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Sample records for dense core formation

  1. ON THE FORMATION OF GLYCOLALDEHYDE IN DENSE MOLECULAR CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Paul M.; Kelly, George; Viti, Serena [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Slater, Ben; Brown, Wendy A.; Puletti, Fabrizio; Burke, Daren J.; Raza, Zamaan, E-mail: paul.woods@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-01

    Glycolaldehyde is a simple monosaccharide sugar linked to prebiotic chemistry. Recently, it was detected in a molecular core in the star-forming region G31.41+0.31 at a reasonably high abundance. We investigate the formation of glycolaldehyde at 10 K to determine whether it can form efficiently under typical dense core conditions. Using an astrochemical model, we test five different reaction mechanisms that have been proposed in the astrophysical literature, finding that a gas-phase formation route is unlikely. Of the grain-surface formation routes, only two are efficient enough at very low temperatures to produce sufficient glycolaldehyde to match the observational estimates, with the mechanism culminating in CH{sub 3}OH + HCO being favored. However, when we consider the feasibility of these mechanisms from a reaction chemistry perspective, the second grain-surface route looks more promising, H{sub 3}CO + HCO.

  2. On the formation of glycolaldehyde in dense molecular cores

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Paul M; Viti, Serena; Slater, Ben; Brown, Wendy A; Puletti, Fabrizio; Burke, Daren J; Raza, Zamaan

    2012-01-01

    Glycolaldehyde is a simple monosaccharide sugar linked to prebiotic chemistry. Recently it was detected in a molecular core in the star-forming region G31.41+0.31 at a reasonably high abundance. We investigate the formation of glycolaldehyde at 10K to determine whether it can form efficiently under typical dense core conditions. Using an astrochemical model, we test five different reaction mechanisms that have been proposed in the astrophysical literature, finding that a gas-phase formation route is unlikely. Of the grain-surface formation routes, only two are efficient enough at very low temperatures to produce sufficient glycolaldehyde to match the observational estimates, with the mechanism culminating in CH3OH + HCO being favoured. However, when we consider the feasibility of these mechanisms from a reaction chemistry perspective, the second grain-surface route looks more promising, H3CO + HCO.

  3. Dense core formation in supersonic turbulent converging flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Hao

    2011-01-01

    We use numerical hydrodynamic simulations to investigate prestellar core formation in the dynamic environment of giant molecular clouds, focusing on planar post-shock layers produced by colliding turbulent flows. A key goal is to test how core evolution and properties depend on the velocity dispersion in the parent cloud; our simulation suite consists of 180 models with inflow Mach numbers Ma=v/c_s=1.1-9. At all Mach numbers, our models show that turbulence and self-gravity collect gas within post-shock regions into filaments at the same time as overdense areas within these filaments condense into cores. This morphology, together with the subsonic velocities we find inside cores, is similar to observations. We extend previous results showing that core collapse develops in an ``outside-in'' manner, with density and velocity approaching the Larson-Penston asymptotic solution. The time for the first core to collapse varies as 1/sqrt(v), consistent with analytic estimates. Core building takes 10 times as long as ...

  4. Massive Infrared-Quiet Dense Cores: Unveiling the Initial Conditions of High-Mass Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Motte, Frédérique; Schneider, N; Schilke, P; Menten, K M

    2008-01-01

    As Pr. Th. Henning said at the conference, cold precursors of high-mass stars are now "hot topics". We here propose some observational criteria to identify massive infrared-quiet dense cores which can host the high-mass analogs of Class 0 protostars and pre-stellar condensations. We also show how far-infrared to millimeter imaging surveys of entire complexes forming OB stars are starting to unveil the initial conditions of high-mass star formation.

  5. Impact of Protostellar Outflows on Turbulence and Star Formation Efficiency in Magnetized Dense Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Chaban, Jonah

    2017-10-01

    The star-forming efficiency of dense gas is thought to be set within cores by outflow and radiative feedback. We use magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate the relation between protostellar outflow evolution, turbulence, and star formation efficiency. We model the collapse and evolution of isolated dense cores for ≳0.5 Myr including the effects of turbulence, radiation transfer, and both radiation and outflow feedback from forming protostars. We show that outflows drive and maintain turbulence in the core environment even with strong initial fields. The star formation efficiency decreases with increasing field strength, and the final efficiencies are 15%–40%. The Stage 0 lifetime, during which the protostellar mass is lower than that of the dense envelope, increases proportionally with the initial magnetic field strength and ranges from ∼ 0.1 {to} 0.4 {Myr}. The average accretion rate is well represented by a tapered turbulent core model, which is a function of the final protostellar mass and is independent of the magnetic field strength. By tagging material launched in the outflow, we demonstrate that the outflow entrains about three times the actual launched gas mass, a ratio that remains roughly constant in time regardless of the initial magnetic field strength. However, turbulent driving increases for stronger fields since momentum is more efficiently imparted to non-outflow material. The protostellar outflow momentum is highest during the first 0.1 Myr and declines thereafter by a factor of ≳ 10 as the accretion rate diminishes.

  6. Condition for the formation of micron-sized dust grains in dense molecular cloud cores

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the condition for the formation of micron-sized grains in dense cores of molecular clouds. This is motivated by the detection of the mid-infrared emission from deep inside a number of dense cores, the so-called `coreshine,' which is thought to come from scattering by micron-sized grains. Based on numerical calculations of coagulation starting from the typical grain size distribution in the diffuse interstellar medium, we obtain a conservative lower limit to the time $t$ to form micron-sized grains: $t/t_\\mathrm{ff}>3 (5/S) (n_\\mathrm{H}/10^5 \\mathrm{cm}^{-3})^{-1/4}$ (where $t_\\mathrm{ff}$ is the free-fall time at hydrogen number density $n_\\mathrm{H}$ in the core, and $S$ the enhancement factor to the grain-grain collision cross-section to account for non-compact aggregates). At the typical core density $n_\\mathrm{H}=10^5 \\mathrm{cm}^{-3}$, it takes at least a few free-fall times to form the micron-sized grains responsible for coreshine. The implication is that those dense cores observed in co...

  7. The effect of ambipolar resistivity on the formation of dense cores

    CERN Document Server

    Van Loo, S; Hartquist, T W; Barker, A J

    2008-01-01

    We aim to understand the formation of dense cores by magnetosonic waves in regions where the thermal to magnetic pressure ratio is small. Because of the low-ionisation fraction in molecular clouds, neutral and charged particles are weakly coupled. Ambipolar diffusion then plays an important role in the formation process. A quiescent, uniform plasma is perturbed by a fast-mode wave. Using 2D numerical simulations, we follow the evolution of the fast-mode wave. The simulations are done with a multifluid, adaptive mesh refinement MHD code. Initial perturbations with wavelengths that are 2 orders of magnitude larger than the dissipation length are strongly affected by the ion-neutral drift. Only in situations where there are large variations in the magnetic field corresponding to a highly turbulent gas can fast-mode waves generate dense cores. This means that, in most cores, no substructure can be produced. However, Core D of TMC-1 is an exception to this case. Due to its atypically high ionisation fraction, wave...

  8. EARLY STAGES OF CLUSTER FORMATION: FRAGMENTATION OF MASSIVE DENSE CORES DOWN TO {approx}< 1000 AU

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    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Fuente, Asuncion [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, P.O. Box 112, E-28803 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Estalella, Robert [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti Franques, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ho, Paul T. P.; Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Fontani, Francesco; Cesaroni, Riccardo [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Lago E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Busquet, Gemma [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Area di Recerca di Tor Vergata, Via Fosso Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Commercon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie, UMR CNRS 8112, Ecole Normale Superieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Boissier, Jeremie [Istituto di Radioastronomia, INAF, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Zapata, Luis A., E-mail: palau@ieec.uab.es [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2013-01-10

    In order to study the fragmentation of massive dense cores, which constitute the cluster cradles, we observed the continuum at 1.3 mm and the CO (2-1) emission of four massive cores with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in the most extended configuration. We detected dust condensations down to {approx}0.3 M {sub Sun} and separate millimeter sources down to 0.''4 or {approx}< 1000 AU, comparable to the sensitivities and separations reached in optical/infrared studies of clusters. The CO (2-1) high angular resolution images reveal high-velocity knots usually aligned with previously known outflow directions. This, in combination with additional cores from the literature observed at similar mass sensitivity and spatial resolution, allowed us to build a sample of 18 protoclusters with luminosities spanning three orders of magnitude. Among the 18 regions, {approx}30% show no signs of fragmentation, while 50% split up into {approx}> 4 millimeter sources. We compiled a list of properties for the 18 massive dense cores, such as bolometric luminosity, total mass, and mean density, and found no correlation of any of these parameters with the fragmentation level. In order to investigate the combined effects of the magnetic field, radiative feedback, and turbulence in the fragmentation process, we compared our observations to radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations and found that the low-fragmented regions are reproduced well in the magnetized core case, while the highly fragmented regions are consistent with cores where turbulence dominates over the magnetic field. Overall, our study suggests that the fragmentation in massive dense cores could be determined by the initial magnetic field/turbulence balance in each particular core.

  9. Early stages of cluster formation: fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ~1000 AU

    CERN Document Server

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M; Estalella, Robert; Ho, Paul T P; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro; Fontani, Francesco; Busquet, Gemma; Commercon, Benoît; Hennebelle, Patrick; Boissier, Jérémie; Zhang, Qizhou; Cesaroni, Riccardo; Zapata, Luis A

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the fragmentation of massive dense cores, which constitute the cluster cradles, we observed with the PdBI in the most extended configuration the continuum at 1.3 mm and the CO(2-1) emission of four massive cores. We detect dust condensations down to ~0.3 Msun and separate millimeter sources down to 0.4" or ~1000 AU, comparable to the sensitivities and separations reached in optical/infrared studies of clusters. The CO(2-1) high angular resolution images reveal high-velocity knots usually aligned with previously known outflow directions. This, in combination with additional cores from the literature observed at similar mass sensitivity and spatial resolution, allowed us to build a sample of 18 protoclusters with luminosities spanning 3 orders of magnitude. Among the 18 regions, ~30% show no signs of fragmentation, while 50% split up into ~4 millimeter sources. We compiled a list of properties for the 18 massive dense cores, such as bolometric luminosity, total mass, and mean density, and foun...

  10. Dense core formation by fragmentation of velocity-coherent filaments in L1517

    CERN Document Server

    Hacar, A

    2011-01-01

    Context. Low-mass star-forming cores differ from their surrounding molecular cloud in turbulence, shape, and density structure. Aims. We aim to understand how dense cores form out of the less dense cloud material by studying the connection between these two regimes. Methods. We observed the L1517 dark cloud in C18O(1-0), N2H+(1-0), and SO(JN=32-21) with the FCRAO 14m telescope, and in the 1.2mm dust continuum with the IRAM 30m telescope. Results. Most of the gas in the cloud lies in four filaments that have typical lengths of 0.5 pc. Five starless cores are embedded in these filaments and have chemical compositions indicative of different evolutionary stages. The filaments have radial profiles of C18O(1-0) emission with a central flattened region and a power-law tail, and can be fitted approximately as isothermal, pressure-supported cylinders. The filaments, in addition, are extremely quiescent. They have subsonic internal motions and are coherent in velocity over their whole length. The large-scale motions i...

  11. Non-linear dense core formation in the dark cloud L1517

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heigl, S.; Burkert, A.; Hacar, A.

    2016-09-01

    We present a solution for the observed core fragmentation of filaments in the Taurus L1517 dark cloud which previously could not be explained (Hacar & Tafalla 2011). Core fragmentation is a vital step for the formation of stars. Observations suggest a connection to the filamentary structure of the cloud gas, but it remains unclear which process is responsible. We show that the gravitational instability process of an infinite, isothermal cylinder can account for the exhibited fragmentation under the assumption that the perturbation grows on the dominant wavelength. We use numerical simulations with the code RAMSES, estimate observed column densities and line-of-sight velocities, and compare them to the observations. A critical factor for the observed fragmentation is that cores grow by redistributing mass within the filament and thus the density between the cores decreases over the fragmentation process. This often leads to wrong dominant wavelength estimates, as it is strongly dependent on the initial central density. We argue that non-linear effects also play an important role on the evolution of the fragmentation. Once the density perturbation grows above the critical line-mass, non-linearity leads to an enhancement of the central core density in comparison to the analytical prediction. Choosing the correct initial conditions with perturbation strengths of around 20%, leads to inclination corrected line-of-sight velocities and central core densities within the observational measurement error in a realistic evolution time.

  12. Physical and chemical structure of dense cores in regions of high mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Zinchenko, A I; Caselli, P; Johansson, L E B; Malafeev, S; Turner, B; Zinchenko, Igor; Pirogov, Lev; Caselli, Paola; Johansson, Lars E.B.; Malafeev, Sergey; Turner, Barry

    2005-01-01

    We found that in regions of high mass star formation the CS emission correlates well with the dust continuum emission and is therefore a good tracer of the total mass while the N$_2$H$^+$ distribution is frequently very different. This is opposite to their typical behavior in low-mass cores where freeze-out plays a crucial role in the chemistry. The behavior of other high density tracers varies from source to source but most of them are closer to CS. Radial density profiles in massive cores are fitted by power laws with indices about -1.6, as derived from the dust continuum emission. The radial temperature dependence on intermediate scales is close to the theoretically expected one for a centrally heated optically thin cloud. The velocity dispersion either remains constant or decreases from the core center to the edge. Several cores including those without known embedded IR sources show signs of infall motions. They can represent the earliest phases of massive protostars. There are implicit arguments in favor...

  13. SURVIVAL OF INTERSTELLAR MOLECULES TO PRESTELLAR DENSE CORE COLLAPSE AND EARLY PHASES OF DISK FORMATION

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    Hincelin, U. [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Guilloteau, S. [University of Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Commerçon, B., E-mail: ugo.hincelin@virginia.edu [Laboratoire de radioastronomie, LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Supérieure (UMR 8112 CNRS), 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2013-09-20

    An outstanding question of astrobiology is the link between the chemical composition of planets, comets, and other solar system bodies and the molecules formed in the interstellar medium. Understanding the chemical and physical evolution of the matter leading to the formation of protoplanetary disks is an important step for this. We provide some new clues to this long-standing problem using three-dimensional chemical simulations of the early phases of disk formation: we interfaced the full gas-grain chemical model Nautilus with the radiation-magnetohydrodynamic model RAMSES, for different configurations and intensities of the magnetic field. Our results show that the chemical content (gas and ices) is globally conserved during the collapsing process, from the parent molecular cloud to the young disk surrounding the first Larson core. A qualitative comparison with cometary composition suggests that comets are constituted of different phases, some molecules being direct tracers of interstellar chemistry, while others, including complex molecules, seem to have been formed in disks, where higher densities and temperatures allow for an active grain surface chemistry. The latter phase, and its connection with the formation of the first Larson core, remains to be modeled.

  14. Dense Gas and Star Formation Characteristics of Cloud Cores Associated with Water Masers

    CERN Document Server

    Plume, R; Evans, N J; Martín-Pintado, J; Gómez-González, J; Plume, Rene; II, Neal J. Evans

    1996-01-01

    We have observed 150 regions of massive star formation, selected originally by the presence of a water maser, in the J = 5-4, 3-2, and 2-1 transitions of CS, and 49 regions in the same transitions of C$^{34}$S. Over 90% of the 150 regions were detected in the J = 2-1 and 3-2 transitions of CS and 75% were detected in the J=5-4 transition. We have combined the data with the J = 7-6 data from our original survey (Plume et al. 1992) to determine the density by analyzing the excitation of the rotational levels. Using Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) models, we have determined densities and column densities for 71 of these regions. The gas densities are very high (the mean log of the density is 5.9), but much less than the critical density of the J=7-6 line. Small maps of 25 of the sources in the J = 5-4 line yield a mean diameter of 1.0 pc. The mean virial mass is 3800 solar masses. The mean ratio of bolometric luminosity to virial mass (L/M) is 190, about 50 times higher than estimates using CO emission, suggesting...

  15. STAR FORMATION IN DENSE CLUSTERS

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    Myers, Philip C., E-mail: pmyers@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star initial mass function (IMF) from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosities matches those in active star-forming regions if protostars have a constant birthrate but not if their births are coeval. For constant birthrate, the ratio of young stellar objects to protostars indicates the star-forming age of a cluster, typically {approx}1 Myr. The protostar accretion luminosity is typically less than its steady spherical value by a factor of {approx}2, consistent with models of episodic disk accretion.

  16. Star formation in dense clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Philip C

    2011-01-01

    A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion, and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star IMF from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosi...

  17. On the Evolution of the Dense Core Mass Function

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Jonathan J Swift Jonathan P

    2008-01-01

    The mass distributions of dense cores in star-forming regions are measured to have a shape similar to the initial mass function of stars. This has been generally interpreted to mean that the constituent cores will form individual stars or stellar systems at a nearly constant star formation efficiency. This article presents a series of numerical experiments evolving distributions of dense cores into stars to quantify the effects of stellar multiplicity, global core fragmentation, and a varying star formation efficiency. We find that the different evolutionary schemes have an overall small effect on the shape of the resultant distribution of stars. Our results imply that at the current level of observational accuracy the comparison between the mass functions of dense cores and stars alone is insufficient to discern between different evolutionary models. Observations over a wide range of mass scales including the high or low-mass tails of these distributions have the largest potential for discerning between diff...

  18. Dense Molecular Cores Being Externally Heated

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Gwanjeong; Gopinathan, Maheswar; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kim, Mi-Ryang

    2016-01-01

    We present results of our study on eight dense cores, previously classified as starless, using infrared (3-160 {\\micron}) imaging observations with \\textit{AKARI} telescope and molecular line (HCN and N$_2$H$^+$) mapping observations with \\textit{KVN} telescope. Combining our results with the archival IR to mm continuum data, we examined the starless nature of these eight cores. Two of the eight cores are found to harbor faint protostars having luminosity of $\\sim0.3-4.4$ L$_{\\odot}$. The other six cores are found to remain as starless and probably are in a dynamically transitional state. The temperature maps produced using multi-wavelength images show an enhancement of about 3-6 K towards the outer boundary of these cores, suggesting that they are most likely being heated externally by nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields. Large virial parameters and an over-dominance of red asymmetric line profiles over the cores may indicate that the cores are set into either an expansion or an oscillatory mot...

  19. HNCO in massive galactic dense cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, I.; Henkel, C.; Mao, R. Q.

    2000-09-01

    We surveyed 81 dense molecular cores associated with regions of massive star formation and Sgr A in the JK-1K-1 = 505-404 and 10010-909 lines of HNCO. Line emission was detected towards 57 objects. Selected subsamples were also observed in the 101-000, 404-303, 707-606, 15015-14014, 16016-15015 and 21021-20020 lines, covering a frequency range from 22 to 461 GHz. HNCO lines from the K-1 = 2,3 ladders were detected in several sources. Towards Orion-KL, K-1 = 5 transitions with upper state energies Eu/k ~ 1100 and 1300 K could be observed. Five HNCO cores were mapped. The sources remain spatially unresolved at 220 and 461 GHz (10010-909 and 21010-20020 transitions) with beam sizes of 24'' and 18\\arcsec, respectively. The detection of hyperfine structure in the 101-000 transition is consistent with optically thin emission under conditions of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (LTE). This is corroborated by a rotational diagram analysis of Orion-KL that indicates optically thin line emission also for transitions between higher excited states. At the same time a tentative detection of interstellar HN13CO (the 100,10-90,9 line at 220 GHz toward G 310.12-0.20) suggests optically thick emission from some rotational transitions. Typical HNCO abundances relative to H2 as derived from a population diagram analysis are ~ 10-9. The rotational temperatures reach ~ 500 K. The gas densities in regions of HNCO K-1=0 emission should be n>~ 106 cm-3 and in regions of K-1>0 emission about an order of magnitude higher even for radiative excitation. HNCO abundances are found to be enhanced in high-velocity gas. HNCO integrated line intensities correlate well with those of thermal SiO emission. This indicates a spatial coexistence of the two species and may hint at a common production mechanism, presumably based on shock chemistry. Based on the observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile and on observations with the Heinrich-Hertz-Telescope (HHT). The HHT

  20. The Dynamics of Dense Cores in the Perseus Molecular Cloud II: The Relationship Between Dense Cores and the Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, Helen; Johnstone, Doug; Goodman, Alyssa

    2010-01-01

    We utilize the extensive datasets available for the Perseus molecular cloud to analyze the relationship between the kinematics of small-scale dense cores and the larger structures in which they are embedded. The kinematic measures presented here can be used in conjunction with those discussed in our previous work as strong observational constraints that numerical simulations (or analytic models) of star formation should match. We find that dense cores have small motions with respect to the 13CO gas, about one third of the 13CO velocity dispersion along the same line of sight. Within each extinction region, the core-to-core velocity dispersion is about half of the total (13CO) velocity dispersion seen in the region. Large-scale velocity gradients account for roughly half of the total velocity dispersion in each region, similar to what is predicted from large-scale turbulent modes following a power spectrum of P(k) ~ k^{-4}.

  1. The Enigmatic Dense Core L1451-mm: A First Hydrostatic Core Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Jaime E.; Goodman, A. A.; Arce, H. G.; Schnee, S.; Bourke, T.; Foster, J.; Robitaille, T.; Tanner, J.; Kauffmann, J.; Tafalla, M.; Caselli, P.; Anglada, G.

    2011-05-01

    We present the detection of a dust continuum source at 93GHz (CARMA) and 230GHz (SMA), and 12CO(2-1) emission (SMA) towards the L1451-mm dense core located in the Perseus Cloud. These detections suggest a compact object and an outflow where no point source is detected using Spitzer. An upper limit for the dense core bolometric luminosity of 0.07Lsun is obtained. We simultaneously model the broadband SED and the continuum visibilities, and the modeling confirms that a central source of heating is needed to explain the observations. It also shows that the data can be well fitted by a dense core with a YSO and disk, or by a dense core with a central First Hydrostatic Core (FHSC). Unfortunately, we are not able to rule out any of these two models, which produce similar fits. We also detect 12CO(2-1) emission with red- and blue-shifted emission suggesting the presence of a slow and poorly collimated outflow, in opposition to what is usually found towards young objects but in agreement with prediction from simulations of a FHSC. This presents the best candidate, so far, for a FHSC, an object that has been identified in simulations of collapsing dense cores. Whatever the true nature of the central object in L1451-mm, this core presents an excellent laboratory to study the earliest phases of star formation.

  2. A Survey of Dense Cores in the Orion B Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Norio; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Sunada, Kazuyoshi

    2009-02-01

    We have carried out an H13CO+(J = 1 - 0) core survey in a large area of 1 deg2, covering most of the dense region in the Orion B molecular cloud, using the Nobeyama 45 m radio telescope with the 25-BEam Array Receiver System. We cataloged 151 dense cores using the clumpfind method. The cores have mean radius, velocity width, and mass of 0.10 ± 0.02 pc, 0.53 ± 0.15 km s-1, and 8.1 ± 6.4 M sun, respectively, which are very similar to those in the Orion A cloud. We examined the spatial relation between our H13CO+ cores and the 850 μm cores observed by Johnstone and colleagues in 2001 and 2006, and found that there are two types of spatial relationships: H13CO+ cores with and without the 850 μm cores. Since the mean density of the 850 μm cores is higher than that of the H13CO+ cores, we can interpret the H13CO+ cores with 850 μm cores as being more centrally concentrated and hence more evolved, compared with those without. Considering the relationship between the masses of the H13CO+ and 850 μm cores, we estimate the 850 μm core mass function (CMF) using the H13CO+ CMF through the generalization of the confusion model proposed by Ikeda and colleagues in 2007. Our predicted 850 μm CMF is found to be quite consistent with that directly derived by Johnstone and colleagues. Furthermore, we predict the initial mass function (IMF) by the generalized confusion model assuming a star formation efficiency of 40% for the H13CO+ cores, and found that our predicted IMF is consistent with the Galactic field-averaged IMF within uncertainties. This agreement may indicate that the origin of the IMF goes back to the cloud structures with densities of less than 104 cm-3.

  3. Shell instability of a collapsing dense core

    CERN Document Server

    Ntormousi, Evangelia

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the formation of binary and multiple stellar systems largely comes down to studying the circumstances for the fragmentation of a condensing core during the first stages of the collapse. However, the probability of fragmentation and the number of fragments seem to be determined to a large degree by the initial conditions. In this work we study the fate of the linear perturbations of a homogeneous gas sphere both analytically and numerically. In particular, we investigate the stability of the well-known homologous solution that describes the collapse of a uniform spherical cloud. The difficulty of the mathematical singularity in the perturbation equations is surpassed here by explicitly introducing a weak shock next to the sonic point. In parallel, we perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) numerical simulations of the linear stages of the collapse and compared the growth rates obtained by each method. With this combination of analytical and numerical tools, we explore the behavior of both spherica...

  4. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Dense Core Clusters in Orion A

    CERN Document Server

    Lane, J; Johnstone, D; Mairs, S; Di Francesco, J; Sadavoy, S; Hatchell, J; Berry, D S; Jenness, T; Hogerheijde, M R; Ward-Thompson, D

    2016-01-01

    The Orion A molecular cloud is one of the most well-studied nearby star-forming regions, and includes regions of both highly clustered and more dispersed star formation across its full extent. Here, we analyze dense, star-forming cores identified in the 850 {\\mu}m and 450 {\\mu}m SCUBA-2 maps from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We identify dense cores in a uniform manner across the Orion A cloud and analyze their clustering properties. Using two independent lines of analysis, we find evidence that clusters of dense cores tend to be mass segregated, suggesting that stellar clusters may have some amount of primordial mass segregation already imprinted in them at an early stage. We also demonstrate that the dense core clusters have a tendency to be elongated, perhaps indicating a formation mechanism linked to the filamentary structure within molecular clouds.

  5. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Dense Core Clusters in Orion A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J.; Kirk, H.; Johnstone, D.; Mairs, S.; Di Francesco, J.; Sadavoy, S.; Hatchell, J.; Berry, D. S.; Jenness, T.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; The JCMT Gould Belt Survey Team

    2016-12-01

    The Orion A molecular cloud is one of the most well-studied nearby star-forming regions, and includes regions of both highly clustered and more dispersed star formation across its full extent. Here, we analyze dense, star-forming cores identified in the 850 and 450 μm SCUBA-2 maps from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We identify dense cores in a uniform manner across the Orion A cloud and analyze their clustering properties. Using two independent lines of analysis, we find evidence that clusters of dense cores tend to be mass segregated, suggesting that stellar clusters may have some amount of primordial mass segregation already imprinted in them at an early stage. We also demonstrate that the dense core clusters have a tendency to be elongated, perhaps indicating a formation mechanism linked to the filamentary structure within molecular clouds.

  6. Discerning the Form of the Dense Core Mass Function

    CERN Document Server

    Swift, Jonathan J

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the ability to discern between lognormal and powerlaw forms for the observed mass function of dense cores in star forming regions. After testing our fitting, goodness-of-fit, and model selection procedures on simulated data, we apply our analysis to 14 datasets from the literature. Whether the core mass function has a powerlaw tail or whether it follows a pure lognormal form cannot be distinguished from current data. From our simulations it is estimated that datasets from uniform surveys containing more than approximately 500 cores with a completeness limit below the peak of the mass distribution are needed to definitively discern between these two functional forms. We also conclude that the width of the core mass function may be more reliably estimated than the powerlaw index of the high mass tail and that the width may also be a more useful parameter in comparing with the stellar initial mass function to deduce the statistical evolution of dense cores into stars.

  7. Dense molecular cloud cores as a source of micrometer-sized grains in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Nozawa, Takaya; Li, Zhi-Yun; Liu, Ming-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Coreshine in dense molecular cloud cores (dense cores) is interpreted as evidence for micrometer-sized grains (referred to as very large grains, VLGs). VLGs may have a significant influence on the total dust amount and the extinction curve. We estimate the total abundance of VLGs in the Galaxy, assuming that dense cores are the site of VLG formation. We find that the VLG abundance relative to the total dust mass is roughly $\\phi_\\mathrm{VLG}\\sim 0.01(1-\\epsilon )/\\epsilon (\\tau_\\mathrm{SF}/5\\times 10^9~\\mathrm{yr})^{-1} (f_\\mathrm{VLG}/0.5)(t_\\mathrm{shat}/10^8~\\mathrm{yr})$, where $\\epsilon$ is the star formation efficiency in dense cores, $\\tau_\\mathrm{SF}$ the timescale of gas consumption by star formation, $f_\\mathrm{VLG}$ the fraction of dust mass eventually coagulated into VLGs in dense cores, and $t_\\mathrm{shat}$ the lifetime of VLGs (determined by shattering). Adopting their typical values for the Galaxy, we obtain $\\phi_\\mathrm{VLG}\\sim 0.02$--0.09. This abundance is well below the value detected in...

  8. Dense Cloud Formation and Star Formation in a Barred Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Nimori, M; Sorai, K; Watanabe, Y; Hirota, A; Namekata, D

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the properties of massive, dense clouds formed in a barred galaxy and their possible relation to star formation, performing a two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulation with the gravitational potential obtained from the 2Mass data from the barred spiral galaxy, M83. Since the environment for cloud formation and evolution in the bar region is expected to be different from that in the spiral arm region, barred galaxies are a good target to study the environmental effects on cloud formation and the subsequent star formation. Our simulation uses for an initial 80 Myr an isothermal flow of non-self gravitating gas in the barred potential, then including radiative cooling, heating and self-gravitation of the gas for the next 40 Myr, during which dense clumps are formed. We identify many cold, dense gas clumps for which the mass is more than $10^4M_{\\odot}$ (a value corresponding to the molecular clouds) and study the physical properties of these clumps. The relation of the velocity dispersion of the i...

  9. Cycling of dense core vesicles involved in somatic exocytosis of serotonin by leech neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citlali eTrueta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the cycling of dense core vesicles producing somatic exocytosis of serotonin. Our experiments were made using electron microscopy and vesicle staining with fluorescent dye FM1-43 in Retzius neurons of the leech, which secrete serotonin from clusters of dense core vesicles in a frequency-dependent manner. Electron micrographs of neurons at rest or after 1 Hz stimulation showed two pools of dense core vesicles. A perinuclear pool near Golgi apparatuses, from which vesicles apparently form, and a peripheral pool with vesicle clusters at a distance from the plasma membrane. By contrast, after 20 Hz electrical stimulation 47% of the vesicle clusters were apposed to the plasma membrane, with some omega exocytosis structures. Dense core and small clear vesicles apparently originating from endocytosis were incorporated in multivesicular bodies. In another series of experiments, neurons were stimulated at 20 Hz while bathed in a solution containing peroxidase. Electron micrographs of these neurons contained gold particles coupled to anti-peroxidase antibodies in dense core vesicles and multivesicular bodies located near the plasma membrane. Cultured neurons depolarized with high potassium in the presence of FM1-43 displayed superficial fluorescent spots, each reflecting a vesicle cluster. A partial bleaching of the spots followed by another depolarization in the presence of FM1-43 produced restaining of some spots, other spots disappeared, some remained without restaining and new spots were formed. Several hours after electrical stimulation the FM1-43 spots accumulated at the center of the somata. This correlated with electron micrographs of multivesicular bodies releasing their contents near Golgi apparatuses. Our results suggest that dense core vesicle cycling related to somatic serotonin release involves two steps: the production of clear vesicles and multivesicular bodies after exocytosis, and the formation of new dense core vesicles in

  10. Phosphorus-bearing molecules in massive dense cores

    CERN Document Server

    Fontani, F; Caselli, P; Vasyunin, A; Palau, Aina

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus is a crucial element for the development of life, but so far P-bearing molecules have been detected only in a few astrophysical objects, hence its interstellar chemistry is almost totally unknown. Here we show new detections of phosphorus nitride in a sample of dense cores in different evolutionary stages of the intermediate- and high-mass star formation process: starless, with protostellar objects, and with ultracompact HII regions. All detected PN line widths are smaller than ~5 km/s , and they arise from regions associated with kinetic temperatures smaller than 100 K. Because the few previous detections reported in the literature are associated with warmer and more turbulent sources, the results of this work show that PN can arise from relatively quiescent and cold gas. This information is challenging for theoretical models that invoke either high desorption temperatures or grain sputtering from shocks to release phosphorus into the gas phase. Derived column densities are of the order of 10^{11-...

  11. Synthetic observations of first hydrostatic cores in collapsing low-mass dense cores. I. Spectral energy distributions and evolutionary sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Commercon, Benoit; Dullemond, Cornelis P; Henning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The low-mass star formation evolutionary sequence is relatively well-defined both from observations and theoretical considerations. The first hydrostatic core is the first protostellar equilibrium object that is formed during the star formation process. Using state-of-the-art radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement calculations, we aim to provide predictions for the dust continuum emission from first hydrostatic cores. We investigate the collapse and the fragmentation of magnetized one solar mass prestellar dense cores and the formation and evolution of first hydrostatic cores using the RAMSES code. We use three different magnetization levels for the initial conditions, which cover a large variety of early evolutionary morphology, e.g., the formation of a disk or a pseudo-disk, outflow launching, and fragmentation. We post-process the dynamical calculations using the 3D radiative transfer code RADMC-3D. We compute spectral energy distributions and usual evolutionary stage indicators such as...

  12. Origin of the dense core mass function in contracting filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Philip C

    2013-01-01

    Mass functions of starless dense cores (CMFs) may arise from contraction and dispersal of core-forming filaments. In an illustrative model, a filament contracts radially by self-gravity, increasing the mass of its cores. During this contraction, FUV photoevaporation and ablation by shocks and winds disperse filament gas and limit core growth. The stopping times of core growth are described by a waiting-time distribution. The initial filament column density profile and the resulting CMF each match recent Herschel observations in detail. Then low-mass cores have short growth ages and arise from the innermost filament gas, while massive cores have long growth ages and draw from more extended filament gas. The model fits the initial density profile and CMF best for mean core density 2 10^4 cm^-3 and filament dispersal time scale 0.5 Myr. Then the typical core mass, radius, mean column density, and contraction speed are respectively 0.8 solar masses, 0.06 pc, 6 10^21 cm^-2, and 0.07 km s^-1, also in accord with ob...

  13. Physical properties of dense cores in Orion B9

    CERN Document Server

    Miettinen, Oskari; Haikala, Lauri K; Juvela, Mika

    2010-01-01

    We aim to determine the physical and chemical properties of dense cores in Orion B9. We observed the NH3(1,1) and (2,2), and the N2H+(3-2) lines towards the submm peak positions. These data are used in conjunction with our LABOCA 870 micron dust continuum data. The gas kinetic temperature in the cores is between ~9.4-13.9 K. The non-thermal velocity dispersion is subsonic in most of the cores. The non-thermal linewidth in protostellar cores appears to increase with increasing bolometric luminosity. The core masses are very likely drawn from the same parent distribution as the core masses in Orion B North. Starless cores in the region are likely to be gravitationally bound, and thus prestellar. Some of the cores have a lower radial velocity than the systemic velocity of the region, suggesting that they are members of the "low-velocity part" of Orion B. The observed core-separation distances deviate from the corresponding random-like model distributions. The distances between the nearest-neighbours are comparab...

  14. Synthetic observations of first hydrostatic cores in collapsing low-mass dense cores. I. Spectral energy distributions and evolutionary sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commerçon, B.; Launhardt, R.; Dullemond, C.; Henning, Th.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The low-mass star formation evolutionary sequence is relatively well-defined both from observations and theoretical considerations. The first hydrostatic core is the first protostellar equilibrium object that is formed during the star formation process. Aims: Using state-of-the-art radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement calculations, we aim to provide predictions for the dust continuum emission from first hydrostatic cores. Methods: We investigated the collapse and the fragmentation of magnetized 1 M⊙ prestellar dense cores and the formation and evolution of first hydrostatic cores using the RAMSES code. We used three different magnetization levels for the initial conditions, which cover a wide variety of early evolutionary morphology, e.g., the formation of a disk or a pseudo-disk, outflow launching, and fragmentation. We post-processed the dynamical calculations using the 3D radiative transfer code RADMC-3D. We computed spectral energy distributions and usual evolutionary stage indicators such as bolometric luminosity and temperature. Results: We find that the first hydrostatic core lifetimes depend strongly on the initial magnetization level of the parent dense core. We derive, for the first time, spectral energy distribution evolutionary sequences from high-resolution radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic calculations. We show that under certain conditions, first hydrostatic cores can be identified from dust continuum emission at 24 μm and 70 μm. We also show that single spectral energy distributions cannot help in distinguishing between the formation scenarios of the first hydrostatic core, i.e., between the magnetized and non-magnetized models. Conclusions: Spectral energy distributions are a first useful and direct way to target first hydrostatic core candidates but high-resolution interferometry is definitively needed to determine the evolutionary stage of the observed sources.

  15. Contraction Signatures toward Dense Cores in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. L.; Friesen, R. K.; Martin, P. G.; Caselli, P.; Kauffmann, J.; Pineda, J. E.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of an HCO+ (3-2) and N2D+ (3-2) molecular line survey performed toward 91 dense cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, to identify the fraction of starless and protostellar cores with systematic radial motions. We quantify the HCO+ asymmetry using a dimensionless asymmetry parameter δv, and identify 20 cores with significant blue or red line asymmetries in optically thick emission indicative of collapsing or expanding motions, respectively. We separately fit the HCO+ profiles with an analytic collapse model and determine contraction (expansion) speeds toward 22 cores. Comparing the δv and collapse model results, we find that δv is a good tracer of core contraction if the optically thin emission is aligned with the model-derived systemic velocity. The contraction speeds range from subsonic (0.03 km s-1) to supersonic (0.4 km s-1), where the supersonic contraction speeds may trace global rather than local core contraction. Most cores have contraction speeds significantly less than their free-fall speeds. Only 7 of 28 starless cores have spectra well-fit by the collapse model, which more than doubles (15 of 28) for protostellar cores. Starless cores with masses greater than the Jeans mass (M/MJ > 1) are somewhat more likely to show contraction motions. We find no trend of optically thin non-thermal line width with M/MJ, suggesting that any undetected contraction motions are small and subsonic. Most starless cores in Perseus are either not in a state of collapse or expansion, or are in a very early stage of collapse.

  16. CONTRACTION SIGNATURES TOWARD DENSE CORES IN THE PERSEUS MOLECULAR CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Friesen, R. K. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Martin, P. G. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H8 (Canada); Caselli, P.; Pineda, J. E. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Gießenbachstrasse 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Kauffmann, J., E-mail: jessicalynn.campbell@mail.utoronto.ca [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2016-03-10

    We report the results of an HCO{sup +} (3–2) and N{sub 2}D{sup +} (3–2) molecular line survey performed toward 91 dense cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, to identify the fraction of starless and protostellar cores with systematic radial motions. We quantify the HCO{sup +} asymmetry using a dimensionless asymmetry parameter δ{sub v}, and identify 20 cores with significant blue or red line asymmetries in optically thick emission indicative of collapsing or expanding motions, respectively. We separately fit the HCO{sup +} profiles with an analytic collapse model and determine contraction (expansion) speeds toward 22 cores. Comparing the δ{sub v} and collapse model results, we find that δ{sub v} is a good tracer of core contraction if the optically thin emission is aligned with the model-derived systemic velocity. The contraction speeds range from subsonic (0.03 km s{sup −1}) to supersonic (0.4 km s{sup −1}), where the supersonic contraction speeds may trace global rather than local core contraction. Most cores have contraction speeds significantly less than their free-fall speeds. Only 7 of 28 starless cores have spectra well-fit by the collapse model, which more than doubles (15 of 28) for protostellar cores. Starless cores with masses greater than the Jeans mass (M/M{sub J} > 1) are somewhat more likely to show contraction motions. We find no trend of optically thin non-thermal line width with M/M{sub J}, suggesting that any undetected contraction motions are small and subsonic. Most starless cores in Perseus are either not in a state of collapse or expansion, or are in a very early stage of collapse.

  17. Gas dynamics in Massive Dense Cores in Cygnus-X

    CERN Document Server

    Csengeri, T; Schneider, N; Motte, F; Dib, S

    2010-01-01

    We study the kinematic properties of dense gas surrounding massive protostars recognized by Bontemps et a. (2010) in a sample of five Massive Dense Cores in Cygnus-X. We investigate whether turbulent support plays a major role in stabilizing the core against fragmentation into Jeans-mass objects or alternatively, the observed kinematics could indicate a high level of dynamics. We present IRAM 30m single-dish (HCO+ and H13CO+) and IRAM PdBI high angular-resolution observations of dense gas tracers (H13CO+ and H13CN) to reveal the kinematics of molecular gas at scales from 0.03 to 0.1 pc. Radiative transfer modeling shows that H13CO+ is depleted within the envelopes of massive protostars and traces the bulk of material surrounding the protostars rather than their inner envelopes. H13CN shows a better correspondence with the peak of the continuum emission, possibly due to abundance anomalies and specific chemistry in the close vicinity of massive protostars. Analyzing the line-widths we show that the observed li...

  18. Contraction Signatures Toward Dense Cores in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, J L; Martin, P G; Caselli, P; Kauffmann, J; Pineda, J E

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of an HCO+ (3-2) and N2D+ (3-2) molecular line survey performed toward 91 dense cores in the Perseus molecular cloud using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, to identify the fraction of starless and protostellar cores with systematic radial motions. We quantify the HCO+ asymmetry using a dimensionless asymmetry parameter $\\delta_v$, and identify 20 cores with significant blue or red line asymmetries in optically-thick emission indicative of collapsing or expanding motions, respectively. We separately fit the HCO+ profiles with an analytic collapse model and determine contraction (expansion) speeds toward 22 cores. Comparing the $\\delta_v$ and collapse model results, we find that $\\delta_v$ is a good tracer of core contraction if the optically-thin emission is aligned with the model-derived systemic velocity. The contraction speeds range from subsonic (0.03 km/s) to supersonic (0.4 km/s), where the supersonic contraction speeds may trace global rather than local core contraction. Most cor...

  19. Formation and evolution of black holes in dense star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sanghamitra

    Using supercomputer simulations combining stellar dynamics and stellar evolution, we have studied various problems related to the existence of black holes in dense star clusters. We consider both stellar and intermediate-mass black holes, and we focus on massive, dense star clusters, such as old globular clusters and young, so called "super star clusters." The first problem concerns the formation of intermediate-mass black holes in young clusters through the runaway collision instability. A promising mechanism to form intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is runaway mergers in dense star clusters, where main-sequence stars collide re- peatedly and form a very massive star (VMS), which then collapses to a black hole (BH). Here we study the effects of primordial mass segregation and the importance of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) on the runaway growth of VMSs using a dynamical Monte Carlo code to model systems with N as high as 10^6 stars. Our Monte Carlo code includes an explicittreatment of all stellar collisions. We place special emphasis on the possibility of top-heavy IMFs, as observed in some very young massive clusters. We find that both primordial mass segregation and the shape of the IMF affect the rate of core collapse of star clusters and thus the time of the runaway. When we include primordial mass segregation we generally see a decrease in core collapse time (tcc). Although for smaller degrees of primordial mass segregation this decrease in tcc is mostly due to the change in the density profile of the cluster, for highly mass-segregated (primordial) clusters, it is the increase in the average mass in the core which reduces the central relaxation time, decreasing tcc. Finally, flatter IMFs generally increase the average mass in the whole cluster, which increases tcc. For the range of IMFs investigated in this thesis, this increase in tcc is to some degree balanced by stellar collisions, which accelerate core collapse. Thus there is no

  20. Parallel Access of Out-Of-Core Dense Extendible Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otoo, Ekow J; Rotem, Doron

    2007-07-26

    Datasets used in scientific and engineering applications are often modeled as dense multi-dimensional arrays. For very large datasets, the corresponding array models are typically stored out-of-core as array files. The array elements are mapped onto linear consecutive locations that correspond to the linear ordering of the multi-dimensional indices. Two conventional mappings used are the row-major order and the column-major order of multi-dimensional arrays. Such conventional mappings of dense array files highly limit the performance of applications and the extendibility of the dataset. Firstly, an array file that is organized in say row-major order causes applications that subsequently access the data in column-major order, to have abysmal performance. Secondly, any subsequent expansion of the array file is limited to only one dimension. Expansions of such out-of-core conventional arrays along arbitrary dimensions, require storage reorganization that can be very expensive. Wepresent a solution for storing out-of-core dense extendible arrays that resolve the two limitations. The method uses a mapping function F*(), together with information maintained in axial vectors, to compute the linear address of an extendible array element when passed its k-dimensional index. We also give the inverse function, F-1*() for deriving the k-dimensional index when given the linear address. We show how the mapping function, in combination with MPI-IO and a parallel file system, allows for the growth of the extendible array without reorganization and no significant performance degradation of applications accessing elements in any desired order. We give methods for reading and writing sub-arrays into and out of parallel applications that run on a cluster of workstations. The axial-vectors are replicated and maintained in each node that accesses sub-array elements.

  1. Chemical and Physical Characterization of Collapsing Low-mass Prestellar Dense Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincelin, U.; Commerçon, B.; Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Guilloteau, S.; Herbst, E.

    2016-05-01

    The first hydrostatic core, also called the first Larson core, is one of the first steps in low-mass star formation as predicted by theory. With recent and future high-performance telescopes, the details of these first phases are becoming accessible, and observations may confirm theory and even present new challenges for theoreticians. In this context, from a theoretical point of view, we study the chemical and physical evolution of the collapse of prestellar cores until the formation of the first Larson core, in order to better characterize this early phase in the star formation process. We couple a state-of-the-art hydrodynamical model with full gas-grain chemistry, using different assumptions for the magnetic field strength and orientation. We extract the different components of each collapsing core (i.e., the central core, the outflow, the disk, the pseudodisk, and the envelope) to highlight their specific physical and chemical characteristics. Each component often presents a specific physical history, as well as a specific chemical evolution. From some species, the components can clearly be differentiated. The different core models can also be chemically differentiated. Our simulation suggests that some chemical species act as tracers of the different components of a collapsing prestellar dense core, and as tracers of the magnetic field characteristics of the core. From this result, we pinpoint promising key chemical species to be observed.

  2. Beyond the pseudo-time-dependent approach: chemical models of dense core precursors

    CERN Document Server

    Hassel, G E; Bergin, E A

    2010-01-01

    Context: Chemical models of dense cloud cores often utilize the so-called pseudo-time-dependent approximation, in which the physical conditions are held fixed and uniform as the chemistry occurs. In this approximation, the initial abundances chosen, which are totally atomic in nature except for molecular hydrogen, are artificial. A more detailed approach to the chemistry of dense cold cores should include the physical evolution during their early stages of formation. Aims: Our major goal is to investigate the initial synthesis of molecular ices and gas-phase molecules as cold molecular gas begins to form behind a shock in the diffuse interstellar medium. The abundances calculated as the conditions evolve can then be utilized as reasonable initial conditions for a theory of the chemistry of dense cores. Methods: Hydrodynamic shock-wave simulations of the early stages of cold core formation are used to determine the time-dependent physical conditions for a gas-grain chemical network. We follow the cold post-sho...

  3. Transport and influence of angular momentum in collapsing dense cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, P.

    2013-09-01

    Angular momentum is playing a key role during the collapse of prestellar cores since it is leading to disk formation and to some extent to binary formation. On the other hand, it has long been recognized that the stars possess a tiny fraction of the initial momentum that their parent clouds retain, an issue known as the "angular momentum problem". In these lectures, we attempt to present the most recent calculations performed to investigate the angular momentum transport and the influence angular momentum has, during the collapse of prestellar cores. After a brief introduction of the star formation context and a broad description of the important features within collapsing cores, we discuss the so-called catastrophic braking. Indeed when magnetic field and rotation axis are aligned, the magnetic braking is so efficient that the formation of early disks is completely prevented. We then present the various studies which have attempted to explore the robustness of this efficient transport including influence of non-ideal MHD, misalignment between magnetic field and rotation axis and turbulence. While the role of the first, is not entirely clear; the two other effects diminish the efficacity of the magnetic braking making the issue less severe than in the pure ideal MHD aligned configuration. Finally, we discuss the fragmentation of low and high mass cores with particular emphasis on the impact of the magnetic field. In particular, we discuss the drastic stabilization that magnetic field has on low mass cores and the possible solution to this apparent conundrum. In the context of high mass stars, its influence is much more limited reducing the number of fragments by a factor of the order of two. However when both radiative feedback and magentic field are included, the fragmentation is very significantly reduced.

  4. An unbiased survey for dense cores in the Lynds 1630 molecular cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lada, Elizabeth A.; Bally, John; Stark, Antony A.

    1991-01-01

    An unbiased, systematic survey for dense cores within the L1630 (Orion B) molecular cloud has been completed. This survey provides the first complete census of dense (n greater tha 10,000/cu cm) cores within a molecular cloud. To identify the dense gas, 3.6 square degrees of the L1630 cloud were surveyed in the J = 2-1 transition of CS. CS emission was detected over 10 percent of the area surveyed, and this emission is not uniformly distributed throughout the cloud but is confined to 42 dense cores. The size, shape, velocity dispersion, and mass of these cores are examined. Comparison of the mass contained within dense cores with the total gas mass within the surveyed region, estimated from CO emission, reveals that the dense cores constitute only a small fraction (not greater than 19 percent) of the total cloud mass.

  5. How is kinematic structure connected to the core scale from filament scale?; Mopra mapping observations with multi-lines of dense cores in Lupus I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokane, Kazuhiro; Saito, Masao; Tachihara, Kengo; Saigo, Kazuya; van Kempen, Tim; Cortes, Paulo; Hill, Tracey; Knee, Lewis; Kurono, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Satoko; Aya, Higuchi; Nyman, Lars-Ake

    2014-06-01

    Recently, high sensitivity mappings of nearby molecular clouds in far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths with Hershel and AzTEC/ASTE show ubiquitous existence of the filamentary structures with 0.1-pc uniform width. It is important to investigate dense core formation from large scale structure via fragmentation. We have conducted MOPRA multi-line mapping observations covered on 0.02 - 0.2 pc scales of 8 dense cores in a filamentary cloud of nearby Lupus I at 140 pc. A class 0/I protostellar core IRAS 15398-3359 is included as a sample, which has an adjacent prestellar core with the separation of 0.13pc in the west. The maps of N2H+, HNC, HC3N show well associated with each core. The velocity field of C18O shows 1.4 km/s/pc from north to south over the region containing two dense cores, which is consistent with past observation of NANTEN. In contrast to C18O results, the velocity field of HC3N shows different structures, which suggest counter rotation of two dense cores; 1.2 km/s/pc from north-west to south-east around a protostellar core and 0.8 km/s/pc from east to west around a presteller core. The filament will be fragmentized and collapsed to dense cores when the line density is over 2Cs/G (where Cs is sound speed and G is gravitational constant). If that velocity gradient was caused by such situation, it should be red-blue-red-blue across two dense cores but the observed kinematics is not consistent with this scenario, which requires that the filament structure would be extremely curved with a skew angle. Although we cannot reject the collapsing interruption, those results suggest the spin-up rotating picture separated from large-scale structure.

  6. Distances to dense cores that contain very low luminosity objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswar, G.; Lee, C. W.; Dib, S.

    2011-12-01

    Aims: We estimate the distances to dense molecular cores that harbour very low luminosity objects (VeLLOs) detected by the Spitzer Space Telescope and attempt to confirm their VeLLO nature. Methods: The cloud distances are estimated using a near-IR photometric method. We use a technique that performs a spectral classification of stars lying towards the fields containing the clouds as either main-sequence stars or giants. In this technique, the observed (J - H) and (H - Ks) colours are dereddened simultaneously using trial values of AV and a normal interstellar extinction law. The best fit of the dereddened colours to the intrinsic colours giving a minimum value of χ2 then yields the corresponding spectral type and AV for the star. The main-sequence stars, thus classified, are then utilized in an AV versus distance plot to bracket the cloud distances. The typical error in the estimation of distances to the clouds are found to be ~18%. Results: We estimate distances to seven cloud cores, IRAM 04191, L1521F, BHR 111, L328, L673-7, L1014, and L1148 using the above method. These clouds contain VeLLO candidates. The estimated distances to the cores are found to be 127 ± 25 pc (IRAM 04191), 136 ± 36 pc (L1521F), 355 ± 65 pc (BHR 111), 217 ± 30 pc (L328), 240 ± 45 pc (L673-7), 258 ± 50 pc (L1014), and 301 ± 55 pc (L1148). We re-evaluated the internal luminosities of the VeLLOs discovered in these seven clouds using the distances estimated from this work. Except for L1014 - IRS (Lint = 0.15 L⊙), all other VeLLO candidates are found to be consistent with the definition of a VeLLO (Lint ≤ 0.1 L⊙). In addition to the cores that harbour VeLLO candidates, we also obtained distances to the clouds L323, L675, L676, CB 188, L1122, L1152, L1155, L1157, and L1158, which are located in the directions of the above seven cores. Towards L1521F and L1148, we found evidence of multiple dust layers.

  7. Quark matter formation in dense stellar objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Phatak

    2001-08-01

    It is expected that at very large densities and/or temperatures a quark-hadron phase transition takes place. Lattice QCD calculations at zero baryon density indicate that the transition occurs at c∼ 150-170 MeV. The transition is likely to be second order or a cross over phenomenon. Although not much is known about the density at which the phase transition takes place at small temperatures, it is expected to occur around the nuclear densities of few times nuclear matter density. Also, there is a strong reason to believe that the quark matter formed after the phase transition is in colour superconducting phase. The matter densities in the interior of neutron stars being larger than the nuclear matter density, the neutron star cores may possibly consist of quark matter which may be formed during the collapse of supernova. Starting with the assumption that the quark matter, when formed consists of predominantly and quarks, we consider the evolution of quarks by weak interactions in the present work. The reaction rates and time required to reach the chemical equilibrium are computed here. Our calculations show that the chemical equilibrium is reached in about 10-7 seconds. Further more during the equilibration process enormous amont of energy is released and copious numbers of neutrinos are produced. Implications of these on the evolution of supernovae will be discussed.

  8. Core formation in silicate bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  9. 13CO, C18O, and CS Observations toward Massive Dense Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Yiping; Yang, Ji; Sunada, Kazuyoshi

    2004-10-01

    We present results of 13CO J=1-0, C18O J=1-0, and CS J=2-1 map observations toward 10 massive star-forming regions selected from the previous CO line survey of cold IRAS sources along the Galactic plane. CS line emission was detected from 9 out of 10 sources, and 13CO line emission was detected in all sources. C18O J=1-0 line emission was detected in only three sources. Physical parameters are derived for the detected sources. The 13CO and C18O data support the idea that gradual dissipation of the internal turbulence leads to formation of denser cores and subsequent star formation. There is no apparent relationship between the CS abundance and the CO temperature. The ratios of LIR to MLTE vary by no more than a factor of 3 for the CS cores and by nearly 1 order of magnitude for the 13CO cores. This indicates that star formation is determined by the gas with high volume density and does not depend on the mass of the cloud. We find that the star formation rate per unit mass is nearly constant in the dense cores. Divided into two subgroups, ``low'' and ``high,'' by their FIR color indexes, the low sources are in an earlier stage than the high sources, based on the high sources' association with H2O masers.

  10. Sulfur chemistry: 1D modeling in massive dense cores

    CERN Document Server

    Wakelam, V; Herpin, F

    2011-01-01

    The main sulfur-bearing molecules OCS, H2S, SO, SO2, and CS have been observed in four high mass dense cores (W43-MM1, IRAS 18264, IRAS 05358, and IRAS 18162). Our goal is to put some constraints on the relative evolutionary stage of these sources by comparing these observations with time-dependent chemical modeling. We used the chemical model Nahoon, which computes the gas-phase chemistry and gas-grain interactions of depletion and evaporation. Mixing of the different chemical compositions shells in a 1D structure through protostellar envelope has been included since observed lines suggest nonthermal supersonic broadening. Observed radial profiles of the temperature and density are used to compute the chemistry as a function of time. With our model, we underproduce CS by several orders of magnitude compared to the other S-bearing molecules, which seems to contradict observations, although some uncertainties in the CS abundance observed at high temperature remain. The OCS/SO2, SO/SO2, and H2S/SO2 abundance ra...

  11. S-bearing molecules in Massive Dense Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Herpin, Fabrice; Wakelam, Valentine; Bontemps, Sylvain; Lis, D C

    2009-01-01

    Chemical composition of the massive cores forming high-mass stars can put some constrains on the time scale of the massive star formation: sulphur chemistry is of specific interest due to its rapid evolution in warm gas and because the abundance of sulphur bearing species increases significantly with the temperature. Two mid-infrared quiet and two brighter massive cores are observed in various transitions (E_up up to 289K) of CS, OCS, H2S, SO, SO2 and of their isotopologues at mm wavelengths with the IRAM 30m and CSO telescopes. 1D modeling of the dust continuum is used to derive the density and temperature laws, which are then applied in the RATRAN code to model the observed line emission, and to derive the relative abundances of the molecules. All lines, except the highest energy SO2 transition, are detected. Infall (up to 2.9km/s) may be detected towards the core W43MM1. The inferred mass rate is 5.8-9.4 10^{-2} M_{\\odot}/yr. We propose an evolutionary sequence of our sources (W43MM1-IRAS18264-1152-IRAS053...

  12. Star Forming Dense Cloud Cores in the TeV -ray SNR RX J1713.7-3946

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, H.; Sato, J.; Yamamoto, H.; Hayakawa, T.; Torii, K.; Moribe, N.; Kawamura, A.; Okuda, T.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Maezawa, H.; Inoue, T.; Inutsuka, S.; Tanaka, T.; Mizuno, A.; Ogawa, H.; Stutzki, J.; Bertoldi, F.; Anderl, S.; Bronfman, L.; Koo, B.C.

    2010-10-27

    RX J1713.7-3946 is one of the TeV {gamma}-ray supernova remnants (SNRs) emitting synchrotron X rays. The SNR is associated with molecular gas located at {approx}1 kpc. We made new molecular observations toward the dense cloud cores, peaks A, C and D, in the SNR in the {sup 12}CO(J=2-1) and {sup 13}CO(J=2-1) transitions at angular resolution of 90 degrees. The most intense core in {sup 13}CO, peak C, was also mapped in the {sup 12}CO(J=4-3) transition at angular resolution of 38 degrees. Peak C shows strong signs of active star formation including bipolar outflow and a far-infrared protostellar source and has a steep gradient with a r{sup -2.2 {+-} 0.4} variation in the average density within radius r. Peak C and the other dense cloud cores are rim-brightened in synchrotron X rays, suggesting that the dense cloud cores are embedded within or on the outer boundary of the SNR shell. This confirms the earlier suggestion that the X rays are physically associated with the molecular gas (Fukui et al. 2003). We present a scenario where the densest molecular core, peak C, survived against the blast wave and is now embedded within the SNR. Numerical simulations of the shock-cloud interaction indicate that a dense clump can indeed survive shock erosion, since shock propagation speed is stalled in the dense clump. Additionally, the shock-cloud interaction induces turbulence and magnetic field amplification around the dense clump that may facilitate particle acceleration in the lower-density inter-clump space leading to the enhanced synchrotron X rays around dense cores.

  13. A new mechanism for dendritic pattern formation in dense systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-06-01

    Patterns are often formed when particles cluster: Since patterns reflect the connectivity of different types of material, the emergence of patterns affects the physical and chemical properties of systems and shares a close relationship to their macroscopic functions. A radial dendritic pattern (RDP) is observed in many systems such as snow crystals, polymer crystals and biological systems. Although most of these systems are considered as dense particle suspensions, the mechanism of RDP formation in dense particle systems is not yet understood. It should be noted that the diffusion limited aggregation model is not applicable to RDP formation in dense systems, but in dilute particle systems. Here, we propose a simple model that exhibits RDP formation in a dense particle system. The model potential for the inter-particle interaction is composed of two parts, a repulsive and an attractive force. The repulsive force is applied to all the particles all the time and the attractive force is exerted only among particles inside a circular domain, which expands at a certain speed as a wave front propagating from a preselected centre. It is found that an RDP is formed if the velocity of the wave front that triggers the attractive interaction is of the same order of magnitude as the time scale defined by the aggregation speed.

  14. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Dense Core Clusters in Orion B

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, H; Di Francesco, J; Lane, J; Buckle, J; Berry, D S; Broekhoven-Fiene, H; Currie, M J; Fich, M; Hatchell, J; Jenness, T; Mottram, J C; Nutter, D; Pattle, K; Pineda, J E; Quinn, C; Salji, C; Tisi, S; Hogerheijde, M R; Ward-Thompson, D

    2016-01-01

    The JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey obtained SCUBA-2 observations of dense cores within three sub-regions of Orion B: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, all of which contain clusters of cores. We present an analysis of the clustering properties of these cores, including the two-point correlation function and Cartwright's Q parameter. We identify individual clusters of dense cores across all three regions using a minimal spanning tree technique, and find that in each cluster, the most massive cores tend to be centrally located. We also apply the independent M-Sigma technique and find a strong correlation between core mass and the local surface density of cores. These two lines of evidence jointly suggest that some amount of mass segregation in clusters has happened already at the dense core stage.

  15. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Dense Core Clusters in Orion B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, H.; Johnstone, D.; Di Francesco, J.; Lane, J.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; The JCMT Gould Belt Survey Team

    2016-04-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Gould Belt Legacy Survey obtained SCUBA-2 observations of dense cores within three sub-regions of Orion B: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, all of which contain clusters of cores. We present an analysis of the clustering properties of these cores, including the two-point correlation function and Cartwright’s Q parameter. We identify individual clusters of dense cores across all three regions using a minimal spanning tree technique, and find that in each cluster, the most massive cores tend to be centrally located. We also apply the independent M-Σ technique and find a strong correlation between core mass and the local surface density of cores. These two lines of evidence jointly suggest that some amount of mass segregation in clusters has happened already at the dense core stage.

  16. The Deuterium Fractionation Timescale in Dense Cloud Cores: A Parameter Space Exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Shuo; Tan, Jonathan C; Wakelam, Valentine

    2013-01-01

    The deuterium fraction of simple species such as N$_2$H$^+$ can be easily measured and can provide information about the age of dense and cold material, important to compare with dynamical models of cloud core formation and evolution. Here we perform a parameter space exploration using a gas-phase chemical model which includes deuterium chemistry and the spin states of H$_2$ and H$_3^+$ isotopologues. This allows us to study the effect of various poorly known parameters on the timescale to achieve the deuterium fractions observed in starless cores and clumps in various star-forming regions. We conclude that for a broad range of parameters, the relatively large deuterium fractions ($\\gtrsim$ 0.1) observed towards both low- and high-mass starless cores require core ages to be at least a few times longer than the free-fall timescale. This condition could be relaxed if cosmic ray ionization rates are very high $\\gtrsim 10^{-16}\\:{\\rm s}^{-1}$ or initial ortho-to-para ratios of $\\rm H_2$ are very low ($\\lesssim 10...

  17. The JCMT Gould Belt survey: Dense core clusters in Orion B

    OpenAIRE

    Kirk, H.; Johnstone, D.; Francesco, J. Di; Lane, J; Buckle, J.; Berry, D.S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, Katherine M; Pineda, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Gould Belt Legacy Survey obtained SCUBA-2 observations of dense cores within three sub-regions of OrionB: LDN1622, NGC2023/2024, and NGC2068/2071, all of which contain clusters of cores. We present an analysis of the clustering properties of these cores, including the two-point correlation function and Cartwright’s Q parameter. We identify individual clusters of dense cores across all three regions using a minimal spanning tree technique, and find that in...

