affected the collagen fibrillar structure. In the cross-linked fibres, a clear fibrillar structure comparable to native collagen was observed which was not observed in the non-cross-linked fibre. The amide III doublet in the Raman spectra provided additional evidence of alignment in the cross-linked fibres. Raman spectroscopy also indicated no residual polyethylene glycol (from the fibre forming buffer or water in any of the fibres.

  7. The process of EDC-NHS cross-linking of reconstituted collagen fibres increases collagen fibrillar order and alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, D. V.; Shepherd, J. H.; Ghose, S.; Kew, S. J.; Cameron, R. E.; Best, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the production of collagen fibre bundles through a multi-strand, semi-continuous extrusion process. Cross-linking using an EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide), NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide) combination was considered. Atomic Force Microscopy and Raman spectroscopy focused on how cross-linking affected the collagen fibrillar structure. In the cross-linked fibres, a clear fibrillar structure comparable to native collagen was observed which was not observed in the non-cross-linked fibre. The amide III doublet in the Raman spectra provided additional evidence of alignment in the cross-linked fibres. Raman spectroscopy also indicated no residual polyethylene glycol (from the fibre forming buffer) or water in any of the fibres.

  8. Conductive dense hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremets, M.; Troyan, I.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen at ambient pressures and low temperatures forms a molecular crystal which is expected to display metallic properties under megabar pressures. This metal is predicted to be superconducting with a very high critical temperature Tc of 200-400 K. The superconductor may potentially be recovered metastably at ambient pressures, and it may acquire a new quantum state as a metallic superfluid and a superconducting superfluid. Recent experiments performed at low temperatures T 220 GPa, new Raman modes arose, providing evidence for the transformation to a new opaque and electrically conductive phase IV. Above 260 GPa, in the next phase V, hydrogen reflected light well. Its resistance was nearly temperature-independent over a wide temperature range, down to 30 K, indicating that the hydrogen was metallic. Releasing the pressure induced the metallic phase to transform directly into molecular hydrogen with significant hysteresis at 200 GPa and 295 K. These data were published in our paper: M. I. Eremets and I. A. Troyan "Conductive dense hydrogen." Nature Materials 10: 927-931. We will present also new results on hydrogen: phase diagram with phases IV and V determined in P,T domain up to 300 GPa and 350 K. We will also discuss possible structures of phase IV based on our Raman and infrared measurements up to 300 GPa.

  9. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  10. Effect of nordihydroguaiaretic acid cross-linking on fibrillar collagen: in vitro evaluation of fibroblast adhesion strength and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Y. Rioja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fixation is required to reinforce reconstituted collagen for orthopedic bioprostheses such as tendon or ligament replacements. Previous studies have demonstrated that collagen fibers cross-linked by the biocompatible dicatechol nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA have mechanical strength comparable to native tendons. This work focuses on investigating fibroblast behavior on fibrillar and NDGA cross-linked type I collagen to determine if NDGA modulates cell adhesion, morphology, and migration. A spinning disk device that applies a range of hydrodynamic forces under uniform chemical conditions was employed to sensitively quantify cell adhesion strength, and a radial barrier removal assay was used to measure cell migration on films suitable for these quantitative in vitro assays. The compaction of collagen films, mediated by the drying and cross-linking fabrication process, suggests a less open organization compared to native fibrillar collagen that likely allowed the collagen to form more inter-chain bonds and chemical links with NDGA polymers. Fibroblasts strongly adhered to and migrated on native and NDGA cross-linked fibrillar collagen; however, NDGA modestly reduced cell spreading, adhesion strength and migration rate. Thus, it is hypothesized that NDGA cross-linking masked some adhesion receptor binding sites either physically, chemically, or both, thereby modulating adhesion and migration. This alteration in the cell-material interface is considered a minimal trade-off for the superior mechanical and compatibility properties of NDGA cross-linked collagen compared to other fixation approaches.

  11. Heavy mesons in dense matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolos, Laura; Gamermann, Daniel; Garcia-Recio, Carmen; Molina, Raquel; Nieves, Juan; Oset, Eulogio; Ramos, Angels; LlanesEstrada, FJ; Pelaez,

    2011-01-01

    Charmed mesons in dense matter are studied within a unitary coupled-channel approach which takes into account Pauli-blocking effects and meson self-energies in a self-consistent manner. We obtain the open-charm meson spectral functions in this dense medium, and discuss their implications on hidden c

  12. Sources of variability in platelet accumulation on type 1 fibrillar collagen in microfluidic flow assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith B Neeves

    Full Text Available Microfluidic flow assays (MFA that measure shear dependent platelet function have potential clinical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of bleeding and thrombotic disorders. As a step towards clinical application, the objective of this study was to measure how phenotypic and genetic factors, as well as experimental conditions, affect the variability of platelet accumulation on type 1 collagen within a MFA. Whole blood was perfused over type 1 fibrillar collagen at wall shear rates of 150, 300, 750 and 1500 s⁻¹ through four independent channels with a height of 50 µm and a width of 500 µm. The accumulation of platelets was characterized by the lag time to 1% platelet surface coverage (Lag(T, the rate of platelet accumulation (V(PLT, and platelet surface coverage (SC. A cohort of normal donors was tested and the results were correlated to plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF levels, platelet count, hematocrit, sex, and collagen receptors genotypes. VWF levels were the strongest determinant of platelet accumulation. VWF levels were positively correlated to V(PLT and SC at all wall shear rates. A longer Lag(T for platelet accumulation at arterial shear rates compared to venous shear rates was attributed to the time required for plasma proteins to adsorb to collagen. There was no association between platelet accumulation and hematocrit or platelet count. Individuals with the AG genotype of the GP6 gene had lower platelet accumulation than individuals with the AA genotype at 150 s⁻¹ and 300 s⁻¹. Recalcified blood collected into sodium citrate and corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI resulted in diminished platelet accumulation compared to CTI alone, suggesting that citrate irreversibly diminishes platelet function. This study the largest association study of MFA in healthy donors (n = 104 and will likely set up the basis for the determination of the normal range of platelet responses in this type of assay.

  13. Fabrication and evaluation of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resins/composites containing nano fibrillar silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ming; Gao, Yi; Liu, Yi; Liao, Yiliang; Hedin, Nyle E; Fong, Hao

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the reinforcement of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA dental resins (without conventional glass filler) and composites (with conventional glass filler) with various mass fractions of nano fibrillar silicate (FS). Three dispersion methods were studied to separate the silanized FS as nano-scaled single crystals and uniformly distribute them into dental matrices. The photo-curing behaviors of the Bis-GMA/TEGDMA/FS resins were monitored in situ by RT-NIR to study the photopolymerization rate and the vinyl double bond conversion. Mechanical properties (flexural strength, elastic modulus and work-of-fracture) of the nano FS reinforced resins/composites were tested, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used for the statistical analysis of the acquired data. The morphology of nano FS and the representative fracture surfaces of its reinforced resins/composites were examined by SEM/TEM. Impregnation of small mass fractions (1% and 2.5%) of nano FS into Bis-GMA/TEGDMA (50/50 mass ratio) dental resins/composites improved the mechanical properties substantially. Larger mass fraction of impregnation (7.5%), however, did not further improve the mechanical properties (one way ANOVA, P>0.05) and may even reduce the mechanical properties. The high degree of separation and uniform distribution of nano FS into dental resins/composites was a challenge. Impregnation of nano FS into dental resins/composites could result in two opposite effects: a reinforcing effect due to the highly separated and uniformly distributed nano FS single crystals, or a weakening effect due to the formation of FS agglomerates/particles. Uniform distribution of highly separated nano FS single crystals into dental resins/composites could significantly improve the mechanical properties of the resins/composites.

  14. Densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxanes .1. Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipsen, T.A C; Derks, R.; van der Vegt, H.A.; Pennings, A.J; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    Novel densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxanes were obtained by using functional branched prepolymers. Two types of soluble prepolymers were prepared from di- and trifunctional alkoxysilane monomers via cohydrolysis/condensation and for both final crosslinking occurred via hydrosilylation. The prepoly

  15. Tendon and ligament fibrillar crimps give rise to left-handed helices of collagen fibrils in both planar and helical crimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Marco; Ottani, Vittoria; Stagni, Rita; Ruggeri, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    Collagen fibres in tendons and ligaments run straight but in some regions they show crimps which disappear or appear more flattened during the initial elongation of tissues. Each crimp is formed of collagen fibrils showing knots or fibrillar crimps at the crimp top angle. The present study analyzes by polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy the 3D morphology of fibrillar crimp in tendons and ligaments of rat demonstrating that each fibril in the fibrillar region always twists leftwards changing the plane of running and sharply bends modifying the course on a new plane. The morphology of fibrillar crimp in stretched tendons fulfills the mechanical role of the fibrillar crimp acting as a particular knot/biological hinge in absorbing tension forces during fibril strengthening and recoiling collagen fibres when stretching is removed. The left-handed path of fibrils in the fibrillar crimp region gives rise to left-handed fibril helices observed both in isolated fibrils and sections of different tendons and ligaments (flexor digitorum profundus muscle tendon, Achilles tendon, tail tendon, patellar ligament and medial collateral ligament of the knee). The left-handed path of fibrils represents a new final suprafibrillar level of the alternating handedness which was previously described only from the molecular to the microfibrillar level. When the width of the twisting angle in the fibrillar crimp is nearly 180 degrees the fibrils appear as left-handed flattened helices forming crimped collagen fibres previously described as planar crimps. When fibrils twist with different subsequent rotational angles (< 180 degrees ) they always assume a left-helical course but, running in many different nonplanar planes, they form wider helical crimped fibres.

  16. Characterization of fibrillar collagens and extracellular matrix of glandular benign prostatic hyperplasia nodules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler M Bauman

    Full Text Available Recent studies have associated lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS in men with prostatic fibrosis, but a definitive link between collagen deposition and LUTS has yet to be demonstrated. The objective of this study was to evaluate ECM and collagen content within normal glandular prostate tissue and glandular BPH, and to evaluate the association of clinical parameters of LUTS with collagen content.Fibrillar collagen and ECM content was assessed in normal prostate (48 patients and glandular BPH nodules (24 patients using Masson's trichrome stain and Picrosirius red stain. Second harmonic generation (SHG imaging was used to evaluate collagen content. Additional BPH tissues (n = 47 were stained with Picrosirius red and the association between clinical parameters of BPH/LUTS and collagen content was assessed.ECM was similar in normal prostate and BPH (p = 0.44. Total collagen content between normal prostate and glandular BPH was similar (p = 0.27, but a significant increase in thicker collagen bundles was observed in BPH (p = 0.045. Using SHG imaging, collagen content in BPH (mean intensity = 62.52; SEM = 2.74 was significantly higher than in normal prostate (51.77±3.49; p = 0.02. Total collagen content was not associated with treatment with finasteride (p = 0.47 or α-blockers (p = 0.52, pre-TURP AUA symptom index (p = 0.90, prostate-specific antigen (p = 0.86, post-void residual (PVR; p = 0.32, prostate size (p = 0.21, or post-TURP PVR (p = 0.51. Collagen content was not associated with patient age in patients with BPH, however as men aged normal prostatic tissue had a decreased proportion of thick collagen bundles.The proportion of larger bundles of collagen, but not total collagen, is increased in BPH nodules, suggesting that these large fibers may play a role in BPH/LUTS. Total collagen content is independent of clinical parameters of BPH and LUTS. If fibrosis and overall ECM deposition are

  17. Quantifying the interfibrillar spacing and fibrillar orientation of the aortic extracellular matrix using histology image processing: toward multiscale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmirzadi, Danial; Bruck, Hugh A; Hsieh, Adam H

    2013-05-01

    An essential part of understanding tissue microstructural mechanics is to establish quantitative measures of the morphological changes. Given the complex, highly localized, and interactive architecture of the extracellular matrix, developing techniques to reproducibly quantify the induced microstructural changes has been found to be challenging. In this paper, a new method for quantifying the changes in the fibrillar organization is developed using histology images. A combinatorial frequency-spatial image processing approach was developed based on the Fourier and Hough transformations of histology images to measure interfibrillar spacing and fibrillar orientation, respectively. The method was separately applied to the inner and outer wall thickness of native- and elastin-isolated aortic tissues under different loading states. Results from both methods were interpreted in a complementary manner to obtain a more complete understanding of morphological changes due to tissue deformations at the microscale. The observations were consistent in quantifying the observed morphological changes during tissue deformations and in explaining such changes in terms of tissue-scale phenomena. The findings of this study could pave the way for more rigorous modeling of structure-property relationships in soft tissues, with implications extendable to cardiovascular constitutive modeling and tissue engineering.

  18. Determining the fibrillar orientation of bast fibres with polarized light microscopy: the modified Herzog test (red plate test) explained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, E; Holst, B

    2013-11-01

    The identification of bast fibre samples, in particular, bast fibres used in textiles, is an important issue in archaeology, criminology and other scientific fields. One of the characteristic features of bast fibres is their fibrillar orientation, referred to as Z- or S twist (or alternatively right- and left-handed fibres). An empirical test for determining the fibrillar orientation using polarized light microscopy has been known in the community for many years. It is referred to as the modified Herzog test or red plate test. The test has the reputation for never producing false results, but also for occasionally not working. However, so far, no proper justification has been provided in the literature that the 'no false results' assumption is really correct and it has also not been clear up till now, why the method sometimes does not work. In this paper, we present an analytical model for the modified Herzog test, which explains why the test never gives a false result. We also provide an explanation for why the Herzog test sometimes does not work: According to our model, the Herzog test will not work if none of the three distinct layers in the secondary cell wall is significantly thicker than the others.

  19. Determining the fibrillar orientation of bast fibres with polarized light microscopy: the modified Herzog test (red plate test) explained

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAUGAN, E; HOLST, B

    2013-01-01

    The identification of bast fibre samples, in particular, bast fibres used in textiles, is an important issue in archaeology, criminology and other scientific fields. One of the characteristic features of bast fibres is their fibrillar orientation, referred to as Z- or S twist (or alternatively right- and left-handed fibres). An empirical test for determining the fibrillar orientation using polarized light microscopy has been known in the community for many years. It is referred to as the modified Herzog test or red plate test. The test has the reputation for never producing false results, but also for occasionally not working. However, so far, no proper justification has been provided in the literature that the ‘no false results’ assumption is really correct and it has also not been clear up till now, why the method sometimes does not work. In this paper, we present an analytical model for the modified Herzog test, which explains why the test never gives a false result. We also provide an explanation for why the Herzog test sometimes does not work: According to our model, the Herzog test will not work if none of the three distinct layers in the secondary cell wall is significantly thicker than the others. PMID:24020614

  20. Application of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for study on fibrillar and oligomeric aggregates of alpha-synuclein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severinovskaya O. V.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the -synuclein (ASN aggregates of different structural origin, namely amyloid fibrils and spherical oligomers, in comparison with a native protein. Methods. MALDI TOF mass spectrometry and atomic for- ce microscopy (AFM. Results. The mass spectra of native and fibrillar ASN have similar character, i. e. they are characterized by the well pronounced peak of protein molecular ion, the low molecular weight associates, and rather low contain of fragmentation products. The spectrum of oligomeric aggregate is characterized by the high contain of fragmentation products, low intensity of protein molecular ion and the absence of peaks of associates. Conclusions. The difference between the spectra of fibrillar and oligomeric ASN could be explained, first, by the different content of the «residual» monomeric ASN and the protein degradation products in the studied samples, and, second, by the different structure-depended mechanisms of the protein degradation induced by the laser ionization. We suggested that the MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy is a method useful for the investigation of ASN aggregation and characterization of its high order self-associates; besides, there is an interest in estimating the potency of the MALDI-TOF for the analysis of aggregation of various amyloidogenic proteins.

  1. Hierarchical model of fibrillar collagen organization for interpreting the second-order susceptibility tensors in biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuer, Adam E; Akens, Margarete K; Krouglov, Serguei; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Wilson, Brian C; Whyne, Cari M; Barzda, Virginijus

    2012-11-21

    The second-order nonlinear polarization properties of fibrillar collagen in various rat tissues (vertebrae, tibia, tail tendon, dermis, and cornea) are investigated with polarization-dependent second-harmonic generation (P-SHG) microscopy. Three parameters are extracted: the second-order susceptibility ratio, R = [Formula: see text] ; a measure of the fibril distribution asymmetry, |A|; and the weighted-average fibril orientation, . A hierarchical organizational model of fibrillar collagen is developed to interpret the second-harmonic generation polarization properties. Highlights of the model include: collagen type (e.g., type-I, type-II), fibril internal structure (e.g., straight, constant-tilt), and fibril architecture (e.g., parallel fibers, intertwined, lamellae). Quantifiable differences in internal structure and architecture of the fibrils are observed. Occurrence histograms of R and |A| distinguished parallel from nonparallel fibril distributions. Parallel distributions possessed low parameter values and variability, whereas nonparallel distributions displayed an increase in values and variability. From the P-SHG parameters of vertebrae tissue, a three-dimensional reconstruction of lamellae of intervertebral disk is presented.

  2. FibrilTool, an ImageJ plug-in to quantify fibrillar structures in raw microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaoud, Arezki; Burian, Agata; Borowska-Wykręt, Dorota; Uyttewaal, Magalie; Wrzalik, Roman; Kwiatkowska, Dorota; Hamant, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    Cell biology heavily relies on the behavior of fibrillar structures, such as the cytoskeleton, yet the analysis of their behavior in tissues often remains qualitative. Image analysis tools have been developed to quantify this behavior, but they often involve an image pre-processing stage that may bias the output and/or they require specific software. Here we describe FibrilTool, an ImageJ plug-in based on the concept of nematic tensor, which can provide a quantitative description of the anisotropy of fiber arrays and their average orientation in cells, directly from raw images obtained by any form of microscopy. FibrilTool has been validated on microtubules, actin and cellulose microfibrils, but it may also help analyze other fibrillar structures, such as collagen, or the texture of various materials. The tool is ImageJ-based, and it is therefore freely accessible to the scientific community and does not require specific computational setup. The tool provides the average orientation and anisotropy of fiber arrays in a given region of interest (ROI) in a few seconds.

  3. Constructing dense genetic linkage maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Jong, de A.G.; Ooijen, van J.W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a novel combination of techniques for the construction of dense genetic linkage maps. The construction of such maps is hampered by the occurrence of even small proportions of typing errors. Simulated annealing is used to obtain the best map according to the optimality criterion:

  4. Method for dense packing discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallus, Yoav; Elser, Veit; Gravel, Simon

    2010-11-01

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit-cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to previously reported improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest-known lattice sphere packings and the best-known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and 11 dimensions, respectively, providing numerical evidence for their optimality. For nonspherical particles, we report a dense packing of regular four-dimensional simplices with density ϕ=128/219≈0.5845 and with a similar structure to the densest-known tetrahedron packing.

  5. Unconditional Continuous Variable Dense Coding

    CERN Document Server

    Ralph, T C

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the conditions under which unconditional dense coding can be achieved using continuous variable entanglement. We consider the effect of entanglement impurity and detector efficiency and discuss experimental verification. We conclude that the requirements for a strong demonstration are not as stringent as previously thought and are within the reach of present technology.

  6. Self-diffusion in a dense magnetized plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, J.S.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    Self-diffusion through dense classical one-component plasmas in a uniform magnetic field is studied by means of renormalized kinetic theory. Extensions of the Landau and the Rostoker equations to plasmas of high density are derived. The coefficient of self-diffusion along the magnetic field is evalu

  7. Warm Dense Matter: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalantar, D H; Lee, R W; Molitoris, J D

    2004-04-21

    This document provides a summary of the ''LLNL Workshop on Extreme States of Materials: Warm Dense Matter to NIF'' which was held on 20, 21, and 22 February 2002 at the Wente Conference Center in Livermore, CA. The warm dense matter regime, the transitional phase space region between cold material and hot plasma, is presently poorly understood. The drive to understand the nature of matter in this regime is sparking scientific activity worldwide. In addition to pure scientific interest, finite temperature dense matter occurs in the regimes of interest to the SSMP (Stockpile Stewardship Materials Program). So that obtaining a better understanding of WDM is important to performing effective experiments at, e.g., NIF, a primary mission of LLNL. At this workshop we examined current experimental and theoretical work performed at, and in conjunction with, LLNL to focus future activities and define our role in this rapidly emerging research area. On the experimental front LLNL plays a leading role in three of the five relevant areas and has the opportunity to become a major player in the other two. Discussion at the workshop indicated that the path forward for the experimental efforts at LLNL were two fold: First, we are doing reasonable baseline work at SPLs, HE, and High Energy Lasers with more effort encouraged. Second, we need to plan effectively for the next evolution in large scale facilities, both laser (NIF) and Light/Beam sources (LCLS/TESLA and GSI) Theoretically, LLNL has major research advantages in areas as diverse as the thermochemical approach to warm dense matter equations of state to first principles molecular dynamics simulations. However, it was clear that there is much work to be done theoretically to understand warm dense matter. Further, there is a need for a close collaboration between the generation of verifiable experimental data that can provide benchmarks of both the experimental techniques and the theoretical capabilities

  8. Predicting diffusivities in dense fluid mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. DARIVA

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work the Enskog solution of the Boltzmann equation, as corrected by Speedy, together with the Weeks-Chandler-Andersen (WCA perturbation theory of liquids is employed in correlating and predicting self-diffusivities of dense fluids. Afterwards this theory is used to estimate mutual diffusion coefficients of solutes at infinite dilution in sub and supercritical solvents. We have also investigated the behavior of Fick diffusion coefficients in the proximity of a binary vapor-liquid critical point since this subject is of great interest for extraction purposes. The approach presented here, which makes use of a density and temperature dependent hard-sphere diameter, is shown to be excellent for predicting diffusivities in dense pure fluids and fluid mixtures. The calculations involved highly nonideal mixtures as well as systems with high molecular asymmetry. The predicted diffusivities are in good agreement with the experimental data for the pure and binary systems. The methodology proposed here makes only use of pure component information and density of mixtures. The simple algebraic relations are proposed without any binary adjustable parameters and can be readily used for estimating diffusivities in multicomponent mixtures.

  9. Intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like carbon films prepared by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨武保; 王久丽; 张谷令; 范松华; 刘赤子; 杨思泽

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the structures, optical and mechanical properties of diamond-like carbon films are studied, which are prepared by a self-fabricated electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method at room temperature in the ambient gases of mixed acetylene and nitrogen. The morphology and microstructure of the processed film are characterized by the atomic force microscope image, Raman spectra and middle Fourier transform infrared transmittance spectra, which reveal that there is an intertwisted fibrillar diamond-like structure in the film and the film is mainly composed of sp3 CH, sp3 C-C, sp2 C=C, C=N and C60. The film micro-hardness and bulk modulus are measured by a nano-indenter and the refractive constant and deposition rate are also calculated.

  10. Antimicrobial peptide (Cn-AMP2) from liquid endosperm of Cocos nucifera forms amyloid-like fibrillar structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gour, Shalini; Kaushik, Vibha; Kumar, Vijay; Bhat, Priyanka; Yadav, Subhash C; Yadav, Jay K

    2016-04-01

    Cn-AMP2 is an antimicrobial peptide derived from liquid endosperm of coconut (Cocos nucifera). It consists of 11 amino acid residues and predicted to have high propensity for β-sheet formation that disposes this peptide to be amyloidogenic. In the present study, we have examined the amyloidogenic propensities of Cn-AMP2 in silico and then tested the predictions under in vitro conditions. The in silico study revealed that the peptide possesses high amyloidogenic propensity comparable with Aβ. Upon solubilisation and agitation in aqueous buffer, Cn-AMP2 forms visible aggregates that display bathochromic shift in the Congo red absorbance spectra, strong increase in thioflavin T fluorescence and fibrillar morphology under transmission electron microscopy. All these properties are typical of an amyloid fibril derived from various proteins/peptides including Aβ.

  11. Structural Transitions in Dense Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lambiotte, R; Bhat, U; Redner, S

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an evolving network model in which a new node attaches to a randomly selected target node and also to each of its neighbors with probability $p$. The resulting network is sparse for $p<\\frac{1}{2}$ and dense (average degree increasing with number of nodes $N$) for $p\\geq \\frac{1}{2}$. In the dense regime, individual networks realizations built by this copying mechanism are disparate and not self-averaging. Further, there is an infinite sequence of structural anomalies at $p=\\frac{2}{3}$, $\\frac{3}{4}$, $\\frac{4}{5}$, etc., where the dependences on $N$ of the number of triangles (3-cliques), 4-cliques, undergo phase transitions. When linking to second neighbors of the target can occur, the probability that the resulting graph is complete---where all nodes are connected---is non-zero as $N\\to\\infty$.

  12. Holographic Renormalization in Dense Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanyong Park

    2014-01-01

    describes a dense medium at finite temperature, is investigated in this paper. In a dense medium, two different thermodynamic descriptions are possible due to an additional conserved charge. These two different thermodynamic ensembles are classified by the asymptotic boundary condition of the bulk gauge field. It is also shown that in the holographic renormalization regularity of all bulk fields can reproduce consistent thermodynamic quantities and that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy is nothing but the renormalized thermal entropy of the dual field theory. Furthermore, we find that the Reissner-Nordström AdS black brane is dual to a theory with conformal matter as expected, whereas a charged black brane with a nontrivial dilaton profile is mapped to a theory with nonconformal matter although its leading asymptotic geometry still remains as AdS space.

  13. Radiative properties of dense nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Fedorov, Andrei G; Luo, Zhongyang; Ni, Mingjiang

    2012-09-01

    The radiative properties of dense nanofluids are investigated. For nanofluids, scattering and absorbing of electromagnetic waves by nanoparticles, as well as light absorption by the matrix/fluid in which the nanoparticles are suspended, should be considered. We compare five models for predicting apparent radiative properties of nanoparticulate media and evaluate their applicability. Using spectral absorption and scattering coefficients predicted by different models, we compute the apparent transmittance of a nanofluid layer, including multiple reflecting interfaces bounding the layer, and compare the model predictions with experimental results from the literature. Finally, we propose a new method to calculate the spectral radiative properties of dense nanofluids that shows quantitatively good agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Dilatons for Dense Hadronic Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hyun Kyu

    2009-01-01

    The idea that the explicit breaking of scale invariance by the trace anomaly of QCD can be rephrased as a spontaneous breaking has been recently exploited to capture the low-energy strong interaction dynamics of dense (and also hot) matter in terms of two dilaton fields, the "soft" (chi_s) and the "hard" (chi_h) fields, in the frame work of the hidden local gauge symmetry. In the Freund-Nambu model, the spontaneous symmetry breaking of scale symmetry is induced by an explicitly breaking term, while the spontaneous symmetry breaking is possible in the flat potential model which is scale symmetric. We discuss the interplay of the soft and hard dilatons using the spontaneously broken scale symmetry schemes and uncover a novel structure of dense matter hitherto unexplored.

  15. Losartan inhibits the adhesion of rat platelets to fibrillar collagen--a potential role of nitric oxide and prostanoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, T; Chabielska, E; Pawlak, R; Kucharewicz, I; Buczko, W

    2000-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of losartan on rat platelet adhesion to fibrillar collagen. Washed platelets were counted before and after 15 minutes incubation with collagen (50 microg/ml) and the percentage of adhering platelets was calculated as the index of their adhesion. When the platelets were incubated with collagen 40.8 +/- 0.3% of the platelets adhered. Losartan produced a dose dependent decrease in a number of adhering platelets both when the drug was administered to the animals ex vivo at doses of 3, 10 and 30 mg/kg (p < 0.01-0.001) or was added to the preparation of washed platelets in vitro in concentrations of 10(-8)-10(-5) M (p < 0.01-0.001). In the next step of the study we assessed the influence of L-NAME (10 mg/kg ex vivo, 30 microM in vitro) and indomethacin (2.5 mg/kg ex vivo, 30 microM in vitro) on the antiadhesive effect of losartan (10 mg/kg ex vivo, 10(-6) M in vitro). Blockade of nitric oxide synthase with L-NAME partially reversed the antiadhesive effect of losartan both ex vivo and in vitro. Indomethacin diminished the inhibitory effect of losartan on platelet adhesion when administered ex vivo, but it failed to modify this parameter when added to the suspension of platelets in vitro. In conclusion, losartan reduces platelet adhesion to fibrillar collagen in a dose-dependent manner. The observed action of losartan seems to be mediated mainly by endothelium- and platelet-derived nitric oxide.

  16. Properties of industrial dense gas plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, E. M.; Forney, L. J.

    Hazardous gases and vapors are often discharged into the atmosphere from industrial plants during catastrophic events (e.g. Union Carbide incident in Bhopal, India). In many cases the discharged components are more dense than air and settle to the ground surface downstream from the stack exit. In the present paper, the buoyant plume model of Hoult, Fay and Forney (1969, J. Air Pollut. Control Ass. 19, 585-590.) has been altered to predict the properties of hazardous discharges. In particular, the plume impingement point, radius and concentration are predicted for typical stack exit conditions, wind speeds and temperature profiles. Asymptotic expressions for plume properties at the impingement point are also derived for a constant crosswind and neutral temperature profile. These formulae are shown to be useful for all conditions.

  17. On a strong dense periodicity property of shifts of finite type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzul-Kifli, Syahida Che; Al-Muttairi, Hassan [School of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (Malaysia)

    2015-10-22

    There are various definitions of chaotic dynamical systems. The most utilized definition of chaos is Devaney chaos which isolates three components as being the essential features of chaos; transitivity, dense periodic points and sensitive dependence on initial conditions. In this paper, we focus on a strong dense periodicity property i.e. the set of points with prime period at least n is dense for each n. On shift of finite type over two symbols Σ{sub 2}, we show that the strong dense periodicity property implies another strong chaotic notions; locally everywhere onto (also called exact) and totally transitive.

  18. Constructing Dense Graphs with Unique Hamiltonian Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mark A. M.

    2012-01-01

    It is not difficult to construct dense graphs containing Hamiltonian cycles, but it is difficult to generate dense graphs that are guaranteed to contain a unique Hamiltonian cycle. This article presents an algorithm for generating arbitrarily large simple graphs containing "unique" Hamiltonian cycles. These graphs can be turned into dense graphs…

  19. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subedi, Ramesh; Shneor, R.; Monaghan, Peter; Anderson, Bryon; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Benaoum, Hachemi; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Boeglin, Werner; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Ibrahim, Hassan; Igarashi, Ryuichi; De Jager, Cornelis; Jans, Eddy; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Mazouz, Malek; Meekins, David; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Potokar, Milan; Punjabi, Vina; Qiang, Yi; Reinhold, Joerg; Ron, Guy; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon, Patricia; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Voutier, Eric; Watson, John; Weinstein, Lawrence; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Wood, Stephen; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan

    2008-06-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus with high-momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in carbon-12 the neutron-proton pairs are nearly 20 times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  20. Probing Cold Dense Nuclear Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Subedi, R; Monaghan, P; Anderson, B D; Aniol, K; Annand, J; Arrington, J; Benaoum, H; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Boeglin, W; Chen, J -P; Choi, Seonho; Cisbani, E; Craver, B; Frullani, S; Garibaldi, F; Gilad, S; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, O; Hansen, J -O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Ibrahim, H; Igarashi, R; De Jager, C W; Jans, E; Jiang, X; Kaufman, L; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kumbartzki, G; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; Marrone, S; Mazouz, M; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Potokar, M; Punjabi, V; Qiang, Y; Reinhold, J; Ron, G; Rosner, G; Saha, A; Sawatzky, B; Shahinyan, A; Širca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Sulkosky, V; Urciuoli, G; Voutier, E; Watson, J W; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S; Zheng, X -C; Zhu, L; 10.1126/science.1156675

    2009-01-01

    The protons and neutrons in a nucleus can form strongly correlated nucleon pairs. Scattering experiments, where a proton is knocked-out of the nucleus with high momentum transfer and high missing momentum, show that in 12C the neutron-proton pairs are nearly twenty times as prevalent as proton-proton pairs and, by inference, neutron-neutron pairs. This difference between the types of pairs is due to the nature of the strong force and has implications for understanding cold dense nuclear systems such as neutron stars.

  1. Dilatons in Dense Baryonic Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Hyun Kyu

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the role of dilaton, which is supposed to be representing a special feature of scale symmetry of QCD, trace anomaly, in dense baryonic matter. The idea that the scale symmetry breaking of QCD is responsible for the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry is presented along the similar spirit of Freund-Nambu model. The incorporation of dilaton field in the hidden local symmetric parity doublet model is briefly sketched with the possible role of dilaton at high density baryonic matter, the emergence of linear sigma model in dilaton limit.

  2. Viscoelastic behavior of dense microemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cametti, C.; Codastefano, P.; D'arrigo, G.; Tartaglia, P.; Rouch, J.; Chen, S. H.

    1990-09-01

    We have performed extensive measurements of shear viscosity, ultrasonic absorption, and sound velocity in a ternary system consisting of water-decane-sodium di(2-ethylhexyl)sulfo- succinate(AOT), in the one-phase region where it forms a water-in-oil microemulsion. We observe a rapid increase of the static shear viscosity in the dense microemulsion region. Correspondingly the sound absorption shows unambiguous evidence of a viscoelastic behavior. The absorption data for various volume fractions and temperatures can be reduced to a universal curve by scaling both the absorption and the frequency by the measured static shear viscosity. The sound absorption can be interpreted as coming from the high-frequency tail of the viscoelastic relaxation, describable by a Cole-Cole relaxation formula with unusually small elastic moduli.

  3. Neutrino Oscillations in Dense Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, A. E.

    2017-03-01

    A modification of the electroweak theory, where the fermions with the same electroweak quantum numbers are combined in multiplets and are treated as different quantum states of a single particle, is proposed. In this model, mixing and oscillations of particles arise as a direct consequence of the general principles of quantum field theory. The developed approach enables one to calculate the probabilities of the processes taking place in the detector at long distances from the particle source. Calculations of higher-order processes, including computation of the contributions due to radiative corrections, can be performed in the framework of the perturbation theory using the regular diagram technique. As a result, the analog to the Dirac-Schwinger equation of quantum electrodynamics describing neutrino oscillations and its spin rotation in dense matter can be obtained.

  4. DPIS for warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Horioka, K.; Okamura, M.

    2010-05-23

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) offers an challenging problem because WDM, which is beyond ideal plasma, is in a low temperature and high density state with partially degenerate electrons and coupled ions. WDM is a common state of matter in astrophysical objects such as cores of giant planets and white dwarfs. The WDM studies require large energy deposition into a small target volume in a shorter time than the hydrodynamical time and need uniformity across the full thickness of the target. Since moderate energy ion beams ({approx} 0.3 MeV/u) can be useful tool for WDM physics, we propose WDM generation using Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS). In the DPIS, laser ion source is connected to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator directly without the beam transport line. DPIS with a realistic final focus and a linear accelerator can produce WDM.

  5. Comparative analysis of fibrillar and basement membrane collagen expression in embryos of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H R; Reiter, R S; D'Alessio, M; Di Liberto, M; Ramirez, F; Exposito, J Y; Gambino, R; Solursh, M

    1997-06-01

    The time of appearance and location of three distinct collagen gene transcripts termed 1 alpha, 2 alpha, and 3 alpha, were monitored in the developing S. purpuratus embryo by in situ hybridization. The 1 alpha and 2 alpha transcripts of fibrillar collagens were detected simultaneously in the primary (PMC) and secondary (SMC) mesenchyme cells of the late gastrula stage and subsequently expressed in the spicules and gut associated cells of the pluteus stage. The 3 alpha transcripts of the basement membrane collagen appeared earlier than 1 alpha and 2 alpha, and were first detected in the presumptive PMC at the vegetal plate of the late blastula stage. The PMC exhibited high expression of 3 alpha at the mesenchyme blastula stage, but during gastrulation the level of expression was reduced differentially among the PMC. In the late gastrula and pluteus stages, both PMC and SMC expressed 3 alpha mRNA, and thus at these stages all three collagen genes displayed an identical expression pattern by coincidence. This study thus provides the first survey of onset and localization of multiple collagen transcripts in a single sea urchin species.

  6. Quercetin protects human brain microvascular endothelial cells from fibrillar β-amyloid1–40-induced toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjie Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta-peptides (Aβ are known to undergo active transport across the blood-brain barrier, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy has been shown to be a prominent feature in the majority of Alzheimer׳s disease. Quercetin is a natural flavonoid molecule and has been demonstrated to have potent neuroprotective effects, but its protective effect on endothelial cells under Aβ-damaged condition is unclear. In the present study, the protective effects of quercetin on brain microvascular endothelial cells injured by fibrillar Aβ1–40 (fAβ1–40 were observed. The results show that fAβ1–40-induced cytotoxicity in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs can be relieved by quercetin treatment. Quercetin increases cell viability, reduces the release of lactate dehydrogenase, and relieves nuclear condensation. Quercetin also alleviates intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and increases superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, it strengthens the barrier integrity through the preservation of the transendothelial electrical resistance value, the relief of aggravated permeability, and the increase of characteristic enzyme levels after being exposed to fAβ1–40. In conclusion, quercetin protects hBMECs from fAβ1–40-induced toxicity.

  7. Direct inhibition of elastase and matrixmetalloproteinases and stimulation of biosynthesis of fibrillar collagens, elastin, and fibrillins by xanthohumol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Neena; Samuel, Mathew; Arena, Rosemarie; Chen, Yu-Jun; Conte, Jennifer; Natarajan, Prashanthi; Natrajan, Prashanti; Haas, Gerhard; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    In skin aging there is deterioration of the extracellular matrix's collagen and elastin fibers, from its reduced biosynthesis and increased degradation by elastase and matrixmetalloproteinases (MMPs). Xanthohumol is a flavonoid isolated from the hop plant Humulus lupulus L., with anti-microbial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic properties. The goal of this research was to investigate xanthohumol as an anti-skinaging agent via its beneficial regulation of the extracellular matrix. To this purpose, we examined the direct effect of xanthohumol on the activities of elastase and MMPs (MMPs 1, 2, and 9) and its effect on the expression (protein and/or transcription levels) of collagens (types I, III, and V), elastin, and fibrillins (1 and 2) in dermal fibroblasts. Xanthohumol significantly inhibited elastase and MMP-9 activities from its lowest concentration, and MMP-1 and MMP-2 at its higher concentrations, which implies a greater protective effect on elastin. It dramatically increased the expression of types I, III, and V collagens, and elastin, fibrillin-1, and fibrillin-2 in dermal fibroblasts. The effects were similar to those of ascorbic acid. This is the first report identifying xanthohumol's potential to improve skin structure and firmness: it simultaneously inhibits the activities of elastase/MMPs and stimulates the biosynthesis of fibrillar collagens, elastin, and fibrillins.

  8. High-throughput Image Analysis of Fibrillar Materials: A Case Study on Polymer Nanofiber Packing, Alignment, and Defects in OFETs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Nils; Rafshoon, Joshua; Naghshpour, Kaylie; Fast, Tony; Chu, Ping-Hsun; McBride, Michael; Risteen, Bailey; Grover, Martha A; Reichmanis, Elsa

    2017-09-27

    High-throughput discovery of process-structure-property relationships in materials through an informatics-enabled empirical approach is an increasingly utilized technique in materials research due to the rapidly expanding availability of data. Here, process-structure-property relationships are extracted for the nucleation, growth and deposition of semiconducting poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) nanofibers used in organic field effect transistors, via high-throughput image analysis. This study is performed using an automated image analysis pipeline combining existing open-source software and new algorithms, enabling the rapid evaluation of structural metrics for images of fibrillar materials, including local orientational order, fiber length density, and fiber length distributions. We observe that microfluidic processing leads to fibers that pack with unusually high density, while sonication yields fibers that pack sparsely with low alignment. The is attributed to differences in their crystallization mechanisms. P3HT nanofiber packing during thin film deposition exhibits behavior suggesting that fibers are confined to packing in two-dimensional layers. We find that fiber alignment, a feature correlated with charge carrier mobility, is driven by increasing fiber length, and that shorter fibers tend to segregate to the buried dielectric interface during deposition, creating potentially performance-limiting defects in alignment. Another barrier to perfect alignment is the curvature of P3HT fibers; we propose a mechanistic simulation of fiber growth that reconciles both this curvature and the log-normal distribution of fiber lengths inherent to the fiber populations under consideration.

  9. Constitutive relations for steady, dense granular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vescovi, D.; Berzi, D.; di Prisco, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    In the recent past, the flow of dense granular materials has been the subject of many scientific works; this is due to the large number of natural phenomena involving solid particles flowing at high concentration (e.g., debris flows and landslides). In contrast with the flow of dilute granular media, where the energy is essentially dissipated in binary collisions, the flow of dense granular materials is characterized by multiple, long-lasting and frictional contacts among the particles. The work focuses on the mechanical response of dry granular materials under steady, simple shear conditions. In particular, the goal is to obtain a complete rheology able to describe the material behavior within the entire range of concentrations for which the flow can be considered dense. The total stress is assumed to be the linear sum of a frictional and a kinetic component. The frictional and the kinetic contribution are modeled in the context of the critical state theory [8, 10] and the kinetic theory of dense granular gases [1, 3, 7], respectively. In the critical state theory, the granular material approaches a certain attractor state, independent on the initial arrangement, characterized by the capability of developing unlimited shear strains without any change in the concentration. Given that a disordered granular packing exists only for a range of concentration between the random loose and close packing [11], a form for the concentration dependence of the frictional normal stress that makes the latter vanish at the random loose packing is defined. In the kinetic theory, the particles are assumed to interact through instantaneous, binary and uncorrelated collisions. A new state variable of the problem is introduced, the granular temperature, which accounts for the velocity fluctuations. The model has been extended to account for the decrease in the energy dissipation due to the existence of correlated motion among the particles [5, 6] and to deal with non

  10. 5G Ultra-Dense Cellular Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Xiaohu; Tu, Song; Mao, Guoqiang; Wang, Cheng-xiang; Han, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Traditional ultra-dense wireless networks are recommended as a complement for cellular networks and are deployed in partial areas, such as hotspot and indoor scenarios. Based on the massive multiple-input multi-output (MIMO) antennas and the millimeter wavecommunication technologies, the 5G ultra-dense cellular network is proposed to deploy in overall cellular scenarios. Moreover, a distribution network architecture is presented for 5G ultra-dense cellular networks. Furthermore, the backhaul ...

  11. Interference Coordination for Dense Wireless Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soret, Beatriz; Pedersen, Klaus I.; Jørgensen, Niels T.K.

    2015-01-01

    The promise of ubiquitous and super-fast connectivity for the upcoming years will be in large part fulfilled by the addition of base stations and spectral aggregation. The resulting very dense networks (DenseNets) will face a number of technical challenges. Among others, the interference emerges ...... simply react to an identified interference problem. As an example, we propose two algorithms to apply time domain and frequency domain small cell interference coordination in a DenseNet....

  12. HOW GOOD IS A DENSE SHOP SCHEDULE?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈礴; 俞文(鱼此)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we study a class of simple and easy-to-construct shop schedules, known as dense schedules. We present tight bounds on the maximum deviation in makespan of dense flow-shop and job-shop schedules from their optimal ones. For dense open-shop schedules, we do the same for the special case of four machines and thus add a stronger supporting case for proving a standing conjecture.

  13. Breaking Dense Structures: Proving Stability of Densely Structured Hybrid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike Möhlmann

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstraction and refinement is widely used in software development. Such techniques are valuable since they allow to handle even more complex systems. One key point is the ability to decompose a large system into subsystems, analyze those subsystems and deduce properties of the larger system. As cyber-physical systems tend to become more and more complex, such techniques become more appealing. In 2009, Oehlerking and Theel presented a (de-composition technique for hybrid systems. This technique is graph-based and constructs a Lyapunov function for hybrid systems having a complex discrete state space. The technique consists of (1 decomposing the underlying graph of the hybrid system into subgraphs, (2 computing multiple local Lyapunov functions for the subgraphs, and finally (3 composing the local Lyapunov functions into a piecewise Lyapunov function. A Lyapunov function can serve multiple purposes, e.g., it certifies stability or termination of a system or allows to construct invariant sets, which in turn may be used to certify safety and security. In this paper, we propose an improvement to the decomposing technique, which relaxes the graph structure before applying the decomposition technique. Our relaxation significantly reduces the connectivity of the graph by exploiting super-dense switching. The relaxation makes the decomposition technique more efficient on one hand and on the other allows to decompose a wider range of graph structures.

  14. The 26S Proteasome Degrades the Soluble but Not the Fibrillar Form of the Yeast Prion Ure2p In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    Full Text Available Yeast prions are self-perpetuating protein aggregates that cause heritable and transmissible phenotypic traits. Among these, [PSI+] and [URE3] stand out as the most studied yeast prions, and result from the self-assembly of the translation terminator Sup35p and the nitrogen catabolism regulator Ure2p, respectively, into insoluble fibrillar aggregates. Protein quality control systems are well known to govern the formation, propagation and transmission of these prions. However, little is known about the implication of the cellular proteolytic machineries in their turnover. We previously showed that the 26S proteasome degrades both the soluble and fibrillar forms of Sup35p and affects [PSI+] propagation. Here, we show that soluble native Ure2p is degraded by the proteasome in an ubiquitin-independent manner. Proteasomal degradation of Ure2p yields amyloidogenic N-terminal peptides and a C-terminal resistant fragment. In contrast to Sup35p, fibrillar Ure2p resists proteasomal degradation. Thus, structural variability within prions may dictate their ability to be degraded by the cellular proteolytic systems.

  15. Optimal probabilistic dense coding schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kögler, Roger A.; Neves, Leonardo

    2017-04-01

    Dense coding with non-maximally entangled states has been investigated in many different scenarios. We revisit this problem for protocols adopting the standard encoding scheme. In this case, the set of possible classical messages cannot be perfectly distinguished due to the non-orthogonality of the quantum states carrying them. So far, the decoding process has been approached in two ways: (i) The message is always inferred, but with an associated (minimum) error; (ii) the message is inferred without error, but only sometimes; in case of failure, nothing else is done. Here, we generalize on these approaches and propose novel optimal probabilistic decoding schemes. The first uses quantum-state separation to increase the distinguishability of the messages with an optimal success probability. This scheme is shown to include (i) and (ii) as special cases and continuously interpolate between them, which enables the decoder to trade-off between the level of confidence desired to identify the received messages and the success probability for doing so. The second scheme, called multistage decoding, applies only for qudits ( d-level quantum systems with d>2) and consists of further attempts in the state identification process in case of failure in the first one. We show that this scheme is advantageous over (ii) as it increases the mutual information between the sender and receiver.

  16. STAR FORMATION IN DENSE CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Philip C., E-mail: pmyers@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star initial mass function (IMF) from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosities matches those in active star-forming regions if protostars have a constant birthrate but not if their births are coeval. For constant birthrate, the ratio of young stellar objects to protostars indicates the star-forming age of a cluster, typically {approx}1 Myr. The protostar accretion luminosity is typically less than its steady spherical value by a factor of {approx}2, consistent with models of episodic disk accretion.