  18. Nucleation of strange matter in dense stellar cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, J.E. (Instituto Astronomico e Geofisico, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida M. Stefano 4200, Agua Funda (04301) Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)); Benvenuto, O.G. (Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N (1900) La Plata (Argentina)); Vucetich, H. (Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Calle 49 y 115, C.C.67 (1900) La Plata (Argentina))

    1992-05-15

    We investigate the nucleation of strange quark matter inside hot, dense nuclear matter. Applying Zel'dovich's kinetic theory of nucleation we find a lower limit of the temperature {ital T} for strange-matter bubbles to appear, which happens to be satisfied inside the Kelvin-Helmholtz cooling era of a compact star life but not much after it. Our bounds thus suggest that a prompt conversion could be achieved, giving support to earlier expectations for nonstandard type-II supernova scenarios.

  19. THE JCMT GOULD BELT SURVEY: A FIRST LOOK AT DENSE CORES IN ORION B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, H.; Francesco, J. Di; Johnstone, D. [NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Rd, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Duarte-Cabral, A.; Hatchell, J. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Sadavoy, S.; Mottram, J. C. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Buckle, J.; Salji, C. [Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Berry, D. S.; Currie, M. J.; Jenness, T. [Joint Astronomy Centre, 660 N. A‘ohōkū Place, University Park, Hilo, Hawaii 96720 (United States); Broekhoven-Fiene, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8P 1A1 (Canada); Fich, M.; Tisi, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Nutter, D.; Quinn, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Pattle, K. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Pineda, J. E. [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Garching (Germany); Hogerheijde, M. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); and others

    2016-02-01

    We present a first look at the SCUBA-2 observations of three sub-regions of the Orion B molecular cloud: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We identify 29, 564, and 322 dense cores in L1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071 respectively, using the SCUBA-2 850 μm map, and present their basic properties, including their peak fluxes, total fluxes, and sizes, and an estimate of the corresponding 450 μm peak fluxes and total fluxes, using the FellWalker source extraction algorithm. Assuming a constant temperature of 20 K, the starless dense cores have a mass function similar to that found in previous dense core analyses, with a Salpeter-like slope at the high-mass end. The majority of cores appear stable to gravitational collapse when considering only thermal pressure; indeed, most of the cores which have masses above the thermal Jeans mass are already associated with at least one protostar. At higher cloud column densities, above 1–2 × 10{sup 23} cm{sup −2}, most of the mass is found within dense cores, while at lower cloud column densities, below 1 × 10{sup 23} cm{sup −2}, this fraction drops to 10% or lower. Overall, the fraction of dense cores associated with a protostar is quite small (<8%), but becomes larger for the densest and most centrally concentrated cores. NGC 2023/2024 and NGC 2068/2071 appear to be on the path to forming a significant number of stars in the future, while L1622 has little additional mass in dense cores to form many new stars.

  20. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: A First Look at Dense Cores in Orion B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, H.; Di Francesco, J.; Johnstone, D.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Sadavoy, S.; Hatchell, J.; Mottram, J. C.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coude, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Kirk, J. M.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2016-02-01

    We present a first look at the SCUBA-2 observations of three sub-regions of the Orion B molecular cloud: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We identify 29, 564, and 322 dense cores in L1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071 respectively, using the SCUBA-2 850 μm map, and present their basic properties, including their peak fluxes, total fluxes, and sizes, and an estimate of the corresponding 450 μm peak fluxes and total fluxes, using the FellWalker source extraction algorithm. Assuming a constant temperature of 20 K, the starless dense cores have a mass function similar to that found in previous dense core analyses, with a Salpeter-like slope at the high-mass end. The majority of cores appear stable to gravitational collapse when considering only thermal pressure; indeed, most of the cores which have masses above the thermal Jeans mass are already associated with at least one protostar. At higher cloud column densities, above 1-2 × 1023 cm-2, most of the mass is found within dense cores, while at lower cloud column densities, below 1 × 1023 cm-2, this fraction drops to 10% or lower. Overall, the fraction of dense cores associated with a protostar is quite small (<8%), but becomes larger for the densest and most centrally concentrated cores. NGC 2023/2024 and NGC 2068/2071 appear to be on the path to forming a significant number of stars in the future, while L1622 has little additional mass in dense cores to form many new stars.

  1. Magnetic processes in a collapsing dense core. II. Fragmentation. Is there a fragmentation crisis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebelle, P.; Teyssier, R.

    2008-01-01

    Context: A large fraction of stars are found in binary systems. It is therefore important for our understanding of the star formation process, to investigate the fragmentation of dense molecular cores. Aims: We study the influence of the magnetic field, ideally coupled to the gas, on the fragmentation in multiple systems of collapsing cores. Methods: We present high resolution numerical simulations performed with the RAMSES MHD code starting with a uniform sphere in solid body rotation and a uniform magnetic field parallel to the rotation axis. We pay particular attention to the strength of the magnetic field and interpret the results using the analysis presented in a companion paper. Results: The results depend much on the amplitude, A, of the perturbations seeded initially. For a low amplitude, A=0.1, we find that for values of the mass-to-flux over critical mass-to-flux ratio, μ, as high as μ = 20, the centrifugally supported disk which fragments in the hydrodynamical case is stabilized and remains axisymmetric. Detailed investigations reveal that this is due to the rapid growth of the toroidal magnetic field induced by the differential motions within the disk. For values of μ smaller than ≃5, corresponding to higher magnetic intensities, there is no centrifugally supported disk because of magnetic braking. When the amplitude of the perturbation is equal to A=0.5, each initial peak develops independently and the core fragments for a large range of μ. Only for values of μ close to 1 is the magnetic field able to prevent the fragmentation. Conclusions: Since a large fraction of stars are binaries, the results of low magnetic intensities preventing the fragmentation in the case of weak perturbations is problematic. We discuss three possible mechanisms which could lead to the formation of binary systems, namely the presence of high amplitude fluctuations in the core initially, ambipolar diffusion and fragmentation during the second collapse.

  2. A Massive Molecular Outflow in the Dense Dust Core AGAL G337.916-00.477

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Kazufumi; Hattori, Yusuke; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Ohama, Akio; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Tokuda, Kazuki; Onishi, Toshikazu; Hattori, Yasuki; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Fukui, Yasuo

    2017-05-01

    Massive molecular outflows erupting from high-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) provide important clues to understanding the mechanism of high-mass star formation. Based on new CO J = 3-2 and J = 1-0 observations using the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) and Mopra telescope facilities, we discovered a massive bipolar outflow associated with the dense dust core AGAL G337.916-00.477 (AGAL337.9-S), located 3.48 kpc from the Sun. The outflow lobes have extensions of less than 1 pc—and thus were not fully resolved in the angular resolutions of ASTE and Mopra—and masses of ˜50 M ⊙. The maximum velocities of the outflow lobes are as high as 36-40 {km} {{{s}}}-1. Our analysis of the infrared and submillimeter data indicates that AGAL337.9-S is in an early evolutionary stage of high-mass star formation, having the total far-infrared luminosity of ˜ 5× {10}4 {L}⊙ . We also found that another dust core, AGAL G337.922-00.456 (AGAL337.9-N), located 2‧ north of AGAL337.9-S, is a high-mass YSO in an earlier evolutionary stage than AGAL337.9-S, as it is less bright in the mid-infrared than AGAL337.9-S.

  3. Dispersal of dense protostellar material - NH3 hot cores and outflows in Sagittarius B2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, S.N.; Genzel, R.; Palmer, P.

    1987-05-01

    VLA observations of Sgr B2 in six ammonia transitions have uncovered two 200-K condensations with approximately 0.2 pc diameters associated with water maser sources which are similar to the Orion hot core but are more massive. Total NH3 mass of the northern source is 1000 times higher than in the Orion hot core. The hot core emission traces dense gas around newly formed massive stars, and is produced during a relatively brief stage after the star begins to heat the surrounding medium and before the dense gas is dispersed by outflow and the emergence of an expanding H II region. 36 references.

  4. First experimental demonstration of magnetic-field assisted fast heating of a dense plasma core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Sakata, Shohei; Lee, Seung Ho; Matsuo, Kazuki; Sawada, Hiroshi; Iwasa, Yuki; Law, King Fai Farley; Morita, Hitoki; Kojima, Sadaoki; Abe, Yuki; Yao, Akira; Hata, Masayasu; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Morace, Alessio; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Nagatomo, Hideo; Azechi, Hiroshi; Firex Project Team

    2016-10-01

    Fast heating of a dense plasma core by an energetic electron beam is being studied on GEKKO-LFEX laser facility. Here, we introduce a laser-driven kilo-tesla external magnetic field to guide the diverging electron beam to the dense plasma core. This involve placing a spherical target in the magnetic field, compressing it with the GEKKO-XII laser beams and then using the LFEX laser beams injected into the dense plasma to generate the electron beam which do the fast heating. Cu-Ka emission is used to visualize transport or heating processes of a dense plasma. X-ray spectrum from a highly ionized Cu ions indicates several keV of the temperature increment induced by the LFEX.

  5. Baryon formation and dissociation in dense hadronic and quark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jincheng [Interdisciplinary Center for Theoretical Study and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui 230026 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wang Qun, E-mail: qunwang@ustc.edu.cn [Interdisciplinary Center for Theoretical Study and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Anhui 230026 (China); Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Rischke, Dirk H. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-10-19

    We study the formation of baryons as composed of quarks and diquarks in hot and dense hadronic matter in a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL)-type model. We first solve the Dyson-Schwinger equation for the diquark propagator and then use this to solve the Dyson-Schwinger equation for the baryon propagator. We find that stable baryon resonances exist only in the phase of broken chiral symmetry. In the chirally symmetric phase, we do not find a pole in the baryon propagator. In the color-superconducting phase, there is a pole, but it has a large decay width. The diquark does not need to be stable in order to form a stable baryon, a feature typical for so-called Borromean states. Varying the strength of the diquark coupling constant, we also find similarities to the properties of an Efimov state.

  6. Magnetic processes in a collapsing dense core. II Fragmentation. Is there a fragmentation crisis ?

    CERN Document Server

    Hennebelle, P

    2007-01-01

    Abridged. A large fraction of stars are found in binary systems. It is therefore important for our understanding of the star formation process, to investigate the fragmentation of dense molecular cores. We study the influence of the magnetic field, ideally coupled to the gas, on the fragmentation in multiple systems of collapsing cores. We present high resolution numerical simulations performed with the RAMSES MHD code starting with a uniform sphere in solid body rotation and a uniform magnetic field parallel to the rotation axis. We pay particular attention to the strength of the magnetic field and interpret the results using the analysis presented in a companion paper. The results depend much on the amplitude, $A$, of the perturbations seeded initially. For a low amplitude, $A=0.1$, we find that for values of the mass-to-flux over critical mass-to-flux ratio, $\\mu$, as high as $\\mu = 20$, the centrifugally supported disk which fragments in the hydrodynamical case, is stabilized and remains axisymmetric. Det...

  7. A massive molecular outflow in the dense dust core AGAL G337.916-00.477

    CERN Document Server

    Torii, Kazufumi; Hasegawa, Keisuke; Ohama, Akio; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Tokuda, Kazuki; Onishi, Toshikazu; Hattori, Yasuki; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Fukui, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The massive molecular outflows erupting from the high-mass young stellar objects provide important clues to understand the mechanism of the high-mass star formation. Based on new CO J=3-2 and J=1-0 observations with ASTE and Mopra, we discovered a new and very young massive bipolar outflow associated with the dense dust core AGAL G337.916-00.477 (AGAL337.9-S), located at 3.2kpc. The outflow is very compact less than 1,pc and is not fully resolved in the angular resolutions of ASTE and Mopra. The maximum velocities of the outflow lobes are as high as 30-40km/s. The total source luminosity for AGAL337.9-S was estimated to be ~10^5 Lo. Compared with the other massive outflows, we concluded that the AGAL337.9-S outflow is certainly one of the most massive and youngest high-mass young stellar objects ever known in the Milky Way. The short dynamical timescale ~10^4yrs of the outflow and mid-infrared-faint spectral energy distribution of AGAL337.9-S support for its young age. We also found that another dust core AGA...

  8. The EARP Complex and Its Interactor EIPR-1 Are Required for Cargo Sorting to Dense-Core Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topalidou, Irini; Cattin-Ortolá, Jérôme; Pappas, Andrea L; Cooper, Kirsten; Merrihew, Gennifer E; MacCoss, Michael J; Ailion, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The dense-core vesicle is a secretory organelle that mediates the regulated release of peptide hormones, growth factors, and biogenic amines. Dense-core vesicles originate from the trans-Golgi of neurons and neuroendocrine cells, but it is unclear how this specialized organelle is formed and acquires its specific cargos. To identify proteins that act in dense-core vesicle biogenesis, we performed a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans for mutants defective in dense-core vesicle function. We previously reported the identification of two conserved proteins that interact with the small GTPase RAB-2 to control normal dense-core vesicle cargo-sorting. Here we identify several additional conserved factors important for dense-core vesicle cargo sorting: the WD40 domain protein EIPR-1 and the endosome-associated recycling protein (EARP) complex. By assaying behavior and the trafficking of dense-core vesicle cargos, we show that mutants that lack EIPR-1 or EARP have defects in dense-core vesicle cargo-sorting similar to those of mutants in the RAB-2 pathway. Genetic epistasis data indicate that RAB-2, EIPR-1 and EARP function in a common pathway. In addition, using a proteomic approach in rat insulinoma cells, we show that EIPR-1 physically interacts with the EARP complex. Our data suggest that EIPR-1 is a new interactor of the EARP complex and that dense-core vesicle cargo sorting depends on the EARP-dependent trafficking of cargo through an endosomal sorting compartment.

  9. Hydrophobic-Core Microcapsules and Their Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M. (Inventor); Li, Wenyan (Inventor); Buhrow, Jerry W. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic-core microcapsules and methods of their formation are provided. A hydrophobic-core microcapsule may include a shell that encapsulates a hydrophobic substance with a core substance, such as dye, corrosion indicator, corrosion inhibitor, and/or healing agent, dissolved or dispersed therein. The hydrophobic-core microcapsules may be formed from an emulsion having hydrophobic-phase droplets, e.g., containing the core substance and shell-forming compound, dispersed in a hydrophilic phase. The shells of the microcapsules may be capable of being broken down in response to being contacted by an alkali, e.g., produced during corrosion, contacting the shell.

  10. Hydrophilic-Core Microcapsules and Their Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M. (Inventor); Li, Wenyan (Inventor); Buhrow, Jerry W. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophilic-core microcapsules and methods of their formation are provided. A hydrophilic-core microcapsule may include a shell that encapsulates water with the core substance dissolved or dispersed therein. The hydrophilic-core microcapsules may be formed from an emulsion having hydrophilic-phase droplets dispersed in a hydrophobic phase, with shell-forming compound contained in the hydrophilic phase or the hydrophobic phase and the core substance contained in the hydrophilic phase. The shells of the microcapsules may be capable of being broken down in response to being contacted by an alkali, e.g., produced during corrosion, contacting the shell.

  11. Direct Observation of a Sharp Transition to Coherence in Dense Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Jaime E.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Arce, Héctor G.; Caselli, Paola; Foster, Jonathan B.; Myers, Philip C.; Rosolowsky, Erik W.

    2010-03-01

    We present NH3 observations of the B5 region in Perseus obtained with the Green Bank Telescope. The map covers a region large enough (~11'×14') that it contains the entire dense core observed in previous dust continuum surveys. The dense gas traced by NH3(1,1) covers a much larger area than the dust continuum features found in bolometer observations. The velocity dispersion in the central region of the core is small, presenting subsonic non-thermal motions which are independent of scale. However, it is because of the coverage and high sensitivity of the observations that we present the detection, for the first time, of the transition between the coherent core and the dense but more turbulent gas surrounding it. This transition is sharp, increasing the velocity dispersion by a factor of 2 in less than 0.04 pc (the 31'' beam size at the distance of Perseus, ~250 pc). The change in velocity dispersion at the transition is ≈3 km s-1 pc-1. The existence of the transition provides a natural definition of dense core: the region with nearly constant subsonic non-thermal velocity dispersion. From the analysis presented here, we can neither confirm nor rule out a corresponding sharp density transition.

  12. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: A First Look at Dense Cores in Orion B

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, H; Johnstone, D; Duarte-Cabral, A; Sadavoy, S; Hatchell, J; Mottram, J C; Buckle, J; Berry, D S; Broekhoven-Fiene, H; Currie, M J; Fich, M; Jenness, T; Nutter, D; Pattle, K; Pineda, J E; Quinn, C; Salji, C; Tisi, S; Hogerheijde, M R; Ward-Thompson, D; Bastien, P; Bresnahan, D; Butner, H; Chen, M; Chrysostomou, A; Coude, S; Davis, C J; Drabek-Maunder, E; Fiege, J; Friberg, P; Friesen, R; Fuller, G A; Graves, S; Greaves, J; Gregson, J; Holland, W; Joncas, G; Kirk, J M; Knee, L B G; Mairs, S; Marsh, K; Matthews, B C; Moriarty-Schieven, G; Mowat, C; Rawlings, J; Richer, J; Robertson, D; Rosolowsky, E; Rumble, D; Thomas, H; Tothill, N; Viti, S; White, G J; Wouterloot, J; Yates, J; Zhu, M

    2015-01-01

    We present a first look at the SCUBA-2 observations of three sub-regions of the Orion B molecular cloud: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, from the JCMT Gould Belt Legacy Survey. We identify 29, 564, and 322 dense cores in L1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071 respectively, using the SCUBA-2 850 micron map, and present their basic properties, including their peak fluxes, total fluxes, and sizes, and an estimate of the corresponding 450 micron peak fluxes and total fluxes, using the FellWalker source extraction algorithm. Assuming a constant temperature of 20 K, the starless dense cores have a mass function similar to that found in previous dense core analyses, with a Salpeter-like slope at the high-mass end. The majority of cores appear stable to gravitational collapse when considering only thermal pressure; indeed, most of the cores which have masses above the thermal Jeans mass are already associated with at least one protostar. At higher cloud column densities, above 1-2 x 10^23 cm^-2, most of ...

  13. A census of dense cores in the Aquila cloud complex: SPIRE/PACS observations from the Herschel Gould Belt survey

    CERN Document Server

    Konyves, V; Men'shchikov, A; Palmeirim, P; Arzoumanian, D; Schneider, N; Roy, A; Didelon, P; Maury, A; Shimajiri, Y; Di Francesco, J; Bontemps, S; Peretto, N; Benedettini, M; Bernard, J -Ph; Elia, D; Griffin, M J; Hill, T; Kirk, J; Ladjelate, B; Marsh, K; Martin, P G; Motte, F; Luong, Q Nguyen; Pezzuto, S; Roussel, H; Rygl, K L J; Sadavoy, S I; Schisano, E; Spinoglio, L; Ward-Thompson, D; White, G J

    2015-01-01

    We present and discuss the results of the Herschel Gould Belt survey observations in a ~11 deg^2 area of the Aquila molecular cloud complex at d~260 pc, imaged with the SPIRE/PACS cameras from 70 to 500 micron. We identify a complete sample of starless dense cores and embedded protostars in this region, and analyze their global properties and spatial distributions. We find a total of 651 starless cores, ~60% of which are gravitationally bound prestellar cores, and they will likely form stars in the future. We also detect 58 protostellar cores. The core mass function (CMF) derived for the prestellar cores is very similar in shape to the stellar initial mass function (IMF), supporting the earlier view that there is a close physical link between the IMF and the CMF. The global shift in mass scale observed between the CMF and the IMF is consistent with a typical star formation efficiency of ~40%. By comparing the numbers of starless cores to the number of young stellar objects, we estimate that the lifetime of pr...

  14. Low-mass protostars and dense cores in different evolutionary stages in IRAS 00213+6530

    CERN Document Server

    Busquet, G; Estalella, R; Girart, J M; Anglada, G; Sepúlveda, I

    2009-01-01

    We aim at studying with high angular resolution a dense core associated with a low-luminosity IRAS source, IRAS 00213+6530, in order to investigate whether low mass star formation is really taking place in isolation. We performed observations at 1.2mm with the IRAM 30m telescope, VLA observations at 6cm, 3.6cm, 1.3cm, 7mm, and H2O maser and NH3 lines, and observations with the NASA 70m antenna in CCS and H2O maser. The cm and mm continuum emission, together with the near infrared data from the 2MASS allowed us to identify 3 YSOs, IRS1, VLA8A, and VLA8B, with different radio and infrared properties, and which seem to be in different evolutionary stages. The NH3 emission consists of three clouds. Two of these, MM1 and MM2, are associated with dust emission, while the southern cloud is only detected in NH3. The YSOs are embedded in MM1, where we found evidence of line broadening and temperature enhancements. On the other hand, the southern cloud and MM2 appear to be quiescent and starless. We modeled the radial ...

  15. Ice and Dust in the Quiescent Medium of Isolated Dense Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boogert, A. C. A.; Huard, T. L.; Cook, A. M.; Chiar, J. E.; Knez, C.; Decin, L.; Blake, G. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2011-03-01

    The relation between ices in the envelopes and disks surrounding young stellar objects (YSOs) and those in the quiescent interstellar medium (ISM) is investigated. For a sample of 31 stars behind isolated dense cores, ground-based and Spitzer spectra and photometry in the 1-25 μm wavelength range are combined. The baseline for the broad and overlapping ice features is modeled, using calculated spectra of giants, H2O ice and silicates. The adopted extinction curve is derived empirically. Its high resolution allows for the separation of continuum and feature extinction. The extinction between 13 and 25 μm is ~50% relative to that at 2.2 μm. The strengths of the 6.0 and 6.85 μm absorption bands are in line with those of YSOs. Thus, their carriers, which, besides H2O and CH3OH, may include NH+ 4, HCOOH, H2CO, and NH3, are readily formed in the dense core phase, before stars form. The 3.53 μm C-H stretching mode of solid CH3OH was discovered. The CH3OH/H2O abundance ratios of 5%-12% are larger than upper limits in the Taurus molecular cloud. The initial ice composition, before star formation occurs, therefore depends on the environment. Signs of thermal and energetic processing that were found toward some YSOs are absent in the ices toward background stars. Finally, the peak optical depth of the 9.7 μm band of silicates relative to the continuum extinction at 2.2 μm is significantly shallower than in the diffuse ISM. This extends the results of Chiar et al. to a larger sample and higher extinctions. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  16. Testing the universality of the star-formation efficiency in dense molecular gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimajiri, Y.; André, Ph.; Braine, J.; Könyves, V.; Schneider, N.; Bontemps, S.; Ladjelate, B.; Roy, A.; Gao, Y.; Chen, H.

    2017-08-01

    -dependent HCN conversion factor for external galaxies: αHerschel - HCNfit' = 64 × G0-0.34. Re-estimating the dense gas masses in external galaxies with αHerschel - HCNfit'(G0), we found that SFEdense is remarkably constant, with a scatter of less than 1.5 orders of magnitude around 4.5 × 10-8 yr-1, over eight orders of magnitude in dense gas mass. Conclusions: Our results confirm that SFEdense of galaxies is quasi-universal on a wide range of scales from 1-10 pc to > 10 kpc. Based on the tight link between star formation and filamentary structure found in Herschel studies of nearby clouds, we argue that SFEdense is primarily set by the "microphysics" of core and star formation along filaments. Partly based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope under project numbers 150-14 and 032-15. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).

  17. Mechanisms and Geochemical Models of Core Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rubie, David C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the Earth's core is a consequence of planetary accretion and processes in the Earth's interior. The mechanical process of planetary differentiation is likely to occur in large, if not global, magma oceans created by the collisions of planetary embryos. Metal-silicate segregation in magma oceans occurs rapidly and efficiently unlike grain scale percolation according to laboratory experiments and calculations. Geochemical models of the core formation process as planetary accretion proceeds are becoming increasingly realistic. Single stage and continuous core formation models have evolved into multi-stage models that are couple to the output of dynamical models of the giant impact phase of planet formation. The models that are most successful in matching the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle, based on experimentally-derived element partition coefficients, show that the temperature and pressure of metal-silicate equilibration must increase as a function of time and mass accreted and so m...

  18. Sub-kpc ALMA imaging of compact star-forming galaxies at z~2.5: revealing the formation of dense galactic cores in the progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Barro, G; Pérez-González, P G; Trump, J R; Koo, D C; Faber, S M; Dekel, A; Primack, J R; Guo, Y; Kocevski, D D; Muñoz-Mateos, J C; Rujoparkarn, W; Sheth, K

    2016-01-01

    We present spatially-resolved Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) 870 $\\mu$m dust continuum maps of six massive, compact, dusty star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at $z\\sim2.5$. These galaxies are selected for their small rest-frame optical sizes ($r_{\\rm e, F160W}\\sim1.6$ kpc) and high stellar-mass densities that suggest that they are direct progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at $z\\sim2$. The deep observations yield high far-infrared (FIR) luminosities of L$_{\\rm IR}=10^{12.3-12.8}$ L$_{\\odot}$ and star formation rates (SFRs) of SFR$=200-700$ M$_{\\odot}$yr$^{-1}$, consistent with those of typical star-forming "main sequence" galaxies. The high-spatial resolution (FWHM$\\sim$0.12"-0.18") ALMA and HST photometry are combined to construct deconvolved, mean radial profiles of their stellar mass and (UV+IR) SFR. We find that the dusty, nuclear IR-SFR overwhelmingly dominates the bolometric SFR up to $r\\sim5$ kpc, by a factor of over 100$\\times$ from the unobscured UV-SFR. Furthermore, the effecti...

  19. Early Stage of Origin of Earth (interval after Emergence of Sun, Formation of Liquid Core, Formation of Solid Core)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechernikova, G. V.; Sergeev, V. N.

    2017-05-01

    Gravitational collapse of interstellar molecular cloud fragment has led to the formation of the Sun and its surrounding protoplanetary disk, consisting of 5 × 10^5 dust and gas. The collapse continued (1 years. Age of solar system (about 4.57×10^9 years) determine by age calcium-aluminum inclusions (CAI) which are present at samples of some meteorites (chondrites). Subsidence of dust to the central plane of a protoplanetary disk has led to formation of a dust subdisk which as a result of gravitational instability has broken up to condensations. In the process of collisional evolution they turned into dense planetesimals from which the planets formed. The accounting of a role of large bodies in evolution of a protoplanetary swarm in the field of terrestrial planets has allowed to define times of formation of the massive bodies permitting their early differentiation at the expense of short-lived isotopes heating and impacts to the melting temperature of the depths. The total time of Earth's growth is estimated about 10^8 years. Hf geochronometer showed that the core of the Earth has existed for Using W about 3×10^7 Hf geohronometer years since the formation of the CAI. Thus data W point to the formation of the Earth's core during its accretion. The paleomagnetic data indicate the existence of Earth's magnetic field past 3.5×10^9 years. But the age of the solid core, estimated by heat flow at the core-mantle boundary is 1.7×10^9 (0.5 years). Measurements of the thermal conductivity of liquid iron under the conditions that exist in the Earth's core, indicate the absence of the need for a solid core of existence to support the work geodynamo, although electrical resistivity measurements yield the opposite result.

  20. Synthetic observations of first hydrostatic cores in collapsing low-mass dense cores. I. Spectral energy distributions and evolutionary sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Commercon, Benoit; Launhardt, Ralf; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Henning, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The low-mass star formation evolutionary sequence is relatively well-defined both from observations and theoretical considerations. The first hydrostatic core is the first protostellar equilibrium object that is formed during the star formation process. Using state-of-the-art radiation-magneto-hydrodynamic 3D adaptive mesh refinement calculations, we aim to provide predictions for the dust continuum emission from first hydrostatic cores. We investigate the collapse and the fragmentation of ma...

  1. Microscopic studies of defect formation under dense electronic excitation in insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanimura, Katsumi; Itoh, Noriaki

    1988-05-01

    Current experimental studies carried out to elucidate the lattice relaxation that occurs under dense electronic excitation in insulators are surveyed. The experimental observation treated includes defect formation by cascade-excitation of self-trapped excitons and by interaction between free and self-trapped excitons. It is pointed out that in certain solids defect generation by electronic excitation occurs only under dense electronic excitation, while in some others the defect yield depends on the density of excitation to a lesser extent. The mechanism of the effects of dense electronic excitation varies depending on the materials. Some of the crucial steps for defect formation under dense electronic excitation are presented.

  2. Recycling of intact dense core vesicles in neurites of NGF-treated PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Roslyn A; Khera, Rebecca S; Lieber, Janet L; Angleson, Joseph K

    2004-07-30

    Exocytic fusion in neuroendocrine cells does not always result in complete release of the peptide contents from dense core vesicles (DCVs). In this study, we use fluorescence imaging and immunoelectron microscopy to examine the retention, endocytosis and recycling of chromogranin B in DCVs of NGF-treated PC12 cells. Our results indicate that DCVs retained and retrieved an intact core that was available for subsequent exocytic release. The endocytic process was inhibited by cyclosporine A or by substitution of extracellular Ca(2+) with Ba(2+) and the total recycling time was less than 5 min.

  3. Formation and liquid permeability of dense colloidal cube packings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castillo, Sonja I R; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M E; Philipse, Albert P.

    2015-01-01

    The liquid permeability of dense random packings of cubic colloids with rounded corners is studied for solid hematite cubes and hollow microporous silica cubes. The permeabilities of these two types of packings are similar, confirming that the micropores in the silica shell of the hollow cubes do

  4. Dense Cloud Cores revealed by ALMA CO observations in the low metallicity dwarf galaxy WLM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, M.; Elmegreen, B.; Hunter, D.; Cortes, J.; Brinks, E.; Cigan, P.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding stellar birth requires observations of the clouds in which they form. These clouds are dense and self-gravitating, and in all existing observations, they are molecular with H2 the dominant species and CO the best available. When the abundances of carbon and oxygen are low compared to hydrogen, and the opacity from dust is also low, as in primeval galaxies and local dwarf irregular galaxies CO forms slowly and is easily destroyed, so it cannot accumulate inside dense clouds. Then we lose our ability to trace the gas in regions of star formation and we lose critical information on the temperatures, densities, and velocities of the material that collapses. I will report on high resolution observations with ALMA of CO clouds in the local group dwarf irregular galaxy WLM, which has a metallicity that is 13% of the solar value and 50% lower than the previous CO detection threshold and the properties derived of very small dense CO clouds mapped..

  5. Fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ≲ 1000 AU: Relation between fragmentation and density structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5-parell 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Estalella, Robert [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fuente, Asunción [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, P.O. Box 112, E-28803 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Fontani, Francesco; Sánchez-Monge, Álvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Lago E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Commerçon, Benoit; Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie, UMR CNRS 8112, École Normale Supérieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Busquet, Gemma [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Area di Recerca di Tor Vergata, Via Fosso Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Bontemps, Sylvain [Université de Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Zapata, Luis A. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Di Francesco, James, E-mail: palau@ieec.uab.es [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 355, STN CSC, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2014-04-10

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 μm (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the spectral energy distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. Even though the estimated fragmentation level is strictly speaking a lower limit, its relative value is significant and several trends could be explored with our data. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered the effects of rotational-to-gravitational energy ratio, non-thermal velocity dispersion, and turbulence mode on the density structure of the cores, and found that compressive turbulence seems to yield higher central densities. Finally, a possible explanation for the origin of cores with concentrated density profiles, which are the cores showing no fragmentation, could be related with a strong magnetic field, consistent with the outcome of radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

  6. Crystallization in Earth's Core after High-Temperature Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, K.; Morard, G.; Hernlund, J. W.; Helffrich, G. R.; Ozawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent core formation models based on the metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements suggest that the Earth's core was formed by metal segregation at high pressure and high temperature in a deep magma ocean. It is also thought that the simultaneous solubility of silicon and oxygen in liquid iron are strongly enhanced at high pressure and high temperature, such that at the end of accretion the core was rich in both silicon and oxygen. Here we performed crystallization experiments on the Fe-Si binary and Fe-Si-O ternary systems up to core pressure in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The starting material for the latter was a homogeneous mixture of fine-grain Fe-Si and SiO2 (sustain without extreme degrees of secular cooling. However, even for modest degrees of joint Si-O incorporation into the early core, the buoyancy released by crystallization of SiO2 is sufficient to overcome thermal stratification and sustain the geodynamo.

  7. Fragmentation of massive dense cores down to ~1000 AU: Relation between fragmentation and density structure

    CERN Document Server

    Palau, Aina; Girart, J M; Fuente, A; Fontani, F; Commercon, B; Busquet, G; Bontemps, S; Sanchez-Monge, A; Zapata, L A; Zhang, Q; Hennebelle, P; Di Francesco, J

    2014-01-01

    In order to shed light on the main physical processes controlling fragmentation of massive dense cores, we present a uniform study of the density structure of 19 massive dense cores, selected to be at similar evolutionary stages, for which their relative fragmentation level was assessed in a previous work. We inferred the density structure of the 19 cores through a simultaneous fit of the radial intensity profiles at 450 and 850 micron (or 1.2 mm in two cases) and the Spectral Energy Distribution, assuming spherical symmetry and that the density and temperature of the cores decrease with radius following power-laws. We find a weak (inverse) trend of fragmentation level and density power-law index, with steeper density profiles tending to show lower fragmentation, and vice versa. In addition, we find a trend of fragmentation increasing with density within a given radius, which arises from a combination of flat density profile and high central density and is consistent with Jeans fragmentation. We considered th...

  8. Properties of dense cores in clustered massive star-forming regions at high angular resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro; Fontani, Francesco; Busquet, Gemma; Juarez, Carmen; Estalella, Robert; Tan, Jonathan C; Sepulveda, Inma; Ho, Paul T P; Zhang, Qizhou; Kurtz, Stan

    2013-01-01

    We aim at characterising dense cores in the clustered environments associated with massive star-forming regions. For this, we present an uniform analysis of VLA NH3(1,1) and (2,2) observations towards a sample of 15 massive star-forming regions, where we identify a total of 73 cores, classify them as protostellar, quiescent starless, or perturbed starless, and derive some physical properties. The average sizes and ammonia column densities are 0.06 pc and 10^15 cm^-2, respectively, with no significant differences between the starless and protostellar cores, while the linewidth and rotational temperature of quiescent starless cores are smaller, 1.0 km/s and 16 K, than those of protostellar (1.8 km/s, 21 K), and perturbed starless (1.4 km/s, 19 K) cores. Such linewidths and temperatures for these quiescent starless cores in the surroundings of massive stars are still significantly larger than the typical values measured in starless cores of low-mass star-forming regions, implying an important non-thermal compone...

  9. Evidence of Evolution in the Dense Cores in Massive Star Forming Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Jun Zhou; Jarken Esimbek; Ji-Xian Sun; Bing-Gang Ju; Jing-Jiang Sun

    2005-01-01

    The excitation of H2O masers usually needs very high density gas,hence it can serve as a marker of dense gas in HⅡ region. We selected a sample of H2O maser sources from Plume et al. (four with, and four without detected CS(J = 7 - 6) emission), and observed them in 13CO(J=1-0) and C18O (J=1-0). C18O (J=1-0) emission was detected only in three of the sources with detected CS(J=7-6) emission. An analysis combined with some data in the literature suggests that these dense cores may be located at different evolutionary stages. Multi-line observation study may provide us clues on the evolution of massive star forming regions and the massive stars themselves.

  10. SKS anisotropy on a dense broadband array over the Ruby Mountains Metamorphic Core Complex, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, E. M.; Litherland, M.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Ruby Mountains metamorphic core complex (RMCC), located in the Basin-and-Range Province in northeastern Nevada, is thought to have formed by some combination of low-angle detachment faulting, lateral crustal flow, and vertical diapirism. We deployed a 50-station densely-spaced passive seismic array from June 2010 through June 2012, as part of the Earthscope Flexible Array campaign. We were particularly interested in determining whether two layers of anisotropy are distinguishable, as this could imply the existence of discrete crustal and mantle strain fabrics, and potentially provide insight into local flow involved in the formation of the RMCC. We analyzed SKS splitting using the SplitLab program (Wüstefeld et al., 2008, Comp. Geosci. 34, 515) to calculate fast-axis direction, Φ, and time delay, δt, of events with magnitude ≥ 5.50 at distances of 90 to 130 degrees on 35 of our broadband seismic stations. Approximately ten such events were used per station. The mean delay time found was 0.8 s with a standard deviation of 0.28 s, and the mean fast-axis azimuthal direction was -70.1 degrees with a standard deviation of 19 degrees. We did not find evidence of two-layer anisotropy beneath the Ruby Mountains: mean splitting times within and beyond the RMCC are well within one standard deviation of each other, and average fast directions show no obvious trend within the RMCC. Either there is no significant additional crustal strain associated with the RMCC formation; or, the strain direction is identical to that of regional mantle flow; or, most likely, our data quality is insufficient to resolve crustal anisotropy superimposed on mantle anisotropy with a potentially similar fast direction. However, a systematic counterclockwise rotation of fast-axis direction across our array—the four easternmost stations (D03, D02, B17, and C18) have a mean Φ = -40.5 degrees, whereas the four westernmost stations (D05, B01, B02, and C02) have a mean Φ = -79.5 degrees

  11. The BLAST Survey of the Vela Molecular Cloud: Physical Properties of the Dense Cores in Vela-D

    CERN Document Server

    Olmi, Luca; Angles-Alcazar, Daniel; Bock, James J; Chapin, Edward L; De Luca, Massimo; Devlin, Mark J; Dicker, Simon; Elia, Davide; Fazio, Giovanni G; Giannini, Teresa; Griffin, Matthew; Gundersen, Joshua O; Halpern, Mark; Hargrave, Peter C; Hughes, David H; Klein, Jeff; Lorenzetti, Dario; Marengo, Massimo; Marsden, Gaelen; Martin, Peter G; Massi, Fabrizio; Mauskopf, Philip; Netterfield, Calvin B; Patanchon, Guillaume; Rex, Marie; Salama, Alberto; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Smith, Howard A; Strafella, Francesco; Thomas, Nicholas; Truch, Matthew D P; Tucker, Carole; Tucker, Gregory S; Viero, Marco P; Wiebe, Donald V

    2009-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large-Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) carried out a 250, 350 and 500 micron survey of the galactic plane encompassing the Vela Molecular Ridge, with the primary goal of identifying the coldest, dense cores possibly associated with the earliest stages of star formation. Here we present the results from observations of the Vela-D region, covering about 4 square degrees, in which we find 141 BLAST cores. We exploit existing data taken with the Spitzer MIPS, IRAC and SEST-SIMBA instruments to constrain their (single-temperature) spectral energy distributions, assuming a dust emissivity index beta = 2.0. This combination of data allows us to determine the temperature, luminosity and mass of each BLAST core, and also enables us to separate starless from proto-stellar sources. We also analyze the effects that the uncertainties on the derived physical parameters of the individual sources have on the overall physical properties of starless and proto-stellar cores, and we find that there appe...

  12. Exceptional dense water formation on the Adriatic shelf in the winter of 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mihanović

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we document dense water formation throughout the Adriatic shelf and coastal area in January/February 2012, resulting in record-breaking densities observed during and after the event. The unprecedented dense water generation was preconditioned by a dry and warm year which resulted in a significant reduction of coastal freshwaters, superimposed on a long-term basin-wide salinity increase. The final event that triggered the dense water formation was an extended period of cold weather with strong and severe winds. Record-breaking potential density anomalies (above 30 kg m−3 were measured at several formation sites. Accumulated surface net heat and water losses in some coastal regions exceeded 1.5 GJ m−2 and 250 kg m−2 over 21 days, respectively. Excessiveness, importance of shelf-type dense water formation and effects on the thermohaline circulation and deep aquatic systems are discussed.

  13. Dense Gas in Molecular Cores Associated with Planck Galactic Cold Clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jinghua; Wu, Yuefang; Liu, Tie; Zhang, Tianwei; Zeng Li, Jin; Liu, Hong-Li; Meng, Fanyi; Chen, Ping; Hu, Runjie; Wang, Ke

    2016-03-01

    We present the first survey of dense gas toward Planck Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCCs). Observations in the J = 1-0 transitions of HCO+ and HCN toward 621 molecular cores associated with PGCCs were performed using the Purple Mountain Observatory’s 13.7 m telescope. Among them, 250 sources were detected, including 230 cores detected in HCO+ and 158 in HCN. Spectra of the J = 1-0 transitions from 12CO, 13CO, and C18O at the centers of the 250 cores were extracted from previous mapping observations to construct a multi-line data set. The significantly low detection rate of asymmetric double-peaked profiles, together with the good consistency among central velocities of CO, HCO+, and HCN spectra, suggests that the CO-selected Planck cores are more quiescent than classical star-forming regions. The small difference between line widths of C18O and HCN indicates that the inner regions of CO-selected Planck cores are no more turbulent than the exterior. The velocity-integrated intensities and abundances of HCO+ are positively correlated with those of HCN, suggesting that these two species are well coupled and chemically connected. The detected abundances of both HCO+ and HCN are significantly lower than values in other low- to high-mass star-forming regions. The low abundances may be due to beam dilution. On the basis of an inspection of the parameters given in the PGCC catalog, we suggest that there may be about 1000 PGCC objects that have a sufficient reservoir of dense gas to form stars.

  14. Comparative study of the relationships between CO isotopic luminosities and infrared luminosity for the Galactic dense cores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Combining the 12CO(1-0),13CO(1-0),and C18O(1-0) data with IRAS four band data,we here estimate the physical parameters such as size,viral mass,and CO J=1-0 isotopic and infrared luminosities for 29 dense molecular clouds from two published CO samples. We further analyze the various correlations between CO J=1-0 isotopic luminosities and infrared luminosity(star formation rate,SFR) and discuss the relationships between the molecular gas tracers and SFR. The results show that 12CO(1-0),13CO(1-0) and C18O(1-0) luminosities have tight correlations with each other. CO J=1-0 isotopic luminosities and SFR show weak correlations with larger scatter than the HCN-IR correlations of 47 dense cores in the Galaxy and 65 external star-forming galaxies. This might be interpreted as that both the SFR and star formation efficiency are mainly determined by the molecular gas at high volume density rather than high column density.

  15. Formation and liquid permeability of dense colloidal cube packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Sonja I. R.; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M. E.; Philipse, Albert P.

    2015-02-01

    The liquid permeability of dense random packings of cubic colloids with rounded corners is studied for solid hematite cubes and hollow microporous silica cubes. The permeabilities of these two types of packings are similar, confirming that the micropores in the silica shell of the hollow cubes do not contribute to the permeability. From the Brinkman screening length √{k } of ˜16 nm, we infer that the relevant pores are indeed intercube pores. Furthermore, we relate the permeability to the volume fraction and specific solid volume of the cubes using the Kozeny-Carman relation. The Kozeny-Carman relation contains a constant that accounts for the topology and size distribution of the pores in the medium. The constant obtained from our study with aspherical particles is of the same order of magnitude as those from studies with spherical and ellipsoidal particles, which supports the notion that the Kozeny-Carman relation is applicable for any dense particle packing with (statistically) isotropic microstructures, irrespective of the particle shape.

  16. The Galactic Center Cloud G0.253+0.016: A Massive Dense Cloud with low Star Formation Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffmann, Jens; Zhang, Qizhou

    2013-01-01

    We present the first interferometric molecular line and dust emission maps for the Galactic Center (GC) cloud G0.253+0.016, observed using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter--wave Astronomy (CARMA) and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). This cloud is very dense, and concentrates a mass exceeding the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex (2x10^5 M_sun) into a radius of only 3pc, but it is essentially starless. G0.253+0.016 therefore violates "star formation laws" presently used to explain trends in galactic and extragalactic star formation by a factor ~45. Our observations show a lack of dense cores of significant mass and density, thus explaining the low star formation activity. Instead, cores with low densities and line widths 1km/s---probably the narrowest lines reported for the GC region to date---are found. Evolution over several 10^5 yr is needed before more massive cores, and possibly an Arches--like stellar cluster, could form. Given the disruptive dynamics of the GC region, and the potentially unbound ...

  17. A (sub)millimetre study of dense cores in Orion B9

    CERN Document Server

    Miettinen, Oskari; Haikala, Lauri K; Juvela, Mika

    2011-01-01

    We aim to further constrain the properties and evolutionary stages of dense cores in Orion B9. The central part of Orion B9 was mapped at 350 micron with APEX/SABOCA. A sample of nine cores in the region were observed in C17O(2-1), H13CO+(4-3) (towards 3 sources), DCO+(4-3), N2H+(3-2), and N2D+(3-2) with APEX/SHFI. These data are used in conjunction with our previous APEX/LABOCA 870-micron dust continuum data. Many of the LABOCA cores show evidence of substructure in the higher-resolution SABOCA image. In particular, we report on the discovery of multiple very low-mass condensations in the prestellar core SMM 6. Based on the 350-to-870 micron flux density ratios, we determine dust temperatures of ~7.9-10.8 K, and dust emissivity indices of ~0.5-1.8. The CO depletion factors are in the range ~1.6-10.8. The degree of deuteration in N2H+ is ~0.04-0.99, where the highest value (seen towards the prestellar core SMM 1) is, to our knowledge, the most extreme level of N2H+ deuteration reported so far. The level of HC...

  18. Dense gas in molecular cores associated with Planck Galactic cold clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Jinghua; Liu, Tie; Zhang, Tianwei; Li, Jin Zeng; Liu, Hong-Li; Meng, Fanyi; Chen, Ping; Hu, Runjie; Wang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    We present the first survey of dense gas towards Planck Galactic Cold Clumps (PGCCs). Observations in the J=1-0 transitions of HCO+ and HCN towards 621 molecular cores associated with PGCCs were performed using the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7-m telescope. Among them, 250 sources have detection, including 230 cores detected in HCO+ and 158 in HCN. Spectra of the J=1-0 transitions from CO, 13CO, and C18O at the centers of the 250 cores were extracted from previous mapping observations to construct a multi-line data set. The significantly low detection rate of asymmetric double-peaked profiles, together with the well consistence among central velocities of CO, HCO+, and HCN spectra, suggests that the CO-selected Planck cores are more quiescent compared to classical star-forming regions. The small difference between line widths of C18O and HCN indicates that the inner regions of CO-selected Planck cores are not more turbulent than the exterior. The velocity-integrated intensities and abundances of HCO+ are p...

  19. Zonal flow formation in the Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagoshi, Takehiro; Kageyama, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya

    2010-02-11

    Zonal jets are very common in nature. Well-known examples are those in the atmospheres of giant planets and the alternating jet streams found in the Earth's world ocean. Zonal flow formation in nuclear fusion devices is also well studied. A common feature of these zonal flows is that they are spontaneously generated in turbulent systems. Because the Earth's outer core is believed to be in a turbulent state, it is possible that there is zonal flow in the liquid iron of the outer core. Here we report an investigation at the current low-viscosity limit of numerical simulations of the geodynamo. We find a previously unknown convection regime of the outer core that has a dual structure comprising inner, sheet-like radial plumes and an outer, westward cylindrical zonal flow. We numerically confirm that the dual-convection structure with such a zonal flow is stable under a strong, self-generated dipole magnetic field.

  20. Dense Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Nearby Seyfert Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kohno, K; Vila-Vilaro, B; Okumura, S K; Shibatsuka, T; Okiura, M; Ishizuki, S; Kawabe, R

    2002-01-01

    An imaging survey of CO(1-0), HCN(1-0), and HCO$^+$(1-0) lines in the centers of nearby Seyfert galaxies has been conducted using the Nobeyama Millimeter Array and the RAINBOW interferometer. Preliminary results reveal that 3 Seyferts out of 7 show abnormally high HCN/CO and HCN/HCO$^+$ ratios, which cannot occur even in nuclear starburst galaxies. We suggest that the enhanced HCN emission originated from X-ray irradiated dense obscuring tori, and that these molecular line ratios can be a new diagnostic tool to search for ``pure'' AGNs. According to our HCN diagram, we suggest that NGC 1068, NGC 1097, and NGC 5194 host ``pure'' AGNs, whereas Seyfert nuclei of NGC 3079, NGC 6764, and NGC 7469 may be ``composite'' in nature.

  1. Chemical and physical characterization of collapsing low-mass prestellar dense cores

    CERN Document Server

    Hincelin, U; Wakelam, V; Hersant, F; Guilloteau, S; Herbst, E

    2016-01-01

    The first hydrostatic core, also called the first Larson core, is one of the first steps in low-mass star formation, as predicted by theory. With recent and future high performance telescopes, details of these first phases become accessible, and observations may confirm theory and even bring new challenges for theoreticians. In this context, we study from a theoretical point of view the chemical and physical evolution of the collapse of prestellar cores until the formation of the first Larson core, in order to better characterize this early phase in the star formation process. We couple a state-of-the-art hydrodynamical model with full gas-grain chemistry, using different assumptions on the magnetic field strength and orientation. We extract the different components of each collapsing core (i.e., the central core, the outflow, the disk, the pseudodisk, and the envelope) to highlight their specific physical and chemical characteristics. Each component often presents a specific physical history, as well as a sp...

  2. Defect formation in insulators under dense electronic excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Noriaki (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    Defect formation in insulators induced by electronic excitation is reviewed, emphasizing the possible effect on the formation of heavy ion tracks. The relaxation of excitons that produces self-trapped excitons and defects is discussed first. Evidence for defect formation by the interaction of a self-trapped exciton with another excitation event is then described. It is pointed out that track registration has been observed so far only in materials in which excitons are self-trapped. It is suggested that track registration occurs though interaction of self-trapped excitons among each other or with other excitation events. (author).

  3. CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey: Dense Gas in the Young L1451 Region of Perseus

    CERN Document Server

    Storm, Shaye; Lee, Katherine I; Fernández-López, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W; Teuben, Peter; Arce, Héctor G; Rosolowsky, Erik W; Meisner, Aaron M; Isella, Andrea; Kauffmann, Jens; Shirley, Yancy L; Kwon, Woojin; Plunkett, Adele L; Pound, Marc W; Segura-Cox, Dominique M; Tassis, Konstantinos; Tobin, John J; Volgenau, Nikolaus H; Crutcher, Richard M; Testi, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    We present a 3 mm spectral line and continuum survey of L1451 in the Perseus Molecular Cloud. These observations are from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), which also imaged Barnard 1, NGC 1333, Serpens Main and Serpens South. L1451 is the survey region with the lowest level of star formation activity---it contains no confirmed protostars. HCO+, HCN, and N2H+ (J=1-0) are all detected throughout the region, with HCO+ the most spatially widespread, and molecular emission seen toward 90% of the area above N(H_2) column densities of 1.9x10^21 cm^-2. HCO+ has the broadest velocity dispersion, near 0.3 km/s on average, compared to ~0.15 km/s for the other molecules, thus representing a range from supersonic to subsonic gas motions. Our non-binary dendrogram analysis reveals that the dense gas traced by each molecule has similar hierarchical structure, and that gas surrounding the candidate first hydrostatic core (FHSC), L1451-mm, and other previously detected single-dish continuum clumps have sim...

  4. Star Formation Isochrone Surfaces: Clues on Star Formation Quenching in Dense Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Aragon-Calvo, M A; Silk, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The star formation history of galaxies is a complex process usually considered to be stochastic in nature, for which we can only give average descriptions such as the color-density relation. In this work we follow star-forming gas particles in a hydrodynamical N-body simulation back in time in order to study their initial spatial configuration. By keeping record of the time when a gas particle started forming stars we can produce gas-star isochrone surfaces delineating the surfaces of accreting gas that begin producing stars at different times. These accretion surfaces are closely packed inside dense regions, intersecting each other, and as a result galaxies inside proto-clusters stop accreting gas early, naturally explaining the color dependence on density. The process described here has a purely gravitational / geometrical origin, arguably operating at a more fundamental level than complex processes such as AGN and supernovae, and providing a conceptual origin for the color-density relation.

  5. Thermal evolution and core formation of planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Taichi; Nagahara, Hiroko

    2017-04-01

    Planetesimals did not get an adequate thermal energy by accretion to form large scale magma ocean because of smaller radii, masses, gravity and accretion energy, however, there are various evidences for the presence of core in planetesimals: 4-Vesta has a core and non-magmatic iron meteorites were segregated metal in bodies that did not experience silicate melting. It has been pointed out that accretion time of planetesimals controls melting and differentiation, because short lived nuclides are plausible heat source. Other factors such as radiative cooling from the surface and thermal conductivity, would also affect thermal evolution of planetesimals. Furthermore, percolation of Fe-S melt through silicate matrix is controlled by the porosity and grain size of silicates and dihedral angle between the melt and silicates. Therefore, the interior structure of planetesimals should be considered by taking the accretion, growth, and thermal evolution of the interior simultaneously. We make a numerical simulation with a spherical 1D model on the basis of the model by Neuman, which is a non-stationary heat conduction equation. We specifically pay attention to the process at temperatures between eutectic temperature Fe-FeS (1213K) and silicate solidus (1425K) and the surface tension of the melt that governs percolation. The model contains three free parameters, formation time, accretion duration, and final size of the planetesimals. The results show that the interior structure can be divided to four types: Type A is undifferentiated, Type B is differentiated to core and mantle of which core was formed by Fe-S melt percolation, Type C is partially differentiated to FeS core and mantle, where mantle retains residual Fe metal, and Type D is differentiated to core and mantle by metal separation in silicate magma. Type A would correspond to the parent bodies of chondrites, and Type B (and Type C?) core would be the source of non-magmatic iron meteorites. Type D would be parent

  6. Prestellar core modeling in the presence of a filament - The dense heart of L1689B

    CERN Document Server

    Steinacker, Juergen; Henning, Thomas; Heigl, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Short version: We apply a new synergetic radiative transfer method: the derived 1D density profiles are both consistent with a cut through the Herschel PACS/SPIRE and JCMT SCUBA-2 continuum maps of L1689B and with a derived local interstellar radiation field. Choosing an appropriate cut along the filament major axis, we minimize the impact of the filament emission on the modeling. For the bulk of the core (5000-20000 au) an isothermal sphere model with a temperature of around 10 K provides the best fits. We show that the power law index of the density profile, as well as the constant temperature can be derived directly from the radial surface brightness profiles. For the inner region (< 5000 au), we find a range of densities and temperatures that are consistent with the surface brightness profiles and the local interstellar radiation field. Based on our core models, we find that pixel-by-pixel single temperature spectral energy distribution fits are incapable of determining dense core properties. We conclu...

  7. BDNF and its pro-peptide are stored in presynaptic dense core vesicles in brain neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieni, Sandra; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Dekkers, Martijn; Rauskolb, Stefanie; Ionescu, Mihai S.; Deogracias, Ruben; Gundelfinger, Eckart D.; Kojima, Masami; Nestel, Sigrun; Frotscher, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates numerous and complex biological processes including memory retention, its extremely low levels in the mature central nervous system have greatly complicated attempts to reliably localize it. Using rigorous specificity controls, we found that antibodies reacting either with BDNF or its pro-peptide both stained large dense core vesicles in excitatory presynaptic terminals of the adult mouse hippocampus. Both moieties were ∼10-fold more abundant than pro-BDNF. The lack of postsynaptic localization was confirmed in Bassoon mutants, a seizure-prone mouse line exhibiting markedly elevated levels of BDNF. These findings challenge previous conclusions based on work with cultured neurons, which suggested activity-dependent dendritic synthesis and release of BDNF. They instead provide an ultrastructural basis for an anterograde mode of action of BDNF, contrasting with the long-established retrograde model derived from experiments with nerve growth factor in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:22412021

  8. Munc13 controls the location and efficiency of dense-core vesicle release in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bospoort, Rhea; Farina, Margherita; Schmitz, Sabine K; de Jong, Arthur; de Wit, Heidi; Verhage, Matthijs; Toonen, Ruud F

    2012-12-10

    Neuronal dense-core vesicles (DCVs) contain diverse cargo crucial for brain development and function, but the mechanisms that control their release are largely unknown. We quantified activity-dependent DCV release in hippocampal neurons at single vesicle resolution. DCVs fused preferentially at synaptic terminals. DCVs also fused at extrasynaptic sites but only after prolonged stimulation. In munc13-1/2-null mutant neurons, synaptic DCV release was reduced but not abolished, and synaptic preference was lost. The remaining fusion required prolonged stimulation, similar to extrasynaptic fusion in wild-type neurons. Conversely, Munc13-1 overexpression (M13OE) promoted extrasynaptic DCV release, also without prolonged stimulation. Thus, Munc13-1/2 facilitate DCV fusion but, unlike for synaptic vesicles, are not essential for DCV release, and M13OE is sufficient to produce efficient DCV release extrasynaptically.

  9. Silence of Synaptotagmin VII inhibits release of dense core vesicles in PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Synaptotagmin VII (Syt VII), which has a higher Ca2+ affinity and slower disassembly kinetics with lipid than Syt I and Syt IX, was regarded as being uninvolved in synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis but instead possibly as a calcium sensor for the slower kinetic phase of dense core vesicles (DCVs) release. By using high temporal resolution capacitance and amperometry measurements, it was demonstrated that the knockdown of endogenous Syt VII attenuated the fusion of DCV with the plasma membrane, reduced the amplitude of the exocytotic burst of the Ca2+-triggered DCV release without affecting the slope of the sustained component, and blocked the fusion pore expansion. This suggests that Syt VII is the Ca2+ sensor of DCV fusion machinery and is an essential factor for the establishment and maintenance of the pool size of releasable DCVs in PC12 cells.

  10. Modeling of molecular clouds with formation of prestellar cores

    CERN Document Server

    Donkov, Sava; Veltchev, Todor V

    2012-01-01

    We develop a statistical approach for description of dense structures (cores) in molecular clouds that might be progenitors of stars. Our basic assumptions are a core mass-density relationship and a power-law density distribution of these objects as testified by numerical simulations and observations. The core mass function (CMF) was derived and its slope in the high-mass regime was obtained analytically. Comparisons with observational CMFs in several Galactic clouds are briefly presented.

  11. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Mai [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Tetsuya [Cell Signaling Group, Waseda Bioscience Research Institute in Singapore (WABOIS), Waseda University, 11 Biopolis Way, 05-01/02 Helios, Singapore 138667 (Singapore); Numano, Rika [The Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS), Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tennpaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Ikematsu, Kazuya [Forensic Pathology and Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kakeyama, Masaki [Laboratory of Environmental Health Sciences, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Tsuboi, Takashi, E-mail: takatsuboi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  12. Geochemistry: how well can Pb isotopes date core formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamber, Balz S; Kramers, Jan D

    2006-11-02

    Timescale and the physics of planetary core formation are essential constraints for models of Earth's accretion and early differentiation. Wood and Halliday use the apparent mismatch in core-formation dates determined from tungsten (W) and lead (Pb) chrono-meters to argue for a two-stage core formation, involving an early phase of metal segregation followed by a protracted episode of sulphide melt addition. However, we show here that crust-;mantle Pb isotope systematics do not require diachronous core formation. Our observations indicate that very early (< or = 35 Myr) core formation and planet accretion remain the most plausible scenario.

  13. The EMPIRE Survey: Systematic Variations in the Dense Gas Fraction and Star Formation Efficiency from Full-Disk Mapping of M51

    CERN Document Server

    Bigiel, F; Jimenez-Donaire, M J; Pety, J; Usero, A; Cormier, D; Bolatto, A; Garcia-Burillo, S; Colombo, D; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Hughes, A; Kepley, A; Kramer, C; Sandstrom, K; Schinnerer, E; Schruba, A; Schuster, K; Tomicic, N; Zschaechner, L

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from the EMPIRE survey, an IRAM large program that is mapping tracers of high density molecular gas across the disks of nine nearby star-forming galaxies. Here, we present new maps of the 3-mm transitions of HCN, HCO+, and HNC across the whole disk of our pilot target, M51. As expected, dense gas correlates with tracers of recent star formation, filling the "luminosity gap" between Galactic cores and whole galaxies. In detail, we show that both the fraction of gas that is dense, f_dense traced by HCN/CO, and the rate at which dense gas forms stars, SFE_dense traced by IR/HCN, depend on environment in the galaxy. The sense of the dependence is that high surface density, high molecular gas fraction regions of the galaxy show high dense gas fractions and low dense gas star formation efficiencies. This agrees with recent results for individual pointings by Usero et al. 2015 but using unbiased whole-galaxy maps. It also agrees qualitatively with the behavior observed contrasting our ow...

  14. Dust formation in dense CSM behind the shock: A study based on SN2010jl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Arkaprabha; Dwek, Eli

    2016-06-01

    Dust is known to form in the quiescent outflows of AGB stars and in the explosively ejected matter of core collapse supernovae (CCSNe). Recent optical and near-infrared (IR) observations of the light curve of the ultraluminous CCSN SN2010jl has shown evidence for the rapid rise of a thermal IR emission component from newly forming dust in its spectrum. The UV-optical light curve from the SN cannot be powered by the radioactivities in the ejecta, and is powered by the interaction of the SN blast wave with the ambient dense circumstellar (CSM) shell. Observations of the evolution of the broad H and He lines in the spectra show that the dust could not have formed in the SN ejecta, but must have formed in the CSM instead. The supernova blast-wave traverses the CSM heating and ionizing the gas and destroying all pre-existing molecules and dust grains. The shocked CSM gas cools rapidly behind the shock to temperatures below the dust condensation temperatures. However, the radiation emanating from the shocked CSM plays a pivotal role in determining the earliest epoch after which seed nucleation centers can form and survive in the post-shock region. We use X-ray and UV-optical data from SN2010jl to follow the evolution of the shock through the CSM, and solve for the time-dependent temperature and density profile of the post-shock gas. Embedding a 10°. A seed nucleation center in the dense cooling shell, we calculate its temperature, and the earliest epoch beyond which such grain can survive evaporation and rapidly grow to large submicron grains. Thereafter, we study the formation of possible dust species through nucleation of condensable elements, and trace their evolution in time through accretion and coagulation. The final dust mass yield has been calculated and compared with other known dust sources in the galaxy. Detection of the IR excess as early as 67 days post-explosion poses new challenges to our understanding of the dust scenario behind shocks. Our model, first

  15. Triggering Collapse of the Presolar Dense Cloud Core and Injecting Short-Lived Radioisotopes with a Shock Wave. II. Varied Shock Wave and Cloud Core Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Boss, Alan P

    2013-01-01

    A variety of stellar sources have been proposed for the origin of the short-lived radioisotopes that existed at the time of the formation of the earliest Solar System solids, including Type II supernovae, AGB and super-AGB stars, and Wolf-Rayet star winds. Our previous adaptive mesh hydrodynamics models with the FLASH2.5 code have shown which combinations of shock wave parameters are able to simultaneously trigger the gravitational collapse of a target dense cloud core and inject significant amounts of shock wave gas and dust, showing that thin supernova shocks may be uniquely suited for the task. However, recent meteoritical studies have weakened the case for a direct supernova injection to the presolar cloud, motivating us to re-examine a wider range of shock wave and cloud core parameters, including rotation, in order to better estimate the injection efficiencies for a variety of stellar sources. We find that supernova shocks remain as the most promising stellar source, though planetary nebulae resulting f...

  16. Endobrevin/VAMP-8-dependent dense granule release mediates thrombus formation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Gwenda J; Ren, Qiansheng; Dilks, James R; Blair, Price; Whiteheart, Sidney W; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2009-07-30

    Individuals whose platelets lack dense or alpha-granules suffer various degrees of abnormal bleeding, implying that granule cargo contributes to hemostasis. Despite these clinical observations, little is known regarding the effects of impaired platelet granule secretion on thrombus formation in vivo. In platelets, SNARE proteins mediate the membrane fusion events required for granule cargo release. Endobrevin/VAMP-8 is the primary vesicle-SNARE (v-SNARE) responsible for efficient release of dense and alpha-granule contents; thus, VAMP-8(-/-) mice are a useful model to evaluate the importance of platelet granule secretion in thrombus formation. Thrombus formation, after laser-induced vascular injury, in these mice is delayed and decreased, but not absent. In contrast, thrombus formation is almost completely abolished in the mouse model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, ruby-eye, which lacks dense granules. Evaluation of aggregation of VAMP-8(-/-) and ruby-eye platelets indicates that defective ADP release is the primary abnormality leading to impaired aggregation. These results demonstrate the importance of dense granule release even in the earliest phases of thrombus formation and validate the distal platelet secretory machinery as a potential target for antiplatelet therapies.

  17. Endobrevin/VAMP-8–dependent dense granule release mediates thrombus formation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Gwenda J.; Ren, Qiansheng; Dilks, James R.; Blair, Price; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Individuals whose platelets lack dense or α-granules suffer various degrees of abnormal bleeding, implying that granule cargo contributes to hemostasis. Despite these clinical observations, little is known regarding the effects of impaired platelet granule secretion on thrombus formation in vivo. In platelets, SNARE proteins mediate the membrane fusion events required for granule cargo release. Endobrevin/VAMP-8 is the primary vesicle-SNARE (v-SNARE) responsible for efficient release of dense and α-granule contents; thus, VAMP-8−/− mice are a useful model to evaluate the importance of platelet granule secretion in thrombus formation. Thrombus formation, after laser-induced vascular injury, in these mice is delayed and decreased, but not absent. In contrast, thrombus formation is almost completely abolished in the mouse model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, ruby-eye, which lacks dense granules. Evaluation of aggregation of VAMP-8−/− and ruby-eye platelets indicates that defective ADP release is the primary abnormality leading to impaired aggregation. These results demonstrate the importance of dense granule release even in the earliest phases of thrombus formation and validate the distal platelet secretory machinery as a potential target for antiplatelet therapies. PMID:19395672

  18. Prestellar core modeling in the presence of a filament. The dense heart of L1689B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacker, J.; Bacmann, A.; Henning, Th.; Heigl, S.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Lacking a paradigm for the onset of star formation, it is important to derive basic physical properties of prestellar cores and filaments like density and temperature structures. Aims: We aim to disentangle the spatial variation in density and temperature across the prestellar core L1689B, which is embedded in a filament. We want to determine the range of possible central densities and temperatures that are consistent with the continuum radiation data. Methods: We apply a new synergetic radiative transfer method: the derived 1D density profiles are both consistent with a cut through the Herschel PACS/SPIRE and JCMT SCUBA-2 continuum maps of L1689B and with a derived local interstellar radiation field. Choosing an appropriate cut along the filament major axis, we minimize the impact of the filament emission on the modeling. Results: For the bulk of the core (5000-20 000 au) an isothermal sphere model with a temperature of around 10 K provides the best fits. We show that the power law index of the density profile, as well as the constant temperature can be derived directly from the radial surface brightness profiles. For the inner region (transfer methods also avoids the loss of information owing to smearing of all maps to the coarsest spatial resolution. We find the central core region to be colder and denser than estimated in recent inverse radiative transfer modeling, possibly indicating the start of star formation in L1689B.

  19. Dense core properties in the Infrared Dark cloud G14.225-0.506 revealed by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Ohashi, Satoshi; Chen, Huei-Ru Vivien; Zhang, Qizhou; Busquet, Gemma; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Palau, Aina; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi

    2016-01-01

    We have performed a dense core survey toward the Infrared Dark Cloud G14.225-0.506 at 3 mm continuum emission with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). This survey covers the two hub-filament systems with an angular resolution of $\\sim3$\\arcsec ($\\sim0.03$ pc). We identified 48 dense cores. Twenty out of the 48 cores are protostellar due to their association with young stellar objects (YSOs) and/or X-ray point-sources, while the other 28 cores are likely prestellar and unrelated with known IR or X-ray emission. Using APEX 870 $\\mu$m continuum emission, we also identified the 18 clumps hosting these cores. Through virial analysis using the ALMA N$_2$H$^+$ and VLA/Effelsberg NH$_3$ molecular line data, we found a decreasing trend in the virial parameter with decreasing scales from filaments to clumps, and then to cores. The virial parameters of $0.1-1.3$ in cores, indicate that cores are likely undergoing dynamical collapse. The cumulative Core Mass Function (CMF) for the prestellar cores ca...

  20. Solubility of Iron in Metallic Hydrogen and Stability of Dense Cores in Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, Sean; Militzer, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    The formation of the giant planets in our solar system, and likely a majority of giant exoplanets, is commonly explained by the accretion of nebular hydrogen and helium onto a large core of terrestrial-like composition. The fate of this core has important consequences for the evolution of the interior structure of the planet. It has recently been shown that H2O, MgO and SiO2 dissolve in liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. In this study, we perform ab initio calculations to study the solubility of an innermost metallic core. We find dissolution of iron to be strongly favored above 2000 K over the entire pressure range (0.4-4 TPa) considered. We compare with and summarize the results for solubilities on other probable core constituents. The calculations imply that giant planet cores are in thermodynamic disequilibrium with surrounding layers, promoting erosion and redistribution of heavy elements. Differences in solubility behavior between iron and rock may influence evolution of interior...

  1. Highly sensitive detection of copper ions by densely grafting fluorescein inside polyethyleneimine core-silica shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yali; Zheng, Xingwang

    2015-12-21

    In this work, polyethyleneimine (PEI) core-silica shell nanoparticles were synthesized and used for densely grafting fluorescent receptor units inside the core of these particles to result in multi-receptor units collectively sensing a target. Herein, copper ion quenching of the fluorescence intensity of a fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) system was selected as a model to confirm our proof-of-concept strategy. Our results showed that, compared to free FITC in solution, a 10-fold enhancement of the Stern-Volmer constant value for Cu(2+) quenching of the fluorescence intensity of the grafted state of FITC in PEI core-silica shell nanoparticles was achieved. Furthermore, compared to a previous collective sensing scheme by densely grafting fluorescent receptor units on a silica nanoparticle surface, the proposed scheme, which grafted fluorescent receptor units inside a polymer nano-core, was simple, highly efficient and presented higher sensitivity.

  2. Estimates of the hydrologic impact of drilling water on core samples taken from partially saturated densely welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the extent to which drill water might be expected to be imbibed by core samples taken from densely welded tuff. In a related experimental study conducted in G-Tunnel, drill water imbibition by the core samples was observed to be minimal. Calculations were carried out with the TOUGH code with the intent of corroborating the imbibition observations. Due to the absence of hydrologic data pertaining directly to G-Tunnel welded tuff, it was necessary to apply data from a similar formation. Because the moisture retention curve was not available for imbibition conditions, the drainage curve was applied to the model. The poor agreement between the observed and calculated imbibition data is attributed primarily to the inappropriateness of the drainage curve. Also significant is the value of absolute permeability (k) assumed in the model. Provided that the semi-log plot of the drainage and imbibition moisture retention curves are parallel within the saturation range of interest, a simple relationship exists between the moisture retention curve, k, and porosity ({phi}) which are assumed in the model and their actual values. If k and {phi} are known, we define the hysteresis factor {lambda} to be the ratio of the imbibition and drainage suction pressures for any saturation within the range of interest. If k and {phi} are unknown, {lambda} also accounts for the uncertainties in their values. Both the experimental and modeling studies show that drill water imbibition by the core has a minimal effect on its saturation state. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Ultrastructural localization of RFamide-like peptides in neuronal dense-cored vesicles in the peduncle of Hydra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koizumi, O; Wilson, Douglas Clyde; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    1989-01-01

    The presence of Arg-Phe-amide (RFamide)-like peptides in dense-cored vesicles in neurons of the peduncle of Hydra was demonstrated by immunogold electron microscopy. Thin sections of Lowicryl-embedded tissue labeled with antisera to RFamide and 5-nm gold-conjugated, secondary antibody and of Epon...

  4. Dense Core Properties in the Infrared Dark Cloud G14.225-0.506 Revealed by ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Satoshi; Sanhueza, Patricio; Chen, Huei-Ru Vivien; Zhang, Qizhou; Busquet, Gemma; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Palau, Aina; Tatematsu, Ken'ichi

    2016-12-01

    We have performed a dense core survey toward the Infrared Dark Cloud G14.225-0.506 at 3 mm continuum emission with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). This survey covers the two hub-filament systems with an angular resolution of ˜ 3\\prime\\prime (˜0.03 pc). We identified 48 dense cores. 20 out of the 48 cores are protostellar due to their association with young stellar objects (YSOs) and/or X-ray point-sources, while the other 28 cores are likely prestellar and unrelated with known IR or X-ray emission. Using APEX 870 μm continuum emission, we also identified the 18 clumps hosting these cores. Through virial analysis using the ALMA N2H+ and VLA/Effelsberg NH3 molecular line data, we found a decreasing trend in the virial parameter with decreasing scales from filaments to clumps, and then to cores. The virial parameters of 0.1-1.3 in cores indicate that cores are likely undergoing dynamical collapse. The cumulative core mass function for the prestellar core candidates has a power law index of α =1.6, with masses ranging from 1.5 to 22 {M}⊙ . We find no massive prestellar or protostellar cores. Previous studies suggest that massive O-type stars have not been produced yet in this region. Therefore, high-mass stars should be formed in the prestellar cores by accreting a significant amount of gas from the surrounding medium. Another possibility is that low-mass YSOs become massive by accreting from their parent cores that are fed by filaments. These two possibilities might be consistent with the scenario of global hierarchical collapse.

  5. Biodegradable particle formation for drug and gene delivery using supercritical fluid and dense gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Kenji

    2008-02-14

    Recent developments in biodegradable particle formation using supercritical fluids and dense gases have been reviewed with an emphasis on studies of micronizing and encapsulating poorly-soluble pharmaceuticals and gene. General review articles published in previous years have then been provided. A brief description of the operating principles of some types of particle formation processes is given. These include the rapid expansion of supercritical solutions (RESS), the particles from gas-saturated solution (PGSS) processes, the gas antisolvent process (GAS), and the supercritical antisolvent process (SAS). The papers have been reviewed under two groups, one involving the production of particles from pure biodegradable substances, and the other involving coating, capsule, and impregnation that contain active components, especially those that relate to pharmaceuticals. This review is a comprehensive review specifically focused on the formation of biodegradable particles for drug and gene delivery system using supercritical fluid and dense gas.

  6. Regulation of Dense-Core Granule Replenishment by Autocrine BMP Signalling in Drosophila Secondary Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redhai, Siamak; Hellberg, Josephine E E U; Wainwright, Mark; Perera, Sumeth W; Castellanos, Felix; Kroeger, Benjamin; Gandy, Carina; Leiblich, Aaron; Corrigan, Laura; Hilton, Thomas; Patel, Benjamin; Fan, Shih-Jung; Hamdy, Freddie; Goberdhan, Deborah C I; Wilson, Clive

    2016-10-01

    Regulated secretion by glands and neurons involves release of signalling molecules and enzymes selectively concentrated in dense-core granules (DCGs). Although we understand how many secretagogues stimulate DCG release, how DCG biogenesis is then accelerated to replenish the DCG pool remains poorly characterised. Here we demonstrate that each prostate-like secondary cell (SC) in the paired adult Drosophila melanogaster male accessory glands contains approximately ten large DCGs, which are loaded with the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) ligand Decapentaplegic (Dpp). These DCGs can be marked in living tissue by a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) lipid-anchored form of GFP. In virgin males, BMP signalling is sporadically activated by constitutive DCG secretion. Upon mating, approximately four DCGs are typically released immediately, increasing BMP signalling, primarily via an autocrine mechanism. Using inducible knockdown specifically in adult SCs, we show that secretion requires the Soluble NSF Attachment Protein, SNAP24. Furthermore, mating-dependent BMP signalling not only promotes cell growth, but is also necessary to accelerate biogenesis of new DCGs, restoring DCG number within 24 h. Our analysis therefore reveals an autocrine BMP-mediated feedback mechanism for matching DCG release to replenishment as secretion rates fluctuate, and might explain why in other disease-relevant systems, like pancreatic β-cells, BMP signalling is also implicated in the control of secretion.

  7. Porous shell/dense core structures prepared in tungsten phosphate glass through template-free route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento Correa, Deleon; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Odone Mazali, Italo, E-mail: mazali@iqm.unicamp.br [Institute of Chemistry, University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The preparation of the 11.7Li{sub 2}O-39.7WO{sub 3}-10.9CaO-37.7P{sub 2}O{sub 5} glass (pgLWCP) was based on a one-step heat treatment of the 6Li{sub 2}O-18WO{sub 3}-43CaO-33P{sub 2}O{sub 5} (gLWCP) glass followed by leaching of the {beta}-Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} phase formed during the crystallization process. The porous structure was formed in the region formerly occupied by the {beta}-Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} phase. The gLWCP undergoes devitrification through surface crystallization. This process occurs after a thermal treatment in lower temperature and in a shorter period of time than that required for the complete crystallization. After acid leaching treatment, we obtained a core-/shell-like structure with a very well-defined dense glass (gLWCP)/porous glass (pgLWCP) interface. The pgLWCP exhibits reversible coloration-decoloration reactions.

  8. Excitatory and Inhibitory Neurons in the Hippocampus Exhibit Molecularly Distinct Large Dense Core Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Jorge Ramirez-Franco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal interneurons comprise a diverse family of inhibitory neurons which function is critical for fine information processing. Along with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, interneurons secrete a myriad of neuroactive substances via secretory vesicles which molecular composition and regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we have carried out an immunohistofluorescence analysis to describe the molecular content of vesicles in distinct populations of hippocampal neurons. Our results indicate that phogrin, an integral protein of secretory vesicles in neuroendocrine cells, is highly enriched in parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Consistently, immunoelectron microscopy revealed phogrin staining in axon terminals of symmetrical synapses establishing inhibitory contacts with cell bodies of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, phogrin is highly expressed in CA3 and dentate gyrus interneurons which are both positive for PV and neuropeptide Y. Surprisingly, chromogranin B a canonical large dense core vesicle marker, is excluded from inhibitory cells in the hippocampus but highly expressed in excitatory CA3 pyramidal neurons and dentate gyrus granule cells. Our results provide the first evidence of phogrin expression in hippocampal interneurons and suggest the existence of molecularly distinct populations of secretory vesicles in different types of inhibitory neurons.

  9. Impaired maturation of large dense-core vesicles in muted-deficient adrenal chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhenhua; Wei, Lisi; Feng, Yaqin; Chen, Xiaowei; Du, Wen; Ma, Jing; Zhou, Zhuan; Chen, Liangyi; Li, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The large dense-core vesicle (LDCV), a type of lysosome-related organelle, is involved in the secretion of hormones and neuropeptides in specialized secretory cells. The granin family is a driving force in LDCV biogenesis, but the machinery for granin sorting to this biogenesis pathway is largely unknown. The mu mutant mouse, which carries a spontaneous null mutation on the Muted gene (also known as Bloc1s5), which encodes a subunit of the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1), is a mouse model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Here, we found that LDCVs were enlarged in mu adrenal chromaffin cells. Chromogranin A (CgA, also known as CHGA) was increased in mu adrenals and muted-knockdown cells. The increased CgA in mu mice was likely due a failure to export this molecule out of immature LDCVs, which impairs LDCV maturation and docking. In mu chromaffin cells, the size of readily releasable pool and the vesicle release frequency were reduced. Our studies suggest that the muted protein is involved in the selective export of CgA during the biogenesis of LDCVs.

  10. Modulation of cargo release from dense core granules by size and actin network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmy, Felix

    2007-08-01

    During regulated fusion of secretory granules with the plasma membrane, a fusion pore first opens and then dilates. The dilating pore allows cargo proteins from the dense core to be released into the extracellular space. Using real-time evanescent field fluorescence microscopy of live PC12 cells, it was determined how rapidly proteins of different sizes escape from single granules after fusion. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-Venus is released 40-fold slower than the three times smaller neuropeptide Y [NPY-monomeric GFP (mGFP)]. An NPY bearing two mGFPs in tandem [NPY-(mGFP)(2)] as an intermediate-sized fusion probe is released most slowly. Although, the time-course of release varies substantially for a given probe. Coexpression of beta-actin, actin-related protein 3 or mAbp1 slowed the release of the two larger cargo molecules but did not affect release of NPY-mGFP or of the granule-membrane-bound probe Vamp-pHluorin. Additionally, high concentrations of cytochalasin D slowed release of the tPA-Venus. Together these results suggest that fusion pore dilation is not the only determinate of release time-course and that actin rearrangements similar to those mediating actin-mediated motility influences the time-course of release without directly interfering with the granule membrane to cell membrane connection.

  11. An LMT/AzTEC 1.1 mm Survey of Dense Cores in the Monoceros R2 Giant Molecular Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Alyssa D.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Wilson, Grant; Offner, Stella; Heyer, Mark H.; Pokhrel, Riwaj; Gomez-Ruiz, Arturo; Luna, Abraham

    2017-01-01

    We present a census of dense gas cores in the MonR2 Giant Molecular Cloud with observations from the AzTEC instrument on the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) at λ = 1.1 mm. We detect 270 cores total, 84 with protostars, and 186 starless. AzTEC’s excellent 8‧‧resolution allows for the identification of discrete 1.1 mm sources about 0.05 × 0.05 pc in size in this distant (830 pc) cloud. After performing total flux and half-power area corrections for under-detected low S/N cores, we find that the cores have a median mass ˜ 2.8 M⊙ and a median deconvolved FWHM size ˜ 0.09 pc. 58% of the cores (154) lie above the Bonnor-Ebert mass versus size stability line for cores with T˜12K, suggesting they are unstable to further collapse. Bonnor-Ebert, Plummer-like, and Gaussian models are fit to 1-D and 2-D core radial column density profiles, with Plummer-like performing the best fit of the three models. We present a correlation between local core mass density and column density of gas (as traced by Herschel) characterized by a steep power-law that flattens above Σgas ~ 62 M⊙pc-2 (4.15 AV )smoothing over parsec scales. This core-gas correlation’s resemblance to the star-gas correlation for YSOs in Gutermuth et al. (2011) yields an approximate Mstar ˜ 0.4Mcore and indicates that stellar clustering is likely set by core clustering. Finally we derive an estimated global core formation efficiency that increases with increasing Herschel column density and asymptotically approaches CFE ˜ 0.4 for AV > 15.

  12. Deeply Embedded Protostellar Population in the Central Molecular Zone Suggested by H$_2$O Masers and Dense Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Xing; Kauffmann, Jens; Pillai, Thushara; Longmore, Steven N; Kruijssen, J M Diederik; Battersby, Cara

    2016-01-01

    The Central Molecular Zone (CMZ), usually referring to the inner 500 pc of the Galaxy, contains a dozen of massive ($\\sim10^5$ $M_\\odot$) molecular clouds. Are these clouds going to actively form stars like Sgr B2? How are they affected by the extreme physical conditions in the CMZ, such as strong turbulence? Here we present a first step towards answering these questions. Using high-sensitivity, high angular resolution radio and (sub)millimeter observations, we studied deeply embedded star formation in six massive clouds in the CMZ, including the 20 and 50 km s$^{-1}$ clouds, Sgr B1 off (as known as dust ridge clouds e/f), Sgr C, Sgr D, and G0.253-0.016. The VLA water maser observations suggest a population of deeply embedded protostellar candidates, many of which are new detections. The SMA 1.3 mm continuum observations reveal peaks in dust emission associated with the masers, suggesting the existence of dense cores. While our findings confirm that clouds such as G0.253-0.016 lack internal compact substructu...

  13. An origin of arc structures deeply embedded in dense molecular cloud cores

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Tokuda, Kazuki; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the formation of arc-like structures in the infalling envelope around protostars, motivated by the recent ALMA observations of the high-density molecular cloud core, MC27/L1527F. We performed self-gravitational hydrodynamical numerical simulations with an adaptive mesh refinement code. A filamentary cloud with a 0.1~pc width fragments into cloud cores because of perturbations due to weak turbulence. The cloud core undergoes gravitational collapse to form multiple protostars, and gravitational torque from the orbiting protostars produces arc structures extending up to a 1000~AU scale. As well as on a spatial extent, the velocity ranges of the arc structures, $\\sim0.5\\,\\mathrm{km\\,s}^{-1}$, are in agreement with the ALMA observations. We also found that circumstellar disks are often misaligned in triple system. The misalignment is caused by the tidal interaction between the protostars when they undergo close encounters because of a highly eccentric orbit of the tight binary pair.

  14. High core count single-mode multicore fiber for dense space division multiplexing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aikawa, K.; Sasaki, Y.; Amma, Y.;

    2016-01-01

    Multicore fibers and few-mode fibers have the potential to realize dense-space-division multiplexing systems. Several dense-space-division multiplexing system transmission experiments over multicore fibers and few-mode fibers have been demonstrated so far. Multicore fibers, including recent resul...

  15. Survey of ortho-H2D+(1_{1,0}-1_{1,1}) in dense cloud cores

    CERN Document Server

    Caselli, Paola; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; van der Tak, Floris; Crapsi, Antonio; Bacmann, Aurore

    2008-01-01

    We present a survey of the ortho-H2D+(1_{1,0}-1_{1,1}) line toward a sample of 10 starless cores and 6 protostellar cores, carried out at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The high diagnostic power of this line is revealed for the study of the chemistry, and the evolutionary and dynamical status of low-mass dense cores. The line is detected in 7 starless cores and in 4 protostellar cores. N(ortho-H2D+) ranges between 2 and 40x10^{12} cm^{-2} in starless cores and between 2 and 9x10^{12} cm^{-2} in protostellar cores. The brightest lines are detected toward the densest and most centrally concentrated starless cores, where the CO depletion factor and the deuterium fractionation are also largest. The large scatter observed in plots of N(ortho-H2D+) vs. the observed deuterium fractionation and vs. the CO depletion factor is likely to be due to variations in the ortho-to-para (o/p) ratio of H2D+ from >0.5 for T_{kin} < 10 K gas in pre-stellar cores to ~0.03 (consistent with T_{kin} ~15 K for protostellar c...

  16. On the Survivability and Metamorphism of Tidally Disrupted Giant Planets: the Role of Dense Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Shang-Fei; Lin, Douglas N C; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    A large population of planetary candidates in short-period orbits have been found through transit searches. Radial velocity surveys have also revealed several Jupiter-mass planets with highly eccentric orbits. Measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect indicate some misaligned planetary systems. This diversity could be induced by post-formation dynamical processes such as planet-planet scattering, the Kozai effect, or secular chaos which brings planets to the vicinity of their host stars. In this work, we propose a novel mechanism to form close-in super-Earths and Neptune-like planets through the tidal disruption of giant planets as a consequence of these dynamical processes. We model the core-envelope structure of giant planets with composite polytropes. Using three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of close encounters between planets and their host stars, we find that the presence of a core with a mass more than ten Earth masses can significantly increase the fraction of envelope which remains boun...

  17. The evolutionary status of dense cores in the NGC 1333 IRAS 4 region

    CERN Document Server

    Koumpia, E; Kwon, W; Tobin, J J; Fuller, G A; Plume, R

    2016-01-01

    Protostellar evolution, following the formation of the protostar is becoming reasonably well characterized, but the evolution from a prestellar core to a protostar is not well known, although the first hydrostatic core (FHSC) must be a pivotal step. NGC 1333 IRAS 4C is a potentially very young object, that we directly compare with the nearby Class 0 IRAS 4A and IRAS 4B. Observational constraints are provided by spectral imaging from the JCMT Spectral Legacy Survey (330-373 GHz) and continuum and line observations from CARMA. We present integrated intensity and velocity maps of several species, including CO, H2CO and CH3OH. The velocity of an observed outflow, the degree of CO depletion, the deuteration of DCO+/HCO+ and gas kinetic temperatures are observational signatures that we present. We report differences between the three sources in four aspects: a) the kinetic temperature is much lower towards IRAS 4C, b) the line profiles of the detected species show strong outflow activity towards IRAS 4A and IRAS 4B...

  18. Protostellar disk formation and transport of angular momentum during magnetized core collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Joos, Marc; Ciardi, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical studies of collapsing clouds found that the presence of a relatively strong magnetic field may prevent the formation of disks and their fragmentation. However most previous studies have been limited to cases where the magnetic field and the rotation axis of the cloud are aligned. We study the transport of angular momentum, and the effects on disk formation, for non-aligned initial configurations, and for a range magnetic intensities. We perform three-dimensional, adaptive mesh, numerical simulations of magnetically supercritical collapsing dense cores using the magneto-hydrodynamic code Ramses. At variance to earlier analysis, we show that the transport of angular momentum acts less efficiently in collapsing cores with non-aligned rotation and magnetic field. Analytically this result can be understood by taking into account the bending of field lines occurring during the gravitational collapse. We find that massive disks, containing at least 10% of the intial core mass, can form during the earlies...

  19. Earliest phases of star formation (EPoS): Dust temperature distributions in isolated starless cores

    CERN Document Server

    Lippok, N; Henning, Th; Beuther, Z Balog H; Kainulainen, J; Krause, O; Linz, H; Nielbock, M; Ragan, S E; Robitaille, T P; Sadavoy, S I; Schmiedeke, A

    2016-01-01

    Constraining the temperature and density structure of dense molecular cloud cores is fundamental for understanding the initial conditions of star formation. We use Herschel observations of the thermal FIR dust emission from nearby isolated molecular cloud cores and combine them with ground-based submillimeter continuum data to derive observational constraints on their temperature and density structure. The aim of this study is to verify the validity of a ray-tracing inversion technique developed to derive the dust temperature and density structure of isolated starless cores directly from the dust emission maps and to test if the resulting temperature and density profiles are consistent with physical models. Using this ray-tracing inversion technique, we derive the dust temperature and density structure of six isolated starless cloud cores. We employ self-consistent radiative transfer modeling to the derived density profiles, treating the ISRF as the only heating source. The best-fit values of local strength o...

  20. Numerical study of core formation of asymmetrically driven cone-guided targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hiroshi; Sakagami, Hitoshi

    2017-10-01

    Compression of a directly driven fast ignition cone-sphere target with a finite number of laser beams is numerically studied using a three-dimensional hydrodynamics code IMPACT-3D. The formation of a dense plasma core is simulated for 12-, 9-, 6-, and 4-beam configurations of the GEKKO XII laser. The complex 3D shapes of the cores are analyzed by elucidating synthetic 2D x-ray radiographic images in two orthogonal directions. The simulated x-ray images show significant differences in the core shape between the two viewing directions and rotation of the stagnating core axis in the top view for the axisymmetric 9- and 6-beam configurations.

  1. Properties of Dense Cores Embedded in Musca Derived from Extinction Maps and 13CO, C18O, and NH3 Emission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machaieie, Dinelsa A.; Vilas-Boas, José W.; Wuensche, Carlos A.; Racca, Germán A.; Myers, Philip C.; Hickel, Gabriel R.

    2017-02-01

    Using near-infrared data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey catalog and the Near Infrared Color Excess method, we studied the extinction distribution in five dense cores of Musca, which show visual extinction greater than 10 mag and are potential sites of star formation. We analyzed the stability in four of them, fitting their radial extinction profiles with Bonnor–Ebert isothermal spheres, and explored their properties using the J = 1–0 transition of 13CO and C18O and the J = K = 1 transition of NH3. One core is not well described by the model. The stability parameter of the fitted cores ranges from 4.5 to 5.7 and suggests that all cores are stable, including Mu13, which harbors one young stellar object (YSO), the IRAS 12322-7023 source. However, the analysis of the physical parameters shows that Mu13 tends to have larger A V, n c, and P ext than the remaining starless cores. The other physical parameters do not show any trend. It is possible that those are the main parameters to explore in active star-forming cores. Mu13 also shows the most intense emission of NH3. Its 13CO and C18O lines have double peaks, whose integrated intensity maps suggest that they are due to the superposition of clouds with different radial velocities seen in the line of sight. It is not possible to state whether these clouds are colliding and inducing star formation or are related to a physical process associated with the formation of the YSO.

  2. Redox state during core formation on asteroid 4-Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Emily A.; Savage, Paul S.; Badro, James; Barrat, Jean-Alix; Moynier, Frédéric

    2013-07-01

    Core formation is the main differentiation event in the history of a planet. However, the chemical composition of planetary cores and the physicochemical conditions prevailing during core formation remain poorly understood. The asteroid 4-Vesta is the smallest extant planetary body known to have differentiated a metallic core. Howardite, Eucrite, Diogenite (HED) meteorites, which are thought to sample 4-Vesta, provide us with an opportunity to study core formation in planetary embryos. Partitioning of elements between the core and mantle of a planet fractionates their isotopes according to formation conditions. One such element, silicon, shows large isotopic fractionation between metal and silicate, and its partitioning into a metallic core is only possible under very distinctive conditions of pressure, oxygen fugacity and temperature. Therefore, the silicon isotope system is a powerful tracer with which to study core formation in planetary bodies. Here we show through high-precision measurement of Si stable isotopes that HED meteorites are significantly enriched in the heavier isotopes compared to chondrites. This is consistent with the core of 4-Vesta containing at least 1 wt% of Si, which in turn suggests that 4-Vesta's differentiation occurred under more reducing conditions (ΔIW˜-4) than those previously suggested from analysis of the distribution of moderately siderophile elements in HEDs.

  3. Variations in the Star Formation Efficiency of the Dense Molecular Gas across the Disks of Star-forming Galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Usero, Antonio; Leroy, Adam K.; Walter, Fabian; Schruba, Andreas; García-Burillo, Santiago; Sandstrom, Karin; Bigiel, Frank; Brinks, Elias; Kramer, Carsten; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; de Blok, W. J. G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new survey of HCN(1-0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, focused on the little-explored regime of normal star-forming galaxy disks. Combining HCN, CO, and infrared (IR) emission, we investigate the role of dense gas in star formation, finding systematic variations in both the a

  4. Blue straggler formation at core collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Sambaran

    2016-01-01

    Among the most striking feature of blue straggler stars (BSS) is the presence of multiple sequences of BSSs in the colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of several globular clusters. It is often envisaged that such a multiple BSS sequence would arise due a recent core collapse of the host cluster, triggering a number of stellar collisions and binary mass transfers simultaneously over a brief episode of time. Here we examine this scenario using direct N-body computations of moderately massive star clusters (of order 10^4 Msun ). As a preliminary attempt, these models are initiated with approx. 8-10 Gyr old stellar population and King profiles of high concentrations, being "tuned" to undergo core collapse quickly. BSSs are indeed found to form in a "burst" at the onset of the core collapse and several of such BS-bursts occur during the post-core-collapse phase. In those models that include a few percent primordial binaries, both collisional and binary BSSs form after the onset of the (near) core-collapse. However, t...

  5. A Massive Galaxy in its Core Formation Phase Three Billion Years After the Big Bang

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Erica; Franx, Marijn; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Schreiber, Natascha Förster; da Cunha, Elisabete; Tacconi, Linda; Bezanson, Rachel; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Leja, Joel; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind; van der Wel, Arjen; Whitaker, Katherine; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-01-01

    Most massive galaxies are thought to have formed their dense stellar cores at early cosmic epochs. However, cores in their formation phase have not yet been observed. Previous studies have found galaxies with high gas velocity dispersions or small apparent sizes but so far no objects have been identified with both the stellar structure and the gas dynamics of a forming core. Here we present a candidate core in formation 11 billion years ago, at z=2.3. GOODS-N-774 has a stellar mass of 1.0x10^11 Msun, a half-light radius of 1.0 kpc, and a star formation rate of 90[+45-20]Msun/yr. The star forming gas has a velocity dispersion 317+-30 km/s, amongst the highest ever measured. It is similar to the stellar velocity dispersions of the putative descendants of GOODS-N-774, compact quiescent galaxies at z~2 and giant elliptical galaxies in the nearby Universe. Galaxies such as GOODS-N-774 appear to be rare; however, from the star formation rate and size of the galaxy we infer that many star forming cores may be heavil...

  6. A Massive Galaxy in Its Core Formation Phase Three Billion Years After the Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erica; van Dokkum, Pieter; Franx, Marijn; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Schreiber, Natascha M. Forster; da Cunha, Elisabete; Tacconi, Linda; Bezanson, Rachel; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Leja, Joel; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind; van der Wel, Arjen; Whitaker, Katherine; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-01-01

    Most massive galaxies are thought to have formed their dense stellar cores at early cosmic epochs. However, cores in their formation phase have not yet been observed. Previous studies have found galaxies with high gas velocity dispersions or small apparent sizes but so far no objects have been identified with both the stellar structure and the gas dynamics of a forming core. Here we present a candidate core in formation 11 billion years ago, at z = 2.3. GOODS-N-774 has a stellar mass of 1.0 × 10 (exp 11) solar mass, a half-light radius of 1.0 kpc, and a star formation rate of 90 (sup +45 / sub -20) solar mass/yr. The star forming gas has a velocity dispersion 317 plus or minus 30 km/s, amongst the highest ever measured. It is similar to the stellar velocity dispersions of the putative descendants of GOODS-N-774, compact quiescent galaxies at z is approximately equal to 2 (exp 8-11) and giant elliptical galaxies in the nearby Universe. Galaxies such as GOODS-N-774 appear to be rare; however, from the star formation rate and size of the galaxy we infer that many star forming cores may be heavily obscured, and could be missed in optical and near-infrared surveys.

  7. The rate and latency of star formation in dense, massive clumps in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Heyer, M; Urquhart, J S; Csengeri, T; Wienen, M; Leurini, S; Menten, K; Wyrowski, F

    2016-01-01

    Newborn stars form within the localized, high density regions of molecular clouds. The sequence and rate at which stars form in dense clumps and the dependence on local and global environments are key factors in developing descriptions of stellar production in galaxies. We seek to observationally constrain the rate and latency of star formation in dense massive clumps that are distributed throughout the Galaxy and to compare these results to proposed prescriptions for stellar production. A sample of 24 micron-based Class~I protostars are linked to dust clumps that are embedded within molecular clouds selected from the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy. We determine the fraction of star-forming clumps, f*, that imposes a constraint on the latency of star formation in units of a clump's lifetime. Protostellar masses are estimated from models of circumstellar environments of young stellar objects from which star formation rates are derived. Physical properties of the clumps are calculated from 870 m...

  8. A sensitivity study of the dense shelf water formation in the Okhotsk Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasajima, Y.; Hasumi, H.; Nakamura, T.

    2010-11-01

    Sensitivity of Dense Shelf Water (DSW) formation to tidal mixing around the Kuril Straits, wind stress, and river runoff in the Okhotsk Sea is examined by an ice-ocean coupled model. Horizontal resolution of the model is set to 3-8 km in the northern Okhotsk Sea for well resolving the coastal polynyas which is believed to be the principal region of DSW formation. The model shows a good performance in terms of sea ice production and the consequent DSW formation. DSW is also found to be formed in the offshore region apart from the coastal polynya. DSW is defined independently for each experiment such that it identifies the water influenced by brine. By introducing such definition the sensitivity of the DSW formation is assessed separately for change of density and that of formation rate. The density of DSW exhibits high sensitivity to all the elements considered herein, while its formation rate is sensitive only to winds. Winds affect the DSW formation rate mainly by influencing that occurs in the offshore region.

  9. A Search for Small-Scale Clumpiness in Dense Cores of Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Pirogov, L E; 10.1134/S1063772908120020

    2009-01-01

    We have analyzed HCN(1-0) and CS(2-1) line profiles obtained with high signal-to-noise ratios toward distinct positions in three selected objects in order to search for small-scale structure in molecular cloud cores associated with regions of high-mass star formation. In some cases, ripples were detected in the line profiles, which could be due to the presence of a large number of unresolved small clumps in the telescope beam. The number of clumps for regions with linear scales of ~0.2-0.5 pc is determined using an analytical model and detailed calculations for a clumpy cloud model; this number varies in the range: ~2 10^4-3 10^5, depending on the source. The clump densities range from ~3 10^5-10^6 cm^{-3}, and the sizes and volume filling factors of the clumps are ~(1-3) 10^{-3} pc and ~0.03-0.12. The clumps are surrounded by inter-clump gas with densities not lower than ~(2-7) 10^4 cm^{-3}. The internal thermal energy of the gas in the model clumps is much higher than their gravitational energy. Their mean ...

  10. Core Pedagogy: Individual Uncertainty, Shared Practice, Formative Ethos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotger, Benjamin H.

    2015-01-01

    Attention to the core practices of teaching necessitates core pedagogies in teacher preparation. This article outlines the diffusion of one such pedagogy from medical to teacher education. The concept of clinical simulations is outlined through the lens of "signature pedagogies" and their uncertain, engaging, formative qualities.…

  11. Core Pedagogy: Individual Uncertainty, Shared Practice, Formative Ethos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotger, Benjamin H.

    2015-01-01

    Attention to the core practices of teaching necessitates core pedagogies in teacher preparation. This article outlines the diffusion of one such pedagogy from medical to teacher education. The concept of clinical simulations is outlined through the lens of "signature pedagogies" and their uncertain, engaging, formative qualities.…

  12. CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey: Project Overview with Analysis of Dense Gas Structure and Kinematics in Barnard 1

    CERN Document Server

    Storm, S; Fernández-López, M; Lee, K I; Looney, L W; Teuben, P J; Rosolowsky, E; Arce, H G; Ostriker, E C; Segura-Cox, D; Pound, M W; Salter, D M; Volgenau, N H; Shirley, Y L; Chen, C; Gong, H; Plunkett, A L; Tobin, J J; Kwon, W; Isella, A; Kauffmann, J; Tassis, K; Crutcher, R M; Gammie, C F; Testi, L

    2014-01-01

    We present details of the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), while focusing on observations of Barnard 1. CLASSy is a CARMA Key Project that spectrally imaged N2H+, HCO+, and HCN (J=1-0 transitions) across over 800 square arcminutes of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds. The observations have angular resolution near 7" and spectral resolution near 0.16 km/s. We imaged ~150 square arcminutes of Barnard 1, focusing on the main core, and the B1 Ridge and clumps to its southwest. N2H+ shows the strongest emission, with morphology similar to cool dust in the region, while HCO+ and HCN trace several molecular outflows from a collection of protostars in the main core. We identify a range of kinematic complexity, with N2H+ velocity dispersions ranging from ~0.05-0.50 km/s across the field. Simultaneous continuum mapping at 3 mm reveals six compact object detections, three of which are new detections. A new non-binary dendrogram algorithm is used to analyze dense gas structures in the N2H+ position...

  13. Formation of Massive Black Holes in Dense Star Clusters. II. IMF and Primordial Mass Segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, Sanghamitra; Bierbaum, Matt; Rasio, Frederic A

    2011-01-01

    A promising mechanism to form intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) is the runaway merger in dense star clusters, where main-sequence stars collide and form a very massive star (VMS), which then collapses to a black hole. In this paper we study the effects of primordial mass segregation and the importance of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) on the runaway growth of VMSs using a dynamical Monte Carlo code for N-body systems with N as high as 10^6 stars. Our code now includes an explicit treatment of all stellar collisions. We place special emphasis on the possibility of top-heavy IMFs, as observed in some very young massive clusters. We find that both primordial mass segregation and the shape of the IMF affect the rate of core collapse of star clusters and thus the time of the runaway. When we include primordial mass segregation we generally see a decrease in core collapse time (tcc). Moreover, primordial mass segregation increases the average mass in the core, thus reducing the central relaxation time,...

  14. Sulfur in Earth's Mantle and Its Behavior During Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, Nancy L.; Righter,Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The density of Earth's outer core requires that about 5-10% of the outer core be composed of elements lighter than Fe-Ni; proposed choices for the "light element" component of Earth's core include H, C, O, Si, S, and combinations of these elements [e.g. 1]. Though samples of Earth's core are not available, mantle samples contain elemental signatures left behind from the formation of Earth's core. The abundances of siderophile (metal-loving) elements in Earth's mantle have been used to gain insight into the early accretion and differentiation history of Earth, the process by which the core and mantle formed, and the composition of the core [e.g. 2-4]. Similarly, the abundance of potential light elements in Earth's mantle could also provide constraints on Earth's evolution and core composition. The S abundance in Earth's mantle is 250 ( 50) ppm [5]. It has been suggested that 250 ppm S is too high to be due to equilibrium core formation in a high pressure, high temperature magma ocean on early Earth and that the addition of S to the mantle from the subsequent accretion of a late veneer is consequently required [6]. However, this earlier work of Li and Agee [6] did not parameterize the metalsilicate partitioning behavior of S as a function of thermodynamic variables, limiting the different pressure and temperature conditions during core formation that could be explored. Here, the question of explaining the mantle abundance of S is revisited, through parameterizing existing metal-silicate partitioning data for S and applying the parameterization to core formation in Earth.

  15. Dense Gas Fraction and Star Formation Efficiency Variations in the Antennae Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bigiel, Frank; Blitz, Leo; Bolatto, Alberto D; da Cunha, Elisabete; Rosolowsky, Erik; Sandstrom, Karin; Usero, Antonio; Walter, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    We use the CARMA millimeter interferometer to map the Antennae Galaxies (NGC4038/39), tracing the bulk of the molecular gas via the 12CO(1-0) line and denser molecular gas via the high density transitions HCN(1-0), HCO+(1-0), CS(2-1), and HNC(1-0). We detect bright emission from all tracers in both the two nuclei and three locales in the overlap region between the two nuclei. These three overlap region peaks correspond to previously identified "supergiant molecular clouds". We combine the CARMA data with Herschel infrared (IR) data to compare observational indicators of the star formation efficiency (SFR/H2~IR/CO), dense gas fraction (HCN/CO), and dense gas star formation efficiency (IR/HCN). Regions within the Antennae show ratios consistent with those seen for entire galaxies, but these ratios vary by up to a factor of 6 within the galaxy. The five detected regions vary strongly in both their integrated intensities and these ratios. The northern nucleus is the brightest region in mm-wave line emission, whil...

  16. Reconstruction of Galaxy Star Formation Histories through SED Fitting: The Dense Basis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Kartheik; Gawiser, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    The standard assumption of a simplified parametric form for galaxy Star Formation Histories (SFHs) during Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) fitting biases estimations of physical quantities (Stellar Mass, SFR, age) and underestimates their true uncertainties. Here, we describe the Dense Basis formalism, which uses an atlas of well-motivated basis SFHs to provide robust reconstructions of galaxy SFHs and provides estimates of previously inaccessible quantities like the number of star formation episodes in a galaxy's past. We train and validate the method using a sample of realistic SFHs at z=1 drawn from current Semi Analytic Models and Hydrodynamical simulations, as well as SFHs generated using a stochastic prescription. We then apply the method on ~1100 CANDELS galaxies at 1high S/N SEDs for the N~O(10^8) galaxies from the upcoming generation of surveys including LSST, HETDEX and J-PAS.

  17. 32-core Dense SDM Unidirectional Transmission of PDM-16QAM Signals Over 1600 km Using Crosstalk-managed Single-mode Heterogeneous Multicore Transmission Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizuno, Takayuki; Shibahara, K.; Ono, Hirotaka;

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate 32-core dense space-division multiplexed (DSDM) unidirectional transmission of PDM-16QAM 20-WDM signals over 1644.8 km employing a low-crosstalk single-mode heterogeneous 32-core fiber in a partial recirculating-loop system.......We demonstrate 32-core dense space-division multiplexed (DSDM) unidirectional transmission of PDM-16QAM 20-WDM signals over 1644.8 km employing a low-crosstalk single-mode heterogeneous 32-core fiber in a partial recirculating-loop system....

  18. 32-core Inline Multicore Fiber Amplifier for Dense Space Division Multiplexed Transmission Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, S.; Mizuno, T.; Jung, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-core-count SDM amplifier, i.e. 32-core multicore-fiber amplifier, in a cladding-pumped configuration. An average gain of 17dB and NF of 7dB is obtained for -5dBm input signal power in the wavelength range 1544nm-1564nm....

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HCO+ and N2D+ dense cores in Perseus (Campbell+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. L.; Friesen, R. K.; Martin, P. G.; Caselli, P.; Kauffmann, J.; Pineda, J. E.

    2016-05-01

    Table 1 summarizes the 91 dense cores observed, with their Right Ascension and Declination pointing positions. Pointed observations of the Perseus cores were performed using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT). Targets were observed in the HCO+ (3-2) and N2D+ (3-2) rotational transitions in position-switching mode, with assumed rest frequencies of 267.557619GHz and 231.321665GHz, respectively. The spectral resolution was 30.5kHz, corresponding to a velocity resolution of 0.03km/s for HCO+ (3-2) and 0.04km/s for N2D+ (3-2). Observations were conducted between 2007 September and 2009 September. (3 data files).

  20. DENSE GAS FRACTION AND STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY VARIATIONS IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigiel, F. [Institut für theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Leroy, A. K. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Street, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Blitz, L. [Department of Astronomy, Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bolatto, A. D. [Department of Astronomy and Laboratory for Millimeter-Wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Da Cunha, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Rosolowsky, E. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Sandstrom, K. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Usero, A., E-mail: bigiel@uni-heidelberg.de [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Alfonso XII 3, E-28014, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-20

    We use the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) millimeter interferometer to map the Antennae Galaxies (NGC 4038/39), tracing the bulk of the molecular gas via the {sup 12}CO(1–0) line and denser molecular gas via the high density transitions HCN(1–0), HCO{sup +}(1–0), CS(2–1), and HNC(1–0). We detect bright emission from all tracers in both the two nuclei and three locales in the overlap region between the two nuclei. These three overlap region peaks correspond to previously identified “supergiant molecular clouds.” We combine the CARMA data with Herschel infrared (IR) data to compare observational indicators of the star formation efficiency (star formation rate/H{sub 2} ∝ IR/CO), dense gas fraction (HCN/CO), and dense gas star formation efficiency (IR/HCN). Regions within the Antennae show ratios consistent with those seen for entire galaxies, but these ratios vary by up to a factor of six within the galaxy. The five detected regions vary strongly in both their integrated intensities and these ratios. The northern nucleus is the brightest region in millimeter-wave line emission, while the overlap region is the brightest part of the system in the IR. We combine the CARMA and Herschel data with ALMA CO data to report line ratio patterns for each bright point. CO shows a declining spectral line energy distribution, consistent with previous studies. HCO{sup +} (1–0) emission is stronger than HCN (1–0) emission, perhaps indicating either more gas at moderate densities or higher optical depth than is commonly seen in more advanced mergers.

  1. Multi-line spectral imaging of dense cores in the Lupus molecular cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Benedettini, Milena; Burton, Micheal G; Viti, Serena; Molinari, Sergio; Caselli, Paola; Testi, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    The molecular clouds Lupus 1, 3 and 4 were mapped with the Mopra telescope at 3 and 12 mm. Emission lines from high density molecular tracers were detected, i.e. NH$_3$ (1,1), NH$_3$ (2,2), N$_2$H$^+$ (1-0), HC$_3$N (3-2), HC$_3$N (10-9), CS (2-1), CH$_3$OH (2$_0-1_0$)A$^+$ and CH$_3$OH (2$_{-1}-1_{-1}$)E. Velocity gradients of more than 1 km s$^{-1}$ are present in Lupus 1 and 3 and multiple gas components are present in these clouds along some lines of sight. Lupus 1 is the cloud richest in high density cores, 8 cores were detected in it, 5 cores were detected in Lupus 3 and only 2 in Lupus 4. The intensity of the three species HC$_3$N, NH$_3$ and N$_2$H$^+$ changes significantly in the various cores: cores that are brighter in HC$_3$N are fainter or undetected in NH$_3$ and N$_2$H$^+$ and vice versa. We found that the column density ratios HC$_3$N/N$_2$H$^+$ and HC$_3$N/NH$_3$ change by one order of magnitude between the cores, indicating that also the chemical abundance of these species is different. The ...

  2. The Star Formation Rate - Dense Gas Relation in the Nuclei of Nearby Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Narayanan, Desika; Hernquist, Lars

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between the star formation rate (SFR) and dense molecular gas mass in the nuclei of galaxies. To do this, we utilize the observed 850 micron luminosity as a proxy for the infrared luminosity and SFR, and correlate this with the observed CO (J=3-2) luminosity. We find tentative evidence that the LIR-CO (J=3-2) index is similar to the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS) index (N ~ 1.5) in the central ~1.7 kpc of galaxies, and flattens to a roughly linear index when including emission from the entire galaxy. This result may imply that the volumetric Schmidt relation is the underlying driver behind the observed SFR-dense gas correlations, and provides tentative confirmation for recent numerical models. While the data exclude the possibility of a constant LIR-CO (J=3-2) index for both galaxy nuclei and global measurements at the ~80% confidence level, the considerable error bars cannot preclude alternative interpretations.

  3. Exceptional dense water formation on the Adriatic shelf in the winter of 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mihanović

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We document dense water formation (DWF throughout the Adriatic shelf and coastal area in January/February 2012, resulting in record-breaking densities observed during and after the event. The unprecedented dense water generation was preconditioned by a dry and warm year which resulted in a significant reduction of coastal freshwaters, superimposed on a long-term basin-wide salinity increase. The final event that triggered the DWF was an extended period of cold weather with strong and severe winds. Record-breaking potential density anomalies (above 30 kg m−3 were measured at several DWF sites. Accumulated surface net heat and water losses in some coastal regions exceeded 1.5 GJ m−2 and 250 kg m−2 over 21 days, respectively. Excessiveness, importance of shelf-type DWF, effects on the thermohaline circulation and deep aquatic systems, and connection with climate change are discussed.

  4. TWO MASS DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE L 1641 MOLECULAR CLOUDS: THE HERSCHEL CONNECTION OF DENSE CORES AND FILAMENTS IN ORION A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polychroni, D. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Athens, Astronomy and Mechanics, Faculty of Physics, Panepistimiopolis, 15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Schisano, E.; Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Turrini, D.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Benedettini, M.; Busquet, G.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pestalozzi, M.; Pezzuto, S. [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali (INAF-IAPS), via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Roy, A.; André, Ph.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Könyves, V. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/IRFU CNRS/INSU Université Paris Diderot, Paris-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Martin, P. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Di Francesco, J. [National Research Council Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Arzoumanian, D. [IAS, CNRS (UMR 8617), Université Paris-Sud, Bâtiment 121, F-91400 Orsay (France); Bontemps, S., E-mail: dpolychroni@phys.uoa.gr [Université de Bordeaux, Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Bordeaux, CNRS/INSU, UMR 5804, BP 89, F-33271, Floirac Cedex (France); and others

    2013-11-10

    We present Herschel survey maps of the L 1641 molecular clouds in Orion A. We extracted both the filaments and dense cores in the region. We identified which of the dense sources are proto- or pre-stellar, and studied their association with the identified filaments. We find that although most (71%) of the pre-stellar sources are located on filaments there, is still a significant fraction of sources not associated with such structures. We find that these two populations (on and off the identified filaments) have distinctly different mass distributions. The mass distribution of the sources on the filaments is found to peak at 4 M {sub ☉} and drives the shape of the core mass function (CMF) at higher masses, which we fit with a power law of the form dN/dlogM∝M {sup –1.4±0.4}. The mass distribution of the sources off the filaments, on the other hand, peaks at 0.8 M {sub ☉} and leads to a flattening of the CMF at masses lower than ∼4 M {sub ☉}. We postulate that this difference between the mass distributions is due to the higher proportion of gas that is available in the filaments, rather than in the diffuse cloud.

  5. A massive galaxy in its core formation phase three billion years after the Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erica; van Dokkum, Pieter; Franx, Marijn; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Schreiber, Natascha Förster; da Cunha, Elisabete; Tacconi, Linda; Bezanson, Rachel; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Leja, Joel; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind; van der Wel, Arjen; Whitaker, Katherine; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-09-18

    Most massive galaxies are thought to have formed their dense stellar cores in early cosmic epochs. Previous studies have found galaxies with high gas velocity dispersions or small apparent sizes, but so far no objects have been identified with both the stellar structure and the gas dynamics of a forming core. Here we report a candidate core in the process of formation 11 billion years ago, at redshift z = 2.3. This galaxy, GOODS-N-774, has a stellar mass of 100 billion solar masses, a half-light radius of 1.0 kiloparsecs and a star formation rate of solar masses per year. The star-forming gas has a velocity dispersion of 317 ± 30 kilometres per second. This is similar to the stellar velocity dispersions of the putative descendants of GOODS-N-774, which are compact quiescent galaxies at z ≈ 2 (refs 8-11) and giant elliptical galaxies in the nearby Universe. Galaxies such as GOODS-N-774 seem to be rare; however, from the star formation rate and size of this galaxy we infer that many star-forming cores may be heavily obscured, and could be missed in optical and near-infrared surveys.

  6. The end of star formation in Chamaeleon I ? A LABOCA census of starless and protostellar cores

    CERN Document Server

    Belloche, A; Parise, B; André, Ph; Hatchell, J; Jørgensen, J K; Bontemps, S; Weiß, A; Menten, K M; Muders, D; 10.1051/0004-6361/201015733

    2011-01-01

    Chamaeleon I is the most active region in terms of star formation in the Chamaeleon molecular cloud complex. Its population of prestellar and protostellar cores is not known and a controversy exists concerning its history of star formation. Our goal is to characterize the earliest stages of star formation in this cloud. We used the bolometer array LABOCA at APEX to map the cloud in dust continuum emission at 870 micron. The detected sources are analysed by carefully taking into account the spatial filtering inherent in the data reduction process. A search for associations with YSOs is performed using Spitzer data and the SIMBAD database. Most of the detected 870 micron emission is distributed in 5 filaments. We identify 59 starless cores, one candidate first hydrostatic core, and 21 sources associated with more evolved YSOs. The starless cores are only found above a visual extinction threshold of 5 mag. They are less dense than those detected in other nearby molecular clouds by a factor of a few on average. T...

  7. HD 62542: Probing the Bare, Dense Core of an Interstellar Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Daniel

    2010-09-01

    The line of sight to HD 62542 is remarkable for its unusual UV extinction, high column densities of various molecules {for A_v 1}, and apparent dearth of diffuse atomic gas. Most of the interstellar material resides in a single cold cloud - a small, relatively dense {n_H 500-1000 cm^-3}, molecular knot whose more diffuse outer layers appear to have been stripped away by stellar winds and shocks. As such, it provides an ideal venue for investigating the properties of moderately dense molecular gas - including the production of molecules and growth of grains in such gas - with minimal confusion from any associated diffuse atomic gas. We propose to obtain high resolution, moderately high S/N STIS spectra of C I, CO and its isotopomers, C_2, CS, C II, O I, and many other atomic species {characterized by a wide range in depletion behavior}. Those data will be used to compare various diagnostics of the physical conditions {e.g., C I and O I fine-structure excitation, CO and C_2 rotational excitation}, to determine the relative abundances of the various CO isotopomers {fractionation}, and to determine the depletions of various elements in moderately dense gas {the predicted severe depletions have likely been masked by associated diffuse gas in other cases}. Understanding the fractionation and excitation of CO in this relatively simple case will aid in understanding its behavior in other more complex regions {important because CO and its isotopomers are often used to trace and characterize molecular gas where H_2 cannot be directly measured}.

  8. A census of dense cores in the Taurus L1495 cloud from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, K A; Andre, Ph; Griffin, M J; Konyves, V; Palmeirim, P; Men'shchikov, A; Ward-Thompson, D; Benedettini, M; Bresnahan, D W; Di Francesco, J; Elia, D; Peretto, N; Pezzuto, S; Roy, A; Sadavoy, S; Schneider, N; Spinoglio, L; White, G J

    2016-01-01

    We present a catalogue of dense cores in a $\\sim 4^\\circ\\times2^\\circ$ field of the Taurus star-forming region, inclusive of the L1495 cloud, derived from Herschel SPIRE and PACS observations in the 70 $\\mu$m, 160 $\\mu$m, 250 $\\mu$m, 350 $\\mu$m, and 500 $\\mu$m continuum bands. Estimates of mean dust temperature and total mass are derived using modified blackbody fits to the spectral energy distributions. We detect 528 starless cores of which $\\sim10$-20% are gravitationally bound and therefore presumably prestellar. Our census of unbound objects is $\\sim85$% complete for $M>0.015\\,M_\\odot$ in low density regions ($A_V\\stackrel{0.1\\,M_\\odot$ overall. The prestellar core mass function (CMF) is consistent with lognormal form, resembling the stellar system initial mass function, as has been reported previously. All of the inferred prestellar cores lie on filamentary structures whose column densities exceed the expected threshold for filamentary collapse, in agreement with previous reports. Unlike the prestellar C...

  9. The influence of turbulence during magnetized core collapse and its consequences on low-mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Joos, Marc; Ciardi, Andrea; Fromang, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] Theoretical and numerical studies of star formation have shown that magnetic field (B) has a strong influence on both disk formation and fragmentation; even a relatively low B can prevent these processes. However, very few studies investigated the combined effects of B and turbulence. We study the effects of turbulence in magnetized core collapse, focusing on the magnetic diffusion, the orientation of the angular momentum (J) of the protostellar core, and on its consequences on disk formation, fragmentation and outflows. We perform 3D, AMR, MHD simulations of magnetically supercritical collapsing dense cores of 5 Msun using the MHD code RAMSES. A turbulent velocity field is imposed as initial conditions, characterised by a Kolmogorov power spectrum. Different levels of turbulence and magnetization are investigated, as well as 3 realisations for the turbulent velocity field. Magnetic diffusion, orientation of the rotation axis with respect to B, transport of J, disk formation, fragmentation and outf...

  10. A proposed chemical scheme for HCCO formation in cold dense clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Wakelam, V; Hickson, K M; Ruaud, M

    2015-01-01

    The ketenyl radical (HCCO) has recently been discovered in two cold dense clouds with a non-negligible abundance of a few 1e-11 (compared to H2) (Agundez et al. 2015). Until now, no chemical network has been able to reproduce this observation. We propose here a chemical scheme that can reproduce HCCO abundances together with HCO, H2CCO and CH3CHO in the dark clouds Lupus-1A and L486. The main formation pathway for HCCO is the OH + CCH -> HCCO + H reaction as suggested by Agundez et al. (2015) but with a much larger rate coefficient than used in current models. Since this reaction has never been studied experimentally or theoretically, this larger value is based on a comparison with other similar systems.

  11. Long-Haul Dense Space Division Multiplexed Transmission over Low-Crosstalk Heterogeneous 32-Core Transmission Line Using Partial Recirculating Loop System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizuno, Takayuki; Shibahara, Kohki; Ye, Feihong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present long-haul 32-core dense space division multiplexed (DSDM) unidirectional transmission over a single-mode multicore transmission line. We developed a low-crosstalk heterogeneous 32-core fiber with a square lattice arrangement, and a novel partial recirculating loop system...

  12. Dense cloud cores revealed by CO in the low metallicity dwarf galaxy WLM

    CERN Document Server

    Rubio, Monica; Hunter, Deidre A; Brinks, Elias; Cortes, Juan R; Cigan, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Understanding stellar birth requires observations of the clouds in which they form. These clouds are dense and self-gravitating, and in all existing observations, they are molecular with H_2 the dominant species and CO the best available tracer. When the abundances of carbon and oxygen are low compared to hydrogen, and the opacity from dust is also low, as in primeval galaxies and local dwarf irregular galaxies, CO forms slowly and is easily destroyed, so it is difficult for it to accumulate inside dense clouds. Here we report interferometric observations of CO clouds in the local group dwarf irregular galaxy Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte (WLM), which has a metallicity that is 13% of the solar value and 50% lower than the previous CO detection threshold. The clouds are tiny compared to the surrounding atomic and H_2 envelopes, but they have typical densities and column densities for CO clouds in the Milky Way. The normal CO density explains why star clusters forming in dwarf irregulars have similar densities to star ...

  13. Deep-Sea Bioluminescence Blooms after Dense Water Formation at the Ocean Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Houpert, Loïc; Lefèvre, Dominique; Martini, Séverine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Samarai, Imen Al; Albert, Arnaud; André, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C.; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, José; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Cârloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q.; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galatà, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gómez-González, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J.; Hello, Yann; Hernández-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hößl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Presti, Domenico Lo; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Păvălaş, Gabriela E.; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Rivière, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G.; Salesa, Francisco; Sánchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schöck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J. M.; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G. F.; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Véronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; De Dios Zornoza, Juan; Zúñiga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as “open-sea convection”. It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts. PMID:23874425

  14. Deep-sea bioluminescence blooms after dense water formation at the ocean surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Christian; Canals, Miquel; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Houpert, Loïc; Lefèvre, Dominique; Martini, Séverine; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Robert, Anne; Testor, Pierre; Aguilar, Juan Antonio; Samarai, Imen Al; Albert, Arnaud; André, Michel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Anton, Gisela; Anvar, Shebli; Ardid, Miguel; Jesus, Ana Carolina Assis; Astraatmadja, Tri L; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Baret, Bruny; Basa, Stéphane; Bertin, Vincent; Biagi, Simone; Bigi, Armando; Bigongiari, Ciro; Bogazzi, Claudio; Bou-Cabo, Manuel; Bouhou, Boutayeb; Bouwhuis, Mieke C; Brunner, Jurgen; Busto, José; Camarena, Francisco; Capone, Antonio; Cârloganu, Christina; Carminati, Giada; Carr, John; Cecchini, Stefano; Charif, Ziad; Charvis, Philippe; Chiarusi, Tommaso; Circella, Marco; Coniglione, Rosa; Costantini, Heide; Coyle, Paschal; Curtil, Christian; Decowski, Patrick; Dekeyser, Ivan; Deschamps, Anne; Donzaud, Corinne; Dornic, Damien; Dorosti, Hasankiadeh Q; Drouhin, Doriane; Eberl, Thomas; Emanuele, Umberto; Ernenwein, Jean-Pierre; Escoffier, Stéphanie; Fermani, Paolo; Ferri, Marcelino; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Folger, Florian; Fritsch, Ulf; Fuda, Jean-Luc; Galatà, Salvatore; Gay, Pascal; Giacomelli, Giorgio; Giordano, Valentina; Gómez-González, Juan-Pablo; Graf, Kay; Guillard, Goulven; Halladjian, Garadeb; Hallewell, Gregory; van Haren, Hans; Hartman, Joris; Heijboer, Aart J; Hello, Yann; Hernández-Rey, Juan Jose; Herold, Bjoern; Hößl, Jurgen; Hsu, Ching-Cheng; de Jong, Marteen; Kadler, Matthias; Kalekin, Oleg; Kappes, Alexander; Katz, Uli; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Kooijman, Paul; Kopper, Claudio; Kouchner, Antoine; Kreykenbohm, Ingo; Kulikovskiy, Vladimir; Lahmann, Robert; Lamare, Patrick; Larosa, Giuseppina; Lattuada, Dario; Lim, Gordon; Presti, Domenico Lo; Loehner, Herbert; Loucatos, Sotiris; Mangano, Salvatore; Marcelin, Michel; Margiotta, Annarita; Martinez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Meli, Athina; Montaruli, Teresa; Moscoso, Luciano; Motz, Holger; Neff, Max; Nezri, Emma Nuel; Palioselitis, Dimitris; Păvălaş, Gabriela E; Payet, Kevin; Payre, Patrice; Petrovic, Jelena; Piattelli, Paolo; Picot-Clemente, Nicolas; Popa, Vlad; Pradier, Thierry; Presani, Eleonora; Racca, Chantal; Reed, Corey; Riccobene, Giorgio; Richardt, Carsten; Richter, Roland; Rivière, Colas; Roensch, Kathrin; Rostovtsev, Andrei; Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquin; Rujoiu, Marius; Russo, Valerio G; Salesa, Francisco; Sánchez-Losa, Augustin; Sapienza, Piera; Schöck, Friederike; Schuller, Jean-Pierre; Schussler, Fabian; Shanidze, Rezo; Simeone, Francesco; Spies, Andreas; Spurio, Maurizio; Steijger, Jos J M; Stolarczyk, Thierry; Taiuti, Mauro G F; Toscano, Simona; Vallage, Bertrand; Van Elewyck, Véronique; Vannoni, Giulia; Vecchi, Manuela; Vernin, Pascal; Wijnker, Guus; Wilms, Jorn; de Wolf, Els; Yepes, Harold; Zaborov, Dmitry; De Dios Zornoza, Juan; Zúñiga, Juan

    2013-01-01

    The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as "open-sea convection". It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts.