  17. Star formation in dense clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Philip C

    2011-01-01

    A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion, and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star IMF from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosi...

  18. Brain propagation of transduced α-synuclein involves non-fibrillar protein species and is enhanced in α-synuclein null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helwig, Michael; Klinkenberg, Michael; Rusconi, Raffaella; Musgrove, Ruth E; Majbour, Nour K; El-Agnaf, Omar M A; Ulusoy, Ayse; Di Monte, Donato A

    2016-03-01

    Aggregation and neuron-to-neuron transmission are attributes of α-synuclein relevant to its pathogenetic role in human synucleinopathies such as Parkinson's disease. Intraparenchymal injections of fibrillar α-synuclein trigger widespread propagation of amyloidogenic protein species via mechanisms that require expression of endogenous α-synuclein and, possibly, its structural corruption by misfolded conformers acting as pathological seeds. Here we describe another paradigm of long-distance brain diffusion of α-synuclein that involves inter-neuronal transfer of monomeric and/or oligomeric species and is independent of recruitment of the endogenous protein. Targeted expression of human α-synuclein was induced in the mouse medulla oblongata through an injection of viral vectors into the vagus nerve. Enhanced levels of intra-neuronal α-synuclein were sufficient to initiate its caudo-rostral diffusion that likely involved at least one synaptic transfer and progressively reached specific brain regions such as the locus coeruleus, dorsal raphae and amygdala in the pons, midbrain and forebrain. Transfer of human α-synuclein was compared in two separate lines of α-synuclein-deficient mice versus their respective wild-type controls and, interestingly, lack of endogenous α-synuclein expression did not counteract diffusion but actually resulted in a more pronounced and advanced propagation of exogenous α-synuclein. Self-interaction of adjacent molecules of human α-synuclein was detected in both wild-type and mutant mice. In the former, interaction of human α-synuclein with mouse α-synuclein was also observed and might have contributed to differences in protein transmission. In wild-type and α-synuclein-deficient mice, accumulation of human α-synuclein within recipient axons in the pons, midbrain and forebrain caused morphological evidence of neuritic pathology. Tissue sections from the medulla oblongata and pons were stained with different antibodies recognizing

  19. Goodpasture Antigen-binding Protein/Ceramide Transporter Binds to Human Serum Amyloid P-Component and Is Present in Brain Amyloid Plaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mencarelli, Chiara; Bode, Gerard H.; Losen, Mario; Kulharia, Mahesh; Molenaar, Peter C.; Veerhuis, Robert; Steinbusch, Harry W. M.; De Baets, Marc H.; Nicolaes, Gerry A. F.; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) is a non-fibrillar glycoprotein belonging to the pentraxin family of the innate immune system. SAP is present in plasma, basement membranes, and amyloid deposits. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that the Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP) binds to

  20. 高密度CO2处理虾仁营养组成和水分子状态的变化规律%Changes in nutritious component and water molecule of peeled shrimp during dense phase carbon dioxide treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈亚励; 屈小娟; 刘书成; 吉宏武; 郝记明; 黄万有; 郭明慧

    2014-01-01

    Dense phase carbon dioxide (DPCD) is a non-thermal processing technology, which affects microorganisms and enzymes through molecular effects of CO2 under pressures below 50 MPa and 60℃. DPCD has had less of a significant effect on the quality of food and has been applied to the process of meats, vegetables, seeds and food powders, fruits, spices and herbs, and fish. Currently, most of research are more focused on microorganisms and enzymes that are inactivated by DPCD. However, some research indicated that DPCD has an effect on the quality of meat and its products, mainly related to muscle pH value, color, water holding capacity, texture, etc. The nutritional composition of meat and its products also has a decisive effect on their qualities. Water is the highest content in meat and its products composition. Water can directly affect color, tenderness, juiciness, flavor, and the processing characteristics of meat and its products. Water content and its distribution showed dynamic changes in the processing and storage of meat and its products, which is an important factor in determining quality and shelf life. Litopenaeus vannamei is a favorite of consumers in aquatic products due to tender meat and high nutritional value. In our previous study, Litopenaeus vannamei was treated for sterilization and inactivation of polyphenol oxidase by DPCD. In order to further investigate the effect of DPCD on shrimp muscle quality, peeled shrimp were used as the studied object. The effects of temperature (35-55℃), pressure (5-25 MPa), and time (10-60 min) on nutritious components and water molecules of shrimp muscle were studied. The results showed as follows: when using the untreated peeled shrimp, the content of nutritious components (moisture, crude protein, crude fat, and ash), especially fat, significantly decreased (P<0.05) after DPCD treatment. With the increasing of DPCD treatment intensity, fat was extracted and water was dried out by DPCD. Partially ionized minerals

  1. Thermophysical properties of warm dense hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Holst, Bastian; Desjarlais, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    We study the thermophysical properties of warm dense hydrogen using quantum molecular dynamics simulations. New results are presented for the pair distribution functions, the equation of state, the Hugoniot curve, and the reflectivity. We compare with available experimental data and predictions of the chemical picture. Especially, we discuss the nonmetal-to-metal transition which occurs at about 40 GPa in the dense fluid.

  2. Heavy meson production in hot dense matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolos, Laura; Gamermann, Daniel; Garcia-Recio, Carmen; Molina, Raquel; Nieves, Juan; Oset, Eulogio; Ramos, Angels; Nieves, JM; Oset, E; Vacas, MJV

    2010-01-01

    The properties of charmed mesons in dense matter are studied using a unitary coupled-channel approach in the nuclear medium which takes into account Pauli-blocking effects and meson self-energies in a self-consistent manner. We obtain the open-charm meson spectral functions in this dense nuclear env

  3. Finding dense locations in indoor tracking data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Finding the dense locations in large indoor spaces is very useful for getting overloaded locations, security, crowd management, indoor navigation, and guidance. Indoor tracking data can be very large and are not readily available for finding dense locations. This paper presents a graph-based mode...

  4. Nonlinear Surface Dilatational Rheology and Foaming Behavior of Protein and Protein Fibrillar Aggregates in the Presence of Natural Surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, Leonard M C

    2016-04-19

    The surface and foaming properties of native soy glycinin (11S) and its heat-induced fibrillar aggregates, in the presence of natural surfactant steviol glycoside (STE), were investigated and compared at pH 7.0 to determine the impact of protein structure modification on protein-surfactant interfacial interactions. The adsorption at, and nonlinear dilatational rheological behavior of, the air-water interface were studied by combining drop shape analysis tensiometry, ellipsometry, and large-amplitude oscillatory dilatational rheology. Lissajous plots of surface pressure versus deformation were used to analyze the surface rheological response in terms of interfacial microstructure. The heat treatment generates a mixture of long fibrils and unconverted peptides. The presence of small peptides in 11S fibril samples resulted in a faster adsorption kinetics than that of native 11S. The addition of STE affected the adsorption of 11S significantly, whereas no apparent effect on the adsorption of the 11S fibril-peptide system was observed. The rheological response of interfaces stabilized by 11S-STE mixtures also differed significantly from the response for 11S fibril-peptide-STE mixtures. For 11S, the STE reduces the degree of strain hardening in extension and increases strain hardening in compression, suggesting the interfacial structure may change from a surface gel to a mixed phase of protein patches and STE domains. The foams generated from the mixtures displayed comparable foam stability to that of pure 11S. For 11S fibril-peptide mixtures STE only significantly affects the response in extension, where the degree of strain softening is decreased compared to the pure fibril-peptide system. The foam stability of the fibril-peptide system was significantly reduced by STE. These findings indicate that fibrillization of globular proteins could be a potential strategy to modify the complex surface and foaming behaviors of protein-surfactant mixtures.

  5. Dense image correspondences for computer vision

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ce

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the fundamental building-block of many new computer vision systems: dense and robust correspondence estimation. Dense correspondence estimation techniques are now successfully being used to solve a wide range of computer vision problems, very different from the traditional applications such techniques were originally developed to solve. This book introduces the techniques used for establishing correspondences between challenging image pairs, the novel features used to make these techniques robust, and the many problems dense correspondences are now being used to solve. The book provides information to anyone attempting to utilize dense correspondences in order to solve new or existing computer vision problems. The editors describe how to solve many computer vision problems by using dense correspondence estimation. Finally, it surveys resources, code, and data necessary for expediting the development of effective correspondence-based computer vision systems.   ·         Provides i...

  6. Hausdorff hyperspaces of $R^m$ and their dense subspaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Wieslaw

    2007-01-01

    Let $CLB_H(X)$ denote the hyperspace of closed bounded subsets of a metric space $X$, endowed with the Hausdorff metric topology. We prove, among others, that natural dense subspaces of $CLB_H(R^m)$ of all nowhere dense closed sets, of all perfect sets, of all Cantor sets and of all Lebesgue measure zero sets are homeomorphic to the Hilbert space $\\ell_2$. Moreover, we investigate the hyperspace $CL_H(R)$ of all nonempty closed subsets of the real line $R$ with the Hausdorff (infinite-valued) metric. We show that a nonseparable component of $CL_H(R)$ is homeomorphic to the Hilbert space $\\ell_2(2^{\\aleph_0})$ as long as it does not contain any of the sets $R, [0,\\infty), (-\\infty,0]$.

  7. Fibrillar structures in food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes-Nijboer, A.; Venema, P.; Linden, van der E.

    2012-01-01

    Assembly of proteins or peptides into fibrils is an important subject of study in various research fields. In the field of food research, the protein fibrils are interesting candidates as functional ingredients. It is essential to understand the formation and properties of the fibrils for successful

  8. Curcumin binds to the pre-fibrillar aggregates of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and alters its amyloidogenic pathway resulting in reduced cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Nidhi K; Srivastava, Ankit; Katyal, Nidhi; Jain, Nidhi; Khan, M Ashhar I; Kundu, Bishwajit; Deep, Shashank

    2015-05-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that affects motor neurons. Unfortunately, effective therapeutics against this disease is still not available. Almost 20% of familial ALS (fALS) is suggested to be associated with pathological deposition of superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Evidences suggest that SOD1-containing pathological inclusions in ALS exhibit amyloid like properties. An effective strategy to combat ALS may be to inhibit amyloid formation of SOD1 using small molecules. In the present study, we observed the fibrillation of one of the premature forms of SOD1 (SOD1 with reduced disulfide) in the presence of curcumin. Using ThT binding assay, AFM, TEM images and FTIR, we demonstrate that curcumin inhibits the DTT-induced fibrillation of SOD1 and favors the formation of smaller and disordered aggregates of SOD1. The enhancement in curcumin fluorescence on the addition of oligomers and pre-fibrillar aggregates of SOD1 suggests binding of these species to curcumin. Docking studies indicate that putative binding site of curcumin may be the amyloidogenic regions of SOD1. Further, there is a significant increase in SOD1 mediated toxicity in the regime of pre-fibrillar and fibrillar aggregates which is not evident in curcumin containing samples. All these data suggest that curcumin reduces toxicity by binding to the amyloidogenic regions of the species on the aggregation pathway and blocking the formation of the toxic species. Nanoparticles of curcumin with higher aqueous solubility show similar aggregation control as that of curcumin bulk. This suggests a potential role for curcumin in the treatment of ALS.

  9. Fibril specific, conformation dependent antibodies recognize a generic epitope common to amyloid fibrils and fibrillar oligomers that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasool Suhail

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyloid-related degenerative diseases are associated with the accumulation of misfolded proteins as amyloid fibrils in tissue. In Alzheimer disease (AD, amyloid accumulates in several distinct types of insoluble plaque deposits, intracellular Aβ and as soluble oligomers and the relationships between these deposits and their pathological significance remains unclear. Conformation dependent antibodies have been reported that specifically recognize distinct assembly states of amyloids, including prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils. Results We immunized rabbits with a morphologically homogeneous population of Aβ42 fibrils. The resulting immune serum (OC specifically recognizes fibrils, but not random coil monomer or prefibrillar oligomers, indicating fibrils display a distinct conformation dependent epitope that is absent in prefibrillar oligomers. The fibril epitope is also displayed by fibrils of other types of amyloids, indicating that the epitope is a generic feature of the polypeptide backbone. The fibril specific antibody also recognizes 100,000 × G soluble fibrillar oligomers ranging in size from dimer to greater than 250 kDa on western blots. The fibrillar oligomers recognized by OC are immunologically distinct from prefibrillar oligomers recognized by A11, even though their sizes overlap broadly, indicating that size is not a reliable indicator of oligomer conformation. The immune response to prefibrillar oligomers and fibrils is not sequence specific and antisera of the same specificity are produced in response to immunization with islet amyloid polypeptide prefibrillar oligomer mimics and fibrils. The fibril specific antibodies stain all types of amyloid deposits in human AD brain. Diffuse amyloid deposits stain intensely with anti-fibril antibody although they are thioflavin S negative, suggesting that they are indeed fibrillar in conformation. OC also stains islet amyloid deposits in transgenic mouse models of type

  10. Kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graedel, T.E.; Langer, W.D.; Frerking, M.A.

    1982-03-01

    A detailed model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds has been developed to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature, and other topics of interest. The full computation involves 328 individual reactions (expanded to 1067 to study carbon and oxygen isotope chemistry); photodegradation processes are unimportant in these dense clouds and are excluded.

  11. Dense Matter Characterization by X-ray Thomson Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Edwards, M J; Lee, R W; Collins, G W; Cauble, R C; Hsing, W W; Hammel, B A

    2000-12-29

    We discuss the extension of the powerful technique of Thomson scattering to the x-ray regime for providing an independent measure of plasma parameters for dense plasmas. By spectrally-resolving the scattering, the coherent (Rayleigh) unshifted scattering component can be separated from the incoherent Thomson component, which is both Compton and Doppler shifted. The free electron density and temperature can then be inferred from the spectral shape of the high frequency Thomson scattering component. In addition, as the plasma temperature is decreased, the electron velocity distribution as measured by incoherent Thomson scattering will make a transition from the traditional Gaussian Boltzmann distribution to a density-dependent parabolic Fermi distribution to. We also present a discussion for a proof-of-principle experiment appropriate for a high energy laser facility.

  12. Ion structure in dense plasmas: MSA versus HNC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuensch, K; Vorberger, J; Gericke, D O [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Gregori, G [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.wuensch@warwick.ac.uk

    2009-05-29

    We present results for the ionic structure in dense, moderately to strongly coupled plasmas using two models: the mean spherical approximation (MSA) and the hypernetted chain (HNC) approach. While the first method allows for an analytical solution, the latter has to be solved iteratively. Independent of the coupling strength, the results show only small differences when the ions are considered to form an unscreened one-component plasma (OCP) system. If the electrons are treated as a polarizable background, the different ways to incorporate the screening yield, however, large discrepancies between the models, particularly for more strongly coupled plasmas.

  13. An essential nuclear protein in trypanosomes is a component of mRNA transcription/export pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Serpeloni

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, different RNA species are exported from the nucleus via specialized pathways. The mRNA export machinery is highly integrated with mRNA processing, and includes a different set of nuclear transport adaptors as well as other mRNA binding proteins, RNA helicases, and NPC-associated proteins. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, a widespread and neglected human disease which is endemic to Latin America. Gene expression in Trypanosoma has unique characteristics, such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-encoding genes and mRNA processing by trans-splicing. In general, post-transcriptional events are the major points for regulation of gene expression in these parasites. However, the export pathway of mRNA from the nucleus is poorly understood. The present study investigated the function of TcSub2, which is a highly conserved protein ortholog to Sub2/ UAP56, a component of the Transcription/Export (TREX multiprotein complex connecting transcription with mRNA export in yeast/human. Similar to its orthologs, TcSub2 is a nuclear protein, localized in dispersed foci all over the nuclei -except the fibrillar center of nucleolus- and at the interface between dense and non-dense chromatin areas, proposing the association of TcSub2 with transcription/processing sites. These findings were analyzed further by BrUTP incorporation assays and confirmed that TcSub2 is physically associated with active RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II, but not RNA polymerase I (RNA pol I or Spliced Leader (SL transcription, demonstrating participation particularly in nuclear mRNA metabolism in T. cruzi. The double knockout of the TcSub2 gene is lethal in T. cruzi, suggesting it has an essential function. Alternatively, RNA interference assays were performed in Trypanosoma brucei. It allowed demonstrating that besides being an essential protein, its knockdown causes mRNA accumulation in the nucleus and

  14. Kinetics of the neuroinflammation-oxidative stress correlation in rat brain following the injection of fibrillar amyloid-beta onto the hippocampus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; Valdivia-Velázquez, Miguel; Acosta-Martínez, J Pablo; Ortiz, Genaro G

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe-following the injection of a single intracerebral dose of fibrillar amyloid-beta(1-40) in vivo-some correlations between proinflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress indicators in function of time, as well as how these variables fit in a regression model. We found a positive, significant correlation between interleukin (IL)-1beta or IL-6 and the activity of the glutathione peroxidase enzyme (GSH-Px), but IL-1beta or IL-6 maintained a strong, negative correlation with the lipid peroxidation (LPO). The first 12 h marked a positive correlation between IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), but starting from the 36 h, this relationship became negative. We found also particular patterns of behavior through the time for IL-1beta, nitrites and IL-6, with parallel or sequential interrelationships. Results shows clearly that, in vivo, the fibrillar amyloid-beta (Abeta) disrupts the oxidative balance and initiate a proinflammatory response, which in turn feeds the oxidative imbalance in a coordinated, sequential way. This work contributes to our understanding of the positive feedbacks, focusing the "cytokine cycle" along with the oxidative stress mediators in a complex, multicellular, and interactive environment.

  15. Microglial phagocytosis induced by fibrillar β-amyloid is attenuated by oligomeric β-amyloid: implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Nan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive microglia are associated with β-amyloid (Aβ deposit and clearance in Alzhiemer's Disease (AD. Paradoxically, entocranial resident microglia fail to trigger an effective phagocytic response to clear Aβ deposits although they mainly exist in an "activated" state. Oligomeric Aβ (oAβ, a recent target in the pathogenesis of AD, can induce more potent neurotoxicity when compared with fibrillar Aβ (fAβ. However, the role of the different Aβ forms in microglial phagocytosis, induction of inflammation and oxidation, and subsequent regulation of phagocytic receptor system, remain unclear. Results We demonstrated that Aβ(1-42 fibrils, not Aβ(1-42 oligomers, increased the microglial phagocytosis. Intriguingly, the pretreatment of microglia with oAβ(1-42 not only attenuated fAβ(1-42-triggered classical phagocytic response to fluorescent microspheres but also significantly inhibited phagocytosis of fluorescent labeled fAβ(1-42. Compared with the fAβ(1-42 treatment, the oAβ(1-42 treatment resulted in a rapid and transient increase in interleukin 1β (IL-1β level and produced higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, nitric oxide (NO, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and intracellular superoxide anion (SOA. The further results demonstrated that microglial phagocytosis was negatively correlated with inflammatory mediators in this process and that the capacity of phagocytosis in fAβ(1-42-induced microglia was decreased by IL-1β, lippolysaccharide (LPS and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP. The decreased phagocytosis could be relieved by pyrrolidone dithiocarbamate (PDTC, a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB inhibitor, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a free radical scavenger. These results suggest that the oAβ-impaired phagocytosis is mediated through inflammation and oxidative stress-mediated mechanism in microglial cells. Furthermore, oAβ(1-42 stimulation reduced the mRNA expression of CD36, integrin β1 (Itgb1, and Ig

  16. Injection of photoelectrons into dense argon gas

    CERN Document Server

    Borghesani, A F

    2010-01-01

    The injection of photoelectrons in a gaseous or liquid sample is a widespread technique to produce a cold plasma in a weakly--ionized system in order to study the transport properties of electrons in a dense gas or liquid. We report here the experimental results of photoelectron injection into dense argon gas at the temperatureT=142.6 K as a function of the externally applied electric field and gas density. We show that the experimental data can be interpreted in terms of the so called Young-Bradbury model only if multiple scattering effects due to the dense environment are taken into account when computing the scattering properties and the energetics of the electrons.

  17. THE ENERGETIC ENVIRONMENT AND THE DENSE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN ULIRGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Vega

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We t the near-infrared to radio spectral energy distributions of a sample of 30 luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies with models that include both starburst and AGN components. The aim of the work was to determine important physical parameters for this kind of objects such as the optical depth towards the luminosity source, the star formation rate, the star formation efficiency and the AGN fraction. We found that although about half of our sample have best- t models that include an AGN component, only 30% have an AGN which accounts for more than 10% of the infrared luminosity whereas all have an energetically dominant starburst. Our models also determine the mass of dense molecular gas. Assuming that this mass is that traced by the HCN molecule, we reproduce the observed linear relation between HCN luminosity and infrared luminosity found by Gao & Solomon (2004. However, our derived conversion factor between HCN luminosity and the mass of dense molecular gas is a factor of 2 smaller than that assumed by these authors. Finally, we nd that the star formation efficiency falls as the starburst ages.

  18. The energetic environment and the dense interstellar medium in ULIRGs

    CERN Document Server

    Vega, O; Bressan, A; Granato, G L; Silva, L; Panuzzo, P

    2009-01-01

    We fit the near-infrared to radio spectral energy distributions of a sample of 30 luminous and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies with models that include both starburst and AGN components. The aim of the work was to determine important physical parameters for this kind of objects such as the optical depth towards the luminosity source, the star formation rate, the star formation efficiency and the AGN fraction. We found that although about half of our sample have best-fit models that include an AGN component, only 30 % have an AGN which accounts for more than 10 % of the infrared luminosity whereas all have an energetically dominant starburst. Our models also determine the mass of dense molecular gas. Assuming that this mass is that traced by the HCN molecule, we reproduce the observed linear relation between HCN luminosity and infrared luminosity found by Gao and Solomon (2004). However, our derived conversion factor between HCN luminosity and the mass of dense molecular gas is a factor of 2 smaller than that...

  19. DENSE CLUMPS AND CANDIDATES FOR MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN W40

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoikura, Tomomi; Dobashi, Kazuhito [Department of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Nakamura, Fumitaka; Hara, Chihomi; Kawabe, Ryohei [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Tanaka, Tomohiro [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Shimajiri, Yoshito [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service d’Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sugitani, Kouji, E-mail: ikura@u-gakugei.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan)

    2015-06-20

    We report the results of the {sup 12}CO (J = 3−2) and HCO{sup +} (J = 4−3) observations of the W40 H ii region with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) 10 m telescope (HPBW ≃ 22″) to search for molecular outflows and dense clumps. We found that the velocity field in the region is highly complex, consisting of at least four distinct velocity components at V{sub LSR} ≃ 3, 5, 7, and 10 km s{sup −1}. The ∼7 km s{sup −1} component represents the systemic velocity of cold gas surrounding the entire region, and causes heavy absorption in the {sup 12}CO spectra over the velocity range 6 ≲ V{sub LSR} ≲ 9 km s{sup −1}. The ∼5 and ∼10 km s{sup −1} components exhibit high {sup 12}CO temperature (≳40 K) and are found mostly around the H ii region, suggesting that these components are likely to be tracing dense gas interacting with the expanding shell around the H ii region. Based on the {sup 12}CO data, we identified 13 regions of high velocity gas, which we interpret as candidate outflow lobes. Using the HCO{sup +} data, we also identified six clumps and estimated their physical parameters. On the basis of the ASTE data and near-infrared images from 2MASS, we present an updated three-dimensional model of this region. In order to investigate molecular outflows in W40, the SiO (J = 1−0, v = 0) emission line and some other emission lines at 40 GHz were also observed with the 45 m telescope at the Nobeyama Radio Observatory, but they were not detected at the present sensitivity.

  20. DNS of turbulent flows of dense gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciacovelli, L.; Cinnella, P.; Gloerfelt, X.; Grasso, F.

    2017-03-01

    The influence of dense gas effects on compressible turbulence is investigated by means of numerical simulations of the decay of compressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence (CHIT) and of supersonic turbulent flows through a plane channel (TCF). For both configurations, a parametric study on the Mach and Reynolds numbers is carried out. The dense gas considered in these parametric studies is PP11, a heavy fluorocarbon. The results are systematically compared to those obtained for a diatomic perfect gas (air). In our computations, the thermodynamic behaviour of the dense gases is modelled by means of the Martin-Hou equation of state. For CHIT cases, initial turbulent Mach numbers up to 1 are analyzed using mesh resolutions up to 5123. For TCF, bulk Mach numbers up to 3 and bulk Reynolds numbers up to 12000 are investigated. Average profiles of the thermodynamic quantities exhibit significant differences with respect to perfect-gas solutions for both of the configurations. For high-Mach CHIT, compressible structures are modified with respect to air, with weaker eddy shocklets and stronger expansions. In TCF, the velocity profiles of dense gas flows are much less sensitive to the Mach number and collapse reasonably well in the logarithmic region without any special need for compressible scalings, unlike the case of air, and the overall flow behaviour is midway between that of a variable-property liquid and that of a gas.

  1. Dense matter at RAON: Challenges and possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yujeong; Lee, Chang-Hwan; Gaitanos, T.; Kim, Youngman

    2016-11-01

    Dense nuclear matter is ubiquitous in modern nuclear physics because it is related to many interesting microscopic and macroscopic phenomena such as heavy ion collisions, nuclear structure, and neutron stars. The on-going rare isotope science project in Korea will build up a rare isotope accelerator complex called RAON. One of the main goals of RAON is to investigate rare isotope physics including dense nuclear matter. Using the relativistic Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (RBUU) transport code, we estimate the properties of nuclear matter that can be created from low-energy heavyion collisions at RAON.We give predictions for the maximum baryon density, the isospin asymmetry and the temperature of nuclear matter that would be formed during 197Au+197Au and 132Sn+64Ni reactions. With a large isospin asymmetry, various theoretical studies indicate that the critical densities or temperatures of phase transitions to exotic states decrease. Because a large isospin asymmetry is expected in the dense matter created at RAON, we discuss possibilities of observing exotic states of dense nuclear matter at RAON for large isospin asymmetry.

  2. Dense high temperature ceramic oxide superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Dense superconducting ceramic oxide articles of manufacture and methods for producing these articles are described. Generally these articles are produced by first processing these superconducting oxides by ceramic processing techniques to optimize materials properties, followed by reestablishing the superconducting state in a desired portion of the ceramic oxide composite.

  3. Denseness of Numerical Radius Attaining Holomorphic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee HanJu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the density of numerical radius attaining holomorphic functions on certain Banach spaces using the Lindenstrauss method. In particular, it is shown that if a complex Banach space is locally uniformly convex, then the set of all numerical attaining elements of is dense in .

  4. Denseness of Numerical Radius Attaining Holomorphic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ju Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the density of numerical radius attaining holomorphic functions on certain Banach spaces using the Lindenstrauss method. In particular, it is shown that if a complex Banach space X is locally uniformly convex, then the set of all numerical attaining elements of A(BX:X is dense in A(BX:X.

  5. Coalescence preference in dense packing of bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeseul; Gim, Bopil; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-11-01

    Coalescence preference is the tendency that a merged bubble from the contact of two original bubbles (parent) tends to be near to the bigger parent. Here, we show that the coalescence preference can be blocked by densely packing of neighbor bubbles. We use high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence phenomenon which occurs in micro scale seconds and inside dense packing of microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Previous theory and experimental evidence predict a power of -5 between the relative coalescence position and the parent size. However, our new observation for coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles shows a different power of -2. We believe that this result may be important to understand coalescence dynamics in dense packing of soft matter. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST and also was supported by Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (2009-0082580) and by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry and Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2012R1A6A3A04039257).

  6. APT: Action localization Proposals from dense Trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, J.C.; Jain, M.; Gati, E.; Snoek, C.G.M.; Xie, X.; Jones, M.W.; Tam, G.K.L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is on action localization in video with the aid of spatio-temporal proposals. To alleviate the computational expensive video segmentation step of existing proposals, we propose bypassing the segmentations completely by generating proposals directly from the dense trajectories used to repr

  7. Dense ceramic membranes for methane conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, Henny J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Dense ceramic membranes made from mixed oxygen-ionic and electronic conducting perovskite-related oxides allow separation of oxygen from an air supply at elevated temperatures (>700 °C). By combining air separation and catalytic partial oxidation of methane to syngas into a ceramic membrane reactor,

  8. Improvements in accuracy of dense OPC models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallingal, Chidam; Oberschmidt, James; Viswanathan, Ramya; Abdo, Amr; Park, OSeo

    2008-10-01

    Performing model-based optical proximity correction (MBOPC) on layouts has become an integral part of patterning advanced integrated circuits. Earlier technologies used sparse OPC, the run times of which explode when the density of layouts increases. With the move to 45 nm technology node, this increase in run time has resulted in a shift to dense simulation OPC, which is pixel-based. The dense approach becomes more efficient at 45nm technology node and beyond. New OPC model forms can be used with the dense simulation OPC engine, providing the greater accuracy required by smaller technology nodes. Parameters in the optical model have to be optimized to achieve the required accuracy. Dense OPC uses a resist model with a different set of parameters than sparse OPC. The default search ranges used in the optimization of these resist parameters do not always result in the best accuracy. However, it is possible to improve the accuracy of the resist models by understanding the restrictions placed on the search ranges of the physical parameters during optimization. This paper will present results showing the correlation between accuracy of the models and some of these optical and resist parameters. The results will show that better optimization can improve the model fitness of features in both the calibration and verification set.

  9. Building a dense surface map incrementally from semi-dense point cloud and RGB images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian-shan LI; Rong XIONG; Shoudong HUANG; Yi-ming HUANG

    2015-01-01

    Building and using maps is a fundamental issue for bionic robots in fi eld applications. A dense surface map, which offers rich visual and geometric information, is an ideal representation of the environment for indoor/outdoor localization, navigation, and recognition tasks of these robots. Since most bionic robots can use only small light-weight laser scanners and cameras to acquire semi-dense point cloud and RGB images, we propose a method to generate a consistent and dense surface map from this kind of semi-dense point cloud and RGB images. The method contains two main steps: (1) generate a dense surface for every single scan of point cloud and its corresponding image(s) and (2) incrementally fuse the dense surface of a new scan into the whole map. In step (1) edge-aware resampling is realized by segmenting the scan of a point cloud in advance and resampling each sub-cloud separately. Noise within the scan is reduced and a dense surface is generated. In step (2) the average surface is estimated probabilistically and the non-coincidence of different scans is eliminated. Experiments demonstrate that our method works well in both indoor and outdoor semi-structured environments where there are regularly shaped ob jects.

  10. Mechanisms of the self-assembly of EAK16-family peptides into fibrillar and globular structures: molecular dynamics simulations from nano- to micro-seconds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamyari, Soheila; Kargar, Faezeh; Sheikh-Hasani, Vahid; Emadi, Saeed; Fazli, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    The self-assembly of EAK16-family peptides in a bulk solution was studied using a combination of all-atom and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. In addition, specified concentrations of EAK16 peptides were induced to form fibrillary or globular assemblies in vitro. The results show that the combination of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations on the single- and double-chain levels and coarse-grained simulations on the many-chain level predicts the experimental observations reasonably well. At neutral pH conditions, EAK16-I and EAK16-II assemble into fibrillary structures, whereas EAK16-IV aggregates into globular assemblies. Mechanisms of the formation of fibrillar and globular assemblies are described using the simulation results.

  11. Sub micrometric fibrillar structures of codoped poly aniline obtained by co-oxidation using the NaCl O/ammonium peroxydisulfate system: synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osorio F, J. E.; Gomez Y, C.; Hernandez P, M. A.; Corea T, M. L., E-mail: josorio@ipn.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Quimica e Industrias Extractivas, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-07-01

    A mixture of ammonium peroxydisulfate and sodium hypochlorite (NaCl O) (co-oxi dating system) were used to obtain poly aniline (PANi) doped with HCl and camphorsulfonic acid (CsA) (co-doping). The effect of HCl/CsA ratio added during polymerization structure, morphology and electrical conductivity of the conducting polymer was investigated. When NaCl O is used, the polymerization rate is substantially increased and the morphology changes from micrometric granular to nano metric fibrillar. CsA was used as complementary dopant but also to improve the solubility of PANi in common solvents. However, results suggest that quinone-like heterocycles containing carbonyl radicals as well as phenazine-type aromatic rings might be impeding an efficient doping in detriment of the conductivity. For the characterization X-Ray diffraction analysis, UV visible spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used. (Author)

  12. Ordered fibrillar morphology of donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers at multiple scales via blending with flexible polymers and solvent vapor annealing: insight into photophysics and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyang; Liu, Jiangang; Xu, Yaozhuo; Yu, Xinhong; Xing, Rubo; Han, Yanchun

    2014-01-28

    The ordered, aligned fibrillar morphology at multiple scales of a donor-acceptor (D-A) conjugated copolymer of 3,6-bis-(thiophen-2-yl)-N,N'-bis(2-octyl-1-dodecyl)-1,4-dioxo-pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole and thieno[3,2-b]thiophene (PDBT-TT) was prepared via blending with flexible polymers (PS13.7k, PDBT-TT/PS = 1/10 w/w) followed by chloroform (CF) solvent vapor annealing (SVA) for 24 h. The aligned fibrillar bundles were of about 500 nm width, consisting of parallel aligned nanofibrils of ab. 10 nm width. It was found that the direction of backbones in nanofibrils was parallel to the long axis of nanofibrils, which implied an intense intra-chain conjugation associated with extended backbones and J-aggregation of PDBT-TT. This ordered morphology corresponded to the characteristic photophysical features of (i) red-shifted absorption arising from J-aggregation, (ii) larger Davydov splitting, (iii) the prevailing absorbance of J-aggregation over H-aggregation in its UV-Vis spectrum and (iv) more red-shifted max photoluminescence emission, compared with the films prepared via the other methods. By investigating the Raman spectra and XRD profiles, it is proposed that the origin of the best morphological and photophysical order is the combination of blending and SVA. The limited and "flexible" space formed due to phase separation between PDBT-TT and PS facilitated the motion of rigid PDBT-TT chains and promoted their stacking order as templates, and CF vapor assisted the conformational transition of chains to more "coil-like" to help them reorganize in a thermodynamic stable way.

  13. A two-year study with fibrillar beta-amyloid (Abeta) immunization in aged canines: effects on cognitive function and brain Abeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Elizabeth; Pop, Viorela; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Hill, MaryAnn; Saing, Tommy; Sarsoza, Floyd; Nistor, Michaela; Christie, Lori-Ann; Milton, Saskia; Glabe, Charles; Barrett, Edward; Cribbs, David

    2008-04-02

    Aged canines (dogs) accumulate human-type beta-amyloid (Abeta) in diffuse plaques in the brain with parallel declines in cognitive function. We hypothesized that reducing Abeta in a therapeutic treatment study of aged dogs with preexisting Abeta pathology and cognitive deficits would lead to cognitive improvements. To test this hypothesis, we immunized aged beagles (8.4-12.4 years) with fibrillar Abeta(1-42) formulated with aluminum salt (Alum) for 2.4 years (25 vaccinations). Cognitive testing during this time revealed no improvement in measures of learning, spatial attention, or spatial memory. After extended treatment (22 vaccinations), we observed maintenance of prefrontal-dependent reversal learning ability. In the brain, levels of soluble and insoluble Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) and the extent of diffuse plaque accumulation was significantly decreased in several cortical regions, with preferential reductions in the prefrontal cortex, which is associated with a maintenance of cognition. However, the amount of soluble oligomers remained unchanged. The extent of prefrontal Abeta was correlated with frontal function and serum anti-Abeta antibody titers. Thus, reducing total Abeta may be of limited therapeutic benefit to recovery of cognitive decline in a higher mammalian model of human brain aging and disease. Immunizing animals before extensive Abeta deposition and cognitive decline to prevent oligomeric or fibrillar Abeta formation may have a greater impact on cognition and also more directly evaluate the role of Abeta on cognition in canines. Alternatively, clearing preexisting Abeta from the brain in a treatment study may be more efficacious for cognition if combined with a second intervention that restores neuron health.

  14. Effect of LOS/NLOS Propagation on 5G Ultra-Dense Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galiotto, Carlo; Pratas, Nuno; Doyle, Linda

    2017-01-01

    The combined presence of Line-of-Sight (LOS) and Non-Line-of-Sight (NLOS) components in the radio propagation environment can severely degrade the Ultra-Dense Networks (UDNs) performance. Backed by a stochastic geometry model, we show that when the LOS/NLOS propagation components are taken into a...... and to take advantage of extreme cell densification in the upcoming 5G wireless networks....

  15. Orbital free molecular dynamics; Approche sans orbitale des plasmas denses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, F

    2007-08-15

    The microscopic properties of hot and dense plasmas stay a field essentially studied thanks to classical theories like the One Component Plasma, models which rely on free parameters, particularly ionization. In order to investigate these systems, we have used, in this PhD work, a semi-classical model, without free parameters, that is based on coupling consistently classical molecular dynamics for the nuclei and orbital free density functional theory for the electrons. The electronic fluid is represented by a free energy entirely determined by the local density. This approximation was validated by a comparison with an ab initio technique, quantum molecular dynamics. This one is identical to the previous except for the description of the free energy that depends on a quantum-independent-particle model. Orbital free molecular dynamics was then used to compute equation of state of boron and iron plasmas in the hot and dense regime. Furthermore, comparisons with classical theories were performed on structural and dynamical properties. Finally, equation of state and transport coefficients mixing laws were studied by direct simulation of a plasma composed of deuterium and copper. (author)

  16. Dense Output for Strong Stability Preserving Runge–Kutta Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2016-12-10

    We investigate dense output formulae (also known as continuous extensions) for strong stability preserving (SSP) Runge–Kutta methods. We require that the dense output formula also possess the SSP property, ideally under the same step-size restriction as the method itself. A general recipe for first-order SSP dense output formulae for SSP methods is given, and second-order dense output formulae for several optimal SSP methods are developed. It is shown that SSP dense output formulae of order three and higher do not exist, and that in any method possessing a second-order SSP dense output, the coefficient matrix A has a zero row.

  17. Colloquium: Nonlinear Collective Interactions in Dense Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, P K

    2010-01-01

    The current understanding of some important collective processes in dense quantum plasmas is presented. After reviewing the basic properties of dense quantum plasmas with degenerate electrons, we present model equations (e.g. the quantum hydrodynamic and effective nonlinear Schr\\"odinger-Poisson equations) that describe collective nonlinear phenomena at nanoscales. The effects of the electron degeneracy arise due to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle and Pauli's exclusion principle for overlapping electron wave functions that result in a nonlinear quantum electron pressure and tunneling/diffusion of electrons through a nonlinear quantum Bohm potential. Since degenerate electrons have $1/2-$spin due to their Fermionic nature, there also appear a spin electron current and a spin force acting on the electrons due to the Bohr magnetization. The present nonlinear equations do not include strong electron correlations and electron-exchange interactions. The quantum effects caused by the electron degeneracy produce n...

  18. Active fluidization in dense glassy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Rituparno; Bhuyan, Pranab Jyoti; Rao, Madan; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-07-20

    Dense soft glasses show strong collective caging behavior at sufficiently low temperatures. Using molecular dynamics simulations of a model glass former, we show that the incorporation of activity or self-propulsion, f0, can induce cage breaking and fluidization, resulting in the disappearance of the glassy phase beyond a critical f0. The diffusion coefficient crosses over from being strongly to weakly temperature dependent as f0 is increased. In addition, we demonstrate that activity induces a crossover from a fragile to a strong glass and a tendency of active particles to cluster. Our results are of direct relevance to the collective dynamics of dense active colloidal glasses and to recent experiments on tagged particle diffusion in living cells.

  19. Strategies for Dense Optical CDMA Communication Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yu-bao; LIN Jin-tong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper,we have formulated a strategy that the limited available code sequences in pure Direct-Sequence(DS)or Frequency-Hopping(FH)system can be reused to realize dense optical CDMA:the strategy of novel hybrid DS/FH system.In which,the case that there are n users employing the same FH pattern but different DS code patterns is considered.On the condition that the impact of channel noises is neglected,the upper bound probability of error is evaluated based on the stationary random process theory.The results show that the hybrid system is suitable for Dense Optical CDMA(DOCDMA)communication.Moreover,the problems such as the link-impairment,dispersion of group velocity,etc.in the pure(DS or FH)system can be solved effectively.

  20. The kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, T. E.; Langer, W. D.; Frerking, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds is formulated to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, the formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, and the evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature. The abundances of the dominant isotopes of the carbon- and oxygen-bearing molecules are calculated. The chemical abundances are found to be quite sensitive to electron concentration since the electron concentration determines the ratio of H3(+) to He(+), and the electron density is strongly influenced by the metals abundance. For typical metal abundances and for H2 cloud density not less than 10,000 molecules/cu cm, nearly all carbon exists as CO at late cloud ages. At high cloud density, many aspects of the chemistry are strongly time dependent. Finally, model calculations agree well with abundances deduced from observations of molecular line emission in cold dense clouds.

  1. Topological Surface States in Dense Solid Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Ivan I; Hemley, Russell J

    2016-11-11

    Metallization of dense hydrogen and associated possible high-temperature superconductivity represents one of the key problems of physics. Recent theoretical studies indicate that before becoming a good metal, compressed solid hydrogen passes through a semimetallic stage. We show that such semimetallic phases predicted to be the most stable at multimegabar (∼300  GPa) pressures are not conventional semimetals: they exhibit topological metallic surface states inside the bulk "direct" gap in the two-dimensional surface Brillouin zone; that is, metallic surfaces may appear even when the bulk of the material remains insulating. Examples include hydrogen in the Cmca-12 and Cmca-4 structures; Pbcn hydrogen also has metallic surface states but they are of a nontopological nature. The results provide predictions for future measurements, including probes of possible surface superconductivity in dense hydrogen.

  2. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X......-ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation...

  3. Accelerating Dense Linear Algebra on the GPU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg

    and matrix-vector operations on GPUs. Such operations form the backbone of level 1 and level 2 routines in the Basic Linear Algebra Subroutines (BLAS) library and are therefore of great importance in many scientific applications. The target hardware is the most recent NVIDIA Tesla 20-series (Fermi...... architecture). Most of the techniques I discuss for accelerating dense linear algebra are applicable to memory-bound GPU algorithms in general....

  4. Observations of Plasmons in Warm Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Neumayer, P; Lee, R W; Widmann, K; Pollaine, S W; Wallace, R J; Gregori, G; Holl, A; Bornath, T; Thiele, R; Schwarz, V; Kraeft, W; Redmer, R

    2006-09-05

    We present the first collective x-ray scattering measurements of plasmons in solid-density plasmas. The forward scattering spectra of a laser-produced narrow-band x-ray line from isochorically heated beryllium show that the plasmon frequency is a sensitive measure of the electron density. Dynamic structure calculations that include collisions and detailed balance match the measured plasmon spectrum indicating that this technique will enable new applications to determine the equation of state and compressibility of dense matter.

  5. Splashing onset in dense suspension droplets

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Ivo; Xu, Qin; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the impact of droplets of dense suspensions onto a solid substrate. We show that a global hydrodynamic balance is unable to predict the splash onset and propose to replace it by an energy balance at the level of the particles in the suspension. We experimentally verify that the resulting, particle-based Weber number gives a reliable, particle size and density dependent splash onset criterion. We further show that the same argument also explains why, in bimodal systems, smaller ...

  6. Scheme for implementing quantum dense coding with four-particle decoherence-free states in an ion trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Xiao-Juan; Cao Shuai; Fang Mao-Fa; Liao Xiang-Ping

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes an experimentally feasible scheme for implementing quantum dense coding of trapped-ion system in decoherence-free states.As the phase changes due to time evolution of components with different eigenenergies of quantum superposition are completely frozen,quantum dense coding based on this model would be perfect.The scheme is insensitive to heating of vibrational mode and Bell states can be exactly distinguished via detecting the ionic state.

  7. A method for dense packing discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Kallus, Yoav; Gravel, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing which are reported in [arXiv:0910.5226]. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest known lattice sphere packings and the best known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and ...

  8. Hybrid-Based Dense Stereo Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, T. Y.; Ting, H. W.; Jaw, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    Stereo matching generating accurate and dense disparity maps is an indispensable technique for 3D exploitation of imagery in the fields of Computer vision and Photogrammetry. Although numerous solutions and advances have been proposed in the literature, occlusions, disparity discontinuities, sparse texture, image distortion, and illumination changes still lead to problematic issues and await better treatment. In this paper, a hybrid-based method based on semi-global matching is presented to tackle the challenges on dense stereo matching. To ease the sensitiveness of SGM cost aggregation towards penalty parameters, a formal way to provide proper penalty estimates is proposed. To this end, the study manipulates a shape-adaptive cross-based matching with an edge constraint to generate an initial disparity map for penalty estimation. Image edges, indicating the potential locations of occlusions as well as disparity discontinuities, are approved by the edge drawing algorithm to ensure the local support regions not to cover significant disparity changes. Besides, an additional penalty parameter 𝑃𝑒 is imposed onto the energy function of SGM cost aggregation to specifically handle edge pixels. Furthermore, the final disparities of edge pixels are found by weighting both values derived from the SGM cost aggregation and the U-SURF matching, providing more reliable estimates at disparity discontinuity areas. Evaluations on Middlebury stereo benchmarks demonstrate satisfactory performance and reveal the potency of the hybrid-based dense stereo matching method.

  9. Dense Visual SLAM with Probabilistic Surfel Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhixin; Ye, Mao; Ren, Liu

    2017-11-01

    Visual SLAM is one of the key technologies to align the virtual and real world together in Augmented Reality applications. RGBD dense Visual SLAM approaches have shown their advantages in robustness and accuracy in recent years. However, there are still several challenges such as the inconsistencies in RGBD measurements across multiple frames that could jeopardize the accuracy of both camera trajectory and scene reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a novel map representation called Probabilistic Surfel Map (PSM) for dense visual SLAM. The main idea is to maintain a globally consistent map with both photometric and geometric uncertainties encoded in order to address the inconsistency issue. The key of our PSM is proper modeling and updating of sensor measurement uncertainties, as well as the strategies to apply them for improving both the front-end pose estimation and the back-end optimization. Experimental results on publicly available datasets demonstrate major improvements with our approach over the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, comparing with σ-DVO, we achieve a 40% reduction in absolute trajectory error and an 18% reduction in relative pose error in visual odometry, as well as an 8.5% reduction in absolute trajectory error in complete SLAM. Moreover, our PSM enables generation of a high quality dense point cloud with comparable accuracy as the state-of-the-art approach.