  15. Deep-sea bioluminescence blooms after dense water formation at the ocean surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Tamburini

    Full Text Available The deep ocean is the largest and least known ecosystem on Earth. It hosts numerous pelagic organisms, most of which are able to emit light. Here we present a unique data set consisting of a 2.5-year long record of light emission by deep-sea pelagic organisms, measured from December 2007 to June 2010 at the ANTARES underwater neutrino telescope in the deep NW Mediterranean Sea, jointly with synchronous hydrological records. This is the longest continuous time-series of deep-sea bioluminescence ever recorded. Our record reveals several weeks long, seasonal bioluminescence blooms with light intensity up to two orders of magnitude higher than background values, which correlate to changes in the properties of deep waters. Such changes are triggered by the winter cooling and evaporation experienced by the upper ocean layer in the Gulf of Lion that leads to the formation and subsequent sinking of dense water through a process known as "open-sea convection". It episodically renews the deep water of the study area and conveys fresh organic matter that fuels the deep ecosystems. Luminous bacteria most likely are the main contributors to the observed deep-sea bioluminescence blooms. Our observations demonstrate a consistent and rapid connection between deep open-sea convection and bathypelagic biological activity, as expressed by bioluminescence. In a setting where dense water formation events are likely to decline under global warming scenarios enhancing ocean stratification, in situ observatories become essential as environmental sentinels for the monitoring and understanding of deep-sea ecosystem shifts.

  16. Dense gas without star formation: The kpc-sized molecular disk in 3C326 N

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvadba, Nicole; Lehnert, Matt; Guillard, Pierre; Salome, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of a 3 kpc disk of few 10^9 Ms of dense, warm H_2 in the nearby radio galaxy 3C326 N, which shows no signs of on-going or recent star formation and falls a factor 60 below the Schmidt-Kennicutt law. VLT/SINFONI imaging spectroscopy shows broad (FWHM \\sim 500 km/s) ro-vibrational H_2 lines across all of the disk, with irregular profiles and line ratios consistent with shocks. The ratio of turbulent and gravitational energy suggests that the gas is highly turbulent and not gravitationally bound. In absence of the driving by the jet, short turbulent dissipation times suggest the gas should collapse rapidly and form stars, at odds with the recent star-formation history. Motivated by hydrodynamic models of rapid H_2 formation boosted by turbulent compression, we propose that the molecules formed from diffuse atomic gas in the turbulent jet cocoon. Since the gas is not self-gravitating, it cannot form molecular clouds or stars while the jet is active, and is likely to disperse and become ato...

  17. Core formation, evolution, and convection - A geophysical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of the earth's core, which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo, is proposed. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al-26. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long-lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  18. Core formation, evolution, and convection: A geophysical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A model is proposed for the formation and evolution of the Earth's core which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  19. Soliton formation in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    of an approximate scaling relation is tested. It is concluded that compression of input pulses of several ps duration and sub-MW peak power can lead to a formation of solitons with ∼100 fs duration and multi-megawatt peak powers. The dispersion slope of realistic hollow-core fibers appears to be the main obstacle......The formation of solitons upon compression of linearly chirped pulses in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers is investigated numerically. The dependence of soliton duration on the chirp and power of the input pulse and on the dispersion slope of the fiber is investigated, and the validity...

  20. Hydride formation in core-shell alloyed metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2016-07-01

    The model and analysis presented are focused on hydride formation in nanoparticles with a Pd shell and a core formed by another metal. The arrangement of metal atoms is assumed to be coherent (no dislocations). The lattice strain distribution, elastic energy, and chemical potential of hydrogen atoms are scrutinized. The slope of the chemical potential (as a function of hydrogen uptake) is demonstrated to decrease with increasing the core volume, and accordingly the critical temperature for hydride formation and the corresponding hysteresis loops are predicted to decrease as well.

  1. CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey: project overview with analysis of dense gas structure and kinematics in Barnard 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Lee, Katherine I.; Teuben, Peter; Pound, Marc W.; Salter, Demerese M.; Chen, Che-Yu; Gong, Hao [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Fernández-López, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Departments of Physics and Statistics, University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, 3333 University Way, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Arce, Héctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Ostriker, Eve C. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Volgenau, Nikolaus H. [Owens Valley Radio Observatory, MC 105-24 OVRO, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Shirley, Yancy L. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Tobin, John J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Kwon, Woojin [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Isella, Andrea, E-mail: sstorm@astro.umd.edu [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2014-10-20

    We present details of the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy), while focusing on observations of Barnard 1. CLASSy is a CARMA Key Project that spectrally imaged N{sub 2}H{sup +}, HCO{sup +}, and HCN (J = 1 → 0 transitions) across over 800 square arcminutes of the Perseus and Serpens Molecular Clouds. The observations have angular resolution near 7'' and spectral resolution near 0.16 km s{sup –1}. We imaged ∼150 square arcminutes of Barnard 1, focusing on the main core, and the B1 Ridge and clumps to its southwest. N{sub 2}H{sup +} shows the strongest emission, with morphology similar to cool dust in the region, while HCO{sup +} and HCN trace several molecular outflows from a collection of protostars in the main core. We identify a range of kinematic complexity, with N{sub 2}H{sup +} velocity dispersions ranging from ∼0.05 to 0.50 km s{sup –1} across the field. Simultaneous continuum mapping at 3 mm reveals six compact object detections, three of which are new detections. A new, non-binary dendrogram algorithm is used to analyze dense gas structures in the N{sub 2}H{sup +} position-position-velocity (PPV) cube. The projected sizes of dendrogram-identified structures range from about 0.01 to 0.34 pc. Size-linewidth relations using those structures show that non-thermal line-of-sight velocity dispersion varies weakly with projected size, while rms variation in the centroid velocity rises steeply with projected size. Comparing these relations, we propose that all dense gas structures in Barnard 1 have comparable depths into the sky, around 0.1-0.2 pc; this suggests that overdense, parsec-scale regions within molecular clouds are better described as flattened structures rather than spherical collections of gas. Science-ready PPV cubes for Barnard 1 molecular emission are available for download.

  2. Variations in the Star Formation Efficiency of the Dense Molecular Gas across the Disks of Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Usero, Antonio; Walter, Fabian; Schruba, Andreas; García-Burillo, Santiago; Sandstrom, Karin; Bigiel, Frank; Brinks, Elias; Kramer, Carsten; Rosolowsky, Erik; Schuster, Karl-Friedrich; de Blok, W J G

    2015-01-01

    We present a new survey of HCN(1-0) emission, a tracer of dense molecular gas, focused on the little-explored regime of normal star-forming galaxy disks. Combining HCN, CO, and infrared (IR) emission, we investigate the role of dense gas in Star Formation (SF), finding systematic variations in both the apparent dense gas fraction and the apparent SF efficiency (SFE) of dense gas. The latter may be unexpected, given the popularity of gas density threshold models to explain SF scaling relations. We used the IRAM 30-m telescope to observe HCN(1-0) across 29 nearby disk galaxies whose CO(2-1) emission has previously been mapped by the HERACLES survey. Because our observations span a range of galactocentric radii, we are able to investigate the properties of the dense gas as a function of local conditions. We focus on how the IR/CO, HCN/CO, and IR/HCN ratios (observational cognates of the SFE, dense gas fraction, and dense gas SFE) depend on the stellar surface density and the molecular/atomic ratio. The HCN/CO ra...

  3. Reconstructing The Star Formation Histories Of Galaxies Through Sed Fitting Using The Dense Basis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Kartheik; Gawiser, Eric

    2017-06-01

    The Dense Basis SED fitting method reveals previously inaccessible information about the number and duration of star formation episodes and the timing of stellar mass assembly as well as uncertainties in these quantities, in addition to accurately recovering traditional SED parameters including M*, SFR and dust attenuation. This is done using basis Star Formation Histories (SFHs) chosen by comparing the goodness-of-fit of mock galaxy SEDs to the goodness-of-reconstruction of their SFHs, trained and validated using three independent datasets of mock galaxies at z=1 from SAMs, Hydrodynamic simulations and stochastic realizations. Of the six parametrizations of SFHs considered, we reject the traditional parametrizations of constant and exponential SFHs and suggest four novel improvements, quantifying the bias and scatter of each parametrization. We then apply the method to a sample of 1100 CANDELS GOODS-S galaxies at 110^9 M_sun, in contrast to current simulations. About 40% of the CANDEL galaxies have SFHs whose maximum occurs at or near the epoch of observation. These results are presented in Iyer and Gawiser (2017, ApJ 838 127), available at https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.04371

  4. Was core formation violent enough to homogenize the early mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperman, S. A.; Kaula, W. M.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamics of iron, its thermal state and its phase in the accreting Earth probably played a major role in the Earth's early thermal evolution. Plausible impact thermal histories make it possible that pure iron was molten in the accreting Earth after it was about 10% grown. Hence, iron eutectic alloys (FeS, FeO) certainly were. Additionally, the initial temperature of the core is an important constraint on the secular cooling of the early Earth and on the strength of the early geodynamo. Whether iron is solid or molten would influence geochemical equilibria in the upper and lower mantle; the mode of core formation, by spherical or near-spherical blobs, stalk-like instabilities, or something more catastrophic would influence the partitioning of siderophiles between silicate and iron phases. Early descent of iron (during accretion) favors partitioning according to low-pressure phase equilibria, whereas late descent favors higher pressure. The later core formation occurs, the greater the heat pulse, due to the strong dependence of gravitational potential energy on planetary radius. The heat may homogenize the mantle if core formation is global; otherwise, heterogeneity of iron differentiation may leave some of the pre-archean mantle unaffected. The larger the chunks of proto-core (and hence smaller surface/volume ratios) the greater the heterogeneity.

  5. Two Mass Distributions in the L 1641 Molecular Clouds: The Herschel connection of Dense Cores and Filaments in Orion A

    CERN Document Server

    Polychroni, D; Elia, D; Roy, A; Molinari, S; Martin, P; Andre, Ph; Turrini, D; Rygl, K L J; Benedettini, M; Busquet, G; di Giorgio, A M; Pestalozzi, M; Pezzuto, S; Arzoumanian, D; Bontemps, S; Di Francesco, J; Hennemann, M; Hill, T; Konyves, V; Menshchikov, A; Motte, F; Nguyen-Luong, Q; Peretto, N; Schneider, N; White, G

    2013-01-01

    We present the Herschel Gould Belt survey maps of the L\\,1641 molecular clouds in Orion A. We extracted both the filaments and dense cores in the region. We identified which of dense sources are proto- or pre-stellar, and studied their association with the identified filaments. We find that although most (71%) of the pre-stellar sources are located on filaments there is still a significant fraction of sources not associated with such structures. We find that these two populations (on and off the identified filaments) have distinctly different mass distributions. The mass distribution of the sources on the filaments is found to peak at 4 Solar masses and drives the shape of the CMF at higher masses, which we fit with a power law of the form d$N$/dlog$M \\propto M^{-1.4\\pm0.4}$. The mass distribution of the sources off the filaments, on the other hand, peaks at 0.8 Solar masses and leads to a flattening of the CMF at masses lower than ~4 Solar masses. We postulate that this difference between the mass distributi...

  6. Core Formation in the Earth: Constraints from Ni and Co

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, N. L.; Draper, D. S.; Agee, C. B.

    2004-01-01

    Due to their metal-loving nature, Ni and Co were strongly partitioned into the metallic core and were left depleted in the silicate mantle during core formation in the Earth. Based on experimental liquid metal- liquid silicate partition coefficients (D), studies have suggested that core formation in an early magma Ocean can explain the observed mantle depletions of Ni and Co [l-51. However, the conditions proposed by the magma ocean models have ranged from pressures of 24 to 59 GPa and temperatures of 2200 to < 4000 K. Furthermore, the proposed magma Ocean oxygen fugacities have differed by nearly two orders of magnitude.Chabot and Agee noted that the different models predicted contradictory behaviors for D(Ni) and D(Co) as a function of temperature. With the hope of resolving the discrepancies between the magma ocean models, we conducted a systematic experimental study to constrain the effects of temperature on D(Ni) and D(Co).

  7. Probing dense matter in compact star cores with radio pulsar data

    CERN Document Server

    Alford, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    Astrophysical observations of compact stars provide, in addition to collider experiments, the other big source of information on matter under extreme conditions. The largest and most precise data set about neutron stars is the timing data of radio pulsars. We show how this unique data can be used to learn about the ultra-dense matter in the compact star interior. The method relies on astro-seismology based on special global oscillation modes (r-modes) that emit gravitational waves. They would prevent pulsars from spinning with their observed high frequencies, unless the damping of these modes, determined by the microscopic properties of matter, can prevent this. We show that for each form of matter there is a distinct region in a frequency/spindown-rate diagram where r-modes can be present. We find that stars containing ungapped quark matter are consistent with both the observed radio and x-ray data, whereas, even when taking into account the considerable uncertainties, neutron star models with standard visco...

  8. Growing evidence for a core formation threshold traced in Herschel Gould Belt survey clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könyves , V.; André, Ph.; Schneider, N.; Palmeirim, P.; Arzoumanian, D.; Men'shchikov, A.

    2013-11-01

    It has already been suggested that a threshold in column density - or in visual extinction - may need to be exceeded to form dense cores and then protostars. Based on Herschel Gould Belt survey results in the Aquila and Orion B molecular cloud complexes we observe clear connection between the locations of the detected prestellar cores and their background column density values. This finding appears to support a core formation scenario where such threshold corresponds to the extinction above which interstellar filaments become gravitationally unstable and fragment into cores. In these two actively star-forming regions we find the vast majority of the gravitationally bound prestellar cores above a high column density of about (6-7) × 1021 cm-2 (AV ˜ 6-7). This limit similarly appears in the column density probability distribution function (PDF) of the regions as well. The spatial distribution of the protostars and young stellar objects (YSOs) also shows a tight connection with the densest sites of both clouds, as more than 70 % of them appear above the mentioned AV thresholds. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  9. On the Formation of Cool, Non-Flowing Cores in Galaxy Clusters via Hierarchical Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, J O; Norman, M L; Bryan, G L

    2003-01-01

    We present a new model for the creation of cool cores in rich galaxy clusters within a LambdaCDM cosmological framework using the results from high spatial dynamic range, adaptive mesh hydro/N-body simulations. It is proposed that cores of cool gas first form in subclusters and these subclusters merge to create rich clusters with cool, central X-Ray excesses. The rich cool clusters do not possess ``cooling flows'' due to the presence of bulk velocities in the intracluster medium in excess of 1000 km/sec produced by on-going accretion of gas from supercluster filaments. This new model has several attractive features including the presence of substantial core substructure within the cool cores, and it predicts the appearance of cool bullets, cool fronts, and cool filaments all of which have been recently observed with X-Ray satellites. This hierarchical formation model is also consistent with the observation that cool cores in Abell clusters occur preferentially in dense supercluster environments. On the other ...

  10. Electron-ion relaxation in a dense plasma. [supernovae core physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, J. E.; Buchler, J.-R.

    1974-01-01

    The microscopic physics of the thermonuclear runaway in highly degenerate carbon-oxygen cores is investigated to determine if and how a detonation wave is generated. An expression for the electron-ion relaxation time is derived under the assumption of large degeneracy and extreme relativity of the electrons in a two-temperature plasma. Since the nuclear burning time proves to be several orders of magnitude shorter than the relaxation time, it is concluded that in studying the structure of the detonation wave the electrons and ions must be treated as separate fluids.

  11. Triggering Collapse of the Presolar Dense Cloud Core and Injecting Short-Lived Radioisotopes with a Shock Wave. III. Rotating Three Dimensional Cloud Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Boss, Alan P

    2014-01-01

    A key test of the supernova triggering and injection hypothesis for the origin of the solar system's short-lived radioisotopes is to reproduce the inferred initial abundances of these isotopes. We present here the most detailed models to date of the shock wave triggering and injection process, where shock waves with varied properties strike fully three dimensional, rotating, dense cloud cores. The models are calculated with the FLASH adaptive mesh hydrodynamics code. Three different outcomes can result: triggered collapse leading to fragmentation into a multiple protostar system; triggered collapse leading to a single protostar embedded in a protostellar disk; or failure to undergo dynamic collapse. Shock wave material is injected into the collapsing clouds through Rayleigh-Taylor fingers, resulting in initially inhomogeneous distributions in the protostars and protostellar disks. Cloud rotation about an axis aligned with the shock propagation direction does not increase the injection efficiency appreciably, ...

  12. Dense CO2 as a Solute, Co-Solute or Co-Solvent in Particle Formation Processes: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana V. M. Nunes

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The application of dense gases in particle formation processes has attracted great attention due to documented advantages over conventional technologies. In particular, the use of dense CO2 in the process has been subject of many works and explored in a variety of different techniques. This article presents a review of the current available techniques in use in particle formation processes, focusing exclusively on those employing dense CO2 as a solute, co-solute or co-solvent during the process, such as PGSS (Particles from gas-saturated solutions®, CPF (Concentrated Powder Form®, CPCSP (Continuous Powder Coating Spraying Process, CAN-BD (Carbon dioxide Assisted Nebulization with a Bubble Dryer®, SEA (Supercritical Enhanced Atomization, SAA (Supercritical Fluid-Assisted Atomization, PGSS-Drying and DELOS (Depressurization of an Expanded Liquid Organic Solution. Special emphasis is given to modifications introduced in the different techniques, as well as the limitations that have been overcome.

  13. Experiments on metal-silicate plumes and core formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Peter; Weeraratne, Dayanthie

    2008-11-28

    Short-lived isotope systematics, mantle siderophile abundances and the power requirements of the geodynamo favour an early and high-temperature core-formation process, in which metals concentrate and partially equilibrate with silicates in a deep magma ocean before descending to the core. We report results of laboratory experiments on liquid metal dynamics in a two-layer stratified viscous fluid, using sucrose solutions to represent the magma ocean and the crystalline, more primitive mantle and liquid gallium to represent the core-forming metals. Single gallium drop experiments and experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with gallium layers and gallium mixtures produce metal diapirs that entrain the less viscous upper layer fluid and produce trailing plume conduits in the high-viscosity lower layer. Calculations indicate that viscous dissipation in metal-silicate plumes in the early Earth would result in a large initial core superheat. Our experiments suggest that metal-silicate mantle plumes facilitate high-pressure metal-silicate interaction and may later evolve into buoyant thermal plumes, connecting core formation to ancient hotspot activity on the Earth and possibly on other terrestrial planets.

  14. Observations of Shoaling Nonlinear Internal Waves: Formation of Trapped Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, R.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Chang, M.; Tang, T.; Yang, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Large-amplitude nonlinear internal waves (NLIWs) shoaling on the continental slope in the northern South China Sea are observed. Observed NLIWs often reach the breaking limit, the maximum horizontal current velocity exceeding the wave speed, and trapped cores are formed with recirculating fluid. The conjugate flow does not form. The vertical position of the maximum horizontal velocity is displaced from surface to subsurface, via the formation of the trapped core. Trapped-core NLIWs are strongly dissipative and evolve rapidly into trains of NLIWs. The vertical overturning is as large as 75 m, and the turbulence kinetic energy dissipation rate is estimated as O(10^{-5}) W kg-1. We propose that the formation and the evolution of trapped cores catalyze the generation of the trains of NLIWs on the Dongsha plateau often captured by satellite images and by recent field observations. The generation, evolution, fission, dissipation, and energetics of observed trapped-core NLIWs will be discussed and compared with results of numerical models and laboratory experiments.

  15. Core Formation and Evolution of Asteroid 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2014-01-01

    The howardites, eucrites, and diogenites (HEDs) are a suite of related meteorite types that formed by igneous and impact processes on the same parent body. Multiple lines of evidence, including infrared spectroscopy of the asteroid belt and the petrology and geochemistry of the HEDs, suggest that the asteroid 4 Vesta is the parent body for the HEDs. Observations by NASA's Dawn spacecraft mission strongly support the conclusion that the HEDs are from Vesta. The abundances of the moderately siderophile elements Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P in eucrites require that most or all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. These observations place important constraints on the mode and timescale of core formation on Vesta. Possible core formation mechanisms include porous flow, which potentially could occur prior to initiation of silicate melting, and metallic rain in a largely molten silicate magma ocean. Once the core forms, convection within the core could possible sustain a magnetic dynamo for a period of time. We consider each process in turn.

  16. 12-core x 3-mode Dense Space Division Multiplexed Transmission over 40 km Employing Multi-carrier Signals with Parallel MIMO Equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mizuno, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Takara, H.;

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate dense SDM transmission of 20-WDM multi-carrier PDM-32QAM signals over a 40-km 12-core x 3-mode fiber with 247.9-b/s/Hz spectral efficiency. Parallel MIMO equalization enables 21-ns DMD compensation with 61 TDE taps per subcarrier.......We demonstrate dense SDM transmission of 20-WDM multi-carrier PDM-32QAM signals over a 40-km 12-core x 3-mode fiber with 247.9-b/s/Hz spectral efficiency. Parallel MIMO equalization enables 21-ns DMD compensation with 61 TDE taps per subcarrier....

  17. Modelling the formation of dense water in the northern Adriatic: Sensitivity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilibić, Ivica; Mihanović, Hrvoje; Janeković, Ivica; Šepić, Jadranka

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to document the effects of imposing different river runoff forcing and tidal forcing to the dense water formation (DWF) rates and dynamics in a semi-enclosed sea. An extreme DWF episode that occurred in the winter of 2012 in the shallow northern Adriatic Sea during a prolonged cold bora wind outbreak event has been reproduced using a one-way coupled atmosphere-ocean modelling system comprised of the atmospheric Aladin/HR mesoscale model and ocean ROMS model. Three different river runoff forcing and tides/no tides scenarios were imposed on the model. The introduction of tides and river climatology instead of real rivers did not substantially change the modelled DWF transports and volumes, whereas the simulation using the old Raicich climatology resulted in a substantial freshening of the entire Adriatic that reduced or prevented the DWF at sites in the northern and northeastern Adriatic. The necessity of using an up-to-date river runoff climatology to properly reproduce the DWF in semi-enclosed seas is emphasised.

  18. Formation of a disordered solid via a shock-induced transition in a dense particle suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petel, Oren E; Frost, David L; Higgins, Andrew J; Ouellet, Simon

    2012-02-01

    Shock wave propagation in multiphase media is typically dominated by the relative compressibility of the two components of the mixture. The difference in the compressibility of the components results in a shock-induced variation in the effective volume fraction of the suspension tending toward the random-close-packing limit for the system, and a disordered solid can take form within the suspension. The present study uses a Hugoniot-based model to demonstrate this variation in the volume fraction of the solid phase as well as a simple hard-sphere model to investigate the formation of disordered structures within uniaxially compressed model suspensions. Both models are discussed in terms of available experimental plate impact data in dense suspensions. Through coordination number statistics of the mesoscopic hard-sphere model, comparisons are made with the trends of the experimental pressure-volume fraction relationship to illustrate the role of these disordered structures in the bulk properties of the suspensions. A criterion for the dynamic stiffening of suspensions under high-rate dynamic loading is suggested as an analog to quasi-static jamming based on the results of the simulations.

  19. The dynamics of collapsing cores and star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Keto, Eric; Rawlings, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Low-mass stars are generally understood to form by the gravitational collapse of the dense molecular clouds known as starless cores. Continuum observations have not been able to distinguish among the several different hypotheses that describe the collapse because the predicted density distributions are the almost the same, as they are for all spherical self-gravitating clouds. However, the predicted contraction velocities are different enough that the models can be discriminated by comparing the velocities at large and small radii. This can be done by observing at least two different molecular line transitions that are excited at different densities. For example, the spectral lines of the H2O (110 - 101) and C18O (1-0) have critical densities for collisional de-excitation that differ by 5 orders of magnitude. We compare observations of these lines from the contracting starless core L1544 against the spectra predicted for several different hypothetical models of contraction including the Larson-Penston flow, t...

  20. The Herschel view of massive star formation in G035.39--00.33: a dense and cold filament of W48 undergoing a mini-starburst

    CERN Document Server

    Luong, Q Nguyen; Hennemann, M; Hill, T; Rygl, K L J; Schneider, N; Bontemps, S; Men'shchikov, A; André, Ph; Peretto, N; Anderson, L D; Arzoumanian, D; Deharveng, L; Didelon, P; Di Francesco, J; Griffin, M J; Kirk, J M; Konyves, V; Martin, P G; Maury, A; Minier, V; Molinari, S; Pestalozzi, M; Pezzuto, S; Reid, M; Roussel, H; Schuller, F; Testi, L; Ward-Thompson, D; White, G J; Zavagno, A

    2011-01-01

    The filament IRDC G035.39-00.33 in the W48 molecular complex is one of the darkest infrared clouds observed by Spitzer. It has been observed by the PACS (70 and 160 micron) and SPIRE (250, 350 and 500) cameras of the \\textit{Herschel} Space Observatory as part of the W48 molecular cloud complex in the framework of the HOBYS key programme. The observations reveal a sample of 28 compact sources (deconvolved FWHM sizes 20 solar mass. The cloud characteristics we derive from the analysis of their spectral energy distributions (20-50 solar mass with sizes of 0.1-0.2 pc and average densities of 2-20 x 10^5 cm^3) make these massive dense cores excellent candidates to form intermediate- to high-mass stars. Most of the massive dense cores are located inside the G035.39-00.33 filament and host IR-quiet high-mass protostars. The large number of protostars found in this filament suggests that we are witnessing a mini-burst of star formation with an efficiency of ~20% and a rate density of ~40 solar mass per year per kpc^...

  1. Pressure regimes and core formation in the accreting earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    Recent work suggests that a large degree of melting is required to segregate metal from silicates, suggesting a connection with the formation of magma oceans. At low pressures metallic liquids do not wet silicate minerals, preventing the metal from aggregating into large masses that can sink. At high pressures, above 25 GPa, the dihedral angles of grains in contact with oxygen-rich metallic liquids may be reduced enough to allow percolation of metal, but this has not been confirmed. Physical models of core formation and accretion may therefore involve the formation of magma oceans and the segregation of metal at both high and low pressures. Models of core formation involving different pressure regimes are discussed as well as chemical evidence bearing on the models. Available geophysical data is ambiguous. The nature of the 670 km boundary (chemical difference or strictly phase change) between the upper and lower mantle is in doubt. There is some evidence that plumes are derived from the lower mantle, and seismic tomography strongly indicates that penetration of subducting oceanic crust into the lower mantle, but the tomography data also indicates that the 670 km discontinuity is a significant barrier to general mantle convection. The presence of the D' layer at the base of the lower mantle could be a reaction zone between the mantle and core indicating core-mantle disequilibrium, or D' layer could be subducted material. The abundance of the siderophile elements in the mantle could provide clues to the importance of high pressure processes in Earth, but partition coefficients at high pressures are only beginning to be measured.

  2. Geochemical Constraints on Core Formation in the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John H.; Drake, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    New experimental data on the partitioning of siderophile and chalcophile elements among metallic and silicate phases may be used to constrain hypotheses of core formation in the Earth. Three current hypotheses can explain gross features of mantle geochemistry, but none predicts siderophile and chalcophile element abundances to within a factor of two of observed values. Either our understanding of metal-silicate interactions and/or our understanding of the early Earth requires revision.

  3. Protostellar collapse of magneto-turbulent cloud cores: shape during collapse and outflow formation

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Tomoaki

    2010-01-01

    We investigate protostellar collapse of molecular cloud cores by numerical simulations, taking into account turbulence and magnetic fields. By using the adaptive mesh refinement technique, the collapse is followed over a wide dynamic range from the scale of a turbulent cloud core to that of the first core. The cloud core is lumpy in the low density region owing to the turbulence, while it has a smooth density distribution in the dense region produced by the collapse. The shape of the dense region depends mainly on the mass of the cloud core; a massive cloud core tends to be prolate while a less massive cloud core tends to be oblate. In both cases, anisotropy of the dense region increases during the isothermal collapse. The minor axis of the dense region is always oriented parallel to the local magnetic field. All the models eventually yield spherical first cores supported mainly by the thermal pressure. Most of turbulent cloud cores exhibit protostellar outflows around the first cores. These outflows are clas...

  4. Infall/Expansion Velocities in the Low-mass Dense Cores L492, L694-2, and L1521F: Dependence on Position and Molecular Tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keown, Jared; Schnee, Scott; Bourke, Tyler L.; Di Francesco, James; Friesen, Rachel; Caselli, Paola; Myers, Philip; Williger, Gerard; Tafalla, Mario

    2016-12-01

    Although surveys of infall motions in dense cores have been carried out for years, few surveys have focused on mapping infall across cores using multiple spectral-line observations. To fill this gap, we present IRAM 30 m telescope maps of N2H+(1-0), DCO+(2-1), DCO+(3-2), and HCO+(3-2) emission toward two prestellar cores (L492 and L694-2) and one protostellar core (L1521F). We find that the measured infall velocity varies with position across each core and choice of molecular line, likely as a result of radial variations in core chemistry and dynamics. Line-of-sight infall speeds estimated from DCO+(2-1) line profiles can decrease by 40-50 m s-1 when observing at a radial offset ≥slant 0.04 pc from the core's dust continuum emission peak. Median infall speeds calculated from all observed positions across a core can also vary by as much as 65 m s-1, depending on the transition. These results show that while single-pointing, single-transition surveys of core infall velocities may be good indicators of whether a core is either contracting or expanding, the magnitude of the velocities they measure are significantly impacted by the choice of molecular line, proximity to the core center, and core evolutionary state.

  5. CAPS-1 promotes fusion competence of stationary dense-core vesicles in presynaptic terminals of mammalian neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Margherita; van de Bospoort, Rhea; He, Enqi; Persoon, Claudia M; van Weering, Jan R T; Broeke, Jurjen H; Verhage, Matthijs; Toonen, Ruud F

    2015-02-26

    Neuropeptides released from dense-core vesicles (DCVs) modulate neuronal activity, but the molecules driving DCV secretion in mammalian neurons are largely unknown. We studied the role of calcium-activator protein for secretion (CAPS) proteins in neuronal DCV secretion at single vesicle resolution. Endogenous CAPS-1 co-localized with synaptic markers but was not enriched at every synapse. Deletion of CAPS-1 and CAPS-2 did not affect DCV biogenesis, loading, transport or docking, but DCV secretion was reduced by 70% in CAPS-1/CAPS-2 double null mutant (DKO) neurons and remaining fusion events required prolonged stimulation. CAPS deletion specifically reduced secretion of stationary DCVs. CAPS-1-EYFP expression in DKO neurons restored DCV secretion, but CAPS-1-EYFP and DCVs rarely traveled together. Synaptic localization of CAPS-1-EYFP in DKO neurons was calcium dependent and DCV fusion probability correlated with synaptic CAPS-1-EYFP expression. These data indicate that CAPS-1 promotes fusion competence of immobile (tethered) DCVs in presynaptic terminals and that CAPS-1 localization to DCVs is probably not essential for this role.

  6. Metal Oxide Assisted Preparation of Core-Shell Beads with Dense Metal-Organic Framework Coatings for the Enhanced Extraction of Organic Pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio, Mateo; Palomino Cabello, Carlos; Gonzalez, Veronica; Maya, Fernando; Parra, Jose B; Cerdà, Victor; Turnes Palomino, Gemma

    2016-08-08

    Dense and homogeneous metal-organic framework (MOF) coatings on functional bead surfaces are easily prepared by using intermediate sacrificial metal oxide coatings containing the metal precursor of the MOF. Polystyrene (PS) beads are coated with a ZnO layer to give ZnO@PS core-shell beads. The ZnO@PS beads are reactive in the presence of 2-methylimidazole to transform part of the ZnO coating into a porous zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) external shell positioned above the internal ZnO precursor shell. The obtained ZIF-8@ZnO@PS beads can be easily packed in column format for flow-through applications, such as the solid-phase extraction of trace priority-listed environmental pollutants. The prepared material shows an excellent permeance to flow when packed as a column to give high enrichment factors, facile regeneration, and excellent reusability for the extraction of the pollutant bisphenol A. It also shows an outstanding performance for the simultaneous enrichment of mixtures of endocrine disrupting chemicals (bisphenol A, 4-tert-octylphenol and 4-n-nonylphenol), facilitating their analysis when present at very low levels (coatings.

  7. Core Formation Timescale, Silicate-Metal Equilibration, and W Diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Q.; Jacobsen, B.; Tinker, D.; Lesher, C.

    2004-12-01

    The extent to which material accreted to the proto-Earth and segregated to form the core was chemically and isotopically equilibrated with the silicate mantle is an outstanding problem in planetary science. This is particularly important when attempting to assign a meaningful age for planetary accretion and core formation based on Hf-W isotope systematics. The Earth and other terrestrial planets likely formed by accretion of previously differentiated planetesimals. For the planetesimals themselves the most important energy source for metal-silicate differentiation is the combined radioactive heating due to decay of 26Al (half-life 0.7 Ma) and 60Fe (half-life 1.5 Ma). It is expected that the fractionation of Hf and W during planetesimal core formation will lead to a divergence in the W isotopic compositions of the core and silicate portions of these bodies. This expectation is supported by the enormously radiogenic 182W signatures reported for basaltic eucrites. The observation that the W isotopic compositions of the silicate portions of Earth, Moon and Mars are similar and markedly less radiogenic than eucrites suggests that during planet accretion the pre-differentiated metallic core material containing low 182W must have equilibrated extensively with the more radiogenic (high 182W) silicate material to subdue the ingrowth of 182W in the silicate mantle of the planets. The standard theory of planet formation predicts that after runaway and oligarchic growth, the late stage of planet formation is characterized by impact and merging of Mars-sized objects. This is a tremendously energetic process estimated to raise the temperature of the proto-Earth to about 7000K (a temperature equivalent to a mass spectrometer's plasma source, which indiscriminately ionizes all incoming elements). After the giant impacts, the proto-Earth had a luminosity and surface temperature close to a low mass star for a brief period of time. Stevenson (1990) argued that emulsification caused

  8. The Influence of Surface Morphology of Dense Ca-P Ceramics on Apatite Formation in Dynamic SBF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at exploring the effect of surface morphology of dense phosphate calcium (Ca-P) ceramics upon the formation of bone-like apatite in static or dynamic simulated body fluid (SBF). Dense and sandblasted calcium phosphate ceramics were immersed into dynamic SBF flowing at normal physiological speed of body fluid of skeletal muscle.The changes were characterized using SEM, XPS, IR and XRD. Changes can be observed after the sandblasted surface of dense calcium phosphate ceramics had been immersed in SBF for 14 days. XPS analysis results showed that the flake-like structure was composed of Ca, P, C, O; IR analysis result of surface structure of samples showed that there were specific peaks for CO2-3; XRD results indicated the decrease in crystallinity and the increase in amorphous structure. The rough surface was advantageous for the formation of bone-like apatite. Increasing the Ca2+, HPO2-4 concentration of SBF could also enhance the bone like apatite formation. All the results demonstrated that local concentration is a key factor affecting nucleation.

  9. The geochemical constraints on Earth's accretion and core formation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudge, J. F.; Kleine, T.; Bourdon, B.

    2010-12-01

    There are now a wide range of geochemical observations that can be used to place constraints on Earth's first hundred million years. During this time the Earth accreted through collisions between numerous planetary embryos, and these collisions are thought to have caused significant melting and segregation of metal, forming the Earth's core. Information on the pressure, temperature, and oxygen fugacity conditions of core formation can be obtained from the abundances of siderophile elements in Earth's mantle and high pressure partitioning experiments. Timing information can be obtained from isotopic measurements, notably Hf-W and U-Pb. Here we present a simple geochemical box model that can be used to provide constraints on Earth's accretion and core formation. A key parameter in the model is the degree of equilibration during metal-silicate segregation. Existing models have shown that the siderophile element abundances are consistent with full equilibration in a deep magma ocean, with an increase in oxygen fugacity during accretion. Here we show that the siderophile element abundances are equally consistent with scenarios involving partial equilibration. The Hf-W isotopic observations constrain the degree of equilibration to be at least 36%. The timing constraints depend strongly on the degree of equilibration, but nevertheless bounds can be placed on the timing of Earth's accretion. With full equilibration, the Hf-W observations imply a rapid early accretion stage (at least 80% of Earth accreting within 35 Myr), but with partial equilibration accretion may be much more protracted. If Pb partitions into Earth’s core, the U-Pb observations can be used to constrain the late stages of accretion, and are consistent with the final 10% of Earth’s accretion occurring during the Moon-forming giant impact at ~4.45Ga.

  10. Massive molecular cloud cores and activities of star formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Wu-Fei; Wu Yue-Fang; Wei Yue; Ju Bing-Gang

    2005-01-01

    We have mapped 23 sources in the J=1-0 lines of 12CO, 13CO and C18O with the 13.7-m telescope at Qinghai station of Purple Mountain Observatory. The samples were chosen from the massive star formation regions whose single point lines have the broad-wing profile. The mapping shows that 12 clouds have cores and 5 outflows were identified with the 12CO J=1-0 lines. Among the 12 cores, systematic velocity shifts were found in 2 cores, and blue asymmetric double-peak profile of 12CO line was found in IRAS 19529+2704, indicating that it may be an infall candidate. Physical parameters of the cores and outflows were derived from the local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption. The masses range from ~ 9.4 × 102M⊙ to ~ 2.2 × 105M⊙. The hydrogen molecule densities range from ~ 3.4 × 102cm-3 to~ 1.2 × 104cm-3. The molecular outflows have masses larger than 3.5M⊙, and kinetic energies greater than 0.9× 1038J.The outflows have significantly greater masses and kinetic energies than those from low-mass young stellar objects(YSOs). For the cores, 2MASS data are available, dozens of 2MASS sources with different colour indices and brightness are often found around IRAS source, among which the reddest 2MASS source is always within the IRAS error ellipse thus probably corresponds to the IRAS source.

  11. Dense water formation and BiOS-induced variability in the Adriatic Sea simulated using an ocean regional circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunić, Natalija; Vilibić, Ivica; Šepić, Jadranka; Somot, Samuel; Sevault, Florence

    2016-08-01

    A performance analysis of the NEMOMED8 ocean regional circulation model was undertaken for the Adriatic Sea during the period of 1961-2012, focusing on two mechanisms, dense water formation (DWF) and the Adriatic-Ionian Bimodal Oscillating System (BiOS), which drive interannual and decadal variability in the basin. The model was verified based on sea surface temperature and sea surface height satellite measurements and long-term in situ observations from several key areas. The model qualitatively reproduces basin-scale processes: thermohaline-driven cyclonic circulation and freshwater surface outflow along the western Adriatic coast, dense water dynamics, and the inflow of Ionian and Levantine waters to the Adriatic. Positive temperature and salinity biases are reported; the latter are particularly large along the eastern part of the basin, presumably because of the inappropriate introduction of eastern Adriatic rivers into the model. The highest warm temperature biases in the vertical direction were found in dense-water-collecting depressions in the Adriatic, indicating either an inappropriate quantification of DWF processes or temperature overestimation of modelled dense water. The decadal variability in the thermohaline properties is reproduced better than interannual variability, which is considerably underestimated. The DWF rates are qualitatively well reproduced by the model, being larger when preconditioned by higher basin-wide salinities. Anticyclonic circulation in the northern Ionian Sea was modelled only during the Eastern Mediterranean Transient. No other reversals of circulation that could be linked to BiOS-driven changes were modelled.

  12. Scratching beneath the surface while coupling atmosphere, ocean and waves: Analysis of a dense water formation event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniel, Sandro; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bonaldo, Davide; Falcieri, Francesco M.; Miglietta, Mario Marcello; Ricchi, Antonio; Sclavo, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Cold Air Outbreaks (CAOs) over shallow seas may lead to dense water formation episodes, enhancing water, heat, nutrient and sediment exchanges across the continental margin, with associated seabed reshaping. During winter 2012, a CAO episode characterised by exceptional intensity stroke the northern Adriatic Sea, one of the most effective cool engines driving the Mediterranean circulation, providing a paramount opportunity for an integrated investigation of dense shelf water dynamics. In the present study, we describe this event using a fully coupled modeling approach exploring the effects of mutual interactions among atmosphere, ocean currents and sea surface waves, usually not completely accounted for, in the resulting dense water formation. Whilst atmospheric fields appear to be marginally affected by coupled dynamics in the present case, implications for sea surface elevation and circulation are far from negligible. Measurements collected in the northern Adriatic Sea showed that a physically consistent description of energy exchanges between ocean and atmosphere provides an improved estimate of heat fluxes and of air and sea temperatures. In addition, the explicit inclusion of wave action within the modeling system further enhances the modulation of air-sea exchanges and the propagation of its effect along the water column, resulting in a different intensity of northern Adriatic gyres and in different water fluxes flowing through the formation basin. Through these main controls on the water volume involved in the densification process and on the intensity of momentum input and cooling, a coupled modeling strategy accounting for atmosphere-waves-currents interactions can turn out to be crucial for improving the quantification of thermohaline properties and energy content, newly formed dense water mass, and provide a better description of its migration pathways and rates of off-shelf descent.

  13. Infall/Expansion Velocities in the Low-Mass Dense Cores L492, L694-2, and L1521F: Dependence on Position and Molecular Tracer

    CERN Document Server

    Keown, Jared; Bourke, Tyler L; Di Francesco, James; Friesen, Rachel; Caselli, Paola; Myers, Philip; Williger, Gerard; Tafalla, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Although surveys of infall motions in dense cores have been carried out for years, few surveys have focused on mapping infall across cores using multiple spectral line observations. To fill this gap, we present IRAM 30-m Telescope maps of N2H+(1-0), DCO+(2-1), DCO+(3-2), and HCO+(3-2) emission towards two prestellar cores (L492 and L694-2) and one protostellar core (L1521F). We find that the measured infall velocity varies with position across each core and choice of molecular line, likely as a result of radial variations in core chemistry and dynamics. Line-of-sight infall speeds estimated from DCO+(2-1) line profiles can decrease by 40-50 m/s when observing at a radial offset >= 0.04 pc from the core's dust continuum emission peak. Median infall speeds calculated from all observed positions across a core can also vary by as much as 65 m/s depending on the transition. These results show that while single-pointing, single-transition surveys of core infall velocities may be good indicators of whether a core is...

  14. Star Formation Efficiency in the Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N.; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel) and Hα (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to Hα luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and Hα morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (A1991, A2052, A2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given Hα luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/Hα ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming intrinsic extinction by modest amounts of dust (E(B - V) ~ 0.2) or a top-heavy initial mass function in the extended filaments. The measured star formation rates vary from ~0.05 M sun yr-1 in the nuclei of non-cooling systems, consistent with passive, red ellipticals, to ~5 M sun yr-1 in systems with complex, extended, optical filaments. Comparing the estimates of the star formation rate based on UV, Hα, and infrared luminosities to the spectroscopically determined X-ray cooling rate suggests a star formation efficiency of 14+18 - 8%. This value represents the time-averaged fraction, by mass, of gas cooling out of the intracluster medium, which turns into stars and agrees well with the global fraction of baryons in stars required by simulations to reproduce the stellar mass function for galaxies. This result provides a new constraint on the efficiency of star formation in accreting systems.

  15. Star Formation Efficiency in the Cool Cores of Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, Michael; Rupke, David S N; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys Solar Blind Channel) and Halpha (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to Halpha luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and Halpha morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (Abell 1991, Abell 2052, Abell 2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star-forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given Halpha luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/Halpha ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming in...

  16. A model for core formation in the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.; Drake, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two basic types exogenous models were proposed to account for siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in the Earth's upper mantle. The first model requires that the Earth be depleted in volatiles and that, after a core formation event which extracted the most siderophile elements into the core, additional noble siderophile elements (Pt, Ir, Au) were added as a late veneer and mixed into the mantle. The second model postulates a reduced Earth with approximately CI elemental abundances in which a primary core forming event depleted all siderophile elements in the mantle. The plausibility of models which require fine scale mixing of chondritic material into the upper mantle is analyzed. Mixing in liquids is more efficient, but large degrees of silicate partial melting will facilitate the separation of magma from residual solids. Any external events affecting the upper mantle of the Earth should also be evident in the Moon; but siderophile and chalcophile element abundance patterns inferred for the mantles of the Earth and Moon differ. There appear to be significant physical difficulties associated with chondritic veneer models.

  17. 60Fe-60Ni chronology of core formation in Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Haolan

    2014-01-01

    The timescales of accretion, core formation, and magmatic differentiation in planetary bodies can be constrained using extinct radionuclide systems. Experiments have shown that Ni becomes more siderophile with decreasing pressure, which is reflected in the progressively higher Fe/Ni ratios in the mantles of Earth, Mars and Vesta. Mars formed rapidly and its mantle has a high Fe/Ni ratio, so the 60Fe-60Ni decay system (t1/2=2.62 Myr) is well suited to establish the timescale of core formation in this object. We report new measurements of 60Ni/58Ni ratios in bulk SNC/martian (Shergotty-Nakhla-Chassigny) meteorites and chondrites. The difference in {\\epsilon}60Ni values between SNC meteorites and the building blocks of Mars assumed to be chondritic (55 % ordinary chondrites +45% enstatite chondrites) is +0.028+/-0.023 (95% confidence interval). Using a model of growth of planetary embryo, this translates into a time for Mars to have reached ~44 % of its present size of 1.9(-0.8)(+1.7) Myr with a strict lower lim...

  18. Triggering Collapse of the Presolar Dense Cloud Core and Injecting Short-Lived Radioisotopes with a Shock Wave. IV. Effects of Rotational Axis Orientation

    CERN Document Server

    Boss, Alan P

    2015-01-01

    Both astronomical observations of the interaction of Type II supernova remnants (SNR) with dense interstellar clouds as well as cosmochemical studies of the abundances of daughter products of short-lived radioisotopes (SLRIs) formed by supernova nucleosynthesis support the hypothesis that the Solar Systems SLRIs may have been derived from a supernova. This paper continues a series devoted to examining whether such a shock wave could have triggered the dynamical collapse of a dense, presolar cloud core and simultaneously injected sufficient abundances of SLRIs to explain the cosmochemical evidence. Here we examine the effects of shock waves striking clouds whose spin axes are oriented perpendicular, rather than parallel, to the direction of propagation of the shock front. The models start with 2.2 solar mass cloud cores and shock speeds of 20 or 40 km/sec. Central protostars and protoplanetary disks form in all models, though with disk spin axes aligned somewhat randomly. The disks derive most of their angular...

  19. Nano-scale ultra-dense Z-pinches formation from laser-irradiated nanowire arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Kaymak, Vural; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N; Rocca, Jorge J

    2016-01-01

    We show that ulta-dense Z-pinches with nanoscale dimensions can be generated by irradiating aligned nanowires with femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensity. Using fully three-dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulations we demonstrate that the laser pulse drives a forward electron current in the area around the wires. This forward current induces return current densities of $\\sim$ 0.1 Giga-Amperes per $\\mu$m\\textsuperscript{2} through the wires. The resulting strong, quasi-static, self-generated azimuthal magnetic field pinches the nanowires into hot plasmas with a peak electron density of $> 9\\cdot 10^{24}$ cm\\textsuperscript{-3}, exceeding 1000 times the critical density. Arrays of these new ultra-dense nanopinches can be expected to lead to efficient micro-fusion and other applications.

  20. The Role of Non-ionizing Radiation Pressure in Star Formation: The Stability of Cores and Filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, Young Min

    2016-01-01

    Stars form when filaments and dense cores in molecular clouds fragment and collapse due to self-gravity. In the most basic analyses of gravitational stability, the competition between self-gravity and thermal pressure sets the critical (i.e. maximum stable) mass of spheres and the critical line density of cylinders. Previous work has considered additional support from magnetic fields and turbulence. Here, we consider the effects of non-ionizing radiation, specifically the inward radiation pressure force that acts on dense structures embedded in an isotropic radiation field. Using hydrostatic, isothermal models, we find that irradiation lowers the critical mass and line density for gravitational collapse, and can thus act as a trigger for star formation. For structures with moderate central densities, $\\sim10^3$ cm$^{-3}$, the interstellar radiation field in the Solar vicinity has an order unity effect on stability thresholds. For more evolved objects with higher central densities, a significant lowering of st...

  1. Formation of Glycerol through Hydrogenation of CO Ice under Prestellar Core Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoseev, G.; Chuang, K.-J.; Ioppolo, S.; Qasim, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Linnartz, H.

    2017-06-01

    Observational studies reveal that complex organic molecules (COMs) can be found in various objects associated with different star formation stages. The identification of COMs in prestellar cores, i.e., cold environments in which thermally induced chemistry can be excluded and radiolysis is limited by cosmic rays and cosmic-ray-induced UV photons, is particularly important as this stage sets up the initial chemical composition from which ultimately stars and planets evolve. Recent laboratory results demonstrate that molecules as complex as glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol are efficiently formed on icy dust grains via nonenergetic atom addition reactions between accreting H atoms and CO molecules, a process that dominates surface chemistry during the “CO freeze-out stage” in dense cores. In the present study we demonstrate that a similar mechanism results in the formation of the biologically relevant molecule glycerol—HOCH2CH(OH)CH2OH—a three-carbon-bearing sugar alcohol necessary for the formation of membranes of modern living cells and organelles. Our experimental results are fully consistent with a suggested reaction scheme in which glycerol is formed along a chain of radical-radical and radical-molecule interactions between various reactive intermediates produced upon hydrogenation of CO ice or its hydrogenation products. The tentative identification of the chemically related simple sugar glyceraldehyde—HOCH2CH(OH)CHO—is discussed as well. These new laboratory findings indicate that the proposed reaction mechanism holds much potential to form even more complex sugar alcohols and simple sugars.

  2. Feedback Regulated Star Formation in Cool Core Clusters of Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Grant Russell

    2011-07-01

    /ISM heating by AGN feedback is directly observed. The ˜15 kpc soft excess filament, part of which is cospatial with extended 1.3 GHz radio emission, may be associated with dredge-up of low entropy gas by the propagating radio source. Results from our study of the hot X-ray gas are framed in the context of inferred young stellar component ages associated with the central emission line nebula in the BCG. We find that inferred ages of the young stellar component are both younger and older than the inferred ages of the X-ray cavities, suggesting that low levels of star formation have managed to persist amid the AGN feedback-driven excavation of the X-ray cavity network. In Chapter 3 we present Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet imaging of seven BCGs in cool core clusters selected on the basis of elevated star formation rates. We find that even at low levels, star formation provides a dominant contribution to the ionizing photon reservoir required to power the observed luminosities of the emission line nebula. Weak, compact radio sources are observed in each of these seven BCGs. The combination of higher SFR and lower radio power is consistent with a scenario wherein a low state of AGN feedback allows for increased residual condensation from the ambient X-ray atmosphere, accounting for the elevated star formation rates. In Chapter 4 we present a comparison study of episodic star formation and AGN activity in the giant radio galaxy 3C 236, which is not associated with a cluster. We find that an episodic AGN/starburst connection can be fostered by a non-steady transport of gas to the nucleus. These results are then compared with Abell 2597, enabling a better understanding of the roles that may be played by cooling flows vs. mergers and hot vs. cold accretion modes in depositing the gaseous reservoirs that fuel both star formation and AGN activity. In Chapter 5 we broaden the context of the thesis with a search for high redshift Fanaroff-Riley class I radio galaxies, which may

  3. The Formation Mass of a Binary System via Fragmentation of a Rotating Parent Core with Increasing Total Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Arreaga-Garcia, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Recent VLA and CARMA observations have shown proto-stars in binaries with unprecedented resolution. Specifically, the proto-stellar masses of systems such as CB230 IRS1 and L1165-SMM1 have been detected in the range of $0.1-0.25 \\, M_{\\odot}$. These are much more massive than the masses generally obtained by numerical simulations of binary formation, around $0.01 \\, M_{\\odot}$. Motivated by these discrepancies in mass, in this paper we study the formation mass of a binary system as a function of the total mass of its parent core. To achieve this objective, we present a set of numerical simulations of the gravitational collapse of a uniform and rotating core, in which azimuthal symmetric mass seeds are initially implemented in order to favor the formation of a dense filament, out of which a binary system may be formed by direct fragmentation. We first observed that this binary formation process is diminished when the total mass of the parent core $M_0$ is increased; then we increased the level of the ratio of ...

  4. Global view of sea-ice production in polynyas and its linkage to dense/bottom water formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Kay I.; Nihashi, Sohey; Iwamoto, Katsushi

    2016-12-01

    Global overturning circulation is driven by density differences. Saline water rejected during sea-ice formation in polynyas is the main source of dense water, and thus sea-ice production is a key factor in the overturning circulation. Due to difficulties associated with in situ observation, sea-ice production and its interannual variability have not been well understood until recently. Methods to estimate sea-ice production on large scales have been developed using heat flux calculations based on satellite microwave radiometer data. Using these methods, we present the mapping of sea-ice production with the same definition and scale globally, and review the polynya ice production and its relationship with dense/bottom water. The mapping demonstrates that ice production rate is high in Antarctic coastal polynyas, in contrast to Arctic coastal polynyas. This is consistent with the formation of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), the densest water mass which occupies the abyssal layer of the global ocean. The Ross Ice Shelf polynya has by far the highest ice production in the Southern Hemisphere. The Cape Darnley polynya (65°E-69°E) is found to be the second highest production area and recent observations revealed that this is the missing (fourth) source of AABW. In the region off the Mertz Glacier Tongue (MGT), the third source of AABW, sea-ice production decreased by as much as 40 %, due to the MGT calving in early 2010, resulting in a significant decrease in AABW production. The Okhotsk Northwestern polynya exhibits the highest ice production in the Northern Hemisphere, and the resultant dense water formation leads to overturning in the North Pacific, extending to the intermediate layer. Estimates of its ice production show a significant decrease over the past 30-50 years, likely causing the weakening of the North Pacific overturning. These regions demonstrate the strong linkage between variabilities of sea-ice production and bottom/intermediate water formation. The

  5. Star formation in galaxy mergers: ISM turbulence, dense gas excess, and scaling relations for disks and starbusts

    CERN Document Server

    Bournaud, Frederic; Chapon, Damien; Teyssier, Romain

    2010-01-01

    Galaxy interactions and mergers play a significant, but still debated and poorly understood role in the star formation history of galaxies. Numerical and theoretical models cannot yet explain the main properties of merger-induced starbursts, including their intensity and their spatial extent. Usually, the mechanism invoked in merger-induced starbursts is a global inflow of gas towards the central kpc, resulting in a nuclear starburst. We show here, using high-resolution AMR simulations and comparing to observations of the gas component in mergers, that the triggering of starbursts also results from increased ISM turbulence and velocity dispersions in interacting systems. This forms cold gas that are denser and more massive than in quiescent disk galaxies. The fraction of dense cold gas largely increases, modifying the global density distribution of these systems, and efficient star formation results. Because the starbursting activity is not just from a global compacting of the gas to higher average surface de...

  6. Initial development and performance evaluation of a process for formation of dense carbon by pyrolysis of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, G. P.; Cusick, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The three steps in pyrolytic carbon formation are: (1) gaseous hydrocarbon polymerization and aromatic formation; (2) gas-phase condensation and surface adsorption/impingement of polyaromatic hydrocarbon; and (3) final dehydration to carbon. The structure of the carbon in the various stages of formation is examined. The apparatuses and experimental procedures for the pyrolysis of methane in a 60 cm long quartz reactor tube at temperatures ranging from 1400-1600 K are described. The percentage of carbon converted and its density are calculated and tabularly presented. The results reveal that dense carbon formation is maximized and soot eliminated by this procedure. It is observed that conversion efficiency depends on the composition of the inlet gas and conversion increases with increasing temperature. Based on the experimental data a three-man carbon reactor subsystem (CRS) is developed; the functions of the Sabatier Methanation Reactor, two carbon formation reactors and fluid handling components of the CRS are analyzed. The CRS forms 16 kg of carbon at a rate of 0.8 kg/day for 20 days in a two percent volume density quartz wool packing at temperature of 1500-1600 K.

  7. Thermal Evolution And Core Formation In Planetesimals And Planetary Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramek, O.; Labrosse, S.; Ricard, Y. R.; milelli, L.

    2011-12-01

    Recent dating of iron meteorites shows that they were formed almost as early as the oldest known objects of the solar system, the CAIs. Moreover, several meteorites show a magnetization that is thought to originate from the action of a dynamo at the early stages of the planetesimals evolution. Core formation requires melting of the metal which then can percolate toward the center, providing the solid matrix deforms and compacts. The energy source for melting of the metal comes from a combination of short lived radionuclides, mostly 26Al, and accretion energy for bodies larger than about 1000 km. We considered a suite of numerical calculations solving for the coupled problem of thermal evolution, melt percolation and matrix compaction, systematically exploring the different accretion histories, final body size and initial concentration in 26Al. Our model handles simultaneously metal and silicates in both solid and liquid states. Depending on the accretion rate, melting occurs from the center outward, in a shallow outer shell progressing inward, or in the two locations. Segregation of the protocore decreases the efficiency of radiogenic heating by confining the 26Al in the outer silicate shell. Various types of planetesimals partly differentiated and sometimes differentiated in multiple metal-silicate layers can be obtained. We discuss the thermal profiles of the accreted bodies in relation to possible early dynamo action as evidenced by remanent magnetization observed on some meteorite samples.

  8. Dense-plasma-driven ultrafast formation of FePt organization on silicon substrate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ROHIT MEDWAL; NEERU SEHDEV; WANG YING; R S RAWAT; S ANNAPOORNI

    2017-02-01

    This article demonstrates the removal of organic capping and promotion of long-range 2D organization of chemically synthesized FePt nanoparticles dispersed on Si$\\langle 100\\rangle$ substrate by means of pulsed H+ energetic ion irradiation using a dense plasma focus (DPF) device. The irradiation of energetic H$^+$ ions on FePt nanoparticles clearly resulted in enhanced structural and magnetic behaviour of the FePt nanoparticles as a function ofplasma focused irradiation shots. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the FePt nanoparticles clearly show a marked enhancement in average particle size from 2.5 nm for nonirradiated sample to about 28nm for four plasma focus shots irradiation. The gradual removal of organic capping over chemically synthesized FePt nanoparticles with increasing plasma focus shots exposure is confirmed usingRaman spectroscopy. A uniform 2D organization of bimetallic FePt nanoparticles over 1 cm $\\times$ 1 cm silicon substrate is obtained with three plasma focus shots with better magnetic properties as compared with plasma-untreated FePtnanoparticles.

  9. Survey of ortho-H2D+ (1(1,0)-1(1,1)) in dense cloud cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caselli, P.; Vastel, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Crapsi, A.; Bacmann, A.

    2008-01-01

    Aims. We present a survey of the ortho-H2D+ (1(1,0)-1(1,1)) line toward a sample of 10 starless cores and 6 protostellar cores, carried out at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The high diagnostic power of this line is revealed for the study of the chemistry, and the evolutionary and dynamical

  10. BURST OF STAR FORMATION DRIVES BUBBLE IN GALAXY'S CORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    These NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshots reveal dramatic activities within the core of the galaxy NGC 3079, where a lumpy bubble of hot gas is rising from a cauldron of glowing matter. The picture at left shows the bubble in the center of the galaxy's disk. The structure is more than 3,000 light-years wide and rises 3,500 light-years above the galaxy's disk. The smaller photo at right is a close-up view of the bubble. Astronomers suspect that the bubble is being blown by 'winds' (high-speed streams of particles) released during a burst of star formation. Gaseous filaments at the top of the bubble are whirling around in a vortex and are being expelled into space. Eventually, this gas will rain down upon the galaxy's disk where it may collide with gas clouds, compress them, and form a new generation of stars. The two white dots just above the bubble are probably stars in the galaxy. The close-up reveals that the bubble's surface is lumpy, consisting of four columns of gaseous filaments that tower above the galaxy's disk. The filaments disperse at a height of 2,000 light-years. Each filament is about 75 light-years wide. Velocity measurements taken by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope in Hawaii show that the gaseous filaments are ascending at more than 4 million miles an hour (6 million kilometers an hour). According to theoretical models, the bubble formed when ongoing winds from hot stars mixed with small bubbles of very hot gas from supernova explosions. Observations of the core's structure by radio telescopes indicate that those processes are still active. The models suggest that this outflow began about a million years ago. They occur about every 10 million years. Eventually, the hot stars will die, and the bubble's energy source will fade away. Astronomers have seen evidence of previous outbursts from radio and X-ray observations. Those studies show rings of dust and gas and long plumes of material, all of which are larger than the bubble. NGC 3079 is 50

  11. Formation of dense partonic matter in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC: Experimental evaluation by the PHENIX collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Adcox, K; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S V; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Yu A; Botelho, S S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N L; Bucher, D; Büsching, H; Bumazhnov, V A; Bunce, G M; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S K; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; Dávid, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Chenawi, K F; Enyo, H; Esumi, S C; Ewell, L A; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Zeev; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Sen-Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R S; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B A; Khanzadeev, A V; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E P; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Bösing, C; Klinksiek, S A; Kochenda, L M; Kochetkov, D; Kochetkov, V; Köhler, D; Kohama, T; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R A; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu Zu Ping; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J R; Makdisi, Y I; Man'ko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martínez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E A; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A M; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Muhlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P O; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V A; Oskarsson, A; Österman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, Thomas; Petridis, A; Pinkenburg, C H; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M E; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R K; Shea, T K; Shein, I V; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiryak, Yu; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sørensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H A; Towell, R S; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjo, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, E A; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2004-01-01

    Extensive experimental data from high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions were recorded using the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The comprehensive set of measurements from the first three years of RHIC operation includes charged particle multiplicities, transverse energy, yield ratios and spectra of identified hadrons in a wide range of transverse momenta (p_T), elliptic flow, two-particle correlations, non-statistical fluctuations, and suppression of particle production at high p_T. The results are examined with an emphasis on implications for the formation of a new state of dense matter. We find that the state of matter created at RHIC cannot be described in terms of ordinary color neutral hadrons.

  12. Thermodynamic considerations and computer simulations on the formation of core-shell nanoparticles under electrochemical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, O A; Leiva, E P M; Mariscal, M M

    2008-06-28

    We report on thermodynamic modeling and computer simulations on the electrochemical generation of metallic and bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs) by means of quenched molecular dynamics (QMD). The present results suggest that the spontaneous formation of core-shell NPs depends on several factors, i.e. size and shape of the core, chemical composition of the system, and under-/oversaturation conditions. Homo- and heteroatomic prototypical systems were considered. The former systems were Au and Pt. The latter were Ag(core)/Au(shell), Pt(core)/Au(shell), Au(core)/Ag(shell) and Au(core)/Pt(shell).