  10. Dense Correspondences across Scenes and Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tau, Moria; Hassner, Tal

    2016-05-01

    We seek a practical method for establishing dense correspondences between two images with similar content, but possibly different 3D scenes. One of the challenges in designing such a system is the local scale differences of objects appearing in the two images. Previous methods often considered only few image pixels; matching only pixels for which stable scales may be reliably estimated. Recently, others have considered dense correspondences, but with substantial costs associated with generating, storing and matching scale invariant descriptors. Our work is motivated by the observation that pixels in the image have contexts-the pixels around them-which may be exploited in order to reliably estimate local scales. We make the following contributions. (i) We show that scales estimated in sparse interest points may be propagated to neighboring pixels where this information cannot be reliably determined. Doing so allows scale invariant descriptors to be extracted anywhere in the image. (ii) We explore three means for propagating this information: using the scales at detected interest points, using the underlying image information to guide scale propagation in each image separately, and using both images together. Finally, (iii), we provide extensive qualitative and quantitative results, demonstrating that scale propagation allows for accurate dense correspondences to be obtained even between very different images, with little computational costs beyond those required by existing methods.

  11. Numerical modeling for dilute and dense sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Ziebarth, J. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have successfully implemented a numerical model for spray-combustion calculations. In this model, the governing gas-phase equations in Eulerian coordinate are solved by a time-marching multiple pressure correction procedure based on the operator-splitting technique. The droplet-phase equations in Lagrangian coordinate are solved by a stochastic discrete particle technique. In order to simplify the calculation procedure for the circulating droplets, the effective conductivity model is utilized. The k-epsilon models are utilized to characterize the time and length scales of the gas phase in conjunction with turbulent modulation by droplets and droplet dispersion by turbulence. This method entails random sampling of instantaneous gas flow properties and the stochastic process requires a large number of computational parcels to produce the satisfactory dispersion distributions even for rather dilute sprays. Two major improvements in spray combustion modelings were made. Firstly, we have developed a probability density function approach in multidimensional space to represent a specific computational particle. Secondly, we incorporate the Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model for handling the dense spray effects. This breakup model is based on the reasonable assumption that atomization and drop breakup are indistinguishable processes within a dense spray near the nozzle exit. Accordingly, atomization is prescribed by injecting drops which have a characteristic size equal to the nozzle exit diameter. Example problems include the nearly homogeneous and inhomogeneous turbulent particle dispersion, and the non-evaporating, evaporating, and burning dense sprays. Comparison with experimental data will be discussed in detail.

  12. Gluonic phases, vector condensates, and exotic hadrons in dense QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbar, E V; Miransky, V A; Hashimoto, Michio

    2007-01-01

    We study the dynamics in phases with vector condensates of gluons (gluonic phases) in dense two-flavor quark matter. These phases yield an example of dynamics in which the Higgs mechanism is provided by condensates of gauge (or gauge plus scalar) fields. Because vacuum expectation values of spatial components of vector fields break the rotational symmetry, it is naturally to have a spontaneous breakdown both of external and internal symmetries in this case. In particular, by using the Ginzburg-Landau approach, we establish the existence of a gluonic phase with both the rotational symmetry and the electromagnetic U(1) being spontaneously broken. In other words, this phase describes an anisotropic medium in which the color and electric superconductivities coexist. It is shown that this phase corresponds to a minimum of the Ginzburg-Landau potential and, unlike the two-flavor superconducting (2SC) phase, it does not suffer from the chromomagnetic instability. The dual (confinement) description of its dynamics is...

  13. Exact recoverability from dense corrupted observations via $L_1$ minimization

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Nam H

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a surprising phenomenon: given $m$ highly corrupted measurements $y = A_{\\Omega \\bullet} x^{\\star} + e^{\\star}$, where $A_{\\Omega \\bullet}$ is a submatrix selected uniformly at random from an orthogonal matrix $A$ and $e^{\\star}$ is an unknown sparse error vector whose nonzero entries may be unbounded, we show that with high probability $l_1$-minimization can recover $x^{\\star}$ exactly from only $m = C \\mu^2 k (\\log n)^2$ where $k$ is the number of nonzero components of $x^{\\star}$ and $\\mu = n \\max_{ij} A_{ij}^2$, even if nearly $100 %$ measurements are corrupted. We further guarantee that stable recovery is possible when measurements are polluted by both gross sparse and small dense errors: $y = A_{\\Omega \\bullet} x^{\\star} + e^{\\star}+ \

  14. Evolution of Force Networks in Dense Particulate Media

    CERN Document Server

    Kramar, Miroslav; Kondic, Lou; Mischaikow, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    We introduce novel sets of measures with the goal of describing dynamical properties of force networks in dense particulate systems. The presented approach is based on persistent homology and allows for extracting precise, quantitative measures that describe the evolution of geometric features of the interparticle forces, without necessarily considering the details related to individual contacts between particles. The networks considered emerge from discrete element simulations of two dimensional particulate systems consisting of compressible frictional circular disks. We quantify the evolution of the networks for slowly compressed systems undergoing jamming transition. The main findings include uncovering significant but localized changes of force networks for unjammed systems, global (system-wide) changes as the systems evolve through jamming, to be followed by significantly less dramatic evolution for the jammed states. We consider both connected components, related in loose sense to force chains, and loop...

  15. Propagation of Electromagnetic Waves in Extremely Dense Media

    CERN Document Server

    Masood, Samina

    2016-01-01

    We study the propagation of electromagnetic (EM) waves in extremely dense exotic systems with very unique properties. These EM waves develop a longitudinal component due to its interaction with the medium. Renormalization scheme of QED is used to understand the propagation of EM waves in both longitudinal and transverse directions. The propagation of EM waves in a quantum statistically treatable medium affects the properties of the medium itself. The electric permittivity and the magnetic permeability of the medium are modified and influence the related behavior of the medium. All the electromagnetic properties of a medium become a function of temperature and chemical potential of the medium. We study in detail the modifications of electric permittivity and magnetic permeability and other related properties of a medium in the superdense stellar objects.

  16. Quantum statistical mechanics of dense partially ionized hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, H. E.; Rogers, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    The theory of dense hydrogenic plasmas beginning with the two component quantum grand partition function is reviewed. It is shown that ionization equilibrium and molecular dissociation equilibrium can be treated in the same manner with proper consideration of all two-body states. A quantum perturbation expansion is used to give an accurate calculation of the equation of state of the gas for any degree of dissociation and ionization. In this theory, the effective interaction between any two charges is the dynamic screened potential obtained from the plasma dielectric function. We make the static approximation; and we carry out detailed numerical calculations with the bound and scattering states of the Debye potential, using the Beth-Uhlenbeck form of the quantum second virial coefficient. We compare our results with calculations from the Saha equation.

  17. Growth and nitrogen use in Xanthium canadense grown in an open or in a dense stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watari, Ryoji; Nagashima, Hisae; Hirose, Tadaki

    2012-04-01

    Plants develop branches profusely when grown solitarily, while less so when grown in a dense stand. Such changes in architecture are associated with changes in dry mass allocation and nitrogen use. Here, we studied what traits in plant growth and nitrogen use were influenced by different light climates in the stand. Annual plants (Xanthium canadense) were grown solitarily or in a dense stand. Dry mass growth was analyzed as the product of the net assimilation rate (NAR) and leaf area (LA). Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) was analyzed as the product of nitrogen productivity (NP) and the mean residence time (MRT) of nitrogen. These growth variables were further factorized into their components. Solitary plants maintained a high NAR, whereas plants in the dense stand decreased the NAR due to mutual shading. Plants in the dense stand developed a larger LA with a higher specific leaf area than solitary plants. Solitary plants had higher NUE due to higher NP. A temporal increase in NUE was attributed to the increase in MRT of nitrogen. Light climate was different between solitary and dense-stand plants, but they took up a comparable amount of nitrogen and used it differently in response to the given light climate. NUE was thus demonstrated to be a useful tool for analyzing the mechanism leading to different N use in plant growth. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  18. Temperature relaxation in dense plasma mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    We present a model to calculate temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasma mixtures. The electron-ion relaxation rates are calculated using an average-atom model and the ion-ion relaxation rates by the Landau-Spitzer approach. This method allows the study of the temperature relaxation in many-temperature electron-ion and ion-ion systems such as those encountered in inertial confinement fusion simulations. It is of interest for general nonequilibrium thermodynamics dealing with energy flows between various systems and should find broad use in present high energy density experiments.

  19. Leeuwpan fine coal dense medium plant

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lundt, M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available availability to treat the higher grade coal (the bottom layer of coal) from the no. 2 Seam for a local and export metallurgical market. Following the path of evolution, in 2007, Leeuwpan commissioned the first double stage ultra-fines dense medium cyclone... plant in the coal industry, to form part of its overall DMS plant. It replaced the spirals to treat the -1 mm material. Spirals are still the most commonly and accepted method used by the industry, but it seems as if the pioneering cyclone process...

  20. Resolving Ultrafast Heating of Dense Cryogenic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Harmand, M.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Förster, E.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Hilbert, V.; Hochhaus, D.; Holst, B.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Mithen, J. P.; Mitzner, R.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Roling, S.; Schulz, M.; Siemer, B.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; White, T.; Wöstmann, M.; Zacharias, H.; Döppner, T.; Glenzer, S. H.; Redmer, R.

    2014-03-01

    We report on the dynamics of ultrafast heating in cryogenic hydrogen initiated by a ≲300 fs, 92 eV free electron laser x-ray burst. The rise of the x-ray scattering amplitude from a second x-ray pulse probes the transition from dense cryogenic molecular hydrogen to a nearly uncorrelated plasmalike structure, indicating an electron-ion equilibration time of ˜0.9 ps. The rise time agrees with radiation hydrodynamics simulations based on a conductivity model for partially ionized plasma that is validated by two-temperature density-functional theory.

  1. Oscillating propagators in heavy-dense QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Akerlund, Oscar; Rindlisbacher, Tobias

    2016-10-11

    Using Monte Carlo simulations and extended mean field theory calculations we show that the $3$-dimensional $\\mathbb{Z}_3$ spin model with complex external fields has non-monotonic correlators in some regions of its parameter space. This model serves as a proxy for heavy-dense QCD in $(3+1)$ dimensions. Non-monotonic correlators are intrinsically related to a complex mass spectrum and a liquid-like (or crystalline) behavior. A liquid phase could have implications for heavy-ion experiments, where it could leave detectable signals in the spatial correlations of baryons.

  2. Interference Alignment in Dense Wireless Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Niesen, Urs

    2009-01-01

    We consider arbitrary dense wireless networks, in which $n$ nodes are placed in an arbitrary (deterministic) manner on a square region of unit area and communicate with each other over Gaussian fading channels. We provide inner and outer bounds for the $n\\times n$-dimensional unicast and the $n\\times 2^n$-dimensional multicast capacity regions of such a wireless network. These inner and outer bounds differ only by a factor $O(\\log(n))$, yielding a fairly tight scaling characterization of the entire regions. The communication schemes achieving the inner bounds use interference alignment as a central technique and are surprisingly simple.

  3. Phase transitions in dense 2-colour QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Boz, Tamer; Fister, Leonard; Skullerud, Jon-Ivar

    2013-01-01

    We investigate 2-colour QCD with 2 flavours of Wilson fermion at nonzero temperature T and quark chemical potential mu, with a pion mass of 700 MeV (m_pi/m_rho=0.8). From temperature scans at fixed mu we find that the critical temperature for the superfluid to normal transition depends only very weakly on mu above the onset chemical potential, while the deconfinement crossover temperature is clearly decreasing with mu. We also present results for the Landau-gauge gluon propagator in the hot and dense medium.

  4. Flavour Oscillations in Dense Baryonic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We suggest that fast neutral meson oscillations may occur in a dense baryonic matter, which can influence the balance of s/¯s quarks in the nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus interactions, if primordial multiplicities of neutral K 0, mesons are sufficiently asymmetrical. The phenomenon can occur even if CP symmetry is fully conserved, and it may be responsible for the enhanced sub-threshold production of multi-strange hyperons observed in the low-energy A+A and p+A interactions.

  5. Gravity-driven dense granular flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ERTAS,DENIZ; GREST,GARY S.; HALSEY,THOMAS C.; DEVINE,DOV; SILBERT,LEONARDO E.

    2000-03-29

    The authors report and analyze the results of numerical studies of dense granular flows in two and three dimensions, using both linear damped springs and Hertzian force laws between particles. Chute flow generically produces a constant density profile that satisfies scaling relations suggestive of a Bagnold grain inertia regime. The type for force law has little impact on the behavior of the system. Failure is not initiated at the surface, consistent with the absence of surface flows and different principal stress directions at vs. below the surface.

  6. The CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP δ is differently regulated by fibrillar and oligomeric forms of the Alzheimer amyloid-β peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Lars NG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factors CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBP α, β and δ have been shown to be expressed in brain and to be involved in regulation of inflammatory genes in concert with nuclear factor κB (NF-κB. In general, C/EBPα is down-regulated, whereas both C/EBPβ and δ are up-regulated in response to inflammatory stimuli. In Alzheimer's disease (AD one of the hallmarks is chronic neuroinflammation mediated by astrocytes and microglial cells, most likely induced by the formation of amyloid-β (Aβ deposits. The inflammatory response in AD has been ascribed both beneficial and detrimental roles. It is therefore important to delineate the inflammatory mediators and signaling pathways affected by Aβ deposits with the aim of defining new therapeutic targets. Methods Here we have investigated the effects of Aβ on expression of C/EBP family members with a focus on C/EBPδ in rat primary astro-microglial cultures and in a transgenic mouse model with high levels of fibrillar Aβ deposits (tg-ArcSwe by western blot analysis. Effects on DNA binding activity were analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Cross-talk between C/EBPδ and NF-κB was investigated by analyzing binding to a κB site using a biotin streptavidin-agarose pull-down assay. Results We show that exposure to fibril-enriched, but not oligomer-enriched, preparations of Aβ inhibit up-regulation of C/EBPδ expression in interleukin-1β-activated glial cultures. Furthermore, we observed that, in aged transgenic mice, C/EBPα was significantly down-regulated and C/EBPβ was significantly up-regulated. C/EBPδ, on the other hand, was selectively down-regulated in the forebrain, a part of the brain showing high levels of fibrillar Aβ deposits. In contrast, no difference in expression levels of C/EBPδ between wild type and transgenic mice was detected in the relatively spared hindbrain. Finally, we show that interleukin-1β-induced C/EBPδ DNA

  7. Electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Colwell, Morris A

    1976-01-01

    Electronic Components provides a basic grounding in the practical aspects of using and selecting electronics components. The book describes the basic requirements needed to start practical work on electronic equipment, resistors and potentiometers, capacitance, and inductors and transformers. The text discusses semiconductor devices such as diodes, thyristors and triacs, transistors and heat sinks, logic and linear integrated circuits (I.C.s) and electromechanical devices. Common abbreviations applied to components are provided. Constructors and electronics engineers will find the book useful

  8. The symmetry energy in cold dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Jeong, Kie Sang

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the symmetry energy in cold dense matter both in the normal quark phase and in the 2-color superconductor (2SC) phase. For the normal phase, the thermodynamic potential is calculated by using hard dense loop (HDL) resummation to leading order, where the dominant contribution comes from the longitudinal gluon rest mass. The effect of gluonic interaction to the symmetry energy, obtained from the thermodynamic potential, was found to be small. In the 2SC phase, the non-perturbative BCS paring gives enhanced symmetry energy as the gapped states are forced to be in the common Fermi sea reducing the number of available quarks that can contribute to the asymmetry. We used high density effective field theory to estimate the contribution of gluon interaction to the symmetry energy. Among the gluon rest masses in 2SC phase, only the Meissner mass has iso-spin dependence although the magnitude is much smaller than the Debye mass. As the iso-spin dependence of gluon rest masses is even smaller than the case ...

  9. Symmetry energy in cold dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kie Sang, E-mail: k.s.jeong@yonsei.ac.kr; Lee, Su Houng, E-mail: suhoung@yonsei.ac.kr

    2016-01-15

    We calculate the symmetry energy in cold dense matter both in the normal quark phase and in the 2-color superconductor (2SC) phase. For the normal phase, the thermodynamic potential is calculated by using hard dense loop (HDL) resummation to leading order, where the dominant contribution comes from the longitudinal gluon rest mass. The effect of gluonic interaction on the symmetry energy, obtained from the thermodynamic potential, was found to be small. In the 2SC phase, the non-perturbative BCS paring gives enhanced symmetry energy as the gapped states are forced to be in the common Fermi sea reducing the number of available quarks that can contribute to the asymmetry. We used high density effective field theory to estimate the contribution of gluon interaction to the symmetry energy. Among the gluon rest masses in 2SC phase, only the Meissner mass has iso-spin dependence although the magnitude is much smaller than the Debye mass. As the iso-spin dependence of gluon rest masses is even smaller than the case in the normal phase, we expect that the contribution of gluonic interaction to the symmetry energy in the 2SC phase will be minimal. The different value of symmetry energy in each phase will lead to different prediction for the particle yields in heavy ion collision experiment.

  10. Ion Beam Driven Warm Dense Matter Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S. M.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Barnard, J. J.

    2008-11-01

    We report plans and experimental results in ion beam-driven warm dense matter (WDM) experiments. Initial experiments use a 0.3 MeV K+ beam from the NDCX-I accelerator. The WDM conditions are to be achieved by longitudinal and transverse neutralized drift compression to provide a hot spot on the target with a 1-mm beam spot size, and 2-ns pulse length. As a technique for heating matter to high energy density, intense ion beams can deliver precise and uniform beam energy deposition, in a relatively large sample size, and can heat any solid-phase target material. The range of the beams in solid targets is less than 1 micron, which can be lengthened by using reduced density porous targets. We have developed a WDM target chamber and target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial experiments will explore measurement of temperature and other target parameters. Experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  11. Redesigning Triangular Dense Matrix Computations on GPUs

    KAUST Repository

    Charara, Ali

    2016-08-09

    A new implementation of the triangular matrix-matrix multiplication (TRMM) and the triangular solve (TRSM) kernels are described on GPU hardware accelerators. Although part of the Level 3 BLAS family, these highly computationally intensive kernels fail to achieve the percentage of the theoretical peak performance on GPUs that one would expect when running kernels with similar surface-to-volume ratio on hardware accelerators, i.e., the standard matrix-matrix multiplication (GEMM). The authors propose adopting a recursive formulation, which enriches the TRMM and TRSM inner structures with GEMM calls and, therefore, reduces memory traffic while increasing the level of concurrency. The new implementation enables efficient use of the GPU memory hierarchy and mitigates the latency overhead, to run at the speed of the higher cache levels. Performance comparisons show up to eightfold and twofold speedups for large dense matrix sizes, against the existing state-of-the-art TRMM and TRSM implementations from NVIDIA cuBLAS, respectively, across various GPU generations. Once integrated into high-level Cholesky-based dense linear algebra algorithms, the performance impact on the overall applications demonstrates up to fourfold and twofold speedups, against the equivalent native implementations, linked with cuBLAS TRMM and TRSM kernels, respectively. The new TRMM/TRSM kernel implementations are part of the open-source KBLAS software library (http://ecrc.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Res-kblas.aspx) and are lined up for integration into the NVIDIA cuBLAS library in the upcoming v8.0 release.

  12. Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense Media

    CERN Document Server

    Masood, Samina S

    2014-01-01

    We study the finite temperature and density effects on beta decay rates to compute their contributions to nucleosynthesis. QED type corrections to beta decay from the hot and dense background are estimated in terms of the statistical corrections to the self-mass of an electron. For this purpose, we re-examine the hot and dense background contributions to the electron mass and compute its effect to the beta decay rate, helium yield, energy density of the universe as well as the change in neutrino temperature from the first order contribution to the self-mass of electrons during these processes. We explicitly show that the thermal contribution to the helium abundance at T = m of a cooling universe 0.045 % is higher than the corresponding contribution to helium abundance of a heating universe 0.031% due to the existence of hot fermions before the beginning of nucleosynthesis and their absence after the nucleosynthesis, in the early universe. Thermal contribution to helium abundance was a simple quadratic functio...

  13. Compton scattering measurements from dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenzer, S H; Neumayer, P; Doeppner, T; Landen, L; Lee, R W; Wallace, R; Weber, S; Lee, H J; Kritcher, A L; Falcone, R; Regan, S P; Sawada, H; Meyerhofer, D D; Gregori, G; Fortmann, C; Schwarz, V; Redmer, R

    2007-10-02

    Compton scattering has been developed for accurate measurements of densities and temperatures in dense plasmas. One future challenge is the application of this technique to characterize compressed matter on the National Ignition Facility where hydrogen and beryllium will approach extremely dense states of matter of up to 1000 g/cc. In this regime, the density, compressibility, and capsule fuel adiabat may be directly measured from the Compton scattered spectrum of a high-energy x-ray line source. Specifically, the scattered spectra directly reflect the electron velocity distribution. In non-degenerate plasmas, the width provides an accurate measure of the electron temperatures, while in partially Fermi degenerate systems that occur in laser-compressed matter it provides the Fermi energy and hence the electron density. Both of these regimes have been accessed in experiments at the Omega laser by employing isochorically heated solid-density beryllium and moderately compressed beryllium foil targets. In the latter experiment, compressions by a factor of 3 at pressures of 40 Mbar have been measured in excellent agreement with radiation hydrodynamic modeling.

  14. Compton scattering measurements from dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenzer, S H; Neumayer, P; Doeppner, T; Landen, O L; Lee, R W; Wallace, R J; Weber, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Lee, H J; Kritcher, A L; Falcone, R [University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States); Regan, S P; Sawada, H; Meyerhofer, D D [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY (United States); Gregori, G [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Fortmann, C; Schwarz, V; Redmer, R [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)], E-mail: glenzer1@llnl.gov

    2008-05-15

    Compton scattering techniques have been developed for accurate measurements of densities and temperatures in dense plasmas. One future challenge is the application of this technique to characterize compressed matter on the National Ignition Facility where hydrogen and beryllium will approach extremely dense states of matter of up to 1000 g/cc. In this regime, the density, compressibility, and capsule fuel adiabat may be directly measured from the Compton scattered spectrum of a high-energy x-ray line source. Specifically, the scattered spectra directly reflect the electron velocity distribution. In non-degenerate plasmas, the width provides an accurate measure of the electron temperatures, while in partially Fermi degenerate systems that occur in laser-compressed matter it provides the Fermi energy and hence the electron density. Both of these regimes have been accessed in experiments at the Omega laser by employing isochorically heated solid-density beryllium and moderately compressed beryllium foil targets. In the latter experiment, compressions by a factor of 3 at pressures of 40 Mbar have been measured in excellent agreement with radiation hydrodynamic modeling.

  15. Probing the Physical Structures of Dense Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di

    2015-08-01

    Filament is a common feature in cosmological structures of various scales, ranging from dark matter cosmic web, galaxy clusters, inter-galactic gas flows, to Galactic ISM clouds. Even within cold dense molecular cores, filaments have been detected. Theories and simulations with (or without) different combination of physical principles, including gravity, thermal balance, turbulence, and magnetic field, can reproduce intriguing images of filaments. The ubiquity of filaments and the similarity in simulated ones make physical parameters, beyond dust column density, a necessity for understanding filament evolution. I report three projects attempting to measure physical parameters of filaments. We derive the volume density of a dense Taurus filament based on several cyanoacetylene transitions observed by GBT and ART. We measure the gas temperature of the OMC 2-3 filament based on combined GBT+VLA ammonia images. We also measured the sub-millimeter polarization vectors along OMC3. These filaments were found to be likely a cylinder-type structure, without dynamic heating, and likely accreting mass along the magnetic field lines.

  16. Wireless Fractal Ultra-Dense Cellular Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yixue; Chen, Min; Hu, Long; Song, Jeungeun; Volk, Mojca; Humar, Iztok

    2017-04-12

    With the ever-growing number of mobile devices, there is an explosive expansion in mobile data services. This represents a challenge for the traditional cellular network architecture to cope with the massive wireless traffic generated by mobile media applications. To meet this challenge, research is currently focused on the introduction of a small cell base station (BS) due to its low transmit power consumption and flexibility of deployment. However, due to a complex deployment environment and low transmit power of small cell BSs, the coverage boundary of small cell BSs will not have a traditional regular shape. Therefore, in this paper, we discuss the coverage boundary of an ultra-dense small cell network and give its main features: aeolotropy of path loss fading and fractal coverage boundary. Simple performance analysis is given, including coverage probability and transmission rate, etc., based on stochastic geometry theory and fractal theory. Finally, we present an application scene and discuss challenges in the ultra-dense small cell network.

  17. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I. [Los Alamos National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  18. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  19. A cyclic undecamer peptide mimics a turn in folded Alzheimer amyloid β and elicits antibodies against oligomeric and fibrillar amyloid and plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hoogerhout

    Full Text Available The 39- to 42-residue amyloid β (Aβ peptide is deposited in extracellular fibrillar plaques in the brain of patients suffering from Alzheimer's Disease (AD. Vaccination with these peptides seems to be a promising approach to reduce the plaque load but results in a dominant antibody response directed against the N-terminus. Antibodies against the N-terminus will capture Aβ immediately after normal physiological processing of the amyloid precursor protein and therefore will also reduce the levels of non-misfolded Aβ, which might have a physiologically relevant function. Therefore, we have targeted an immune response on a conformational neo-epitope in misfolded amyloid that is formed in advance of Aβ-aggregation. A tetanus toxoid-conjugate of the 11-meric cyclic peptide Aβ(22-28-YNGK' elicited specific antibodies in Balb/c mice. These antibodies bound strongly to the homologous cyclic peptide-bovine serum albumin conjugate, but not to the homologous linear peptide-conjugate, as detected in vitro by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The antibodies also bound--although more weakly--to Aβ(1-42 oligomers as well as fibrils in this assay. Finally, the antibodies recognized Aβ deposits in AD mouse and human brain tissue as established by immunohistological staining. We propose that the cyclic peptide conjugate might provide a lead towards a vaccine that could be administered before the onset of AD symptoms. Further investigation of this hypothesis requires immunization of transgenic AD model mice.

  20. Increased fibrillar beta-amyloid in response to human clq injections into hippocampus and cortex of APP+PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyett, Kristal W; DiCarlo, Giovanni; Jantzen, Paul T; Jackson, Jennifer; O'Leary, Charlotte; Wilcock, Donna; Morgan, Dave; Gordon, Marcia N

    2003-01-01

    Human C1q when injected directly into hippocampus and cortex of doubly transgenic APP+PS1 mice results in the increase of Congo red-positive fibrillar deposits. Although there was no significant change in overall area stained for Abeta total, qualitatively it appeared that there was less diffuse Abeta in C1q-treated mice versus vehicle. There was no apparent change in astroglial or microglial activation caused by injection of C1q with respect to vehicle injections. These effects of C1q were only found in 50% BUB/BnJ mice, a strain with higher serum complement activity than other mouse lines. These in vivo data were consistent with the effects of C1q to increase fibrillogenesis of Abeta in vitro. In conclusion, complement protein C1q, believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease in humans, can cause increased fibrillogenesis in the APP+PS1 mouse model of amyloid deposition.

  1. A triple-emission fluorescent probe reveals distinctive amyloid fibrillar polymorphism of wild-type alpha-synuclein and its familial Parkinson's disease mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celej, M Soledad; Caarls, Wouter; Demchenko, Alexander P; Jovin, Thomas M

    2009-08-11

    Intracytoplasmic neuronal deposits containing amyloid fibrils of the 140-amino acid presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein (AS) are the hallmark of Parkinson's (PD) disease and related neurodegenerative disorders. Three point mutations (A53T, A30P, and E46K) are linked to early onset PD. Compared to the wild-type (WT) protein, the mutants aggregate faster in vitro, but their fibrillar products are quite similar. Using the extrinsic multiple-emission probe 4'-(diethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone (FE), we demonstrate unique and distinct spectroscopic signatures for the amyloid fibrils formed by the WT and mutant AS, presumably indicative of subtle differences in supramolecular structure. The two well-separated emission bands of the FE probe originate from a proton transfer reaction in the excited state. The ratiometric response constitutes a sensitive, tunable reporter of microenvironmental properties such as polarity and hydrogen bonding. The very distinctive fluorescence spectra of the FE probe bound to the four AS variants reflect different tautomeric equilibria in the excited state and the existence of at least two different binding sites in the fibrils for the dye. Deconvolution of the two-dimensional excitation-emission spectra leads to estimations of different local dielectric constants and extents of hydration characteristic of the proteins. The sensitivity of such a simple external probe to conformational alterations induced by point mutations is unprecedented and provides new insight into key phenomena related to amyloid fibrils: plasticity, polymorphism, propagation of structural features, and structure-function relationships underlying toxicity.

  2. Pinocembrin Protects Human Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells against Fibrillar Amyloid- β1−40 Injury by Suppressing the MAPK/NF- κ B Inflammatory Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ peptides in Alzheimer’s disease (AD may contribute to disease progression through Aβ-induced microvascular endothelial pathogenesis. Pinocembrin has been shown to have therapeutic effects in AD models. These effects correlate with preservation of microvascular function, but the effect on endothelial cells under Aβ-damaged conditions is unclear. The present study focuses on the in vitro protective effect of pinocembrin on fibrillar Aβ1−40 (fAβ1−40 injured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs and explores potential mechanisms. The results demonstrate that fAβ1−40-induced cytotoxicity in hBMECs can be rescued by pinocembrin treatment. Pinocembrin increases cell viability, reduces the release of LDH, and relieves nuclear condensation. The mechanisms of this reversal from Aβ may be associated with the inhibition of inflammatory response, involving inhibition of MAPK activation, downregulation of phosphor-IKK level, relief of IκBα degradation, blockage of NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, and reduction of the release of proinflammatory cytokines. Pinocembrin does not show obvious effects on regulating the redox imbalance after exposure to fAβ1−40. Together, the suppression of MAPK and the NF-κB signaling pathways play a significant role in the anti-inflammation of pinocembrin in hBMECs subjected to fAβ1−40. This may serve as a therapeutic agent for BMEC protection in Alzheimer’s-related deficits.

  3. Biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic combined with fibrillar collagen with and without citric acid conditioning in the treatment of periodontal osseous defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nery, E B; Eslami, A; Van Swol, R L

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the combination of biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic (BCP) and collagen and citric acid root conditioning would promote accelerated new attachment of periodontal tissue to the root surface in dogs. Intrabony defects were surgically produced for each animal and were made chronic for 16 weeks. These defects were assigned to two study treatment and one control group: ceramic-collagen without citric acid (CO-CE); ceramic-collagen with citric acid (CO-CE-CA); and control (surgical debridement and root planing only). Results showed that all groups gained new attachment level as demonstrated both clinically and histometrically. The treatment groups showed a significant mean gain greater than the control (P less than .005), but no significant difference was found between treatment groups. Small areas of ankylosis was also found in both treatments but there was no evidence of active root resorption. It is concluded that the use of combined BCP and fibrillar collagen is beneficial in promoting new attachment of periodontal tissues to the root surface in dogs. Although citric acid root conditioning did as well or better than ceramic and collagen alone, its benefits are still speculative and need further experimentation.

  4. Kinetic theory molecular dynamics and hot dense matter: theoretical foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, F R; Bauer, J D; Murillo, M S

    2014-09-01

    Electrons are weakly coupled in hot, dense matter that is created in high-energy-density experiments. They are also mildly quantum mechanical and the ions associated with them are classical and may be strongly coupled. In addition, the dynamical evolution of plasmas under these hot, dense matter conditions involve a variety of transport and energy exchange processes. Quantum kinetic theory is an ideal tool for treating the electrons but it is not adequate for treating the ions. Molecular dynamics is perfectly suited to describe the classical, strongly coupled ions but not the electrons. We develop a method that combines a Wigner kinetic treatment of the electrons with classical molecular dynamics for the ions. We refer to this hybrid method as "kinetic theory molecular dynamics," or KTMD. The purpose of this paper is to derive KTMD from first principles and place it on a firm theoretical foundation. The framework that KTMD provides for simulating plasmas in the hot, dense regime is particularly useful since current computational methods are generally limited by their inability to treat the dynamical quantum evolution of the electronic component. Using the N-body von Neumann equation for the electron-proton plasma, three variations of KTMD are obtained. Each variant is determined by the physical state of the plasma (e.g., collisional versus collisionless). The first variant of KTMD yields a closed set of equations consisting of a mean-field quantum kinetic equation for the electron one-particle distribution function coupled to a classical Liouville equation for the protons. The latter equation includes both proton-proton Coulombic interactions and an effective electron-proton interaction that involves the convolution of the electron density with the electron-proton Coulomb potential. The mean-field approach is then extended to incorporate equilibrium electron-proton correlations through the Singwi-Tosi-Land-Sjolander (STLS) ansatz. This is the second variant of KTMD

  5. Decay of Langmuir wave in dense plasmas and warm dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Son, S; Moon, Sung Joon

    2010-01-01

    The decays of the Langmuir waves in dense plasmas are computed using the dielectric function theory widely used in the solid state physics. Four cases are considered: a classical plasma, a Maxwellian plasma, a degenerate quantum plasma, and a partially degenerate plasma. The result is considerably different from the conventional Landau damping theory.

  6. Thermal relaxation in a dense liquid under shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, D. H.; Trevino, S. F.

    1981-11-01

    We have studied by means of molecular dynamics the propagation of a planar shock wave in a dense, three-dimensional column of a simple modified Lennard-Jones liquid. The column is 49.37σ2 in cross section, and 238.5σ in length, where σ is the length parameter in the potential. The column contains approximately 10 000 atoms. It is initially in equilibrium at a density of 0.85σ-3 and temperature of 1.16ɛk, where ɛ is the energy parameter in the potential. Shock compression is effected by causing the column to move in the longitudinal direction with a velocity of - Up and to collide with its mirror image across a mirror located at the origin. From the motion of the atoms in response to this kind of excitation, we calculate the shock velocity and the shock-front structure in the liquid, as well as the profiles of mass density, stress distribution, and energy density behind the shock front. Our shock-front structure agrees well with that obtained from the Navier-Stokes equations, but we also find important differences between our shock profiles and those postulated or computed from the continuum theory. In particular, we find that in 4×10-11 s, the longest time of our calculations, the stress components did not relax to a hydrostatic condition, and the corresponding kinetic temperature profile showed a relaxation process similar to what we found earlier in a crystalline solid. We examine the atomistic mechanisms of the various relaxation processes, and discuss their implications on the shock compression of dense systems of solids and liquids as opposed to rarefield systems of gases.

  7. Improvement of foam stabilty of soy protein on fibrillar aggregate by glycosylation%糖接枝处理改善大豆蛋白纤维聚集体泡沫稳定性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王梦萍; 陈燕琼; 王金梅; 齐军茹; 杨晓泉

    2016-01-01

    为了探究糖接枝对大豆蛋白纤维聚集行为和泡沫性质的影响,明确蛋白质结构与功能的关系,该研究以大豆蛋白(soy protein isolation,SPI)和乳糖(lactose)为原料,通过干热法制备糖接枝大豆蛋白(SPI-lactose conjugate,SPI-Lac),以及在酸性条件下加热诱导其形成纤维聚集体(pH值2.0),制备了一种糖接枝大豆蛋白纤维聚集体(SPI-lactose conjugate fibillar aggregates),并考察了糖接枝对大豆蛋白的纤维聚集行为及泡沫性质的影响。研究结果表明:大豆蛋白在酸性条件下(pH 值2.0)经加热后会发生水解,同时水解产物不断聚集形成大分子的纤维聚集体。糖接枝导致大豆蛋白的水解速度下降,但荧光光强和粒径的结果表明糖接枝能增强纤维聚集能力。SPI-Lac在中性条件下的溶解度(pH值5.0—7.0)显著高于SPI(P<0.05),且不同时间处理的SPI-Lac纤维聚集体均能改善SPI在酸性条件下的溶解度(pH值2.0—5.0)。此外,不同时间处理的SPI-Lac纤维聚集体在酸性条件下的起泡能力均高于SPI纤维聚集体。SPI和SPI-Lac纤维聚集体的形成会导致 SPI 起泡能力的下降,但是短时间酸热处理形成的纤维聚集体泡沫稳定性得到显著改善。因此,糖接枝结合短时间酸热处理制备的糖接枝大豆蛋白纤维聚集体在中性条件下的泡沫稳定性显著提高(P<0.05),是合理有效的蛋白质改性方法。%To improve the solubility of the fibrillar aggregates under neutral condition and increase their functional properties, soy protein isolation (SPI) - lactose conjugate fibrillar aggregates were prepared by conjugating SPI with lactose under dry-heated Maillard reaction and then heating at pH value of 2.0 and 85°C. SPI-lactose conjugate fibrillar aggregates were detected using the dynamic light scattering (DLS) combined with Thioflavine-T fluorometry, transmission

  8. Imaging Cytoskeleton Components by Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitkina, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex of detergent-insoluble components of the cytoplasm playing critical roles in cell motility, shape generation, and mechanical properties of a cell. Fibrillar polymers—actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments—are major constituents of the cytoskeleton, which constantly change their organization during cellular activities. The actin cytoskeleton is especially polymorphic, as actin filaments can form multiple higher order assemblies performing different functions. Structural information about cytoskeleton organization is critical for understanding its functions and mechanisms underlying various forms of cellular activity. Because of the nanometer-scale thickness of cytoskeletal fibers, electron microscopy (EM) is a key tool to determine the structure of the cytoskeleton. This article describes application of rotary shadowing (or metal replica) EM for visualization of the cytoskeleton. The procedure is applicable to thin cultured cells growing on glass coverslips and consists of detergent extraction of cells to expose their cytoskeleton, chemical fixation to provide stability, ethanol dehydration and critical point drying to preserve three-dimensionality, rotary shadowing with platinum to create contrast, and carbon coating to stabilize replicas. This technique provides easily interpretable three-dimensional images, in which individual cytoskeletal fibers are clearly resolved, and individual proteins can be identified by immunogold labeling. More importantly, replica EM is easily compatible with live cell imaging, so that one can correlate the dynamics of a cell or its components, e.g., expressed fluorescent proteins, with high resolution structural organization of the cytoskeleton in the same cell. PMID:26498781

  9. Complexities of One-Component Phase Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccioli, Andrea; Glasser, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    For most materials, the solid at and near the triple-point temperature is denser than the liquid with which it is in equilibrium. However, for water and certain other materials, the densities of the phases are reversed, with the solid being less dense. The profound consequences for the appearance of the "pVT" diagram of one-component materials…

  10. Sound scattering in dense granular media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA XiaoPing; LAURENT J; KHIDAS Y; LANGLOIS V

    2009-01-01

    The sound propagation in a dense granular medium is basically characterized by the ratio of wave-length to the grain size. Two types of wave transport are distinguished: one corresponds to coherent waves in the long wavelength limit, the other to short-wavelength scattered waves by the inhomoge-neous contact force networks. These multiply scattered elastic waves are shown to exhibit a diffusive characteristics of transport over long distances of propagation. Determination of the transport mean free path l* and the inelastic absorption (Q~(-1)) allows the inference of the structural properties of the material such as the heterogeneity and internal dissipation. The relevance of our experiments for seismological applications is discussed. Moreover, we apply the correlation technique of the configu-ration-specific sound scattering to monitoring the dynamic behaviour of the granular medium (irre-versible rearrangements) under strong vibration, shearing and thermal cycling, respectively.

  11. Charmonium propagation through a dense medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopeliovich B.Z.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Attenuation of a colourless c̄c dipole propagating with a large momentum through a hot medium originates from two sources, Debye screening (melting, and inelastic collisions with surrounding scattering centres (absorption. The former never terminates completely production of a bound charmonium in heavy ion collisions, even at very high temperatures. The latter, is controlled my the magnitude of the dipole cross section, related to the transport coefficient, which is the rate of transverse momentum broadening in the medium. A novel procedure of Lorentz boosting of the Schrödinger equation is developed, which allows to calculate the charmonium survival probability employing the path-integral technique, incorporating both melting and absorption. A novel mechanism of charmonium regeneration in a dense medium is proposed.

  12. Intense, ultrashort light and dense, hot matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Ravindra Kumar

    2009-07-01

    This article presents an overview of the physics and applications of the interaction of high intensity laser light with matter. It traces the crucial advances that have occurred over the past few decades in laser technology and nonlinear optics and then discusses physical phenomena that occur in intense laser fields and their modeling. After a description of the basic phenomena like multiphoton and tunneling ionization, the physics of plasma formed in dense matter is presented. Specific phenomena are chosen for illustration of the scientific and technological possibilities – simulation of astrophysical phenomena, relativistic nonlinear optics, laser wakefield acceleration, laser fusion, ultrafast real time X-ray diffraction, application of the particle beams produced from the plasma for medical therapies etc. A survey of the Indian activities in this research area appears at the end.

  13. Frontiers and challenges in warm dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Desjarlais, Michael; Redmer, Ronald; Trickey, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) occupies a loosely defined region of phase space intermediate between solid, liquid, gas, and plasma, and typically shares characteristics of two or more of these phases. WDM is generally associated with the combination of strongly coupled ions and moderately degenerate electrons, and careful attention to quantum physics and electronic structure is essential. The lack of a small perturbation parameter greatly limits approximate attempts at its accurate description. Since WDM resides at the intersection of solid state and high energy density physics, many high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments pass through this difficult region of phase space. Thus, understanding and modeling WDM is key to the success of experiments on diverse facilities. These include the National Ignition Campaign centered on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), pulsed-power driven experiments on the Z machine, ion-beam-driven WDM experiments on the NDCX-II, and fundamental WDM research at the Linear Coherent...

  14. Evolution of Binaries in Dense Stellar Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanova, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the field, the binaries in dense stellar systems are frequently not primordial, and could be either dynamically formed or significantly altered from their primordial states. Destruction and formation of binaries occur in parallel all the time. The destruction, which constantly removes soft binaries from a binary pool, works as an energy sink and could be a reason for cluster entering the binary-burning phase. The true binary fraction is greater than observed, as a result, the observable binary fraction evolves differently from the predictions. Combined measurements of binary fractions in globular clusters suggest that most of the clusters are still core-contracting. The formation, on other hand, affects most the more evolutionary advanced stars, which significantly enhances the population of X-ray sources in globular clusters. The formation of binaries with a compact objects proceeds mainly through physical collisions, binary-binary and single-binary encounters; however, it is the dynamical for...

  15. Carbon nitride frameworks and dense crystalline polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Chris J.; Salamat, Ashkan; Bojdys, Michael J.; Needs, Richard J.; McMillan, Paul F.

    2016-09-01

    We used ab initio random structure searching (AIRSS) to investigate polymorphism in C3N4 carbon nitride as a function of pressure. Our calculations reveal new framework structures, including a particularly stable chiral polymorph of space group P 43212 containing mixed s p2 and s p3 bonding, that we have produced experimentally and recovered to ambient conditions. As pressure is increased a sequence of structures with fully s p3 -bonded C atoms and three-fold-coordinated N atoms is predicted, culminating in a dense P n m a phase above 250 GPa. Beyond 650 GPa we find that C3N4 becomes unstable to decomposition into diamond and pyrite-structured CN2.

  16. Plasmon resonance in warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, R; Bornath, T; Fortmann, C; Holl, A; Redmer, R; Reinholz, H; Ropke, G; Wierling, A; Glenzer, S H; Gregori, G

    2008-02-21

    Collective Thomson scattering with extreme ultraviolet light or x-rays is shown to allow for a robust measurement of the free electron density in dense plasmas. Collective excitations like plasmons appear as maxima in the scattering signal. Their frequency position can directly be related to the free electron density. The range of applicability of the standard Gross-Bohm dispersion relation and of an improved dispersion relation in comparison to calculations based on the dielectric function in random phase approximation is investigated. More important, this well-established treatment of Thomson scattering on free electrons is generalized in the Born-Mermin approximation by including collisions. We show that, in the transition region from collective to non-collective scattering, the consideration of collisions is important.

  17. Dense QCD: a Holographic Dyonic Salt

    CERN Document Server

    Rho, Mannque; Zahed, Ismail

    2009-01-01

    Dense QCD at zero temperature with a large number of colors is a crystal. We show that in the holographic dual description, the crystal is made out of pairs of dyons with $e=g=\\pm 1$ charges in a salt-like arrangement. We argue that with increasing density the dyon masses and topological charges equalize, turning the salt-like configuration to a bcc of half-instantons. The latter is dual to a cubic crystal of half-skyrmions. We estimate the transition from an fcc crystal of instantons to a bcc crystal of dyons to about 3 times nuclear matter density with a dyon binding energy of about 180 MeV.

  18. Dynamic structure of dense krypton gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelstaff, P. A.; Salacuse, J. J.; Schommers, W.; Ram, J.

    1984-07-01

    We have made molecular-dynamics computer simulations of dense krypton gas (10.6×1027 atoms/m3 and 296 K) using reasonably realistic pair potentials. Comparisons are made with the recent experimental data[P. A. Egelstaff et al., Phys. Rev. A 27, 1106 (1983)] for the dynamic structure factor S(q,ω) over the range 0.4

  19. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McSherry, D.J

    2000-09-01

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The Laser-Produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron Al layer, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, broadly speaking, did not always agree with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron layer of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, where placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays where produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times. (author)

  20. X-ray scattering from dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, Declan Joseph

    Dense plasmas were studied by probing them with kilovolt x-rays and measuring those scattered at various angles. The laser produced x-ray source emitted Ti He alpha 4.75 keV x-rays. Two different plasma types were explored. The first was created by laser driven shocks on either side of a sample foil consisting of 2 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 1 micron CH layers. We have observed a peak in the x-ray scattering cross section, indicating diffraction from the plasma. However, the experimentally inferred plasma density, did not always agree broadly with the hydrodynamic simulation MEDX (A modified version of MEDUSA). The second plasma type that we studied was created by soft x-ray heating on either side of a sample foil, this time consisting of 1 micron thickness of Al, sandwiched between two 0.2 micron CH layers. Two foil targets, each consisting of a 0.1 micron thick Au foil mounted on 1 micron of CH, were placed 4 mm from the sample foil. The soft x-rays were produced by laser irradiating these two foil targets. We found that, 0.5 ns after the peak of the laser heating pulses, that the measured cross sections more closely matched those simulated using the Thomas Fermi model than the Inferno model. Later in time, at 2 ns, the plasma is approaching a weakly coupled state. This is the first time x-ray scattering cross sections have been measured from dense plasmas generated by radiatively heating both sides of the sample. Moreover, these are absolute values typically within a factor of two of expectation for early x-ray probe times.

  1. Dense gas dispersion in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Morten

    1998-09-01

    Dense gas dispersion is characterized by buoyancy induced gravity currents and reduction of the vertical mixing. Liquefied gas releases from industrial accidents are cold because of the heat of evaporation which determines the density for a given concentration and physical properties. The temperature deficit is moderated by the heat flux from the ground, and this convection is an additional source of turbulence which affects the mixing. A simple model as the soil heat flux is used to estimate the ability of the ground to sustain the heat flux during release. The initial enthalpy, release rate, initial entrainment and momentum are discussed for generic source types and the interaction with obstacles is considered. In the MTH project BA experiments source with and without momentum were applied. The continuously released propane gas passed a two-dimensional removable obstacle perpendicular to the wind direction. Ground-level gas concentrations and vertical profiles of concentration, temperature, wind speed and turbulence were measured in front of and behind the obstacle. Ultrasonic anemometers providing fast velocity and concentration signals were mounted at three levels on the masts. The observed turbulence was influenced by the stability and the initial momentum of the jet releases. Additional information were taken from the `Dessert tortoise` ammonia jet releases, from the `Fladis` experiment with transition from dense to passive dispersion, and from the `Thorney Island` continuous releases of isothermal freon mixtures. The heat flux was found to moderate the negative buoyancy in both the propane and ammonia experiments. The heat flux measurements are compared to an estimate by analogy with surface layer theory. (au) 41 tabs., 146 ills., 189 refs.

  2. Detecting Densely Distributed Graph Patterns for Fine-Grained Image Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luming; Yang, Yang; Wang, Meng; Hong, Richang; Nie, Liqiang; Li, Xuelong

    2016-02-01

    Fine-grained image categorization is a challenging task aiming at distinguishing objects belonging to the same basic-level category, e.g., leaf or mushroom. It is a useful technique that can be applied for species recognition, face verification, and so on. Most of the existing methods either have difficulties to detect discriminative object components automatically, or suffer from the limited amount of training data in each sub-category. To solve these problems, this paper proposes a new fine-grained image categorization model. The key is a dense graph mining algorithm that hierarchically localizes discriminative object parts in each image. More specifically, to mimic the human hierarchical perception mechanism, a superpixel pyramid is generated for each image. Thereby, graphlets from each layer are constructed to seamlessly capture object components. Intuitively, graphlets representative to each super-/sub-category is densely distributed in their feature space. Thus, a dense graph mining algorithm is developed to discover graphlets representative to each super-/sub-category. Finally, the discovered graphlets from pairwise images are integrated into an image kernel for fine-grained recognition. Theoretically, the learned kernel can generalize several state-of-the-art image kernels. Experiments on nine image sets demonstrate the advantage of our method. Moreover, the discovered graphlets from each sub-category accurately capture those tiny discriminative object components, e.g., bird claws, heads, and bodies.

  3. [Ocular changes associated with connective tissue disorders: role of the elastic and collagen components].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, M J; Bellón, J M; Buján, J

    2001-08-01

    Every day, the emerging fields of genomics and proteomics provide new information about both normal and pathological processes, among which, the extracellular matrix appears to play a significant role. Over the past decade, the classic fibrillar components of the matrix, collagen and elastin, have been the subject of extensive research leading to a wealth of information which is far form being fully interpreted. Although the basic composition and structure of the matrix components has been well established, today more than twenty five different varieties of collagen have been described, and elastic fibers are currently described as polymeric complexes, composed of at least 19 different proteins in their microfibrillar and amorphic portions. Mutations in three of the genes coding for some of the most abundant proteins in the elastic fibers give rise to a wide range of elastic tissue phenotypes, from skeletal or dermal anomalies to vascular or ocular defects. In this review, our aim was to gain insight into the fibrillar component of the extracellular matrix in an attempt to improve our understanding of certain ocular disorders.

  4. Breast cancer screening in Korean woman with dense breast tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ann [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Asian women, including Korean, have a relatively higher incidence of dense breast tissue, compared with western women. Dense breast tissue has a lower sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer and a higher relative risk for breast cancer, compared with fatty breast tissue. Thus, there were limitations in the mammographic screening for women with dense breast tissue, and many studies for the supplemental screening methods. This review included appropriate screening methods for Korean women with dense breasts. We also reviewed the application and limitation of supplemental screening methods, including breast ultrasound, digital breast tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging; and furthermore investigated the guidelines, as well as the study results.

  5. meta-DENSE complex acquisition for reduced intravoxel dephasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletras, Anthony H.; Arai, Andrew E.

    2004-08-01

    Displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) with a meta-DENSE readout and RF phase cycling to suppress the STEAM anti-echo is described for reducing intravoxel dephasing signal loss. This RF phase cycling scheme, when combined with existing meta-DENSE suppression of the T1 recovering signal, yields higher quality DENSE myocardial strain maps. Phantom and human images are provided to demonstrate the technique, which is capable of acquiring phase contrast displacement encoded images at low encoding gradient strengths providing better spatial resolution and less signal loss due to intravoxel dephasing than prior methods.

  6. Control of dense collagen gel scaffolds for tissue engineering through measurement and modelling of hydraulic permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpooshan, Vahid

    Among various natural biopolymers, type I collagen gels have demonstrated the highest potential as biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering (TE). However, the successful application of collagen gels requires a greater understanding of the relationship between their microstructure and physical-mechanical properties. Therefore, a precise method to modulate collagen gel microstructure in order to attain optimal scaffold properties for diverse biomedical applications is necessary. This dissertation describes a new approach to produce collagen gels with defined microstructures, quantified by hydraulic permeability ( k), in order to optimize scaffold properties for TE applications. It was hypothesized that the measurement of k can be used to study the role of microstructure in collagen gel properties, as well as cell function and cell-scaffold interactions. Applying increasing levels of plastic compression (PC) to the highly hydrated collagen gels resulted in an increase in collagen fibrillar density, reduced Happel model derived k values, increased gel stiffness, promoted MSC metabolic activity, osteogenic differentiation, and mineral deposition, while cell-induced gel contraction diminished. Thus, collagen gels with lower k and higher stiffness values exhibited greater potential for bone tissue engineering. Correlating between collagen gel microstructure, k, and fibroblast function within collagen gels indicated that increasing the level of PC yielded a reduction in pore size and an increase in fibril bundle diameter. Decrease in k values resulted in a decrease in gel contraction and an increase in cell metabolic activity. An increase in cell density accelerated contraction. Therefore, fibroblast function within collagen gels can be optimised by a balance between the microstructure, k, and cell seeding density. Developing a micromechanical model to measure experimental k of collagen gels during confined compression revealed the formation of a dense collagen lamella

  7. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of transport properties in liquid and dense-plasma plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, J. D.; Cohen, James S.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Horner, D. A.; Collins, L. A.

    2011-02-01

    We have calculated the viscosity and self-diffusion coefficients of plutonium in the liquid phase using quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) and in the dense-plasma phase using orbital-free molecular dynamics (OFMD), as well as in the intermediate warm dense matter regime with both methods. Our liquid metal results for viscosity are about 40% lower than measured experimentally, whereas a previous calculation using an empirical interatomic potential (modified embedded-atom method) obtained results 3-4 times larger than the experiment. The QMD and OFMD results agree well at the intermediate temperatures. The calculations in the dense-plasma regime for temperatures from 50 to 5000 eV and densities about 1-5 times ambient are compared with the one-component plasma (OCP) model, using effective charges given by the average-atom code inferno. The inferno-OCP model results agree with the OFMD to within about a factor of 2, except for the viscosity at temperatures less than about 100 eV, where the disagreement is greater. A Stokes-Einstein relationship of the viscosities and diffusion coefficients is found to hold fairly well separately in both the liquid and dense-plasma regimes.

  8. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of transport properties in liquid and dense-plasma plutonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, J D; Cohen, James S; Kilcrease, D P; Horner, D A; Collins, L A

    2011-02-01

    We have calculated the viscosity and self-diffusion coefficients of plutonium in the liquid phase using quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) and in the dense-plasma phase using orbital-free molecular dynamics (OFMD), as well as in the intermediate warm dense matter regime with both methods. Our liquid metal results for viscosity are about 40% lower than measured experimentally, whereas a previous calculation using an empirical interatomic potential (modified embedded-atom method) obtained results 3-4 times larger than the experiment. The QMD and OFMD results agree well at the intermediate temperatures. The calculations in the dense-plasma regime for temperatures from 50 to 5000 eV and densities about 1-5 times ambient are compared with the one-component plasma (OCP) model, using effective charges given by the average-atom code INFERNO. The INFERNO-OCP model results agree with the OFMD to within about a factor of 2, except for the viscosity at temperatures less than about 100 eV, where the disagreement is greater. A Stokes-Einstein relationship of the viscosities and diffusion coefficients is found to hold fairly well separately in both the liquid and dense-plasma regimes.

  9. Stark profiles of forbidden and allowed transitions in a dense, laser produced helium plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya'akobi, B.; George, E. V.; Bekefi, G.; Hawryluk, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Comparisons of experimental and theoretical Stark profiles of the allowed 2(1)P-3(1)D helium line at 6678 A and of the forbidden 2(1)P-3(1)P component at 6632 A in a dense plasma were carried out. The plasma was produced by optical breakdown of helium by means of a repetitive, high power CO2 laser. The allowed line shows good agreement with conventional theory, but discrepancies are found around the centre of the forbidden component. When normally neglected ion motions are taken into consideration, the observed discrepancies are partially removed. Tables of the Stark profiles for the pair of lines are given.

  10. Dense Molecular Cores Being Externally Heated

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Gwanjeong; Gopinathan, Maheswar; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kim, Mi-Ryang

    2016-01-01

    We present results of our study on eight dense cores, previously classified as starless, using infrared (3-160 {\\micron}) imaging observations with \\textit{AKARI} telescope and molecular line (HCN and N$_2$H$^+$) mapping observations with \\textit{KVN} telescope. Combining our results with the archival IR to mm continuum data, we examined the starless nature of these eight cores. Two of the eight cores are found to harbor faint protostars having luminosity of $\\sim0.3-4.4$ L$_{\\odot}$. The other six cores are found to remain as starless and probably are in a dynamically transitional state. The temperature maps produced using multi-wavelength images show an enhancement of about 3-6 K towards the outer boundary of these cores, suggesting that they are most likely being heated externally by nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields. Large virial parameters and an over-dominance of red asymmetric line profiles over the cores may indicate that the cores are set into either an expansion or an oscillatory mot...

  11. The ionization fraction in dense clouds

    CERN Document Server

    De Boisanger, C B; Van Dishoeck, E F

    1995-01-01

    We present submillimeter observations of various molecular ions toward two dense clouds, NGC 2264 IRS1 and W 3 IRS5, in order to investigate their ionization fraction. Analysis of the line intensity ratios by the way of statistical equilibrium calculations allows determination of the physical parameters: n(H2)~(1-2)e6 cm-3 and T(kin)~50-100 K. Column densities and abundances are also derived. Together, the abundances of the observed ions provide a lower limit to the ionization fraction, which is (2-3)e-9 in both clouds. In order to better constrain the electron abundance, a simple chemical model is built which calculates the steady state abundances of the major positive ions, using the observed abundances wherever available. With reasonable assumptions, good agreement within a factor of two with the observations can be achieved. The calculated electron fraction is x(e)= (1.0-3.3)e-8 in the case of NGC 2264 and x(e)=(0.5-1.1)e-8 for W 3 IRS5. In the first case, the high abundance of N2H+ requires a rather high...

  12. Elemental nitrogen partitioning in dense interstellar clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Daranlot, Julien; Bergeat, Astrid; Costes, Michel; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    Many chemical models of dense interstellar clouds predict that the majority of gas-phase elemental nitrogen should be present as N2, with an abundance approximately five orders of magnitude less than that of hydrogen. As a homonuclear diatomic molecule, N2 is difficult to detect spectroscopically through infrared or millimetre-wavelength transitions so its abundance is often inferred indirectly through its reaction product N2H+. Two main formation mechanisms each involving two radical-radical reactions are the source of N2 in such environments. Here we report measurements of the low temperature rate constants for one of these processes, the N + CN reaction down to 56 K. The effect of the measured rate constants for this reaction and those recently determined for two other reactions implicated in N2 formation are tested using a gas-grain model employing a critically evaluated chemical network. We show that the amount of interstellar nitrogen present as N2 depends on the competition between its gas-phase format...

  13. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Order and instabilities in dense bacterial colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimring, Lev

    2012-02-01

    The structure of cell colonies is governed by the interplay of many physical and biological factors, ranging from properties of surrounding media to cell-cell communication and gene expression in individual cells. The biomechanical interactions arising from the growth and division of individual cells in confined environments are ubiquitous, yet little work has focused on this fundamental aspect of colony formation. By combining experimental observations of growing monolayers of non-motile strain of bacteria Escherichia coli in a shallow microfluidic chemostat with discrete-element simulations and continuous theory, we demonstrate that expansion of a dense colony leads to rapid orientational alignment of rod-like cells. However, in larger colonies, anisotropic compression may lead to buckling instability which breaks perfect nematic order. Furthermore, we found that in shallow cavities feedback between cell growth and mobility in a confined environment leads to a novel cell streaming instability. Joint work with W. Mather, D. Volfson, O. Mondrag'on-Palomino, T. Danino, S. Cookson, and J. Hasty (UCSD) and D. Boyer, S. Orozco-Fuentes (UNAM, Mexico).

  15. Distribution and mass of diffuse and dense CO gas in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Brunt, Christopher; Clark, Paul; Klessen, Ralf; Shetty, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Emission from carbon monoxide (CO) is ubiquitously used as a tracer of dense star forming molecular clouds. There is, however, growing evidence that a significant fraction of CO emission originates from diffuse molecular gas. Quantifying the contribution of diffuse CO-emitting gas is vital for understanding the relation between molecular gas and star formation. We examine the Galactic distribution of two CO-emitting gas components, a high column density component detected in 13CO and 12CO, and a low column density component detected in 12CO, but not in 13CO. The "diffuse" and "dense" components are identified using a combination of smoothing, masking, and erosion/dilation procedures, making use of three large-scale 12CO and 13CO surveys of the Inner and Outer Milky Way. The diffuse component, which globally represents 25 (1.5x1e8 Mo) of the total molecular gas mass (6.5x1e8 Mo), is more extended perpendicular to the Galactic plane. The fraction of diffuse gas increases from 15% at a galactocentric radius of 3...

  16. Ectopic bone formation in rapidly fabricated acellular injectable dense collagen-Bioglass hybrid scaffolds via gel aspiration-ejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, Amir K; Muja, Naser; Kamranpour, Neysan O; Lepry, William C; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Clarke, Susan A; Nazhat, Showan N

    2016-04-01

    Gel aspiration-ejection (GAE) has recently been introduced as an effective technique for the rapid production of injectable dense collagen (IDC) gel scaffolds with tunable collagen fibrillar densities (CFDs) and microstructures. Herein, a GAE system was applied for the advanced production and delivery of IDC and IDC-Bioglass(®) (IDC-BG) hybrid gel scaffolds for potential bone tissue engineering applications. The efficacy of GAE in generating mineralizable IDC-BG gels (from an initial 75-25 collagen-BG ratio) produced through needle gauge numbers 8G (3.4 mm diameter and 6 wt% CFD) and 14G (1.6 mm diameter and 14 wt% CFD) was investigated. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of as-made gels revealed an increase in collagen fibril alignment with needle gauge number. In vitro mineralization of IDC-BG gels was confirmed where carbonated hydroxyapatite was detected as early as day 1 in simulated body fluid, which progressively increased up to day 14. In vivo mineralization of, and host response to, acellular IDC and IDC-BG gel scaffolds were further investigated following subcutaneous injection in adult rats. Mineralization, neovascularization and cell infiltration into the scaffolds was enhanced by the addition of BG and at day 21 post injection, there was evidence of remodelling of granulation tissue into woven bone-like tissue in IDC-BG. SHG imaging of explanted scaffolds indicated collagen fibril remodelling through cell infiltration and mineralization over time. In sum, the results suggest that IDC-BG hybrid gels have osteoinductive properties and potentially offer a novel therapeutic approach for procedures requiring the injectable delivery of a malleable and dynamic bone graft that mineralizes under physiological conditions.

  17. Permutation Matrix Method for Dense Coding Using GHZ States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Rui-Bo; CHEN Li-Bing; WANG Fa-Qiang; SU Zhi-Kun

    2008-01-01

    We present a new method called the permutation matrix method to perform dense coding using Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states. We show that this method makes the study of dense coding systematically and regularly. It also has high potential to be realized physically.

  18. Mining connected global and local dense subgraphs for bigdata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Shen, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    The problem of discovering connected dense subgraphs of natural graphs is important in data analysis. Discovering dense subgraphs that do not contain denser subgraphs or are not contained in denser subgraphs (called significant dense subgraphs) is also critical for wide-ranging applications. In spite of many works on discovering dense subgraphs, there are no algorithms that can guarantee the connectivity of the returned subgraphs or discover significant dense subgraphs. Hence, in this paper, we define two subgraph discovery problems to discover connected and significant dense subgraphs, propose polynomial-time algorithms and theoretically prove their validity. We also propose an algorithm to further improve the time and space efficiency of our basic algorithm for discovering significant dense subgraphs in big data by taking advantage of the unique features of large natural graphs. In the experiments, we use massive natural graphs to evaluate our algorithms in comparison with previous algorithms. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our algorithms for the two problems and their efficiency. This work is also the first that reveals the physical significance of significant dense subgraphs in natural graphs from different domains.

  19. Phase Structure and Transport Properties of Dense Quark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We provide a summary of our current knowledge of the phase structure of very dense quark matter. We concentrate on the question how the ground state at asymptotically high density -- color-flavor-locked (CFL) matter -- is modified as the density is lowered. We discuss the nature of the quasi-particle excitations, and present work on the transport properties of dense QCD matter.

  20. Finding dense locations in symbolic indoor tracking data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Tanvir; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Lu, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Finding the dense locations in large indoor spaces is very useful for many applications such as overloaded area detection, security control, crowd management, indoor navigation, and so on. Indoor tracking data can be enormous and are not immediately ready for finding dense locations. This paper...

  1. Dense film polyimide membranes for aggressive sour gas feed separations

    KAUST Repository

    Kraftschik, Brian

    2013-02-01

    Dense film membranes of the copolyimide 6FDA-DAM:DABA (3:2) are studied for simultaneous removal of CO2 and H2S from sour natural gas streams. Pure and mixed gas permeation as well as pure gas sorption data are reported at 35°C and pressures up to 62bar. The H2S partial pressures used are representative of highly aggressive field operations. Penetrant-induced plasticization effects are evident at feed pressures below 1bar in pure H2S feeds; sub-Tg thermal annealing is used to effectively mitigate this effect, and these annealed films are used throughout the study. Surprisingly, H2S/CH4 selectivity nearly doubles for mixed gas testing in comparison to the pure component ideal selectivity values and approaches the level of a state-of-the-art glassy polymer, cellulose acetate (CA), at H2S partial pressures above 2bar. Furthermore, permeation experiments using a 9.95% H2S, 19.9% CO2, 70.15% CH4 mixture at low feed pressures give CO2/CH4 selectivity of up to 49-over 30% greater than the pure component selectivity for 6FDA-DAM:DABA (3:2). The overall sour gas separation performance of this polyimide is comparable to high-performance rubbery polymer membranes, which have been reported for only moderate H2S partial pressure feeds, and is superior to that for CA based on a practical combined acid gas separation efficiency metric that we introduce. Finally, methods for continued development of the current polyimide membrane material for aggressive sour gas separations are presented. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Reconstruction of in-plane strain maps using hybrid dense sensor network composed of sensing skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Austin; Laflamme, Simon; Ubertini, Filippo

    2016-12-01

    The authors have recently developed a soft-elastomeric capacitive (SEC)-based thin film sensor for monitoring strain on mesosurfaces. Arranged in a network configuration, the sensing system is analogous to a biological skin, where local strain can be monitored over a global area. Under plane stress conditions, the sensor output contains the additive measurement of the two principal strain components over the monitored surface. In applications where the evaluation of strain maps is useful, in structural health monitoring for instance, such signal must be decomposed into linear strain components along orthogonal directions. Previous work has led to an algorithm that enabled such decomposition by leveraging a dense sensor network configuration with the addition of assumed boundary conditions. Here, we significantly improve the algorithm’s accuracy by leveraging mature off-the-shelf solutions to create a hybrid dense sensor network (HDSN) to improve on the boundary condition assumptions. The system’s boundary conditions are enforced using unidirectional RSGs and assumed virtual sensors. Results from an extensive experimental investigation demonstrate the good performance of the proposed algorithm and its robustness with respect to sensors’ layout. Overall, the proposed algorithm is seen to effectively leverage the advantages of a hybrid dense network for application of the thin film sensor to reconstruct surface strain fields over large surfaces.

  3. Tracing dense and diffuse neutral hydrogen in the halo of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, Vanessa A; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M

    2016-01-01

    We have combined observations of Galactic high-velocity HI from two surveys: a very sensitive survey from the Green Bank 140ft Telescope with limited sky coverage, and the less sensitive but complete Galactic All Sky Survey from the 64m Parkes Radio Telescope. The two surveys preferentially detect different forms of neutral gas due to their sensitivity. We adopt a machine learning approach to divide our data into two populations that separate across a range in column density: 1) a narrow line-width population typical of the majority of bright high velocity cloud components, and 2) a fainter, broad line-width population that aligns well with that of the population found in the Green Bank survey. We refer to these populations as dense and diffuse gas respectively, and find that diffuse gas is typically located at the edges and in the tails of high velocity clouds, surrounding dense components in the core. A fit to the average spectrum of each type of gas in the Galactic All Sky Survey data reveals the dense pop...

  4. Graphle: Interactive exploration of large, dense graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huttenhower Curtis

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide variety of biological data can be modeled as network structures, including experimental results (e.g. protein-protein interactions, computational predictions (e.g. functional interaction networks, or curated structures (e.g. the Gene Ontology. While several tools exist for visualizing large graphs at a global level or small graphs in detail, previous systems have generally not allowed interactive analysis of dense networks containing thousands of vertices at a level of detail useful for biologists. Investigators often wish to explore specific portions of such networks from a detailed, gene-specific perspective, and balancing this requirement with the networks' large size, complex structure, and rich metadata is a substantial computational challenge. Results Graphle is an online interface to large collections of arbitrary undirected, weighted graphs, each possibly containing tens of thousands of vertices (e.g. genes and hundreds of millions of edges (e.g. interactions. These are stored on a centralized server and accessed efficiently through an interactive Java applet. The Graphle applet allows a user to examine specific portions of a graph, retrieving the relevant neighborhood around a set of query vertices (genes. This neighborhood can then be refined and modified interactively, and the results can be saved either as publication-quality images or as raw data for further analysis. The Graphle web site currently includes several hundred biological networks representing predicted functional relationships from three heterogeneous data integration systems: S. cerevisiae data from bioPIXIE, E. coli data using MEFIT, and H. sapiens data from HEFalMp. Conclusions Graphle serves as a search and visualization engine for biological networks, which can be managed locally (simplifying collaborative data sharing and investigated remotely. The Graphle framework is freely downloadable and easily installed on new servers, allowing any

  5. Dense surface reconstruction with shadows in MIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bingxiong; Sun, Yu; Qian, Xiaoning

    2013-09-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of internal organ surfaces provides useful information for better control and guidance of the operations of surgical tools for minimally invasive surgery (MIS). The current reconstruction techniques using stereo cameras are still challenging due to the difficulties in correspondence matching in MIS, since there is very limited texture but significant specular reflection on organ surfaces. This paper proposes a new approach to overcome the problem by introducing weakly structured light actively casting surgical tool shadows on organ surfaces. The contribution of this paper is twofold: first, we propose a robust approach to extract shadow edges from a sequence of shadowed images; second, we develop a novel field surface interpolation (FSI) approach to obtain an accurate and dense disparity map. Our approach does not rely on texture information and is able to reconstruct accurate 3-D information by exploiting shadows from surgical tools. One advantage is that the point correspondences are directly calculated and no explicit stereo matching is required, which ensures the efficiency of the method. Another advantage is the minimum hardware requirement because only stereo cameras and a separated single-point light source are required. We evaluated the proposed approach using both phantom models and ex vivo images. Based on the experimental results, we achieved the precision of the recovered 3-D surfaces within 0.7 mm for phantom models and 1.2 mm for ex vivo images. The comparison of disparity maps indicates that with the addition of shadows, the proposed method significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art stereo algorithms for MIS.

  6. Pion decay constants in dense skyrmion matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee H.-J.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available According to the QCD, the hadronic matter can have various phases with matter density and temperature. In general, when there is phase transition in a matter, it is known that a symmetry in the matter changes. In case of the hadronic matter, the chiral symmetry in the matter is expected to be restored when the matter density (or temperature increases. The actual order parameter with respect to the chiral symmetry in the hadronic matter is known as the quark condensate from the QCD, but the pion decay constant, corresponding to the radius of the chiral circle, plays the role of the order parameter in an effective field theoretical approach to the QCD. In this paper, by using the skyrmion model which is an effective theory to the QCD, we construct the skyrmion matter as a model of the hadronic matter (nuclear matter and calculate the pion decay constant in the matter. Because of presence of the matter, the pion decay constant is split into the two components, the temporal component and the spatial component. We discuss the phase transition in the skyrmion matter and behavior of the two components of the decay constant for massless pion with density of the skyrmion matter.

  7. [Towards a structuring fibrillar ontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimberteau, J-C

    2012-10-01

    Over previous decades and centuries, the difficulty encountered in the manner in which the tissue of our bodies is organised, and structured, is clearly explained by the impossibility of exploring it in detail. Since the creation of the microscope, the perception of the basic unity, which is the cell, has been essential in understanding the functioning of reproduction and of transmission, but has not been able to explain the notion of form; since the cells are not everywhere and are not distributed in an apparently balanced manner. The problems that remain are those of form and volume and also of connection. The concept of multifibrillar architecture, shaping the interfibrillar microvolumes in space, represents a solution to all these questions. The architectural structures revealed, made up of fibres, fibrils and microfibrils, from the mesoscopic to the microscopic level, provide the concept of a living form with structural rationalism that permits the association of psychochemical molecular biodynamics and quantum physics: the form can thus be described and interpreted, and a true structural ontology is elaborated from a basic functional unity, which is the microvacuole, the intra and interfibrillar volume of the fractal organisation, and the chaotic distribution. Naturally, new, less linear, less conclusive, and less specific concepts will be implied by this ontology, leading one to believe that the emergence of life takes place under submission to forces that the original form will have imposed and oriented the adaptive finality. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  8. Hyperon-Nucleon Interactions and the Composition of Dense Nuclear Matter from Quantum Chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beane, S R; Cohen, S D; Detmold, W; Lin, H -W; Luu, T C; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Savage, M J

    2012-10-01

    The low-energy neutron-{Sigma}{sup -} interactions determine, in part, the role of the strange quark in dense matter, such as that found in astrophysical environments. The scattering phase shifts for this system are obtained from a numerical evaluation of the QCD path integral using the technique of Lattice QCD. Our calculations, performed at a pion mass of m{sub pi} ~ 389 MeV in two large lattice volumes, and at one lattice spacing, are extrapolated to the physical pion mass using effective field theory. The interactions determined from QCD are consistent with those extracted from hyperon-nucleon experimental data within uncertainties, and strengthen theoretical arguments that the strange quark is a crucial component of dense nuclear matter.

  9. Hyperon-Nucleon Interactions and the Composition of Dense Nuclear Matter from Quantum Chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, S R; Cohen, S D; Detmold, W; Lin, H -W; Luu, T C; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Savage, M J; Walker-Loud, A

    2012-01-01

    The low-energy neutron-Sigma^- interactions determine, in part, the role of the strange quark in dense matter, such as that found in astrophysical environments. The scattering phase shifts for this system are obtained from a numerical evaluation of the QCD path integral using the technique of Lattice QCD. Our calculations, performed at a pion mass of m_pi ~ 389 MeV in two large lattice volumes, and at one lattice spacing, are extrapolated to the physical pion mass using effective field theory. The interactions determined from QCD are consistent with those extracted from hyperon-nucleon experimental data within uncertainties, and strengthen theoretical arguments that the strange quark is a crucial component of dense nuclear matter.

  10. Biodegradable particle formation for drug and gene delivery using supercritical fluid and dense gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Kenji

    2008-02-14

    Recent developments in biodegradable particle formation using supercritical fluids and dense gases have been reviewed with an emphasis on studies of micronizing and encapsulating poorly-soluble pharmaceuticals and gene. General review articles published in previous years have then been provided. A brief description of the operating principles of some types of particle formation processes is given. These include the rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS), the particles from gas-saturated solution (PGSS) processes, the gas antisolvent process (GAS), and the supercritical antisolvent process (SAS). The papers have been reviewed under two groups, one involving the production of particles from pure biodegradable substances, and the other involving coating, capsule, and impregnation that contain active components, especially those that relate to pharmaceuticals. This review is a comprehensive review specifically focused on the formation of biodegradable particles for drug and gene delivery system using supercritical fluid and dense gas.

  11. Modeling Complex Organic Molecules in dense regions: Eley-Rideal and complex induced reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Ruaud, M; Hickson, K M; Gratier, P; Hersant, F; Wakelam, V

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed the existence of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) in cold dense cores and prestellar cores. The presence of these molecules in such cold conditions is not well understood and remains a matter of debate since the previously proposed "warm- up" scenario cannot explain these observations. In this article, we study the effect of Eley- Rideal and complex induced reaction mechanisms of gas-phase carbon atoms with the main ice components of dust grains on the formation of COMs in cold and dense regions. Based on recent experiments we use a low value for the chemical desorption efficiency (which was previously invoked to explain the observed COM abundances). We show that our introduced mechanisms are efficient enough to produce a large amount of complex organic molecules in the gas-phase at temperatures as low as 10K.

  12. Hyperon-nucleon interactions from quantum chromodynamics and the composition of dense nuclear matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beane, S R; Chang, E; Cohen, S D; Detmold, W; Lin, H-W; Luu, T C; Orginos, K; Parreño, A; Savage, M J; Walker-Loud, A

    2012-10-26

    The low-energy nΣ(-) interactions determine, in part, the role of the strange quark in dense matter, such as that found in astrophysical environments. The scattering phase shifts for this system are obtained from a numerical evaluation of the QCD path integral using the technique of lattice QCD. Our calculations, performed at a pion mass of m(π)~389 MeV in two large lattice volumes and at one lattice spacing, are extrapolated to the physical pion mass using effective field theory. The interactions determined from lattice QCD are consistent with those extracted from hyperon-nucleon experimental data within uncertainties and strengthen model-dependent theoretical arguments that the strange quark is a crucial component of dense nuclear matter.

  13. Densely Aligned Graphene Nanoribbon Arrays and Bandgap Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Justin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Chen, Changxin [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Gong, Ming [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Kenney, Michael [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2017-01-04

    Graphene has attracted great interest for future electronics due to its high mobility and high thermal conductivity. However, a two-dimensional graphene sheet behaves like a metal, lacking a bandgap needed for the key devices components such as field effect transistors (FETs) in digital electronics. It has been shown that, partly due to quantum confinement, graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with ~2 nm width can open up sufficient bandgaps and evolve into semiconductors to exhibit high on/off ratios useful for FETs. However, a challenging problem has been that, such ultra-narrow GNRs (~2 nm) are difficult to fabricate, especially for GNRs with smooth edges throughout the ribbon length. Despite high on/off ratios, these GNRs show very low mobility and low on-state conductance due to dominant scattering effects by imperfections and disorders at the edges. Wider GNRs (>5 nm) show higher mobility, higher conductance but smaller bandgaps and low on/off ratios undesirable for FET applications. It is highly desirable to open up bandgaps in graphene or increase the bandgaps in wide GNRs to afford graphene based semiconductors for high performance (high on-state current and high on/off ratio) electronics. Large scale ordering and dense packing of such GNRs in parallel are also needed for device integration but have also been challenging thus far. It has been shown theoretically that uniaxial strains can be applied to a GNR to engineer its bandgap. The underlying physics is that under uniaxial strain, the Dirac point moves due to stretched C-C bonds, leading to an increase in the bandgap of armchair GNRs by up to 50% of its original bandgap (i.e. bandgap at zero strain). For zigzag GNRs, due to the existence of the edge states, changes of bandgap are smaller under uniaxial strain and can be increased by ~30%. This work proposes a novel approach to the fabrication of densely aligned graphene nanoribbons with highly smooth edges afforded by anisotropic etching and uniaxial strain for

  14. Common interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence of non-fibrillar collagens: sequence analysis and structural studies on triple-helix peptide models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, Geetha; Li, Yingjie; Mohs, Angela; Strafaci, Christopher; Popiel, Magdalena; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2008-02-22

    Interruptions in the repeating (Gly-X1-X2)(n) amino acid sequence pattern are found in the triple-helix domains of all non-fibrillar collagens, and perturbations to the triple-helix at such sites are likely to play a role in collagen higher-order structure and function. This study defines the sequence features and structural consequences of the most common interruption, where one residue is missing from the tripeptide pattern, Gly-X1-X2-Gly-AA(1)-Gly-X1-X2, designated G1G interruptions. Residues found within G1G interruptions are predominantly hydrophobic (70%), followed by a significant amount of charged residues (16%), and the Gly-X1-X2 triplets flanking the interruption are atypical. Studies on peptide models indicate the degree of destabilization is much greater when Pro is in the interruption, GP, than when hydrophobic residues (GF, GY) are present, and a rigid Gly-Pro-Hyp tripeptide adjacent to the interruption leads to greater destabilization than a flexible Gly-Ala-Ala sequence. Modeling based on NMR data indicates the Phe residue within a GF interruption is located on the outside of the triple helix. The G1G interruptions resemble a previously studied collagen interruption GPOGAAVMGPO, designated G4G-type, in that both are destabilizing, but allow continuation of rod-like triple helices and maintenance of the single residue stagger throughout the imperfection, with a loss of axial register of the superhelix on both sides. Both kinds of interruptions result in a highly localized perturbation in hydrogen bonding and dihedral angles, but the hydrophobic residue of a G4G interruption packs near the central axis of the superhelix, while the hydrophobic residue of a G1G interruption is located on the triple-helix surface. The different structural consequences of G1G and G4G interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence pattern suggest a physical basis for their differential susceptibility to matrix metalloproteinases in type X collagen.

  15. Stimulation of the Fibrillar Collagen and Heat Shock Proteins by Nicotinamide or Its Derivatives in Non-Irradiated or UVA Radiated Fibroblasts, and Direct Anti-Oxidant Activity of Nicotinamide Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena Philips

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In skin aging, from intrinsic factors or exposure to ultraviolet (UV radiation, there is loss of structural fibrillar collagen and regulatory heat shock proteins. Phenolic compounds, with hydroxyl groups attached to an aromatic ring, have antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Nicotinamide is an amide derivative of niacin or vitamin B3, with an amide linked to an aromatic ring, with UV absorptive, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cell death/apoptosis properties. The goal of this research was to investigate the anti-skin aging mechanism of nicotinamide and its derivatives, 2,6-dihydroxynicotinamide, 2,4,5,6-tetrahydroxynicotinamide, and 3-hydroxypicolinamide (collectively niacin derivatives, through the stimulation of fibrillar collagens (type I, III and V, at protein and/or promoter levels and the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP-27, 47, 70, and 90 in non-irradiated or UVA radiated dermal fibroblasts; and from its direct antioxidant activity. UVA radiation inhibited the expression of types I and III collagen, and HSP-47 in dermal fibroblasts. The niacin derivatives significantly and similarly stimulated the expression of types I (transcriptionally, III and V collagens in non-irradiated, and UVA radiated fibroblasts indicating predominant effects. The 2,6-dihydroxynicotinamide had greater stimulatory effect on types I and III collagen in the non-irradiated, and UVA radiated fibroblasts, as well as greater direct antioxidant activity than the other niacin derivatives. The niacin derivatives, with a few exceptions, stimulated the expression of HSP-27, 47, 70 and 90 in non-irradiated, and UVA radiated fibroblasts. However, they had varied effects on the expression of the different HSPs in non-irradiated, and UVA radiated fibroblasts indicating non-predominant, albeit stimulatory, effect. Overall, nicotinamide and its derivatives have anti skin aging potential through the stimulation of fibrillar collagen and HSPs.

  16. Finding Hierarchical and Overlapping Dense Subgraphs using Nucleus Decompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshadhri, Comandur [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Pinar, Ali [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catalyurek, Umit [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Finding dense substructures in a graph is a fundamental graph mining operation, with applications in bioinformatics, social networks, and visualization to name a few. Yet most standard formulations of this problem (like clique, quasiclique, k-densest subgraph) are NP-hard. Furthermore, the goal is rarely to nd the \\true optimum", but to identify many (if not all) dense substructures, understand their distribution in the graph, and ideally determine a hierarchical structure among them. Current dense subgraph nding algorithms usually optimize some objective, and only nd a few such subgraphs without providing any hierarchy. It is also not clear how to account for overlaps in dense substructures. We de ne the nucleus decomposition of a graph, which represents the graph as a forest of nuclei. Each nucleus is a subgraph where smaller cliques are present in many larger cliques. The forest of nuclei is a hierarchy by containment, where the edge density increases as we proceed towards leaf nuclei. Sibling nuclei can have limited intersections, which allows for discovery of overlapping dense subgraphs. With the right parameters, the nuclear decomposition generalizes the classic notions of k-cores and k-trusses. We give provable e cient algorithms for nuclear decompositions, and empirically evaluate their behavior in a variety of real graphs. The tree of nuclei consistently gives a global, hierarchical snapshot of dense substructures, and outputs dense subgraphs of higher quality than other state-of-theart solutions. Our algorithm can process graphs with tens of millions of edges in less than an hour.

  17. HNCO in massive galactic dense cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, I.; Henkel, C.; Mao, R. Q.

    2000-09-01

    We surveyed 81 dense molecular cores associated with regions of massive star formation and Sgr A in the JK-1K-1 = 505-404 and 10010-909 lines of HNCO. Line emission was detected towards 57 objects. Selected subsamples were also observed in the 101-000, 404-303, 707-606, 15015-14014, 16016-15015 and 21021-20020 lines, covering a frequency range from 22 to 461 GHz. HNCO lines from the K-1 = 2,3 ladders were detected in several sources. Towards Orion-KL, K-1 = 5 transitions with upper state energies Eu/k ~ 1100 and 1300 K could be observed. Five HNCO cores were mapped. The sources remain spatially unresolved at 220 and 461 GHz (10010-909 and 21010-20020 transitions) with beam sizes of 24'' and 18\\arcsec, respectively. The detection of hyperfine structure in the 101-000 transition is consistent with optically thin emission under conditions of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE). This is corroborated by a rotational diagram analysis of Orion-KL that indicates optically thin line emission also for transitions between higher excited states. At the same time a tentative detection of interstellar HN13CO (the 100,10-90,9 line at 220 GHz toward G 310.12-0.20) suggests optically thick emission from some rotational transitions. Typical HNCO abundances relative to H2 as derived from a population diagram analysis are ~ 10-9. The rotational temperatures reach ~ 500 K. The gas densities in regions of HNCO K-1=0 emission should be n>~ 106 cm-3 and in regions of K-1>0 emission about an order of magnitude higher even for radiative excitation. HNCO abundances are found to be enhanced in high-velocity gas. HNCO integrated line intensities correlate well with those of thermal SiO emission. This indicates a spatial coexistence of the two species and may hint at a common production mechanism, presumably based on shock chemistry. Based on the observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile and on observations with the Heinrich-Hertz-Telescope (HHT). The HHT

  18. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy L. Ward

    2000-06-30

    . This successfully reduced cracking, however the films retained open porosity. The investigation of this concept will be continued in the final year of the project. Investigation of a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) method for defect mending in dense membranes was also initiated. An appropriate metal organic precursor (iron tetramethylheptanedionate) was identified whose deposition can be controlled by access to oxygen at temperatures in the 280-300 C range. Initial experiments have deposited iron oxide, but only on the membrane surface; thus refinement of this method will continue.

  19. Neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohs, Andreas

    2015-04-13

    In this thesis, neutrino reactions in hot and dense matter are studied. In particular, this work is concerned with neutrino-matter interactions that are relevant for neutrino transport in core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). The majority of the energy from a CCSN is released in the form of neutrinos. Accurate understanding and computation of these interactions is most relevant to achieve sufficiently reliable predictions for the evolution of CCSNe and other related question such as the production of heavy elements or neutrino oscillations. For this purpose this work follows the combined approach of searching for new important neutrino reactions and improving the computation of those reactions that are already implemented. First we estimate the relevance of charged-current weak interactions that include muon-neutrinos or muons, as well as the role of neutron decay for neutrino transport in CCSNe. All of these reactions were previously neglected in CCSN-simulations. We derive and compute the matrix element and subsequent semi-analytic expressions for transport properties like the inverse mean free path of the new reactions. It is found that these reactions are important for muon neutrinos and low energy electron antineutrinos at very high densities in the protoneutron star surface. Consequently their implementation might lead to several changes in the prediction of CCSNe signatures such as the nucleosynthesis yields. Second we improve the precision in the computation of well known neutrino-nucleon reactions like neutrino absorption on neutrons. We derive semi-analytic expressions for transport properties that use less restrictive approximations while keeping the computational demand constant. Therefore we consider the full relativistic kinematics of all participating particles i.e. allowing for relativistic nucleons and finite lepton masses. Also the weak magnetism terms of the matrix elements are explicitly included to all orders. From our results we suggest that the

  20. The Key Technique of Manufacture of Dense Chromium Sesquioxide Refractories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIMaoqiang; ZHANGShuying; 等

    1998-01-01

    Dense chromium sesquioxide refractories have widely been used in the kilns for making alkai-free and anti-alkali glass fibers due to their excellent re-sistance to molten glasses.Densifications of chromium sesquioxide during sintering can be blocked by evaporation of chromium trioxide derived from oxidation at high temperature,In this paper the mech-anism of sintering chromium oxide and the process-ing technique for making dense chromium sesquiox-ide refractories are discussed .A process in laboratory scale for making dense chromium sesquioxide bricks is demonstrated.

  1. Dense deposit disease in a child with febrile sore throat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Conti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dense deposit disease or membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II is a rare glomerulopathy characterized on renal biopsy by deposition of abnormal electron-dense material in the glomerular basement membrane. The pathophysiologic basis is uncontrolled systemic activation of the alternate pathway of the complement cascade. C3 nephritic factor, an autoantibody directed against the C3 convertase of the alternate pathway, plays a key role. In some patients, complement gene mutations have been identified. We report the case of a child who had persistent microscopic hematuria, proteinuria, and hypocomplementemia C3 for over 2 months. Renal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of dense deposit disease.

  2. Configuration of nucleolarDNA in situ in nucleolus ofAllium cepa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The location and configuration of nucleolar DNA have not beendetermined for a long time. In this paper, we have observed the nucleolar ultrastructure and the character of nucleolar DNA in Allium cepa cells by conventional electron microscopy and the cytochemical NAMA-Ur DNA specific staining method. Furthermore, we have properly improved the NAMA-Ur method so as to analyze the location and configuration of nucleolar DNA in situ. Our results indicated that the nucleolar DNA in Allium cepa cells is mainly located at the border between fibrillar centers and dense fibrillar component, especially distributed in the configuration of encircling the fibrillar centers.

  3. Clinorotation influences rDNA and NopA100 localization in nucleoli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, M. A.; González-Camacho, F.; Rodríguez-Vilariño, V.; Kordyum, E. L.; Medina, F. J.

    The nucleolus is the transcription site of rRNA genes as well as the site of processing and initial packaging of their transcripts. The plant nucleolin homologue NopA100 is involved in the regulation of r-chromatin condensation/expansion and rDNA transcription as well as in rRNA processing. We have investigated with immunogold electron microscopy the location of nucleolar DNA and NopA100 in cress root meristematic cells grown under slow horizontal clinorotation, reproducing an important feature of microgravity, namely the absence of an orienting action of a gravity vector, compared to control conditions. We demonstrate redistribution of both rDNA and NopA100 in nucleolar subcomponents induced by clinorotation. Ribosomal DNA concentrated predominantly in fibrillar centers in the form of condensed r-chromatin inclusions and internal non condensed fibrils, redistributing from the dense fibrillar component and the transition zone between fibrillar centers and the dense fibrillar component, recognized as the loci of rDNA transcription. The content of NopA100 was much higher in the inner space of fibrillar centers and reduced in the dense fibrillar component as compared to the control. Based on these data, an effect of slow horizontal clinorotation in lowering the level of rDNA transcription as well as rRNA processing is suggested.

  4. SUPPORTED DENSE CERAMIC MEMBRANES FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy L. Ward

    2002-07-01

    Mixed-conducting ceramics have the ability to conduct oxygen with perfect selectivity at elevated temperatures, making them extremely attractive as membrane materials for oxygen separation and membrane reactor applications. While the conductivity of these materials can be quite high at elevated temperatures (typically 800-1000 C), much higher oxygen fluxes, or, alternatively, equivalent fluxes at lower temperatures, could be provided by supported thin or thick film membrane layers. Based on that motivation, the objective of this project was to explore the use of ultrafine aerosol-derived powder of a mixed-conducting ceramic material for fabrication of supported thick-film dense membranes. The project focused on the mixed-conducting ceramic composition SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} (SCFO) because of the desirable permeability and stability of that material, as reported in the literature. Appropriate conditions to produce the submicron SrCo{sub 0.5}FeO{sub x} powder using aerosol pyrolysis were determined. Porous supports of the same composition were produced by partial sintering of a commercially obtained powder that possessed significantly larger particle size than the aerosol-derived powder. The effects of sintering conditions (temperature, atmosphere) on the porosity and microstructure of the porous discs were studied, and a standard support fabrication procedure was adopted. Subsequently, a variety of paste and slurry formulations were explored utilizing the aerosol-derived SCFO powder. These formulations were applied to the porous SCFO support by a doctor blade or spin coating procedure. Sintering of the supported membrane layer was then conducted, and additional layers were deposited and sintered in some cases. The primary characterization methods were X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, and room-temperature nitrogen permeation was used to assess defect status of the membranes.We found that non-aqueous paste/slurry formulations incorporating

  5. Inference of population structure using dense haplotype data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel John Lawson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of genome-wide dense variation data provides an opportunity to investigate ancestry in unprecedented detail, but presents new statistical challenges. We propose a novel inference framework that aims to efficiently capture information on population structure provided by patterns of haplotype similarity. Each individual in a sample is considered in turn as a recipient, whose chromosomes are reconstructed using chunks of DNA donated by the other individuals. Results of this "chromosome painting" can be summarized as a "coancestry matrix," which directly reveals key information about ancestral relationships among individuals. If markers are viewed as independent, we show that this matrix almost completely captures the information used by both standard Principal Components Analysis (PCA and model-based approaches such as STRUCTURE in a unified manner. Furthermore, when markers are in linkage disequilibrium, the matrix combines information across successive markers to increase the ability to discern fine-scale population structure using PCA. In parallel, we have developed an efficient model-based approach to identify discrete populations using this matrix, which offers advantages over PCA in terms of interpretability and over existing clustering algorithms in terms of speed, number of separable populations, and sensitivity to subtle population structure. We analyse Human Genome Diversity Panel data for 938 individuals and 641,000 markers, and we identify 226 populations reflecting differences on continental, regional, local, and family scales. We present multiple lines of evidence that, while many methods capture similar information among strongly differentiated groups, more subtle population structure in human populations is consistently present at a much finer level than currently available geographic labels and is only captured by the haplotype-based approach. The software used for this article, ChromoPainter and fineSTRUCTURE, is

  6. On the Virtual Cell Transmission in Ultra Dense Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Zhu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultra dense networks (UDN are identified as one of the key enablers for 5G, since they can provide an ultra high spectral reuse factor exploiting proximal transmissions. By densifying the network infrastructure equipment, it is highly possible that each user will have one or more dedicated serving base station antennas, introducing the user-centric virtual cell paradigm. However, due to irregular deployment of a large amount of base station antennas, the interference environment becomes rather complex, thus introducing severe interferences among different virtual cells. This paper focuses on the downlink transmission scheme in UDN where a large number of users and base station antennas is uniformly spread over a certain area. An interference graph is first created based on the large-scale fadings to give a potential description of the interference relationship among the virtual cells. Then, base station antennas and users in the virtual cells within the same maximally-connected component are grouped together and merged into one new virtual cell cluster, where users are jointly served via zero-forcing (ZF beamforming. A multi-virtual-cell minimum mean square error precoding scheme is further proposed to mitigate the inter-cluster interference. Additionally, the interference alignment framework is proposed based on the low complexity virtual cell merging to eliminate the strong interference between different virtual cells. Simulation results show that the proposed interference graph-based virtual cell merging approach can attain the average user spectral efficiency performance of the grouping scheme based on virtual cell overlapping with a smaller virtual cell size and reduced signal processing complexity. Besides, the proposed user-centric transmission scheme greatly outperforms the BS-centric transmission scheme (maximum ratio transmission (MRT in terms of both the average user spectral efficiency and edge user spectral efficiency. What is more

  7. Fermion mass and the pressure of dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, Eduardo S; 10.1063/1.2714447

    2008-01-01

    We consider a simple toy model to study the effects of finite fermion masses on the pressure of cold and dense matter, with possible applications in the physics of condensates in the core of neutron stars and color superconductivity.