  13. Dense SDM (12-core × 3-mode) transmission over 527 km with 33.2-ns mode-dispersion employing low-complexity parallel MIMO frequency-domain equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibahara, K.; Mizuno, T.; Takara, H.;

    We demonstrate 12-core × 3-mode dense SDM transmission over 527 km graded-index multi-core few-mode fiber without mode-dispersion management. Employing low baud rate multi-carrier signal and frequency-domain equalization enables 33.2-ns DMD compensation with low computational complexity. © 2015 OSA...

  14. Dense SDM (12-Core × 3-Mode) Transmission Over 527 km With 33.2-ns Mode-Dispersion Employing Low-Complexity Parallel MIMO Frequency-Domain Equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibahara, Kohki; Lee, Doohwan; Kobayashi, Takayuki;

    2016-01-01

    as intercore crosstalk. Mode dependent loss/gain effect was also mitigated by employing both a ring-core FM erbium-doped fiber amplifier and a free-space optics type gain equalizer. By combining these advanced techniques together, we finally demonstrate 12-core × 3-mode dense SDM transmission over 527-km GI MC...

  15. CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey: Structure and Kinematics of Dense Gas in Serpens Main

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Katherine I; Storm, Shaye; Looney, Leslie W; Mundy, Lee G; Segura-Cox, Dominique; Teuben, Peter; Rosolowsky, Erik; Arce, Hector G; Ostriker, Eve C; Shirley, Yancy L; Kwon, Woojin; Kauffmann, Jens; Tobin, John J; Plunkett, Adele L; Pound, Marc W; Salter, Demerese M; Volgenau, N H; Chen, Che-Yu; Tassis, Konstantinos; Isella, Andrea; Crutcher, Richard M; Gammie, Charles F; Testi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    We present observations of N2H+(1-0), HCO+(1-0), and HCN(1-0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 square arcminutes of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of 7 arcsecs. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N2H+(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified s...

  16. Evidence for the rapid formation of low mass early-type galaxies in dense environments

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yiqing; Blakeslee, John; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Jordán, Andrés; Puzia, Thomas H; Toloba, Elisa; Zhang, Hong-Xin

    2015-01-01

    We explore the environmental dependence of star formation timescales in low mass galaxies using the [$\\alpha$/Fe] abundance ratio as an evolutionary clock. We present integrated [$\\alpha$/Fe] measurements for 11 low mass ($M_\\star \\sim 10^9~M_\\odot$) early-type galaxies (ETGs) with a large range of cluster-centric distance in the Virgo Cluster. We find a gradient in [$\\alpha$/Fe], where the galaxies closest to the cluster center (the cD galaxy, M87) have the highest values. This trend is driven by galaxies within a projected radius of 0.4~Mpc (0.26 times the virial radius of Virgo~A), all of which have super-solar [$\\alpha$/Fe]. Galaxies in this mass range exhibit a large scatter in the [$\\alpha$/Fe]--$\\sigma$ diagram, and do not obviously lie on an extension of the relation defined by massive ETGs. In addition, we find a correlation between [$\\alpha$/Fe] and globular cluster specific frequency ($S_N$), suggesting that low-mass ETGs that formed their stars over a short period of time, were also efficient at f...

  17. SiO excitation from dense shocks in the earliest stages of massive star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Leurini, S; López-Sepulcre, A; Gusdorf, A; Csengeri, T; Anderl, S

    2014-01-01

    Molecular outflows are a direct consequence of accretion, and therefore they represent one of the best tracers of accretion processes in the still poorly understood early phases of high-mass star formation. Previous studies suggested that the SiO abundance decreases with the evolution of a massive young stellar object probably because of a decay of jet activity, as witnessed in low-mass star-forming regions. We investigate the SiO excitation conditions and its abundance in outflows from a sample of massive young stellar objects through observations of the SiO(8-7) and CO(4-3) lines with the APEX telescope. Through a non-LTE analysis, we find that the excitation conditions of SiO increase with the velocity of the emitting gas. We also compute the SiO abundance through the SiO and CO integrated intensities at high velocities. For the sources in our sample we find no significant variation of the SiO abundance with evolution for a bolometric luminosity-to-mass ratio of between 4 and 50 $L_\\odot/M_\\odot$. We also ...

  18. CARMA LARGE AREA STAR FORMATION SURVEY: STRUCTURE AND KINEMATICS OF DENSE GAS IN SERPENS MAIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Katherine I.; Storm, Shaye; Mundy, Lee G.; Teuben, Peter; Pound, Marc W.; Salter, Demerese M.; Chen, Che-Yu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Fernández-López, Manuel; Looney, Leslie W.; Segura-Cox, Dominique [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Departments of Physics and Statistics, University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, 3333 University Way, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada); Arce, Héctor G.; Plunkett, Adele L. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, PO Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Ostriker, Eve C. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Shirley, Yancy L. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kwon, Woojin [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Kauffmann, Jens [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69 D-53121, Bonn Germany (Germany); Tobin, John J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Volgenau, N. H. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tassis, Konstantinos, E-mail: ijlee9@astro.umd.edu [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, PO Box 2208, GR-710 03, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); and others

    2014-12-20

    We present observations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1 → 0), HCO{sup +} (J = 1 → 0), and HCN (J = 1 → 0) toward the Serpens Main molecular cloud from the CARMA Large Area Star Formation Survey (CLASSy). We mapped 150 arcmin{sup 2} of Serpens Main with an angular resolution of ∼7''. The gas emission is concentrated in two subclusters (the NW and SE subclusters). The SE subcluster has more prominent filamentary structures and more complicated kinematics compared to the NW subcluster. The majority of gas in the two subclusters has subsonic to sonic velocity dispersions. We applied a dendrogram technique with N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1-0) to study the gas structures; the SE subcluster has a higher degree of hierarchy than the NW subcluster. Combining the dendrogram and line fitting analyses reveals two distinct relations: a flat relation between nonthermal velocity dispersion and size, and a positive correlation between variation in velocity centroids and size. The two relations imply a characteristic depth of 0.15 pc for the cloud. Furthermore, we have identified six filaments in the SE subcluster. These filaments have lengths of ∼0.2 pc and widths of ∼0.03 pc, which is smaller than a characteristic width of 0.1 pc suggested by Herschel observations. The filaments can be classified into two types based on their properties. The first type, located in the northeast of the SE subcluster, has larger velocity gradients, smaller masses, and nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios. The other type, located in the southwest of the SE subcluster, has the opposite properties. Several YSOs are formed along two filaments which have supercritical mass per unit length ratios, while filaments with nearly critical mass-per-unit-length ratios are not associated with YSOs, suggesting that stars are formed on gravitationally unstable filaments.

  19. HCV Core Residues Critical for Infectivity Are Also Involved in Core-NS5A Complex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik, Katarzyna; Baugh, James; Chatterji, Udayan; Lim, Precious J.; Bobardt, Michael D.; Gallay, Philippe A.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver disease. The molecular machinery of HCV assembly and particle release remains obscure. A better understanding of the assembly events might reveal new potential antiviral strategies. It was suggested that the nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A), an attractive recent drug target, participates in the production of infectious particles as a result of its interaction with the HCV core protein. However, prior to the present study, the NS5A-binding site in the viral core remained unknown. We found that the D1 domain of core contains the NS5A-binding site with the strongest interacting capacity in the basic P38-K74 cluster. We also demonstrated that the N-terminal basic residues of core at positions 50, 51, 59 and 62 were required for NS5A binding. Analysis of all substitution combinations of R50A, K51A, R59A, and R62A, in the context of the HCVcc system, showed that single, double, triple, and quadruple mutants were fully competent for viral RNA replication, but deficient in secretion of viral particles. Furthermore, we found that the extracellular and intracellular infectivity of all the mutants was abolished, suggesting a defect in the formation of infectious particles. Importantly, we showed that the interaction between the single and quadruple core mutants and NS5A was impaired in cells expressing full-length HCV genome. Interestingly, mutations of the four basic residues of core did not alter the association of core or NS5A with lipid droplets. This study showed for the first time that basic residues in the D1 domain of core that are critical for the formation of infectious extracellular and intracellular particles also play a role in core-NS5A interactions. PMID:24533158

  20. Slp4-a/granuphilin-a inhibits dense-core vesicle exocytosis through interaction with the GDP-bound form of Rab27A in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2003-04-25

    Slp4-a (synaptotagmin-like protein 4-a)/granuphilin-a is specifically localized on dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells and negatively controls dense-core vesicle exocytosis through specific interaction with Rab27A via the N-terminal Slp homology domain (SHD) (Fukuda, M., Kanno, E., Saegusa, C., Ogata, Y., and Kuroda, T. S. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 39673-39678). However, the mechanism of the inhibition by Slp4-a has never been elucidated at the molecular level and is still a matter of controversy. In this study, I discovered an unexpected biochemical property of Slp4-a, that Slp4-a, but not other Rab27 effectors reported thus far, is capable of interacting with both Rab27A(T23N), a dominant negative form that mimics the GDP-bound form, and Rab27A(Q78L), a dominant active form that mimics the GTP-bound form, whereas Slp4-a specifically recognizes the GTP-bound form of Rab3A and Rab8A and does not recognize their GDP-bound form. I show by deletion and mutation analyses that the TGDWFY sequence in SHD2 is essential for Rab27A(T23N) binding, whereas SHD1 is involved in Rab27A(Q78L) binding. I further show by immunoprecipitation and cotransfection assays that Munc18-1, but not syntaxin IA, directly interacts with the C-terminal domain of Slp4-a in a Rab27A-independent manner. Expression of Slp4-a mutants that lack Rab27A(T23N) binding activity (i.e. specific binding to Rab27A(Q78L)) completely reverses the inhibitory effect of the wild-type Slp4-a on high KCl-dependent neuropeptide Y secretion in PC12 cells. The results strongly indicate that interaction of Slp4-a with the GDP-bound form of Rab27A, not with syntaxin IA or Munc18-1, is the primary reason that Slp4-a expression inhibits dense core vesicle exocytosis in PC12 cells.

  1. Dense molecular cocoons in the massive protocluster W3 IRS5: a test case for models of massive star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, K -S; Hogerheijde, M R; van der Tak, F F S; Benz, A O; Megeath, S T; Wilson, T L

    2013-01-01

    [Context] Two competing models describe the formation of massive stars in objects like the Orion Trapezium. In the turbulent core accretion model, the resulting stellar masses are directly related to the mass distribution of the cloud condensations. In the competitive accretion model, the gravitational potential of the protocluster captures gas from the surrounding cloud for which the individual cluster members compete. [Aims] With high resolution submillimeter observations of the structure, kinematics, and chemistry of the proto-Trapezium cluster W3 IRS5, we aim to determine which mode of star formation dominates. [Methods] We present 354 GHz Submillimeter Array observations at resolutions of 1"-3" (1800-5400 AU) of W3 IRS5. ...... [Results] The observations show five emission peaks (SMM1-5). SMM1 and SMM2 contain massive embedded stars (~20 Msun); SMM3-5 are starless or contain low-mass stars (= 10^7 cm^-3, but the core masses are small, 0.2-0.6 Msun. The detected molecular emission reveals four different c...

  2. Gas Giants in Hot Water: Inhibiting Giant Planet Formation and Planet Habitability in Dense Star Clusters Through Cosmic Time

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Todd A

    2012-01-01

    I show that the temperature of nuclear star clusters, starburst clusters in M82, compact high-z galaxies, and some globular clusters of the Galaxy likely exceeded the ice line temperature (T_Ice ~ 150-170 K) during formation for a time comparable to the planet formation timescale. The protoplanetary disks within these systems will thus not have an ice line, decreasing the total material available for building protoplanetary embryos, inhibiting the formation of gas- and ice-giants if they form by core accretion, and prohibiting habitability. Planet formation by gravitational instability is similarly suppressed because Toomre's Q > 1 in all but the most massive disks. I discuss these results in the context of the observed lack of planets in 47 Tuc. I predict that a similar search for planets in the globular cluster NGC 6366 ([Fe/H] = -0.82) should yield detections, whereas (counterintuitively) the relatively metal-rich globular clusters NGC 6440, 6441, and 6388 should be devoid of giant planets. The characteris...

  3. Dense cores in galaxies out to z=2.5 in SDSS, UltraVISTA, and the five 3D-HST/CANDELS fields: number density, evolution, and the apparent need for efficient cooling at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    van Dokkum, Pieter; van der Wel, Arjen; Nelson, Erica June; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind E; Whitaker, Katherine E; Brammer, Gabriel; Conroy, Charlie; Schreiber, Natascha M Forster; Fumagalli, Mattia; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Marchesini, Danilo; Muzzin, Adam; Oesch, Pascal; Wuyts, Stijn

    2014-01-01

    The dense interiors of massive galaxies are among the most intriguing environments in the Universe. In this paper we ask when these dense cores were formed and determine how galaxies gradually assembled around them. We select galaxies that have a stellar mass >3x10^10 Msun inside r=1 kpc out to z=2.5, using the 3D-HST survey and data at low redshift. The number density of galaxies with dense cores appears to have decreased from z=2.5 to the present, probably at least in part due to stellar mass loss and the resulting adiabatic expansion. We infer that dense cores were mostly formed at z>2.5, consistent with their largely quiescent stellar populations. While the cores appear to form early, the galaxies in which they reside show strong evolution: their total masses increase by a factor of 2-3 from z=2.5 to z=0 and their effective radii increase by a factor of 5-6. As a result, the contribution of dense cores to the total mass of the galaxies in which they reside decreases from ~50% at z=2.5 to ~15% at z=0. Beca...

  4. North Atlantic Deep Water Formation: Information from Ice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeschger, H.

    1984-01-01

    The main results of measurements of the CO2 concentration of air occluded in natural ice during periods of climatic change are presented, as well as other measured ice core parameters. Elements of an interpretation of the data in terms of mechanisms of changing environmental systems are briefly discussed.

  5. Amphiphilic core-shell nanoparticles containing dense polyethyleneimine shells for efficient delivery of microRNA to Kupffer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuojin; Niu, Dechao; Zhang, Junyong; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yao, Yuan; Li, Pei; Gong, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery approach to transfer exogenous genes into macrophages is still a great challenge. Current gene delivery methods often result in low cellular uptake efficiency in vivo in some types of cells, especially for the Kupffer cells (KCs). In this article, we demonstrate that amphiphilic core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of well-defined hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) cores and branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) shells (denoted as PEI@PMMA NPs) are efficient nanocarriers to deliver microRNA (miRNA)-loaded plasmid to the KCs. Average hydrodynamic diameter of PEI@ PMMA NPs was 279 nm with a narrow size distribution. The NPs also possessed positive surface charges up to +30 mV in water, thus enabling effective condensation of negatively charged plasmid DNA. Gel electrophoresis assay showed that the resultant PEI@PMMA NPs were able to completely condense miRNA plasmid at a weight ratio of 25:1 (N/P ratio equal to 45:1). The Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry results showed that the PEI@PMMA/miRNA NPs displayed low cytotoxicity and cell apoptosis activity against the KCs. The maximum cell transfection efficiency reached 34.7% after 48 hours, which is much higher than that obtained by using the commercial Lipofectamine™ 2000 (1.7%). Bio-transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the PEI@PMMA NPs were mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of the KCs. Furthermore, when compared to the control groups, the protein expression of target nuclear factor κB P65 was considerably inhibited (P<0.05) both in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrate that the PEI@PMMA NPs with a unique amphiphilic core-shell nanostructure are promising nanocarriers for delivering miRNA plasmid to KCs.

  6. Nucleosynthesis and Clump Formation in a Core Collapse Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Kifonidis, K; Janka, H T; Müller, E

    1999-01-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional simulations were performed for the first five minutes of the evolution of a core collapse supernova explosion in a 15 solar mass blue supergiant progenitor. The computations start shortly after core bounce and include neutrino-matter interactions by using a light-bulb approximation for the neutrinos, and a treatment of the nucleosynthesis due to explosive silicon and oxygen burning. We find that newly formed iron-group elements are distributed throughout a significant fraction of the stellar helium core by the concerted action of convective and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Fast moving nickel mushrooms with velocities up to 4000 km/s are observed. This offers a natural explanation for the amount of mixing required in light curve and spectral synthesis studies of Type Ib explosions. A continuation of the calculations to later times, however, indicates, that the iron velocities observed in SN 1987 A cannot be reproduced because of a strong deceleration of the clumps during their...

  7. Element Partitioning Constraints on Formation and Composition of the Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Agee, C. B.; Fei, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Element partitioning study provides a number of constraints on the formation and composition of the core. First, partitioning of siderophile elements between the core and mantle should explain the "excess" siderophile elements in the mantle. Second, partitioning of light element(s) between the core and mantle should supply the core with the right amount of light element(s) to account for the density deficit in the core. Third, partitioning of light element(s) between the inner and outer core should be consistent with the observed difference in density deficits (relative to pure Fe) between these two reservoirs. In this study, high-pressure and high-temperature experiments have been conducted to investigate the pressure, temperature, and composition effects on partitioning of siderophile elements Ni and Co between core-forming Fe alloy and mantle silicate melt and minerals, partitioning of light elements S, O, and Si between core-forming Fe alloy and mantle silicate melt and minerals, and partitioning of light elements S and C between solid and liquid Fe. The implications of these results for mechanism of core formation and the composition of the core are discussed.

  8. Gas giants in hot water: inhibiting giant planet formation and planet habitability in dense star clusters through cosmic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Todd A.

    2013-05-01

    I show that the temperature of nuclear star clusters, starburst clusters in M82, compact high-z galaxies and some globular clusters of the Galaxy likely exceeded the ice-line temperature (TIce ≈ 150-170 K) during formation for a time comparable to the planet formation time-scale. The protoplanetary discs within these systems will thus, not have an ice line, decreasing the total material available for building protoplanetary embryos, inhibiting the formation of gas- and ice-giants if they form by core accretion, and prohibiting habitability. Planet formation by gravitational instability is similarly suppressed because Toomre's Q > 1 in all but the most massive discs. I show that cluster irradiation can in many cases dominate the thermodynamics and structure of passive and active protoplanetary discs for semi-major axes larger than ˜1-5 au. I discuss these results in the context of the observed lack of planets in 47 Tuc. I predict that a similar search for planets in the globular cluster NGC 6366 ([Fe/H] = -0.82) should yield detections, whereas (counterintuitively) the relatively metal-rich globular clusters NGC 6440, 6441 and 6388 should be devoid of giant planets. The characteristic stellar surface density above which TIce is exceeded in star clusters is ˜ 6 × 103 M⊙ pc- 2 f- 1/2dg, MW, where fdg, MW is the dust-to-gas ratio of the embedding material, normalized to the Milky Way value. Simple estimates suggest that ˜5-50 per cent of the stars in the universe formed in an environment exceeding this surface density. Future microlensing planet searches that directly distinguish between the bulge and disc planet populations of the Galaxy and M31 can test these predictions. Caveats and uncertainties are detailed.

  9. Heave Compensation Evaluation and Formation Strength Estimation from Drill String Acceleration Measurements While Coring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, G.; Goldberg, D.; Meltser, A.

    2001-05-01

    One of the recurring challenges in deep-sea drilling has been to maintain a precise control of coring depths, and to limit the influence of surface heave on drill bit motion. Operating in water depths between 1 and 6 km, the Ocean Drilling Program has relied on a drill string heave compensator to collect more than 200 km of cores, with maximum penetration of 2km. To evaluate the efficiency of the heave compensation, a device was developed to measure downhole acceleration from the top of the core barrel. This probe records three-axis acceleration and pressure at up to 100 samples per second. The first deployments of this instrument on ODP Legs 185 and 191 show that the heave compensator limits the bit motion to about 10% of the surface heave. This device could prove most useful to monitor heave compensation on shallow water drilling platforms where heave is a primary concern. The high-resolution downhole acceleration data can also be used to determine some of the mechanical properties of the formation. When deployed on piston cores, a maximum vertical acceleration of up to 3G is recorded as the coring shoe penetrates the formation. This maximum value is characteristic of the sediment strength and its degree of consolidation and can be used to identify formations that are typically difficult to recover, such as hard layers or hydrate-bearing sediments. With rotary coring, downhole acceleration signals decrease in magnitude and frequency content with the increasing hardness of the formation. High amplitude is observed in uncompacted sediments and low amplitudes in low-porosity oceanic basalt. Comparison between acceleration records and geophysical logs show that this relationship can be observed at a dm-scale within an individual core. Easy to deploy and adding almost no time to coring operations, the downhole accelerometer tool offers a way to characterize formations continuously while coring, which is particularly useful in the event of poor core recovery.

  10. Proposal of C-core Type Transverse Flux Motor for Ship Propulsion – Increasing Torque Density by Dense Stator Configuration –

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yamamoto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Electric ship propulsion system has been drawing attention as a solution for savings in energy and maintenance costs. The system is mainly composed of motor, converter and gearbox and required for high torque at low speed. In this situation, transverse flux motors (TFMs have been proposed to fulfill the low-speed high-torque characteristic due to suitable for short pole pitch and large number of poles to increase torque output. In this trend, we have proposed C-core type motors taking advantage of TFMs’ structure. In this manuscript, a simple design method based on the magnetic-circuit theory and simple modeling of the motor is proposed to search a design parameter for maximizing torque as a pre-process of numerical study. The method takes into consideration the effects of magnetic leakage flux, magnetic saturation and pole-core combination in accordance with the systematic theory. The simple modeling is conducted based on a dense armature structure in previous axial flux motors (AFMs applied to the new motor design. The validity of the method is verified by 3-D finite element analysis (FEA and relative error is at most 20%. The minimalist design is shown to be advantageous for effective use in 3-D FEA. As a detailed design by the FEA, high torque density and low cogging to output ratio can be achieved simultaneously in the proposed machine.

  11. Partitioning of Sulfur and Platinum at Core Formation Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suer, T. A.; Siebert, J.; Fiquet, G.; Remusat, L.

    2015-12-01

    Measuring the partitioning behavior of highly siderophile elements (HSE) at high pressures and temperatures is important for understanding the mantle's elemental reservoir and the core mantle differentiation process. Low solubility of HSEs in silicate melts and the small size of samples obtained from diamond anvil cell (DAC) experiments have prevented the experimental study of the partitioning of these elements at realistic deep magma ocean conditions. In this study, we present results for metal-silicate partitioning experiments of sulfur and platinum conducted at pressures between 45 and 80 GPa and at temperatures from 3500 to 4200 K. With the nanoSIMS as our main tool for measuring trace element concentrations, we have developed a protocol for studying the partitioning behavior of these elements from samples that underwent equilibration at high pressure and temperatures in a Laser-Heated DAC. The nanoSIMS has the spatial resolution and the required sensitivity to measure the low concentration of some HSEs in the quenched silicate glass. The results of this study will help to refine current core-mantle differentiation models. Furthermore they add constraints to the contribution of the late veneer to the mantle's elemental abundances.

  12. Dense water cascading, bottom currents and sediment wave formation at the exit of the Bari canyon (Southern Adriatic Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, Leonardo; Miserocchi, Stefano; Boldrin, Alfredo; Turchetto, Margherita; Foglini, Federica; Trincardi, Fabio

    2010-05-01

    The dense water forming in the North Adriatic (NAdDW) spreading southward along the Italian continental shelf, sinks in the Southern Adriatic basin through particular cascading events. Such events are seasonal, occurring specially in April, with variable intensity. These phenomena control the water mass mixing, the deep ocean ventilation, the behaviour of deep ecosystems, the formation of complex erosive and depositional bedforms and the abyssal export and burial of nutrients and carbon. Because of the NadDW formation is linked to climate factors (frequency, duration and size of Bura winds), the temporal variations of the NadDW dispersion into the Southern Adriatic allow to make inferences of the impact of recent climate changes on the ecosystems of the deep Mediterranean Sea. Previous research projects (EuroStrataform, HERMES) acquired a large data set of bathymetric, side-scan sonar (TOBI) and Chirp sonar profiles, which were used to build detailed morpho-bathymetric maps of the Southern Adriatic margin. There, the seabed is extremely complex, characterized by a large variety of bedforms (sediment waves, erosive scours, longitudinal furrows and giant comet marks). A branch of the cascading NAdDW is confined and accelerated through the Bari canyon where it produces a strong current capable of reaching down-slope velocities greater than 60 cm s-1 near the bottom at ~600 m of water depth, eroding the canyon thalweg and entraining large amounts of fine-grained sediment. At the exit of the canyon, in water depth greater than 800 m, the current becomes less confined, spreads laterally and generates an 80-km2-wide field of mud waves; these bedforms migrate up current and show amplitudes up to 50 m and wavelengths of about 1 km. Cruise IMPACT-09 of RV Urania was carried out in the Southern Adriatic Sea from 17-30 March 2009 with main scope of studying the impact of NadDW cascading events on the deep ecosystems of the Southern Adriatic. Experiments planned in the cruise

  13. FEM simulation of formation of metamorphic core complex with ANSYS software

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This study utilizes ANSYS to establish FEM's model of metamorphic core complex,and used thermal-structure analysis to simulate metamorphic core complex's temperature field and stress field.The metamorphic core complex formation mechanism is discussed.The simulation results show that the temperature field change appearing as the earth surface's temperature is the lowest,and the temperature of metamorphic core complex's nucleus is the highest.The temperature field is higher along with depth increase,and the stress field change appearing as the biggest stress occurs in the nucleus.The next stress field occurs at the top of the cover.

  14. Dynamics, CO depletion, and deuterium fractionation of the dense condensations within the fragmented prestellar core Orion B9-SMM 6

    CERN Document Server

    Miettinen, Oskari

    2013-01-01

    We present APEX observations of C17O(2-1), N2H+(3-2), and N2D+(3-2) towards the subfragments inside the prestellar core SMM 6 in Orion B9. We combined these spectral line data with our previous SABOCA 350-{\\mu}m dust continuum map of the source. The subfragments are characterised by subsonic internal non-thermal motions ({\\sigma}NT~0.5cs), and most of them appear to be gravitationally bound. The dispersion of the N2H+ velocity centroids among the condensations is very low (0.02 km/s). The CO depletion factors we derive, fD=0.8+/-0.4 - 3.6+/-1.5, do not suggest any significant CO freeze-out but this may be due to the canonical CO abundance we adopt. The fractional abundances of N2H+ and N2D+ with respect to H2 are found to be ~0.9-2.3x10^-9 and ~4.9-9.9x10^-10, respectively. The deuterium fractionation of N2H+, or the N2D+/N2H+ column density ratio, lies in the range 0.30+/-0.07 - 0.43+/-0.09. The detected substructure inside SMM 6 is likely the result of cylindrical Jeans-type gravitational fragmentation. We ...

  15. Partitioning of Phosphorus and Molybdenum between the Earth's Mantle and Core and the Conditions of Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuff, K. M.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Lee, C. T.

    2008-01-01

    There are several hypotheses on the specific processes that might have occurred during the formation of the Earth. One hypothesis that has been proposed is that early in the Earth's formation, there was a magma ocean present, and within this body, siderophile elements separated out of the silicate liquid to form the metal core. This study addresses this hypothesis. P and Mo are moderately siderophile elements that are present in both the mantle and the core. The concentrations of P and Mo in silicate vs. metal can be measured and in turn used to determine the temperatures, pressures, oxygen fugacity and melt composition required to achieve the same concentrations as observed in the mantle. The data here include eight experiments examining the partitioning of P and Mo between metallic liquid and silicate liquid. The purpose of the experiments has been to gain a greater understanding of core-mantle separation during the Earth formation process and examines temperature effect on P and Mo, which has not been systematically studied before.

  16. Dense and diffuse gas in dynamically active clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Garrod, R T; Rawlings, J M C

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the chemical and observational implications of repetitive transient dense core formation in molecular clouds. We allow a transient density fluctuation to form and disperse over a period of 1 Myr, tracing its chemical evolution. We then allow the same gas immediately to undergo further such formation and dispersion cycles. The chemistry of the dense gas in subsequent cycles is similar to that of the first, and a limit cycle is reached quickly (2 - 3 cycles). Enhancement of hydrocarbon abundances during a specific period of evolution is the strongest indicator of previous dynamical history. The molecular content of the diffuse background gas in the molecular cloud is expected to be strongly enhanced by the core formation and dispersion process. Such enhancement may remain for as long as 0.5 Myr. The frequency of repetitive core formation should strongly determine the level of background molecular enhancement. We also convolve the emission from a synthesised dark cloud, comprised of ensembles of t...

  17. Nanoscale switch for vortex polarization mediated by Bloch core formation in magnetic hybrid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlhüter, Phillip; Bryan, Matthew Thomas; Warnicke, Peter; Gliga, Sebastian; Stevenson, Stephanie Elizabeth; Heldt, Georg; Saharan, Lalita; Suszka, Anna Kinga; Moutafis, Christoforos; Chopdekar, Rajesh Vilas; Raabe, Jörg; Thomson, Thomas; Hrkac, Gino; Heyderman, Laura Jane

    2015-08-01

    Vortices are fundamental magnetic topological structures characterized by a curling magnetization around a highly stable nanometric core. The control of the polarization of this core and its gyration is key to the utilization of vortices in technological applications. So far polarization control has been achieved in single-material structures using magnetic fields, spin-polarized currents or spin waves. Here we demonstrate local control of the vortex core orientation in hybrid structures where the vortex in an in-plane Permalloy film coexists with out-of-plane maze domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. The vortex core reverses its polarization on crossing a maze domain boundary. This reversal is mediated by a pair of magnetic singularities, known as Bloch points, and leads to the transient formation of a three-dimensional magnetization structure: a Bloch core. The interaction between vortex and domain wall thus acts as a nanoscale switch for the vortex core polarization.

  18. Amphiphilic core shell nanoparticles containing dense polyethyleneimine shells for efficient delivery of microRNA to Kupffer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Z

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zuojin Liu,1,* Dechao Niu,2,3,* Junyong Zhang,1 Wenfeng Zhang,1 Yuan Yao,2 Pei Li,2 Jianping Gong1 1Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 2Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, 3Lab of Low-Dimensional Materials Chemistry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Efficient and targeted delivery approach to transfer exogenous genes into macrophages is still a great challenge. Current gene delivery methods often result in low cellular uptake efficiency in vivo in some types of cells, especially for the Kupffer cells (KCs. In this article, we demonstrate that amphiphilic core–shell nanoparticles (NPs consisting of well-defined hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA cores and branched polyethyleneimine (PEI shells (denoted as PEI@PMMA NPs are efficient nanocarriers to deliver microRNA (miRNA-loaded plasmid to the KCs. Average hydrodynamic diameter of PEI@PMMA NPs was 279 nm with a narrow size distribution. The NPs also possessed positive surface charges up to +30 mV in water, thus enabling effective condensation of negatively charged plasmid DNA. Gel electrophoresis assay showed that the resultant PEI@PMMA NPs were able to completely condense miRNA plasmid at a weight ratio of 25:1 (N/P ratio equal to 45:1. The Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry results showed that the PEI@PMMA/miRNA NPs displayed low cytotoxicity and cell apoptosis activity against the KCs. The maximum cell transfection efficiency reached 34.7% after 48 hours, which is much higher than that obtained by using the commercial Lipofectamine™ 2000 (1.7%. Bio-transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the PEI@PMMA NPs were mainly distributed in

  19. Consequences of the simultaneous formation of giant planets by the core accretion mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Guilera, O M; Benvenuto, O G

    2010-01-01

    The core accretion mechanism is presently the most widely accepted cause of the formation of giant planets. For simplicity, most models presently assume that the growth of planetary embryos occurs in isolation. We explore how the simultaneous growth of two embryos at the present locations of Jupiter and Saturn affects the outcome of planetary formation. We model planet formation on the basis of the core accretion scenario and include several key physical ingredients. We consider a protoplanetary gas disk that exponentially decays with time. For planetesimals, we allow for a distribution of sizes from 100~m to 100~km with most of the mass in the smaller objects. We include planetesimal migration as well as different profiles for the surface density $\\Sigma$ of the disk. The core growth is computed in the framework of the oligarchic growth regime and includes the viscous enhancement of the planetesimal capture cross-section. Planet migration is ignored. By comparing calculations assuming formation of embryos in...

  20. EVIDENCE BASED PROGRESSIVE CORE STABILIZATION EXERCISE FORMATION FOR LOW CORE ENDURANCE INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulandaivelan.S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is the commonest pain among individuals affecting more than half of the population. Segmental stabilization exercises gaining popularity among many treatment choices available to the therapist. Transverses abdominis (TA and Multifidi (MF are the two core muscles that were affected by LBP. This descriptive partial review study examines how various exercises recruits TA and MF? Then how do one to prognoses them progressively over short period of time? And what is the dose, volume needed? This review put an attempt to solve the above questions based on recent evidence based practice. Finally we have given exercise schedule for physiotherapists to follow.

  1. Formate and acetate records in the Muztagata ice core,Northwest Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Junxia; YAO Tandong; XU Baiqing; WU Guangjian; XIANG Shurong

    2004-01-01

    Formate and acetate concentrations are measured in a 22.56 m-depth ice core recovered in Mt. Muztagata Glacier, northwest Tibetan Plateau. The mean concentrations for formate and acetate in this ice core are 186.6±160.1 and 136.4±133.9 rng/g, respectively. Study shows that there is a positive correlation between formate and nitrate, suggesting both continental origins. However, no significant relationship has been found between formate and acetate, though they both have obvious periodical variations. Because Mt. Muztagata lies in the mid-latitude and is correlative to the nearby human activities, formate and acetate concentrations are higher than those in Greenland and Antarctica. During recent decades, the increase of formate concentration in the Muztagata ice core and formaldehyde production shows a close correlation. We preliminarily presume that the high formate concentration in the Muztagata ice core is concerned with the thriving of house decoration in which excess formaldehyde was used.

  2. Efficient star cluster formation in the core of a galaxy cluster: The dwarf irregular NGC 1427A in Fornax

    CERN Document Server

    Mora, Marcelo D; Puzia, Thomas H

    2014-01-01

    Gas-rich galaxies in dense environments such as galaxy clusters and massive groups are affected by a number of possible types of interactions with the cluster environment, which make their evolution radically different than that of field galaxies. The dIrr galaxy NGC 1427A, presently infalling towards the core of the Fornax galaxy cluster, offers a unique opportunity to study those processes in a level of detail not possible to achieve for galaxies at higher redshits. Using HST/ACS and auxiliary VLT/FORS ground-based observations, we study the properties of the most recent episodes of star formation in this gas-rich galaxy, the only one of its type near the core of the Fornax cluster. We study the structural and photometric properties of young star cluster complexes in NGC 1427A, identifying 12 bright such complexes with exceptionally blue colors. The comparison of our broadband near-UV/optical photometry with simple stellar population models yields ages below ~4x10^6 yr and stellar masses from a few thousand...

  3. Dense core secretory vesicles revealed as a dynamic Ca2+ store in neuroendocrine cells with a vesicle-associated membrane protein aequorin chimaera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kathryn J.; Pinton, Paolo; Varadi, Aniko; Tacchetti, Carlo; Ainscow, Edward K.; Pozzan, Tullio; Rizzuto, Rosario; Rutter, Guy A.

    2001-01-01

    The role of dense core secretory vesicles in the control of cytosolic-free Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]c) in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells is enigmatic. By constructing a vesicle-associated membrane protein 2–synaptobrevin.aequorin chimera, we show that in clonal pancreatic islet β-cells: (a) increases in [Ca2+]c cause a prompt increase in intravesicular-free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]SV), which is mediated by a P-type Ca2+-ATPase distinct from the sarco(endo) plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, but which may be related to the PMR1/ATP2C1 family of Ca2+ pumps; (b) steady state Ca2+ concentrations are 3–5-fold lower in secretory vesicles than in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi apparatus, suggesting the existence of tightly bound and more rapidly exchanging pools of Ca2+; (c) inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate has no impact on [Ca2+]SV in intact or permeabilized cells; and (d) ryanodine receptor (RyR) activation with caffeine or 4-chloro-3-ethylphenol in intact cells, or cyclic ADPribose in permeabilized cells, causes a dramatic fall in [Ca2+]SV. Thus, secretory vesicles represent a dynamic Ca2+ store in neuroendocrine cells, whose characteristics are in part distinct from the ER/Golgi apparatus. The presence of RyRs on secretory vesicles suggests that local Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release from vesicles docked at the plasma membrane could participate in triggering exocytosis. PMID:11571310

  4. Dense core secretory vesicles revealed as a dynamic Ca(2+) store in neuroendocrine cells with a vesicle-associated membrane protein aequorin chimaera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, K J; Pinton, P; Varadi, A; Tacchetti, C; Ainscow, E K; Pozzan, T; Rizzuto, R; Rutter, G A

    2001-10-01

    The role of dense core secretory vesicles in the control of cytosolic-free Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](c)) in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells is enigmatic. By constructing a vesicle-associated membrane protein 2-synaptobrevin.aequorin chimera, we show that in clonal pancreatic islet beta-cells: (a) increases in [Ca(2+)](c) cause a prompt increase in intravesicular-free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]SV), which is mediated by a P-type Ca(2+)-ATPase distinct from the sarco(endo) plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase, but which may be related to the PMR1/ATP2C1 family of Ca(2+) pumps; (b) steady state Ca(2+) concentrations are 3-5-fold lower in secretory vesicles than in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or Golgi apparatus, suggesting the existence of tightly bound and more rapidly exchanging pools of Ca(2+); (c) inositol (1,4,5) trisphosphate has no impact on [Ca(2+)](SV) in intact or permeabilized cells; and (d) ryanodine receptor (RyR) activation with caffeine or 4-chloro-3-ethylphenol in intact cells, or cyclic ADPribose in permeabilized cells, causes a dramatic fall in [Ca(2+)](SV). Thus, secretory vesicles represent a dynamic Ca(2+) store in neuroendocrine cells, whose characteristics are in part distinct from the ER/Golgi apparatus. The presence of RyRs on secretory vesicles suggests that local Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release from vesicles docked at the plasma membrane could participate in triggering exocytosis.

  5. From Cores to Envelopes to Disks: A Multi-scale View of Magnetized Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Charles L. H.

    2014-12-01

    Observations of polarization in star forming regions have been made across many wavelengths, many size scales, and many stages of stellar evolution. One of the overarching goals of these observations has been to determine the importance of magnetic fields -- which are the cause of the polarization -- in the star formation process. We begin by describing the commissioning and the calibration of the 1.3 mm dual-polarization receiver system we built for CARMA (the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy), a radio telescope in the eastern Sierra region of California. One of the primary science drivers behind the polarization system is to observe polarized thermal emission from dust grains in the dense clumps of dust and gas where the youngest, Class 0 protostars are forming. We go on to describe the CARMA TADPOL survey -- the largest high-resolution (~1000 AU scale) survey to date of dust polarization in low-mass protostellar cores -- and discuss our main findings: (1) Magnetic fields (B-fields) on scales of ~1000 AU are not tightly aligned with protostellar outflows. Rather, the data are consistent both with scenarios where outflows and magnetic fields are preferentially misaligned (perpendicular) and where they are randomly aligned. (2) Sources with high CARMA polarization fractions have consistent B-field orientations on large scales (~20'', measured using single-dish submillimeter telescopes) and small scales (~2.5'', measured by CARMA). We interpret this to mean that in at least some cases B-fields play a role in regulating the infall of material all the way down to the ~1000 AU scales of protostellar envelopes. Finally, (3) While on the whole outflows appear to be randomly aligned with B-fields, in sources with low polarization fractions there is a hint that outflows are preferentially perpendicular to small-scale B-fields, which suggests that in these sources the fields have been wrapped up by envelope rotation. This work shows that the ~1000 AU

  6. Mantle formation, coagulation and the origin of cloud/core-shine: II. Comparison with observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ysard, N; Jones, A P; Dartois, E; Godard, M; Gavilan, L

    2016-01-01

    Many dense interstellar clouds are observable in emission in the near-IR, commonly referred to as "Cloudshine", and in the mid-IR, the so-called "Coreshine". These C-shine observations have usually been explained with grain growth but no model has yet been able to self-consistently explain the dust spectral energy distribution from the near-IR to the submm. We want to demonstrate the ability of our new core/mantle evolutionary dust model THEMIS (The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model at the IaS), which has been shown to be valid in the far-IR and submm, to reproduce the C-shine observations. Our starting point is a physically motivated core/mantle dust model. It consists of 3 dust populations: small aromatic-rich carbon grains; bigger core/mantle grains with mantles of aromatic-rich carbon and cores either made of amorphous aliphatic-rich carbon or amorphous silicate. We assume an evolutionary path where these grains, when entering denser regions, may first form a second aliphatic-rich carbon mantle (coagulat...

  7. Limits Imposed on Heat Produced during Core Formation by Radiative Transfer Processes and Thermodynamic Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criss, R. E.; Hofmeister, A.

    2010-12-01

    The popular view that Earth is sufficiently hot to still be shedding primordal heat, largely originating in the core, is inconsistent with thermodynamic constraints and recent heat transport studies. Previous work presumes that the large difference in gravitational potential energy (Ug) between a fictious, homogeneous reference state and Earth’s current layered configuration of metallic core and rocky mantle was converted to frictional heat during core formation, greatly increasing temperature (T) inside the Earth. However, heating (ΔT >0) was deduced by assuming that Ug is positive, which is inconsistent with Newton’s law of gravitation. Use of an erroneous sign for ΔUg has prevented recognition that the process is an exothermic transformation. Thermodynamic principles were not considered in previous analyses: neglecting the effect of the change in configuration on entropy and energy contributes greatly to the view that heat is retained. Instead, stringent limits are set on the permissible temperature increase by the rapid rate of ballistic radiative transfer, a process associated with transient events, as well as by the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics. In the static, instantaneous model of core formation, configurational entropy (S) of the Earth decreases upon forming the ordered layered state; this entropy decrease is offset by a greater increase in S of the surrounding universe, which can only be accomplished by release of heat to space (the surroundings). Instantaneous dissipation of heat in the static model reasonably approximates radiative processes being superfast. Core formation involves negligible changes in volume and rotational energy, so Helmholtz free energy (=Ug-TS) is conserved, as in atmospheric processes and other graviational-thermodynamic problems. Because S of the universe is immense and heat must flow from hotter to colder bodies, negligible heat from core formation is retained, consistent with the exothermic nature of this transition

  8. Metal-silicate partitioning during core formation on super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, L. K.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Petaev, M. I.; Sasselov, D. D.; Remo, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Separation of the Earth into a rocky mantle and metallic Fe core is a problem long studied in the planetary science community (e.g. [1]). The timing of core formation influences the abundances of the siderophile elements found in the Earth's mantle, and the mechanism of core formation influences the degree of chemical equilibration between the rocky mantle and the core at the time of metal separation. However, limited work has been done on formation of metallic cores and its effects on mantle chemistry in rocky planets larger than the Earth. Super-Earths, exoplanets with masses up to ~ 5 Earth masses and radii up to ~1.6-1.7 Earth radii, have significantly larger internal pressures and consequently higher internal temperatures than the Earth, therefore conclusions from Earth-centric studies of core formation may be erroneous. Partitioning coefficients for many of the relevant elements (e.g. Fe, Ni, Si, O, etc.) are available in the literature, but only to relatively low pressures. The relevant pressures for super-Earths are significantly larger. However, data on Fe-O-Ni-Si partitioning at pressures (200-500 GPa) and temperatures relevant to super-Earths have been measured by laser-induced shocks with the ZBL laser at Sandia National Laboratory with a method described in [2]. We will present a model which integrates this data with lower pressure partition coefficients from the literature (e.g. [3],[4],[5]), with special emphasis on Fe and O, to describe partitioning behavior at high pressures and discuss its implications for core size and composition on rocky super-Earths. [1] Ringwood, A.E. (1977) Geochem. J. 11, 111-135. [2] Remo, J.L., Petaev, M.I., Jacobsen, S. B. (2008) LPSC abstract, 1420. [3] Frost, D.J. et al. (2010) JGR, B02202. [4] Kombayashi, T. (2014) JGR, 4164-4177. [5] Rubie, D.C. et al. (2011) EPSL, 301, 31-42. [5

  9. Triggering Collapse of the Presolar Dense Cloud Core and Injecting Short-lived Radioisotopes with a Shock Wave. V. Nonisothermal Collapse Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2017-08-01

    Recent meteoritical analyses support an initial abundance of the short-lived radioisotope (SLRI) 60Fe that may be high enough to require nucleosynthesis in a core-collapse supernova, followed by rapid incorporation into primitive meteoritical components, rather than a scenario where such isotopes were inherited from a well-mixed region of a giant molecular cloud polluted by a variety of supernovae remnants and massive star winds. This paper continues to explore the former scenario, by calculating three-dimensional, adaptive mesh refinement, hydrodynamical code (FLASH 2.5) models of the self-gravitational, dynamical collapse of a molecular cloud core that has been struck by a thin shock front with a speed of 40 km s-1, leading to the injection of shock front matter into the collapsing cloud through the formation of Rayleigh-Taylor fingers at the shock-cloud intersection. These models extend the previous work into the nonisothermal collapse regime using a polytropic approximation to represent compressional heating in the optically thick protostar. The models show that the injection efficiencies of shock front materials are enhanced compared to previous models, which were not carried into the nonisothermal regime, and so did not reach such high densities. The new models, combined with the recent estimates of initial 60Fe abundances, imply that the supernova triggering and injection scenario remains a plausible explanation for the origin of the SLRIs involved in the formation of our solar system.

  10. Apatite formation on alkaline-treated dense TiO2 coatings deposited using the solution precursor plasma spray process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dianying; Jordan, Eric H; Gell, Maurice; Wei, Mei

    2008-05-01

    A dense titania (TiO2) coating was deposited from an ethanol-based solution containing titanium isopropoxide using the solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS) process. XRD and Raman spectrum analyses confirmed that the coating is exclusively composed of rutile TiO2. SEM micrographs show the as-sprayed coating is dense with a uniform thickness and there are no coarse splat boundaries. The as-sprayed coating was chemically treated in 5M NaOH solution at 80 degrees C for 48 h. The bioactivity of as-sprayed and alkaline-treated coatings was investigated by immersing the coatings in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14-28 days, respectively. After 28 days immersion, there is a complete layer of carbonate-containing apatite formed on the alkaline-treated TiO2 coating surface, but none formed on the as-sprayed coating.

  11. Effect of reaction time on formation of silica core/shell particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan P. Nikolić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The silica core/shell nanostructures were prepared by a wet-chemical process. Silica core particles were prepared by hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate. The obtained particles (average size ∼0.4 µm were used as templates for assembling of silica nanoparticles generated from highly basic sodium silicate solution. The silica core particles were functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES to allow electrostatic assembling of silica nanoparticles on the surface of silica core particles. In order to find the optimal conditions for synthesis of silica core/shell particles with mesoporous shells, the effect of reaction time on formation of silica nanoparticles was investigated. The effect of process parameters on generation and aggregation of silica nanoparticles prepared from highly basic sodium silicate solution was also investigated. It was shown that the size of silica nanoparticles and tendency towards aggregation increase with increasing the reaction time and temperature. These behaviours were reflected on the formation of mesoporous silica shell around silica core particles. Thin and uniform mesoporous silica layers were obtained if reaction times were kept short. When the reaction time was prolonged, the thicker and non-uniform shells were obtained.

  12. The Dense Filamentary Giant Molecular Cloud G23.0-0.4: Birthplace of Ongoing Massive Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Yang; Shao, Xiangjun; Yang, Ji

    2015-01-01

    We present observations of 1.5 square degree maps of the 12CO, 13CO, and C18O (J=1-0) emission toward the complex region of the supernova remnant (SNR) W41 and SNR G22.7-0.2. A massive (~5E5Msun), large (~84x15 pc), and dense (~10E3 cm^-3) giant molecular cloud (GMC), G23.0-0.4 with VLSR~77 km/s, is found to be adjacent to the two SNRs. The GMC displays a filamentary structure approximately along the Galactic plane. The filamentary structure of the dense molecular gas, traced by C18O (J=1-0) emission, is also coincident well with the distribution of the dust-continuum emission in the direction. Two dense massive MC clumps, two 6.7 GHz methanol masers, and one HII/SNR complex, associated with the 77 km/s GMC G23.0-0.4, are aligned along the filamentary structure, indicating the star forming activity within the GMC. These sources have periodic projected spacing of 0.18-0.26degree along the giant filament, which is consistent well with the theoretical predictions of 0.22degree. It indicates that the turbulence s...

  13. A Formative Program Evaluation of Electronic Clinical Tracking System Documentation to Meet National Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lynette S; Branstetter, M Laurie

    2016-09-01

    Electronic clinical tracking systems are used in many educational institutions of higher learning to document advanced practice registered nursing students' clinical experiences. Students' clinical experiences are constructed according to the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties core competencies. These competencies form a basis for evaluation of advanced practice registered nursing programs. However, no previous studies have evaluated the use of electronic clinical tracking systems to validate students' clinical experiences in meeting national core competencies. Medatrax, an electronic clinical tracking system, is evaluated using a formative program evaluation approach to determine if students' clinical documentations meet Family/Across the Lifespan Nurse Practitioner Competencies in a midsouthern family nurse practitioner program. This formative program evaluation supports the use of an electronic clinical tracking system in facilitating accreditation and program outcome goals. The significance of this study is that it provides novel evidence to support the use of an electronic clinical tracking system to assist a midsouthern school of nursing in meeting national core competencies.

  14. Expression of Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 (vGluT2 on Large Dense-Core Vesicles within GnRH Neuroterminals of Aging Female Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiling Yin

    Full Text Available The pulsatile release of GnRH is crucial for normal reproductive physiology across the life cycle, a process that is regulated by hypothalamic neurotransmitters. GnRH terminals co-express the vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2 as a marker of a glutamatergic phenotype. The current study sought to elucidate the relationship between glutamate and GnRH nerve terminals in the median eminence--the site of GnRH release into the portal capillary vasculature. We also determined whether this co-expression may change during reproductive senescence, and if steroid hormones, which affect responsiveness of GnRH neurons to glutamate, may alter the co-expression pattern. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were ovariectomized at young adult, middle-aged and old ages (~4, 11, and 22 months, respectively and treated four weeks later with sequential vehicle + vehicle (VEH + VEH, estradiol + vehicle (E2 + VEH, or estradiol + progesterone (E2+P4. Rats were perfused 24 hours after the second hormone treatment. Confocal microscopy was used to determine colocalization of GnRH and vGluT2 immunofluorescence in the median eminence. Post-embedding immunogold labeling of GnRH and vGluT2, and a serial electron microscopy (EM technique were used to determine the cellular interaction between GnRH terminals and glutamate signaling. Confocal analysis showed that GnRH and vGluT2 immunofluorescent puncta were extensively colocalized in the median eminence and that their density declined with age but was unaffected by short-term hormone treatment. EM results showed that vGluT2 immunoreactivity was extensively associated with large dense-core vesicles, suggesting a unique glutamatergic signaling pathway in GnRH terminals. Our results provide novel subcellular information about the intimate relationship between GnRH terminals and glutamate in the median eminence.

  15. Dense Breasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also appear white on mammography, they can be hidden by or within dense breast tissue. Other imaging ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  16. Galactic Cold Cores VII: Filament Formation and Evolution - Methods & Observational Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera-Ingraham, A; Juvela, M; Montillaud, J; Men'shchikov, A; Malinen, J; Pelkonen, V -M; Marston, A; Martin, P G; Pagani, L; Paladini, R; Paradis, D; Ysard, N; Ward-Thompson, D; Bernard, J -P; Marshall, D J; Montier, L; Tóth, V

    2016-01-01

    The association of filaments with protostellar objects has made these structures a priority target in star formation studies. The datasets of the Herschel Galactic Cold Cores Key Programme allow for a statistical study of filaments with a wide range of intrinsic and environmental characteristics. Characterisation of this sample can be used to identify key physical parameters and quantify the role of environment in the formation of supercritical filaments. Filaments were extracted from fields at DMcrit/2 may become supercritical and form stars. This translates into a need for filaments to become at least moderately self-gravitating in order to undergo localised star formation or become star-forming filaments.

  17. Discrete stages of core formation survive the Moon-forming impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, C.; Bennett, N.; Du, Z.; Fei, Y.

    2016-12-01

    There is mounting evidence that Earth contains isotopic variations produced by short-lived systems, namely Hf-W and I-Xe. The lifetimes of these systems are 50 Ma and 80 Ma, respectively, requiring that chemical heterogeneities that were formed extremely early in solar system history and have survived within Earth's mantle to the modern day. The isotopic heterogeneity observed within Earth's mantle contrasts the isotopic similarity of bulk silicate Earth and bulk silicate Moon. This suggests the process(es) responsible for the isotopic variations within Earth predate the Moon-forming impact. Here, we focus on the potential role of core-formation in generating coupled isotopic variations associated with the Hf-W and I-Xe systems. We present metal-silicate partitioning data for W and I from experiments employing laser-heated diamond anvil cells. Experiments were conducted up to the pressure and temperature conditions directly relevant to core formation at GSECARS, APS. Samples were prepared using focused ion beam milling and analyzed by field emission electron microbeam techniques (EDS & WDS). These analyses demonstrate that W and I preferentially partition into the core under a wide range of conditions. In combination with literature data, this suggests that core formation left the residual mantle with an increased Hf/W ratio and a decreased I/Xe ratio. These parent-daughter fractionations lead to radiogenic W and unradiogenic Xe isotopic signatures compared to mantle that experienced the extraction of core material at a later date, on average. Relatively radiogenic W and unradiogenic Xe isotopic signatures are associated with plume rocks, potentially linking the plume source to mantle reservoirs that experienced early core extraction relative to the bulk mantle. Compositional variables, pressure, and temperature also affect the magnitude of Hf/W and I/Xe fractionation associated with core formation. The interplay of these variables will be evaluated alongside the

  18. Multilayer formation and evaporation of deuterated ices in prestellar and protostellar cores

    CERN Document Server

    Taquet, Vianney; Sipilä, Olli

    2014-01-01

    Extremely large deuteration of several molecules has been observed towards prestellar cores and low-mass protostars for a decade. New observations performed towards low-mass protostars suggest that water presents a lower deuteration in the warm inner gas than in the cold external envelope. We coupled a gas-grain astrochemical model with a one-dimension model of collapsing core to properly follow the formation and the deuteration of interstellar ices as well as their subsequent evaporation in the low-mass protostellar envelopes with the aim of interpreting the spatial and temporal evolutions of their deuteration. The astrochemical model follows the formation and the evaporation of ices with a multilayer approach and also includes a state-of-the-art deuterated chemical network by taking the spin states of H$_2$ and light ions into account. Because of their slow formation, interstellar ices are chemically heterogeneous and show an increase of their deuterium fractionation towards the surface. The differentiation...

  19. Formation of a solid inner core during the accretion of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkani-Hamed, Jafar

    2017-05-01

    The formation of an inner core during the accretion of Earth is investigated by using self-gravitating and compressible Earth models formed by accreting a total of 25 or 50 Moon to Mars-sized planetary embryos. The impact of an embryo heats the proto-Earth's interior differentially, more below the impact site than elsewhere. The rotating core dynamically overturns and stratifies shortly after each impact, creating a spherically symmetric and radially increasing temperature distribution relative to an adiabatic profile. Merging of an embryo to the proto-Earth increases the lithostatic pressure that results in compressional temperature increase while further enhances the melting temperature of the core causing solidification. A total of 36 thermal evolution models of the growing proto-Earth's core are calculated to investigate effects of major physical parameters. No solidification is considered in the first 21 models where modified two-body escape velocities are used as the impact velocities of the embryos. At the end of accretion, temperatures in the upper part of the core are significantly different among these models, whereas temperatures in the deeper parts are similar. The core solidification considered in the remaining 15 models, where impact velocities higher than the modified two-body escape velocities are adopted, drastically changes the temperature distribution in the deeper parts of the core. All of the models produce partially solidified stiff inner cores, 1000-2100 km in radius, at the end of accretion, where the solid fraction is larger than 50%. The innermost of the stiff inner cores is completely solidified to radii 250-1500 km.

  20. Ultrastructure of the human aortic fibrolipid lesion. Formation of the atherosclerotic lipid-rich core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocan, T. M.; Schifani, T. A.; Guyton, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of the atherosclerotic lipid-rich core has been elucidated by electron microscopy of the core region in small, raised fibrolipid lesions. The relationship among lipid deposits, extracellular matrix, and cells found in distinct regions of the fibrolipid lesion was examined. Extracellular lipid droplets, verified by osmium-thiocarbohydrazide-osmium staining, made up approximately 40% of the lipid-rich core volume. The lipid droplets were often found distinctly associated with elastin and/or collagen; these associations were dependent upon the location examined within or near the lipid-rich core. Within areas of intense extracellular lipid deposits, crystalline clefts suggesting cholesterol monohydrate were observed. Stereologic analysis of the lipid-rich core components revealed marked reductions in the volume fractions of cells, reticular ground substance, and basement membrane; while the extent of extracellular lipid increased 7-10-fold. Eleven percent or less of lipid in the core region was found within cells, usually smooth muscle cells. Above the core region in the lesion cap, monocyte-macrophage foam cells were prominent. Cellular lipid droplets were much larger (profile diameters sixfold higher) than extracellular droplets. With these data as well as transitional morphologic features at the boundaries of the core region, it is suggested that the abundant extracellular lipid does not derive from cell necrosis, and lipid deposition in association with extracellular matrix constituents is an early event in the development of the lipid-rich core. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3717297

  1. The Impact of Feedback During Massive Star Formation by Core Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Kei E I; Zhang, Yichen

    2016-01-01

    We study the impact of feedback during the formation of massive stars that are accreting from massive gas cores using analytic method. MHD-driven disk winds are known to be the primary feedback mechanism for low-mass star formation. Radiative feedback processes are also expected to become significant for more massive protostars. We model feedback from disk winds, radiation pressure, photoevaporation and stellar winds, while following protostellar evolution in a series of models of collapsing massive cores. We find disk winds are the dominant feedback mechanism for massive star formation from cores in clump environments with surface densities Sigma>0.3g/cm2. >90% of total momentum is input by the disk wind, however radiation pressure also assists in widening the outflow cavity. Photoevaporation is of relatively minor importance due to dust attenuation of ionizing photons. Mass-loss and momentum feedback from stellar winds have very minor effects during the accretion stage. We find the SFE from the cores to be ...

  2. Evaluation of the Heat, Entropy, and Rotational Changes Produced by Gravitational Segregation during Core Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne M. Hofmeister; Robert E. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Core formation by gravitational segregation allegedly released sufficient interior heat to melt the Earth. Analysis of the energetics, which compare gravitational potential energy (Ug) of a fictitious, homogeneous reference state to Earth’s current layered configuration, needs updating to correct errors and omissions, and to accommodate recent findings: (1) An erroneous positive sign was used for Ug while maintaining the reference value of 0 at infinity, which results in an incorrect sign for ΔUg, which is crucial in determining whether a process is endothermic or exothermic. (2) The value of Ug for Earth’s initial state is uncertain. (3) Recent meteorite evidence indicates that core formation began before the Earth was full-sized, which severely limitsDUg. (4) Inhomogeneous accretion additionally reducedDUg. (5) The potentially large effect of differential rotation between the core and the mantle was not accounted for. (6) Entropy changes associated with creating order were neglected. Accordingly, we revise values of Ug, evaluate uncertainties, and show thatDUg was converted substantially to configurational energy (TDS). These considerations limit the large sources of primordial heat to impacts and radioactivity. Although these processes may play a role in core formation, their energies are independent of gravitational segregation, which produces order and rotational energy, not internal heat. Instead, gravitational segregation promotes planetary cooling mainly because it segregates lithophilic radioactive elements upward, increasing surface heat flux while shortening the distance over which radiogenic heat diffuses outwards.

  3. Core-assisted gas capture instability: a new mode of giant planet formation by gravitationally unstable discs

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, Sergei; Boley, Aaron C

    2014-01-01

    Giant planet formation in the core accretion (CA) paradigm is predicated by the formation of a core, assembled by the coagulation of grains and later by planetesimals within a protoplanetary disc. In contrast, in the disc instability paradigm, giant planet formation is believed to be independent of core formation: massive self-gravitating gas fragments cool radiatively and collapse as a whole. We show that giant planet formation in the disc instability model may be also enhanced by core formation for reasons physically very similar to the CA paradigm. In the model explored here, efficient grain sedimentation within an initial fragment (rather than the disc) leads to the formation of a core composed of heavy elements. We find that massive atmospheres form around cores and undergo collapse as a critical core mass is exceeded, analogous to CA theory. The critical mass of the core to initiate such a collapse depends on the fragment mass and metallicity, as well as core luminosity, but ranges from less than 1 to a...

  4. Heterogeneous Earth Accretion and Incomplete Metal-Silicate Reequilibration at High Pressure During Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubie, D. C.; Mann, U.; Frost, D. J.; Kegler, P.; Holzheid, A.; Palme, H.

    2007-12-01

    We present a new model of core formation, based on the partitioning of siderophile elements, that involves accreting the Earth through a series of collisions with smaller bodies that had already differentiated at low pressure. Each impact results in a magma ocean in which the core of the impactor reequilibrates with silicate liquid at high pressure before merging with the Earth's protocore. The oxygen contents of the chondritic compositions of the proto-Earth and impactors can be varied. The compositions of coexisting metal and silicate are determined through mass balance combined with partitioning equations for Ni, FeO, Si and other siderophile elements. The oxygen fugacity is fixed by the partitioning of FeO and is a function of P, T and bulk oxygen content. An important constraint for core formation is that core-mantle partition coefficients for Ni and Co must both converge to values of 23-28. Based on a recent study of the partitioning of Ni and Co over a wide P-T range (Kegler et al., EPSL, submitted) together with other published data, this constraint is not satisfied by a single- stage core formation model at any conditions because the partition coefficients converge at values that are much too low. In the present multi-stage model, the correct values can be reached if only part of each impactor core reequilibrates with silicate liquid in the magma ocean (as proposed by previous models based on Hf-W isotope studies). Physically, this would mean that impactor cores fail to emulsify completely as they sink through the magma ocean. Incorporating other elements (e.g. V and Cr) in the model requires, in addition, that the bulk composition of the impactors changes during accretion from reduced (FeO-poor) to oxidised FeO-rich). Then, with the resulting increase in fO2, incomplete reequilibration of the cores during the final 20-30% of Earth accretion is required to satisfy the Ni-Co constraint. In addition, this model enables the concentrations of O and Si in the

  5. Induced Core Formation Time in Subcritical Magnetic Clouds by Large-Scale Trans-Alfv\\'enic Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kudoh, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    We clarify the mechanism of accelerated core formation by large-scale nonlinear flows in subcritical magnetic clouds by finding a semi-analytical formula for the core formation time and describing the physical processes that lead to them. Recent numerical simulations show that nonlinear flows induce rapid ambipolar diffusion that leads to localized supercritical regions that can collapse. Here, we employ non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations including ambipolar diffusion for gravitationally stratified sheets threaded by vertical magnetic fields. One of the horizontal dimensions is eliminated, resulting in a simpler two-dimensional simulation that can clarify the basic process of accelerated core formation. A parameter study of simulations shows that the core formation time is inversely proportional to the square of the flow speed when the flow speed is greater than the Alfv\\'en speed. We find a semi-analytical formula that explains this numerical result. The formula also predicts that the core formation t...

  6. Herschel observations of extra-ordinary sources: H{sub 2}S as a probe of dense gas and possibly hidden luminosity toward the Orion KL hot core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crockett, N. R.; Bergin, E. A.; Neill, J. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Black, J. H. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala (Sweden); Blake, G. A.; Kleshcheva, M. [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, MS 150-21, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the light hydride H{sub 2}S obtained from the full spectral scan of the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL) taken as part of the Herschel Observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources GT (guaranteed time) key program. In total, we observe 52, 24, and 8 unblended or slightly blended features from H{sub 2} {sup 32}S, H{sub 2} {sup 34}S, and H{sub 2} {sup 33}S, respectively. We only analyze emission from the so-called hot core, but emission from the plateau, extended ridge, and/or compact ridge are also detected. Rotation diagrams for ortho and para H{sub 2}S follow straight lines given the uncertainties and yield T {sub rot} = 141 ± 12 K. This indicates H{sub 2}S is in local thermodynamic equilibrium and is well characterized by a single kinetic temperature or an intense far-IR radiation field is redistributing the population to produce the observed trend. We argue the latter scenario is more probable and find that the most highly excited states (E {sub up} ≳ 1000 K) are likely populated primarily by radiation pumping. We derive a column density, N {sub tot}(H{sub 2} {sup 32}S) = 9.5 ± 1.9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup –2}, gas kinetic temperature, T {sub kin} = 120±{sub 10}{sup 13} K, and constrain the H{sub 2} volume density, n{sub H{sub 2}} ≳ 9 × 10 {sup 7} cm{sup –3}, for the H{sub 2}S emitting gas. These results point to an H{sub 2}S origin in markedly dense, heavily embedded gas, possibly in close proximity to a hidden self-luminous source (or sources), which are conceivably responsible for Orion KL's high luminosity. We also derive an H{sub 2}S ortho/para ratio of 1.7 ± 0.8 and set an upper limit for HDS/H{sub 2}S of <4.9 × 10 {sup –3}.

  7. Evolution of Prolate Molecular Clouds at HII Boundaries: I. Formation of fragment-core structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kinnear, Timothy M; White, Glenn J; Goodwin, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of a prolate cloud at an Hii boundary is investigated using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The prolate molecular clouds in our investigation are set with their semi-major axis perpendicular to the radiative direction of a plane parallel ionising Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) flux. Simulations on three high mass prolate clouds reveal that EUV radiation can trigger distinctive high density core formation embedded in a final linear structure. This contrasts with results of the previous work in which only an isotropic Far Ultraviolet (FUV) interstellar background flux was applied. A systematic investigation on a group of prolate clouds of equal mass but different initial densities and geometric shapes finds that the distribution of the cores over the final linear structure changes with the initial conditions of the prolate cloud and the strength of the EUV radiation flux. These highly condensed cores may either scatter over the full length of the final linear structure or form two groups of high...

  8. The lead isotopic age of the Earth can be explained by core formation alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bernard J; Halliday, Alex N

    2010-06-10

    The meaning of the age of the Earth defined by lead isotopes has long been unclear. Recently it has been proposed that the age of the Earth deduced from lead isotopes reflects volatile loss to space at the time of the Moon-forming giant impact rather than partitioning into metallic liquids during protracted core formation. Here we show that lead partitioning into liquid iron depends strongly on carbon content and that, given a content of approximately 0.2% carbon, experimental and isotopic data both provide evidence of strong partitioning of lead into the core throughout the Earth's accretion. Earlier conclusions that lead is weakly partitioned into iron arose from the use of carbon-saturated (about 5% C) iron alloys. The lead isotopic age of the Earth is therefore consistent with partitioning into the core and with no significant late losses of moderately volatile elements to space during the giant impact.

  9. Origin of interfacial nanoscopic gaseous domains and formation of dense gas layer at hydrophobic solid-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong; Birkett, Greg R; Nguyen, Anh V

    2013-12-10

    Interfacial gas enrichment (IGE) covering the entire area of hydrophobic solid-water interface has recently been detected by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and hypothesized to be responsible for the unexpected stability and anomalous contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles and the significant change from DLVO to non-DLVO forces. In this paper, we provide further proof of the existence of IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) by molecular dynamic simulation. Nitrogen gas adsorption at the water-graphite interface is investigated using molecular dynamic simulation at 300 K and 1 atm normal pressure. The results show that a DGL with a density equivalent to a gas at pressure of 500 atm is formed and equilibrated with a normal pressure of 1 atm. By varying the number of gas molecules in the system, we observe several types of dense gas domains: aggregates, cylindrical caps, and DGLs. Spherical cap gas domains form during the simulation but are unstable and always revert to another type of gas domain. Furthermore, the calculated surface potential of the DGL-water interface, -17.5 mV, is significantly closer to 0 than the surface potential, -65 mV, of normal gas bubble-water interface. This result supports our previously stated hypothesis that the change in surface potential causes the switch from repulsion to attraction for an AFM tip when the graphite surface is covered by an IGE layer. The change in surface potential comes from the structure change of water molecules at the DGL-water interface as compared with the normal gas-water interface. In addition, the contact angle of the cylindrical cap high density nitrogen gas domains is 141°. This contact angle is far greater than 85° observed for water on graphite at ambient conditions and much closer to the 150° contact angle observed for nanobubbles in experiments.

  10. Accelerated gravity testing of aquitard core permeability and implications at formation and regional scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Timms

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating the possibility of leakage through low permeability geological strata is critically important for sustainable water supplies, the extraction of fuels from strata such as coal beds, and the confinement of waste within the earth. The current work demonstrates that relatively rapid and reliable hydraulic conductivity (K measurement of aquitard cores using accelerated gravity can inform and constrain larger scale assessments of hydraulic connectivity. Steady state fluid velocity through a low K porous sample is linearly related to accelerated gravity (g-level in a centrifuge permeameter (CP unless consolidation or geochemical reactions occur. The CP module was custom designed to fit a standard 2 m diameter geotechnical centrifuge (550 g maximum with a capacity for sample dimensions of 30 to 100 mm diameter and 30 to 200 mm in length, and a maximum total stress of ~2 MPa at the base of the core. Formation fluids were used as influent to limit any shrink–swell phenomena which may alter the permeability. Vertical hydraulic conductivity (Kv results from CP testing of cores from three sites within the same regional clayey silt formation varied (10−7 to 10−9 m s−1, n = 14. Results at one of these sites (1.1 × 10−10 to 3.5 × 10−9 m s−1, n = 5 that were obtained in Kv values (3 × 10−9 m s−1 from pore pressure responses over several weeks within a 30 m clayey sequence. Core scale and in situ Kv results were compared with vertical connectivity within a regional flow model, and considered in the context of heterogeneity and preferential flow paths at site and formation scale. More reliable assessments of leakage and solute transport though aquitards over multi-decadal timescales can be achieved by accelerated core testing together with advanced geostatistical and numerical methods.

  11. Formation of hybrid films from perylenediimide-labeled core-shell silica-polymer nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Tânia; Fedorov, Aleksander; Baleizão, Carlos; Farinha, José Paulo S

    2013-07-01

    We prepared water-dispersible core-shell nanoparticles with a perylenediimide-labeled silica core and a poly(butyl methacrylate) shell, for application in photoactive high performance coatings. Films cast from water dispersions of the core-shell nanoparticles are flexible and transparent, featuring homogeneously dispersed silica nanoparticles, and exhibiting fluorescence under appropriate excitation. We characterized the film formation process using nanoparticles where the polymer shell has been labeled with either a non-fluorescent N-benzophenone derivative (NBen) or a fluorescent phenanthrene derivative (PheBMA). We used Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PheBMA to NBen to follow the interparticle interdiffusion of the polymer anchored to the silica surface that occurs after the dried dispersions are annealing above the glass transition temperature of the polymer. By calculating the evolution of the FRET quantum efficiency with annealing time, we could estimate the approximate fraction of mixing (fm) between polymer from neighbor particles, and from this, the apparent diffusion coefficients (Dapp) for this process. For long annealing times, the limiting values of fm are slightly lower than for films of pure PBMA particles at similar temperatures (go up to 80% of total possible mixing). The corresponding diffusion coefficients are also very similar to those reported for films of pure PBMA, indicating that the fact that the polymer chains are anchored to the silica particles does not significantly hinder the diffusion process during the initial part of the mixing process. From the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficients, we found an effective activation energy for diffusion of Ea=38 kcal/mol, very similar to the value obtained for particles of the same polymer without the silica core. With these results, we show that, although the polymer is grafted to the silica surface, polymer interdiffusion during film formation is not significantly

  12. Partitioning of oxygen during core formation on the Earth and Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubie, David C; Gessmann, Christine K; Frost, Daniel J

    2004-05-01

    Core formation on the Earth and Mars involved the physical separation of metal and silicate, most probably in deep magma oceans. Although core-formation models explain many aspects of mantle geochemistry, they have not accounted for the large differences observed between the compositions of the mantles of the Earth (approximately 8 wt% FeO) and Mars (approximately 18 wt% FeO) or the smaller mass fraction of the martian core. Here we explain these differences as a consequence of the solubility of oxygen in liquid iron-alloy increasing with increasing temperature. We assume that the Earth and Mars both accreted from oxidized chondritic material. In a terrestrial magma ocean, 1,200-2,000 km deep, high temperatures resulted in the extraction of FeO from the silicate magma ocean owing to high solubility of oxygen in the metal. Lower temperatures of a martian magma ocean resulted in little or no extraction of FeO from the mantle, which thus remains FeO-rich. The FeO extracted from the Earth's magma ocean may have contributed to chemical heterogeneities in the lowermost mantle, a FeO-rich D" layer and the light element budget of the core.

  13. Giant planet formation in the framework of the core instability model

    CERN Document Server

    Fortier, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    In this Thesis I studied the formation of the four giant planets of the Solar System in the framework of the nucleated instability hypothesis. The model considers that solids and gas accretion are coupled in an interactive fashion, taking into account detailed constitutive physics for the envelope. The accretion rate of the core corresponds to the oligarchic growth regime. I also considered that accreted planetesimals follow a size distribution. One of the main results of this Thesis is that I was able to compute the formation of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune in less than 10 million years, which is considered to be the protoplanetary disk mean lifetime.

  14. Cooling, AGN Feedback and Star Formation in Simulated Cool-Core Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yuan; Ruszkowski, Mateusz; Voit, G Mark; O'Shea, Brian W; Donahue, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback in cool-core galaxy clusters have successfully avoided classical cooling flows, but often produce too much cold gas. We perform adaptive mesh simulations that include momentum-driven AGN feedback, self-gravity, star formation and stellar feedback, focusing on the interplay between cooling, AGN heating and star formation in an isolated cool-core cluster. Cold clumps triggered by AGN jets and turbulence form filamentary structures tens of kpc long. This cold gas feeds both star formation and the supermassive black hole (SMBH), triggering an AGN outburst that increases the entropy of the ICM and reduces its cooling rate. Within 1-2 Gyr, star formation completely consumes the cold gas, leading to a brief shutoff of the AGN. The ICM quickly cools and redevelops multiphase gas, followed by another cycle of star formation/AGN outburst. Within 6.5 Gyr, we observe three such cycles. There is good agreement between our simulated cluster and the observations...

  15. Influence of air pressure on soliton formation in hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Roberts, Peter John

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Soliton formation during dispersive compression of chirped few-picosecond pulses at the microjoule level in a hollow-core photonic bandgap (HC-PBG) fiber is studied by numerical simulations. Long-pass filtering of the emerging frequency-shifted solitons is investigated with the objective...... at high powers. This allows a scaling of the output pulse energy toward the microjoule level. © 2009 Optical Society of America...

  16. Core Formation in the Earth and Moon: New Constraints From V, Cr, and Mn Partitioning Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, N. L.; Agee, C. B.

    2002-05-01

    The mantles of the Earth and Moon are similarly depleted in V, Cr, and Mn relative to the concentrations of these elements in chondritic meteorites [1,2]. The similar depletions have been suggested to be due to a common genesis of the Earth and Moon, with the Moon inheriting its mantle, complete with V, Cr, and Mn depletions, from the Earth during the impact-induced formation of the Moon. We have conducted multi-anvil experiments that systematically examined the effects of pressure, temperature, and silicate and metallic compositions on liquid metal-liquid silicate partitioning of V, Cr, and Mn. Increasing temperature is found to significantly increase the metal-silicate partition coefficients for all three elements. Increasing the S or C content of the metallic liquid also causes the partition coefficients to increase. Silicate composition has an effect consistent with Cr and Mn being divalent and V being trivalent. Over our experimental range of 3-14 GPa, the partitioning behavior of V, Cr, and Mn did not vary with pressure. With the effects of oxygen fugacity, metallic and silicate compositions, temperature and pressure understood, the partition coefficient for each element was expressed as a function of these thermodynamic variables and applied to different core formation scenarios. Our new metal-silicate experimental partitioning data can explain the mantle depletions of V, Cr, and Mn by core formation in a high temperature magma ocean under oxygen fugacity conditions two log units below the iron-wuestite buffer, conditions similar to those proposed by [3] from their metal-magnesiowuestite study. In contrast, more oxidizing conditions proposed in recent core formation models [4] cannot account for the V, Cr, and Mn depletions. Additionally, because we observe little or no pressure effect on V, Cr, and Mn partitioning in our experiments, we conclude that the mantle depletions of these elements during core formation are not dependent on planet size. Accordingly

  17. Low-Mass Star Formation: From Molecular Cloud Cores to Protostars and Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inutsuka, S.-I.; Machida, M.; Matsumoto, T.; Tsukamoto, Y.; Iwasaki, K.

    2015-05-01

    This review describes realistic evolution of magnetic field and rotation of the protostars, dynamics of outflows and jets, and the formation and evolution of protoplanetary disks. Recent advances in the protostellar collapse simulations cover a huge dynamic range from molecular cloud core density to stellar density in a self-consistent manner and account for all the non-ideal magnetohydrodynamical effects, such as Ohmic resistivity, ambipolar diffusion, and Hall current. We explain the emergence of the first core, i.e., the quasi-hydrostatic object that consists of molecular gas, and the second core, i.e., the protostar. Ohmic dissipation largely removes the magnetic flux from the center of a collapsing cloud core. A fast well-collimated bipolar jet along the rotation axis of the protostar is driven after the magnetic field is re-coupled with warm gas (˜103 K) around the protostar. The circumstellar disk is born in the "dead zone", a region that is de-coupled from the magnetic field, and the outer radius of the disk increases with that of the dead zone during the early accretion phase. The rapid increase of the disk size occurs after the depletion of the envelope of molecular cloud core. The effect of Hall current may create two distinct populations of protoplanetary disks.

  18. Outflows, Dusty Cores, and a Burst of Star Formation in the North America and Pelican Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Bally, John; Probst, Ron; Reipurth, Bo; Shirley, Yancy L; Stringfellow, Guy S

    2014-01-01

    We present observations of near-infrared 2.12 micro-meter molecular hydrogen outflows emerging from 1.1 mm dust continuum clumps in the North America and Pelican Nebula (NAP) complex selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). Hundreds of individual shocks powered by over 50 outflows from young stars are identified, indicating that the dusty molecular clumps surrounding the NGC 7000 / IC 5070 / W80 HII region are among the most active sites of on-going star formation in the Solar vicinity. A spectacular X-shaped outflow, MHO 3400, emerges from a young star system embedded in a dense clump more than a parsec from the ionization front associated with the Pelican Nebula (IC 5070). Suspected to be a binary, the source drives a pair of outflows with orientations differing by 80 degrees. Each flow exhibits S-shaped symmetry and multiple shocks indicating a pulsed and precessing jet. The `Gulf of Mexico' located south of the North America Nebula (NGC 7000), contains a dense cluster of molecular hydrogen ...

  19. The evolution of the core mass function by gas accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Dib, Sami

    2012-01-01

    We show how the mass function of dense cores (CMF) which results from the gravoturbulent fragmentation of a molecular cloud evolves in time under the effect of gas accretion. Accretion onto the cores leads to the formation of larger numbers of massive cores and to a flattening of the CMF. This effect should be visible in the CMF of star forming regions that are massive enough to contain high mass cores and when comparing the CMF of cores in and off dense filaments which have different environmental gas densities.

  20. Dense Plasma Focus Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jungman, Gerard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The mechanisms for pinch formation in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices, with the generation of high-energy ions beams and subsequent neutron production over a relatively short distance, are not fully understood. Here we report on high-fidelity 2D and 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the LA-COMPASS code to study the pinch formation dynamics and its associated instabilities and neutron production.

  1. Multiple low-turbulence starless cores associated with intermediate- to high-mass star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuther, H.; Henning, Th.

    2009-09-01

    Aims: Characterizing the gas and dust properties prior to and in the neighborhood of active intermediate- to high-mass star formation. Methods: Two Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) - IRDC 19175-4 and IRDC 19175-5 - that are located in the vicinity of the luminous massive star-forming region IRAS 19175+1357, but that remain absorption features up to 70 μm wavelength, were observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in the 3.23 mm dust continuum as well as the N2H^+(1-0) and 13CS(2-1) line emission. Results: While IRDC 19175-4 is clearly detected in the 3.23 mm continuum, the second source in the field, IRDC 19175-5, is only barely observable above the 3σ continuum detection threshold. However, the N2H^+(1-0) observations reveal 17 separate sub-sources in the vicinity of the two IRDCs. Most of them exhibit low levels of turbulence (Δ v ≤ 1 km s-1), indicating that the fragmentation process in these cores may be dominated by the interplay of thermal pressure and gravity, but not so much by turbulence. Combining the small line widths with the non-detection up to 70 μm and the absence of other signs of star formation activity, most of these 17 cores with masses between sub-solar to ~10 M⊙ are likely still in a starless phase. The N2H+ column density analysis indicates significant abundance variations between the cores. Furthermore, we find a large CS depletion factor of the order 100. Although the strongest line and continuum peak is close to virial equilibrium, its slightly broader line width compared to the other cores is consistent with it being in a contraction phase potentially at the verge of star formation. Based on the 3.23 mm upper limits, the other cores may be gravitationally stable or even transient structures. The relative peak velocities between neighboring cores are usually below 1 km s-1, and we do not identify streaming motions along the filamentary structures. Average densities are between 105 and 106 cm-3 (one to two orders of magnitude

  2. Pump-probe studies of radiation induced defects and formation of warm dense matter with pulsed ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, T.; Persaud, A.; Gua, H.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Minior, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    We report results from the 2nd generation Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment at Berkeley Lab. NDCX-II is a pulsed, linear induction accelerator designed to drive thin foils to warm dense matter (WDM) states with peak temperatures of ~ 1 eV using intense, short pulses of 1.2 MeV lithium ions. Tunability of the ion beam enables pump-probe studies of radiation effects in solids as a function of excitation density, from isolated collision cascades to the onset of phase-transitions and WDM. Ion channeling is an in situ diagnostic of damage evolution during ion pulses with a sensitivity of channeled ions tracks lattice disorder evolution with a resolution of ~ 1 ns using fast current measurements. We will discuss pump-probe experiments with pulsed ion beams and the development of diagnostics for WDM and multi-scale (ms to fs) access to the materials physics of collision cascades e.g. in fusion reactor materials. Work performed under auspices of the US DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  3. Monte Carlo Error Analysis Applied to Core Formation: The Single-stage Model Revived

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, E.; Walter, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion of studies that scrutinize whether or not the siderophile element budget of the modern mantle can plausibly be explained by metal-silicate equilibration in a deep magma ocean during core formation. The single-stage equilibrium scenario is seductive because experiments that equilibrate metal and silicate can then serve as a proxy for the early earth, and the physical and chemical conditions of core formation can be identified. Recently, models have become more complex as they try to accommodate the proliferation of element partitioning data sets, each of which sets its own limits on the pressure, temperature, and chemistry of equilibration. The ability of single stage models to explain mantle chemistry has subsequently been challenged, resulting in the development of complex multi-stage core formation models. Here we show that the extent to which extant partitioning data are consistent with single-stage core formation depends heavily upon (1) the assumptions made when regressing experimental partitioning data (2) the certainty with which regression coefficients are known and (3) the certainty with which the core/mantle concentration ratios of the siderophile elements are known. We introduce a Monte Carlo algorithm coded in MATLAB that samples parameter space in pressure and oxygen fugacity for a given mantle composition (nbo/t) and liquidus, and returns the number of equilibrium single-stage liquidus “solutions” that are permissible, taking into account the uncertainty in regression parameters and range of acceptable core/mantle ratios. Here we explore the consequences of regression parameter uncertainty and the impact of regression construction on model outcomes. We find that the form of the partition coefficient (Kd with enforced valence state, or D) and the handling of the temperature effect (based on 1-atm free energy data or high P-T experimental observations) critically affects model outcomes. We consider the most

  4. Dense water formation in the north-western Mediterranean area during HyMeX-SOP2 in 1/36° ocean simulations: Sensitivity to initial conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Fabien; Lebeaupin Brossier, Cindy; Giordani, Hervé; Arsouze, Thomas; Beuvier, Jonathan; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Bresson, Émilie; Ducrocq, Véronique; Fourrié, Nadia; Nuret, Mathieu

    2016-08-01

    The north-western Mediterranean Sea is a key location where intense air-sea exchanges occur in autumn and winter. The succession of strong mistral and tramontane situations, leading to significant evaporation and ocean heat loss, is well known as the controlling factor in the dense water formation (DWF) with deep convection episodes. During HyMeX-SOP2 (1 February to 15 March 2013), several platforms sampled the area in order to document DWF and air-sea exchanges. This study investigates the ability of the NEMO-WMED36 ocean model (1/36°-resolution), driven in surface by the hourly air-sea fluxes from the AROME-WMED forecasts (2.5 km resolution), to represent DWF during HyMeX-SOP2 and focuses on the sensitivity to initial conditions. After a short evaluation of the atmospheric forcing, the high-resolution oceanic simulations using three different data sets as initial and boundary conditions are compared to observations collected during the field campaign. It evidences that using regional model outputs may lead to unrealistic thermohaline characteristics for the intermediate and deep waters, which degrade the simulated new dense water formed. Using ocean analyses built from observations, permits to obtain more realistic characteristics of the Western Mediterranean dense water. However, a low stratification favors an overestimation of the convective area and of the DWF rate. The DWF chronology is also impacted. Nevertheless, in every run, SOP2 is characterized by the production of water denser than 29.11 kg m-3 with a peak during the strong mistral event of 23-25 February followed by a period of restratification, before a last event of bottom convection on 13-15 March.

  5. Formation of core (polystyrene)-shell (polybenzimidazole) nanoparticles using sulfonated polystyrene as template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Mousumi; Arunbabu, Dhamodaran; Jana, Tushar

    2010-11-15

    We report formation of core (polystyrene)-shell (polybenzimidazole) nanoparticles from a new blend system consisting of an amorphous polymer polybenzimidazole (PBI) and an ionomer sodium salt of sulfonated polystyrene (SPS-Na). The ionomer used for the blending is spherical in shape with sulfonate groups on the surface of the particles. An in depth investigation of the blends at various sulfonation degrees and compositions using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy provides direct evidence of specific hydrogen bonding interactions between the N-H groups of PBI and the sulfonate groups of SPS-Na. The disruption of PBI chains self association owing to the interaction between the functional groups of these polymer pairs is the driving force for the blending. Thermodynamical studies carried out by using differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) establish partially miscible phase separated blending of these polymers in a wider composition range. The two distinguishable glass transition temperatures (T(g)) which are different from the neat components and unaltered with the blends composition attribute that the domain size of heterogeneity (d(d)) of the blends is >20 nm since one of the blend component (SPS-Na particle) diameter is ∼70 nm. The diminish of PBI chains self association upon blending with SPS-Na particles and the presence of invariant T(g)'s of the blends suggest the wrapping of PBI chains over the SPS-Na spherical particle surface and hence resulting a core-shell morphology. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study provides direct evidence of core-shell nanoparticle formation; where core is the polystyrene and shell is the PBI. The sulfonation degree affects the blends phase separations. The higher degree of sulfonation favors the disruption of PBI self association and thus forms partially miscible two phases blends with core-shell morphology.

  6. Alkali element depletion by core formation and vaporization on the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodders, K.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The depletion of Na, K, Rb, and Cs in the Earth's upper mantle and crust relative to their abundances in chondrites is a long standing problem in geochemistry. Here we consider two commonly invoked mechanisms, namely core formation, and vaporization, for producing the observed depletions. Our models predict that a significant percentage of the Earth's bulk alkali element inventory is in the core (30 percent for Na, 52 percent for K, 74 percent for Rb, and 92 percent for Cs). These predictions agree with independent estimates from nebular volatility trends and (for K) from terrestrial heat flow data. Our models also predict that vaporization and thermal escape during planetary accretion are unlikely to produce the observed alkali element depletion pattern. However, loss during the putative giant impact which formed the Moon cannot be ruled out. Experimental, observational, and theoretical tests of our predictions are also described. Alkali element partitioning into the Earth's core was modeled by assuming that alkali element partitioning during core formation on the aubrite parent body (APB) is analogous to that on the early Earth. The analogy is reasonable for three reasons. First, the enstatite meteorites are the only known meteorites with the same oxygen isotope systematics as the Earth-Moon system. Second, the large core size of the Earth and the V depletion in the mantle requires accretion from planetesimals as reduced as the enstatite chondrites. Third, experimental studies of K partitioning between silicate and metal plus sulfide show that more K goes into the metal plus sulfide at higher pressures than at one atmosphere pressure. Thus partitioning in the relatively low pressure natural laboratory of the APB is a good guide to alkali elemental partitioning during the growth of the Earth.

  7. Runaway Growth of Mars and Implications for Core Formation Relative to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, A. N.; Wood, B. J.; Kleine, T.

    2005-12-01

    Martian meteorites are relatively young objects widely considered to reflect melting of the mantle of Mars over the past 1.4 Gyr. As such, their trace element compositions partly reflect the complex history of melting in the martian mantle. Hafnium (Hf) and tungsten (W) having different bulk distribution coefficients during mantle melting and thus may be fractionated by such processes. This explains why Hf/W, as measured in martian meteorites, is decoupled from W isotopic compositions, which would have been produced by 182Hf decay during the first 50 Myrs of the solar system. In contrast, little fractionation is expected among Ba, Th, and W, all of which have a similar incompatibility during melting in Earth's mantle. Assuming this is also true for the martian mantle, Ba/W and Th/W may be used as a proxy for the degree of metal segregation. The W isotopic compositions indeed show some relationship with the degree of mantle W depletion predicted to have been caused by core formation, as deduced from measured Ba/W or Th/W. These indices, as well as the W isotopic variations themselves, provide evidence of heterogeneity probably caused by early core formation, which can be compared with the effects generated by early partial melting as recorded by the 146Sm-142Nd system. Shergottites such as Zagami with no Nd isotopic effect and hence no indication of Hf/W fractionation from partial melting appear to define rapid timescales for accretion and core formation of about one million years, implying a runaway growth mechanism of accretion for Mars. This is consistent with certain dynamical models and argues against early migration of Jupiter-sized objects through the inner solar system. Melting and core formation on Mars appears to have continued for at least 10 Myrs as recorded in the W and Nd isotopic compositions of some other martian meteorites. This accretion and core formation history is strikingly different from that of the Earth. The last major stage of Earth

  8. Outflows, dusty cores, and a burst of star formation in the North America and Pelican nebulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bally, John [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Ginsburg, Adam [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany); Probst, Ron [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Reipurth, Bo [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 640 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Shirley, Yancy L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Stringfellow, Guy S., E-mail: John.Bally@colorado.edu, E-mail: aginsburg@eso.org, E-mail: probst@noao.edu, E-mail: reipurth@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: yshirley@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: Guy.Stringfellow@colorado.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present observations of near-infrared 2.12 μm molecular hydrogen outflows emerging from 1.1 mm dust continuum clumps in the North America and Pelican Nebula (NAP) complex selected from the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). Hundreds of individual shocks powered by over 50 outflows from young stars are identified, indicating that the dusty molecular clumps surrounding the NGC 7000/IC 5070/W80 H II region are among the most active sites of ongoing star formation in the solar vicinity. A spectacular X-shaped outflow, MHO 3400, emerges from a young star system embedded in a dense clump more than a parsec from the ionization front associated with the Pelican Nebula (IC 5070). Suspected to be a binary, the source drives a pair of outflows with orientations differing by 80°. Each flow exhibits S-shaped symmetry and multiple shocks indicating a pulsed and precessing jet. The 'Gulf of Mexico', located south of the North America Nebula (NGC 7000), contains a dense cluster of molecular hydrogen objects (MHOs), Herbig-Haro (HH) objects, and over 300 young stellar objects (YSOs), indicating a recent burst of star formation. The largest outflow detected thus far in the North America and Pelican Nebula complex, the 1.6 parsec long MHO 3417 flow, emerges from a 500 M {sub ☉} BGPS clump and may be powered by a forming massive star. Several prominent outflows such as MHO 3427 appear to be powered by highly embedded YSOs only visible at λ > 70 μm. An 'activity index' formed by dividing the number of shocks by the mass of the cloud containing their source stars is used to estimate the relative evolutionary states of Bolocam clumps. Outflows can be used as indicators of the evolutionary state of clumps detected in millimeter and submillimeter dust continuum surveys.

  9. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  10. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  11. Very Early Phases of Massive Star Formation: An SMA Follow-up of Herschel Hi-Gal Survey Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard Alan; Zhang, Q.; Jimenez-Serra, I. M.; Beltran, M.; Cesaroni, R.; Finn, S.; Foster, J.; Jackson, J.; Molinari, S.; Viti, S.

    2011-01-01

    We used the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to observe eight cold, massive ( 1000Msol) dense cores in dark clouds discovered in the Herschel HiGal survey. In contrast to numerous studies of hot molecular cores, very little is known about objects prior to the hot core phase. The SMA results allow us to study systematically the physical and chemical evolution of these dense cores. These protostellar objects were selected because the Hershel SEDs of the dust have temperatures spanning the range between about 10K and 20K, suggestive of different evolutionary phases of very young stars, because the objects were comparatively bright at 250 microns ( 10Jy) and distinct in all five FIR HiGal bands, and because they seemed to be morphologically simple. Only one of the sources is bright enough to be detected at MIPS24; this source, the most mature one, already shows a small outflow in CO. The SMA was used in both compact and very extended configurations, with the 230GHz band. The SMA molecular line maps will be compared with chemical modelling (including dust grain and gas phase reactions) to constrain the physical conditions in these young cores, and their evolutionary stages.

  12. Constraining star formation rates in cool-core brightest cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mittal, Rupal; Combes, Francoise

    2015-01-01

    We used broad-band imaging data for 10 cool-core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and conducted a Bayesian analysis using stellar population synthesis to determine the likely properties of the constituent stellar populations. Determination of ongoing star formation rates (SFRs), in particular, has a direct impact on our understanding of the cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM), star formation and AGN-regulated feedback. Our model consists of an old stellar population and a series of young stellar components. We calculated marginalized posterior probability distributions for various model parameters and obtained 68% plausible intervals from them. The 68% plausible interval on the SFRs is broad, owing to a wide range of models that are capable of fitting the data, which also explains the wide dispersion in the star formation rates available in the literature. The ranges of possible SFRs are robust and highlight the strength in such a Bayesian analysis. The SFRs are correlated with the X-ray mass deposition...

  13. Ectopic bone formation in rapidly fabricated acellular injectable dense collagen-Bioglass hybrid scaffolds via gel aspiration-ejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, Amir K; Muja, Naser; Kamranpour, Neysan O; Lepry, William C; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Clarke, Susan A; Nazhat, Showan N

    2016-04-01

    Gel aspiration-ejection (GAE) has recently been introduced as an effective technique for the rapid production of injectable dense collagen (IDC) gel scaffolds with tunable collagen fibrillar densities (CFDs) and microstructures. Herein, a GAE system was applied for the advanced production and delivery of IDC and IDC-Bioglass(®) (IDC-BG) hybrid gel scaffolds for potential bone tissue engineering applications. The efficacy of GAE in generating mineralizable IDC-BG gels (from an initial 75-25 collagen-BG ratio) produced through needle gauge numbers 8G (3.4 mm diameter and 6 wt% CFD) and 14G (1.6 mm diameter and 14 wt% CFD) was investigated. Second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of as-made gels revealed an increase in collagen fibril alignment with needle gauge number. In vitro mineralization of IDC-BG gels was confirmed where carbonated hydroxyapatite was detected as early as day 1 in simulated body fluid, which progressively increased up to day 14. In vivo mineralization of, and host response to, acellular IDC and IDC-BG gel scaffolds were further investigated following subcutaneous injection in adult rats. Mineralization, neovascularization and cell infiltration into the scaffolds was enhanced by the addition of BG and at day 21 post injection, there was evidence of remodelling of granulation tissue into woven bone-like tissue in IDC-BG. SHG imaging of explanted scaffolds indicated collagen fibril remodelling through cell infiltration and mineralization over time. In sum, the results suggest that IDC-BG hybrid gels have osteoinductive properties and potentially offer a novel therapeutic approach for procedures requiring the injectable delivery of a malleable and dynamic bone graft that mineralizes under physiological conditions.

  14. Shocks and Cool Cores: An ALMA View of Massive Galaxy Cluster Formation at High Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Kaustuv

    2017-07-01

    These slides present some recent results on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect imaging of galaxy cluster substructures. The advantage of SZ imaging at high redshifts or in the low density cluster outskirts is already well-known. Now with ALMA a combination of superior angular resolution and high sensitivity is available. One example is the first ALMA measurement of a merger shock at z=0.9 in the famous El Gordo galaxy cluster. Here comparison between SZ, X-ray and radio data enabled us to put constraints on the shock Mach number and magnetic field strength for a high-z radio relic. Second example is the ALMA SZ imaging of the core region of z=1.4 galaxy cluster XMMU J2235.2-2557. Here ALMA data provide an accurate measurement of the thermal pressure near the cluster center, and from a joint SZ/X-ray analysis we find clear evidence for a reduced core temperature. This result indicate that a cool core establishes itself early enough in the cluster formation history while the gas accumulation is still continuing. The above two ALMA measurements are among several other recent SZ results that shed light on the formation process of massive clusters at high redshifts.

  15. Scar formation after stereotactic vacuum-assisted core biopsy of benign breast lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazici, B. [Department of Radiology, Maidstone Hospital Breast Unit, Kent (United Kingdom); Sever, A.R. [Department of Radiology, Maidstone Hospital Breast Unit, Kent (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: sever@blueyonder.co.uk; Mills, P. [Department of Pathology, Maidstone Hospital Breast Unit, Kent (United Kingdom); Fish, D. [Department of Pathology, Maidstone Hospital Breast Unit, Kent (United Kingdom); Jones, S.E. [Department of Surgery, Maidstone Hospital Breast Unit, Kent (United Kingdom); Jones, P.A. [Department of Surgery, Maidstone Hospital Breast Unit, Kent (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    AIM: To evaluate scar formation of impalpable breast lesions with benign histological outcome using stereotactic 11-gauge vacuum-assisted core biopsy (VACB). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and ten lesions with benign histology for which follow-up mammograms were available, were assessed for scar formation at the biopsy site. All biopsies were performed using stereotactic VACB with 11-gauge needle. The incidence of post-biopsy scar formation and the number of specimens removed were determined. RESULTS: In 4.3% (9/210) of the lesions for which a biopsy was performed with 11-gauge directional vacuum-assisted technique, the follow-up mammogram revealed a scar formation. Of these, six were minimal scars, two were moderate scars and one was a marked scar. Minimal and moderate scars were diagnosed on imaging only. However, the case with marked scar formation required tissue diagnosis to rule out malignancy. CONCLUSION: Although uncommon, scar formation can be seen in the follow-up mammograms after percutaneous breast biopsies. It is important that the radiologist interpreting follow-up mammograms is aware of the features of this lesion and its relationship to the biopsy procedure.

  16. Dengue Virus Capsid Protein Binds Core Histones and Inhibits Nucleosome Formation in Human Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M.; Barthel, Sebastian; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (re)emerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C) is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection. PMID:21909430

  17. Formation of titanium dioxide core-shell microcapsules through a binary-phase spray technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergek, Jonatan; Elgh, Björn; Palmqvist, Anders E C; Nordstierna, Lars

    2017-09-13

    Core-shell microcapsules consisting of a titanium dioxide shell and a hydrophobic solvent core have been prepared with diameters of a few micrometers and a narrow size distribution using a simple and fast airbrush technique. These microcapsules were prepared at room temperature in a single-step process in which an oil with a dissolved titanium alkoxide precursor was forced together with an aqueous solution, containing a surface-active polymer, through a narrow spray nozzle using a nitrogen gas propellant. Several different parameters of chemical, physical, and processing origin were investigated to find an optimal recipe. Two different alkanes, one ketone, and four alcohols were tested and evaluated as core materials, alone or together with the antifungal biocide 2-n-octyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (OIT). Long-chain alcohols were found suitable as core oil due to their low solubility in water and surface activity. The addition of the surface-active polymers in the water phase was important in aiding the formation and stabilization of the titanium dioxide shell. An impressive loading of 50 wt% of the semi-hydrophobic OIT was possible to encapsulate using this simple and applicable procedure.

  18. Dengue virus capsid protein binds core histones and inhibits nucleosome formation in human liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonya M Colpitts

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a member of the Flaviviridae and a globally (reemerging pathogen that causes serious human disease. There is no specific antiviral or vaccine for dengue virus infection. Flavivirus capsid (C is a structural protein responsible for gathering the viral RNA into a nucleocapsid that forms the core of a mature virus particle. Flaviviral replication is known to occur in the cytoplasm yet a large portion of capsid protein localizes to the nucleus during infection. The reasons for the nuclear presences of capsid are not completely understood. Here, we expressed mature DENV C in a tandem affinity purification assay to identify potential binding partners in human liver cells. DENV C targeted the four core histones, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. DENV C bound recombinant histones in solution and colocalized with histones in the nucleus and cytoplasm of liver cells during DENV infection. We show that DENV C acts as a histone mimic, forming heterodimers with core histones, binding DNA and disrupting nucleosome formation. We also demonstrate that DENV infection increases the amounts of core histones in livers cells, which may be a cellular response to C binding away the histone proteins. Infection with DENV additionally alters levels of H2A phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. The interactions of C and histones add an interesting new role for the presence of C in the nucleus during DENV infection.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of crater formation by core-shell structured cluster impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Seki, Toshio; Matsuo, Jiro

    2012-07-01

    Crater formation processes by the impacts of large clusters with binary atomic species were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Argon and xenon atoms are artificially organized in core-shell cluster structures with various component ratios and irradiated on a Si(1 0 0) target surface. When the cluster has Xe1000 core covered with 1000 Ar atoms, and impacts at a total of 20 keV, the core Xe cluster penetrates into the deep area, and a crater with a conical shape is left on the target. On the other hand, in the case of a cluster with the opposite structure, Ar1000 core covered with 1000 Xe atoms, the cluster stops at a shallow area of the target. The incident cluster atoms are mixed and tend to spread in a lateral direction, which results in a square shaped crater with a shallower hole and wider opening. The MD simulations suggest that large cluster impacts cause different irradiation effects by changing the structure, even if the component ratio is the same.

  20. Dynamics of Crystal Formation in the Greenland NorthGRIP Ice Core

    CERN Document Server

    Mathiesen, J; Jensen, M H; Levinsen, M; Olesen, P; Dahl-Jensen, D; Svensson, A; Mathiesen, Joachim; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H.; Levinsen, Mogens; Olesen, Poul; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Svensson, Anders

    2003-01-01

    The North Greenland Ice Core Project (NorthGRIP) provides paleoclimatic information back to at least 115 kyr before present [Dahl-Jensen et al., 2002]. Each year, precipitation on the ice sheet covers it with a new layer of snow, which gradually transforms into ice crystals as the layer sinks into the ice sheet. The size distribution of ice crystals has been measured at selected depths in the upper 880 m of the NorthGRIP ice core [Svensson et al., 2003b], which cover a time span of 5300 years. The distributions change with time toward a universal curve, indicating a common underlying physical process in the formation of crystals. We identify this process as an interplay between fragmentation of the crystals and diffusion of their grain boundaries. The process is described by a two-parameter differential equation to which we obtain the exact solution. The solution is in excellent agreement with the experimentally observed distributions.

  1. Non-chondritic iron isotope ratios in planetary mantles as a result of core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elardo, Stephen M.; Shahar, Anat

    2017-02-01

    Information about the materials and conditions involved in planetary formation and differentiation in the early Solar System is recorded in iron isotope ratios. Samples from Earth, the Moon, Mars and the asteroid Vesta reveal significant variations in iron isotope ratios, but the sources of these variations remain uncertain. Here we present experiments that demonstrate that under the conditions of planetary core formation expected for the Moon, Mars and Vesta, iron isotopes fractionate between metal and silicate due to the presence of nickel, and enrich the bodies' mantles in isotopically light iron. However, the effect of nickel diminishes at higher temperatures: under conditions expected for Earth's core formation, we infer little fractionation of iron isotopes. From our experimental results and existing conceptual models of magma ocean crystallization and mantle partial melting, we find that nickel-induced fractionation can explain iron isotope variability found in planetary samples without invoking nebular or accretionary processes. We suggest that near-chondritic iron isotope ratios of basalts from Mars and Vesta, as well as the most primitive lunar basalts, were achieved by melting of isotopically light mantles, whereas the heavy iron isotope ratios of terrestrial ocean floor basalts are the result of melting of near-chondritic Earth mantle.

  2. Permeability Estimation of Grosmont Formation, Alberta, Canada by Statistically Combining Well-logs and Core Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Keehm, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Permeability estimation in carbonate reservoirs is quite challenging since they are very heterogeneous. Moreover, the amount of core measurement data is commonly limited. In this paper, we present permeability maps for Grosmont formation in Canada with very limited permeability data, using bi-variated probability density function (porosity and permeability) conditioned to geological information. Grosmont formation consists of four units: Lower Grosmont (LG); Upper Grosmont (UG1); Upper Grosmont 2 (UG2); and Upper Grosmont 3 (UG3). From the previous studies, UG2 and UG3 are more promising reservoir units since they have larger porosity and permeability with vuggy pores and fractures by diagenesis (dolomitization and karstification). Thus, we applied our method to these two units. We first investigated core measurement data (porosity and permeability) and compared them to local geological aspects, such as the degree of diagenesis and vicinity of unconformity. Then we could divide the study area into 6 groups, and we established a bivariated probability density function (pdf) for each group and each unit (total of 12 pdfs) with core measurements of porosity and permeability. In the next step, we created porosity maps using well-log data for UG2 and UG3. The final step is to generate permeability maps for UG2 and UG3 by drawing a permeability value from the bivariated pdf conditioned to porosity. The final results show more realistic permeability maps for Grosmont formation when compared to conventional kriging results. Moreover, the strengths of this approach is (1) that it can use geological information and (2) that it can handle the variability of permeability, which can be naturally occurred in carbonate reservoirs. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Energy Resources R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No. 2008RER11P0430302009).

  3. Star formation in the Galactic Center GMC cores: Sagittarius B2 and the dust ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lis, D. C.; Menten, K. M.

    1995-01-01

    The total far-infrared luminosity and the ionizing flux inferred from radio continuum observations of the Galactic center region imply a rate of star formation per unit mass of molecular material comparable to that in the Galactic disk. However, H2O and OH masers commonly found in sites of high-mass star formation are relatively rare in the nuclear disk. Far-infrared studies suggest that the formation rate of stars with masses greater than approximately 20 Solar Mass is reduced in the central region compared to the Galactic disk. Star formation might be suppressed currently in the central region as a result of the different geometry and strength of the magnetic fields there, which arguably might tend to inhibit cloud collapse. High gas pressures implied by observations of the diffuse X-ray emission suggest that giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the nuclear disk may be held together by external pressure rather than self-gravity. The gravitational collapse leading to the formation of high density cores may thus be suppressed in all but the most massive clouds.

  4. A tale of two cores: Triggered massive star formation in the bright-rimmed cloud SFO 75

    CERN Document Server

    Urquhart, J S; Morgan, L K; Pestalozzi, M R; White, G J; Muna, D N; White, Glenn J.

    2007-01-01

    Abridged: We present a detailed multi-wavelength study of the bright-rimmed cloud SFO 75, including 1.3cm and 1.2mm continuum, and 13CO and ammonia spectral line observations. The 13CO and 1.2 mm emission reveals the presence of a dense core located behind the bright rim of the cloud which is approximately coincident with that of the IRAS point source. From an analysis of the IRAS and 1.2mm fluxes we derive a dust temperature of ~30 K, a luminosity of 1.6x10^4 L\\odot and estimate the core mass to be ~570 M\\odot. The higher resolution ammonia observations resolve the 1.2mm core into two distinct cores, one directly behind the cloud's rim (Core A) and the second located slightly farther back (Core B). Comparing the morphology of Core A with that of the photon-dominated region and ionised boundary layer leaves little doubt that it is being strongly affected by the ionisation front. 2MASS and GLIMPSE archive data which reveal a small cluster of three deeply embedded high- and intermediate-mass young stellar objec...

  5. The Earth's core formation and development: evidence from evolution of tectonomagmatic processes and paleomagnetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkov, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    Many geologists confident that the core provides modern tectonic and magmatic activity on the Earth, which explains our interest in this topic, and vice versa we can use evolution of tectonomagmatic processes throughout the Earth's (and other terrestrial planetary bodies) history for reconstruction of the core formation and evolution. Most researchers, follow to V. Safronov (1972) and A. Ringwood (1979), confident that the Earth has occurred due to accumulation of hypothetical chemically homogeneous planetesimals, composed by chondrite material, ie, as a result of homogeneous accretion. However, this single-stage chondrite model of accretion is inconsistent with fact of cardinal change of tectonomagmatic processes on the terrestrial planets in the middle stages of their development. For example, the critical irreversible change of the Earth's tectonomagmatic evolution occurred in range 2.35-2.0 Ga, when geochemical-enriched Fe-Ti picrites and basalts firstly appeared in large quantities and first geological evidence of plate tectonics showed up (Sharkov, Bogatikov, 2010). We suggest that these changes were linked with ascending of mantle superplumes of the second generation (thermochemical), originated at the the boundary of liquid iron core and silicate mantle, in similar way as the modern plumes. All terrestrial planetary bodies (Earth, Venus, Mars, Mercury, and the Moon) have a similar structure, consist of iron core and silicate envelope, and developed at the same scenario, which provide for drastic irreversible change in character of tectonomagmatic processes at the middle stages of their evolution (Sharkov, Bogatikov, 2009). Such a situation can be realized only in case: (1) the terrestrial planetary bodies originally had heterogeneous structure, and (2) their heating occurred from the top down accompanied by cooling of outer shells. As a result, material of the primordial cores, where enriched material survived, were remained a long time untouched. It

  6. Evolution of Binaries in Dense Stellar Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanova, Natalia

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the field, the binaries in dense stellar systems are frequently not primordial, and could be either dynamically formed or significantly altered from their primordial states. Destruction and formation of binaries occur in parallel all the time. The destruction, which constantly removes soft binaries from a binary pool, works as an energy sink and could be a reason for cluster entering the binary-burning phase. The true binary fraction is greater than observed, as a result, the observable binary fraction evolves differently from the predictions. Combined measurements of binary fractions in globular clusters suggest that most of the clusters are still core-contracting. The formation, on other hand, affects most the more evolutionary advanced stars, which significantly enhances the population of X-ray sources in globular clusters. The formation of binaries with a compact objects proceeds mainly through physical collisions, binary-binary and single-binary encounters; however, it is the dynamical for...

  7. Constraining star formation rates in cool-core brightest cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rupal; Whelan, John T.; Combes, Françoise

    2015-07-01

    We used broad-band imaging data for 10 cool-core brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and conducted a Bayesian analysis using stellar population synthesis to determine the likely properties of the constituent stellar populations. Determination of ongoing star formation rates (SFRs), in particular, has a direct impact on our understanding of the cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM), star formation and AGN-regulated feedback. Our model consists of an old stellar population and a series of young stellar components. We calculated marginalized posterior probability distributions for various model parameters and obtained 68 per cent plausible intervals from them. The 68 per cent plausible interval on the SFRs is broad, owing to a wide range of models that are capable of fitting the data, which also explains the wide dispersion in the SFRs available in the literature. The ranges of possible SFRs are robust and highlight the strength in such a Bayesian analysis. The SFRs are correlated with the X-ray mass deposition rates (the former are factors of 4-50 lower than the latter), implying a picture where the cooling of the ICM is a contributing factor to star formation in cool-core BCGs. We find that 9 out of 10 BCGs have been experiencing starbursts since 6 Gyr ago. While four out of nine BCGs seem to require continuous SFRs, five out of nine seem to require periodic star formation on intervals ranging from 20 to 200 Myr. This time-scale is similar to the cooling time of the ICM in the central (<5 kpc) regions.

  8. THE RELATION BETWEEN COOL CLUSTER CORES AND HERSCHEL-DETECTED STAR FORMATION IN BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawle, T. D.; Egami, E.; Rex, M.; Fiedler, A.; Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Portouw, J.; Walth, G. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Edge, A. C. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Smith, G. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Altieri, B.; Valtchanov, I. [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC, ESA, P.O. Box 78, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain); Perez-Gonzalez, P. G. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Van der Werf, P. P. [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Zemcov, M., E-mail: trawle@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    We present far-infrared (FIR) analysis of 68 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at 0.08 < z < 1.0. Deriving total infrared luminosities directly from Spitzer and Herschel photometry spanning the peak of the dust component (24-500 {mu}m), we calculate the obscured star formation rate (SFR). 22{sup +6.2}{sub -5.3}% of the BCGs are detected in the far-infrared, with SFR = 1-150 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The infrared luminosity is highly correlated with cluster X-ray gas cooling times for cool-core clusters (gas cooling time <1 Gyr), strongly suggesting that the star formation in these BCGs is influenced by the cluster-scale cooling process. The occurrence of the molecular gas tracing H{alpha} emission is also correlated with obscured star formation. For all but the most luminous BCGs (L{sub TIR} > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }), only a small ({approx}<0.4 mag) reddening correction is required for SFR(H{alpha}) to agree with SFR{sub FIR}. The relatively low H{alpha} extinction (dust obscuration), compared to values reported for the general star-forming population, lends further weight to an alternate (external) origin for the cold gas. Finally, we use a stacking analysis of non-cool-core clusters to show that the majority of the fuel for star formation in the FIR-bright BCGs is unlikely to originate from normal stellar mass loss.

  9. Multilayer formation and evaporation of deuterated ices in prestellar and protostellar cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taquet, Vianney; Charnley, Steven B. [Astrochemistry Laboratory and The Goddard Center for Astrobiology, Mailstop 691, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20770 (United States); Sipilä, Olli [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-08-10

    Extremely large deuteration of several molecules has been observed toward prestellar cores and low-mass protostars for a decade. New observations performed toward low-mass protostars suggest that water presents a lower deuteration in the warm inner gas than in the cold external envelope. We coupled a gas-grain astrochemical model with a one-dimensional model of a collapsing core to properly follow the formation and the deuteration of interstellar ices as well as their subsequent evaporation in the low-mass protostellar envelopes with the aim of interpreting the spatial and temporal evolutions of their deuteration. The astrochemical model follows the formation and the evaporation of ices with a multilayer approach and also includes a state-of-the-art deuterated chemical network by taking the spin states of H{sub 2} and light ions into account. Because of their slow formation, interstellar ices are chemically heterogeneous and show an increase of their deuterium fractionation toward the surface. The differentiation of the deuteration in ices induces an evolution of the deuteration within protostellar envelopes. The warm inner region is poorly deuterated because it includes the whole molecular content of ices, while the deuteration predicted in the cold external envelope scales with the highly deuterated surface of ices. We are able to reproduce the observed evolution of water deuteration within protostellar envelopes, but we are still unable to predict the super-high deuteration observed for formaldehyde and methanol. Finally, the extension of this study to the deuteration of complex organics, important for the prebiotic chemistry, shows good agreement with the observations, suggesting that we can use the deuteration to retrace their mechanisms and their moments of formation.

  10. ASAXS study on the formation of core-shell Ag/Au nanoparticles in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haug, J; Kruth, H; Dubiel, M [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Institute of Physics, Von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Hofmeister, H [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Haas, S; Tatchev, D; Hoell, A, E-mail: joerg.haug@physik.uni-halle.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Institute of Applied Materials, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-12-16

    Nanosized metal particles of various configurations embedded in surface regions of glass have great potential as nonlinear optical materials for photonic devices. We have prepared Ag/Au nanoparticles in core-shell configuration in soda-lime silicate glass by double-ion implantation and investigated their structural characteristics by anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering (ASAXS) and transmission electron microscopy. Measurements at x-ray energies slightly below the Au L{sub 3} edge indicate the formation of bimetallic Ag/Au shells in some of the nanoparticles for high-dose ion implantation. An element-specific analysis of the ASAXS results allowed us not only to validate and quantify the core-shell structure, but simultaneously also the composition of the shells. Hollow nanoparticles were found for an Au-Ag implantation sequence, whereas an Ag-Au sequence generates a diluted core composition. The shift of the maximum position of optical absorption of the samples due to surface plasmon resonance of bimetallic nanoparticles, as monitored by optical spectroscopy, revealed the considerable influence of the respective particle configuration.

  11. Formation and Collapse of Quiescent Cloud Cores Induced by Dynamic Compressions

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, Gilberto C; Shadmehri, Mohsen; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    We present numerical hydrodynamical simulations of the formation, evolution and gravitational collapse of isothermal molecular cloud cores induced by generic turbulent compressions in spherical geometry. A compressive wave is set up in a constant sub-Jeans density distribution. As the wave travels through the simulation grid, a shock-bounded layer is formed. The inner shock of this layer reaches and bounces off the center, leaving behind a central core with an initial almost uniform density distribution, surrounded by an envelope consisting of the material in the shock-bounded shell, with a power-law density profile with index close to -2 even in non-collapsing cases. The resulting density structure resembles a quiescent core of radius < 0.1 pc, with a Bonnor-Ebert-like (BE-like) profile, although it has significant dynamical differences: it is initially non-self-gravitating and confined by the ram pressure of the infalling material, and consequently, growing continuously in mass and size. With the appropi...

  12. Minimum Core Masses for Giant Planet Formation With Realistic Equations of State and Opacities

    CERN Document Server

    Piso, Ana-Maria A; Murray-Clay, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    Giant planet formation by core accretion requires a core that is sufficiently massive to trigger runaway gas accretion in less that the typical lifetime of protoplanetary disks. We explore how the minimum required core mass, M_crit, depends on a non-ideal equation of state and on opacity changes due to grain growth, across a range of stellocentric distances from 5-100 AU. This minimum M_crit applies when planetesimal accretion does not substantially heat the atmosphere. Compared to an ideal gas polytrope, the inclusion of molecular hydrogen (H_2) dissociation and variable occupation of H_2 rotational states increases M_crit. Specifically, M_crit increases by a factor of ~2 if the H_2 spin isomers, ortho- and parahydrogen, are in thermal equilibrium, and by a factor of ~2-4 if the ortho-to-para ratio is fixed at 3:1. Lower opacities due to grain growth reduce M_crit. For a standard disk model around a Solar mass star, we calculate M_crit ~ 8 M_Earth at 5 AU, decreasing to ~5 M_Earth at 100 AU, for a realistic ...

  13. Impact vaporization of planetesimal cores in the late stages of planet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Richard G.; Root, Seth; Lemke, Raymond W.; Stewart, Sarah T.; Jacobsen, Stein B.; Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2015-04-01

    Differentiated planetesimals delivered iron-rich material to the Earth and Moon in high-velocity collisions at the end stages of accretion. The physical process of accreting this late material has implications for the geochemical evolution of the Earth-Moon system and the timing of Earth’s core formation. However, the fraction of a planetesimal’s iron core that is vaporized by an impact is not well constrained as a result of iron’s poorly understood equation of state. Here we determine the entropy in the shock state of iron using a recently developed shock-and-release experimental technique implemented at the Sandia National Laboratory Z-Machine. We find that the shock pressure required to vaporize iron is 507 (+65, -85) GPa, which is lower than the previous theoretical estimate (887 GPa) and readily achieved by the high velocity impacts at the end stages of accretion. We suggest that impact vaporization of planetesimal cores dispersed iron over the surface of the growing Earth and enhanced chemical equilibration with the mantle. In addition, the comparatively low abundance of highly siderophile elements in the lunar mantle and crust can be explained by the retention of a smaller fraction of vaporized planetesimal iron on the Moon, as compared with Earth, due to the Moon’s lower escape velocity.

  14. Differentiation of Asteroid 4 Vesta: Core Formation by Iron Rain in a Silicate Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Geochemical observations of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites, together with observations made by NASA's Dawn spacecraft while orbiting asteroid 4 Vesta, suggest that Vesta resembles H chondrites in bulk chemical composition, possible with about 25 percent of a CM-chondrite like composition added in. For this model, the core is 15 percent by mass (or 8 percent by volume) of the asteroid, with a composition of 73.7 percent by weight Fe, 16.0 percent by weight S, and 10.3 percent by weight Ni. The abundances of moderately siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P) in eucrites require that essentially all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. The combination of the melting phase relationships for the silicate and metal phases, together with the moderately siderophile element concentrations together require that complete melting of the metal phase occurred (temperature is greater than1350 degrees Centigrade), along with substantial (greater than 40 percent) melting of the silicate material. Thus, core formation on Vesta occurs as iron rain sinking through a silicate magma ocean.

  15. CO J = 2-1 LINE EMISSION IN CLUSTER GALAXIES AT z {approx} 1: FUELING STAR FORMATION IN DENSE ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagg, Jeff [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago (Chile); Pope, Alexandra; Alberts, Stacey [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Armus, Lee; Desai, Vandana [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Department of Physics, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Bussmann, Robert S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Le Floc' h, Emeric [AIM, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, Bat. 709, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Melbourne, Jason [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: jwagg@eso.org [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    We present observations of CO J = 2-1 line emission in infrared-luminous cluster galaxies at z {approx} 1 using the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our two primary targets are optically faint, dust-obscured galaxies (DOGs) found to lie within 2 Mpc of the centers of two massive (>10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) galaxy clusters. CO line emission is not detected in either DOG. We calculate 3{sigma} upper limits to the CO J = 2-1 line luminosities, L'{sub CO} < 6.08 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} and <6.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}. Assuming a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor derived for ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the local universe, this translates to limits on the cold molecular gas mass of M{sub H{sub 2}}< 4.86 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} and M{sub H{sub 2}}< 5.30 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }. Both DOGs exhibit mid-infrared continuum emission that follows a power law, suggesting that an active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributes to the dust heating. As such, estimates of the star formation efficiencies in these DOGs are uncertain. A third cluster member with an infrared luminosity, L{sub IR} < 7.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }, is serendipitously detected in CO J = 2-1 line emission in the field of one of the DOGs located roughly two virial radii away from the cluster center. The optical spectrum of this object suggests that it is likely an obscured AGN, and the measured CO line luminosity is L'{sub CO} = (1.94 {+-} 0.35) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}, which leads to an estimated cold molecular gas mass M{sub H{sub 2}}= (1.55{+-}0.28) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. A significant reservoir of molecular gas in a z {approx} 1 galaxy located away from the cluster center demonstrates that the fuel can exist to drive an increase in star formation and AGN activity at the outskirts of high-redshift clusters.

  16. ALMA Observations of Warm Dense Gas in NGC 1614 --- Breaking of Star Formation Law in the Central kpc

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, C K; Lu, N; Gao, Y; Diaz-Santos, T; Herrero-Illana, R; Meijerink, R; Privon, G; Zhao, Y -H; Evans, A S; König, S; Mazzarella, J M; Aalto, S; Appleton, P; Armus, L; Charmandaris, V; Chu, J; Haan, S; Inami, H; Murphy, E J; Sanders, D B; Schulz, B; van der Werf, P

    2014-01-01

    We present ALMA Cycle-0 observations of the CO (6-5) line emission and of the 435um dust continuum emission in the central kpc of NGC 1614, a local luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) at a distance of 67.8 Mpc (1 arcsec = 329 pc). The CO emission is well resolved by the ALMA beam (0".26 x 0".20) into a circum-nuclear ring, with an integrated flux of f_{CO(6-5)} = 898 (+-153) Jy km/s, which is 63(+-12)% of the total CO(6-5) flux measured by Herschel. The molecular ring, located between 100pc < r < 350pc from the nucleus, looks clumpy and includes seven unresolved (or marginally resolved) knots with median velocity dispersion of 40 km/s. These knots are associated with strong star formation regions with \\Sigma_{SFR} 100 M_\\sun/yr/kpc^{2} and \\Sigma_{Gas} 1.0E4 M_\\sun/pc^{2}. The non-detections of the nucleus in both the CO (6-5) line emission and the 435um continuum rule out, with relatively high confidence, a Compton-thick AGN in NGC 1614. Comparisons with radio continuum emission show a strong deviation fro...

  17. Special core analyses and relative permeability measurement on Almond formation reservoir rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.; Brinkmeyer, A.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on samples of rock from the Almond Formation in Greater Green River Basin of southwestern Wyoming. The core was from Arch Unit Well 121 of Patrick Draw field. Samples were taken from the 4,950 to 4,965 ft depth interval. Thin section evaluation, X-ray diffraction, routine permeability and porosity, capillary pressure and wettability tests were performed to characterize the samples. Fluid flow capacity characteristics were measured during two-phase unsteady- and steady-state and three-phase steady-state relative permeability tests. Test results are presented in tables and graphs. Relative permeability results are compared with those of a 260-mD, fired Berea sandstone sample which was previously subjected to similar tests. Brine relative permeabilities were similar for the two samples, whereas oil and gas relative permeabilities for the Almond formation rock were higher at equivalent saturation conditions compared to Berea results. Most of the tests described in this report were conducted at 74{degrees}F laboratory temperature. Additional tests are planned at 150{degrees}F temperature. Equipment and procedural modifications to perform the elevated temperature tests are described.

  18. Special core analyses and relative permeability measurement on Almond formation reservoir rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.; Brinkmeyer, A.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on samples of rock from the Almond Formation in Greater Green River Basin of southwestern Wyoming. The core was from Arch Unit Well 121 of Patrick Draw field. Samples were taken from the 4,950 to 4,965 ft depth interval. Thin section evaluation, X-ray diffraction, routine permeability and porosity, capillary pressure and wettability tests were performed to characterize the samples. Fluid flow capacity characteristics were measured during two-phase unsteady- and steady-state and three-phase steady-state relative permeability tests. Test results are presented in tables and graphs. Relative permeability results are compared with those of a 260-mD, fired Berea sandstone sample which was previously subjected to similar tests. Brine relative permeabilities were similar for the two samples, whereas oil and gas relative permeabilities for the Almond formation rock were higher at equivalent saturation conditions compared to Berea results. Most of the tests described in this report were conducted at 74[degrees]F laboratory temperature. Additional tests are planned at 150[degrees]F temperature. Equipment and procedural modifications to perform the elevated temperature tests are described.

  19. Multiple low-turbulence starless cores associated with intermediate- to high-mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Beuther, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the initial conditions for intermediate- to high-mass star formation, we observed two Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) that remain absorption features up to 70mum wavelength, with the PdBI in the 3.23mm dust continuum as well as the N2H+(1--0) and 13CS(2-1) line emission. While IRDC19175-4 is clearly detected in the 3.23mm continuum, the second source in the field, IRDC19175-5, is only barely observable above the 3sigma continuum detection threshold. However, the N2H+(1-0) observations reveal 17 separate sub-sources in the vicinity of the two IRDCs. Most of them exhibit low levels of turbulence (dv \\leq 1km/s), indicating that the fragmentation process in these cores may be dominated by the interplay of thermal pressure and gravity, but not so much by turbulence. Combining the small line widths with the non-detection up to 70mum and the absence of other signs of star formation activity, most of these 17 cores with masses between sub-solar to ~10M_sun are likely still in a starless phase. Furthermo...