  8. Fabrication, Properties and Applications of Dense Hydroxyapatite: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythili Prakasam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last five decades, there have been vast advances in the field of biomaterials, including ceramics, glasses, glass-ceramics and metal alloys. Dense and porous ceramics have been widely used for various biomedical applications. Current applications of bioceramics include bone grafts, spinal fusion, bone repairs, bone fillers, maxillofacial reconstruction, etc. Amongst the various calcium phosphate compositions, hydroxyapatite, which has a composition similar to human bone, has attracted wide interest. Much emphasis is given to tissue engineering, both in porous and dense ceramic forms. The current review focusses on the various applications of dense hydroxyapatite and other dense biomaterials on the aspects of transparency and the mechanical and electrical behavior. Prospective future applications, established along the aforesaid applications of hydroxyapatite, appear to be promising regarding bone bonding, advanced medical treatment methods, improvement of the mechanical strength of artificial bone grafts and better in vitro/in vivo methodologies to afford more particular outcomes.

  9. Densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxanes .2. Thermal and mechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipsen, T.A C; Derks, R.; van der Vegt, H.A.; Stenekes, R.; Pennings, A.J; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of two densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxane systems were investigated in relation to the molecular structure. The networks were prepared from functional branched prepolymers and crosslinked via a hydrosilylation curing reaction. The prepolymers having only viny

  10. RESEARCH ON DENSITY STABILITY OF AIR DENSE MEDIUM FLUIDIZED BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆振福; 陈清如

    1994-01-01

    In this papcr on thc basis of studying the distribution of fine coal in the dense medium fluidized bed, the optimal size range of fine coal, which constitutes a fluidized bed together with the dense medium, has been found. In the separating process the fine coal will continuously accumulate in fluidized bed, thus inevitably reducing the density of the bed. In order to keep bed density stable, the authors adopted such measures as split-flow of used medium and complement of fresh dense medium. The experiment results in both lab and pilot systems of the air-dense medium fluidized bed show that these measures are effective and satisfactory. Then authors also have established some relative dynamic mathematical models for it.

  11. Automated Motion Estimation for 2D Cine DENSE MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Andrew D.; Epstein, Frederick H.

    2013-01-01

    Cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) is a magnetic resonance (MR) method that directly encodes tissue displacement into MR phase images. This technique has successfully interrogated many forms of tissue motion, but is most commonly used to evaluate cardiac mechanics. Currently, motion analysis from cine DENSE images requires manually delineated anatomical structures. An automated analysis would improve measurement throughput, simplify data interpretation, and potentially access important physiological information during the MR exam. In this article, we present the first fully automated solution for the estimation of tissue motion and strain from 2D cine DENSE data. Results using both simulated and human cardiac cine DENSE data indicate good agreement between the automated algorithm and the standard semi-manual analysis method. PMID:22575669

  12. A Green Method for Processing Polymers using Dense Gas Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan B. Yoganathan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Dense CO2 can be used as an environmentally-benign polymer processing medium because of its liquid-like densities and gas-like mass transfer properties.In this work, polymer bio-blends of polycarbonate (PC, a biocompatible polymer, and polycaprolactone (PCL, a biodegradable polymer were prepared. Dense CO2 was used as a reaction medium for the melt-phase PC polymerization in the presence of dense CO2-swollen PCL particles and this method was used to prepare porous PC/PCL blends. To extend the applicability of dense CO2 to the biomedical industry and polymer blend processing, the impregnation of ibuprofen into the blend was conducted and subsequent dissolution characteristics were observed.

  13. Complete multiple round quantum dense coding with quantum logical network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChunYan; LI XiHan; DENG FuGuo; ZHOU Ping; ZHOU HongYu

    2007-01-01

    We present a complete multiple round quantum dense coding scheme for improving the source capacity of that introduced recently by Zhang et al. The receiver resorts to two qubits for storing the four local unitary operations in each round.

  14. Inherited susceptibility determines the distribution of dense low-density lipoprotein subfraction profiles in familial combined hyperlipidemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredie, S.J.H.; Demacker, P.N.M.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H. [Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    1996-04-01

    Familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH) is a heritable lipid disorder, in which dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfraction profiles due to a predominance of small dense LDL particles are frequently observed. These small dense LDL particles are associated with cardiovascular disease. Using segregation analysis, we investigated to what extent these LDL subfraction profiles are genetically determined; also, the mode of inheritance was studied. Individual LDL subfraction profiles were determined by density gradient ultracentrifugation in 623 individuals of 40 well-defined Dutch FCH families. The individual LDL subfraction profile was defined as a quantitative trait by the continuous variable K, a reliable estimate of the relative contribution of each LDL subfraction to the overall profile. Variation in parameter K due to age, sex, and hormonal status was taken into account by introducing liability classes. Segregation analysis was performed by fitting a series of class D regressive models were compared using log-likelihoot ratio tests. Our data show that 60% of the variability of parameter K could be explained by lipid and lipoprotein levels and that a major autosomal locus, recessively inherited, with a population frequency of .42 {+-} .07, and an additional polygenic component of .25 best explained the clustering of atherogenic dense LDL subfraction profiles in these FCH families. Therefore, dense LDL subfraction profiles, associated with elevated lipid levels, appear to have a genetic basis in FCH.

  15. Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, George [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-01-14

    The Topical Collaboration for Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense matter brought together researchers from a variety of nuclear science specialties and a number of institutions to address nuclear physics and neutrino physics problems associated with dense matter and the origin of the elements. See attached final technical reports for (1) the UCSD award and (2) a copy of the report for the whole TC

  16. MICROSPRAY SIMULATION OF DENSE GAS DISPERSION IN COMPLEX TERRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Anfossi, D.; Tinarelli, G.; S. Trini Castelli; Commanay, J.; Nibart, M

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: An extended validation of the new Lagrangian particle model MicroSpray version for dense gas simulation is proposed. MicroSpray simulates the dense gas dispersion in situations characterized by the presence of buildings, other obstacles, complex terrain, and possible occurrence of low wind speed conditions. Its performances are compared to a chlorine railway accident (Macdona), to a field experiment (Kit Fox) and to an atmospheric CFD model.

  17. Measurement of Electron-Ion Relaxation in Warm Dense Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, B. I.; Ogitsu, T.; Engelhorn, K.; Correa, A. A.; Ping, Y.; Lee, J. W.; Bae, L. J.; Prendergast, D.; Falcone, R. W.; Heimann, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental investigation of electron-ion coupling and electron heat capacity of copper in warm and dense states are presented. From time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy, the temporal evolution of electron temperature is obtained for non-equilibrium warm dense copper heated by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. Electron heat capacity and electron-ion coupling are inferred from the initial electron temperature and its decrease over 10 ps. Data are compared with various theoretical models.

  18. Relating quantum discord with the quantum dense coding capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Qiu, Liang, E-mail: lqiu@cumt.edu.cn; Li, Song; Zhang, Chi [China University of Mining and Technology, School of Sciences (China); Ye, Bin [China University of Mining and Technology, School of Information and Electrical Engineering (China)

    2015-01-15

    We establish the relations between quantum discord and the quantum dense coding capacity in (n + 1)-particle quantum states. A necessary condition for the vanishing discord monogamy score is given. We also find that the loss of quantum dense coding capacity due to decoherence is bounded below by the sum of quantum discord. When these results are restricted to three-particle quantum states, some complementarity relations are obtained.

  19. EUV stochastic noise analysis and LCDU mitigation by etching on dense contact-hole array patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seo Min; Koo, Sunyoung; Park, Jun-Taek; Lim, Chang-Moon; Kim, Myoungsoo; Ahn, Chang-Nam; Fumar-Pici, Anita; Chen, Alek C.

    2014-04-01

    Experimental local CD uniformity (LCDU) of the dense contact-hole (CH) array pattern is statistically decomposed into stochastic noise, mask component, and metrology factor. Each component are compared quantitatively, and traced after etching to find how much improvement can be achieved by smoothing. Etch CDU gain factor is defined as the differential of etch CD by resist CD, and used to estimate etch CDU on resist CDU. Stochastic noise has influenced on not only LCDU but also local placement error (LPE) of each contact-hole. This LPE is also decomposed into its constituents in the same statistical way. As a result, stochastic noise is found to be the most dominant factor on LCDU and LPE. Etch LCDU is well expected by Etch Gain factor, but LPE seems to be kept same after etching. Fingerprints are derived from the repeating component and the boundary size for excluding proximity effect in analysis is investigated.

  20. The PPII-to-α-helix transition of poly-l-lysine in methanol/water solvent mixtures accompanied by fibrillar self-aggregation: An influence of fluphenazine molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieślik-Boczula, Katarzyna

    2017-08-01

    Fourier-transform infrared, vibrational circular dichroism spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy are used to follow the structural changes of pure and fluphenazine (FPh)-mixed poly-l-lysine (PLL) triggered by variations of the methanol to water ratio in solvent mixtures. FPh molecules are used as an effective psychotic drug but with a strong Parkinson's-related side effect. To answer the question whether FPh molecules can modify the fibril development, the PLL polypeptide was used as a model of α-helix- and PPII-rich fibrils. It was stated that the presence of FPh molecules did not inhibit the creation of both types of PLL fibrils with clustering features. The methanol-poor aqueous solutions promote the formation of extended polyproline II (PPII) helices; however, the methanol-rich aqueous solutions induce the development of α-helices of both pure and FPh-mixed PLL. Unpredicted and interesting features of PLL fibrillogenesis are evidenced by the formation of uncommon fibrillar aggregates, which are developed in methanol/water solvents from PLL molecules rich in either α-helix or PPII structures. Possibility of PLL molecules to form β-sheet-, α-helix- and PPII-rich fibrils demonstrating that fibrillogenesis is a common phenomenon, and fibrillar aggregates can be based on all of the basic protein secondary structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Equation of state and transport properties of warm dense helium via quantum molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Guo; Cheng, Yan; Chen, Qi-Feng; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    2016-05-01

    The equation of state, self-diffusion, and viscosity coefficients of helium have been investigated by quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations in the warm dense matter regime. Our simulations are validated through the comparison with the reliable experimental data. The calculated principal and reshock Hugoniots of liquid helium are in good agreement with the gas-gun data. On this basis, we revisit the issue for helium, i.e., the possibility of the instabilities predicted by chemical models at around 2000 GPa and 10 g/cm3 along the pressure isotherms of 6309, 15 849, and 31 623 K. Our calculations show no indications of instability in this pressure-temperature region, which reconfirm the predictions of previous QMD simulations. The self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients of warm dense helium have been systematically investigated by the QMD simulations. We carefully test the finite-size effects and convergences of statistics, and obtain numerically converged self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients by using the Kubo-Green formulas. The present results have been used to evaluate the existing one component plasma models. Finally, the validation of the Stokes-Einstein relationship for helium in the warm dense regime is discussed.

  2. Gas suspension flows of a moderately dense binary mixture of solid particles in vertical tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamankhan, P.; Huotari, J. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Combustion and Conversion Lab.

    1996-12-01

    The turbulent, steady, fully-developed flow of a moderately dense (solid volume faction >>0.001) binary mixture of spherical particles in a gaseous carrier is investigated for the case of flow in a vertical riser. The suspended particles are considered to be in turbulent motion, driven by random aerodynamic forces acting between the particle and the gaseous carrier as well as particle-particle interactive forces. A model is constructed based on the combination of the time-averaged after volume-averaged conservation equations of mass, momentum and mechanical energy of the gas phase in the continuum theory and the corresponding equations for the solid particles obtained using the recently developed Enskog theory for dense multi-component mixtures of slightly inelastic spherical particles. The model properly takes into account the contributions of particle-particle collisions, as well as the fluid-dynamic fluctuating forces on individual particles. To demonstrate the validity of this approach, the fully-developed steady-state mean velocity and concentration distributions of a moderately dense binary mixture of solid particles in a turbulent vertical flow calculated by the present model are compared with available experimental measurements. The results provide a qualitative description of the experimentally observed motion of coarse particles in a fast bed of fine solids. (author)

  3. RESIF Seismology Datacentre : Recently Released Data and New Services. Computing with Dense Seisimic Networks Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcke, P.; Pequegnat, C.; Grunberg, M.; Lecointre, A.; Bzeznik, B.; Wolyniec, D.; Engels, F.; Maron, C.; Cheze, J.; Pardo, C.; Saurel, J. M.; André, F.

    2015-12-01

    RESIF is a nationwide french project aimed at building a high quality observation system to observe and understand the inner earth. RESIF deals with permanent seismic networks data as well as mobile networks data, including dense/semi-dense arrays. RESIF project is distributed among different nodes providing qualified data to the main datacentre in Université Grenoble Alpes, France. Data control and qualification is performed by each individual nodes : the poster will provide some insights on RESIF broadband seismic component data quality control. We will then present data that has been recently made publicly available. Data is distributed through worldwide FDSN and european EIDA standards protocols. A new web portal is now opened to explore and download seismic data and metadata. The RESIF datacentre is also now connected to Grenoble University High Performance Computing (HPC) facility : a typical use-case will be presented using iRODS technologies. The use of dense observation networks is increasing, bringing challenges in data growth and handling : we will present an example where HDF5 data format was used as an alternative to usual seismology data formats.

  4. Beyond basin resonance: characterizing wave propagation using a dense array and the ambient seismic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boué, Pierre; Denolle, Marine; Hirata, Naoshi; Nakagawa, Shigeki; Beroza, Gregory C.

    2016-08-01

    Seismic wave resonance in sedimentary basins is a well-recognized seismic hazard; however, concentrated areas of earthquake damage have been observed near basin edges, where wave propagation is particularly complex and difficult to understand with sparse observations. The Tokyo metropolitan area is densely populated, subject to strong shaking from a diversity of earthquake sources, and sits atop the deep Kanto sedimentary basin. It is also instrumented with two seismic arrays: the dense MEtropolitan Seismic Observation network (MeSO-net) within the basin, and the High sensitivity seismograph network (Hi-net) surrounding it. In this study, we explore the 3-D seismic wavefield within and throughout the Kanto basin, including near and across basin boundaries, using cross-correlations of all components of ambient seismic field between the stations of these two arrays. Dense observations allow us to observe clearly the propagation of three modes of both Rayleigh and Love waves. They also show how the wavefield behaves in the vicinity of sharp basin edges with reflected/converted waves and excitation of higher modes.

  5. Dense and Cellular Zirconia Produced by Gel Casting with Agar: Preparation and High Temperature Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Tulliani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified gel-casting process was developed to produce both dense and highly porous (40% volume yttria tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP using agar, a natural polysaccharide, as gelling agent. A fugitive phase, made of commercial polyethylene spheres, was added to the ceramic suspension before gelling to produce cellular ceramic structures. The characterization of the microstructural features of both dense and cellular ceramics was carried out by FEG SEM analysis of cross-sections produced by focused ion beam. The mechanical properties of the components were characterized at room temperature by nanoindentation tests in continuous stiffness measurement mode, by investigating the direct effect of the presence of residual microporosity. The presence of a diffuse residual microporosity from incomplete gel deaeration resulted in a decay of the bending strength and of the elastic modulus. The mechanical behavior of both dense and cellular zirconia (in terms of elastic modulus, flexural strength, and deformation at rupture was investigated by performing four-point bending tests at the temperature of 1500°C.

  6. Atomistic study of mixing at high Z / low Z interfaces at Warm Dense Matter Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Glosli, James; Rudd, Robert; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Team

    2016-10-01

    We use atomistic simulations to study different aspects of mixing occurring at an initially sharp interface of high Z and low Z plasmas in the Warm/Hot Dense Matter regime. We consider a system of Diamond (the low Z component) in contact with Ag (the high Z component), which undergoes rapid isochoric heating from room temperature up to 10 eV, rapidly changing the solids into warm dense matter at solid density. We simulate the motion of ions via the screened Coulomb potential. The electric field, the electron density and ionizations level are computed on the fly by solving Poisson equation. The spatially varying screening lengths computed from the electron cloud are included in this effective interaction; the electrons are not simulated explicitly. We compute the electric field generated at the Ag-C interface as well as the dynamics of the ions during the mixing process occurring at the plasma interface. Preliminary results indicate an anomalous transport of high Z ions (Ag) into the low Z component (C); a phenomenon that is partially related to the enhanced transport of ions due to the generated electric field. These results are in agreement with recent experimental observation on Au-diamond plasma interface. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Statistical mechanics of reacting dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, F.J.

    1978-11-22

    A review of the quantum statistical theory of strongly coupled many component plasmas is given. The theoretical development is shown to consist of six separate parts. Compensation between bound and scattering state contributions to the partition function and use of the shifted Debye energy levels are important aspects of the analysis. The results are valid when the electrons are moderately coupled to the heavy ions, i.e., ..lambda../sub e..cap alpha../* < 1, but no restriction is placed on the coupling between heavy ions. Another restriction is that lambda/lambda/sub D/ < 1, i.e., the thermal deBroglie wavelength is less than the Debye length. Numerical calculations of PV/N/sub 0/kT and C/sub V/ are given for a Rubidium plasma.

  8. Early complement components in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerhuis, R; Janssen, I; Hack, C E; Eikelenboom, P

    1996-01-01

    Activation products of the early complement components C1, C4 and C3 can be found colocalized with diffuse and fibrillar beta-amyloid (beta/A4) deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Immunohistochemically, C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh) and the C1 subcomponents C1s and C1r can not, or only occasionally, be detected in plaques or in astrocytes. The present finding that C1q, C1s and C1-Inh mRNA are present in both AD and control brains suggests that the variable immunohistochemical staining results for C1r, C1s and C1-Inh are due to a rapid consumption, and that the inability to detect C1s, C1r or C1-Inh is probably due to the dissociation of C1s-C1-Inh and C1r-C1-Inh complexes from the activator-bound C1q into the fluid phase. Employing monoclonal antibodies specific for different forms of C1-Inh, no complexed C1-Inh could be found, whereas inactivated C1-Inh seems to be present in astrocytes surrounding beta/A4 plaques in AD brains. These findings, together with our finding (using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) that C1-Inh is locally produced in the brain, suggest that in the brain complement activation at the C1 level is regulated by C1-Inh. Immunohistochemically, no evidence for the presence of the late complement components C5, C7 and C9, or of the membrane attack complex (MAC), was found in beta/A4 plaques. In contrast to the mRNA encoding the early components, that of the late complement components appears to be hardly detectable (C7) or absent (C9). Thus, without blood-brain-barrier impairment, the late complement components are probably present at too low a concentration to allow the formation of the MAC, which is generally believed to be responsible for at least some of the neurodegenerative effects observed in AD. Therefore, the present findings support the idea that in AD, complement does not function as an inflammatory mediator through MAC formation, but through the action of early component activation products.

  9. The characteristics and evolution of dense knots in the Supernova Remnant, Cas A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielens, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    Supernovae are key drivers of the evolution of the interstellar medium of galaxies as they are main sources of freshly synthesized elements, dust and kinetic energy. Dense Fast Moving Knots (FMKs) are an important component of supernova remnants as they may be prime sites for dust formation and their high densities protect this dust against the destructive action of the reverse shock. Herschel, Spitzer, Akari, and ground-based IR studies of dense clumps in the Cas A supernova remnant have revealed large column densities (4E19 per square cm) of warm (500-1000K) dense (1E5 to 1E6 particles per cc) CO gas. This dense environment is very conducive to dust formation and protection. However, the relationship of the molecular and ionic gas is unclear and the derived large column densities are much larger than shock models predict, indicating the importance of energy conduction by electrons from the surrounding hot plasma into the knot. Conduction is a key process in the evolution of knots and drives the overall morphology of supernova remnants and their interaction with the interstellar medium. We propose to observe three CO-rich knots in the [OIII] 52&88 and [OI] 63 fine-structure lines with FIFI-LS/SOFIA. We will compare the distribution of these atomic lines with that of CO and derive the physical conditions and column densities. A pilot program in Cycle 2 has demonstrated the feasibility of this project. The proposed observations will address the key questions: "Can FMKs protect dust ?", "Are the observed variations in the mid-IR CO emission related to variations in the pre-shock density, column density, or the presence of additional heating sources for the gas?", and "What is the importance of electron energy conduction for the heating of the gas and how do these knots dissolve and merge with the SNR/ISM?"

  10. Gallic acid is the major component of grape seed extract that inhibits amyloid fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanqin; Pukala, Tara L; Musgrave, Ian F; Williams, Danielle M; Dehle, Francis C; Carver, John A

    2013-12-01

    Many protein misfolding diseases, for example, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's, are characterised by the accumulation of protein aggregates in an amyloid fibrillar form. Natural products which inhibit fibril formation are a promising avenue to explore as therapeutics for the treatment of these diseases. In this study we have shown, using in vitro thioflavin T assays and transmission electron microscopy, that grape seed extract inhibits fibril formation of kappa-casein (κ-CN), a milk protein which forms amyloid fibrils spontaneously under physiological conditions. Among the components of grape seed extract, gallic acid was the most active component at inhibiting κ-CN fibril formation, by stabilizing κ-CN to prevent its aggregation. Concomitantly, gallic acid significantly reduced the toxicity of κ-CN to pheochromocytoma12 cells. Furthermore, gallic acid effectively inhibited fibril formation by the amyloid-beta peptide, the putative causative agent in Alzheimer's disease. It is concluded that the gallate moiety has the fibril-inhibitory activity.

  11. Selecting the Number of Principal Components in Functional Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yehua; Wang, Naisyin; Carroll, Raymond J

    2013-12-19

    Functional principal component analysis (FPCA) has become the most widely used dimension reduction tool for functional data analysis. We consider functional data measured at random, subject-specific time points, contaminated with measurement error, allowing for both sparse and dense functional data, and propose novel information criteria to select the number of principal component in such data. We propose a Bayesian information criterion based on marginal modeling that can consistently select the number of principal components for both sparse and dense functional data. For dense functional data, we also developed an Akaike information criterion (AIC) based on the expected Kullback-Leibler information under a Gaussian assumption. In connecting with factor analysis in multivariate time series data, we also consider the information criteria by Bai & Ng (2002) and show that they are still consistent for dense functional data, if a prescribed undersmoothing scheme is undertaken in the FPCA algorithm. We perform intensive simulation studies and show that the proposed information criteria vastly outperform existing methods for this type of data. Surprisingly, our empirical evidence shows that our information criteria proposed for dense functional data also perform well for sparse functional data. An empirical example using colon carcinogenesis data is also provided to illustrate the results.

  12. Selecting the Number of Principal Components in Functional Data

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yehua

    2013-12-01

    Functional principal component analysis (FPCA) has become the most widely used dimension reduction tool for functional data analysis. We consider functional data measured at random, subject-specific time points, contaminated with measurement error, allowing for both sparse and dense functional data, and propose novel information criteria to select the number of principal component in such data. We propose a Bayesian information criterion based on marginal modeling that can consistently select the number of principal components for both sparse and dense functional data. For dense functional data, we also develop an Akaike information criterion based on the expected Kullback-Leibler information under a Gaussian assumption. In connecting with the time series literature, we also consider a class of information criteria proposed for factor analysis of multivariate time series and show that they are still consistent for dense functional data, if a prescribed undersmoothing scheme is undertaken in the FPCA algorithm. We perform intensive simulation studies and show that the proposed information criteria vastly outperform existing methods for this type of data. Surprisingly, our empirical evidence shows that our information criteria proposed for dense functional data also perform well for sparse functional data. An empirical example using colon carcinogenesis data is also provided to illustrate the results. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. © 2013 American Statistical Association.

  13. The JCMT dense gas survey in dense molecular clouds: an HCO+/HCN comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Smith, Samantha; Richer, John; Buckle, Jane; Salji, Carl; Hatchell, Jennifer; Drabek, Emily

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of a large-scale survey of the very dense molecular gas in Perseus, Orion A and B, Serpens and Ophiuchus using HCO+ and HCN (J = 4 - 3) transitions. We have used this emission to trace the structure and kinematics of gas at the extremely high densities found in pre- and protostellar cores; as well as tracing outflows powered by these early star-forming cores. We present a comparison of the HCO+/HCN data, highlighting regions where there is a marked discrepancy in the spectra of the two emission lines. This is particularly noticeable in some of the more powerful outflows driven by Class 0 sources, where the HCN is greatly enhanced in the linewings in comparison with HCO+. We also use the HCO+ to positively identify protostellar outflows and their driving sources. We present a statistical analysis of the outflow properties that we derive from this tracer. We show that our results are comparable to those obtained from similar outflow analyses using 12CO.

  14. Experimental Studies of the Transport Parameters of Warm Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouffani, Khalid [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2014-12-01

    There is a need to establish fundamental properties of matter and energy under extreme physical conditions. Although high energy density physics (HEDP) research spans a wide range of plasma conditions, there is one unifying regime that is of particular importance and complexity: that of warm dense matter, the transitional state between solid state condensed matter and energetic plasmas. Most laboratory experimental conditions, including inertial confinement implosion, fall into this regime. Because all aspects of laboratory-created high-energy-density plasmas transition through the warm dense matter regime, understanding the fundamental properties to determine how matter and energy interact in this regime is an important aspect of major research efforts in HEDP. Improved understanding of warm dense matter would have significant and wide-ranging impact on HEDP science, from helping to explain wire initiation studies on the Sandia Z machine to increasing the predictive power of inertial confinement fusion modeling. The central goal or objective of our proposed research is to experimentally determine the electrical resistivity, temperature, density, and average ionization state of a variety of materials in the warm dense matter regime, without the use of theoretical calculations. Since the lack of an accurate energy of state (EOS) model is primarily due to the lack of experimental data, we propose an experimental study of the transport coefficients of warm dense matter.

  15. Dense Molecular Gas: A Sensitive Probe of Stellar Feedback Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F; Murray, Norman; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-01-01

    We show that the mass fraction of GMC gas (n>100 cm^-3) in dense (n>>10^4 cm^-3) star-forming clumps, observable in dense molecular tracers (L_HCN/L_CO(1-0)), is a sensitive probe of the strength and mechanism(s) of stellar feedback. Using high-resolution galaxy-scale simulations with pc-scale resolution and explicit models for feedback from radiation pressure, photoionization heating, stellar winds, and supernovae (SNe), we make predictions for the dense molecular gas tracers as a function of GMC and galaxy properties and the efficiency of stellar feedback. In models with weak/no feedback, much of the mass in GMCs collapses into dense sub-units, predicting L_HCN/L_CO(1-0) ratios order-of-magnitude larger than observed. By contrast, models with feedback properties taken directly from stellar evolution calculations predict dense gas tracers in good agreement with observations. Changing the strength or timing of SNe tends to move systems along, rather than off, the L_HCN-L_CO relation (because SNe heat lower-de...

  16. Role of arches in the generation of shear bands in a dense 3D granular system under shear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigaud, L [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, P.O. 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bordignon, A L; Lopes, H; Lewiner, T; Tavares, G [Departamento de Matematica, PontifIcia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 38071, 22452 970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Morgado, W A M, E-mail: lucas@if.ufrj.b [Departamento de Fisica, PontifIcia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro and National Institute of Science and Technology for Complex Systems, C.P. 38071, 22452-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-09-01

    A model for propagation of arches on cubic lattices, to simulate the internal mobility of grains in a dense granular system under shear is proposed. In this model, the role of the arches in granular transportation presents a non-linear dependence on the local values of the stress components that can be modeled geometrically. In particular, we study a modified Couette flow and were able to reproduce qualitatively the experimental results found in the literature.

  17. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Daniel G; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J; Sandler, Stanley I; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2015-10-20

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein.

  18. Infrared Opacities in Dense Atmospheres of Cool White Dwarf Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Piotr M; Dufour, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Dense, He-rich atmospheres of cool white dwarfs represent a challenge to the modeling. This is because these atmospheres are constituted of a dense fluid in which strong multi-atomic interactions determine their physics and chemistry. Therefore, the ideal-gas-based description of absorption is no longer adequate, which makes the opacities of these atmospheres difficult to model. This is illustrated with severe problems in fitting the spectra of cool, He-rich stars. Good description of the infrared (IR) opacity is essential for proper assignment of the atmospheric parameters of these stars. Using methods of computational quantum chemistry we simulate the IR absorption of dense He/H media. We found a significant IR absorption from He atoms (He-He-He CIA opacity) and a strong pressure distortion of the H$_2$-He collision-induced absorption (CIA). We discuss the implication of these results for interpretation of the spectra of cool stars.

  19. Infrared Opacities in Dense Atmospheres of Cool White Dwarf Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, P. M.; Blouin, S.; Dufour, P.

    2017-03-01

    Dense, He-rich atmospheres of cool white dwarfs represent a challenge to the modeling. This is because these atmospheres are constituted of a dense fluid in which strong multi-atomic interactions determine their physics and chemistry. Therefore, the ideal-gas-based description of absorption is no longer adequate, which makes the opacities of these atmospheres difficult to model. This is illustrated with severe problems in fitting the spectra of cool, He-rich stars. Good description of the infrared (IR) opacity is essential for proper assignment of the atmospheric parameters of these stars. Using methods of computational quantum chemistry we simulate the IR absorption of dense He/H media. We found a significant IR absorption from He atoms (He-He-He CIA opacity) and a strong pressure distortion of the H2-He collision-induced absorption (CIA). We discuss the implication of these results for the interpretation of the spectra of cool stars.

  20. Laboratory measurements of the resistivity of warm dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Nicola; Robinson, Alex; Hakel, Peter; Gregori, Ginaluca; Rajeev, Pattathil; Woolsey, Nigel

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we will present a method for studying material resistivity in warm dense plasmas in the laboratory in which we interrogate the microphysics of the low energy electron distributions associated with an anisotropic return current. Through experimental measurements of the polarization of the Ly- α doublet emission (2s1 / 2-2p1 / 2,3/2 transitions) of sulphur, we determine the resistivity of a sulphur-doped plastic target heated to warm dense conditions by an ultra-intense laser at relativistic intensities, I ~ 5 ×1020 Wcm-2. We describe a method of exploiting classical x-ray scattering to separately measure both the π- and σ- polarizations of Ly-α1 spectral emission in a single shot. These measurements make it possible to explore fundamental material properties such as resistivity in warm and hot dense plasmas through matching plasma physics modelling to atomic physics calculations of the experimentally measured large, positive, polarisation.

  1. Probing warm dense lithium by inelastic X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Saiz, E.; Riley, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University of Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Gregori, G. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom); Gregori, G.; Clarke, R.J.; Neely, D.; Notley, M.M.; Spindloe, C. [Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX (United Kingdom); Gericke, D.O.; Vorberger, J.; Wunsch, K. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Barbrel, B.; Koenig, M. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation des Laser Intenses, Ecole Polytechnique - Universite Paris-6, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Freeman, R.R.; Weber, R.L.; Van Woerkom, L. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Glenzer, S.H.; Landen, O.L.; Neumayer, P.; Price, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Khattak, F.Y. [Department of Physics, Kohat University of Science and Technology, Kohat-26000, NWFP (Pakistan); Pelka, A.; Roth, M.; Schollmeier, M. [Institut fur Kernphysik, Technische Universitat Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    One of the grand challenges of contemporary physics is understanding strongly interacting quantum systems comprising such diverse examples as ultracold atoms in traps, electrons in high-temperature superconductors and nuclear matter. Warm dense matter, defined by temperatures of a few electron volts and densities comparable with solids, is a complex state of such interacting matter. Moreover, the study of warm dense matter states has practical applications for controlled thermonuclear fusion, where it is encountered during the implosion phase, and it also represents laboratory analogues of astrophysical environments found in the core of planets and the crusts of old stars. Here we demonstrate how warm dense matter states can be diagnosed and structural properties can be obtained by inelastic X-ray scattering measurements on a compressed lithium sample. Combining experiments and ab initio simulations enables us to determine its microscopic state and to evaluate more approximate theoretical models for the ionic structure. (authors)

  2. On the Evolution of the Dense Core Mass Function

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Jonathan J Swift Jonathan P

    2008-01-01

    The mass distributions of dense cores in star-forming regions are measured to have a shape similar to the initial mass function of stars. This has been generally interpreted to mean that the constituent cores will form individual stars or stellar systems at a nearly constant star formation efficiency. This article presents a series of numerical experiments evolving distributions of dense cores into stars to quantify the effects of stellar multiplicity, global core fragmentation, and a varying star formation efficiency. We find that the different evolutionary schemes have an overall small effect on the shape of the resultant distribution of stars. Our results imply that at the current level of observational accuracy the comparison between the mass functions of dense cores and stars alone is insufficient to discern between different evolutionary models. Observations over a wide range of mass scales including the high or low-mass tails of these distributions have the largest potential for discerning between diff...

  3. DENSE: Displacement Encoding with Stimulated Echoes in Cardiac Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletras, Anthony H.; Ding, Shujun; Balaban, Robert S.; Wen, Han

    1999-03-01

    Displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) was developed for high-resolution myocardial displacement mapping. Pixel phase is modulated by myocardial displacement and data spatial resolution is limited only by pixel size. 2D displacement vector maps were generated for the systolic action in canines with 0.94 × 1.9 mm nominal in-plane resolution and 2.3 mm/π displacement encoding. A radial strain of 0.208 was measured across the free left ventricular wall over 105 ms during systole. DENSE displacement maps require small first-order gradient moments for encoding. DENSE magnitude images exhibit black-blood contrast which allows for better myocardial definition and reduced motion-related artifacts.

  4. Spatial and temporal segmented dense trajectories for gesture recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kaho; Yoshida, Takeshi; Sumi, Kazuhiko; Habe, Hitoshi; Mitsugami, Ikuhisa

    2017-03-01

    Recently, dense trajectories [1] have been shown to be a successful video representation for action recognition, and have demonstrated state-of-the-art results with a variety of datasets. However, if we apply these trajectories to gesture recognition, recognizing similar and fine-grained motions is problematic. In this paper, we propose a new method in which dense trajectories are calculated in segmented regions around detected human body parts. Spatial segmentation is achieved by body part detection [2]. Temporal segmentation is performed for a fixed number of video frames. The proposed method removes background video noise and can recognize similar and fine-grained motions. Only a few video datasets are available for gesture classification; therefore, we have constructed a new gesture dataset and evaluated the proposed method using this dataset. The experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms the original dense trajectories.

  5. Distributed quantum dense coding with two receivers in noisy environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tamoghna; Prabhu, R.; SenDe, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the effect of noisy channels in a classical information transfer through a multipartite state which acts as a substrate for the distributed quantum dense coding protocol between several senders and two receivers. The situation is qualitatively different from the case with one or more senders and a single receiver. We obtain an upper bound on the multipartite capacity which is tightened in the case of the covariant noisy channel. We also establish a relation between the genuine multipartite entanglement of the shared state and the capacity of distributed dense coding using that state, both in the noiseless and the noisy scenarios. Specifically, we find that, in the case of multiple senders and two receivers, the corresponding generalized Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states possess higher dense coding capacities as compared to a significant fraction of pure states having the same multipartite entanglement.

  6. Warm dense matter and Thomson scattering at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faeustlin, Roland Rainer

    2010-05-15

    X-ray free electron lasers are powerful tools to investigate moderately to strongly correlated solid density low temperature plasmas, named warm dense matter. These plasmas are of most interest for astrophysics and laser plasma interaction, particularly inertial confinement fusion. This work utilizes the ultrashort soft x-ray pulse duration and high brilliance of the free electron laser in Hamburg, FLASH, to generate warm dense matter and to study its ultrafast processes. The techniques applied are absorption measurement, emission spectroscopy and Thomson scattering. Radiative hydrodynamics and Thomson scattering simulations are used to investigate the impact of temperature and density gradients in the sample and to fit the experimental data. The measurements result in a comprehensive picture of soft x-ray matter interaction related to warm dense matter and yield insight into ultrafast equilibration and relaxation mechanisms, in particular impact ionization and radiative recombination. (orig.)

  7. Intense Ion Beam for Warm Dense Matter Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Joshua Eugene [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is exploring the physical limits of compression and focusing of ion beams for heating material to warm dense matter (WDM) and fusion ignition conditions. The NDCX is a beam transport experiment with several components at a scale comparable to an inertial fusion energy driver. The NDCX is an accelerator which consists of a low-emittance ion source, high-current injector, solenoid matching section, induction bunching module, beam neutralization section, and final focusing system. The principal objectives of the experiment are to control the beam envelope, demonstrate effective neutralization of the beam space-charge, control the velocity tilt on the beam, and understand defocusing effects, field imperfections, and limitations on peak intensity such as emittance and aberrations. Target heating experiments with space-charge dominated ion beams require simultaneous longitudinal bunching and transverse focusing. A four-solenoid lattice is used to tune the beam envelope to the necessary focusing conditions before entering the induction bunching module. The induction bunching module provides a head-to-tail velocity ramp necessary to achieve peak axial compression at the desired focal plane. Downstream of the induction gap a plasma column neutralizes the beam space charge so only emittance limits the focused beam intensity. We present results of beam transport through a solenoid matching section and simultaneous focusing of a singly charged K+ ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV. The results include a qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results after the solenoid matching section, which include time resolved current density, transverse distributions, and phase-space of the beam at different diagnostic planes. Electron cloud and gas measurements in the solenoid lattice and in the vicinity of intercepting diagnostics are also presented. Finally

  8. Collaborative Research: Neutrinos & Nucleosynthesis in Hot Dense Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Sanjay

    2013-09-06

    It is now firmly established that neutrinos, which are copiously produced in the hot and dense core of the supernova, play a role in the supernova explosion mechanism and in the synthesis of heavy elements through a phenomena known as r-process nucleosynthesis. They are also detectable in terrestrial neutrino experiments, and serve as a probe of the extreme environment and complex dynamics encountered in the supernova. The major goal of the UW research activity relevant to this project was to calculate the neutrino interaction rates in hot and dense matter of relevance to core collapse supernova. These serve as key input physics in large scale computer simulations of the supernova dynamics and nucleosynthesis being pursued at national laboratories here in the United States and by other groups in Europe and Japan. Our calculations show that neutrino production and scattering rate are altered by the nuclear interactions and that these modifications have important implications for nucleosynthesis and terrestrial neutrino detection. The calculation of neutrino rates in dense matter are difficult because nucleons in the dense matter are strongly coupled. A neutrino interacts with several nucleons and the quantum interference between scattering off different nucleons depends on the nature of correlations between them in dense matter. To describe these correlations we used analytic methods based on mean field theory and hydrodynamics, and computational methods such as Quantum Monte Carlo. We found that due to nuclear effects neutrino production rates at relevant temperatures are enhanced, and that electron neutrinos are more easily absorbed than anti-electron neutrinos in dense matter. The latter, was shown to favor synthesis of heavy neutron-rich elements in the supernova.

  9. Cloud photogrammetry with dense stereo for fisheye cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekmans, Christoph; Schneider, Johannes; Läbe, Thomas; Lennefer, Martin; Stachniss, Cyrill; Simmer, Clemens

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel approach for dense 3-D cloud reconstruction above an area of 10 × 10 km2 using two hemispheric sky imagers with fisheye lenses in a stereo setup. We examine an epipolar rectification model designed for fisheye cameras, which allows the use of efficient out-of-the-box dense matching algorithms designed for classical pinhole-type cameras to search for correspondence information at every pixel. The resulting dense point cloud allows to recover a detailed and more complete cloud morphology compared to previous approaches that employed sparse feature-based stereo or assumed geometric constraints on the cloud field. Our approach is very efficient and can be fully automated. From the obtained 3-D shapes, cloud dynamics, size, motion, type and spacing can be derived, and used for radiation closure under cloudy conditions, for example. Fisheye lenses follow a different projection function than classical pinhole-type cameras and provide a large field of view with a single image. However, the computation of dense 3-D information is more complicated and standard implementations for dense 3-D stereo reconstruction cannot be easily applied. Together with an appropriate camera calibration, which includes internal camera geometry, global position and orientation of the stereo camera pair, we use the correspondence information from the stereo matching for dense 3-D stereo reconstruction of clouds located around the cameras. We implement and evaluate the proposed approach using real world data and present two case studies. In the first case, we validate the quality and accuracy of the method by comparing the stereo reconstruction of a stratocumulus layer with reflectivity observations measured by a cloud radar and the cloud-base height estimated from a Lidar-ceilometer. The second case analyzes a rapid cumulus evolution in the presence of strong wind shear.

  10. Optimized design and research of secondary microprism for dense array concentrating photovoltaic module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanghui; Chen, Bingzhen; Liu, Youqiang; Guo, Limin; Yao, Shun; Wang, Zhiyong

    2015-10-01

    As the critical component of concentrating photovoltaic module, secondary concentrators can be effective in increasing the acceptance angle and incident light, as well as improving the energy uniformity of focal spots. This paper presents a design of transmission-type secondary microprism for dense array concentrating photovoltaic module. The 3-D model of this design is established by Solidworks and important parameters such as inclination angle and component height are optimized using Zemax. According to the design and simulation results, several secondary microprisms with different parameters are fabricated and tested in combination with Fresnel lens and multi-junction solar cell. The sun-simulator IV test results show that the combination has the highest output power when secondary microprism height is 5mm and top facet side length is 7mm. Compared with the case without secondary microprism, the output power can improve 11% after the employment of secondary microprisms, indicating the indispensability of secondary microprisms in concentrating photovoltaic module.

  11. Quantum Dense Coding in Multiparticle Entangled States via Local Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建兰; 匡乐满

    2004-01-01

    We study quantum dense coding between two arbitrarily fixed particles in a (N + 2)-particle maximally-entangled states through introducing an auxiliary qubit and carrying out local measurements. It is shown that the transmitted classical information amount through such an entangled quantum channel is usually less than two classical bits. However, the information amount may reach two classical bits of information, and the classical information capacity is independent of the number of the entangled particles under certain conditions. The results offer deeper insight into quantum dense coding via quantum channels of multi-particle entangled states.

  12. Time-dependent models of dense PDRs with complex molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Morata, O.; Herbst, E.

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of the chemistry of a dense photon-dominated region (PDR) using a time-dependent chemical model. Our major interest is to study the spatial distribution of complex molecules such as hydrocarbons and cyanopolyynes in the cool dense material bordering regions where star formation has taken place. Our standard model uses a homogeneous cloud of density 2x10e4 cm-3 and temperature T=40 K, which is irradiated by a far-ultraviolet radiation field of intermediate intensity, given b...

  13. Dense Subsemigroups of Matrix Semigroups and Semigroups of Linear Transformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yupaporn Kemprasit

    2002-01-01

    Let V be a vector space over a field F = (F, +, .), F* = F\\{0}, LF(V)the semigroup of all linear transformations of V into itself under composition, and Mn(F) the multiplicative full n × n matrix semigroup over F. In this paper, it is proved that the semigroup Mn(F) has a proper dense subsemigroup if and only if(F*, .) has an element of infinite order. Also, the semigroup LF(V) has a proper dense subsemigroup if and only if dimF V = ∞ or (F*, .) has an element of infinite order.

  14. In-plant evaluation of dense medium process performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.Q. Honaker; A. Patwardhan [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Department of Mining Engineering

    2006-07-15

    The separation density and process efficiency values achieved by dense medium processes are a function of the particle size fractions being treated, hydrodynamics of the separator, and medium rheology. An in-plant evaluation of the dense medium processes being used in an operating preparation plant was conducted in an effort to develop relationships between the actual separation density and the medium density and to quantify the separation efficiency values. The results were found to correlate well with current fundamental and operating principles governing the processes, which are reviewed and discussed.

  15. Solving Dense Generalized Eigenproblems on Multi-threaded Architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Aliaga, José I; Davidović, Davor; Di Napoli, Edoardo; Igual, Francisco D; Quintana-Ortí, Enrique S

    2011-01-01

    We compare two approaches to compute a portion of the spectrum of dense symmetric definite generalized eigenproblems: one is based on the reduction to tridiagonal form, and the other on the Krylov-subspace iteration. Two large-scale applications, arising in molecular dynamics and material science, are employed to investigate the contributions of the application, architecture, and parallelism of the method to the performance of the solvers. The experimental results on a state-of-the-art 8-core platform, equipped with a graphics processing unit (GPU), reveal that in real applications, iterative Krylov-subspace methods can be a competitive approach also for the solution of dense problems.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of electrons in dense gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Wade; Boyle, Greg; Cocks, Daniel; Buckman, Stephen; White, Ron

    2014-10-01

    We implement a Monte-Carlo simulation modelling the transport of electrons and positrons in dense gases and liquids, by using a dynamic structure factor that allows us to construct structure-modified effective cross sections. These account for the coherent effects caused by interactions with the relatively dense medium. The dynamic structure factor also allows us to model thermal gases in the same manner, without needing to directly sample the velocities of the neutral particles. We present the results of a series of Monte Carlo simulations that verify and apply this new technique, and make comparisons with macroscopic predictions and Boltzmann equation solutions. Financial support of the Australian Research Council.

  17. Interaction of ultrarelativistic electron and proton bunches with dense plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Rukhadze, A A

    2012-01-01

    Here we discuss the possibility of employment of ultrarelativistic electron and proton bunches for generation of high plasma wakefields in dense plasmas due to the Cherenkov resonance plasma-bunch interaction. We estimate the maximum amplitude of such a wake and minimum system length at which the maximum amplitude can be generated at the given bunch parameters.

  18. Dense Matter and Neutron Stars in Parity Doublet Models

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, S; Negreiros, R; Steinheimer, J

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the properties of dense matter and neutron stars. In particular we discuss model calculations based on the parity doublet picture of hadronic chiral symmetry. In this ansatz the onset of chiral symmetry restoration is reflected by the degeneracy of baryons and their parity partners. In this approach we also incorporate quarks as degrees of freedom to be able to study hybrid stars.

  19. Length scales and selforganization in dense suspension flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Düring, G.; Lerner, E.; Wyart, M.

    2014-01-01

    Dense non-Brownian suspension flows of hard particles display mystifying properties: As the jamming threshold is approached, the viscosity diverges, as well as a length scale that can be identified from velocity correlations. To unravel the microscopic mechanism governing dissipation and its

  20. Antiproton beam polarizer using a dense polarized target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan

    2011-05-01

    We describe considerations regarding the spin filtering method for the antiproton beam. The proposed investigation of the double polarization cross section for antiproton to nucleon interaction is outlined. It will use a single path of the antiproton beam through a dense polarized target, e.g. 3He or CH2, followed by a polarimeter.

  1. Comprehensive Studies of Ultrafast Laser Excited Warm Dense Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhijiang; Mo, Mianzhen; Russell, Brandon; Tsui, Ying; Wang, Xijie; Ng, Andrew; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2016-10-01

    Isochoric excitation of solids by ultrafast laser pulses is an important approach to generate warm dense matter in laboratory. Electrical conductivity, structural dynamics and lattice stabilities are the most important properties in ultrafast laser excited warm dense matter. To investigate these properties, we have developed multiple advanced capabilities at SLAC recently, including the measurement of semi-DC electrical conductivity with ultrafast THz radiation, the study of solid and liquid structural dynamics by ultrafast electron diffraction (UED), and the investigation of lattice stability using frequency domain interferometry (FDI) on both front and rear surfaces. Due to the non-reversible nature in exciting solid to warm dense matter, all these diagnostics are implemented with single-shot approaches, reducing the uncertainties due to shot-to-shot fluctuations. In this talk, we will introduce these novel capabilities and present some highlighted studies in warm dense gold, which was uniformly excited by ultrafast laser pulses at 400nm. We appreciate the supports from DOE FES under FWP #100182.

  2. Rapid haplotype reconstruction in predigrees with dense marker maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windig, J.J.; Meuwissen, T.H.E.

    2004-01-01

    Reconstruction of marker phases is not straightforward when parents are untyped. In these cases information from other relatives has to be used. In dense marker maps, however, the space of possible haplotype configurations tends to be too large for procedures such as Monte Carlo Markov chains (MCMC)

  3. Mechanics of dense suspensions in turbulent channel flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picano, F.; Costa, P.; Breugem, W.P.; Brandt, L.

    2015-01-01

    Dense suspensions are usually investigated in the laminar limit where inertial effects are insignificant. When the flow rate is high enough, i.e. at high Reynolds number, the flow may become turbulent and the interaction between solid and liquid phases modifies the turbulence we know in single-phase

  4. On discrete Zariski-dense subgroups of algebraic groups

    CERN Document Server

    Winkelmann, J

    1993-01-01

    We investigate for which linear-algebraic groups (over the complex numbers or any local field) there exists subgroups which are dense in the Zariski topology, but discrete in the Hausdorff topology. For instance, such subgroups exist for every non-solvable complex group.

  5. Tableaux for Logics of Subinterval Structures over Dense Orderings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresolin, Davide; Goranko, Valentin; Montanari, Angelo;

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we develop tableau-based decision procedures for the logics of subinterval structures over dense linear orderings. In particular, we consider the two difficult cases: the relation of strict subintervals (with both endpoints strictly inside the current interval) and the relation o...

  6. Gas-particle interactions in dense gas-fluidised beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of heterogeneous flow structures in gas-particle flows seriously affects gas¿solid contacting and transport processes in dense gas-fluidized beds. A computational study, using a discrete particle method based on Molecular Dynamics techniques, has been carried out to explore the

  7. Dense Focal Plane Arrays for Pushbroom Satellite Radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iupikov, O. A.; Ivashina, M. V.; Pontoppidan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a dense focal plane array feeding an offset toroidal reflector antenna system is studied and discussed in the context of a potential application in multi-beam radiometers for ocean surveillance. We present a preliminary design of the array feed for the 5-m diameter antenna at X...

  8. Manifestation of chiral symmetry restoration in a dense medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ericson, M; Delorme, J

    1999-01-01

    We generalize the concept of correlator mixing to the case of a dense baryonic medium. We study the subsequent modifications of the axial nucleonic coupling constant and the pion decay one. They arise from a two pion exchange current of a new type. We discuss the link to the condensate evolution.

  9. Numerical simulation of the fast dense gas Ludwieg tube experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamfirescu, C.; Guerdone, A.; Collona, P.

    2006-01-01

    The preliminary design of a Ludwieg tube experiment for the verification of the existence of nonclassical rarefaction shock waves in dense vapors is here critically analyzed by means of real gas numerical simulations of the experimental setup. The Flexible Asymmetric Shock Tube (FAST) setup is a den

  10. Dense Descriptors for Optical Flow Estimation: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Baghaie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the displacements of intensity patterns between sequential frames is a very well-studied problem, which is usually referred to as optical flow estimation. The first assumption among many of the methods in the field is the brightness constancy during movements of pixels between frames. This assumption is proven to be not true in general, and therefore, the use of photometric invariant constraints has been studied in the past. One other solution can be sought by use of structural descriptors rather than pixels for estimating the optical flow. Unlike sparse feature detection/description techniques and since the problem of optical flow estimation tries to find a dense flow field, a dense structural representation of individual pixels and their neighbors is computed and then used for matching and optical flow estimation. Here, a comparative study is carried out by extending the framework of SIFT-flow to include more dense descriptors, and comprehensive comparisons are given. Overall, the work can be considered as a baseline for stimulating more interest in the use of dense descriptors for optical flow estimation.

  11. Easy Fabrication of Dense Ceramic Membrane for Oxygen Separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A combined EDTA-citrate complexing method was developed for the easy preparation of mixed oxygen-ionic and electronic conducting dense ceramic membrane for oxygen separation.The new method takes the advantage of lower calcination temperature for phase formation, lower membrane sintering temperature and higher relative density over the standard ceramic method.

  12. Dry processing versus dense medium processing for preparing thermal coal

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Korte, GJ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available in the region. In addition to not requiring water, the technique is less expensive than dense medium processing - both in terms of capital cost and operating cost. An added benefit when preparing coal for use in power stations is the lower moisture content...

  13. A comparative study of fast dense stereo vision algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunyoto, H.; Mark, W. van der; Gavrila, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    With recent hardware advances, real-time dense stereo vision becomes increasingly feasible for general-purpose processors. This has important benefits for the intelligent vehicles domain, alleviating object segmentation problems when sensing complex, cluttered traffic scenes. In this paper, we prese

  14. Multi-channel Support for Dense Wireless Sensor Networking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durmaz, O.; Dulman, S.O.; Jansen, P.G.; Havinga, Paul J.M.; Havinga, P.J.M.; Lijding, M.E.M.; Meratnia, N.; Meratnia, Nirvana; Wegdam, M.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, most wireless sensor network applications assume the presence of single-channel Medium Access Control (MAC) protocols. When sensor nodes are densely deployed, single-channel MAC protocols may be inadequate due to the higher demand for the limited bandwidth. To overcome this drawback, we

  15. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  16. Cerebellar Granule Cells: Dense, Rich and Evolving Representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badura, Aleksandra; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2017-01-01

    For half a century it was assumed that granule cells use ultra-sparse encoding, but now in vivo calcium-imaging studies have shown that large ensembles of granule cells provide dense signals, which themselves evolve and adapt during training.

  17. Formation and liquid permeability of dense colloidal cube packings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castillo, Sonja I R; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M E; Philipse, Albert P.

    2015-01-01

    The liquid permeability of dense random packings of cubic colloids with rounded corners is studied for solid hematite cubes and hollow microporous silica cubes. The permeabilities of these two types of packings are similar, confirming that the micropores in the silica shell of the hollow cubes do

  18. Multi-scaling of the dense plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2015-03-01

    The dense plasma focus is a copious source of multi-radiations with many potential new applications of special interest such as in advanced SXR lithography, materials synthesizing and testing, medical isotopes and imaging. This paper reviews the series of numerical experiments conducted using the Lee model code to obtain the scaling laws of the multi-radiations.

  19. Long-term visual outcome of dense bilateral congenital cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE He-hua; DENG Da-ming; QIAN Yi-yong; LIN Zhi; CHEN Wei-rong

    2007-01-01

    Background Dense congenital cataracts often cause severe visual impairment. The results of long-term follow-up of dense bilateral congenital cataract in China have not been well documented. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term visual function in children who underwent cataract extraction for dense bilateral congenital cataract in southern part of China.Methods Medical records of children who underwent surgery of dense bilateral congenital cataract between January 1992 and December 2000 at Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center of Sun Yat-sen University were retroactively reviewed. In 38 children available for current follow-up, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and stereoscopic vision, as well as nystagmus, strabismus, and other complications, were evaluated. The mean follow-up period was 107.6 months (range 60 to 167 months).Results The mean age of cataract extraction and secondary intraocular lens implantation were 5.6 months (range 3 to 12 months) and 4.2 years (range 2.4 to 15 years), respectively. The mean BCVA was 0.25 in the better eye and 0.16 in the fellow eye. Stereoscopic vision was absent in all patients, and 3 children had simultaneous perception. Nystagmus was detected in all cases and strabismus in 35 cases. A high correlation was found between timing of cataract extraction and final BCVA of the better eye (r=-0.55, P=0.00). A statistically significant difference was found in BCVA between postand pre-treatment of amblyopia (t=5.65, P=0.00).Conclusions Long-term visual function in children with dense bilateral congenital cataract was poor when cataract surgery was performed at age of 3 months or later. Earlier cataract surgery with adequate optical rehabilitation contributed to better visual outcome.

  20. A nutrient-dense, high fiber, fruit-based supplement bar increases HDL, particularly large HDL, lowers homocysteine, and raises glutathione in a 2-week trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary intake modulates disease risk, but little is known as to how components within food mixtures affect pathophysiology. Here, a low-calorie, high-fiber, fruit-based nutrient-dense bar of defined composition (e.g., vitamins/minerals, fruit polyphenolics, B-glucan, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)) app...

  1. Development of a multi-fluid model for poly-disperse dense gas–solid fluidised beds, Part I: Model derivation and numerical implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sint Annaland, M.; Bokkers, G.A.; Goldschmidt, M.J.V.; Olaofe, O.O.; van der Hoef, Martin Anton; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    We have derived a new set of closure equations for the rheologic properties of a dense gas–solid fluidised bed consisting of a multi-component mixture of slightly inelastic spheres, using the Chapman–Enskog solution procedure of successive approximations, where the particle velocity distribution of

  2. Activation of human microglia by fibrillar prion protein-related peptides is enhanced by amyloid-associated factors SAP and C1q

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerhuis, R.; Boshuizen, R.S.; Morbin, M.; Mazzoleni, G.; Hoozemans, J.J.; Langedijk, J.P.; Tagliavini, F.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Eikelenboom, P.

    2005-01-01

    Complement activation products C1q and C3d, serum amyloid P component (SAP) and activated glial cells accumulate in amyloid deposits of conformationally changed prion protein (PrPSc) in Creutzfeldt¿Jakob disease, Gerstmann¿Sträussler¿Scheinker disease and scrapie-infected mouse brain. Biological pro

  3. Model studies of dense water overflows in the Faroese Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbertson, Alan; Davies, Peter; Stashchuk, Nataliya; Vlasenko, Vasiliy

    2014-01-01

    The overflow of dense water from the Nordic Seas through the Faroese Channel system was investigated through combined laboratory experiments and numerical simulations using the Massachusetts Institute of Technology General Circulation Model. In the experimental study, a scaled, topographic representation of the Faroe-Shetland Channel, Wyville-Thomson Basin and Ridge and Faroe Bank Channel seabed bathymetry was constructed and mounted in a rotating tank. A series of parametric experiments was conducted using dye-tracing and drogue-tracking techniques to investigate deep-water overflow pathways and circulation patterns within the modelled region. In addition, the structure of the outflowing dense bottom water was investigated through density profiling along three cross-channel transects located in the Wyville-Thomson Basin and the converging, up-sloping approach to the Faroe Bank Channel. Results from the dye-tracing studies demonstrate a range of parametric conditions under which dense water overflow across the Wyville-Thomson Ridge is shown to occur, as defined by the Burger number, a non-dimensional length ratio and a dimensionless dense water volume flux parameter specified at the Faroe-Shetland Channel inlet boundary. Drogue-tracking measurements reveal the complex nature of flow paths and circulations generated in the modelled topography, particularly the development of a large anti-cyclonic gyre in the Wyville-Thompson Basin and up-sloping approach to the Faroe Bank Channel, which diverts the dense water outflow from the Faroese shelf towards the Wyville-Thomson Ridge, potentially promoting dense water spillage across the ridge itself. The presence of this circulation is also indicated by associated undulations in density isopycnals across the Wyville-Thomson Basin. Numerical simulations of parametric test cases for the main outflow pathways and density structure in a similarly-scaled Faroese Channels model domain indicate excellent qualitative agreement with

  4. Chemical and Physical Characterization of Collapsing Low-mass Prestellar Dense Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincelin, U.; Commerçon, B.; Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Guilloteau, S.; Herbst, E.

    2016-05-01

    The first hydrostatic core, also called the first Larson core, is one of the first steps in low-mass star formation as predicted by theory. With recent and future high-performance telescopes, the details of these first phases are becoming accessible, and observations may confirm theory and even present new challenges for theoreticians. In this context, from a theoretical point of view, we study the chemical and physical evolution of the collapse of prestellar cores until the formation of the first Larson core, in order to better characterize this early phase in the star formation process. We couple a state-of-the-art hydrodynamical model with full gas-grain chemistry, using different assumptions for the magnetic field strength and orientation. We extract the different components of each collapsing core (i.e., the central core, the outflow, the disk, the pseudodisk, and the envelope) to highlight their specific physical and chemical characteristics. Each component often presents a specific physical history, as well as a specific chemical evolution. From some species, the components can clearly be differentiated. The different core models can also be chemically differentiated. Our simulation suggests that some chemical species act as tracers of the different components of a collapsing prestellar dense core, and as tracers of the magnetic field characteristics of the core. From this result, we pinpoint promising key chemical species to be observed.

  5. Progesterone and gravidity differentially regulate expression of extracellular matrix components in the pregnant rat myometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shynlova, Oksana; Mitchell, Jennifer A; Tsampalieros, Anne; Langille, B Lowell; Lye, Stephen J

    2004-04-01

    Myometrial growth and remodeling during pregnancy depends on increased synthesis of interstitial matrix proteins. We hypothesize that the presence of mechanical tension in a specific hormonal environment regulates the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components in the uterus. Myometrial tissue was collected from pregnant rats on Gestational Days 0, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21, 22, 23 (labor), and 1 day postpartum and ECM expression was analyzed by Northern blotting. Expression of fibronectin, laminin beta2, and collagen IV mRNA was low during early gestation but increased dramatically on Day 23 during labor. Expression of fibrillar collagens (type I and III) peaked Day 19 and decreased near term. In contrast, elastin mRNA remained elevated from midgestation onward. Injection of progesterone (P4) on Days 20-23 (to maintain elevated plasma P4 levels) delayed the onset of labor, caused dramatic reductions in the levels of fibronectin and laminin mRNA, and prevented the fall of collagen III mRNA levels on Day 23. Treatment of pregnant rats with the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486 on Day 19 induced preterm labor on Day 20 and a premature increase in mRNA levels of collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin. Analysis of the uterine tissue from unilaterally pregnant rats revealed that most of the changes in ECM gene expression occurred specifically in the gravid horn. Our results show a decrease in expression of fibrillar collagens and a coordinated temporal increase in expression of components of the basement membrane near term associated with decreased P4 and increased mechanical tension. These ECM changes contribute to myometrial growth and remodeling during late pregnancy and the preparation for the synchronized contractions of labor.

  6. Robotic Mapping and Localization with Real-Time Dense Stereo on Reconfigurable Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kalomiros

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A reconfigurable architecture for dense stereo is presented as an observation framework for a real-time implementation of the simultaneous localization and mapping problem in robotics. The reconfigurable sensor detects point features from stereo image pairs to use at the measurement update stage of the procedure. The main hardware blocks are a dense depth stereo accelerator, a left and right image corner detector, and a stage performing left-right consistency check. For the stereo-processor stage, we have implemented and tested a global-matching component based on a maximum-likelihood dynamic programming technique. The system includes a Nios II processor for data control and a USB 2.0 interface for host communication. Remote control is used to guide a vehicle equipped with a stereo head in an indoor environment. The FastSLAM Bayesian algorithm is applied in order to track and update observations and the robot path in real time. The system is assessed using real scene depth detection and public reference data sets. The paper also reports resource usage and a comparison of mapping and localization results with ground truth.

  7. Light transport in dense composite media: role of near-field coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani Naraghi, Roxana; Sukhov, Sergey; Sáenz, Juan José; Dogariu, Aristide

    In scattering media, optical waves comprise both homogeneous and evanescent components. At very high concentrations of scatterers, particles are located in close proximity and interact through evanescent near fields. Thus, in this regime the energy is not only carried by propagating waves but it also evolves through evanescent coupling between individual scatterers. We have shown that in dense composite media additional transmission channels open because of these near-field interactions between close proximity scatters and, consequently, a new regime of transport emerges. This is clearly beyond simple descriptions of scatterers acting independently of their environment and framed in terms of far-field characteristics such as Mie cross-sections. We will show that, because in the dense media the energy can transfer through both diffusion and evanescent channels, the total transmittance is T =TCS +TNF = 1 1 L (lCS* +lNF*) L (lCS* +lNF*) . Correcting the total transmission in this manner is appealing because it is done in terms of physically meaningful and measurable quantities such a near-field (NF) scattering cross-section σNF.

  8. Stability analysis of unbounded uniform dense granular shear flow based on a viscoplastic constitutive law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Yau; Lai, Jeng-You; Young, D. L.

    2010-11-01

    Asymptotic and transient stability analyses of unbounded uniform granular shear flow at high solids volume fractions were carried out in the paper, based on a model composed of the viscoplastic constitutive law [P. Jop, Y. Forterre, and O. Pouliquen, Nature (London) 441, 727 (2006)] and the dilatancy law [O. Pouliquen et al., J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2006) P07020]. We refer to this model as the VPDL (meaning of the "viscoplastic and dilatancy laws") thereinafter. In this model, dense granular flows were treated as a viscoplastic fluid with a Drucker-Prager-like yielding criterion. We compared our results to those obtained using the frictional-kinetic model (FKM) [M. Alam and P. R. Nott, J. Fluid Mech. 343, 267 (1997)]. Our main result is that unbounded uniform dense granular shear flows are always asymptotically stable at large time based on the VPDL model, at least for two-dimensional perturbations. This is valid for disturbances of layering modes (i.e., the perturbations whose wavenumber vectors are aligned along the transverse coordinate) as well as for nonlayering modes (the streamwise component of the wavenumber vector is nonzero). By contrast, layering modes can be unstable based on the FKM constitutive laws. Interestingly, in the framework of the VPDL, the analysis shows that significant transient growth may occur owing to the non-normality of the linear system, although disturbances eventually decay at large time.

  9. Equations of state and transport properties of warm dense beryllium: a quantum molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Long, Yao; Tian, Ming-Feng; He, Xian-Tu; Zhang, Ping

    2013-04-01

    We have calculated the equations of state, the viscosity and self-diffusion coefficients, and electronic transport coefficients of beryllium in the warm dense regime for densities from 4.0 to 6.0 g/cm(3) and temperatures from 1.0 to 10.0 eV by using quantum molecular dynamics simulations. The principal Hugoniot curve is in agreement with underground nuclear explosive and high-power laser experimental results up to ~20 Mbar. The calculated viscosity and self-diffusion coefficients are compared with the one-component plasma model, using effective charges given by the average-atom model. The Stokes-Einstein relationship, which connects viscosity and self-diffusion coefficients, is found to hold fairly well in the strong coupling regime. The Lorenz number, which is the ratio between thermal and electrical conductivities, is computed via Kubo-Greenwood formula and compared to the well-known Wiedemann-Franz law in the warm dense region.

  10. In Vitro Mineralization of an Osteoid-Like Dense Collagen Construct for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Benedetto

    The aim of this doctoral research was to design and evaluate strategies to rapidly achieve an acellular mineralization of an osteoid-like dense collagen gel for potential applications in bone regeneration. It was hypothesized that the collagen fibrillar density (CFD) affects the microenvironment and the physical properties of the framework of collagen gels. To test this hypothesis, and as a first objective, the mineralization of collagen gel sheets, rolls and strips with increasing CFDs was investigated in vitro in simulated body fluid (SBF). Collagen gels with physiologically relevant CFDs (14.1 wt%) led to greater extent of mineralization (12 dry wt% at day 14 in SBF), when compared to highly hydrated gels. Chemical characterization confirmed this mineral phase to be CHA, which significantly increased the gel apparent modulus and ultimate tensile strength (UTS). Surprisingly, CFD also affected the electrostatic properties of collagen gel, as investigated by quantifying the extent of anionic and cationic dyes bound to collagen gels with different CFDs. It was therefore proposed that the increase in gel CFD led to a more physiological microenvironment, resulting in a higher number of fibril-to-fibril contact points and an increase in charge concentration, which facilitated the mineral formation and validated the proposed osteoid model. As a second objective, the mineralization of dense collagen (DC) gels with physiologically relevant CFD (14.1 wt%) was enhanced and accelerated by mimicking the role of anionic non collagenous proteins (NCPs) in the native osteoid, which act as CHA nucleators. Two strategies were implemented: first, the influence of collagen fibrillization pH on the extent of DC gel mineralization was investigated. Since the collagen molecule is slightly positively charged at physiological pH (isoelectric point at pH 7.8), it was hypothesized that it would be more negatively charged if formed in an alkaline environment, i.e., above its isoelectric

  11. Phase matching alters spatial multiphoton processes in dense atomic ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Leszczyński, Adam; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton processes in dense atomic vapors such as four-wave mixing or coherent blue light generation are typically viewed from single-atom perspective. Here we study the surprisingly important effect of phase matching near two-photon resonances that arises due to spatial extent of the atomic medium within which the multiphoton process occurs. The non-unit refractive index of the atomic vapor may inhibit generation of light in nonlinear processes, significantly shift the efficiency maxima in frequencies and redirect emitted beam. We present these effects on an example of four-wave mixing in dense rubidium vapors in a double-ladder configuration. By deriving a simple theory that takes into account essential spatial properties of the process, we give precise predictions and confirm their validity in the experiment. The model allows us to improve on the geometry of the experiment and engineer more efficient four-wave mixing.

  12. Equilibration dynamics and conductivity of warm dense hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrau, U.; Sperling, P.; Becker, A.; Bornath, T.; Bredow, R.; Döppner, T.; Dziarzhytski, S.; Fennel, T.; Fletcher, L. B.; Förster, E.; Fortmann, C.; Glenzer, S. H.; Göde, S.; Gregori, G.; Harmand, M.; Hilbert, V.; Holst, B.; Laarmann, T.; Lee, H. J.; Ma, T.; Mithen, J. P.; Mitzner, R.; Murphy, C. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Neumayer, P.; Przystawik, A.; Roling, S.; Schulz, M.; Siemer, B.; Skruszewicz, S.; Tiggesbäumker, J.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; White, T.; Wöstmann, M.; Zacharias, H.; Redmer, R.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate subpicosecond dynamics of warm dense hydrogen at the XUV free-electron laser facility (FLASH) at DESY (Hamburg). Ultrafast impulsive electron heating is initiated by a ≤300-fs short x-ray burst of 92-eV photon energy. A second pulse probes the sample via x-ray scattering at jitter-free variable time delay. We show that the initial molecular structure dissociates within (0.9±0.2) ps, allowing us to infer the energy transfer rate between electrons and ions. We evaluate Saha and Thomas-Fermi ionization models in radiation hydrodynamics simulations, predicting plasma parameters that are subsequently used to calculate the static structure factor. A conductivity model for partially ionized plasma is validated by two-temperature density-functional theory coupled to molecular dynamic simulations and agrees with the experimental data. Our results provide important insights and the needed experimental data on transport properties of dense plasmas.

  13. Dense and diffuse gas in dynamically active clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Garrod, R T; Rawlings, J M C

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the chemical and observational implications of repetitive transient dense core formation in molecular clouds. We allow a transient density fluctuation to form and disperse over a period of 1 Myr, tracing its chemical evolution. We then allow the same gas immediately to undergo further such formation and dispersion cycles. The chemistry of the dense gas in subsequent cycles is similar to that of the first, and a limit cycle is reached quickly (2 - 3 cycles). Enhancement of hydrocarbon abundances during a specific period of evolution is the strongest indicator of previous dynamical history. The molecular content of the diffuse background gas in the molecular cloud is expected to be strongly enhanced by the core formation and dispersion process. Such enhancement may remain for as long as 0.5 Myr. The frequency of repetitive core formation should strongly determine the level of background molecular enhancement. We also convolve the emission from a synthesised dark cloud, comprised of ensembles of t...

  14. Multi-view Dense Match for Forest Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W.

    2014-11-01

    LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) is widely used in forestry applications to obtain information about tree density, composition, change, etc. An advantage of LIDAR is its ability to get this information in a 3D structure. However, the density of LIDAR data is low, the acquisition of LIDAR data is often very expensive, and it is difficult to be utilised in small areas. In this article we eavluate different methods by using multi-view to acquire high resolution images of the forest. Using the dense match method a dense point cloud can be generated. Our analysis shows that this method can provide a good alternative to using LIDAR in situations such as these.

  15. FABRICATION OF FINE GRAINED DENSE HAP THROUGH SLIP CASTING ROUTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOWA BEGAM

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to synthesize nano-grained Calcium Hydroxyapatite (HAp through slip casting technique. For this, hydroxyapatite powders were synthesized using two methods, wet chemical method and Ammoniacal method. The as-prepared powders and calcined powders were characterized using XRD, FTIR, to study the phases of the powders. The hydroxyapatite powder calcined at 1000°C for 2hr was used to prepare 50 vol% slurry using DN40 (sodium olyacrylate as dispersing agent. After slip casting, the green bodies were sintered at different temperatures, 1100, 1200, 1250 and 1300°C with 2hr soaking time. The sintered dense samples were characterized for physical and mechanical behavior.Dense HaP samples were obtained at 1250C.

  16. A review of flow modeling for dense medium cyclones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Narasimha; M.S. Brennan; P.N. Holtham [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India). R& amp; D Division

    2006-06-15

    A critical assessment is presented for the existing fluid flow models used for dense medium cyclones (DMCs) and hydrocyclones. As the present discussion indicates, the understanding of dense medium cyclone flow is still far from the complete. However, its similarity to the hydrocyclone provides a basis for improved understanding of fluid flow in DMCs. The complexity of fluid flow in DMCs is basically due to the existence of medium as well as the dominance of turbulent particle size and density effects on separation. Both the theoretical and experimental analysis is done with respect to two-phase motions and solid phase flow in hydrocyclones or DMCs. A detailed discussion is presented on the empirical, semiempirical, and the numerical models based upon both the vorticity-stream function approach and Navier-Stokes equations in their primitive variables and in cylindrical coordinates available in literature. The existing equations describing turbulence and multiphase flows in cyclone are also critically reviewed.

  17. Self-consistent proton crystallization in dense neutron star matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutschera, M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Wojcik, W. [Politechnika Krakowska, Cracow (Poland)

    1992-11-01

    We construct a solid-like variational wave functions for protons localized in dense neutron star matter. The localized protons are centered on the lattice sites and the neutron background is described by periodic Bloch wave functions. The self-consistent periodic structure arises due to a collective mean field. For low proton fraction the periodic potential is weak and the neutron Fermi surface is well approximated by a sphere. With the Skyrme forces we find that the proton solid is of lower energy than a uniform matter for densities above n{sub l} {approx} 4 n{sub 0}, where n{sub 0} = 0.17 fm{sup -3} is the nuclear saturation density. We discuss implications of the proton crystallization for properties of dense matter in neutron stars. (author). 7 refs, 8 figs.

  18. Ion-beam-driven warm dense matter experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, F. M.; Barnard, J. J.; Friedman, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Leitner, M. A.; Lidia, S.; Logan, B. G.; More, R. M.; Ni, P. A.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.

    2010-08-01

    As a technique for heating matter to high energy density, intense beams of heavy ions are capable of delivering precise and uniform beam energy deposition to a relatively large sample. The US heavy ion fusion science program has developed techniques for heating and diagnosing warm dense matter (WDM) targets. We have developed a WDM target chamber and a suite of target diagnostics including a fast multi-channel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. Initial WDM experiments heat targets by both the compressed and uncompressed parts of the NDCX-I beam, and explore measurement of temperature, droplet formation and other target parameters. Continued improvements in beam tuning, bunch compression, and other upgrades are expected to yield higher temperature and pressure in the WDM targets. Future experiments are planned in areas such as dense electronegative targets, porous target homogenization and two-phase equation of state.

  19. The equilibrium of dense plasma in a gravity field

    CERN Document Server

    Vasilev, B V

    2000-01-01

    The equilibrium of dense plasma in a gravity field and problem of a gravity-induced electric polarization in this matter are discussed. The calculation for metals performed before shows that both - the gravity-induced compressive strain and the gravity-induced electric field - are inversely proportional to their Young moduli. The calculation for high dense plasma, where Young modulus is equal to zero, shows that there is another effect: each cell of this plasma inside a celestial body in own gravity field obtains the small positive electric charge. It happens as heavy ions sag on to light electron clouds. A celestial body stays electrically neutral as a whole, because the negative electric charge concentrates on its surface. The gravity-induced positive volume charge is very small, its order of magnitude equals to $10^{-18}e$ per atom only. But it is sufficient for the complete conterbalancing of the gravity force.

  20. Ultrasfast Dynamics in Dense Hydrogen Explored at Flash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, V; Zastrau, U; Neumayer, P; Hochhaus, D; Toleikis, S; Harmand, M; Przystawik, A; Tschentscher, T; Glenzer, S H; Doeppner, T; Fortmann, C; White, T; Gregori, G; Gode, S; Tiggesbaumker, J; Skruszewicz, S; Meiwes-Broer, K H; Sperling, P; Redmer, R; Forster, E

    2011-08-01

    The short pulse duration and high intensity of the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) allows us to generate and probe homogeneous warm dense non-equilibrium hydrogen within a single extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light pulse. By analyzing the spectrum of the 13.5 nm Thomson scattered light we determine the plasma temperature and density. We find that classical models of this interaction are in good agreement with our dense plasma conditions. In a FEL-pump FEL-probe experiment droplets of liquid hydrogen and their scattering behavior for different pump-probe setups were observed under 20{sup o} and 90{sup o}. We find that the scattering behavior of the scattered intensity depends on the scattering angle.

  1. Discerning the Form of the Dense Core Mass Function

    CERN Document Server

    Swift, Jonathan J

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the ability to discern between lognormal and powerlaw forms for the observed mass function of dense cores in star forming regions. After testing our fitting, goodness-of-fit, and model selection procedures on simulated data, we apply our analysis to 14 datasets from the literature. Whether the core mass function has a powerlaw tail or whether it follows a pure lognormal form cannot be distinguished from current data. From our simulations it is estimated that datasets from uniform surveys containing more than approximately 500 cores with a completeness limit below the peak of the mass distribution are needed to definitively discern between these two functional forms. We also conclude that the width of the core mass function may be more reliably estimated than the powerlaw index of the high mass tail and that the width may also be a more useful parameter in comparing with the stellar initial mass function to deduce the statistical evolution of dense cores into stars.

  2. Diagnosis of Choroidal Melanoma in Dense Asteroid Hyalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motiani, Meghna V; McCannel, Colin A; Almanzor, Robert; McCannel, Tara A

    2017-01-01

    To demonstrate the utility of Optos ultra-wide field imaging in the diagnosis and management of choroidal melanoma in the setting of asteroid hyalosis. Observational case report. A 52-year-old female was referred for evaluation of floaters, photopsias, and blurry vision in the right eye. Clinical examination revealed dense asteroid hyalosis obscuring the fundus, and a limited view of a pigmented choroidal lesion in the nasal periphery. Optos ultra-wide field fluorescein angiography and ultrasonography facilitated the diagnosis of a choroidal melanoma. The patient underwent Iodine-125 brachytherapy for local tumor control and excellent tumor response was confirmed with serial follow-up Optos imaging and ultrasonography. Ultra-wide field fundus fluorescein angiography facilitated the diagnosis of a choroidal melanoma, which was obscured by dense asteroid hyalosis, allowing for local tumor control with brachytherapy. Optos wide-field imaging may be a valuable tool for detecting potentially life-threatening lesions in the setting of asteroid hyalosis.

  3. Efficient Decomposition of Dense Matrices over GF(2)

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, Martin R

    2010-01-01

    In this work we describe an efficient implementation of a hierarchy of algorithms for the decomposition of dense matrices over the field with two elements (GF(2)). Matrix decomposition is an essential building block for solving dense systems of linear and non-linear equations and thus much research has been devoted to improve the asymptotic complexity of such algorithms. In this work we discuss an implementation of both well-known and improved algorithms in the M4RI library. The focus of our discussion is on a new variant of the M4RI algorithm - denoted MMPF in this work -- which allows for considerable performance gains in practice when compared to the previously fastest implementation. We provide performance figures on x86_64 CPUs to demonstrate the viability of our approach.

  4. A look at scalable dense linear algebra libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J.J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Van de Geijn, R.A. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Computer Sciences; Walker, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-08-01

    We discuss the essential design features of a library of scalable software for performing dense linear algebra computations on distributed memory concurrent computers. The square block scattered decomposition is proposed as a flexible and general-purpose way of decomposing most, if not all, dense matrix problems. An object- oriented interface to the library permits more portable applications to be written, and is easy to learn and use, since details of the parallel implementation are hidden from the user. Experiments on the Intel Touchstone Delta system with a prototype code that uses the square block scattered decomposition to perform LU factorization are presented and analyzed. It was found that the code was both scalable and efficient, performing at about 14 GFLOPS (double precision) for the largest problem considered.

  5. A look at scalable dense linear algebra libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J.J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States) Dept. of Computer Science Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); van de Geijn, R. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Computer Sciences); Walker, D.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-07-01

    We discuss the essential design features of a library of scalable software for performing dense linear algebra computations on distributed memory concurrent computers. The square block scattered decomposition is proposed as a flexible and general-purpose way of decomposing most, if not all, dense matrix problems. An object- oriented interface to the library permits more portable applications to be written, and is easy to learn and use, since details of the parallel implementation are hidden from the user. Experiments on the Intel Touchstone Delta system with a prototype code that uses the square block scattered decomposition to perform LU factorization are presented and analyzed. It was found that the code was both scalable and efficient, performing at about 14 Gflop/s (double precision) for the largest problem considered.

  6. A look at scalable dense linear algebra libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J.J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Van de Geijn, R.A. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Computer Sciences); Walker, D.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the essential design features of a library of scalable software for performing dense linear algebra computations on distributed memory concurrent computers. The square block scattered decomposition is proposed as a flexible and general-purpose way of decomposing most, if not all, dense matrix problems. An object- oriented interface to the library permits more portable applications to be written, and is easy to learn and use, since details of the parallel implementation are hidden from the user. Experiments on the Intel Touchstone Delta system with a prototype code that uses the square block scattered decomposition to perform LU factorization are presented and analyzed. It was found that the code was both scalable and efficient, performing at about 14 GFLOPS (double precision) for the largest problem considered.

  7. Collective waves in dense and confined microfluidic droplet arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Ulf D.; Fleury, Jean-Baptiste; Seemann, Ralf; Gompper, Gerhard

    Excitation mechanisms for collective waves in confined dense one-dimensional microfluidic droplet arrays are investigated by experiments and computer simulations. We demonstrate that distinct modes can be excited by creating specific `defect' patterns in flowing droplet trains. Excited longitudinal modes exhibit a short-lived cascade of pairs of laterally displacing droplets. Transversely excited modes obey the dispersion relation of microfluidic phonons and induce a coupling between longitudinal and transverse modes, whose origin is the hydrodynamic interaction of the droplets with the confining walls. Moreover, we investigate the long-time behaviour of the oscillations and discuss possible mechanisms for the onset of instabilities. Our findings demonstrate that the collective dynamics of microfluidic droplet ensembles can be studied particularly well in dense and confined systems. Experimentally, the ability to control microfluidic droplets may allow to modulate the refractive index of optofluidic crystals which is a promising approach for the production of dynamically programmable metamaterials.

  8. Propagation of Light in a Hot and Dense Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Masood, Samina

    2016-01-01

    Photons, as quanta of electromagnetic fields, determine the electromagnetic properties of an extremely hot and dense medium. Considering the properties of photons in the interacting medium of charged particles, we explicitly calculate the electromagnetic properties such as the electric permittivity, magnetic permeability, refractive index and the propagation speed of electromagnetic signals in extremely hot and dense background in cosmos. Photons acquire dynamically generated mass in a medium. The screening mass of photon, Debye shielding length and the plasma frequency are calculated as functions of statistical parameters of the medium. We study the properties of the propagating particles in astrophysical systems of distinct statistical conditions. The modifications in the medium properties lead to the equation of state of the system. We mainly calculate all these parameters for extremely high temperatures of the early universe.

  9. The electron-atom interaction in partially ionized dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omarbakiyeva, Yu A; Ramazanov, T S; Roepke, G [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: yultuz@physics.kz

    2009-05-29

    The electron-atom interaction is considered in dense partially ionized plasmas. The separable potential is constructed from scattering data using effective radius theory. Parameters of the interaction potential were obtained from phase shifts, scattering length and effective radius. The binding energy of the electron in the H{sup -} ion is determined for the singlet channel on the basis of the reconstructed separable potential. In dense plasmas, the influence of the Pauli exclusion principle on the phase shifts and the binding energy is considered. Due to the Pauli blocking, the binding energy vanishes at the Mott density. At that density the behavior of the phase shifts is drastically changed. This leads to modifications of macroscopic properties such as composition and transport coefficients.

  10. Dense graphlet statistics of protein interaction and random networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, R; Hormozdiari, F; Moser, F; Schönhuth, A; Holman, J; Ester, M; Sahinalp, S C

    2009-01-01

    Understanding evolutionary dynamics from a systemic point of view crucially depends on knowledge about how evolution affects size and structure of the organisms' functional building blocks (modules). It has been recently reported that statistics over sparse PPI graphlets can robustly monitor such evolutionary changes. However, there is abundant evidence that in PPI networks modules can be identified with highly interconnected (dense) and/or bipartite subgraphs. We count such dense graphlets in PPI networks by employing recently developed search strategies that render related inference problems tractable. We demonstrate that corresponding counting statistics differ significantly between prokaryotes and eukaryotes as well as between "real" PPI networks and scale free network emulators. We also prove that another class of emulators, the low-dimensional geometric random graphs (GRGs) cannot contain a specific type of motifs, complete bipartite graphs, which are abundant in PPI networks.

  11. Magnetoacoustic solitons in dense astrophysical electron-positron-ion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.; Mushtaq, A.

    2013-08-01

    Nonlinear magnetoacoustic waves in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas are investigated by using three fluid quantum magnetohydrodynamic model. The quantum mechanical effects of electrons and positrons are taken into account due to their Fermionic nature (to obey Fermi statistics) and quantum diffraction effects (Bohm diffusion term) in the model. The reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for low amplitude magnetoacoustic soliton in dense electron-positron-ion plasmas. It is found that positron concentration has significant impact on the phase velocity of magnetoacoustic wave and on the formation of single pulse nonlinear structure. The numerical results are also illustrated by taking into account the plasma parameters of the outside layers of white dwarfs and neutron stars/pulsars.

  12. Phase matching alters spatial multiphoton processes in dense atomic ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczyński, Adam; Parniak, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2017-01-09

    Multiphoton processes in dense atomic vapors such as four-wave mixing or coherent blue light generation are typically viewed from single-atom perspective. Here we study the surprisingly important effect of phase matching near two-photon resonances that arises due to spatial extent of the atomic medium within which the multiphoton process occurs. The non-unit refractive index of the atomic vapor may inhibit generation of light in nonlinear processes, significantly shift the efficiency maxima in frequencies and redirect emitted beam. We present these effects on an example of four-wave mixing in dense rubidium vapors in a double-ladder configuration. By deriving a simple theory that takes into account essential spatial properties of the process, we give precise predictions and confirm their validity in the experiment. The model allows us to improve on the geometry of the experiment and engineer more efficient four-wave mixing.

  13. Distributed Wi-Fi Interference Coordination for Dense Deployments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abinader, Fuad; Choudhury, Sayantan; Souza Jr., Vicente A.

    2017-01-01

    with proper OBSS interference coordination. We propose a novel distributed interference coordination scheme for Wi-Fi scheduled mode operation, and evaluate it through system level simulations. Results indicate that the proposed scheme provides significant improvements over Enhanced Distributed Channel Access......Unlicensed spectrum is increasingly being used by mobile operators to meet the mobile traffic demand, and Wi-Fi is foreseen as one of the technologies for implementing mobile traffic offloading. However, Wi-Fi efficiency does not scale well as node density increases, and IEEE 802.11ax Task Group...... (TGax) was created in 2014 for developing WiFi technology enhancements in dense deployments. This paper investigates Wi-Fi performance in the presence of Overlapping Basic Subscriber Set (OBSS) Wi-Fi networks in indoor dense deployments. We observe that Wi-Fi could benefit from scheduled operation...

  14. Dense gas in high-latitude molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reach, William T.; Pound, Marc W.; Wilner, David J.; Lee, Youngung

    1995-01-01

    The nearby molecular clouds MBM 7, 12, 30, 32, 40, 41, and 55 were surveyed for tracers of dense gas, including the (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) rotational lines of CS and the (1-0) lines of HCO(+) and HCN. MBM 7 and MBM 12 contain dense cores, while the other clouds contain little or no traces of dense gas. Comparison of the emission from dense gas tracers to that of (13)CO reveals that the former are more compact in angular size as well as line width. An extensive CS(2-1) survey of part of MBM 12 reveals that the emission is characterized by clumps on approximately 3 min scales as well as extended emission. Observations of the CS(1-0) and (3-2) lines using telescopes with matched beam sizes reveal that the volume density must be at least approximately 10(exp 4.5)/cc within the (3-2) emitting regions, which are approximately 0.03 pc in radius. Electron excitation of the CS rotational levels is ruled out (in the cores) by comparing the (3-2)/(1-0) line ratios with models including H2 and electron collisions. The volume density in the cores is substantially larger than in the portions of the cloud traced by CO emission. The density increases into the cores as r(exp -2), suggesting dynamical collapse. The masses of the cores are close to the virial mass, suggesting they are dynamically bound. The cores in MBM 7 and MBM 12 are thus likely to form stars; they are the nearest sites of star formation.

  15. Simulation of radiowave propagation in a dense urban environment

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Chris V.

    2007-01-01

    One objective of this thesis was to investigate the effect of details, such as the windows of high-rise buildings, on the radiowave propagation in the dense urban environment through modeling and simulations. If adding windows does not significantly change the signal distribution on average, it may not be necessary to build such a detailed model. Simulations are performed using several levels of detail and the results compared to estimate the impact of the fine details on the signal level...

  16. Phases of Dense Matter in Supernovae and Neutron Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申虹; 王延楠

    2012-01-01

    We study the properties of dense matter at finite temperature with various proton fractions for use in supernova simulations. The relativistic mean-field theory is used to describe homogeneous nuclear matter, while the Thomas-Fermi approximation is adopted to describe inhomogeneous matter. We also discuss the equation of state of neutron star matter at zero temperature in a wide density range. The equation of state at high densities can be significantly softened by the inclusion of hyperons.

  17. Microscopic Lensing by a Dense, Cold Atomic Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Roof, Stetson; Havey, Mark; Sokolov, I M; Kupriyanov, D V

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that a cold, dense sample of 87Rb atoms can exhibit a micron-scale lensing effect, much like that associated with a macroscopically-sized lens. The experiment is carried out in the fashion of traditional z-scan measurements but in much weaker fields and where close attention is paid to the detuning dependence of the transmitted light. The results are interpreted using numerical simulations and by modeling the sample as a thin lens with a spherical focal length.

  18. Memory-efficient analysis of dense functional connectomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Loewe

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The functioning of the human brain relies on the interplay and integration of numerous individual units within a complex network. To identify network configurations characteristic of specific cognitive tasks or mental illnesses, functional connectomes can be constructed based on the assessment of synchronous fMRI activity at separate brain sites, and then analyzed using graph-theoretical concepts. In most previous studies, relatively coarse parcellations of the brain were used to define regions as graphical nodes. Such parcellated connectomes are highly dependent on parcellation quality because regional and functional boundaries need to be relatively consistent for the results to be interpretable. In contrast, dense connectomes are not subject to this limitation, since the parcellation inherent to the data is used to define graphical nodes, also allowing for a more detailed spatial mapping of connectivity patterns. However, dense connectomes are associated with considerable computational demands in terms of both time and memory requirements. The memory required to explicitly store dense connectomes in main memory can render their analysis infeasible, especially when considering high-resolution data or analyses across multiple subjects or conditions. Here, we present an object-based matrix representation that achieves a very low memory footprint by computing matrix elements on demand instead of explicitly storing them. In doing so, memory required for a dense connectome is reduced to the amount needed to store the underlying time series data. Based on theoretical considerations and benchmarks, different matrix object implementations and additional programs (based on available Matlab functions and Matlab-based third-party software are compared with regard to their computational efficiency in terms of memory requirements and computation time. The matrix implementation based on on-demand computations has very low memory requirements thus enabling

  19. Topical Collaboration "Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense Matter"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allahverdi, Rouzbeh [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-18

    This is the final technical report describing contributions from the University of New Mexico to Topical Collaboration on "Neutrinos and Nucleosynthesis in Hot and Dense Matter" in the period June 2010 through May 2015. During the funding period, the University of New Mexico successfully hired Huaiyu Duan as a new faculty member with the support from DOE, who has contributed to the Topical Collaboration through his research and collaborations.