  20. Nucleation engineered growth/formation of core-shell and hollow metal nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehra, Kamalesh; Verma, Manoj; Kumar, P. Senthil

    2016-05-01

    Herein, we present a simple yet versatile single step aqueous synthesis procedure for precisely controlling the formation of hollow as well as core-shell metal nanostructures. Modern refined Turkevich protocol has been effectively utilized so as to mechanistically understand the step-by-step autocatalytic process in the monodisperse synthesis of such exotic shaped metal nanostructures. Au core with Ag shell nanoparticles were optimized by the careful addition of Ag+ ions to the pristine gold nanoparticles, the negative charge on which efficiently attracts the Ag+-cations towards their surface and simultaneously reducing them, thereby consolidating the thin shell formation with ease. The shell thickness could as well be tuned by either changing the metal seed or cation concentration. Hollow Au nanostructures were obtained by the inverse addition of Au3+-anions to the as-prepared Ag nanoparticles, thus initiating the galvanic replacement process, wherein the concurrent oxidation of Ag0 and reduction of Au3+ takes place in a cohesive manner, resulting in the final etched nanoring / porous like morphology. The structure-property functional relationship of these artificial metal nanostructures were systematically studied utilizing optical absorption and microscopy techniques.

  1. A new model for the computation of the formation factor of core rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, A.; Chávez, O.; Zaldivar, J.; Godínez, F. A.; García, A.; Zenit, R.

    2017-04-01

    Among all the rock parameters measured by modern well logging tools, the formation factor is essential because it can be used to calculate the volume of oil- and/or gas in wellsite. A new mathematical model to calculate the formation factor is analytically derived from first principles. Given the electrical properties of both rock and brine (resistivities) and tortuosity (a key parameter of the model), it is possible to calculate the dependence of the formation factor with porosity with good accuracy. When the cementation exponent ceases to remain constant with porosity; the new model is capable of capturing both: the non-linear behavior (for small porosity values) and the typical linear one in log-log plots for the formation factor vs. porosity. Comparisons with experimental data from four different conventional core rock lithologies: sands, sandstone, limestone and volcanic are shown, for all of them a good agreement is observed. This new model is robust, simple and of easy implementation for practical applications. In some cases, it could substitute Archie's law replacing its empirical nature.

  2. MINIMUM CORE MASSES FOR GIANT PLANET FORMATION WITH REALISTIC EQUATIONS OF STATE AND OPACITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piso, Ana-Maria A.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Youdin, Andrew N., E-mail: apiso@cfa.harvard.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    Giant planet formation by core accretion requires a core that is sufficiently massive to trigger runaway gas accretion in less than the typical lifetime of protoplanetary disks. We explore how the minimum required core mass, M {sub crit}, depends on a non-ideal equation of state (EOS) and on opacity changes due to grain growth across a range of stellocentric distances from 5-100 AU. This minimum M {sub crit} applies when planetesimal accretion does not substantially heat the atmosphere. Compared to an ideal gas polytrope, the inclusion of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) dissociation and variable occupation of H{sub 2} rotational states increases M {sub crit}. Specifically, M {sub crit} increases by a factor of ∼2 if the H{sub 2} spin isomers, ortho- and parahydrogen, are in thermal equilibrium, and by a factor of ∼2-4 if the ortho-to-para ratio is fixed at 3:1. Lower opacities due to grain growth reduce M {sub crit}. For a standard disk model around a Solar mass star, we calculate M {sub crit} ∼ 8 M {sub ⊕} at 5 AU, decreasing to ∼5 M {sub ⊕} at 100 AU, for a realistic EOS with an equilibrium ortho-to-para ratio and for grain growth to centimeter-sizes. If grain coagulation is taken into account, M {sub crit} may further reduce by up to one order of magnitude. These results for the minimum critical core mass are useful for the interpretation of surveys that find exoplanets at a range of orbital distances.

  3. Reservoir condition special core analyses and relative permeability measurements on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone plugs. Almond formation plug tests were performed to evaluate multiphase, steady-state,reservoir-condition relative permeability measurement techniques and to examine the effect of temperature on relative permeability characteristics. Some conclusions from this project are as follows: An increase in temperature appeared to cause an increase in brine relative permeability results for an Almond formation plug compared to room temperature results. The plug was tested using steady-state oil/brine methods. The oil was a low-viscosity, isoparaffinic refined oil. Fontainebleu sandstone rock and fluid flow characteristics were measured and are reported. Most of the relative permeability versus saturation results could be represented by one of two trends -- either a k{sub rx} versus S{sub x} or k{sub rx} versus Sy trend where x and y are fluid phases (gas, oil, or brine). An oil/surfactant-brine steady-state relative permeability test was performed to examine changes in oil/brine relative permeability characteristics from changes in fluid IFTS. It appeared that, while low interfacial tension increased the aqueous phase relative permeability, it had no effect on the oil relative permeability. The BOAST simulator was modified for coreflood simulation. The simulator was useful for examining effects of variations in relative permeability and capillary pressure functions. Coreflood production monitoring and separator interface level measurement techniques were developed using X-ray absorption, weight methods, and RF admittance technologies. The three types of separators should be useful for routine and specialized core analysis applications.

  4. The JCMT and Herschel Gould Belt Surveys: A comparison of SCUBA-2 and Herschel data of dense cores in the Taurus dark cloud L1495

    CERN Document Server

    Ward-Thompson, Derek; Kirk, Jason; Marsh, Ken; Buckle, Jane; Hatchell, Jennifer; Nutter, David; Griffin, Matt; Di Francesco, James; André, Philippe; Beaulieu, Sylvie; Berry, David; Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Currie, Malcolm; Fich, Michel; Jenness, Timothy; Johnstone, Doug; Kirk, Helen; Mottram, Joseph; Pineda, Jaime; Quinn, Ciera; Sadavoy, Sarah; Salji, Carl; Tisi, Sam; Walker-Smith, Sarah; White, Glenn; Hill, Tracey; Könyves, Vera; Palmeirim, Pedro; Pezzuto, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We present a comparison of SCUBA-2 850-$\\mu$m and Herschel 70--500-$\\mu$m observations of the L1495 filament in the Taurus Molecular Cloud with the goal of characterising the SCUBA-2 Gould Belt Survey (GBS) data set. We identify and characterise starless cores in three data sets: SCUBA-2 850-$\\mu$m, Herschel 250-$\\mu$m, and Herschel 250-$\\mu$m spatially filtered to mimic the SCUBA-2 data. SCUBA-2 detects only the highest-surface-brightness sources, principally detecting protostellar sources and starless cores embedded in filaments, while Herschel is sensitive to most of the cloud structure, including extended low-surface-brightness emission. Herschel detects considerably more sources than SCUBA-2 even after spatial filtering. We investigate which properties of a starless core detected by Herschel determine its detectability by SCUBA-2, and find that they are the core's temperature and column density (for given dust properties). For similar-temperature cores, such as those seen in L1495, the surface brightness...

  5. Dense gas in high-latitude molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reach, William T.; Pound, Marc W.; Wilner, David J.; Lee, Youngung

    1995-01-01

    The nearby molecular clouds MBM 7, 12, 30, 32, 40, 41, and 55 were surveyed for tracers of dense gas, including the (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) rotational lines of CS and the (1-0) lines of HCO(+) and HCN. MBM 7 and MBM 12 contain dense cores, while the other clouds contain little or no traces of dense gas. Comparison of the emission from dense gas tracers to that of (13)CO reveals that the former are more compact in angular size as well as line width. An extensive CS(2-1) survey of part of MBM 12 reveals that the emission is characterized by clumps on approximately 3 min scales as well as extended emission. Observations of the CS(1-0) and (3-2) lines using telescopes with matched beam sizes reveal that the volume density must be at least approximately 10(exp 4.5)/cc within the (3-2) emitting regions, which are approximately 0.03 pc in radius. Electron excitation of the CS rotational levels is ruled out (in the cores) by comparing the (3-2)/(1-0) line ratios with models including H2 and electron collisions. The volume density in the cores is substantially larger than in the portions of the cloud traced by CO emission. The density increases into the cores as r(exp -2), suggesting dynamical collapse. The masses of the cores are close to the virial mass, suggesting they are dynamically bound. The cores in MBM 7 and MBM 12 are thus likely to form stars; they are the nearest sites of star formation.

  6. Genesis of Pre-Hurricane Felix (2007). Part 2; Warm Core Formation, Precipitation Evolution, and Predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, zhuo; Montgomery M. T.; Dunkerton, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part study examining the simulated formation of Atlantic Hurricane Felix (2007) in a cloud-representing framework. Here several open issues are addressed concerning the formation of the storm's warm core, the evolution and respective contribution of stratiform versus convective precipitation within the parent wave's pouch, and the sensitivity of the development pathway reported in Part I to different model physics options and initial conditions. All but one of the experiments include ice microphysics as represented by one of several parameterizations, and the partition of convective versus stratiform precipitation is accomplished using a standard numerical technique based on the high-resolution control experiment. The transition to a warm-core tropical cyclone from an initially cold-core, lower tropospheric wave disturbance is analyzed first. As part of this transformation process, it is shown that deep moist convection is sustained near the pouch center. Both convective and stratiform precipitation rates increase with time. While stratiform precipitation occupies a larger area even at the tropical storm stage, deep moist convection makes a comparable contribution to the total rain rate at the pregenesis stage, and a larger contribution than stratiform processes at the storm stage. The convergence profile averaged near the pouch center is found to become dominantly convective with increasing deep moist convective activity there. Low-level convergence forced by interior diabatic heating plays a key role in forming and intensifying the near-surface closed circulation, while the midlevel convergence associated with stratiform precipitation helps to increase the midlevel circulation and thereby contributes to the formation and upward extension of a tropospheric-deep cyclonic vortex. Sensitivity tests with different model physics options and initial conditions demonstrate a similar pregenesis evolution. These tests suggest that the genesis

  7. Metal-Silicate Differentiation from a Metal Pond Emulsion during Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2011-12-01

    The terrestrial planets demonstrate a heavy bombardment of impacts in their early formation history. Impacts are violent, energetic collisions that may melt the surface and/or cause segregation of impactor material including silicates and liquid metal iron. Although theoretical studies have been done with conceptual models for metal diapir descent to form terrestrial planetary cores, physical or computer modeling studies are scarce due to the strong variations in physical properties between liquid metals and solid silicates. We use laboratory fluid experiments to study core formation processes using liquid metal gallium and high viscosity glucose syrup which provide the buoyancy ratios expected for planetary interiors and low Reynolds number flow dynamics. Preliminary results indicate that the physical process of sinking metal diapirs form trailing conduits that may drag low density surface magmatic material to the base of the mantle. The low density material collects, grows at the base of the box, and rises back to the surface. We compare two cases of a pond made of 1) liquid metal emulsion and 2) a smooth coalesced metal pond. We find that emulsion experiments entrain greater amounts of low density fluid to the base of the box. Once the metal diapir reaches the base, conduit material exhibits flow reversal to return buoyantly to the surface. In the case of coalesced liquid metal diapirs, low density conduit material returns to the surface through the pre-established conduit. In the emulsion diapir case, we observe the formation of a new thermo-chemical buoyant plume that grows, exits the conduit, and travels along a new pathway to the surface. Metal plume descent and chemical plume rise velocities are consistent with Stokes velocity. Estimates of metal-silicate plume sinking time and thermo-chemical plume rise time for terrestrial planetary interiors are provided. We suggest the observation of a thermo-chemical plume as a source for orogeny at the surface of

  8. Effect of Ag Templates on the Formation of Au-Ag Hollow/Core-Shell Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chi-Hang; Chen, Shih-Yun; Song, Jenn-Ming; Haruta, Mitsutaka; Kurata, Hiroki

    2015-12-01

    Au-Ag alloy nanostructures with various shapes were synthesized using a successive reduction method in this study. By means of galvanic replacement, twined Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and single-crystalline Ag nanowires (NWs) were adopted as templates, respectively, and alloyed with the same amount of Au(+) ions. High angle annular dark field-scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) images observed from different rotation angles confirm that Ag NPs turned into AuAg alloy rings with an Au/Ag ratio of 1. The shifts of surface plasmon resonance and chemical composition reveal the evolution of the alloy ring formation. On the other hand, single-crystalline Ag NWs became Ag@AuAg core-shell wires instead of hollow nanostructure through a process of galvanic replacement. It is proposed that in addition to the ratio of Ag templates and Au ion additives, the twin boundaries of the Ag templates were the dominating factor causing hollow alloy nanostructures.

  9. Formation Mechanism of Inclusion in Self-Shielded Flux Cored Arc Welds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ping; LU Xiao-sheng; PAN Chuan; XUE Jin; LI Zheng-bang

    2005-01-01

    The formation mechanism of inclusion in welds with different aluminum contents was determined based on thermodynamic equilibrium in self-shielded flux cored arc welds. Inclusions in welds were systematically studied by optical microscopy, scanning microscopy and image analyzer. The results show that the average size and the contamination rate of inclusions in low-aluminum weld are lower than those in high-aluminum weld. Highly faceted AlN inclusions with big size in the high-aluminum weld are more than those in low-aluminum weld. As a result,the low temperature impact toughness of low-aluminum weld is higher than that of high-aluminum weld. Finally,the thermodynamic analysis indicates that thermodynamic result agrees with the experimental data.

  10. Hf-W chronometry of core formation in planetesimals inferred from weakly irradiated iron meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijer, Thomas S.; Sprung, Peter; Kleine, Thorsten; Leya, Ingo; Burkhardt, Christoph; Wieler, Rainer

    2012-12-01

    The application of Hf-W chronometry to determine the timescales of core formation in the parent bodies of magmatic iron meteorites is severely hampered by 182W burnout during cosmic ray exposure of the parent meteoroids. Currently, no direct method exists to correct for the effects of 182W burnout, making the Hf-W ages for iron meteorites uncertain. Here we present noble gas and Hf-W isotope systematics of iron meteorite samples whose W isotopic compositions remained essentially unaffected by cosmic ray interactions. Most selected samples have concentrations of cosmogenic noble gases at or near the lowermost level observed in iron meteorites and, for iron meteorite standards, have very low noble gas and radionuclide based cosmic ray exposure ages (Mbosi), however, has elevated ɛ182W relative to the other investigated irons, indicating metal-silicate separation ˜2-3 Myr later than in the parent bodies of the three major iron meteorite groups studied here.

  11. Core formation in the earth and shergottite parent body (SPB) - Chemical evidence from basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.; Drake, M. J.; Janssens, M.-J.; Wolf, R.; Ebihara, M.

    1986-01-01

    Abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements in the shergottite parental body (SPB) have been compared with those of the earth. To this end, new INAA and RNAA analyses of non-Antarctic meteorites have been performed, and the composition of the shergottite SPB mantle has been inferred from the compositions of the SNC meteorites. The composition of the earth's mantle has been inferred from the compositions of terrestrial basalt. Finally, the effects of volatile depletion, core formation, and mineral/melt fractionation on the abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements in the SPB and the earth have been taken into consideration. Compared to the earth, the SPB mantle is richer in moderately siderophile elements and more depleted with respect to chalcophile elements. The observed relative abundances of siderophile and chalcophile elements in the SPB and the earth mantles indicate that the SPB underwent accretion and/or differentiation processes which differ from those in the earth.

  12. The formation of galaxy stellar cores by the hierarchical merging of supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Volonteri, M; Haardt, F; Volonteri, Marta; Madau, Piero

    2003-01-01

    We investigate a hierarchical structure formation scenario in which galaxy stellar cores are created from the binding energy liberated by shrinking supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. The binary orbital decay heats the surrounding stars, eroding a preexisting 1/r^2 stellar cusp. We follow the merger history of dark matter halos and associated SMBHs via cosmological Monte Carlo realizations of the merger hierarchy from early times to the present in a LCDM cosmology. Massive black holes get incorporated through a series of mergers into larger and larger halos, sink to the center owing to dynamical friction, accrete a fraction of the gas in the merger remnant to become supermassive, and form a binary system. Stellar dynamical processes drive the binary to harden and eventually coalesce. A simple scheme is applied in which the loss cone is constantly refilled and a constant density core forms due to the ejection of stellar mass. We find that a model in which the effect of the hierarchy of SMBH interactions i...

  13. Radiation Transfer of Models of Massive Star Formation. I. Dependence on Basic Core Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yichen

    2011-01-01

    Radiative transfer calculations of massive star formation are presented. These are based on the Turbulent Core Model of McKee & Tan and self-consistently included a hydrostatic core, an inside-out expansion wave, a zone of free-falling rotating collapse, wide-angle dust-free outflow cavities, an active accretion disk, and a massive protostar. For the first time for such models, an optically thick inner gas disk extends inside the dust destruction front. This is important to conserve the accretion energy naturally and for its shielding effect on the outer region of the disk and envelope. The simulation of radiation transfer is performed with the Monte Carlo code of Whitney, yielding spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for the model series, from the simplest spherical model to the fiducial one, with the above components each added step-by-step. Images are also presented in different wavebands of various telescope cameras, including Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, SOFIA FORCAST and Herschel PACS and SPIRE. The exist...

  14. Modeling AGN Feedback in Cool-Core Clusters: The Formation of Cold Clumps

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven AGN feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the SMBH. When the intra-cluster medium (ICM) in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t_{TI}/t_{ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km/s. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall towards the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, s...

  15. Interactions between plutonism and detachments during metamorphic core complex formation, Serifos Island (Cyclades, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabillard, Aurélien; Arbaret, Laurent; Jolivet, Laurent; Le Breton, Nicole; Gumiaux, Charles; Augier, Romain; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-06-01

    In order to better understand the interactions between plutonic activity and strain localization during metamorphic core complex formation, the Miocene granodioritic pluton of Serifos (Cyclades, Greece) is studied. This pluton (11.6-9.5 Ma) intruded the Cycladic Blueschists during thinning of the Aegean domain along a system of low-angle normal faults belonging to the south dipping West Cycladic Detachment System (WCDS). Based on structural fieldwork, together with microstructural observations and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, we recognize a continuum of deformation from magmatic to brittle conditions within the magmatic body. This succession of deformation events is kinematically compatible with the development of the WCDS. The architecture of the pluton shows a marked asymmetry resulting from its interaction with the detachments. We propose a tectonic scenario for the emplacement of Serifos pluton and its subsequent cooling during the Aegean extension: (1) A first stage corresponds to the metamorphic core complex initiation and associated southwestward shearing along the Meghàlo Livadhi detachment. (2) In the second stage, the Serifos pluton has intruded the dome at shallow crustal level, piercing through the ductile/brittle Meghàlo Livadhi detachment. Southwest directed extensional deformation was contemporaneously transferred upward in the crust along the more localized Kàvos Kiklopas detachment. (3) The third stage was marked by synmagmatic extensional deformation and strain localization at the contact between the pluton and the host rocks resulting in nucleation of narrow shear zones, which (4) continued to develop after the pluton solidification.

  16. Numerical analysis of crust formation in molten core-concrete interaction using MPS method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiichi, Koshizuka; Shoji, Matsuura; Mizue, Sekine; Yoshiaki, Oka [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.; Hiroyuki, Obata [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A two-dimensional code is developed for molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) based on Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) method. Heat transfer is calculated without any specific correlations. A particle can be changed to a moving (fluid) or fixed (solid) particle corresponding to its enthalpy, which provide the phase change model for particles. The phase change model is verified by one-dimensional test calculations. Nucleate boiling and radiation heat transfers are considered between the core debris and the water pool. The developed code is applied to SWISS-2 experiment in which stainless steel is used as the melt material. Calculated heat flux to the water pool agrees well with the experiment, though the ablation speed in the concrete is a little slower. A stable crust is formed in a short time after water is poured in and the heat flux to the water pool rapidly decreases. MACE-M0 using corium is also analyzed. The ablation speed of concrete is slower than that of SWISS-2 because of low heat conduction in corium. An unlimited geometry is analyzed by setting the cyclic boundary condition on the sides. When the crust is broken by the decomposition gas, heat transfer to the water pool is kept high for a longer time because the crust re-formation is delayed. (author)

  17. FORMATION OF NECROTIC CORES IN THE GROWTH OF TUMORS: ANALYTIC RESULTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author studies the mechanism of formation of necrotic cores in the growth of tumors by using rigorous analysis of a mathematical model. The model modifies a corresponding tumor growth model proposed by Byrne and Chaplain in 1996, in the case where no inhibitors exist. The modification is made such that both necrotic tumors and nonnecrotic tumors can be considered in a joint way. It is proved that if the nutrient supply is below a threshold value, then there is not dormant tumor,and all evolutionary tumors will finally vanish. If instead the nutrient supply is above this threshold value then there is a unique dormant tumor which can either be necrotic or nonnecrotic, depending on the level of the nutrient supply and the level of dead-cell dissolution rate, and all evolutionary tumors will converge to this dormant tumor. It is also proved that, in the second case, if the dormant tumor is necrotic then an evolutionary tumor will form a necrotic core at a finite time, and if the dormant tumor is nonnecrotic then an evolutionary tumor will also be nonnecrotic from a finite time.

  18. An Iron-Rain Model for Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta is differentiated into a crust, mantle, and core, as demonstrated by studies of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites and by data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Most models for the differentiation and thermal evolution of Vesta assume that the metal phase completely melts within 20 degrees of the eutectic temperature, well before the onset of silicate melting. In such a model, core formation initially happens by Darcy flow, but this is an inefficient process for liquid metal and solid silicate. However, the likely chemical composition of Vesta, similar to H chondrites with perhaps some CM or CV chondrite, has 13-16 weight percent S. For such compositions, metal-sulfide melting will not be complete until a temperature of at least 1350 degrees Centigrade. The silicate solidus for Vesta's composition is between 1100 and 1150 degrees Centigrade, and thus metal and silicate melting must have substantially overlapped in time on Vesta. In this chemically and physically more likely view of Vesta's evolution, metal sulfide drops will sink by Stokes flow through the partially molten silicate magma ocean in a process that can be envisioned as "iron rain". Measurements of eucrites show that moderately siderophile elements such as Ni, Mo, and W reached chemical equilibrium between the metal and silicate phases, which is an important test for any Vesta differentiation model. The equilibration time is a function of the initial metal grain size, which we take to be 25-45 microns based on recent measurements of H6 chondrites. For these sizes and reasonable silicate magma viscosities, equilibration occurs after a fall distance of just a few meters through the magma ocean. Although metal drops may grow in size by merger with other drops, which increases their settling velocities and decreases the total core formation time, the short equilibration distance ensures that the moderately siderophile elements will reach chemical equilibrium between metal and silicate before

  19. The structure of molecular cloud W51 and dense cores--CO(J=1-0) and HCO+(J=1-0) spectral line mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; Hongjun; PEI; Chunchuan; ZENG; Qin

    2005-01-01

    We present a large scale map of about 15′×15′of CO(J=1-0) toward W51 giant molecular cloud (GMC), which covers the most active star-forming region of W51 GMC, and an interferometry HCO+(J=1-0) map of a high spatial resolution (I.e. 8″.7×6″.1) with a field of view (2′×2′) centered at W51IRS1. A structure model of W51GMC is obtained according to the results of the observations and analyses. The observations demonstrate that some small molecular cores generated by the collision between the W51GMC and the 60-73 km·s-1 foreground cloud are collapsing toward their own centers. In addition, 16 new molecular cores are discovered from the HCO+(J=1-0) map.

  20. On the formation of compact planetary systems via concurrent core accretion and migration

    CERN Document Server

    Coleman, Gavin A L

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of planet formation N-body simulations based on a comprehensive physical model that includes planetary mass growth through mutual embryo collisions and planetesimal/boulder accretion, viscous disc evolution, planetary migration and gas accretion onto planetary cores. The main aim of this study is to determine which set of model parameters leads to the formation of planetary systems that are similar to the compact low mass multi-planet systems that have been discovered by radial velocity surveys and the Kepler mission. We vary the initial disc mass, solids-to-gas ratio and the sizes of the boulders/planetesimals, and for a restricted volume of the parameter space we find that compact systems containing terrestrial planets, super-Earths and Neptune-like bodies arise as natural outcomes of the simulations. Disc models with low values of the solids-to-gas ratio can only form short-period super-Earths and Neptunes when small planetesimals/boulders provide the main source of accretion, since ...

  1. Antioxidant Treatment Reduces Formation of Structural Cores and Improves Muscle Function in RYR1Y522S/WT Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Michelucci

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Central core disease (CCD is a congenital myopathy linked to mutations in the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RYR1, the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel of skeletal muscle. CCD is characterized by formation of amorphous cores within muscle fibers, lacking mitochondrial activity. In skeletal muscle of RYR1Y522S/WT knock-in mice, carrying a human mutation in RYR1 linked to malignant hyperthermia (MH with cores, oxidative stress is elevated and fibers present severe mitochondrial damage and cores. We treated RYR1Y522S/WT mice with N-acetylcysteine (NAC, an antioxidant provided ad libitum in drinking water for either 2 or 6 months. Our results show that 2 months of NAC treatment starting at 2 months of age, when mitochondrial and fiber damage was still minimal, (i reduce formation of unstructured and contracture cores, (ii improve muscle function, and (iii decrease mitochondrial damage. The beneficial effect of NAC treatment is also evident following 6 months of treatment starting at 4 months of age, when structural damage was at an advanced stage. NAC exerts its protective effect likely by lowering oxidative stress, as supported by the reduction of 3-NT and SOD2 levels. This work suggests that NAC administration is beneficial to prevent mitochondrial damage and formation of cores and improve muscle function in RYR1Y522S/WT mice.

  2. Purification and characterization of adenovirus core protein VII: a histone-like protein that is critical for adenovirus core formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Moria, Nithesh; Williams, Martin; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Pouton, Colin W

    2017-07-01

    Adenovirus protein VII is a highly cationic core protein that forms a nucleosome-like structure in the adenovirus core by condensing DNA in combination with protein V and mu. It has been proposed that protein VII could condense DNA in a manner analogous to mammalian histones. Due to the lack of an expression and purification protocol, the interactions between protein VII and DNA are poorly understood. In this study we describe methods for the purification of biologically active recombinant protein VII using an E. coli expression system. We expressed a cleavable fusion of protein VII with thioredoxin and established methods for purification of this fusion protein in denatured form. We describe an efficient method for resolving the cleavage products to obtain pure protein VII using hydroxyapatite column chromatography. Mass spectroscopy data confirmed its mass and purity to be 19.4 kDa and >98 %, respectively. Purified recombinant protein VII spontaneously condensed dsDNA to form particles, as shown by dye exclusion assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and nuclease protection assay. Additionally, an in vitro bioluminescence assay revealed that protein VII can be used to enhance the transfection of mammalian cells with lipofectamine/DNA complexes. The availability of recombinant protein VII will facilitate future studies of the structure of the adenovirus core. Improved understanding of the structure and function of protein VII will be valuable in elucidating the mechanism of adenoviral DNA condensation, defining the morphology of the adenovirus core and establishing the mechanism by which adenoviral DNA enters the nucleus.

  3. Formation of Core-Shell Particles by Interfacial Radical Polymerization Initiated by a Glucose Oxidase-Mediated Redox System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Raveesh; Tibbitt, Mark W; Anseth, Kristi S; Bowman, Christopher N

    2013-03-12

    A unique design paradigm to form core-shell particles based on interfacial radical polymerization is described. The interfacial initiation system is comprised of an enzymatic reaction between glucose and glucose oxidase (GOx) to generate hydrogen peroxide, which, in the presence of iron (Fe(2+)), generates hydroxyl radicals that initiate polymerization. Shell formation on prefabricated polymeric cores is achieved by localizing the initiation reaction to the interface of the core and a surrounding aqueous monomer formulation into which it is immersed. The interfacially confined initiation reaction is accomplished by incorporating one or more of the initiating species in the particle core and the remainder of the complementary initiating components in the surrounding media such that interactions and the resulting initiation reaction occur at the interface. This work is focused on engineering the reaction behavior and mass transport processes to promote interfacially confined polymerization, controlling the rate of shell formation, and manipulating the structure of the core-shell particle. Specifically, incorporating GOx in the precursor solution used to fabricate cores ranging from 100 to 200 μm, and the remainder of the complementary initiating components and monomer in the bulk solution prior to interfacial polymerization yielded shells whose average thickness was 20 μm after 4 min of immersion and at a bulk iron concentration of 12.5 mM. When the locations of glucose and GOx are interchanged, the average thickness of the shell was 15 or 100 μm for bulk iron concentrations of 45 and 12.5 mM, respectively. The initial locations of glucose and GOx also determine the degree of interpenetration of the core and the shell. Specifically, for a bulk iron concentration of 45 mM, the thickness of the interpenetrating layer averaged 12 μm when GOx was initially within the core, whereas no interpenetrating layer was observed when glucose was incorporated in the core. The

  4. Mantle formation, coagulation, and the origin of cloud/core shine. I. Modelling dust scattering and absorption in the infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. P.; Köhler, M.; Ysard, N.; Dartois, E.; Godard, M.; Gavilan, L.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The observed cloudshine and coreshine (C-shine) have been explained in terms of grain growth leading to enhanced scattering from clouds in the J, H, and K photometric bands and the Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands. Aims: Using our global dust-modelling approach THEMIS (The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model at the IaS), we explore the effects of dust evolution in dense clouds, through aliphatic-rich carbonaceous mantle formation and grain-grain coagulation. Methods: We model the effects of wide band gap a-C:H mantle formation and the low-level aggregation of diffuse interstellar medium dust in the moderately-extinguished outer regions of molecular clouds. Results: The formation of wide band gap a-C:H mantles on amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon (a-C) grains leads to a decrease in their absorption cross-sections but no change in their scattering cross-sections at near-infrared wavelengths, resulting in higher albedos. Conclusions: The evolution of dust, with increasing density and extinction in the diffuse-to-dense molecular cloud transition, through mantle formation and grain aggregation, appears to be a likely explanation for the observed C-shine.

  5. Self consistent model of core formation and the effective metal-silicate partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, H.; Labrosse, S.; Kameyama, M.

    2010-12-01

    It has been long known that the formation of the core transforms gravitational energy into heat and is able to heat up the whole Earth by about 2000 K. However, the distribution of this energy within the Earth is still debated and depends on the core formation process considered. Iron rain in the surface magma ocean is supposed to be the first mechanism of separation for large planets, iron then coalesces to form a pond at the base of the magma ocean [Stevenson 1990]. The time scale of the separation can be estimated from falling velocity of the iron phase, which is estimated by numerical simulation [Ichikawa et al., 2010] as ˜ 10cm/s with iron droplet of centimeter-scale. A simple estimate of the metal-silicate partition from the P-T condition of the base of the magma ocean, which must coincide with between peridotite liquidus and solidus by a single-stage model, is inconsistent with Earth's core-mantle partition. P-T conditions where silicate equilibrated with metal are far beyond the liquidus or solidus temperature for about ˜ 700K. For example, estimated P-T conditions are: 40GPa at 3750K for Wade and Wood, 2005, T ≧ 3600K for Chabot and Agee, 2003 and 35GPa at T ≧ 3300K for Gessmann and Rubie, 2000. Meanwhile, Rubie et al., 2003 shown that metal couldn't equilibrate with silicate on the base of the magma ocean before crystallization of silicate. On the other hand, metal-silicate equilibration is achieved only ˜ 5 s in the state of iron rain. Therefore metal and silicate simultaneously separate and equilibrate each other at the P-T condition during the course to the iron pond. Taking into account the release of gravitational energy, temperature of the middle of the magma ocean would be higher than the liquidus. Estimation of the thermal structure during the iron-silicate separation requires the development of a planetary-sized calculation model. However, because of the huge disparity of scales between the cm-sized drops and the magma ocean, a direct

  6. Implications for Core Formation of the Earth from High Pressure-Temperature Au Partitioning Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, L. R.; Sharp, T. G.; Hervig, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    Siderophile elements in the Earth.s mantle are depleted relative to chondrites. This is most pronounced for the highly siderophile elements (HSEs), which are approximately 400x lower than chondrites. Also remarkable is the relative chondritic abundances of the HSEs. This signature has been interpreted as representing their sequestration into an iron-rich core during the separation of metal from silicate liquids early in the Earth's history, followed by a late addition of chondritic material. Alternative efforts to explain this trace element signature have centered on element partitioning experiments at varying pressures, temperatures, and compositions (P-T-X). However, first results from experiments conducted at 1 bar did not match the observed mantle abundances, which motivated the model described above, a "late veneer" of chondritic material deposited on the earth and mixed into the upper mantle. Alternatively, the mantle trace element signature could be the result of equilibrium partitioning between metal and silicate in the deep mantle, under P-T-X conditions which are not yet completely identified. An earlier model determined that equilibrium between metal and silicate liquids could occur at a depth of approximately 700 km, 27(plus or minus 6) GPa and approximately 2000 (plus or minus 200) C, based on an extrapolation of partitioning data for a variety of moderately siderophile elements obtained at lower pressures and temperatures. Based on Ni-Co partitioning, the magma ocean may have been as deep as 1450 km. At present, only a small range of possible P-T-X trace element partitioning conditions has been explored, necessitating large extrapolations from experimental to mantle conditions for tests of equilibrium models. Our primary objective was to reduce or remove the additional uncertainty introduced by extrapolation by testing the equilibrium core formation hypothesis at P-T-X conditions appropriate to the mantle.

  7. Formation of metamorphic core complexes in non-over-thickened continental crust: A case study of Liaodong Peninsula (East Asia)

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kun; Burov, Evgueni; Gumiaux, Charles; Chen, Yan; Lu, Gang; Mezri, Leila; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Pre-thickened hot orogenic crust is often considered a necessary condition for the formation of continental metamorphic core complexes (MCCs). However, the discovery of MCCs in the Liaodong Peninsula, where the crust has a normal thickness (~ 35 km), challenges the universality of this scenario. Therefore, we implement a series of 2-D numerical thermo-mechanical modeling experiments in which we investigate the conditions of MCC formation in normal crusts, as well as th...

  8. Core Flooding Experiments and Reactive Transport Modeling of Seasonal Heat Storage in the Hot Deep Gassum Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmslykke, Hanne D.; Kjøller, Claus; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal storage of excess heat in hot deep aquifers is considered to optimize the usage of commonly available energy sources. The chemical effects of heating the Gassum Sandstone Formation to up to 150 degrees C is investigated by combining laboratory core flooding experiments with petrographic...

  9. Effects of stellar rotation on star formation rates and comparison to core-collapse supernova rates

    CERN Document Server

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Bothwell, Matt S; Thompson, Todd A

    2013-01-01

    We investigate star formation rate (SFR) calibrations in light of recent developments in the modeling of stellar rotation. Using new published non-rotating and rotating stellar tracks, we study the integrated properties of synthetic stellar populations and find that the UV to SFR calibration for the rotating stellar population is 30% smaller than for the non-rotating stellar population, and 40% smaller for the Halpha to SFR calibration. These reductions translate to smaller SFR estimates made from observed UV and Halpha luminosities. Using the UV and Halpha fluxes of a sample of ~300 local galaxies, we derive a total (i.e., sky-coverage corrected) SFR within 11 Mpc of 120-170 Msun/yr and 80-130 Msun/yr for the non-rotating and rotating estimators, respectively. Independently, the number of core-collapse supernovae discovered in the same volume requires a total SFR of 270^{+110}_{-80} Msun/yr, suggesting a mild tension with the SFR estimates made with rotating calibrations. More generally, when compared with t...

  10. On the age and formation mechanism of the core of the Quadrantid meteoroid stream

    CERN Document Server

    Abedin, Abedin; Wiegert, Paul; Pokorny, Petr; Borovicka, Jiri; Brown, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Quadrantid meteor shower is among the strongest annual meteor showers, and has drawn the attention of scientists for several decades. The stream is unusual, among others, for several reasons: its very short duration around maximum activity (~12 - 14 hours) as detected by visual, photographic and radar observations, its recent onset (around 1835 AD) and because it had been the only major stream without an obvious parent body until 2003. Ever since, there have been debates as to the age of the stream and the nature of its proposed parent body, asteroid 2003 EH1. In this work, we present results on the most probable age and formation mechanism of the narrow portion of the Quadrantid meteoroid stream. For the first time we use data on eight high precision photographic Quadrantids, equivalent to gram - kilogram size, to constrain the most likely age of the core of the stream. Out of eight high-precision photographic Quadrantids, five pertain directly to the narrow portion of the stream. In addition, we also us...

  11. The Initial Conditions of Clustered Star Formation III. The Deuterium Fractionation of the Ophiuchus B2 Core

    CERN Document Server

    Friesen, R K; Myers, P C; Belloche, A; Shirley, Y L; Bourke, T L; André, P

    2010-01-01

    We present N2D+ 3-2 (IRAM) and H2D+ 1_11 - 1_10 and N2H+ 4-3 (JCMT) maps of the small cluster-forming Ophiuchus B2 core in the nearby Ophiuchus molecular cloud. In conjunction with previously published N2H+ 1-0 observations, the N2D+ data reveal the deuterium fractionation in the high density gas across Oph B2. The average deuterium fractionation R_D = N(N2D+)/N(N2H+) ~ 0.03 over Oph B2, with several small scale R_D peaks and a maximum R_D = 0.1. The mean R_D is consistent with previous results in isolated starless and protostellar cores. The column density distributions of both H2D+ and N2D+ show no correlation with total H2 column density. We find, however, an anticorrelation in deuterium fractionation with proximity to the embedded protostars in Oph B2 to distances >= 0.04 pc. Destruction mechanisms for deuterated molecules require gas temperatures greater than those previously determined through NH3 observations of Oph B2 to proceed. We present temperatures calculated for the dense core gas through the eq...

  12. Herschel observations of Extra-Ordinary Sources: H2S as a Probe of Dense Gas and Possibly Hidden Luminosity Toward the Orion KL Hot Core

    CERN Document Server

    Crockett, N R; Neill, J L; Black, J H; Blake, G A; Kleshcheva, M

    2014-01-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the light hydride H$_{2}$S obtained from the full spectral scan of the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL) taken as part of the HEXOS GT key program. In total, we observe 52, 24, and 8 unblended or slightly blended features from H$_{2}$$^{32}$S, H$_{2}$$^{34}$S, and H$_{2}$$^{33}$S, respectively. We only analyze emission from the so called hot core, but emission from the plateau, extended ridge, and/or compact ridge are also detected. Rotation diagrams for ortho and para H$_{2}$S follow straight lines given the uncertainties and yield T$_{\\rm rot}$=141$\\pm$12 K. This indicates H$_{2}$S is in LTE and is well characterized by a single kinetic temperature or an intense far-IR radiation field is redistributing the population to produce the observed trend. We argue the latter scenario is more probable and find that the most highly excited states (E$_{\\rm up}$>1000 K) are likely populated primarily by radiation pumping. We derive an H$_{2}$$^{32}$S column density, N$_{\\rm ...

  13. Warm dense crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Ryan A.; Seidler, Gerald T.

    2016-03-01

    The intense femtosecond-scale pulses from x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are able to create and interrogate interesting states of matter characterized by long-lived nonequilibrium semicore or core electron occupancies or by the heating of dense phases via the relaxation cascade initiated by the photoelectric effect. We address here the latter case of "warm dense matter" (WDM) and investigate the observable consequences of x-ray heating of the electronic degrees of freedom in crystalline systems. We report temperature-dependent density functional theory calculations for the x-ray diffraction from crystalline LiF, graphite, diamond, and Be. We find testable, strong signatures of condensed-phase effects that emphasize the importance of wide-angle scattering to study nonequilibrium states. These results also suggest that the reorganization of the valence electron density at eV-scale temperatures presents a confounding factor to achieving atomic resolution in macromolecular serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) studies at XFELs, as performed under the "diffract before destroy" paradigm.

  14. Dense Suspension Splash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wendy; Dodge, Kevin M.; Peters, Ivo R.; Ellowitz, Jake; Klein Schaarsberg, Martin H.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2014-03-01

    Upon impact onto a solid surface at several meters-per-second, a dense suspension plug splashes by ejecting liquid-coated particles. We study the mechanism for splash formation using experiments and a numerical model. In the model, the dense suspension is idealized as a collection of cohesionless, rigid grains with finite surface roughness. The grains also experience lubrication drag as they approach, collide inelastically and rebound away from each other. Simulations using this model reproduce the measured momentum distribution of ejected particles. They also provide direct evidence supporting the conclusion from earlier experiments that inelastic collisions, rather than viscous drag, dominate when the suspension contains macroscopic particles immersed in a low-viscosity solvent such as water. Finally, the simulations reveal two distinct routes for splash formation: a particle can be ejected by a single high momentum-change collision. More surprisingly, a succession of small momentum-change collisions can accumulate to eject a particle outwards. Supported by NSF through its MRSEC program (DMR-0820054) and fluid dynamics program (CBET-1336489).

  15. Human aortic fibrolipid lesions. Progenitor lesions for fibrous plaques, exhibiting early formation of the cholesterol-rich core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocan, T. M.; Guyton, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    The early development of the lipid-rich core and other features of atherosclerotic fibrous plaques has been elucidated by examining discrete, small regions of raised intima in human aorta, which often bear a resemblance to both fatty streaks and fibrous plaques. Approximately one-fourth of small raised lesions (less than 16 sq mm of surface area) contained little or no stainable lipid, while three-fourths had a characteristic appearance, which included a superficial layer of foam cells, a core of noncrystalline and/or crystalline lipid, and a developed or developing collagenous cap. Total intimal volumes of the lipid-containing lesions, termed "fibrolipid lesions," ranged from 3 to 43 microliters, with the majority less than 16 microliters. Core lipid in the smallest lesions was located in the musculoelastic layer of the intima. In larger lesions the core extended luminally into the elastic hyperplastic layer, and cholesterol crystals were found more frequently. Total cholesterol concentration in fibrolipid lesions was similar to that in fatty streaks; however, the ratio of unesterified to total cholesterol was relatively high, similar to that found in fibrous plaques. It is concluded that 1) the formation of a lipid-rich core and cholesterol crystallization are early events in the development of many raised lesions; 2) the consistent association between the superficial layer of foam cells and the deep-lying lipid-rich core raises the possibility of an influence, possibly indirect, of foam-cell lipid metabolism on core formation; and 3) the fibrolipid lesion may represent one stage in a potential transitional morphologic sequence between fatty streak and fibrous plaque. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:4025509

  16. Solar Wind Strahl Observations and Their Implication to the Core-Halo Formation due to Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2011-01-01

    A study of the kinetic properties of the strahl electron velocity distribution functions (VDF?s) in the solar wind is presented. This study focuses on the mechanisms that control and regulate the electron VDF?s and the stability of the strahl electrons in the solar wind; mechanisms that are not yet well understood. Various parameters are investigated such as the strahl-electron density, temperature anisotropy, and electron heat-flux. These parameters are used to investigate the stability of the strahl population. The analysis check for whether the strahl electrons are constrained by some instability (e.g., the whistler or KAW instabilities), or are maintained by other types of processes. The electron heat-flux and temperature anisotropy are determined by modeling of the 3D-VDF?s from which the moments properties of the various populations are obtained. The results of this study have profound implication on the current hypothesis about the probable formation of the solar wind halo electrons produced from the scattering of the strahl population. This hypothesis is strengthened by direct observations of the strahl electrons being scattered into the core-halo in an isolated event. The observation implies that the scattering of the strahl is not a continuous process but occurs in bursts in regions where conditions for wave growth providing the scattering are optimum. Sometimes, observations indicate that the strahl component is anisotropic (Tper/Tpal approx. 2). This provides a possible free energy source for the excitation of whistler waves as a possible scattering mechanism, however this condition is not always observed. The study is based on high time resolution data from the Cluster/PEACE electron spectrometer.

  17. On the chemical ladder of esters. Detection and formation of ethyl formate in the W51 e2 hot molecular core

    CERN Document Server

    Rivilla, V M; Martín-Pintado, J; Fontani, F; Caselli, P; Cesaroni, R

    2016-01-01

    The detection of organic molecules with increasing complexity and potential biological relevance is opening the possibility to understand the formation of the building blocks of life in the interstellar medium. One of the families of molecules with astrobiological interest are the esters, whose simplest member, methyl formate, is rather abundant in star-forming regions. The next step in the chemical complexity of esters is ethyl formate, C$_2$H$_5$OCHO. Only two detections of this species have been reported so far, which strongly limits our understanding of how complex molecules are formed in the interstellar medium. We have searched for ethyl formate towards the W51 e2 hot molecular core, one of the most chemically rich sources in the Galaxy and one of the most promising regions to study prebiotic chemistry, especially after the recent discovery of the P$-$O bond, key in the formation of DNA. We have analyzed a spectral line survey towards the W51 e2 hot molecular core, which covers 44 GHz in the 1, 2 and 3 ...

  18. Morphology and film formation of poly(butyl methacrylate)-polypyrrole core-shell latex particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijs, F; Lang, J

    2000-01-01

    Core-shell latex particles made of a poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA) core and a thin polypyrrole (PPy) shell were synthesized by two-stage polymerization. In the first stage, PBMA latex particles were synthesized in a semicontinuous process by free-radical polymerization. PBMA latex particles were l

  19. The near infrared (0.8-2.6 mu m) absorption spectrum of a dense sodium vapor and possible mechanisms of the spectrum formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigoryan, GG; Leonov, AG; Manykin, EA; Rudenko, AA; Sitnikov, MG; Starostin, AN

    2003-01-01

    The absorption coefficient of a dense sodium vapor (N(0)similar to10(17)-10(18) cm(-3)) in the near infrared spectral range (0.8-2.6 mum) was measured in a homogeneously heated isolated cell. In the range of parameters studied, the sample exhibits significant absorption. Neither the observed spectra

  20. From text to structured data: Converting a word-processed floristic checklist into Darwin Core Archive format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsen, David; Knapp, Sandra; Georgiev, Teodor; Stoev, Pavel; Penev, Lyubomir

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes a pilot project to convert a conventional floristic checklist, written in a standard word processing program, into structured data in the Darwin Core Archive format. After peer-review and editorial acceptance, the final revised version of the checklist was converted into Darwin Core Archive by means of regular expressions and published thereafter in both human-readable form as traditional botanical publication and Darwin Core Archive data files. The data were published and indexed through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) Integrated Publishing Toolkit (IPT) and significant portions of the text of the paper were used to describe the metadata on IPT. After publication, the data will become available through the GBIF infrastructure and can be re-used on their own or collated with other data.

  1. On the chemical ladder of esters. Detection and formation of ethyl formate in the W51 e2 hot molecular core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Fontani, F.; Caselli, P.; Cesaroni, R.

    2017-02-01

    Context. In recent years, the detection of organic molecules with increasing complexity and potential biological relevance is opening the possibility to understand the formation of the building blocks of life in the interstellar medium. One of the families of molecules of substantial astrobiological interest are the esters. The simplest ester, methyl formate (CH3OCHO), is rather abundant in star-forming regions. The next step in the chemical complexity of esters is ethyl formate, C2H5OCHO. Despite the increase in sensitivity of current telescopes, the detection of complex molecules with more than ten atoms such as C2H5OCHO is still a challenge. Only two detections of this species have been reported so far, which strongly limits our understanding of how complex molecules are formed in the interstellar medium. New detections towards additional sources with a wide range of physical conditions are crucial to differentiate between competing chemical models based on dust grain surface and gas-phase chemistry. Aims: We have searched for ethyl formate towards the W51 e2 hot molecular core, one of the most chemically rich sources in the Galaxy and one of the most promising regions to study prebiotic chemistry, especially after the recent discovery of the P-O bond, key in the formation of DNA. Methods: We have analyzed a spectral line survey towards the W51 e2 hot molecular core, which covers 44 GHz in the 1, 2 and 3 mm bands, carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. Results: We report the detection of the trans and gauche conformers of ethyl formate. A local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis indicates that the excitation temperature is 78 ± 10 K and that the two conformers have similar source-averaged column densities of (2.0 ± 0.3) × 10-16 cm-2 and an abundance of 10-8. We compare for the first time the observed molecular abundances of ethyl formate with different competing chemical models based on grain surface and gas-phase chemistry. Conclusions: We propose that

  2. The initial conditions of isolated star formation - X. A suggested evolutionary diagram for prestellar cores

    CERN Document Server

    Simpson, R J; Nutter, D; Ward-Thompson, D; Whitworth, A P

    2011-01-01

    We propose an evolutionary path for prestellar cores on the radius-mass diagram, which is analogous to stellar evolutionary paths on the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram. Using James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) observations of L1688 in the Ophiuchus star-forming complex, we analyse the HCO+ (J=4\\rightarrow3) spectral line profiles of prestellar cores. We find that of the 58 cores observed, 14 show signs of infall in the form of a blue-asymmetric double-peaked line profile. These 14 cores all lie beyond the Jeans mass line for the region on a radius-mass plot. Furthermore another 10 cores showing tentative signs of infall, in their spectral line profile shapes, appear on or just over the Jeans mass line. We therefore propose the manner in which a prestellar core evolves across this diagram. We hypothesise that a core is formed in the low-mass, low-radius region of the plot. It then accretes quasistatically, increasing in both mass and radius. When it crosses the limit of gravitational instability it begins to co...

  3. Accretion-driven core collapse and the collisional formation of massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnell, C Clarke I

    2008-01-01

    We consider the conditions required for a cluster core to shrink, by adiabatic accretion of gas from the surrounding cluster, to densities such that stellar collisions are a likely outcome. We show that the maximum densities attained, and hence the viability of collisions, depends on a competition between core shrinkage (driven by accretion) and core puffing up (driven by relaxation effects). The expected number of collisions scales as $N_{core}^{5/3} \\tilde v^2$ where $N_{core}$ is the number of stars in the cluster core and $\\tilde v$ is the free fall velocity of the parent cluster (gas reservoir). Thus whereas collisions are very unlikely in a relatively low mass, low internal velocity system such as the Orion Nebula Cluster, they become considerably more important at the mass and velocity scale characteristic of globular clusters. Thus stellar collisions in response to accretion induced core shrinkage remains a viable prospect in more massive clusters, and may contribute to the production of intermediate ...

  4. Dense-cored vesicles, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria are closely associated with non-specialized parts of plasma membrane of nerve terminals: implications for exocytosis and calcium buffering by intraterminal organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysakowski, A; Figueras, H; Price, S D; Peng, Y Y

    1999-01-18

    To determine whether there are anatomical correlates for intraterminal Ca2+ stores to regulate exocytosis of dense-cored vesicles (DCVs) and whether these stores can modulate exocytosis of synaptic vesicles, we studied the spatial distributions of DCVs, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER), and mitochondria in 19 serially reconstructed nerve terminals in bullfrog sympathetic ganglia. On average, each bouton had three active zones, 214 DCVs, 26 SER fragments (SERFs), and eight mitochondria. DCVs, SERFs and mitochondria were located, on average, 690, 624, and 526 nm, respectively, away from active zones. Virtually no DCVs were within "docking" (i.e., similar to those for exocytosis of synaptic vesicles. Because there were virtually no SERFs or mitochondria within 50 nm of any active zone, Ca2+ modulation by these organelles is unlikely to affect ACh release evoked by a single action potential. In contrast, 30% of DCVs and 40% of SERFs were located within 50 nm of the nonspecialized regions of the plasma membrane. Because each bouton had at least one SERF within 50 nm of the plasma membrane and most of these SERFs had DCVs, but not mitochondria, near them, it is possible for Ca2+ release from the SER to provide the Ca2+ necessary for DCV exocytosis. The fact that 60% of the mitochondria had some part within 50 nm of the plasma membrane means that it is possible for mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering to affect DCV exocytosis.

  5. An X-ray and Neutron Scattering Study of the Formation of Core-Shell Type Polyoxometalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Panchao; Wu, Bin; Mamontov, Eugene; Daemen, Luke L.; Cheng, Yongqiang; Li, Tao; Seifert, Soenke; Hong, Kunlun; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Keum, Jong Kahk; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.

    2016-03-02

    A typical type of core-shell polyoxometalates can be obtained through the Keggin-type polyoxometalatetemplated growth of a layer of spherical shell structure of {Mo72Fe30}. Small angle X-ray scattering is used to study the structural features and stability of the core-shell structures in aqueous solutions. Timeresolved small angle X-ray scattering is applied to monitor the synthetic reactions and a three-stage formation mechanism is proposed to describe the synthesis of the core-shell polyoxometalates based on the monitoring results. New protocols have been developed by fitting the X-ray data with customed physical models, which provide more convincing, objective, and completed data interpretation. Quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering are used to probe the dynamics of water molecules in the core-shell structures and two different types of water molecules, the confined and structured water, are observed. These water molecules play an important role in bridging core and shell structures and stabilizing the cluster structures.

  6. The Formation of Free-Floating Brown Dwarves and Planetary-Mass Objects by Photo-Erosion of Prestellar Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Whitworth, A P

    2004-01-01

    We explore the possibility that, in the vicinity of an OB star, a prestellar core which would otherwise have formed an intermediate or low-mass star may form a free-floating brown dwarf or planetary-mass object, because the outer layers of the core are eroded by the ionizing radiation from the OB star before they can accrete onto the protostar at the centre of the core. The masses of objects formed in this way are given approximately by $\\sim 0.010 M_\\odot (a_{\\rm I} / 0.3 {\\rm km} {\\rm s}^{-1})^6 (\\dot{\\cal N}_{\\rm Lyc} / 10^{50} {\\rm s}^{-1})^{-1/3} (n_{\\rm 0} / 10^3 {\\rm cm}^{-3})^{-1/3} $, where $a_{\\rm I}$ is the isothermal sound speed in the neutral gas of the core, $\\dot{\\cal N}_{\\rm Lyc}$ is the rate of emission of Lyman continuum photons from the OB star (or stars), and $n_{\\rm 0}$ is the number-density of protons in the HII region surrounding the core. We conclude that the formation of low-mass objects by this mechanism should be quite routine, because the mechanism operates over a wide range of con...

  7. Formation of Dense Pore Structure by Te Addition in Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3: An Approach to Minimize Lattice Thermal Conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Waqar Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We herein report the electronic and thermal transport properties of p-type Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 polycrystalline bulks with dense pore structure. Dense pore structure was fabricated by vaporization of residual Te during the pressureless annealing of spark plasma sintered bulks of Te coated Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 powders. The lattice thermal conductivity was effectively reduced to the value of 0.35 W m−1 K−1 at 300 K mainly due to the phonon scattering by pores, while the power factor was not significantly affected. An enhanced ZT of 1.24 at 300 K was obtained in spark plasma sintered and annealed bulks of 3 wt.% Te coated Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 by these synergetic effects.

  8. Carbon Solubility in Silicon-Iron-Bearing Metals during Core Formation on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Danielson, Lisa R.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Righter, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%) and low Iron(II) Oxide abundances (less than 2 wt%). Based on these extreme values, the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials was estimated to be approximately 3 to 7 log(sub 10) units below the IW buffer (Delta IW-3 to Delta IW-7). This highly reducing nature of the planet has resulted in a large core and relatively thin mantle, extending to only approximately 420 km depth (corresponding to a core-mantle boundary pressure of approximately 4-7 GPa) within the planet. Furthermore, MESSENGER results have suggested the presence of carbon on the surface of the planet. Previous experimental results from have also suggested the possibility of a primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, produced after a global magma ocean event. With these exotic conditions of this compositional end-member planet, it begs the question, what is the core composition of Mercury? Although no definitive conclusion has been reached, previous studies have made advances towards answering this question. Riner et al. and Chen et al. looked at iron sulfide systems and implemented various crystallization and layered core scenarios to try and determine the composition and structure of Mercury's core. Malavergne et al. examined core crystallization scenarios in the presence of sulfur and silicon. Hauck et al. used the most recent geophysical constraints from the MESSENGER spacecraft to model the internal structure of Mercury, including the core, in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. More recently, Chabot et al. conducted a series of metal-silicate partitioning experiments in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. These results showed the core of Mercury has the potential to contain more than 15 wt% silicon. However, with the newest results from MESSENGER's low altitude campaign, carbon is another

  9. Dense topological spaces and dense continuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldwoah, Khaled A.

    2013-09-01

    There are several attempts to generalize (or "widen") the concept of topological space. This paper uses equivalence relations to generalize the concept of topological space via the concept of equivalence relations. By the generalization, we can introduce from particular topology on a nonempty set X many new topologies, we call anyone of these new topologies a dense topology. In addition, we formulate some simple properties of dense topologies and study suitable generalizations of the concepts of limit points, closeness and continuity, as well as Jackson, Nörlund and Hahn dense topologies.

  10. Formation of accretion centers in simulations of colliding uniform density H$_2$ cores

    CERN Document Server

    Arreaga-Garcia, G

    2015-01-01

    We test here the first stage of a route of modifications to be applied to the public GADGET2 code for dynamically identifying accretion centers during the collision process of two adjacent and identical gas cores. Each colliding core has a uniform density profile and rigid body rotation; its mass and size have been chosen to represent the observed core $L1544$; for the thermal and rotational energy ratios with respect to the potential energy, we assume the values $\\alpha=0.3$ and $\\beta=0.1$, respectively. These values favor the gravitational collapse of the core. We here study cases of both -head-on and off-center collisions, in which the pre-collision velocity increases the initial sound speed of the barotropic gas by up to several times. In a simulation the accretion centers are formed by the highest density particles, so we here report their location and properties in order to realize the collision effects on the collapsing and colliding cores. In one of the models we observe a roughly spherical distribut...

  11. Metal-silicate Partitioning and Its Role in Core Formation and Composition on Super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Laura; Jacobsen, Stein B.; Remo, John L.; Petaev, M. I.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    2017-02-01

    We use a thermodynamic framework for silicate-metal partitioning to determine the possible compositions of metallic cores on super-Earths. We compare results using literature values of the partition coefficients of Si and Ni, as well as new partition coefficients calculated using results from laser shock-induced melting of powdered metal-dunite targets at pressures up to 276 GPa, which approaches those found within the deep mantles of super-Earths. We find that larger planets may have little to no light elements in their cores because the Si partition coefficient decreases at high pressures. The planet mass at which this occurs will depend on the metal-silicate equilibration depth. We also extrapolate the equations of state (EOS) of FeO and FeSi alloys to high pressures, and present mass–radius diagrams using self-consistent planet compositions assuming equilibrated mantles and cores. We confirm the results of previous studies that the distribution of elements between mantle and core will not be detectable from mass and radius measurements alone. While observations may be insensitive to interior structure, further modeling is sensitive to compositionally dependent properties, such as mantle viscosity and core freeze-out properties. We therefore emphasize the need for additional high pressure measurements of partitioning as well as EOSs, and highlight the utility of the Sandia Z-facilities for this type of work.

  12. Formation, stratification, and mixing of the cores of Earth and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Seth A.; Rubie, David C.; Hernlund, John; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Nakajima, Miki

    2017-09-01

    Earth possesses a persistent, internally-generated magnetic field, whereas no trace of a dynamo has been detected on Venus, at present or in the past, although a high surface temperature and recent resurfacing events may have removed paleomagnetic evidence. Whether or not a terrestrial body can sustain an internally generated magnetic field by convection inside its metallic fluid core is determined in part by its initial thermodynamic state and its compositional structure, both of which are in turn set by the processes of accretion and differentiation. Here we show that the cores of Earth- and Venus-like planets should grow with stable compositional stratification unless disturbed by late energetic impacts. They do so because higher abundances of light elements are incorporated into the liquid metal that sinks to form the core as the temperatures and pressures of metal-silicate equilibration increase during accretion. We model this process and determine that this establishes a stable stratification that resists convection and inhibits the onset of a geodynamo. However, if a late energetic impact occurs, it could mechanically stir the core creating a single homogenous region within which a long-lasting geodynamo would operate. While Earth's accretion has been punctuated by a late giant impact with likely enough energy to mix the core (e.g. the impact that formed the Moon), we hypothesize that the accretion of Venus is characterized by the absence of such energetic giant impacts and the preservation of its primordial stratifications.

  13. Microscopic insight into the bilateral formation of carbon spirals from a symmetric iron core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Stangl, Andreas; Cox, David C; Silva, S Ravi P; Rümmeli, Mark H; Pichler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Mirrored carbon-spirals have been produced from pressured ferrocene via the bilateral extrusion of the spiral pairs from an iron core. A parametric plot of the surface geometry displays the fractal growth of the conical helix made with the logarithmic spiral. Electron microscopy studies show the core is a crystalline cementite which grows and transforms its shape from spherical to biconical as it extrudes two spiralling carbon arms. In a cross section along the arms we observe graphitic flakes arranged in a herringbone structure, normal to which defects propagate. Local-wave-pattern analysis reveals nanoscale defect patterns of two-fold symmetry around the core. The data suggest that the bilateral growth originates from a globular cementite crystal with molten surfaces and the nano-defects shape emerging hexagonal carbon into a fractal structure. Understanding and knowledge obtained provide a basis for the controlled production of advanced carbon materials with designed geometries.

  14. Meta-Cold Dark Matter: Dark Matter Halos with Cores from Hierarchical Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Strigari, L E; Bullock, J S; Strigari, Louis E.; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Bullock, James S.

    2006-01-01

    We show that dark matter emerging from late decays (z 0.1 Mpc), and simultaneously generates observable constant-density cores in small dark matter halos. We refer to this class of models as meta-Cold Dark Matter (mCDM), because it is born with non-relativistic velocities from the decays of cold thermal relics. The constant-density cores are a result of the low phase-space density of mCDM at birth. Warm dark matter cannot produce similar size phase-space limited cores without saturating the Ly-alpha power spectrum bounds. Dark matter dominated galaxy rotation curves and stellar velocity dispersion profiles may provide the best means to discriminate between mCDM and CDM. mCDM candidates are motivated by the particle spectrum of supersymmetric and extra dimensional extensions to the standard model of particle physics.

  15. New Technique for TOC Estimation Based on Thermal Core Logging in Low-Permeable Formations (Bazhen fm.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Evgeny; Popov, Yury; Spasennykh, Mikhail; Kozlova, Elena; Chekhonin, Evgeny; Zagranovskaya, Dzhuliya; Belenkaya, Irina; Alekseev, Aleksey

    2016-04-01

    A practical method of organic-rich intervals identifying within the low-permeable dispersive rocks based on thermal conductivity measurements along the core is presented. Non-destructive non-contact thermal core logging was performed with optical scanning technique on 4 685 full size core samples from 7 wells drilled in four low-permeable zones of the Bazhen formation (B.fm.) in the Western Siberia (Russia). The method employs continuous simultaneous measurements of rock anisotropy, volumetric heat capacity, thermal anisotropy coefficient and thermal heterogeneity factor along the cores allowing the high vertical resolution (of up to 1-2 mm). B.fm. rock matrix thermal conductivity was observed to be essentially stable within the range of 2.5-2.7 W/(m*K). However, stable matrix thermal conductivity along with the high thermal anisotropy coefficient is characteristic for B.fm. sediments due to the low rock porosity values. It is shown experimentally that thermal parameters measured relate linearly to organic richness rather than to porosity coefficient deviations. Thus, a new technique employing the transformation of the thermal conductivity profiles into continuous profiles of total organic carbon (TOC) values along the core was developed. Comparison of TOC values, estimated from the thermal conductivity values, with experimental pyrolytic TOC estimations of 665 samples from the cores using the Rock-Eval and HAWK instruments demonstrated high efficiency of the new technique for the organic rich intervals separation. The data obtained with the new technique are essential for the SR hydrocarbon generation potential, for basin and petroleum system modeling application, and estimation of hydrocarbon reserves. The method allows for the TOC richness to be accurately assessed using the thermal well logs. The research work was done with financial support of the Russian Ministry of Education and Science (unique identification number RFMEFI58114X0008).