  20. Recent progress on dense nuclear matter in skyrmion approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, YongLiang; Rho, Mannque

    2017-03-01

    The Skyrme model provides a novel unified approach to nuclear physics. In this approach, single baryon, baryonic matter and medium-modified hadron properties are treated on the same footing. Intrinsic density dependence (IDD) reflecting the change of vacuum by compressed baryonic matter figures naturally in the approach. In this article, we review the recent progress on accessing dense nuclear matter by putting baryons treated as solitons, namely, skyrmions, on crystal lattice with accents on the implications in compact stars.

  1. Non-dense domain operator matrices and Cauchy problems

    CERN Document Server

    Lalaoui Rhali, S

    2002-01-01

    In this work, we study Cauchy problems with non-dense domain operator matrices. By assuming that the entries of an unbounded operator matrix are Hille-Yosida operators, we give a necessary and sufficient condition ensuring that the part of this operator matrix generates a semigroup in the closure of its domain. This allows us to prove the well-posedness of the corresponding Cauchy problem. Our results are applied to delay and neutral differential equations.

  2. Composition and thermodynamic properties of dense alkali metal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabdullin, M.T. [NNLOT, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 al-Farabi Str., Almaty 050035 (Kazakhstan); Ramazanov, T.S.; Dzhumagulova, K.N. [IETP, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 al-Farabi Str., Almaty 050035 (Kazakhstan)

    2012-04-15

    In this work composition and thermodynamic properties of dense alkali metal plasmas (Li, Na) were investigated. Composition was derived by solving the Saha equations with corrections due to nonideality. The lowering of the ionization potentials was calculated on the basis of pseudopotentials by taking screening and quantum effects into account (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Structures of Strong Shock Waves in Dense Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhong-He; HE Yong; HU Xi-Wei; LV Jian-Hong; HU Ye-Min

    2007-01-01

    @@ Structures of strong shock waves in dense plasmas are investigated via the steady-state Navier-Stokes equations and Poisson equation. The structures from fluid simulation agree with the ones from kinetic simulation. The effects of the transport coefficients on the structures are analysed. The enhancements of the electronic heat conduction and ionic viscosity both will broaden the width of the shock fronts, and decrease the electric fields in the fronts.

  4. The EOS and neutrino interactions in dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, M.; Reddy, S. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The deleptonization and cooling times of a newly born neutron star depend on the equation of state (EOS) and neutrino opacities in dense matter. Through model calculations we show that effects of Pauli blocking and many-body correlations due to strong interactions reduce both the neutral and charged current neutrino cross sections by large factors compared to the case in which these effects are ignored. (orig.)

  5. Superconductivity in dense MgB2 wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, P C; Finnemore, D K; Bud'ko, S L; Ostenson, J E; Lapertot, G; Cunningham, C E; Petrovic, C

    2001-03-12

    MgB2 becomes superconducting just below 40 K. Whereas porous polycrystalline samples of MgB2 can be synthesized from boron powders, in this Letter we demonstrate that dense wires of MgB2 can be prepared by exposing boron filaments to Mg vapor. The resulting wires have a diameter of 160 microm, are better than 80% dense, and manifest the full chi = -1/4pi shielding in the superconducting state. Temperature-dependent resistivity measurements indicate that MgB2 is a highly conducting metal in the normal state with rho(40 K) = 0.38 microOmega cm. By using this value, an electronic mean-free path, l approximately 600 A can be estimated, indicating that MgB2 wires are well within the clean limit. Tc, Hc2(T), and Jc data indicate that MgB2 manifests comparable or better superconducting properties in dense wire form than it manifests as a sintered pellet.

  6. Rheology of dense suspensions of non colloidal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzelli, Élisabeth

    2017-06-01

    Dense suspensions are materials with broad applications both in industrial processes (e.g. waste disposal, concrete, drilling muds, metalworking chip transport, and food processing) and in natural phenomena (e.g. flows of slurries, debris, and lava). Despite its long research history and its practical relevance, the mechanics of dense suspensions remain poorly understood. The major difficulty is that the grains interact both by hydrodynamic interactions through the liquid and by mechanical contact. These systems thus belong to an intermediate regime between pure suspensions and granular flows. We show that we can unify suspension and granular rheology under a common framework by transferring the frictional approach of dry granular media to wet suspensions of spherical particles. We also discuss non-Newtonian behavior such as normal-stress differences and shear-induced migration. Beyond the classical problem of dense suspension of hard spheres which is far from being completely resolved, there are also entirely novel avenues of study concerning more complex mixtures of particles and fluids such as those involving other types of particles (e.g. fibers) or non-Newtonian fluids that we will also address.

  7. Rheology of dense suspensions of non colloidal particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guazzelli Élisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dense suspensions are materials with broad applications both in industrial processes (e.g. waste disposal, concrete, drilling muds, metalworking chip transport, and food processing and in natural phenomena (e.g. flows of slurries, debris, and lava. Despite its long research history and its practical relevance, the mechanics of dense suspensions remain poorly understood. The major difficulty is that the grains interact both by hydrodynamic interactions through the liquid and by mechanical contact. These systems thus belong to an intermediate regime between pure suspensions and granular flows. We show that we can unify suspension and granular rheology under a common framework by transferring the frictional approach of dry granular media to wet suspensions of spherical particles. We also discuss non-Newtonian behavior such as normal-stress differences and shear-induced migration. Beyond the classical problem of dense suspension of hard spheres which is far from being completely resolved, there are also entirely novel avenues of study concerning more complex mixtures of particles and fluids such as those involving other types of particles (e.g. fibers or non-Newtonian fluids that we will also address.

  8. Connectivity of Confined Dense Networks: Boundary Effects and Scaling Laws

    CERN Document Server

    Coon, Justin P; Georgiou, Orestis

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the probability that a dense network confined within a given geometry is fully connected. We employ a cluster expansion approach often used in statistical physics to analyze the effects that the boundaries of the geometry have on connectivity. To maximize practicality and applicability, we adopt four important point-to-point link models based on outage probability in our analysis: single-input single-output (SISO), single-input multiple-output (SIMO), multiple-input single-output (MISO), and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO). Furthermore, we derive diversity and power scaling laws that dictate how boundary effects can be mitigated (to leading order) in confined dense networks for each of these models. Finally, in order to demonstrate the versatility of our theory, we analyze boundary effects for dense networks comprising MIMO point-to-point links confined within a right prism, a polyhedron that accurately models many geometries that can be found in practice. We provide numerical re...

  9. Accurate segmentation of dense nanoparticles by partially discrete electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelandts, T., E-mail: tom.roelandts@ua.ac.be [IBBT-Vision Lab University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Batenburg, K.J. [IBBT-Vision Lab University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica, Science Park 123, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Biermans, E. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Kuebel, C. [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bals, S. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Sijbers, J. [IBBT-Vision Lab University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2012-03-15

    Accurate segmentation of nanoparticles within various matrix materials is a difficult problem in electron tomography. Due to artifacts related to image series acquisition and reconstruction, global thresholding of reconstructions computed by established algorithms, such as weighted backprojection or SIRT, may result in unreliable and subjective segmentations. In this paper, we introduce the Partially Discrete Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (PDART) for computing accurate segmentations of dense nanoparticles of constant composition. The particles are segmented directly by the reconstruction algorithm, while the surrounding regions are reconstructed using continuously varying gray levels. As no properties are assumed for the other compositions of the sample, the technique can be applied to any sample where dense nanoparticles must be segmented, regardless of the surrounding compositions. For both experimental and simulated data, it is shown that PDART yields significantly more accurate segmentations than those obtained by optimal global thresholding of the SIRT reconstruction. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a novel reconstruction method for partially discrete electron tomography. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It accurately segments dense nanoparticles directly during reconstruction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gray level to use for the nanoparticles is determined objectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method expands the set of samples for which discrete tomography can be applied.

  10. Enhanced Productivity of Chemical Processes Using Dense Fluidized Beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibashis Banerjee; Alvin Chen; Rutton Patel; Dale Snider; Ken Williams; Timothy O' Hern; Paul Tortora

    2008-02-29

    The work detailed in this report addresses Enabling Technologies within Computational Technology by integrating a “breakthrough” particle-fluid computational technology into traditional Process Science and Engineering Technology. The work completed under this DOE project addresses five major development areas 1) gas chemistry in dense fluidized beds 2) thermal cracking of liquid film on solids producing gas products 3) liquid injection in a fluidized bed with particle-to-particle liquid film transport 4) solid-gas chemistry and 5) first level validation of models. Because of the nature of the research using tightly coupled solids and fluid phases with a Lagrangian description of the solids and continuum description of fluid, the work provides ground-breaking advances in reactor prediction capability. This capability has been tested against experimental data where available. The commercial product arising out of this work is called Barracuda and is suitable for a wide (dense-to-dilute) range of industrial scale gas-solid flows with and without reactions. Commercial applications include dense gas-solid beds, gasifiers, riser reactors and cyclones.

  11. High accuracy and visibility-consistent dense multiview stereo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Hoang-Hiep; Labatut, Patrick; Pons, Jean-Philippe; Keriven, Renaud

    2012-05-01

    Since the initial comparison of Seitz et al., the accuracy of dense multiview stereovision methods has been increasing steadily. A number of limitations, however, make most of these methods not suitable to outdoor scenes taken under uncontrolled imaging conditions. The present work consists of a complete dense multiview stereo pipeline which circumvents these limitations, being able to handle large-scale scenes without sacrificing accuracy. Highly detailed reconstructions are produced within very reasonable time thanks to two key stages in our pipeline: a minimum s-t cut optimization over an adaptive domain that robustly and efficiently filters a quasidense point cloud from outliers and reconstructs an initial surface by integrating visibility constraints, followed by a mesh-based variational refinement that captures small details, smartly handling photo-consistency, regularization, and adaptive resolution. The pipeline has been tested over a wide range of scenes: from classic compact objects taken in a laboratory setting, to outdoor architectural scenes, landscapes, and cultural heritage sites. The accuracy of its reconstructions has also been measured on the dense multiview benchmark proposed by Strecha et al., showing the results to compare more than favorably with the current state-of-the-art methods.

  12. The Dense Gas in the Central Kiloparsec of NGC 6946

    CERN Document Server

    Levine, E S; Meijerink, R; Blitz, Leo

    2007-01-01

    We present observations of the HCN and HCO+ J=1-0 transitions in the center of the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 6946 made with the BIMA and CARMA interferometers. Using the BIMA SONG CO map, we investigate the change in the I_HCN/I_CO and I_ HCO/I_CO integrated intensity ratios as a function of radius in the central kiloparsec of the galaxy, and find that they are strongly concentrated at the center. We use the 2MASS K_S band image to find the stellar surface density, and then construct a map of the hydrostatic midplane pressure. We apply a PDR model to the observed I_HCN/I_HCO+ integrated intensity ratio to calculate the number density of molecular hydrogen in the dense gas tracer emitting region, and find that it is roughly constant at 10^5 cm^-3 across our map. We explore two hypotheses for the distribution of the dense gas. If the HCN and HCO+ emission comes from self-gravitating density peaks inside of a less dense gas distribution, there is a linear proportionality between the internal velocity dispersion o...

  13. Gas dynamics in Massive Dense Cores in Cygnus-X

    CERN Document Server

    Csengeri, T; Schneider, N; Motte, F; Dib, S

    2010-01-01

    We study the kinematic properties of dense gas surrounding massive protostars recognized by Bontemps et a. (2010) in a sample of five Massive Dense Cores in Cygnus-X. We investigate whether turbulent support plays a major role in stabilizing the core against fragmentation into Jeans-mass objects or alternatively, the observed kinematics could indicate a high level of dynamics. We present IRAM 30m single-dish (HCO+ and H13CO+) and IRAM PdBI high angular-resolution observations of dense gas tracers (H13CO+ and H13CN) to reveal the kinematics of molecular gas at scales from 0.03 to 0.1 pc. Radiative transfer modeling shows that H13CO+ is depleted within the envelopes of massive protostars and traces the bulk of material surrounding the protostars rather than their inner envelopes. H13CN shows a better correspondence with the peak of the continuum emission, possibly due to abundance anomalies and specific chemistry in the close vicinity of massive protostars. Analyzing the line-widths we show that the observed li...

  14. Dense Cloud Formation and Star Formation in a Barred Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Nimori, M; Sorai, K; Watanabe, Y; Hirota, A; Namekata, D

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the properties of massive, dense clouds formed in a barred galaxy and their possible relation to star formation, performing a two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulation with the gravitational potential obtained from the 2Mass data from the barred spiral galaxy, M83. Since the environment for cloud formation and evolution in the bar region is expected to be different from that in the spiral arm region, barred galaxies are a good target to study the environmental effects on cloud formation and the subsequent star formation. Our simulation uses for an initial 80 Myr an isothermal flow of non-self gravitating gas in the barred potential, then including radiative cooling, heating and self-gravitation of the gas for the next 40 Myr, during which dense clumps are formed. We identify many cold, dense gas clumps for which the mass is more than $10^4M_{\\odot}$ (a value corresponding to the molecular clouds) and study the physical properties of these clumps. The relation of the velocity dispersion of the i...

  15. Exotic x-ray emission from dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmej, F. B.; Dachicourt, R.; Deschaud, B.; Khaghani, D.; Dozières, M.; Šmíd, M.; Renner, O.

    2015-11-01

    Exotic x-ray emission from dense matter is identified as the complex high intensity satellite emission from autoionizing states of highly charged ions. Among a vast amount of possible transitions, double K-hole hollow ion (HI) x-ray emission K0L X → K1L X-1 + hν hollow is of exceptional interest due to its advanced diagnostic potential for matter under extreme conditions where opacity and radiation fields play important roles. Transient ab initio simulations identify intense short pulse radiation fields (e.g., those emitted by x-ray free electron lasers) as possible driving mechanisms of HI x-ray emission via two distinct channels: first, successive photoionization of K-shell electrons, second, photoionization followed by resonant photoexciation among various ionic charge states that are simultaneously present in high density matter. We demonstrated that charge exchange of intermixing inhomogenous plasmas as well as collisions driven by suprathermal electrons are possible mechanisms to populate HIs to observable levels in dense plasmas, particularly in high current Z-pinch plasmas and high intensity field-ionized laser produced plasmas. Although the HI x-ray transitions were repeatedly identified in many other cases of dense optical laser produced plasmas on the basis of atomic structure calculations, their origin is far from being understood and remains one of the last holy grails of high intensity laser-matter interaction.

  16. Isotopologues of dense gas tracers in NGC 1068

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Junzhi; Qiu, Jianjie [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, 200030, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Zhi-Yu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Shi, Yong [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Zhang, Jiangshui [Center For Astrophysics, GuangZhou University, 510006, GuangZhou (China); Fang, Min, E-mail: jzwang@shao.ac.cn [ESO, Karl Schwarzschild Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munich (Germany)

    2014-11-20

    We present observations of isotopic lines of dense gas tracers toward the nuclear region of nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with the IRAM 30 m telescope and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) 12 m telescope. We detected four isotopic lines (H{sup 13}CN 1-0, H{sup 13}CO{sup +} 1-0, HN{sup 13}C 1-0, and HC{sup 18}O{sup +} 1-0) at the 3 mm band with the IRAM 30 m telescope and obtained upper limits of other lines. We calculated optical depths of dense gas tracers with the detected isotopic lines of HCN 1-0, HCO{sup +} 1-0, and HNC 1-0. We find that the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N abundance ratio is greater than 420 if we adopt the upper limit of HC{sup 15}N(1-0) emission. Combining this with fluxes of 1-0 lines from IRAM 30 m observations and the upper limit of 3-2 lines from APEX 12 m observations, we also estimated the excitation condition of molecular gas in the nuclear region of NGC 1068, which is less dense than that in the extreme starburst regions of galaxies.

  17. An extended GS method for dense linear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niki, Hiroshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Abe, Kuniyoshi

    2009-09-01

    Davey and Rosindale [K. Davey, I. Rosindale, An iterative solution scheme for systems of boundary element equations, Internat. J. Numer. Methods Engrg. 37 (1994) 1399-1411] derived the GSOR method, which uses an upper triangular matrix [Omega] in order to solve dense linear systems. By applying functional analysis, the authors presented an expression for the optimum [Omega]. Moreover, Davey and Bounds [K. Davey, S. Bounds, A generalized SOR method for dense linear systems of boundary element equations, SIAM J. Comput. 19 (1998) 953-967] also introduced further interesting results. In this note, we employ a matrix analysis approach to investigate these schemes, and derive theorems that compare these schemes with existing preconditioners for dense linear systems. We show that the convergence rate of the Gauss-Seidel method with preconditioner PG is superior to that of the GSOR method. Moreover, we define some splittings associated with the iterative schemes. Some numerical examples are reported to confirm the theoretical analysis. We show that the EGS method with preconditioner produces an extremely small spectral radius in comparison with the other schemes considered.

  18. Carbon chemistry in dense molecular clouds: Theory and observational constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Geoffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    For the most part, gas phase models of the chemistry of dense molecular clouds predict the abundances of simple species rather well. However, for larger molecules and even for small systems rich in carbon these models often fail spectacularly. Researchers present a brief review of the basic assumptions and results of large scale modeling of the carbon chemistry in dense molecular clouds. Particular attention is to the influence of the gas phase C/O ratio in molecular clouds, and the likely role grains play in maintaining this ratio as clouds evolve from initially diffuse objects to denser cores with associated stellar and planetary formation. Recent spectral line surveys at centimeter and millimeter wavelengths along with selected observations in the submillimeter have now produced an accurate inventory of the gas phase carbon budget in several different types of molecular clouds, though gaps in our knowledge clearly remain. The constraints these observations place on theoretical models of interstellar chemistry can be used to gain insights into why the models fail, and show also which neglected processes must be included in more complete analyses. Looking toward the future, larger molecules are especially difficult to study both experimentally and theoretically in such dense, cold regions, and some new methods are therefore outlined which may ultimately push the detectability of small carbon chains and rings to much heavier species.

  19. Ab initio thermodynamic results for warm dense matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Warm dense matter (WDM) - an exotic state where electrons are quantum degenerate and ions may be strongly correlated - is ubiquitous in dense astrophysical plasmas and highly compressed laboratory systems including inertial fusion. Accurate theoretical predictions require precision thermodynamic data for the electron gas at high density and finite temperature around the Fermi temperature. First such data have been obtained by restricted path integral Monte Carlo (restricted PIMC) simulations and transformed into analytical fits for the free energy. Such results are also key input for novel finite temperature density functional theory. However, the RPIMC data of Ref. 1 are limited to moderate densities, and even there turned out to be surprisingly inaccurate, which is a consequence of the fermion sign problem. These problems were recently overcome by the development of alternative QMC approaches in Kiel (configuration PIMC and permutation blocking PIMC) and Imperial College (Density matrix QMC). The three methods have their strengths and limitations in complementary parameter regions and provide highly accurate thermodynamic data for the electronic contributions in WDM. While the original results were obtained for small particle numbers, recently accurate finite size corrections were derived allowing to compute ab initio thermodynamic data with an unprecedented accuracy of better than 0.3 percent. This provides the final step for the use as benchmark data for experiments and models of Warm dense matter. Co-authors: T. Schoof, S. Groth, T. Dornheim, F. D. Malone, M. Foulkes, and T. Sjostroem, Funded by: DFG via SFB-TR24 and project BO1366-10.

  20. Orbital-free molecular dynamics simulations of transport properties in dense-plasma uranium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, J. D.; Cohen, James S.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Horner, D. A.; Collins, L. A.

    2011-09-01

    We have calculated the self-diffusion coefficients and shear viscosity of dense-plasma uranium using orbital-free molecular dynamics (OFMD) at the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac level. The transport properties of uranium in this regime have not previously been investigated experimentally or theoretically. The OFMD calculations were performed for temperatures from 50 to 5000 eV and densities from ambient to 10 times compressed. The results are compared with the one-component-plasma (OCP) model, using effective charges given by the average-atom code INFERNO and by the regularization procedure from the OFMD method. The latter generally showed better agreement with the OFMD for viscosity and the former for diffusion. A Stokes-Einstein relationship of the OFMD viscosities and diffusion coefficients is found to hold fairly well with a constant of 0.075 ± 0.10, while the OCP/INFERNO model yields 0.13 ± 0.10.

  1. Chlorine in dense interstellar clouds - The abundance of HCl in OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, G. A.; Keene, J.; Phillips, T. G.

    1985-01-01

    The first detection of a chlorine-bearing molecular species in the interstellar medium via emission from the J = 1-0 transition of HCl at 625.9 GHz toward OMC-1 is reported. The relative strengths, widths, and velocities of the resolved hyperfine components are consistent with moderate optical depth emission originating from dense, quiescent molecular cloud material. The overall emission strength implies a fractional abundance of f(HCl/H2) of about (0.5-5.0) x 10 to the -8th, depending on the density of the emitting region. This is approximately an order of magnitude below previous theoretical estimates and a factor of 3-30 below the cosmic abundance of Cl. Recent laboratory work suggests that the lowered fractional abundance of HCl is caused by a combination of depletion onto grains with gas-phase loss processes such as the reaction of HCl with C(+).

  2. Time-resolved spectra of dense plasma focus using spectrometer, streak camera, and CCD combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldin, F. J. [Livermore Operations, National Security Technologies, LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [North Las Vegas Facility, National Security Technologies, LLC, North Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States); Wilkins, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    A time-resolving spectrographic instrument has been assembled with the primary components of a spectrometer, image-converting streak camera, and CCD recording camera, for the primary purpose of diagnosing highly dynamic plasmas. A collection lens defines the sampled region and couples light from the plasma into a step index, multimode fiber which leads to the spectrometer. The output spectrum is focused onto the photocathode of the streak camera, the output of which is proximity-coupled to the CCD. The spectrometer configuration is essentially Czerny-Turner, but off-the-shelf Nikon refraction lenses, rather than mirrors, are used for practicality and flexibility. Only recently assembled, the instrument requires significant refinement, but has now taken data on both bridge wire and dense plasma focus experiments.

  3. Time-Resolved Spectra of Dense Plasma Focus Using Spectrometer, Streak Camera, CCD Combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. J. Goldin, B. T. Meehan, E. C. Hagen, P. R. Wilkins

    2010-10-01

    A time-resolving spectrographic instrument has been assembled with the primary components of a spectrometer, image-converting streak camera, and CCD recording camera, for the primary purpose of diagnosing highly dynamic plasmas. A collection lens defines the sampled region and couples light from the plasma into a step index, multimode fiber which leads to the spectrometer. The output spectrum is focused onto the photocathode of the streak camera, the output of which is proximity-coupled to the CCD. The spectrometer configuration is essentially Czerny–Turner, but off-the-shelf Nikon refraction lenses, rather than mirrors, are used for practicality and flexibility. Only recently assembled, the instrument requires significant refinement, but has now taken data on both bridge wire and dense plasma focus experiments.

  4. Rainbow Particle Imaging Velocimetry for Dense 3D Fluid Velocity Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Jinhui

    2017-04-11

    Despite significant recent progress, dense, time-resolved imaging of complex, non-stationary 3D flow velocities remains an elusive goal. In this work we tackle this problem by extending an established 2D method, Particle Imaging Velocimetry, to three dimensions by encoding depth into color. The encoding is achieved by illuminating the flow volume with a continuum of light planes (a “rainbow”), such that each depth corresponds to a specific wavelength of light. A diffractive component in the camera optics ensures that all planes are in focus simultaneously. For reconstruction, we derive an image formation model for recovering stationary 3D particle positions. 3D velocity estimation is achieved with a variant of 3D optical flow that accounts for both physical constraints as well as the rainbow image formation model. We evaluate our method with both simulations and an experimental prototype setup.

  5. Optical Measurements of Dense Hypervelocity Plasmoids from Coaxial and Railgun Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Andrew; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Brockington, Samuel; Witherspoon, Douglas; Elton, Ray

    2009-11-01

    High velocity dense plasma jets are under continued experimental development for fusion applications including refueling, disruption mitigation, momentum injection/rotation drive, and magnetized target fusion. We present measurements taken on the plasmoids produced by a half-scale coaxial plasmoid accelerator, a full scale coaxial plasmoid accelerator, and a novel minirailgun accelerator. The data presented includes spectroscopic measurements of velocity and density, two point interferometric measurements of line integrated density and velocity, and fast framing camera imaging. Results from these measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight measurements taken using photodiodes, as well as total plasmoid momentum measurements taken using a ballistic pendulum technique. Plasma density is greater than 5 x10^15 cm-3, and velocities range up to 100 km/s, with a small component in some cases exceeding 120 km/s.

  6. Silence of Synaptotagmin VII inhibits release of dense core vesicles in PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Synaptotagmin VII (Syt VII), which has a higher Ca2+ affinity and slower disassembly kinetics with lipid than Syt I and Syt IX, was regarded as being uninvolved in synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis but instead possibly as a calcium sensor for the slower kinetic phase of dense core vesicles (DCVs) release. By using high temporal resolution capacitance and amperometry measurements, it was demonstrated that the knockdown of endogenous Syt VII attenuated the fusion of DCV with the plasma membrane, reduced the amplitude of the exocytotic burst of the Ca2+-triggered DCV release without affecting the slope of the sustained component, and blocked the fusion pore expansion. This suggests that Syt VII is the Ca2+ sensor of DCV fusion machinery and is an essential factor for the establishment and maintenance of the pool size of releasable DCVs in PC12 cells.

  7. Chlorine in dense interstellar clouds - The abundance of HCl in OMC-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, G. A.; Keene, J.; Phillips, T. G.

    1985-01-01

    The first detection of a chlorine-bearing molecular species in the interstellar medium via emission from the J = 1-0 transition of HCl at 625.9 GHz toward OMC-1 is reported. The relative strengths, widths, and velocities of the resolved hyperfine components are consistent with moderate optical depth emission originating from dense, quiescent molecular cloud material. The overall emission strength implies a fractional abundance of f(HCl/H2) of about (0.5-5.0) x 10 to the -8th, depending on the density of the emitting region. This is approximately an order of magnitude below previous theoretical estimates and a factor of 3-30 below the cosmic abundance of Cl. Recent laboratory work suggests that the lowered fractional abundance of HCl is caused by a combination of depletion onto grains with gas-phase loss processes such as the reaction of HCl with C(+).

  8. Morpho-Spectral Recognition of Dense Urban Objects by Hyperspectral Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadal, S.; Ouerghemmi, W.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a methodology for recognizing, identifying and classifying built objects in dense urban areas, using a morphospectral approach applied to VNIR/SWIR hyperspectral image (HySpex). This methodology contains several image processing steps: Principal Components Analysis and Laplacian enhancement, Feature Extraction of segmented build-up objects, and supervised classification from a morpho-spectral database (i.e. spectral and morphometric attributes). The Feature Extraction toolbox automatically generates a vector map of segmented buildings and an urban object-oriented morphometric database which is merged with an independent spectral database of urban objects. Each build-up object is spectrally identified and morphologically characterized thanks to the built-in morpho-spectral database.

  9. Variability and component composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storm, T. van der

    2004-01-01

    In component-based product populations, feature models have to be described at the component level to be able to benefit from a product family approach. As a consequence, composition of components becomes very complex. We describe how component-level variability can be managed in the face of compone

  10. The Dynamics of Dense Cores in the Perseus Molecular Cloud II: The Relationship Between Dense Cores and the Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, Helen; Johnstone, Doug; Goodman, Alyssa

    2010-01-01

    We utilize the extensive datasets available for the Perseus molecular cloud to analyze the relationship between the kinematics of small-scale dense cores and the larger structures in which they are embedded. The kinematic measures presented here can be used in conjunction with those discussed in our previous work as strong observational constraints that numerical simulations (or analytic models) of star formation should match. We find that dense cores have small motions with respect to the 13CO gas, about one third of the 13CO velocity dispersion along the same line of sight. Within each extinction region, the core-to-core velocity dispersion is about half of the total (13CO) velocity dispersion seen in the region. Large-scale velocity gradients account for roughly half of the total velocity dispersion in each region, similar to what is predicted from large-scale turbulent modes following a power spectrum of P(k) ~ k^{-4}.

  11. Methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes in mountainous terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypka, Przemysław; Starzak, Rafał; Owsiak, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes is one of the main factors influencing the water balance between the atmosphere, tree stands and the soil. It also has a major impact on site productivity, spatial arrangement of vegetation structure as well as forest succession. This paper presents a methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching tree stands in a small mountain valley. Measurements taken in three inter-forest meadows unambiguously showed the relationship between the amount of solar insolation and the shading effect caused mainly by the contour of surrounding tree stands. Therefore, appropriate knowledge of elevation, aspect and tilt angles of the analysed planes had to be taken into consideration during modelling. At critical times, especially in winter, the diffuse and reflected components of solar radiation only reached some of the sites studied as the beam component of solar radiation was totally blocked by the densely forested mountain slopes in the neighbourhood. The cross-section contours and elevation angles of all obstructions are estimated from a digital surface model including both digital elevation model and the height of tree stands. All the parameters in a simplified, empirical model of the solar insolation reaching a given horizontal surface within the research valley are dependent on the sky view factor ( SVF). The presented simplified, empirical model and its parameterisation scheme should be easily adaptable to different complex terrains or mountain valleys characterised by diverse geometry or spatial orientation. The model was developed and validated ( R 2 = 0.92 , σ = 0.54) based on measurements taken at research sites located in the Silesian Beskid Mountain Range. A thorough understanding of the factors determining the amount of solar radiation reaching woodlands ought to considerably expand the knowledge of the water exchange balance within forest complexes as well as the estimation of site productivity.

  12. Methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes in mountainous terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypka, Przemysław; Starzak, Rafał; Owsiak, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes is one of the main factors influencing the water balance between the atmosphere, tree stands and the soil. It also has a major impact on site productivity, spatial arrangement of vegetation structure as well as forest succession. This paper presents a methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching tree stands in a small mountain valley. Measurements taken in three inter-forest meadows unambiguously showed the relationship between the amount of solar insolation and the shading effect caused mainly by the contour of surrounding tree stands. Therefore, appropriate knowledge of elevation, aspect and tilt angles of the analysed planes had to be taken into consideration during modelling. At critical times, especially in winter, the diffuse and reflected components of solar radiation only reached some of the sites studied as the beam component of solar radiation was totally blocked by the densely forested mountain slopes in the neighbourhood. The cross-section contours and elevation angles of all obstructions are estimated from a digital surface model including both digital elevation model and the height of tree stands. All the parameters in a simplified, empirical model of the solar insolation reaching a given horizontal surface within the research valley are dependent on the sky view factor (SVF). The presented simplified, empirical model and its parameterisation scheme should be easily adaptable to different complex terrains or mountain valleys characterised by diverse geometry or spatial orientation. The model was developed and validated (R (2) = 0.92 , σ = 0.54) based on measurements taken at research sites located in the Silesian Beskid Mountain Range. A thorough understanding of the factors determining the amount of solar radiation reaching woodlands ought to considerably expand the knowledge of the water exchange balance within forest complexes as well as the estimation of site

  13. Mechanical implications of the domain structure of fiber-forming collagens: comparison of the molecular and fibrillar flexibilities of the alpha1-chains found in types I-III collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Frederick H; Horvath, Istvan; Foran, David J

    2002-05-21

    Fibrillar collagens store, transmit and dissipate elastic energy during tensile deformation. Results of previous studies suggest that the collagen molecule is made up of alternating rigid and flexible domains, and extension of the flexible domains is associated with elastic energy storage. In this study, we model the flexibility of the alpha1-chains found in types I-III collagen molecules and microfibrils in order to understand the molecular basis of elastic energy storage in collagen fibers by analysing the areas under conformational plots for dipeptide sequences. Results of stereochemical modeling suggest that the collagen triple helix is made up of rigid and flexible domains that alternate with periods that are multiples of three amino acid residues. The relative flexibility of dipeptide sequences found in the flexible regions is about a factor of five higher than that found for the flexibility of the rigid regions, and the flexibility of types II and III collagen molecules appears to be higher than that found for the type I collagen molecule. The different collagen alpha1-chains were compared by correlating the flexibilities. The results suggest that the flexibilities of the alpha1-chains of types I and III collagen are more closely related than the flexibilities of the alpha1-chains in types I and II and II and III collagen. The flexible domains found in the alpha1-chains of types I-III collagen were found to be conserved in the microfibril and had periods of about 15 amino acid residues and multiples thereof. The flexibility profiles of types I and II collagen microfibrils were found to be more highly correlated than those for types I and III and II and III. These results suggest that the domain structure of the alpha1-chains found in types I-III collagen is an efficient means for storage of elastic energy during stretching while preserving the triple helical structure of the overall molecule. It is proposed that all collagens that form fibers are designed to

  14. Inhibition of STAT3- and MAPK-dependent PGE2 synthesis ameliorates phagocytosis of fibrillar β-amyloid peptide (1-42) via EP2 receptor in EMF-stimulated N9 microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gen-Lin; Luo, Zhen; Shen, Ting-Ting; Li, Ping; Yang, Ju; Luo, Xue; Chen, Chun-Hai; Gao, Peng; Yang, Xue-Sen

    2016-11-21

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-involved neuroinflammatory processes are prevalent in several neurological conditions and diseases. Amyloid burden is correlated with the activation of E-prostanoid (EP) 2 receptors by PGE2 in Alzheimer's disease. We previously demonstrated that electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure can induce pro-inflammatory responses and the depression of phagocytosis in microglial cells, but the signaling pathways involved in phagocytosis of fibrillar β-amyloid (fAβ) in microglial cells exposed to EMF are poorly understood. Given the important role of PGE2 in neural physiopathological processes, we investigated the PGE2-related signaling mechanism in the immunomodulatory phagocytosis of EMF-stimulated N9 microglial cells (N9 cells). N9 cells were exposed to EMF with or without pretreatment with the selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and antagonists of PG receptors EP1-4. The production of endogenous PGE2 was quantified by enzyme immunoassays. The phagocytic ability of N9 cells was evaluated based on the fluorescence intensity of the engulfed fluorescent-labeled fibrillar β-amyloid peptide (1-42) (fAβ42) measured using a flow cytometer and a fluorescence microscope. The effects of pharmacological agents on EMF-activated microglia were investigated based on the expressions of JAK2, STAT3, p38/ERK/JNK MAPKs, COX-2, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), and EP2 using real-time PCR and/or western blotting. EMF exposure significantly increased the production of PGE2 and decreased the phagocytosis of fluorescent-labeled fAβ42 by N9 cells. The selective inhibitors of COX-2, JAK2, STAT3, and MAPKs clearly depressed PGE2 release and ameliorated microglial phagocytosis after EMF exposure. Pharmacological agents suppressed the phosphorylation of JAK2-STAT3 and MAPKs, leading to the amelioration of the

  15. Fibrillar beta-amyloid peptide Aβ1–40 activates microglial proliferation via stimulating TNF-α release and H2O2 derived from NADPH oxidase: a cell culture study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpe Martyn

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the accumulation of neuritic plaques, containing activated microglia and β-amyloid peptides (Aβ. Fibrillar Aβ can activate microglia, resulting in production of toxic and inflammatory mediators like hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide, and cytokines. We have recently found that microglial proliferation is regulated by hydrogen peroxide derived from NADPH oxidase. Thus, in this study, we investigated whether Aβ can stimulate microglial proliferation and cytokine production via activation of NADPH oxidase to produce hydrogen peroxide. Methods Primary mixed glial cultures were prepared from the cerebral cortices of 7-day-old Wistar rats. At confluency, microglial cells were isolated by tapping, replated, and treated either with or without Aβ. Hydrogen peroxide production by cells was measured with Amplex Red and peroxidase. Microglial proliferation was assessed under a microscope 0, 24 and 48 hours after plating. TNF-α and IL-1β levels in the culture medium were assessed by ELISA. Results We found that 1 μM fibrillar (but not soluble Aβ1–40 peptide induced microglial proliferation and caused release of hydrogen peroxide, TNF-α and IL-1β from microglial cells. Proliferation was prevented by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 μM, by the hydrogen peroxide-degrading enzyme catalase (60 U/ml, and by its mimetics EUK-8 and EUK-134 (20 μM; as well as by an antibody against TNF-α and by a soluble TNF receptor inhibitor. Production of TNF-α and IL-1β, measured after 24 hours of Aβ treatment, was also prevented by apocynin, catalase and EUKs, but the early release (measured after 1 hour of Aβ treatment of TNF-α was insensitive to apocynin or catalase. Conclusion These results indicate that Aβ1–40-induced microglial proliferation is mediated both by microglial release of TNF-α and production of hydrogen peroxide from NADPH oxidase. This suggests that TNF-α and NADPH

  16. Mechanical Components and Tribology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory evaluates fundamental friction, wear, and lubrication technologies for improved, robust, and power-dense vehicle transmissions. The facility explores...

  17. Relativistic two-component jet evolutions in 2D and 3D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of astrophysical jets and theoretical arguments suggest a transverse stratification with two components induced by intrinsic features of the central engine (accretion disk + black hole). We study two-component jet dynamics for an inner fast low density jet, surrounded by a slower, dense

  18. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, S. [ed.] [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Tajima, T. [ed.] [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1991-10-01

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  19. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, S. (ed.) (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics); Tajima, T. (ed.) (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies)

    1991-10-01

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  20. Diphlorethohydroxycarmalol of Ishige okamurae and Caffeine Modified the Expression of Extracellular Fibrillars during Adipogenesis of Mouse Subcutaneous Adipose Derived Stem Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Younmi; Song, Siyoung; Kim, Hagju; Cheon, Yong-Pil

    2013-01-01

    Although, one of the etiologies of localized lipodystrophy of the subcutaneous connective tissue (cellulite) is the histological alternation of adipose tissue, the characteristics of expression of the components of extracellular matrix (ECM) components during adipogenesis are not uncovered. In this study, the effects of caffeine and Ishige okamurae originated diphlorethohydroxycarmalol (DPHC) on the expression of extracellualr fibers was analyzed with quantitative RT-PCR during differentiation induction of mouse subcutaneous adipose derived stem cells (msADSC) into adipocyte. The expression levels of Col1a, Col3a1, and Col61a were decreased by the adipogenci induction in a time-dependent manners. However, Col2a mRNA and Col4a1 mRNA expressions were oposit to them. Caffeine and DPHC stimulated the changes of the expression of these collagens. Eln mRNA expression was increased by induction. DPHC stimulated the expression of it. Mfap5 mRNA expression was deceased in both adipogenic cell and matured adipocytes. Caffeine suppressed the expression of Mfap5 but the effect of DPHC was different by the concentration. The expression of bioglycan, decorin, and lumican were also modified by caffeine and DPHC in a concentration-dependent manner. Based on this study, we revealed firstly the effects of caffeine and DPHC on the expression of collagens, elastin, and glycoproteins during adipogenesis of msADSCs. Those results suggest that DPHC may have antiadipogenic effect and has more positive effets on normal adipose tissue generation and work as suppressor the abnormality of ECM structure. Such results indicate that DPHC can be applied in keeping the stability of the ECM of adipogenic tissues. PMID:25949143

  1. Direct observation of dynamic shear jamming in dense suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Majumdar, Sayantan; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2016-04-01

    Liquid-like at rest, dense suspensions of hard particles can undergo striking transformations in behaviour when agitated or sheared. These phenomena include solidification during rapid impact, as well as strong shear thickening characterized by discontinuous, orders-of-magnitude increases in suspension viscosity. Much of this highly non-Newtonian behaviour has recently been interpreted within the framework of a jamming transition. However, although jamming indeed induces solid-like rigidity, even a strongly shear-thickened state still flows and thus cannot be fully jammed. Furthermore, although suspensions are incompressible, the onset of rigidity in the standard jamming scenario requires an increase in particle density. Finally, whereas shear thickening occurs in the steady state, impact-induced solidification is transient. As a result, it has remained unclear how these dense suspension phenomena are related and how they are connected to jamming. Here we resolve this by systematically exploring both the steady-state and transient regimes with the same experimental system. We demonstrate that a fully jammed, solid-like state can be reached without compression and instead purely with shear, as recently proposed for dry granular systems. This state is created by transient shear-jamming fronts, which we track directly. We also show that shear stress, rather than shear rate, is the key control parameter. From these findings we map out a state diagram with particle density and shear stress as variables. We identify discontinuous shear thickening with a marginally jammed regime just below the onset of full, solid-like jamming. This state diagram provides a unifying framework, compatible with prior experimental and simulation results on dense suspensions, that connects steady-state and transient behaviour in terms of a dynamic shear-jamming process.

  2. Generation of dense statistical connectomes from sparse morphological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eEgger

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sensory-evoked signal flow, at cellular and network levels, is primarily determined by the synaptic wiring of the underlying neuronal circuitry. Measurements of synaptic innervation, connection probabilities and subcellular organization of synaptic inputs are thus among the most active fields of research in contemporary neuroscience. Methods to measure these quantities range from electrophysiological recordings over reconstructions of dendrite-axon overlap at light-microscopic levels to dense circuit reconstructions of small volumes at electron-microscopic resolution. However, quantitative and complete measurements at subcellular resolution and mesoscopic scales to obtain all local and long-range synaptic in/outputs for any neuron within an entire brain region are beyond present methodological limits. Here, we present a novel concept, implemented within an interactive software environment called NeuroNet, which allows (i integration of sparsely sampled (subcellular morphological data into an accurate anatomical reference frame of the brain region(s of interest, (ii up-scaling to generate an average dense model of the neuronal circuitry within the respective brain region(s and (iii statistical measurements of synaptic innervation between all neurons within the model. We illustrate our approach by generating a dense average model of the entire rat vibrissal cortex, providing the required anatomical data, and illustrate how to measure synaptic innervation statistically. Comparing our results with data from paired recordings in vitro and in vivo, as well as with reconstructions of synaptic contact sites at light- and electron-microscopic levels, we find that our in silico measurements are in line with previous results.

  3. Dense Gas in the Outer Spiral Arm of M51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Braine, Jonathan; Gao, Yu; Koda, Jin; Gu, Qiusheng

    2017-02-01

    There is a linear relation between the mass of dense gas traced by the HCN(1–0) luminosity and the star formation rate (SFR) traced by the far-infrared luminosity. Recent observations of galactic disks have shown some systematic variations. In order to explore the SFR–dense gas link at high resolution (∼4″, ∼150 pc) in the outer disk of an external galaxy, we have mapped a region about 5 kpc from the center along the northern spiral arm of M51 in the HCN(1–0), HCO+(1–0), and HNC(1–0) emission lines using the Northern Extended Millimeter Array interferometer. The HCN and HCO+ lines were detected in six giant molecular associations (GMAs), while HNC emission was only detected in the two brightest GMAs. One of the GMAs hosts a powerful H ii region, and HCN is stronger than HCO+ there. Comparing observations of GMAs in the disks of M31 and M33 at similar angular resolution (∼100 pc), we find that GMAs in the outer disk of M51 are brighter in both the HCN and the HCO+ lines by a factor of 3, on average. However, the {I}{HCN}/{I}{CO} and {I}{{HCO}+}/{I}{CO} ratios are similar to the ratios in nearby galactic disks and the Galactic plane. Using the Herschel 70 μm data to trace the total IR luminosity at the resolution of the GMAs, we find that both the {L}{IR}–{L}{HCN} and {L}{IR}–{L}{{HCO}+} relations in the outer disk GMAs are consistent with the proportionality between the {L}{IR} and the dense gas mass established globally in galaxies within the scatter. The IR/HCN and IR/HCO+ ratios of the GMAs vary by a factor of 3, probably depending on whether massive stars are forming.

  4. Inhomogeneous quasistationary state of dense fluids of inelastic hard spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouxon, Itzhak

    2014-05-01

    We study closed dense collections of freely cooling hard spheres that collide inelastically with constant coefficient of normal restitution. We find inhomogeneous states (ISs) where the density profile is spatially nonuniform but constant in time. The states are exact solutions of nonlinear partial differential equations that describe the coupled distributions of density and temperature valid when inelastic losses of energy per collision are small. The derivation is performed without modeling the equations' coefficients that are unknown in the dense limit (such as the equation of state) using only their scaling form specific for hard spheres. Thus the IS is the exact state of this dense many-body system. It captures a fundamental property of inelastic collections of particles: the possibility of preserving nonuniform temperature via the interplay of inelastic cooling and heat conduction that generalizes previous results. We perform numerical simulations to demonstrate that arbitrary initial state evolves to the IS in the limit of long times where the container has the geometry of the channel. The evolution is like a gas-liquid transition. The liquid condenses in a vanishing part of the total volume but takes most of the mass of the system. However, the gaseous phase, which mass grows only logarithmically with the system size, is relevant because its fast particles carry most of the energy of the system. Remarkably, the system self-organizes to dissipate no energy: The inelastic decay of energy is a power law [1+t/t(c)](-2), where t(c) diverges in the thermodynamic limit. This is reinforced by observing that for supercritical systems the IS coincide in most of the space with the steady states of granular systems heated at one of the walls. We discuss the relation of our results to the recently proposed finite-time singularity in other container's geometries.

  5. Crystal structures and dynamical properties of dense CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Xue; Liu, Hanyu; Wu, Min; Yao, Yansun; Tse, John S; Dias, Ranga; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2016-10-04

    Structural polymorphism in dense carbon dioxide (CO2) has attracted significant attention in high-pressure physics and chemistry for the past two decades. Here, we have performed high-pressure experiments and first-principles theoretical calculations to investigate the stability, structure, and dynamical properties of dense CO2 We found evidence that CO2-V with the 4-coordinated extended structure can be quenched to ambient pressure below 200 K-the melting temperature of CO2-I. CO2-V is a fully coordinated structure formed from a molecular solid at high pressure and recovered at ambient pressure. Apart from confirming the metastability of CO2-V (I-42d) at ambient pressure at low temperature, results of ab initio molecular dynamics and metadynamics (MD) simulations provided insights into the transformation processes and structural relationship from the molecular to the extended phases. In addition, the simulation also predicted a phase V'(Pna21) in the stability region of CO2-V with a diffraction pattern similar to that previously assigned to the CO2-V (P212121) structure. Both CO2-V and -V' are predicted to be recoverable and hard with a Vicker hardness of ∼20 GPa. Significantly, MD simulations found that the CO2 in phase IV exhibits large-amplitude bending motions at finite temperatures and high pressures. This finding helps to explain the discrepancy between earlier predicted static structures and experiments. MD simulations clearly indicate temperature effects are critical to understanding the high-pressure behaviors of dense CO2 structures-highlighting the significance of chemical kinetics associated with the transformations.

  6. Parallel Access of Out-Of-Core Dense Extendible Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otoo, Ekow J; Rotem, Doron

    2007-07-26

    Datasets used in scientific and engineering applications are often modeled as dense multi-dimensional arrays. For very large datasets, the corresponding array models are typically stored out-of-core as array files. The array elements are mapped onto linear consecutive locations that correspond to the linear ordering of the multi-dimensional indices. Two conventional mappings used are the row-major order and the column-major order of multi-dimensional arrays. Such conventional mappings of dense array files highly limit the performance of applications and the extendibility of the dataset. Firstly, an array file that is organized in say row-major order causes applications that subsequently access the data in column-major order, to have abysmal performance. Secondly, any subsequent expansion of the array file is limited to only one dimension. Expansions of such out-of-core conventional arrays along arbitrary dimensions, require storage reorganization that can be very expensive. Wepresent a solution for storing out-of-core dense extendible arrays that resolve the two limitations. The method uses a mapping function F*(), together with information maintained in axial vectors, to compute the linear address of an extendible array element when passed its k-dimensional index. We also give the inverse function, F-1*() for deriving the k-dimensional index when given the linear address. We show how the mapping function, in combination with MPI-IO and a parallel file system, allows for the growth of the extendible array without reorganization and no significant performance degradation of applications accessing elements in any desired order. We give methods for reading and writing sub-arrays into and out of parallel applications that run on a cluster of workstations. The axial-vectors are replicated and maintained in each node that accesses sub-array elements.

  7. Structural relaxation in dense liquids composed of anisotropic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tianqi; Schreck, Carl; Chakraborty, Bulbul; Freed, Denise E; O'Hern, Corey S

    2012-10-01

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of dense liquids composed of bidisperse dimer- and ellipse-shaped particles in two dimensions that interact via purely repulsive contact forces. We measure the structural relaxation times obtained from the long-time α decay of the self part of the intermediate scattering function for the translational and rotational degrees of freedom (DOF) as a function of packing fraction φ, temperature T, and aspect ratio α. We are able to collapse the packing-fraction and temperature-dependent structural relaxation times for disks, and dimers and ellipses over a wide range of α, onto a universal scaling function F(±)(|φ-φ(0)|,T,α), which is similar to that employed in previous studies of dense liquids composed of purely repulsive spherical particles in three dimensions. F(±) for both the translational and rotational DOF are characterized by the α-dependent scaling exponents μ and δ and packing fraction φ(0)(α) that signals the crossover in the scaling form F(±) from hard-particle dynamics to super-Arrhenius behavior for each aspect ratio. We find that the fragility of structural relaxation at φ(0), m(φ(0)), decreases monotonically with increasing aspect ratio for both ellipses and dimers. For α>α(p), where α(p) is the location of the peak in the packing fraction φ(J) at jamming onset, the rotational DOF are strongly coupled to the translational DOF, and the dynamic scaling exponents and φ(0) are similar for the rotational and translational DOF. For 1composed of dimer- and ellipse-shaped particles are qualitatively the same, despite the fact that zero-temperature static packings of dimers are isostatic, while static packings of ellipses are hypostatic. Thus, zero-temperature contact counting arguments do not apply to structural relaxation of dense liquids of anisotropic particles near the glass transition.

  8. INFERNO - A better model of atoms in dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberman, D. A.

    1982-03-01

    A self-consistent field model of atoms in dense plasmas has been devised and incorporated in a computer program. In the model there is a uniform positive charge distribution with a hole in it and at the center of the hole an atomic nucleus. There are electrons, in both bound and continuum states, in sufficient number to form an electrically neutral system. The Dirac equation is used so that high Z atoms can be dealt with. A finite temperature is assumed, and a mean field (average atom) approximation is used in statistical averages. Applications have been made to equations of states and to photoabsorption.

  9. Modeling the jet quenching in hot and dense QCD matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lokhtin, I P; Petrushanko, S V; Snigirev, A M; Arsene, I; Tywoniuk, K

    2009-01-01

    One of the important perturbative ("hard") probes of hot and dense QCD matter is the medium-induced energy loss of energetic partons, so called "jet quenching", which is predicted to be very different in cold nuclear matter and in QGP, and leads to a number of phenomena which are already seen in the RHIC data on the qualitative level. The inclusion of jet quenching and other important collective effects, such as radial and elliptic flows, in the existing Monte-Carlo models of relativistic heavy ion collisions is discussed. Some issues on the corresponding physical observables at RHIC and LHC energies obtained with HYDJET++ model are presented.

  10. Exp6-polar thermodynamics of dense supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S; Fried, L E

    2007-12-13

    We introduce a simple polar fluid model for the thermodynamics of dense supercritical water based on a Buckingham (exp-6) core and point dipole representation of the water molecule. The proposed exp6-polar thermodynamics, based on ideas originally applied to dipolar hard spheres, performs very well when tested against molecular dynamics simulations. Comparisons of the model predictions with experimental data available for supercritical water yield excellent agreement for the shock Hugoniot, isotherms and sound speeds, and are also quite good for the self-diffusion constant and relative dielectric constant. We expect the present approach to be also useful for other small polar molecules and their mixtures.

  11. Parton energy loss in hot and dense QCD medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jie; MAO Yaxian; XIANG Wenchang; ZHOU Daicui

    2006-01-01

    Induced gluon radiation and energy loss of heavy quark in hot and dense QCD media are discussed. Using the light-cone path integral approach, an analytical formula of the energy loss of heavy quark is derived. The results show that the quark energy loss obviously depends on the mass of quark, i. e. a remarkable suppression occurs in the case of heavy quark comparing to a light one. The radiative energy loss of energetic quark is proportional to L2, where L is the length of the medium. The dependence of energy loss on L2 turns to L with decreasing quark energy.

  12. Chemical potential calculations in dense liquids using metadynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perego, C.; Giberti, F.; Parrinello, M.

    2016-10-01

    The calculation of chemical potential has traditionally been a challenge in atomistic simulations. One of the most used approaches is Widom's insertion method in which the chemical potential is calculated by periodically attempting to insert an extra particle in the system. In dense systems this method fails since the insertion probability is very low. In this paper we show that in a homogeneous fluid the insertion probability can be increased using metadynamics. We test our method on a supercooled high density binary Lennard-Jones fluid. We find that we can obtain efficiently converged results even when Widom's method fails.

  13. Chemical Potential Calculations In Dense Liquids Using Metadynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Perego, Claudio; Parrinello, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The calculation of chemical potential has traditionally been a challenge in atomistic simulations. One of the most used approaches is Widom's insertion method in which the chemical potential is calculated by periodically attempting to insert an extra particle in the system. In dense systems this method fails since the insertion probability is very low. In this paper we show that in a homogeneous fluid the insertion probability can be increased using metadynamics. We test our method on a supercooled high density binary Lennard-Jones fluid. We find that we can obtain efficiently converged results even when Widom's method fails.

  14. Warm, Dense Plasma Characterization by X-ray Thomson Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Cauble, R C; Lee, R W; Edwards, J E; Degroot, J S

    2000-07-18

    We describe how the powerful technique of spectrally resolved Thomson scattering can be extended to the x-ray regime, for direct measurements of the ionization state, density, temperature, and the microscopic behavior of dense cool plasmas. Such a direct measurement of microscopic parameters of solid density plasmas could eventually be used to properly interpret laboratory measurements of material properties such as thermal and electrical conductivity, EUS and opacity. In addition, x-ray Thomson scattering will provide new information on the characteristics of rarely and hitherto difficult to diagnose Fermi degenerate and strongly coupled plasmas.

  15. Theory of the equation of state of hot dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbee, T W; Surh, M; Yang, L H

    1999-07-23

    Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations are adapted to treat dense plasmas for temperatures exceeding the electronic Fermi temperature. Extended electronic states are obtained in a plane wave basis by using pseudopotentials for the ion cores in the local density approximation to density functional theory. The method reduces to conventional first principles molecular dynamics at low temperatures with the expected high level of accuracy. The occurrence of thermally excited ion cores at high temperatures is treated by means of final state pseudopotentials. The method is applied to the shock compression Hugoniot equation of state for aluminum. Good agreement with experiment is found for temperatures ranging from zero through 105K.

  16. Electronic Structure of Dense Plasmas by X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Rogers, F J; Pollaine, S M; Froula, D H; Blancard, C; Faussurier, G; Renaudin, P; Kuhlbrodt, S; Redmer, R; Landen, O L

    2003-10-07

    We present an improved analytical expression for the x-ray dynamic structure factor from a dense plasma which includes the effects of weakly bound electrons. This result can be applied to describe scattering from low to moderate Z plasmas, and it covers the entire range of plasma conditions that can be found in inertial confinement fusion experiments, from ideal to degenerate up to moderately coupled systems. We use our theory to interpret x-ray scattering experiments from solid density carbon plasma and to extract accurate measurements of electron temperature, electron density and charge state. We use our experimental results to validate various equation-of-state models for carbon plasmas.

  17. Neutron Star Dense Matter Equation of State Constraints with NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, Slavko; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Guillot, Sebastien; Kust Harding, Alice; Ho, Wynn C. G.; Lamb, Frederick K.; Mahmoodifar, Simin; Miller, M. Coleman; Morsink, Sharon; Ozel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Ray, Paul S.; Riley, Tom; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Watts, Anna; Wolff, Michael Thomas; Gendreau, Keith

    2017-08-01

    One of the principal goals of the Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is to place constraints on the dense matter equation of state through sensitive X-ray observations of neutron stars. The NICER mission will focus on measuring the masses and radii of several relatively bright, thermally-emitting, rotation-powered millisecond pulsars, by fitting models that incorporate all relevant relativistic effects and atmospheric radiation transfer processes to their periodic soft X-ray modulations. Here, we provide an overview of the targets NICER will observe and tthe technique and models that have been developed by the NICER team to estimate the masses and radii of these pulsars.

  18. Interaction of fast magnetoacoustic solitons in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahangir, R.; Saleem, Khalid [National Centre for Physics (NCP) Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad (Pakistan); Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Masood, W. [National Centre for Physics (NCP) Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad (Pakistan); COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Pak Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad (Pakistan); Siddiq, M.; Batool, Nazia [National Centre for Physics (NCP) Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-09-15

    One dimensional propagation of fast magnetoacoustic solitary waves in dense plasmas with degenerate electrons is investigated in this paper in the small amplitude limit. In this regard, Korteweg deVries equation is derived and discussed using the plasma parameters that are typically found in white dwarf stars. The interaction of fast magnetoacoustic solitons is explored by using the Hirota bilinear formalism, which admits multi soliton solutions. It is observed that the values of the propagation vectors determine the interaction of solitary waves. It is further noted that the amplitude of the respective solitary waves remain unchanged after the interaction; however, they do experience a phase shift.

  19. MATHEMATICAL MODELS AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR DENSE PARTICULATE FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chun-liang

    2004-01-01

    Sedimentation of particles in inclined and vertical vessels is numerically simulated by the Eulerian two-fluid model. The numerical results show an interesting phenomenon with two circulation vortexes in a vertical vessel but one in the inclined vessel. Sensitivity tests indicate that the boundary layer effect is the key to induce this phenomenon. A numerical method based on 2D unstructured meshes is presented to solve the hard-sphere discrete particle model. Several applications show the numerical method has a good performance to simulate dense particulate flows in irregular domains without regard to element types of the mesh.

  20. Lack of Syneresis during Gelation of Dense Colloidal Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig; Hütter; Schönholzer

    2000-02-01

    This study reports experimental results about the shrinkage of particle networks produced by pH-induced destabilization of dense colloidal suspensions. The resulting solid networks exhibit no syneresis effects, at least prior to aging of the gel. From this lack of syneresis it is concluded that the solidification in wet particle systems either is not purely determined by energy (but is also influenced by entropic effects) or cannot be explained within the framework of (static) equilibrium thermodynamics at all. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  1. Coupling lattice Boltzmann and molecular dynamics models for dense fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, A.; Kotsalis, E. M.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-04-01

    We propose a hybrid model, coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) and molecular dynamics (MD) models, for the simulation of dense fluids. Time and length scales are decoupled by using an iterative Schwarz domain decomposition algorithm. The MD and LB formulations communicate via the exchange of velocities and velocity gradients at the interface. We validate the present LB-MD model in simulations of two- and three-dimensional flows of liquid argon past and through a carbon nanotube. Comparisons with existing hybrid algorithms and with reference MD solutions demonstrate the validity of the present approach.

  2. Three-dimensional biomimetic mineralization of dense hydrogel templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Tomsia, Antoni P; Minor, Andrew M; Song, Xiangyun; Saiz, Eduardo

    2009-07-29

    An electric-current-assisted method was used to mineralize dense hydrogels and create hydroxyapatite/hydrogel composites with unique hierarchical structures. The microstructure of the final material can be controlled by the mineralization technique and the chemistry of the organic matrix. A hydroxyapatite/hydrogel composite was obtained with a large inorganic content (approximately 60% of the weight of the organics). After being heated to 1050 degrees C, the sintered inorganic phase has a very uniformly distributed porosity and its Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area is 0.68 m(2)/g.

  3. Dilution in a Dense Bottom Jet in Cross Currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, O.; Larsen, Torben

    1998-01-01

    A 3-dimensional numerical model describing the dilution in the near field around dense vertical jets in a cross flow is formulated and validated against laboratory experiments. The validation shows that the model reproduces the flow pattern well, though the dilution is underestimated by 20%. The ......%. The model is applied to a case study where the dilution from two vertical jets at an angle in shallow water is described. It is demonstrated that a 20% increase in dilution is possible. It is concluded that the model may become a valuable tool in diffusor design....

  4. Ultra-dense Hot Low Z Line Transition Opacity Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvan, P.; Mínguez, E.; Gil, J. M.; Rodríguez, R.; Rubiano, J. G.; Martel, P.; Angelo, P.; Schott, R.; Philippe, F.; Leboucher-Dalimier, E.; Mancini, R.; Calisti, A.

    2002-12-01

    In this work two atomic physics models (the IDEFIX code using the dicenter model and the code based on parametric potentials ANALOP) have been used to calculate the opacities for bound-bound transitions in hot ultra-dense, low Z plasmas. These simulations are in connection with experiments carried out at LULI during the last two years, focused on bound-bound radiation. In this paper H-like opacities for aluminum and fluorine plasmas have been simulated, using both theoretical models, in a wide range of densities and temperatures higher than 200 eV.

  5. Chiral symmetry in a hot and dense magnetic medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Gabriel N.; Pinto, Marcus B. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    We consider the Linear Sigma Model (LSM) in the Mean Field Approximation (MFA) in order to analyze hot and dense two flavor quark matter subject to strong magnetic fields. We pay especial attention to the case of a finite chemical potential, which has not yet been fully explored. Here, we investigate the strength of the chiral transition and the behavior of the sigma meson mass for {mu}= 0 and {mu}{ne} 0 under strong magnetic fields, as well as its effects over the T-{mu} plane.

  6. Electromagnetic Properties of a Hot and Dense Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Masood, Samina

    2016-01-01

    We study the properties of an electromagnetically interacting medium in the presence of high concentration of electrons at extremely high temperatures and chemical potentials. We show that the electromagnetic properties of a medium such as the electric permittivity, magnetic permeability, magnetic moments and the propagation speed of electromagnetic waves as well as the corresponding particle processes depend on temperature and density of the medium. Electromagnetic properties of neutrinos are significantly modified due to their interactions with electrons when they propagate through such a medium of hot and dense electrons.

  7. 3D electron fluid turbulence at nanoscales in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomy Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Shukla, P K [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)], E-mail: dastgeer@cspar.uah.edu, E-mail: ps@tp4.rub.de

    2008-08-15

    We have performed three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear fluid simulations of electron fluid turbulence at nanoscales in an unmagnetized warm dense plasma in which mode coupling between wave function and electrostatic (ES) potential associated with underlying electron plasma oscillations (EPOs) lead to nonlinear cascades in inertial range. While the wave function cascades towards smaller length scales, ES potential follows an inverse cascade. We find from our simulations that the quantum diffraction effect associated with a Bohm potential plays a critical role in determining the inertial range turbulent spectrum and the subsequent transport level exhibited by the 3D EPOs.

  8. Animal reservoirs for visceral leishmaniasis in densely populated urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Soraia A; Silva, Fabiana L; Carvalho Neta, Alcina C; Bueno, Regina; Guerra, Rita M S N C; Abreu-Silva, Ana L; Santos, Renato L

    2008-02-01

    Leishmaniasis is a zoonotic disease of major public health and veterinary importance, affecting 88 countries with up to 2 million cases per year. This review emphasizes the animal reservoirs and spreading of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in urban areas, particularly in two Brazilian metropolitan areas, namely São Luis and Belo Horizonte, where the disease has become endemic in the past few years. Urbanization of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil during the last decades has created favorable epidemiological conditions for maintenance of the disease, with dense human populations sharing a tropical environment with abundant populations of the mammalian reservoir and the invertebrate vector, facilitating transmission of the disease.

  9. Electrostatic Waves in Dense Dusty Plasmas with High Fugacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N. N.

    Propagation of electrostatic dust modes has been reviewed in the light of the concept of dust fugacity defined by f≡4πnd0λD2R, where nd0 and R are the dust number density and the grain size (radius) while the plasma Debye length (λD) is given through λD-2=λDe-2+λDi-2. Dusty plasmas are defined to be tenuous, dilute or dense when f≪1, ˜1, or ≫1, respectively. Attention is focused on “Dust-Acoustic Waves” (DAWs) and “Dust-Coulomb Waves” (DCWs) which exist in the tenuous (f≪1) and the dense (f≫1) regimes, respectively. A simple physical picture of the DCWs has been proposed in terms of an effective pressure called “Coulomb Pressure defined by PC≡nd0qd02/R, where qd0 is the grain charge. In the lowest order, the DCW phase speed is given by ω/k=PC/ρdδ, where ρd≡nd0md is the dust mass density and δ≡ω2/ω1 is the ratio of charging frequencies. Thus, DCWs which are driven by the Coulomb pressure can be considered as the electrostatic analogue of hydromagnetic (Alfvén or magnetoacoustic) modes which are driven by magnetic field pressure. In the dilute regime, the two waves loose their identities and merge into a single mode, which may be called “Dust Charge-Density Wave” (DCDW). When the grains are closest, DCW dispersion relation is identical with that of “Dust-Lattice Waves” (DLWs). Dense dusty plasmas are governed by a new scale-length defined by λR≡1/4πnd0Rδ, which characterizes the effective shielding length due to grain collective interactions. The scale-length λR plays a fundamental role in dense dusty plasmas, which is very similar to that of the Debye length λD in the tenuous regime. The two scale-lengths are related to the fugacity through fδ≡λD2/λR2. The frequency spectrum as well as the damping rates for various dust modes have been analytically obtained, and compared with the numerical solutions of the kinetic (Vlasov) dispersion relation.

  10. Blockade of Alternative Complement Pathway in Dense Deposit Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Berthe-Aucejo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient aged 17 with dense deposit disease associated with complement activation, circulating C3 Nef, and Factor H mutation presented with nephrotic syndrome and hypertension. Steroid therapy, plasma exchange, and rituximab failed to improve proteinuria and hypertension despite a normalization of the circulating sC5b9 complex. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against C5, was used to block the terminal product of the complement cascade. The dose was adapted to achieve a CH50 below 10%, but proteinuria and blood pressure were not improved after 3 months of treatment.

  11. On a dense minimizer of empirical risk in inverse problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Podlewski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of estimators of a functional parameter in an inverse problem setup are studied. We focus on estimators obtained through dense minimization (as opposed to minimization over \\(\\delta\\-nets of suitably defined empirical risk. At the cost of imposition of a sort of local finite-dimensionality assumption, we fill some gaps in the proofs of results published by Klemelä and Mammen [Ann. Statist. 38 (2010, 482-511]. We also give examples of functional classes that satisfy the modified assumptions.

  12. Blockade of Alternative Complement Pathway in Dense Deposit Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacquépée, Mathieu; Fila, Marc; Peuchmaur, Michel; Perrier-Cornet, Emilia; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Deschênes, Georges

    2014-01-01

    A patient aged 17 with dense deposit disease associated with complement activation, circulating C3 Nef, and Factor H mutation presented with nephrotic syndrome and hypertension. Steroid therapy, plasma exchange, and rituximab failed to improve proteinuria and hypertension despite a normalization of the circulating sC5b9 complex. Eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against C5, was used to block the terminal product of the complement cascade. The dose was adapted to achieve a CH50 below 10%, but proteinuria and blood pressure were not improved after 3 months of treatment. PMID:24672732

  13. Dilution in a Dense Bottom Jet in Cross Currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, O.; Larsen, Torben

    1998-01-01

    A 3-dimensional numerical model describing the dilution in the near field around dense vertical jets in a cross flow is formulated and validated against laboratory experiments. The validation shows that the model reproduces the flow pattern well, though the dilution is underestimated by 20......%. The model is applied to a case study where the dilution from two vertical jets at an angle in shallow water is described. It is demonstrated that a 20% increase in dilution is possible. It is concluded that the model may become a valuable tool in diffusor design....

  14. 3D Electron Fluid Turbulence at Nanoscales in Dense Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Shaikh, Dastgeer

    2008-01-01

    We have performed three dimensional nonlinear fluid simulations of electron fluid turbulence at nanoscales in an unmagnetized warm dense plasma in which mode coupling between wave function and electrostatic potential associated with underlying electron plasma oscillations (EPOs) lead to nonlinear cascades in inertial range. While the wave function cascades towards smaller length scales, electrostatic potential follows an inverse cascade. We find from our simulations that quantum diffraction effect associated with a Bohm potential plays a critical role in determining the inertial range turbulent spectrum and the subsequent transport level exhibited by the 3D EPOs.

  15. Synthesis of Vertically Aligned Dense ZnO Nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Lihong Gong; Xiang Wu; Huibo Chen; Fengyu Qu; Maozhong An

    2011-01-01

    We reported the synthesis of vertically aligned dense ZnO nanowires using Zn powder as the source material by a hydrothermal method and a postannealing process at 200°C. The as-synthesized ZnO nanowires are 100–200 nm in diameter and several micrometers in length and each nanowire has a tapered tip. The morphologies of the products remain after post-annealing treatment. Structural analysis indicates the ZnO nanowire is single crystalline and grows along the [0001] direction. The possible grow...

  16. Cold and Dense Matter in a Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    de la Incera, Vivian

    2009-01-01

    Our Universe is full of regions where extreme physical conditions are realized. Among the most intriguing cases are the so-called magnetars: neutron stars with very dense cores and super-strong magnetic fields. In this paper I review the current understanding of the physical properties of quark matter at ultra-high density in the presence of very large magnetic fields. I will discuss the main results on this topic, the main challenges that still remain, and how they could be related to the physics of magnetars.

  17. Possible Origin of Magnetic Fields in Very Dense Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Pérez Martinez; H. Pérez Rojas; H. J. Mosquera Cuesta

    2004-01-01

    @@ We discuss the bosonization of a relativistic very dense Fermi gas in a magnetic field and the consequent BoseEinstein condensation of the resulting relativistic vector gas of charged particles. The model may be applied to paired spin-up electrons. We show that such systems may maintain self-consistently magnetic fields of order 1010 - 1013 G. That pairing could be the origin of large magnetic fields in some white dwarfs and neutron stars.For fields large enough (~ 1013 for white dwarfs), the system becomes unstable and collapses.

  18. Laterally cyclic loading of monopile in dense sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkvort, Rasmus Tofte; Hededal, Ole; Svensson, M.

    2011-01-01

    the loading conditions. In these tests the load conditions are controlled by two load characteristics, one controlling the level of the cyclic loading and one controlling the characteristic of the cyclic loading. The centrifuge tests were performed in dense dry sand on a pile with prototype dimensions......In order to investigate the response from laterally cyclic loading of monopiles a large centrifuge tests series is ongoing at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). This paper will present some of the tests carried out with a focus on the influence of accumulation of rotation when changing...

  19. Nucleation of strange matter in dense stellar cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, J.E. (Instituto Astronomico e Geofisico, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida M. Stefano 4200, Agua Funda (04301) Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)); Benvenuto, O.G. (Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N (1900) La Plata (Argentina)); Vucetich, H. (Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Calle 49 y 115, C.C.67 (1900) La Plata (Argentina))

    1992-05-15

    We investigate the nucleation of strange quark matter inside hot, dense nuclear matter. Applying Zel'dovich's kinetic theory of nucleation we find a lower limit of the temperature {ital T} for strange-matter bubbles to appear, which happens to be satisfied inside the Kelvin-Helmholtz cooling era of a compact star life but not much after it. Our bounds thus suggest that a prompt conversion could be achieved, giving support to earlier expectations for nonstandard type-II supernova scenarios.

  20. Propagation of Complex Laser Pulses in Optically Dense Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterman, M. R.; Davis, J. C.; Goswami, D.; Yang, W.; Warren, W. S.

    1999-05-01

    Ultrafast laser pulses with complex envelopes (amplitude and frequency modulated) are used to excite an optically dense column of rubidium vapor. Pulse reshaping, stimulated emission dynamics, and residual electronic excitation in the Rb vapor are all shown to depend strongly on the laser pulse shape. Pulses that produce adiabatic passage in the optically thin limit exhibit more complex behavior in optically thick samples, including an unexpected dependence on the sign of the frequency sweep. Numerical solutions of the Maxwell-Bloch equations are shown to account for our results.

  1. Light-field camera-based 3D volumetric particle image velocimetry with dense ray tracing reconstruction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shengxian; Ding, Junfei; New, T. H.; Soria, Julio

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a dense ray tracing reconstruction technique for a single light-field camera-based particle image velocimetry. The new approach pre-determines the location of a particle through inverse dense ray tracing and reconstructs the voxel value using multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique (MART). Simulation studies were undertaken to identify the effects of iteration number, relaxation factor, particle density, voxel-pixel ratio and the effect of the velocity gradient on the performance of the proposed dense ray tracing-based MART method (DRT-MART). The results demonstrate that the DRT-MART method achieves higher reconstruction resolution at significantly better computational efficiency than the MART method (4-50 times faster). Both DRT-MART and MART approaches were applied to measure the velocity field of a low speed jet flow which revealed that for the same computational cost, the DRT-MART method accurately resolves the jet velocity field with improved precision, especially for the velocity component along the depth direction.

  2. Inhibition of tyrosine phosphorylation of sperm flagellar proteins, outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2, is associated with impaired motility during capacitation of hamster spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappa, Daniel; Aladakatti, Ravindranath H; Dasari, Santosh K; Sreekumar, Arun; Wolkowicz, Michael; van der Hoorn, Frans; Seshagiri, Polani B

    2010-02-01

    In mammals, acquisition of fertilization competence of spermatozoa is dependent on the phenomenon of sperm capacitation. One of the critical molecular events of sperm capacitation is protein tyrosine phosphorylation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that a specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor, tyrphostin-A47, inhibited hamster sperm capacitation, accompanied by a reduced sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Interestingly, a high percentage of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa exhibited circular motility, which was associated with a distinct hypo-tyrosine phosphorylation of flagellar proteins, predominantly of Mr 45,000-60,000. In this study, we provide evidence on the localization of capacitation-associated tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins to the nonmembranous, structural components of the sperm flagellum. Consistent with this, we show their ultrastructural localization in the outer dense fiber, axoneme, and fibrous sheath of spermatozoa. Among hypo-tyrosine phosphorylated major proteins of tyrphostin-A47-treated spermatozoa, we identified the 45 kDa protein as outer dense fiber protein-2 and the 51 kDa protein as tektin-2, components of the sperm outer dense fiber and axoneme, respectively. This study shows functional association of hypo-tyrosine-phosphorylation status of outer dense fiber protein-2 and tektin-2 with impaired flagellar bending of spermatozoa, following inhibition of EGFR-tyrosine kinase, thereby showing the critical importance of flagellar protein tyrosine phosphorylation during capacitation and hyperactivation of hamster spermatozoa.

  3. Heterogeneous histologic and clinical evolution in 3 cases of dense deposit disease with long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuères, Marie-Lucile; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rabant, Marion; Galmiche, Louise; Marinozzi, Maria Chiara; Grünfeld, Jean-Pierre; Noël, Laure-Hélène; Servais, Aude

    2014-11-01

    Dense deposit disease is characterized by dense deposits in the glomerular and tubular basement membranes. We report 3 cases with long-term follow-up differing in histologic pattern and clinical evolution. Clinical and histologic data were collected between 1976 and 2012. Age at the first manifestations was 6, 11, and 23 years, respectively. They included proteinuria (patient 1) and nephrotic syndrome (patients 2 and 3); renal function was normal in all cases. Two patients (1 and 3) had low complement component 3 (C3) levels. All patients had C3 nephritic factor. Genetic analysis revealed a rare variant of the factor I gene (patient 1) and a heterozygous mutation in complement factor H-related 5 gene (patient 2). Patient 1 underwent 3 biopsies during her 38 years of follow-up. Thickening of the capillary walls of the glomerular and tubular basement membranes was observed, with mild mesangial proliferation and progressive C3 and complement membrane attack complex mesangial deposits. However, renal function remained normal. Patient 2 also underwent 3 biopsies (22 years of follow-up), revealing a gradual decrease in C3 deposition and mesangial cell proliferation. He presented mild renal insufficiency. Patient 3 underwent 2 biopsies, which displayed unusual bulky membranous deposits, confirmed by electron microscopy, with no mesangial cell proliferation and little C3 and complement membrane attack complex deposits. Kidney function remained normal. These 3 cases of dense deposit disease differed in histologic pattern evolution: accumulation of C3 deposits, decrease in C3 deposits and proliferation, and isolated dense deposits. The histologic factors involved in clinical progression remain to be identified.

  4. Characterizing the Dense Gas in the Eagle and Pelican Pillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, Erin; Pound, M. W.; Mundy, L. G.

    2014-01-01

    We observed two regions with molecular pillars, the Eagle and the Pelican, in order to understand the morphology of dense gas in these structures. Molecular pillars are formed in HII regions at the boundary between ionized gas and molecular clouds through the effects of photoionization, ablation, and recombination. Two sets of models exist for the formation mechanism of the pillars: (1) the growth of radiative hydrodynamic instabilities and (2) shadowing of the ionization front due to clumps in the molecular cloud. We have CARMA observations of the two sources in HCN J=1-0, N2H+ J=1-0, HCO+ J=1-0 and CS J=2-1 with resolutions of 9x6’’ for the Eagle and 4x4’’ for the Pelican. The dense gas follows the structure outlined in the optical images and seen in CO emission, throughout the pillars, with an increase in emission in the heads of the pillars. The differencing morphologies among the molecules are consistent with typical photo-disassociation region behavior. The velocity field shows a distinct gradient from head-to-tail for the majority of the pillars. We find that the morphology and the kinematics of the pillars are consistent with the shadowing model.

  5. Comparing Dense Galaxy Cluster Redshift Surveys with Weak Lensing Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Ho Seong; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J; Zahid, H Jabran

    2014-01-01

    We use dense redshift surveys of nine galaxy clusters at $z\\sim0.2$ to compare the galaxy distribution in each system with the projected matter distribution from weak lensing. By combining 2087 new MMT/Hectospec redshifts and the data in the literature, we construct spectroscopic samples within the region of weak-lensing maps of high (70--89%) and uniform completeness. With these dense redshift surveys, we construct galaxy number density maps using several galaxy subsamples. The shape of the main cluster concentration in the weak-lensing maps is similar to the global morphology of the number density maps based on cluster members alone, mainly dominated by red members. We cross correlate the galaxy number density maps with the weak-lensing maps. The cross correlation signal when we include foreground and background galaxies at 0.5$z_{\\rm cl}$20% for A383, A689 and A750). The fractional excess in the cross correlation signal including foreground and background structures could be a useful proxy for assessing th...

  6. Dense Clustered Multi-Channel Wireless Sensor Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaramakrishnan Sivakumar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dense Wireless Sensor Network Clouds have an inherent issue of latency and packet drops with regards to data collection. Though there is extensive literature that tries to address these issues through either scheduling, channel contention or a combination of the two, the problem still largely exists. In this paper, a Clustered Multi-Channel Scheduling Protocol (CMSP is designed that creates a Voronoi partition of a dense network. Each partition is assigned a channel, and a scheduling scheme is adopted to collect data within the Voronoi partitions. This scheme collects data from the partitions concurrently and then passes it to the base station. CMSP is compared using simulation with other multi-channel protocols like Tree-based Multi-Channel, Multi-Channel MAC and Multi-frequency Media Access Control for wireless sensor networks. Results indicate CMSP has higher throughput and data delivery ratio at a lower power consumption due to network partitioning and hierarchical scheduling that minimizes load on the network.

  7. Kinetic equation for strongly interacting dense Fermi systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lipavsky, P; Spicka, V

    2001-01-01

    We review the non-relativistic Green's-function approach to the kinetic equations for Fermi liquids far from equilibrium. The emphasis is on the consistent treatment of the off-shell motion between collisions and on the non-instant and non-local picture of binary collisions. The resulting kinetic equation is of the Boltzmann type, and it represents an interpolation between the theory of transport in metals and the theory of moderately dense gases. The free motion of particles is renormalised by various mean field and mass corrections in the spirit of Landau's quasiparticles in metals. The collisions are non-local in the spirit of Enskog's theory of non-ideal gases. The collisions are moreover non-instant, a feature which is absent in the theory of gases, but which is shown to be important for dense Fermi systems. In spite of its formal complexity, the presented theory has a simple implementation within the Monte-Carlo simulation schemes. Applications in nuclear physics are given for heavy-ion reactions and th...

  8. Time-dependent models of dense PDRs with complex molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Morata, O

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of the chemistry of a dense photon-dominated region (PDR) using a time-dependent chemical model. Our major interest is to study the spatial distribution of complex molecules such as hydrocarbons and cyanopolyynes in the cool dense material bordering regions where star formation has taken place. Our standard model uses a homogeneous cloud of density 2x10e4 cm-3 and temperature T=40 K, which is irradiated by a far-ultraviolet radiation field of intermediate intensity, given by X=100. We find that over a range of times unsaturated hydrocarbons (e.g., C2H, C4H, C3H2) have relatively high fractional abundances in the more external layers of the PDR, whereas their abundances in the innermost layers are several orders of magnitudes lower. On the other hand, molecules that are typical of late-time chemistry are usually more abundant in the inner parts of the PDR. We also present results for models with different density, temperature, intensity of the radiation field and initial fractional abundance...

  9. Unifying Type II Supernova Light Curves with Dense Circumstellar Material

    CERN Document Server

    Morozova, Viktoriya; Valenti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    A longstanding problem in the study of supernovae (SNe) has been the relationship between the Type IIP and Type IIL subclasses. Whether they come from distinct progenitors or they are from similar stars with some property that smoothly transitions from one class to another has been the subject of much debate. Here we show using one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic SN models that the multi-band light curves of SNe IIL are well fit by ordinary red supergiants surrounded by dense circumstellar material (CSM). The inferred extent of this material, coupled with a typical wind velocity of ~10-100 km/s, suggests enhanced activity by these stars during the last ~months to ~years of their lives, which may be connected with advanced stages of nuclear burning. Furthermore, we find that even for more plateau-like SNe that dense CSM provides a better fit to the first ~20 days of their light curves, indicating that the presence of such material may be more widespread than previously appreciated. Here we choose to model t...

  10. Dense circum-nuclear molecular gas in starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Claire-Elise; Green, James A; Dawson, Joanne R; Jones, Paul A; López-Sánchez, Ángel R; Verdes-Montenegro, Lourdes; Henkel, Christian; Baan, Willem A; Martín, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a study of the dense circum-nuclear molecular gas of starburst galaxies. The study aims to investigate the interplay between starbursts, active galactic nuclei and molecular gas. We characterise the dense gas traced by HCN, HCO$^{+}$ and HNC and examine its kinematics in the circum-nuclear regions of nine starburst galaxies observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect HCN (1$-$0) and HCO$^{+}$ (1$-$0) in seven of the nine galaxies and HNC (1$-$0) in four. Approximately 7 arcsec resolution maps of the circum-nuclear molecular gas are presented. The velocity integrated intensity ratios, HCO$^{+}$ (1$-$0)/HCN (1$-$0) and HNC (1$-$0)/HCN (1$-$0), are calculated. Using these integrated intensity ratios and spatial intensity ratio maps we identify photon dominated regions (PDRs) in NGC 1097, NGC 1365 and NGC 1808. We find no galaxy which shows the PDR signature in only one part of the observed nuclear region. We also observe unusually strong HNC emission in NGC 5236, but it...

  11. Efficiently dense hierarchical graphene based aerogel electrode for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Lu, Chengxing; Peng, Huifen; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Zhenkun; Wang, Gongkai

    2016-08-01

    Boosting gravimetric and volumetric capacitances simultaneously at a high rate is still a discrepancy in development of graphene based supercapacitors. We report the preparation of dense hierarchical graphene/activated carbon composite aerogels via a reduction induced self-assembly process coupled with a drying post treatment. The compact and porous structures of composite aerogels could be maintained. The drying post treatment has significant effects on increasing the packing density of aerogels. The introduced activated carbons play the key roles of spacers and bridges, mitigating the restacking of adjacent graphene nanosheets and connecting lateral and vertical graphene nanosheets, respectively. The optimized aerogel with a packing density of 0.67 g cm-3 could deliver maximum gravimetric and volumetric capacitances of 128.2 F g-1 and 85.9 F cm-3, respectively, at a current density of 1 A g-1 in aqueous electrolyte, showing no apparent degradation to the specific capacitance at a current density of 10 A g-1 after 20000 cycles. The corresponding gravimetric and volumetric capacitances of 116.6 F g-1 and 78.1 cm-3 with an acceptable cyclic stability are also achieved in ionic liquid electrolyte. The results show a feasible strategy of designing dense hierarchical graphene based aerogels for supercapacitors.

  12. Dense neuron clustering explains connectivity statistics in cortical microcircuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V Klinshov

    Full Text Available Local cortical circuits appear highly non-random, but the underlying connectivity rule remains elusive. Here, we analyze experimental data observed in layer 5 of rat neocortex and suggest a model for connectivity from which emerge essential observed non-random features of both wiring and weighting. These features include lognormal distributions of synaptic connection strength, anatomical clustering, and strong correlations between clustering and connection strength. Our model predicts that cortical microcircuits contain large groups of densely connected neurons which we call clusters. We show that such a cluster contains about one fifth of all excitatory neurons of a circuit which are very densely connected with stronger than average synapses. We demonstrate that such clustering plays an important role in the network dynamics, namely, it creates bistable neural spiking in small cortical circuits. Furthermore, introducing local clustering in large-scale networks leads to the emergence of various patterns of persistent local activity in an ongoing network activity. Thus, our results may bridge a gap between anatomical structure and persistent activity observed during working memory and other cognitive processes.

  13. Simulations of nonequilibrium warm dense gold produced by ultrafast heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, B.; Recoules, V.; Torrent, M.; Chen, Z.; Sametoglu, V.; Tsui, Y. Y.; Kirkwood, S. E.; Reid, M.; Mazevet, S.; Ng, A.

    2013-03-01

    The interaction of femtosecond laser pulses with metals produces nonequilibrium states consisting of hot electrons and cold ions. These can last for many picoseconds before relaxing to a thermodynamic equilibrium. Recent experiments using a chirped pulse probe technique provided AC conductivity data of gold at a sufficient time resolution to observe this relaxation process. We developed an ab-initio model that characterizes thermodynamic properties of warm dense matter states in nonequilibrium. Our theoretical scheme combines a standard two temperature model with temperature dependent material parameters and an energy transfer rate that are obtained by means of ab-initio simulations. This enables us to give a prediction for the temperature evolution during the relaxation process. Additionally, we derive the AC conductivity of the nonequilibrium states from our simulations using the Kubo-Greenwood formula. It is used to test our model against measurements. We observe agreement with experiment using an energy relaxation rate, that is smaller than predicted, giving us reason to revisit its determination. We can furthermore provide thermodynamical and structural data of nonequilibrium warm dense gold which are not accessible in experiment.

  14. Spaced resolved analysis of suprathermal electrons in dense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinard A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of the hot electron fraction is a crucial topic for high energy density laser driven plasmas: first, energy losses and radiative properties depend strongly on the hot electron fraction and, second, in ICF hohlraums suprathermal electrons preheat the D-T-capsule and seriously reduce the fusion performance. In the present work we present our first experimental and theoretical studies to analyze single shot space resolved hot electron fractions inside dense plasmas via optically thin X-ray line transitions from autoionizing states. The benchmark experiment has been carried out at an X-pinch in order to create a dense, localized plasma with a well defined symmetry axis of hot electron propagation. Simultaneous high spatial and spectral resolution in the X-ray spectral range has been obtained with a spherically bent quartz Bragg crystal. The high performance of the X-ray diagnostics allowed to identify space resolved hot electron fractions via the X-ray spectral distribution of multiple excited states.

  15. Understanding neutron production in the deuterium dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appelbe, Brian, E-mail: b.appelbe07@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: j.chittenden@imperial.ac.uk; Chittenden, Jeremy, E-mail: b.appelbe07@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: j.chittenden@imperial.ac.uk [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    The deuterium Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) can produce copious amounts of MeV neutrons and can be used as an efficient neutron source. However, the mechanism by which neutrons are produced within the DPF is poorly understood and this limits our ability to optimize the device. In this paper we present results from a computational study aimed at understanding how neutron production occurs in DPFs with a current between 70 kA and 500 kA and which parameters can affect it. A combination of MHD and kinetic tools are used to model the different stages of the DPF implosion. It is shown that the anode shape can significantly affect the structure of the imploding plasma and that instabilities in the implosion lead to the generation of large electric fields at stagnation. These electric fields can accelerate deuterium ions within the stagnating plasma to large (>100 keV) energies leading to reactions with ions in the cold dense plasma. It is shown that the electromagnetic fields present can significantly affect the trajectories of the accelerated ions and the resulting neutron production.

  16. Dense, Parsec-Scale Clumps near the Great Annihilator

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges-Kluck, E J; Harris, A I; Lamb, J W; Hodges, M W

    2009-01-01

    We report on Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-Wave Astronomy (CARMA) and James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) observations toward the Einstein source 1E 1740.7-2942, a LMXB commonly known as the "Great Annihilator." The Great Annihilator is known to be near a small, bright molecular cloud on the sky in a region largely devoid of emission in 12-CO surveys of the Galactic Center. The region is of interest because it is interior to the dust lanes which may be the shock zones where atomic gas from HI nuclear disk is converted into molecular gas. We find that the region is populated with a number of dense (n ~ 10^5 cm^-3) regions of excited gas with small filling factors, and estimate that up to 1-3 x 10^5 solar masses of gas can be seen in our maps. The detection suggests that a significant amount of mass is transported from the shock zones to the GC star-forming regions in the form of small, dense bundles.

  17. Molecular Description of Yield in Densely Crosslinked Epoxy Thermosets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattaraj, Sandipan; Pant, Prita; Pawaskar, Dnyanesh; Nanavati, Hemant

    In densely crosslinked networks, macroscopic yield is a transition from deformations of bond lengths and angles, to cooperative deformation of multiple effective network chains via bond torsions. In this work, we examine this yield in terms of the ''activation number'', ν, of microscopic effective chains between crosslinks. ν is the number of effective network chains, in one Eyring activation volume, V*. It is thus a measure of the number of network chains 'activated' at yield, for cooperative deformation. Microcompression experiments have been performed on SU-8 micropillars, to determine its V* value. SU-8 is an important epoxy thermoset, which is used extensively in the microelectronics industry, in microfluidics and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). The effective chain length based on Arruda and Boyce's 8-chain model, compares well with the rms length, obtained by chain conformer analyses. We find that ν ~ 2-4, at room temperature, for DGEBA-based epoxies including SU-8 and DGEBA-amine networks, over a range of network junction functionalities and V*. That ν corresponds very well with the reduced temperature, T/Tg, also demonstrates its viability as a molecular descriptor of yield in densely crosslinked thermosets.

  18. Unseen head pose prediction using dense multivariate label distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao-li SANG; Hu CHEN; Ge HUANG; Qi-jun ZHAO

    2016-01-01

    Accurate head poses are useful for many face-related tasks such as face recognition, gaze estimation, and emotion analysis. Most existing methods estimate head poses that are included in the training data (i.e., previously seen head poses). To predict head poses that are not seen in the training data, some regression-based methods have been proposed. However, they focus on estimating continuous head pose angles, and thus do not systematically evaluate the performance on predicting unseen head poses. In this paper, we use a dense multivariate label distribution (MLD) to represent the pose angle of a face image. By incorporating both seen and unseen pose angles into MLD, the head pose predictor can estimate unseen head poses with an accuracy comparable to that of estimating seen head poses. On the Pointing’04 database, the mean absolute errors of results for yaw and pitch are 4.01◦ and 2.13◦, respectively. In addition, experiments on the CAS-PEAL and CMU Multi-PIE databases show that the proposed dense MLD-based head pose estimation method can obtain the state-of-the-art performance when compared to some existing methods.

  19. Shrinkage/swelling of compacted clayey loose and dense soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowamooz, Hossein; Masrouri, Farimah

    2009-11-01

    This Note presents an experimental study performed on expansive compacted loose and dense samples using osmotic oedometers. Several successive wetting and drying cycles were applied in a suction range between 0 and 8 MPa under different values of constant net vertical stress (15, 30, and 60 kPa). During the suction cycles, the dense samples showed cumulative swelling strains, while the loose samples showed volumetric shrinkage accumulation. At the end of the suction cycles, the volumetric strains converged to an equilibrium stage that indicated elastic behavior of the swelling soil for any further hydraulic variations. At this stage, the compression curves for the studied soil at the different imposed suctions (0, 2, and 8 MPa) converged towards the saturated state curve for the high applied vertical stresses. We defined this pressure as the saturation stress(P). The compression curves provided sufficient data to examine the soil mechanical behavior at the equilibrium stage. To cite this article: H. Nowamooz, F. Masrouri, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  20. SIFT flow: dense correspondence across scenes and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ce; Yuen, Jenny; Torralba, Antonio

    2011-05-01

    While image alignment has been studied in different areas of computer vision for decades, aligning images depicting different scenes remains a challenging problem. Analogous to optical flow, where an image is aligned to its temporally adjacent frame, we propose SIFT flow, a method to align an image to its nearest neighbors in a large image corpus containing a variety of scenes. The SIFT flow algorithm consists of matching densely sampled, pixelwise SIFT features between two images while preserving spatial discontinuities. The SIFT features allow robust matching across different scene/object appearances, whereas the discontinuity-preserving spatial model allows matching of objects located at different parts of the scene. Experiments show that the proposed approach robustly aligns complex scene pairs containing significant spatial differences. Based on SIFT flow, we propose an alignment-based large database framework for image analysis and synthesis, where image information is transferred from the nearest neighbors to a query image according to the dense scene correspondence. This framework is demonstrated through concrete applications such as motion field prediction from a single image, motion synthesis via object transfer, satellite image registration, and face recognition.