  16. Anionic Pt in Silicate Melts at Low Oxygen Fugacity: Speciation, Partitioning and Implications for Core Formation Processes on Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medard, E.; Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Malouta, A.; Lee, C.-T.

    2017-01-01

    Most siderophile element concentrations in planetary mantles can be explained by metal/ silicate equilibration at high temperature and pressure during core formation. Highly siderophile elements (HSE = Au, Re, and the Pt-group elements), however, usually have higher mantle abundances than predicted by partitioning models, suggesting that their concentrations have been set by late accretion of material that did not equilibrate with the core. The partitioning of HSE at the low oxygen fugacities relevant for core formation is however poorly constrained due to the lack of sufficient experimental constraints to describe the variations of partitioning with key variables like temperature, pressure, and oxygen fugacity. To better understand the relative roles of metal/silicate partitioning and late accretion, we performed a self-consistent set of experiments that parameterizes the influence of oxygen fugacity, temperature and melt composition on the partitioning of Pt, one of the HSE, between metal and silicate melts. The major outcome of this project is the fact that Pt dissolves in an anionic form in silicate melts, causing a dependence of partitioning on oxygen fugacity opposite to that reported in previous studies.

  17. Formation of Silicon/Carbon Core-Shell Nanowires Using Carbon Nitride Nanorods Template and Gold Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyani Putri Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, silicon/carbon (Si/C core-shell nanowires (NWs were synthesized using gold nanoparticles (Au NPs coated carbon nitride nanorods (CN NRs as a template. To begin with, the Au NPs coated CN NRs were prepared by using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition assisted with hot-wire evaporation technique. Fourier transform infrared spectrum confirms the C–N bonding of the CN NRs, while X-ray diffraction pattern indicates the crystalline structure of the Au NPs and amorphous structure of the CN NRs. The Au NPs coated CN NRs were thermally annealed at temperature of 800°C in nitrogen ambient for one hour to induce the growth of Si/C core-shell NWs. The growth mechanism for the Si/C core-shell NWs is related to the nitrogen evolution and solid-liquid-solid growth process which is a result of the thermal annealing. The formation of Si/C core-shell NWs is confirmed by electron spectroscopic imaging analysis.

  18. Summative and Formative Assessments in Mathematics Supporting the Goals of the Common Core Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    Being proficient in mathematics involves having rich and connected mathematical knowledge, being a strategic and reflective thinker and problem solver, and having productive mathematical beliefs and dispositions. This broad set of mathematics goals is central to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. High-stakes testing often drives…

  19. Dynamics of Green AuNP Formation and Their Application in Core-Shell Nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Zhang, Jingdong; Jensen, Palle Skovhus

    The formation of gold nanoparticles in our optimized synthesis is achieved through reduction of tetrachloroauric acid in 2 - (N - morpholino)ethanesulphonic acid (MES) buffered glucose and stabilization by starch at room temperature. The formation has been followed by measuring the electrochemical...

  20. The earliest phases of star formation - A Herschel key project. The thermal structure of low-mass molecular cloud cores

    CERN Document Server

    Launhardt, R; Schmiedeke, A; Henning, Th; Krause, O; Balog, Z; Beuther, H; Birkmann, S; Hennemann, M; Kainulainen, J; Khanzadyan, T; Linz, H; Lippok, N; Nielbock, M; Pitann, J; Ragan, S; Risacher, C; Schmalzl, M; Shirley, Y L; Stecklum, B; Steinacker, J; Tackenberg, J

    2013-01-01

    The temperature and density structure of molecular cloud cores are the most important physical quantities that determine the course of the protostellar collapse and the properties of the stars they form. Nevertheless, density profiles often rely either on the simplifying assumption of isothermality or on observationally poorly constrained model temperature profiles. With the aim of better constraining the initial physical conditions in molecular cloud cores at the onset of protostellar collapse, we initiated the Guaranteed Time Key Project (GTKP) "The Earliest Phases of Star Formation" (EPoS) with the Herschel satellite. This paper gives an overview of the low-mass sources in the EPoS project, including all observations, the analysis method, and the initial results of the survey. We study the thermal dust emission of 12 previously well-characterized, isolated, nearby globules using FIR and submm continuum maps at up to eight wavelengths between 100 micron and 1.2 mm. Our sample contains both globules with sta...

  1. Nature of diffraction fringes originating in the core of core-shell nanoparticle Cu/SiO2 and formation mechanism of the structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnaev, A. R.; Kalashnikov, S. V.; Nomoev, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    This article is devoted to the analysis of the reasons for the occurrence of diffraction fringes in the cores of the core-shell nanoparticles Cu/SiO2. Moiré and diffraction fringes are observed while studying the nanoparticle cores under a transmission electron microscope. The formation of diffraction fringes is closely connected to the mechanism of nanoparticle formation under study and appears to be its consequence, letting us develop a hypothesis of metastable phase formation in nanoparticle cores. In our opinion, the emergence of diffraction fringes in cores of copper is connected to clasterisation in solid solution oversaturated with silicon α-Cu with the diffused interphase state. Only copper and oxygen (oxygen is presented as oxides in such types of copper as M0 - up to 0.01%; and M1 - up to 0.03%), Copper and silicon with oxygen in a stoichiometric proportion that is only sufficient for silicon dioxide formation (SiO2), Copper and silicon with oxygen in an amount that is sufficient not only for silicon dioxide formation, but also for the dissolution of silicon in the α-Cu solid solution, The amount of silicon in the alloy is not sufficient for the total fixation of oxygen contained in copper, Copper, oxygen and silicon whose contamination is greater than 8 wt.%. In the first case, the top-cut of oxygen in α-Cu solid solution is 0.03% at the temperature of 1066 °C. At slow cooling, secondary recrystallisation leads to the formation of equilibrium Cu2O on the line of the ultimate solubility (Figure 1a - line of maximum solubility of oxygen in copper). In the case of fast cooling fixation of oversaturated, single-phase, non-equilibrium α-Cu, solid solution (heat-treated) takes place, which contains saluted oxygen in an interstice crystal lattice of copper.Room temperature for nonferrous alloys (metals) is sufficient for the diffusive mobility of atoms, but insufficient for the formation of an equilibrium phase and stable phase of Cu2O. This is why

  2. The effect of temperature, interaction range, and pair potential on the formation of dodecagonal quasicrystals in core-corona systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattabhiraman, Harini; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-03-01

    A two-dimensional dodecagonal quasicrystal was previously reported by Dotera et al (2014 Nature 506 208) in a system of particles interacting with a hard core of diameter σ and a repulsive square shoulder of diameter δ =1.40σ . In the current work, we examine the formation of this quasicrystal using bond orientational order parameters, correlation functions and tiling distributions. We find that this dodecagonal quasicrystal forms from a fluid phase. We further study the effect of the width of the repulsive shoulder by simulating the system over a range of values of δ. For the range of densities and temperatures considered, we observe the formation of the dodecagonal quasicrystal between δ =1.30σ and 1.44σ . We also study the effect of shape of the interaction potential by simulating the system using three other interaction potentials with two length scales, namely hard-core plus a linear ramp, modified exponential, or Buckingham (exp-6) potential. We observe the presence of the quasicrystal in all three systems. However, depending on the shape of the potential, the formation of the quasicrystal takes place at lower temperatures (or higher interaction strengths). Using free-energy calculations, we demonstrate that the quasicrystal is thermodynamically stable in the square-shoulder and linear-ramp system.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of fluorinated magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for inhibition of insulin amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaat, Hadas; Margel, Shlomo [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Belfort, Georges [Howard P Isermann Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)], E-mail: ch348@mail.biu.ac.il, E-mail: belfog@rpi.edu, E-mail: Shlomo.margel@mail.biu.ac.il

    2009-06-03

    Maghemite ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) magnetic nanoparticles of 15.0 {+-} 2.1 nm are formed by nucleation followed by controlled growth of maghemite thin films on gelatin-iron oxide nuclei. Uniform magnetic {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/poly (2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate) ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PHFBA) core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by emulsion polymerization of the fluorinated monomer 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (HFBA) in the presence of the maghemite nanoparticles. The kinetics of the insulin fibrillation process in the absence and in the presence of the {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PHFBA core-shell nanoparticles are elucidated. A significant direct slow transition from {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheets during insulin fibril formation is observed in the presence of the {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PHFBA nanoparticles. This is in contradiction to our previous manuscript, which illustrated that the {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} core nanoparticles do not affect the kinetics of the formation of the insulin fibrils, and to other previous publications that describe acceleration of the fibrillation process by using various types of nanoparticles. These core-shell nanoparticles may therefore be also useful for the inhibition of conformational changes of other amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow and prion diseases.

  4. The formation of entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations: SPH versus AMR

    CERN Document Server

    Power, C; Hobbs, A

    2013-01-01

    Abridged: We simulate a massive galaxy cluster in a LCDM Universe using three different approaches to solving the equations of non-radiative hydrodynamics: `classic' Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH); a novel SPH with a higher order dissipation switch (SPHS); and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). We find that SPHS and AMR are in excellent agreement, with both forming a well-defined entropy core that rapidly converges with increasing mass and force resolution. By contrast, SPH exhibits rather different behaviour. At low redshift, entropy decreases systematically with decreasing cluster-centric radius, converging on ever lower central values with increasing resolution. At higher redshift, SPH is in better agreement with SPHS and AMR but shows much poorer numerical convergence. We trace these discrepancies to artificial surface tension in SPH at phase boundaries. At early times, the passage of massive substructures close to the cluster centre stirs and shocks gas to build an entropy core. At later times, artif...

  5. Constraints from $^{26}Al$ Measurements on the Galaxy's Recent Global Star Formation Rate and Core Collapse Supernovae Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Timmes, F X; Hartmann, D H

    1997-01-01

    Gamma-rays from the decay of $^{26}$Al offer a stringent constraint on the Galaxy's global star formation rate over the past million years, supplementing other methods for quantifying the recent Galactic star formation rate, such as equivalent widths of H$\\alpha$ emission. Advantages and disadvantages of using $^{26}$Al gamma-ray measurements as a tracer of the massive star formation rate are analyzed. Estimates of the Galactic $^{26}$Al mass derived from COMPTEL measurements are coupled with a simple, analytical model of the $^{26}$Al injection rate from massive stars and restrict the Galaxy's recent star formation rate to \\hbox{5 $\\pm$ 4 M\\sun yr$^{-1}$}. In addition, we show that the derived $^{26}$Al mass implies a present day \\hbox{Type II + Ib} supernovae rate of 3.4 $\\pm$ 2.8 per century, which seems consistent with other independent estimates of the Galactic core collapse supernova rate. If some independent measure of the massive star initial mass function or star formation rate or \\hbox{Type II + Ib}...

  6. Star Formation and Feedback: A Molecular Outflow-Prestellar Core Interaction in L1689N

    CERN Document Server

    Lis, D C; Gerin, M; Pagani, L; Roueff, E; van der Tak, F F S; Vastel, C; Walmsley, C M

    2016-01-01

    We present Herschel, ALMA Compact Array (ACA), and Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) observations of the prestellar core in L1689N, which has been suggested to be interacting with a molecular outflow driven by the nearby solar type protostar IRAS 16293-2422. This source is characterized by some of the highest deuteration levels seen in the interstellar medium. The change in the NH2D line velocity and width across the core provides clear evidence of an interaction with the outflow, traced by the high-velocity water emission. Quiescent, cold gas, characterized by narrow line widths is seen in the NE part of the core, while broader, more disturbed line profiles are seen in the W/SW part. Strong N2D+ and ND3 emission is detected with the ACA, extending S/SW from the peak of the single-dish NH2D emission. The ACA data also reveal the presence a compact dust continuum source, with a mean size of ~1100 au, a central density of (1-2) 10^7 cm-3, and a mass of 0.2-0.4 Msun. The dust emission peak is displaced ~5"...

  7. Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta: Iron Rain in a Silicate Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Geochemical observations of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites, together with observations made by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, suggest that Vesta resembles H chondrites in bulk chemical composition, possibly with about 25% of a CM-chondrite like composition added in. For this model, the core is 15% by mass (or 8 volume %) of the asteroid. The abundances of moderately siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P) in eucrites require that essentially all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. Melting in the Fe-Ni-S system begins at a cotectic temperature of 940 deg. C. Only about 40% of the total metal phase, or 3-4 volume % of Vesta, melts prior to the onset of silicate melting. Liquid iron in solid silicate initially forms isolated pockets of melt; connected melt channels, which are necessary if the metal is to segregate from the silicate, are only possible when the metal phase exceeds about 5 volume %. Thus, metal segregation to form a core does not occur prior to the onset of silicate melting.

  8. The role of dense brines in the formation of vent-distal sedimentary-exhalative (SEDEX) lead-zinc deposits: field and laboratory evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, Donald F.

    2002-03-01

    A majority of the world's sediment-hosted exhalative (SEDEX) lead-zinc deposits are vent-distal. They are not underlain by a discordant alteration zone or stockwork vent complex that would indicate the path by which ore fluids reached the seafloor. The absence of a vent complex, together with sulfide mineral replacement of host rock mineral assemblages has led several investigators to suggest that, in spite of the well-layered nature of these deposits, mineralization was formed by sub-seafloor lateral migration of ore fluids along permeable strata. Field observations, supported by simple laboratory experiments, however, suggest an alternative process for characterizing the genesis of vent-distal SEDEX deposits. Cool, saline brines (e.g., ~120 °C and >15 wt% NaCl equiv.) are denser than seawater and, upon discharging into the sea, would flow away from the discharge vent as bottom-hugging fluids, similar to the behavior of turbidity currents. Their high densities and velocities prevent them from mixing with overlying seawater, thereby precluding significant cooling and dilution of the ore fluid. Upon coming to rest in a seafloor depression, the addition of H2S and/or dilution of the ore fluids to lower salinities result in the eventual precipitation of a vent-distal SEDEX deposit. Furthermore, the dense ore-forming fluid can sink into permeable sediments beneath the brine pool by displacing less dense pore water. The ore fluids are thus capable of effectively overprinting and/or replacing pre-existing minerals in the consolidating sediment pile.

  9. Deformation-aided segregation of Fe-S liquid from olivine under deep Earth conditions: Implications for core formation in the early solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Madeleine T. L.; Bromiley, Geoffrey D.; Butler, Ian B.; Frost, Mungo; Bradley, Robert; Carr, James; Le Godec, Yann; Montési, Laurent G. J.; Zhu, Wenlu; Miller, Kevin; Perrillat, Jean-Philippe; Mariani, Elisabetta; Tatham, Daniel; Redfern, Simon A. T.

    2017-02-01

    The planets and larger rocky bodies of the inner solar system are differentiated, and consist of metallic, iron-rich cores surrounded by thick shells of silicate. Core formation in these bodies, i.e. the segregation of metal from silicate, was a key process in the early solar system, and one which left a lasting geochemical signature. It is commonly assumed that extensive silicate melting and formation of deep magma oceans was required to initiate core formation, due to the inability of iron-rich melts to segregate from a solid silicate matrix. Here we assess the role of deformation in aiding segregation of core-forming melts from solid silicate under conditions of planetary deep interiors. Low-strain rate, high-pressure/temperature deformation experiments and high-resolution 2-D and 3-D textural analysis demonstrate that deformation fundamentally alters iron-rich melt geometry, promoting wetting of silicate grain boundaries and formation of extensive micron to sub-micron width Fe-rich melt bands. Deformation-aided Fe-S melt networks noted here contrast those observed in higher finite strain experiments conducted at lower pressure, and may reveal either an alternative mechanism for melt segregation at higher pressures, or an early stage process of melt segregation. Results suggest, however, that core-mantle chemical equilibration cannot be assumed in models of planetary formation, and that instead, the chemistry of rocky planets may record a complex, multi-stage process of core formation.

  10. Dense with Sense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletras, Anthony H.; Ingkanisorn, W. Patricia; Mancini, Christine; Arai, Andrew E.

    2005-09-01

    Displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) with a low encoding strength phase-cycled meta-DENSE readout and a two fold SENSE acceleration ( R = 2) is described. This combination reduces total breath-hold times for increased patient comfort during cardiac regional myocardial contractility studies. Images from phantoms, normal volunteers, and a patient are provided to demonstrate the SENSE-DENSE combination of methods. The overall breath-hold time is halved while preserving strain map quality.

  11. Rescuing the Cahoon Mine drill cores: Opportunities for modern mapping of the ca. 1.7 Ga Freedom Formation in southern Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, V.; Stewart, E.

    2016-12-01

    Rock cores collected during historic mineral exploration can provide invaluable data for modern analyses, but only if the samples are properly curated. The Cahoon Mine operated in Baraboo, WI during the 1910's and produced iron ore from the ca. 1.7 Ga Freedom Formation. The Freedom Formation is part of the well-known Baraboo-interval stratigraphy and is only present in the subsurface of Wisconsin (Weidman, 1904). Seventeen exploratory drill cores were rescued by Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey (WGNHS) from the original drying house at the mine site. The condition of the containers endangered the stratigraphic context of the collection; identifiers and depth markings were often obscured or lost. The individual core pieces were coated in residue and dust. Most of what is known about the Freedom Formation is from core logs and master's theses from the early 1900's (Leith, 1935; Schmidt, 1951). Ongoing subsurface mapping of the Baraboo-interval sediments and underlying basement of southern Wisconsin integrates new and existing subsurface and regional geophysical datasets. Mapping involves calibrating unique signals in regional aeromagnetic data to known lithology from drill core and cuttings. The Freedom Formation is especially important in this process as its iron-rich composition and regional continuity causes it to have a somewhat unique signal in regional aeromagnetic data. The Cahoon Mine cores in the WGNHS repository are the most extensive collection of physical samples from the Freedom Formation still in existence. We are in the process of curating the cores to facilitate their use in ongoing bedrock mapping. Today the cost and logistics of extensive sampling of this unit makes the existing core collection irreplaceable. We transferred the material to new containers, digitally recorded metadata, and created archival labels. As a result of this effort, the Cahoon Mine cores are now stored in a format that is physically and digitally accessible.

  12. Distribution of Sb, As, Ge, and In between metal and silicate during accretion and core formation in the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Nickodem, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.; Boujibar, A.; Righter, M.; Lapen, T. J.

    2017-02-01

    A large number of siderophile (iron-loving) elements are also volatile, thus offering constraints on the origin of volatile elements in differentiated bodies such as Earth, Moon, Mars and Vesta. Metal-silicate partitioning data for many of these elements is lacking, making their overall mantle concentrations in these bodies difficult to model and origin difficult to distinguish between core formation and volatile depletion. To address this gap in understanding, we have undertaken systematic studies of four volatile siderophile elements - Sb, As, Ge and In - at variable temperature and variable Si content of metal. Several series were carried out at 1 GPa, and between 1500 and 1900 °C, for both C saturated and C-free conditions. The results show that temperature causes a decrease in the metal/silicate partition coefficient for all four elements. In addition, activity coefficients for each element have been determined and show a very strong dependence on Si content of Fe alloy. Si dissolved in metal significantly decreases the metal/silicate partition coefficients, at both 1600 and 1800 °C. The combination of temperature and Si content of the metal causes reduction of the metal-silicate partition coefficient to values that are close to those required for an origin of mantle As, Sb, Ge, and In concentrations by metal-silicate equilibrium processes. Combining these new results with previous studies on As, Sb, Ge, and In, allowed derivation of predictive expressions for metal/silicate partition coefficients for these elements which can then be applied to Earth. The expressions are applied to two scenarios for continuous accretion of Earth; specifically for constant and increasing fO2 during accretion. The results indicate that mantle concentrations of As, Sb, Ge, and In can be explained by metal-silicate equilibrium during an accretion scenario. The modeling is not especially sensitive to either scenario, although all element concentrations are explained better by a

  13. Diffraction at GaAs/Fe3Si core/shell nanowires: The formation of nanofacets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenichen, B.; Hanke, M.; Hilse, M.; Herfort, J.; Trampert, A.; Erwin, S. C.

    2016-05-01

    GaAs/Fe3Si core/shell nanowire structures were fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy on oxidized Si(111) substrates and investigated by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The surfaces of the Fe3Si shells exhibit nanofacets. These facets consist of well pronounced Fe3Si{111} planes. Density functional theory reveals that the Si-terminated Fe3Si{111} surface has the lowest energy in agreement with the experimental findings. We can analyze the x-ray diffuse scattering and diffraction of the ensemble of nanowires avoiding the signal of the substrate and poly-crystalline films located between the wires. Fe3Si nanofacets cause streaks in the x-ray reciprocal space map rotated by an azimuthal angle of 30° compared with those of bare GaAs nanowires. In the corresponding TEM micrograph the facets are revealed only if the incident electron beam is oriented along [1 1 ¯ 0] in accordance with the x-ray results. Additional maxima in the x-ray scans indicate the onset of chemical reactions between Fe3Si shells and GaAs cores occurring at increased growth temperatures.

  14. Diffraction at GaAs/Fe3Si core/shell nanowires: The formation of nanofacets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jenichen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available GaAs/Fe3Si core/shell nanowire structures were fabricated by molecular-beam epitaxy on oxidized Si(111 substrates and investigated by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The surfaces of the Fe3Si shells exhibit nanofacets. These facets consist of well pronounced Fe3Si{111} planes. Density functional theory reveals that the Si–terminated Fe3Si{111} surface has the lowest energy in agreement with the experimental findings. We can analyze the x-ray diffuse scattering and diffraction of the ensemble of nanowires avoiding the signal of the substrate and poly-crystalline films located between the wires. Fe3Si nanofacets cause streaks in the x-ray reciprocal space map rotated by an azimuthal angle of 30° compared with those of bare GaAs nanowires. In the corresponding TEM micrograph the facets are revealed only if the incident electron beam is oriented along [1 1 ¯ 0] in accordance with the x-ray results. Additional maxima in the x-ray scans indicate the onset of chemical reactions between Fe3Si shells and GaAs cores occurring at increased growth temperatures.

  15. Identification of a Small Molecular Anti - HIV - 1 Compound that Interferes with Formation of the Fusion - active gp41 Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV - 1 ) envelope glycoprotein gp41 plays a critical role in the fusion of viral and target cell membranes. The gp41 extracellular domain, which contains fusion peptide (FP), N - and C - terminal hydrophobic heptad repeats (NHR and CHR, respectively). Peptides derived from NHR and CHR regions,designated N- and C- peptides, respectively, can interact with each other to form a six - stranded coiled - coil domain, representing the fusion-active gp41 core. Our previous studies demonstrated that the C- peptides have potent inhibitory activity against HIV- 1 infection.These peptides inhibit HIV- 1 -mediated membrane fusion by binding to NHR regions for preventing the formation of fusion- active gp41 core. One of the C - peptides, T - 20, which is in the phase Ⅲ clinical trails, is expected to become the first peptide HIV fusion inhibitory drug in the near future. However, this peptide HIV fusion inhibitor lacks oral availability and is sensitive to the proteolytic digestion.Therefore, it is essential to develop small molecular non -peptide HIV fusion inhibitors having similar mechanism of action as the C- peptides. We have established an ELISA- based screening assay using a unique monoclonal antibody, NC- 1, which can specifically bind to a conformational epitope on the gp41 core domain. Using this screening assay, we have identified a small molecular anti- HIV- 1 compound,named ADS-Jl, which inhibits HIV- 1- mediated membrane fusion by blocking the interaction between the NHR and CHR regions to form the fusion - active gp41 core. This compound will be used as a lead to design and develop novel HIV fusion inhibitors as new drugs for the treatment of HIV infection and/or AIDS.

  16. Ab Initio Computations and Active Thermochemical Tables Hand in Hand: Heats of Formation of Core Combustion Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klippenstein, Stephen J; Harding, Lawrence B; Ruscic, Branko

    2017-09-07

    The fidelity of combustion simulations is strongly dependent on the accuracy of the underlying thermochemical properties for the core combustion species that arise as intermediates and products in the chemical conversion of most fuels. High level theoretical evaluations are coupled with a wide-ranging implementation of the Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) approach to obtain well-validated high fidelity predictions for the 0 K heat of formation for a large set of core combustion species. In particular, high level ab initio electronic structure based predictions are obtained for a set of 348 C, N, O, and H containing species, which corresponds to essentially all core combustion species with 34 or fewer electrons. The theoretical analyses incorporate various high level corrections to base CCSD(T)/cc-pVnZ analyses (n = T or Q) using H2, CH4, H2O, and NH3 as references. Corrections for the complete-basis-set limit, higher-order excitations, anharmonic zero-point energy, core-valence, relativistic, and diagonal Born-Oppenheimer effects are ordered in decreasing importance. Independent ATcT values are presented for a subset of 150 species. The accuracy of the theoretical predictions is explored through (i) examination of the magnitude of the various corrections, (ii) comparisons with other high level calculations, and (iii) through comparison with the ATcT values. The estimated 2σ uncertainties of the three methods devised here, ANL0, ANL0-F12, and ANL1, are in the range of ±1.0-1.5 kJ/mol for single-reference and moderately multireference species, for which the calculated higher order excitations are 5 kJ/mol or less. In addition to providing valuable references for combustion simulations, the subsequent inclusion of the current theoretical results into the ATcT thermochemical network is expected to significantly improve the thermochemical knowledge base for less-well studied species.

  17. Atoms in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments with high-power pulsed lasers have strongly encouraged the development of improved theoretical understanding of highly charged ions in a dense plasma environment. This work examines the theory of dense plasmas with emphasis on general rules which govern matter at extreme high temperature and density. 106 refs., 23 figs.

  18. Quantum dense key distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Degiovanni, I P; Castelletto, S; Rastello, M L; Bovino, F A; Colla, A M; Castagnoli, G C

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a new protocol for quantum dense key distribution. This protocol embeds the benefits of a quantum dense coding and a quantum key distribution and is able to generate shared secret keys four times more efficiently than BB84 one. We hereinafter prove the security of this scheme against individual eavesdropping attacks, and we present preliminary experimental results, showing its feasibility.

  19. Climate Driven Changes in the Formation Pathways of Atmospheric Sulfate: A Comparison from Bipolar Ice Core Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, L.; Alexander, B.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric sulfate aerosol affects radiative forcing of the atmosphere and thus climate. The formation pathways of sulfate, through gas-phase or aqueous phase oxidation of SO2, have implications for climate forcing because only sulfate produced in the gas-phase can nucleate new aerosol particles. Thus, constraining the formation pathways of sulfate in different climates is important to assess its climate impact. O-17 excess of sulfate (Δ17O(SO42-)) can be used to distinguish the formation pathways of atmospheric sulfate. Δ17O(SO42-) measured from an Antarctic (Vostok) ice core covering a full climate cycle suggested that gas-phase oxidation was more important in the last glacial period than that in the interglacial periods before and after, though its cause was not fully understood. We present new results of Δ17O(SO42-) measured from a Greenland (GISP2) ice core covering the last glacial period. Compared to the Vostok results, the GISP2 results display a similar Δ17O(SO42-) - temperature/climate relationship, but with much smaller Δ17O(SO42-) values in preindustrial Holocene (PIH). This difference seen in PIH is likely because aqueous-phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 is more important in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere, due to differences in cloud pH and oxidant abundances. Results from a new chemistry-climate model (ICECAP) suggest that the enhanced gas-phase oxidation in the glacial period in both hemispheres is due to 1) increased tropospheric OH production in mid- to high latitudes caused by enhanced UV-B radiation originating from reduced stratospheric ozone abundance and higher surface albedos over land and sea ice, and 2) reduced cloud fraction in the glacial climate. Implications for the global sulfur budget will be discussed.

  20. Highly siderophile element (HSE) abundances in the mantle of Mars are due to core formation at high pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L. R.; Pando, K. M.; Williams, J.; Humayun, M.; Hervig, R. L.; Sharp, T. G.

    2015-04-01

    Highly siderophile elements (HSEs) can be used to understand accretion and core formation in differentiated bodies, due to their strong affinity for FeNi metal and sulfides. Coupling experimental studies of metal-silicate partitioning with analyses of HSE contents of Martian meteorites can thus offer important constraints on the early history of Mars. Here, we report new metal-silicate partitioning data for the PGEs and Au and Re across a wide range of pressure and temperature space, with three series designed to complement existing experimental data sets for HSE. The first series examines temperature effects for D(HSE) in two metallic liquid compositions—C-bearing and C-free. The second series examines temperature effects for D(Re) in FeO-bearing silicate melts and FeNi-rich alloys. The third series presents the first systematic study of high pressure and temperature effects for D(Au). We then combine our data with previously published partitioning data to derive predictive expressions for metal-silicate partitioning of the HSE, which are subsequently used to calculate HSE concentrations of the Martian mantle during continuous accretion of Mars. Our results show that at midmantle depths in an early magma ocean (equivalent to approximately 14 GPa, 2100 °C), the HSE contents of the silicate fraction are similar to those observed in the Martian meteorite suite. This is in concert with previous studies on moderately siderophile elements. We then consider model calculations that examine the role of melting, fractional crystallization, and sulfide saturation/undersaturation in establishing the range of HSE contents in Martian meteorites derived from melting of the postcore formation mantle. The core formation modeling indicates that the HSE contents can be established by metal-silicate equilibrium early in the history of Mars, thus obviating the need for a late veneer for HSE, and by extension volatile siderophile elements, or volatiles in general.

  1. Modeling Complex Organic Molecules in dense regions: Eley-Rideal and complex induced reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Ruaud, M; Hickson, K M; Gratier, P; Hersant, F; Wakelam, V

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed the existence of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) in cold dense cores and prestellar cores. The presence of these molecules in such cold conditions is not well understood and remains a matter of debate since the previously proposed "warm- up" scenario cannot explain these observations. In this article, we study the effect of Eley- Rideal and complex induced reaction mechanisms of gas-phase carbon atoms with the main ice components of dust grains on the formation of COMs in cold and dense regions. Based on recent experiments we use a low value for the chemical desorption efficiency (which was previously invoked to explain the observed COM abundances). We show that our introduced mechanisms are efficient enough to produce a large amount of complex organic molecules in the gas-phase at temperatures as low as 10K.

  2. Carbon chemistry in dense molecular clouds: Theory and observational constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Geoffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    For the most part, gas phase models of the chemistry of dense molecular clouds predict the abundances of simple species rather well. However, for larger molecules and even for small systems rich in carbon these models often fail spectacularly. Researchers present a brief review of the basic assumptions and results of large scale modeling of the carbon chemistry in dense molecular clouds. Particular attention is to the influence of the gas phase C/O ratio in molecular clouds, and the likely role grains play in maintaining this ratio as clouds evolve from initially diffuse objects to denser cores with associated stellar and planetary formation. Recent spectral line surveys at centimeter and millimeter wavelengths along with selected observations in the submillimeter have now produced an accurate inventory of the gas phase carbon budget in several different types of molecular clouds, though gaps in our knowledge clearly remain. The constraints these observations place on theoretical models of interstellar chemistry can be used to gain insights into why the models fail, and show also which neglected processes must be included in more complete analyses. Looking toward the future, larger molecules are especially difficult to study both experimentally and theoretically in such dense, cold regions, and some new methods are therefore outlined which may ultimately push the detectability of small carbon chains and rings to much heavier species.

  3. Structure and mechanism of the formation of core-shell nanoparticles obtained through a one-step gas-phase synthesis by electron beam evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoev, Andrey V; Bardakhanov, Sergey P; Schreiber, Makoto; Bazarova, Dashima G; Romanov, Nikolai A; Baldanov, Boris B; Radnaev, Bair R; Syzrantsev, Viacheslav V

    2015-01-01

    The structure of core-shell Cu@silica and Ag@Si nanoparticles obtained in one-step through evaporation of elemental precursors by a high-powered electron beam are investigated. The structure of the core and shell of the particles are investigated in order to elucidate their mechanisms of formation and factors affecting the synthesis. It is proposed that the formation of Cu@silica particles is mainly driven by surface tension differences between Cu and Si while the formation of Ag@Si particles is mainly driven by differences in the vapour concentration of the two components.

  4. Methylacetylene (CH3CCH) and propene (C3H6) formation in cold dense clouds: a case of dust grain chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Hickson, Kevin M; Loison, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    We present an extensive review of gas phase reactions producing methylacetylene and propene showing that these relatively abundant unsaturated hydrocarbons cannot be synthesized through gas-phase reactions. We explain the formation of propene and methylacetylene through surface hydrogenation of C3 depleted onto interstellar ices, C3 being a very abundant species in the gas phase.

  5. Kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graedel, T.E.; Langer, W.D.; Frerking, M.A.

    1982-03-01

    A detailed model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds has been developed to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature, and other topics of interest. The full computation involves 328 individual reactions (expanded to 1067 to study carbon and oxygen isotope chemistry); photodegradation processes are unimportant in these dense clouds and are excluded.

  6. Lack of nuclear clusters in dwarf spheroidal galaxies: implications for massive black holes formation and the cusp/core problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arca-Sedda, Manuel; Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    One of the leading scenarios for the formation of nuclear star clusters in galaxies is related to the orbital decay of globular clusters (GCs) and their subsequent merging, though alternative theories are currently debated. The availability of high-quality data for structural and orbital parameters of GCs allows us to test different nuclear star cluster formation scenarios. The Fornax dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy is the heaviest satellite of the Milky Way and it is the only known dSph hosting five GCs, whereas there are no clear signatures for the presence of a central massive black hole. For this reason, it represents a suited place to study the orbital decay process in dwarf galaxies. In this paper, we model the future evolution of the Fornax GCs simulating them and the host galaxy by means of direct N-body simulations. Our simulations also take into account the gravitational field generated by the Milky Way. We found that if the Fornax galaxy is embedded in a standard cold dark matter halo, the nuclear cluster formation would be significantly hampered by the high central galactic mass density. In this context, we discuss the possibility that infalling GCs drive the flattening of the galactic density profile, giving a possible alternative explanation to the so-called cusp/core problem. Moreover, we briefly discuss the link between GC infall process and the absence of massive black holes in the centre of dSphs.

  7. Melting the core of giant planets: impact on tidal dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Mathis, S

    2015-01-01

    Giant planets are believed to host central dense rocky/icy cores that are key actors in the core-accretion scenario for their formation. In the same time, some of their components are unstable in the temperature and pressure regimes of central regions of giant planets and only ab-initio EOS computations can address the question of the state of matter. In this framework, several works demonstrated that erosion and redistribution of core materials in the envelope must be taken into account. These complex mechanisms thus may deeply modify giant planet interiors for which signatures of strong tidal dissipation have been obtained for Jupiter and Saturn. The best candidates to explain this dissipation are the viscoelastic dissipation in the central dense core and turbulent friction acting on tidal inertial waves in their fluid convective envelope. In this work, we study the consequences of the possible melting of central regions for the efficiency of each of these mechanisms.

  8. Pattern formation with repulsive soft-core interactions: Discrete particle dynamics and Dean-Kawasaki equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfau, Jean-Baptiste; Ollivier, Hélène; López, Cristóbal; Blasius, Bernd; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2016-10-01

    Brownian particles interacting via repulsive soft-core potentials can spontaneously aggregate, despite repelling each other, and form periodic crystals of particle clusters. We study this phenomenon in low-dimensional situations (one and two dimensions) at two levels of description: by performing numerical simulations of the discrete particle dynamics and by linear and nonlinear analysis of the corresponding Dean-Kawasaki equation for the macroscopic particle density. Restricting to low dimensions and neglecting fluctuation effects, we gain analytical insight into the mechanisms of the instability leading to clustering which turn out to be the interplay among diffusion, the intracluster forces, and the forces between neighboring clusters. We show that the deterministic part of the Dean-Kawasaki equation provides a good description of the particle dynamics, including width and shape of the clusters and over a wide range of parameters, and analyze with weakly nonlinear techniques the nature of the pattern-forming bifurcation in one and two dimensions. Finally, we briefly discuss the case of attractive forces.

  9. THE DOUBLE PULSAR: EVIDENCE FOR NEUTRON STAR FORMATION WITHOUT AN IRON CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdman, R. D.; Kramer, M.; Stappers, B. W.; Lyne, A. G. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Breton, R. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Freire, P. C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Possenti, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Loc. Poggio dei Pini, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Manchester, R. N., E-mail: ferdman@jb.man.ac.uk [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2013-04-10

    The double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B is a double neutron star binary, with a 2.4 hr orbital period, which has allowed measurement of relativistic orbital perturbations to high precision. The low mass of the second-formed neutron star, as well as the low system eccentricity and proper motion, point to a different evolutionary scenario compared to most other known double neutron star systems. We describe analysis of the pulse profile shape over 6 years of observations and present the resulting constraints on the system geometry. We find the recycled pulsar in this system, PSR J0737-3039A, to be a near-orthogonal rotator with an average separation between its spin and magnetic axes of 90 Degree-Sign {+-} 11 Degree-Sign {+-} 5 Degree-Sign . Furthermore, we find a mean 95% upper limit on the misalignment between its spin and orbital angular momentum axes of 3. Degree-Sign 2, assuming that the observed emission comes from both magnetic poles. This tight constraint lends credence to the idea that the supernova that formed the second pulsar was relatively symmetric, possibly involving electron capture onto an O-Ne-Mg core.

  10. Simulating star formation in molecular cloud cores IV. The role of turbulence and thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Attwood, R E; Stamatellos, D; Whitworth, A P

    2008-01-01

    We perform SPH simulations of the collapse and fragmentation of low-mass cores having different initial levels of turbulence (alpha_turb=0.05,0.10,0.25). We use a new treatment of the energy equation which captures the transport of cooling radiation against opacity due to both dust and gas (including the effects of dust sublimation, molecules, and H^- ions). We also perform comparison simulations using a standard barotropic equation of state. We find that -- when compared with the barotropic equation of state -- our more realistic treatment of the energy equation results in more protostellar objects being formed, and a higher proportion of brown dwarfs; the multiplicity frequency is essentially unchanged, but the multiple systems tend to have shorter periods (by a factor ~3), higher eccentricities, and higher mass ratios. The reason for this is that small fragments are able to cool more effectively with the new treatment, as compared with the barotropic equation of state. We find that the process of fragmenta...

  11. Alteration in the Madera limestone and Sandia formation from core hole VC-1 Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Terry E. C.

    1988-06-01

    Core hole VC-1 penetrated the southwestern ring fracture zone of the 1.1 Ma Valles caldera and at a depth of 333 m intersected the top of the Paleozoic section including the Abo Formation, Madera Limestone, and Sandia Formation, reaching a total depth of 856 m. The Paleozoic rocks, which consist of thin-bedded limestone, siltstone, mudstone, sandstone, and local conglomerate, are overlain by volcanic rocks of the caldera moat that are less than 0.6 Ma. Diagenetic and at least three hydrothermal alteration stages were identified in the Madera Limestone and Sandia Formation. Diagenetic clay alteration was pervasive throughout the sedimentary rocks. Volcanic activity at 16.5 Ma and continuing through the formation of the Valles caldera resulted in high thermal gradients, which caused recrystallization of diagenetic clay minerals. Interstratified smectite-illite is the most diagnostic clay mineral throughout the section; structurally, the illite component in the ordered interstratified illite-smectite changes gradationally from 70% at the top of the Madera Limestone to 95% at the base of the section in the Sandia Formation. Pyrite that occurs as small clots and lenses as well as finely disseminated is interpreted as being of diagenetic origin, especially in organic-rich beds. Low permeability of much of the Paleozoic section precluded the deposition of hydrothermal minerals except in fractures and intergranular space in some of the more permeable sandstone and brecciated horizons. Three stages of hydrothermal mineral deposition are defined. Stage I is widespread and includes mainly chlorite, calcite, pyrite, and interstratified smectite-illite that was formed prior to caldera development at temperatures approximating 200°C. Stage II is characterized by quartz, sericite, and scarce sulfides deposited locally by fluids at approximately 275°C shortly before or at the time of early caldera-related volcanism. The Stage III hydrothermal event, associated with formation of

  12. Probing star formation in the dense environments of z~1 lensing halos aligned with dusty star-forming galaxies detected with the South Pole Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Welikala, N; Guery, D; Strandet, M; Aird, K A; Aravena, M; Ashby, M L N; Bothwell, M; Beelen, A; Bleem, L E; de Breuck, C; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chapman, S C; Crawford, T M; Dole, H; Doré, O; Everett, W; Flores-Cacho, I; Gonzalez, A H; González-Nuevo, J; Greve, T R; Gullberg, B; Hezaveh, Y D; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Keisler, R; Lagache, G; Ma, J; Malkan, M; Marrone, D P; Mocanu, L M; Montier, L; Murphy, E J; Nesvadba, N P H; Omont, A; Pointecouteau, E; Puget, J L; Reichardt, C L; Rotermund, K M; Scott, D; Serra, P; Spilker, J S; Stalder, B; Stark, A A; Story, K; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Weiss, A

    2015-01-01

    We probe star formation in the environments of massive $\\sim10^{13}\\,M_{\\odot}$ dark matter halos at redshifts of $z$$\\sim$$1$. This star formation is linked to a sub-millimetre clustering signal which we detect in maps of the Planck High Frequency Instrument that are stacked at the positions of a sample of high-redshift ($z$$>$$2$) strongly-lensed dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) selected from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) 2500 deg$^2$ survey. The clustering signal has sub-millimetre colours which are consistent with the mean redshift of the foreground lensing halos ($z$$\\sim$$1$). We report a mean excess of star formation rate (SFR) compared to the field, of $(2700\\pm700)\\,M_{\\odot}\\,{yr}^{-1}$ from all galaxies contributing to this clustering signal within a radius of 3.5' from the SPT DSFGs. The magnitude of the Planck excess is in broad agreement with predictions of a current model of the cosmic infrared background. The model predicts that 80$\\%$ of the excess emission measured by Planck originates f...

  13. A particle-core-MD model for intrabeam scattering and halo formation in high current beams in a FODO channel

    CERN Document Server

    Uhlmann, N; Comunian, M; Pisent, A

    2002-01-01

    An essential problem for the successful operation of high current linear ion accelerators is the control of beam losses due to halo particles. As a possible mechanism for the formation of such a halo we concentrate on the interplay between intrabeam scattering (IBS) and the incidence of particles which are driven to high amplitudes by resonances with the nonlinear space charge fields of a mismatched beam. Since a fully microscopic numerical treatment including all the mutual Coulomb interactions between the beam ions requires much too high computational effort, we developed an approximative method. These particle-core-molecular-dynamics (PCMD) simulations suitably join the mean-field description of the time evolution of the beam in framework of the envelope equations and a microscopic calculation of the Coulomb interactions between pseudo-particles with a renormalized charge. With this method we studied matched and mismatched continuous KV-beams in a FODO channel. In first simulation runs we observed a signif...

  14. Kinetic Study on the Formation of Bimetallic Core-Shell Nanoparticles via Microemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concha Tojo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Computer calculations were carried out to determine the reaction rates and the mean structure of bimetallic nanoparticles prepared via a microemulsion route. The rates of reaction of each metal were calculated for a particular microemulsion composition (fixed intermicellar exchange rate and varying reduction rate ratios between both metal and metal salt concentration inside the micelles. Model predictions show that, even in the case of a very small difference in reduction potential of both metals, the formation of an external shell in a bimetallic nanoparticle is possible if a large reactant concentration is used. The modification of metal arrangement with concentration was analyzed from a mechanistic point of view, and proved to be due to the different impact of confinement on each metal: the reaction rate of the faster metal is only controlled by the intermicellar exchange rate but the slower metal is also affected by a cage-like effect.

  15. Kinetic Study on the Formation of Bimetallic Core-Shell Nanoparticles via Microemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tojo, Concha; Vila-Romeu, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    Computer calculations were carried out to determine the reaction rates and the mean structure of bimetallic nanoparticles prepared via a microemulsion route. The rates of reaction of each metal were calculated for a particular microemulsion composition (fixed intermicellar exchange rate) and varying reduction rate ratios between both metal and metal salt concentration inside the micelles. Model predictions show that, even in the case of a very small difference in reduction potential of both metals, the formation of an external shell in a bimetallic nanoparticle is possible if a large reactant concentration is used. The modification of metal arrangement with concentration was analyzed from a mechanistic point of view, and proved to be due to the different impact of confinement on each metal: the reaction rate of the faster metal is only controlled by the intermicellar exchange rate but the slower metal is also affected by a cage-like effect. PMID:28788260

  16. Fermion mass and the pressure of dense matter

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, Eduardo S; 10.1063/1.2714447

    2008-01-01

    We consider a simple toy model to study the effects of finite fermion masses on the pressure of cold and dense matter, with possible applications in the physics of condensates in the core of neutron stars and color superconductivity.

  17. Core/shell formation and surface segregation of multi shell icosahedral silver-palladium bimetallic nanostructures: A dynamic and thermodynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewage, Jinasena W., E-mail: jinasena@chem.ruh.ac.lk

    2016-05-01

    Core/shell formation and surface segregation of multi shell icosahedral bimetallic silver-palladium nanostructures with the size of 55 and 147 atoms were studied by using the Molecular Dynamics simulations, and calculating Helmholtz free energy changes in the penetration of palladium atoms from shell to core, core to shell transition of silver and melting temperatures by using statistical mechanical densities of states. In 55 atoms icosahedra, two core–shell motifs, Ag{sub 13}Pd{sub 42} and Pd{sub 13}Ag{sub 42} with their isomers Pd{sub 13}(Pd{sub 29}Ag{sub 13}) and Ag{sub 13}(Ag{sub 29}Pd{sub 13}) were considered. Similarly in 147 atoms icosahedra, all mutations corresponding to the occupations of either silver atoms or palladium atoms in the core, inner shell or outer shell and their isomers generated by interchanging thirteen core atoms with thirteen atoms of the other type in the inner and outer shells were considered. It is found that the palladium-core clusters are more stable than the silver-core clusters and cohesive energy increases with the palladium composition. Phase transition of each cluster was studied by means of constant volume heat capacity. The trend in variation of melting temperature is accordance with the energy trend. Helmholtz free energy changes in palladium penetration, core to shell transition of silver and in surface mixing and segregation revealed the thermodynamic stability of the formation of Pd{sub core}Ag{sub shell} structures especially at silver rich environment and the surface segregation of silver. - Highlights: • Nanostructures of Pd{sub m}Ag{sub n} clusters for m + n = 55 and 147 have been studied. • Structures favor the formation of palladium-core surrounded by silver shell. • Calculated thermodynamic parameters confirm the energetic results. • Core/shell formation is favored at concentration of silver. • Silver segregation on surface while palladium penetration to core is observed.

  18. Formation of metamorphic core complexes in non-over-thickened continental crust: A case study of Liaodong Peninsula (East Asia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Burov, Evgueni; Gumiaux, Charles; Chen, Yan; Lu, Gang; Mezri, Leila; Zhao, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Pre-thickened hot orogenic crust is often considered a necessary condition for the formation of continental metamorphic core complexes (MCCs). However, the discovery of MCCs in the Liaodong Peninsula, where the crust has a normal thickness (~ 35 km), challenges the universality of this scenario. Therefore, we implement a series of 2-D numerical thermo-mechanical modeling experiments in which we investigate the conditions of MCC formation in normal crusts, as well as the relationships between the underlying mechanisms and the syn-rift basin evolution. In these experiments, we explore the impact of the lithostratigraphic and thermo-rheological structure of the crust. We also examine the lithosphere thickness, strain softening, extension rate, and surface erosion/ sedimentation processes. The experiments demonstrate that high thermal gradients and crustal heterogeneities result only in a symmetric spreading dome, which is geometrically incompatible with the observations of the MCCs in the Liaodong Peninsula. According to our further findings, the strain softening should play a key role in the development of asymmetric strain localization and domal topography uplift, while synchronous surface erosion controls the polarity of the syn-rift basin. The synthetic model data are compatible with the geological observations and cooling history based on the thermo-chronology for the eastern part of the East Asia during the late Mesozoic to the early Cenozoic. The model-predicted P-T-t paths are essentially different from those inferred for the other known MCCs, confirming the exceptional character of the MCC formation in the wide rift system of the East Asia.

  19. Stratigraphy, correlation, depositional setting, and geophysical characteristics of the Oligocene Snowshoe Mountain Tuff and Creede Formation in two cored boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Daniel; Nelson, Philip H.

    2000-01-01

    Core descriptions and geophysical logs from two boreholes (CCM-1 and CCM-2) in the Oligocene Snowshoe Mountain Tuff and Creede Formation, south-central Colorado, are used to interpret sedimentary and volcanic facies associations and their physical properties. The seven facies association include a mixed sequence of intracaldera ash-flow tuffs and breccias, alluvial and lake margin deposits, and tuffaceous lake beds. These deposits represent volcanic units related to caldera collapse and emplacement of the Snowshoe Mountain Tuff, and sediments and pyroclastic material deposited in the newly formed caldera basin, Early sedimentation is interpreted to have been rapid, and to have occurred in volcaniclastic fan environments at CCM-1 and in a variery of volcaniclastic fan, braided stream shallow lacustrine, and mudflat environments at CCM-2. After an initial period of lake-level rise, suspension settling, turbidite, and debris-flow sedimentation occurred in lacustrine slope and basin environments below wave base. Carbonate sedimentation was initially sporadic, but more continuous in the latter part of the recorded lake history (after the H fallout tuff). Sublacustrine-fan deposition occurred at CCM-1 after a pronounced lake-level fall and subsequent rise that preceded the H tuff. Variations in density, neutron, gamma-ray, sonic, and electrical properties of deposits penetrated oin the two holes reflect variations in lithology, porosity, and alteration. Trends in the geophysical properties of the lacustrine strata are linked to downhole changes in authigenic mineralology and a decrease in porosity interpreted to have resulted primarily from diagenesis. Lithological and geophysical characteristics provide a basis for correlation of the cores; however, mineralogical methods of correlation are hampered by the degree of diagenesis and alteration.

  20. Electro-Optical Characteristics of P+n In0.53Ga0.47As Hetero-Junction Photodiodes in Large Format Dense Focal Plane Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWames, R.; Littleton, R.; Witte, K.; Wichman, A.; Bellotti, E.; Pellegrino, J.

    2015-08-01

    This paper is concerned with focal plane array (FPA) data and use of analytical and three-dimensional numerical simulation methods to determine the physical effects and processes limiting performance. For shallow homojunction P+n designs the temperature dependence of dark current for T InGaAs interface. In this description the fitting property is the effective conductivity, σ eff( T), in mho cm-1. Variation in the data suggests σ eff (300 K) values of 1.2 × 10-11-4.6 × 10-11 mho cm-1). Substrate removal extends the quantum efficiency (QE) spectral band into the visible region. However, dead-layer effects limit the QE to 10% at a wavelength of 0.5 μm. For starlight-no moon illumination conditions, the signal-to-noise ratio is estimated to be 50 at an operating temperature of 300 K. A major result of the 3D numerical simulation of the device is the prediction of a perimeter G-R current not associated with the properties of the metallurgical interface. Another is the prediction that for a junction positioned in the larger band gap InP cap layer the QE is bias-dependent and that a relatively large reverse bias ≥0.9 V is needed for the QE to saturate to the shallow homojunction value. At this higher bias the dark current is larger than the shallow homojunction value. The 3D numerical model and the analytical model agree in predicting and explaining the measured radiatively limited diffusion current originating at the n-side of the junction. The calculations of the area-dependent G-R current for the condition studied are also in agreement. Unique advantages of the 3D numerical simulation are the ability to mimic real device structures, achieve deeper understanding of the real physical effects associated with the various methods of junction formation, and predict how device designs will function.

  1. DPIS for warm dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Horioka, K.; Okamura, M.

    2010-05-23

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) offers an challenging problem because WDM, which is beyond ideal plasma, is in a low temperature and high density state with partially degenerate electrons and coupled ions. WDM is a common state of matter in astrophysical objects such as cores of giant planets and white dwarfs. The WDM studies require large energy deposition into a small target volume in a shorter time than the hydrodynamical time and need uniformity across the full thickness of the target. Since moderate energy ion beams ({approx} 0.3 MeV/u) can be useful tool for WDM physics, we propose WDM generation using Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS). In the DPIS, laser ion source is connected to the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator directly without the beam transport line. DPIS with a realistic final focus and a linear accelerator can produce WDM.

  2. Characteristic differences in the formation of complex coacervate core micelles from neodymium and zinc-based coordination polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yun; Besseling, Nicolaas A M; de Keizer, Arie; Stuart, Martien A Cohen

    2007-05-31

    In this paper we compare the formation of complex coacervate core micelles (C3Ms) from two different tricompontent mixtures, namely neodymium, the bisligand L2EO4 and the poly(cation)-block-poly(neutral) diblock copolymer P2MVP41-b-PEO205, and zinc, L2EO4 and P2MVP41-b-PEO205 mixed systems. Three sets of titration experiments were carried out for each system: (i) titration of diblock copolymer P2MVP41-b-PEO205 with the stoichiometric mixture of metal ions and bisligands, (ii) titration of a mixture of diblock copolymer and bisligand with metal ions, and (iii) titration of a mixture of diblock copolymer and metal ions with bisligands. In all the above three cases, micelles are found to form either in a broad range of charge ratios or in a broad range of metal/bisligand ratios. Upon addition of Nd2-(L2EO4)3 coordination polymer to P2MVP41-b-PEO205 solution, and upon addition of Nd3+ to a mixture of L2EO4 and P2MVP41-b-PEO205, micelles are found to form immediately after the first addition, whereas micelles show up in the similar zinc system only after a certain threshold Zn-(L2EO4) or Zn2+ concentration. This difference can be traced to the different structures of the Nd2-(L2EO4)3 and Zn-(L2EO4) coordination compounds. At very low concentrations, Zn-(L2EO4) are ring-like oligomers, but Nd2-(L2EO4)3 are larger networks. The network structure favors the formation of coacervate micellar core with P2MVP41-b-PEO205. Moreover, excess of Nd3+ ions will break up the C3Ms, while the same amount of Zn2+ has hardly any effect on the C3Ms. The breakdown of C3Ms by Nd3+ is due to the charge inversion of the coordination complex with increasing [Nd3+]/[L2EO4] ratio, which results in repulsive interaction between the coordination complex and the diblock copolymer, whereas no such interaction can occur in the zinc system.

  3. Self-assembled growth of GaN nanowires on amorphous Al x O y : from nucleation to the formation of dense nanowire ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobanska, M; Fernández-Garrido, S; Zytkiewicz, Z R; Tchutchulashvili, G; Gieraltowska, S; Brandt, O; Geelhaar, L

    2016-08-12

    We present a comprehensive description of the self-assembled nucleation and growth of GaN nanowires (NWs) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on amorphous Al x O y buffers (a-Al x O y ) prepared by atomic layer deposition. The results are compared with those obtained on nitridated Si(111). Using line-of-sight quadrupole mass spectrometry, we analyze in situ the incorporation of Ga starting from the incubation and nucleation stages till the formation of the final nanowire ensemble and observe qualitatively the same time dependence for the two types of substrates. However, on a-Al x O y the incubation time is shorter and the nucleation faster than on nitridated Si. Moreover, on a-Al x O y we observe a novel effect of decrease in incorporated Ga flux for long growth durations which we explain by coalescence of NWs leading to reduction of the GaN surface area where Ga may reside. Dedicated samples are used to analyze the evolution of surface morphology. In particular, no GaN nuclei are detected when growth is interrupted during the incubation stage. Moreover, for a-Al x O y , the same shape transition from spherical cap-shaped GaN crystallites to the NW-like geometry is found as it is known for nitridated Si. However, while the critical radius for this transition is only slightly larger for a-Al x O y than for nitridated Si, the critical height is more than six times larger for a-Al x O y . Finally, we observe that in fully developed NW ensembles, the substrate no longer influences growth kinetics and the same N-limited axial growth rate is measured on both substrates. We conclude that the same nucleation and growth processes take place on a-Al x O y as on nitridated Si and that these processes are of a general nature. Quantitatively, nucleation proceeds somewhat differently, which indicates the influence of the substrate, but once shadowing limits growth processes to the upper part of the NW ensemble, they are not affected anymore by the type of substrate.

  4. Modelling dense relational data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard;

    2012-01-01

    Relational modelling classically consider sparse and discrete data. Measures of influence computed pairwise between temporal sources naturally give rise to dense continuous-valued matrices, for instance p-values from Granger causality. Due to asymmetry or lack of positive definiteness they are no......Relational modelling classically consider sparse and discrete data. Measures of influence computed pairwise between temporal sources naturally give rise to dense continuous-valued matrices, for instance p-values from Granger causality. Due to asymmetry or lack of positive definiteness...... they are not naturally suited for kernel K-means. We propose a generative Bayesian model for dense matrices which generalize kernel K-means to consider off-diagonal interactions in matrices of interactions, and demonstrate its ability to detect structure on both artificial data and two real data sets....

  5. On the Coagulation and Size Distribution of Pressure Confined Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xu; Lin, D N C

    2013-01-01

    Observations of the Pipe Nebula have led to the discovery of dense starless cores. The mass of most cores is too small for their self gravity to hold them together. Instead, they are thought to be pressure confined. The observed dense cores' mass function (CMF) matches well with the initial mass function (IMF) of stars in young clusters. Similar CMF's are observed in other star forming regions such as the Aquila Nebula, albeit with some dispersion. The shape of these CMF provides important clues to the competing physical processes which lead to star formation and its feedback on the interstellar media. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical origin of the the mass function of starless cores which are confined by a warm, less dense medium. We consider the coagulation between the cold cores and their ablation due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability induced by their relative motion through the warm medium. We are able to reproduce the observed CMF among the starless cores in the Pipe nebula. Our results indicate...

  6. The effects of lower crustal strength and preexisting midcrustal shear zones on the formation of continental core complexes and low-angle normal faults

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Guangliang

    2016-08-22

    To investigate the formation of core complexes and low-angle normal faults, we devise thermomechanical simulations on a simplified wedge-like orogenic hinterland that has initial topography, Moho relief, and a preexisting midcrustal shear zone that can accommodate shear at very low angles (<20°). We mainly vary the strength of the lower crust and the frictional strength of the preexisting midcrustal shear zone. We find that the strength of the lower crust and the existence and strength of a preexisting shear zone significantly affect the formation and evolution of core complexes. With increasing lower crustal strength, we recognize varying extensional features with decreasing exhumation rate: these are characterized by bivergent metamorphic massifs, classic Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes, multiple consecutive core complexes (or boudinage structures), and a flexural core complex underlined by a large subsurface low-angle detachment fault with a small convex curvature. Topographic loading and mantle buoyancy forces, together with divergent boundaries, drive a regional lower crustal flow that leads to the exhumation of the lower crust where intensive upper crustal faulting induces strong unloading. The detachment fault is a decoupling zone that accommodates large displacement and accumulates sustained shear strain at very low angle between upper and lower crust. Though the regional stress is largely Andersonian, we find non-Andersonian stress in regions adjacent to the preexisting shear zone and those with high topographic gradient. Our new models provide a view that is generally consistent with geological and geophysical observations on how core complexes form and evolve.

  7. Landsat长时间序列数据格式统一与反射率转换方法实现%Method for Landsat dense time series data format unification and surface reflectance conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈文娟; 李明诗

    2014-01-01

    reflectance for each 30 m pixel. The algorithm was applied to the LEDAPS standard data of Landsat7 ETM+ and non-standard data of Landsat5 TM to illustrate the data choice, data format unification and the algorithm implementation of the dense Landsat time series. Finally, a method for the validation of the corrected images was provided. The results show that the surface reflectance products resulting from the LEDAPS processing could effectively reduce the influence caused by ozone, water vapor, and aerosol particles in the atmosphere on the true image surface reflectance. The surface reflectivity is more precise and provides standard products for multiple scientific applications, such as land cover change or forest disturbance dynamic characterization and remote sensing based biophysical parameters retrieval, thus beneficial to formulating criteria for processing sequence image data in China.

  8. Disc formation in turbulent cloud cores: is magnetic flux loss necessary to stop the magnetic braking catastrophe or not?

    CERN Document Server

    Santos-Lima, R; Lazarian, A

    2012-01-01

    Recent numerical analysis of Keplerian disk formation in turbulent, magnetized cloud cores by Santos-Lima, de Gouveia Dal Pino, & Lazarian (2012) demonstrated that reconnection diffusion is an efficient process to remove the magnetic flux excess during the build up of a rotationally supported disk. This process is induced by fast reconnection of the magnetic fields in a turbulent flow. In a similar numerical study, Seifried et al. (2012) concluded that reconnection diffusion or any other non-ideal MHD effects would not be necessary and turbulence shear alone would provide a natural way to build up a rotating disk without requiring magnetic flux loss. Their conclusion was based on the fact that the mean mass-to-flux ratio ({\\mu}) evaluated over a spherical region with a radius much larger than the disk is nearly constant in their models. In this letter we compare the two sets of simulations and show that this averaging over large scales can mask significant real increases of {\\mu} in the inner regions wher...

  9. Formation of core-shell-structured Zn2SnO4-carbon microspheres with superior electrochemical properties by one-pot spray pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young Jun; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-01-14

    Core-shell structured Zn2SnO4-carbon microspheres with different carbon contents are prepared by one-pot spray pyrolysis without any further heating process. A Zn2SnO4-carbon composite microsphere is prepared from one droplet containing Zn and Sn salts and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Melted PVP moves to the outside of the composite microsphere during the drying stage of the droplet. In addition, melting of the phase separated metal salts forms the dense core. Carbonization of the phase separated PVP forms the textured and porous thick carbon shell. The discharge capacities of the core-shell structured Zn2SnO4-carbon microspheres for the 2(nd) and 120(th) cycles at a current density of 1 A g(-1) are 864 and 770 mA h g(-1), respectively. However, the discharge capacities of the bare Zn2SnO4 microspheres prepared by the same process without PVP for the 2(nd) and 120(th) cycles are 1106 and 81 mA h g(-1), respectively. The stable and reversible discharge capacities of the Zn2SnO4-carbon composite microspheres prepared from the spray solution with 15 g PVP decrease from 894 to 528 mA h g(-1) as current density increases from 0.5 to 5 A g(-1).

  10. The Earliest Phases of Star formation (EPoS): Temperature, density, and kinematic structure of the star-forming core CB 17

    CERN Document Server

    Schmalzl, M; Stutz, A M; Linz, H; Bourke, T L; Beuther, H; Henning, Th; Krause, O; Nielbock, M; Schmiedeke, A

    2014-01-01

    Context: The initial conditions for the gravitational collapse of molecular cloud cores and the subsequent birth of stars are still not well constrained. The characteristic cold temperatures (about 10 K) in such regions require observations at sub-millimetre and longer wavelengths. The Herschel Space Observatory and complementary ground-based observations presented in this paper have the unprecedented potential to reveal the structure and kinematics of a prototypical core region at the onset of stellar birth. Aims: This paper aims to determine the density, temperature, and velocity structure of the star-forming Bok globule CB 17. This isolated region is known to host (at least) two sources at different evolutionary stages: a dense core, SMM1, and a Class I protostar, IRS. Methods: We modeled the cold dust emission maps from 100 micron to 1.2 mm with both a modified blackbody technique to determine the optical depth-weighted line-of-sight temperature and column density and a ray-tracing technique to determine ...

  11. Effect of curing modes of dual-curing core systems on microtensile bond strength to dentin and formation of an acid-base resistant zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Takagaki, Tomohiro; Sadr, Alireza; Waidyasekera, Kanchana; Ikeda, Masaomi; Chen, Jihua; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2011-12-01

    To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and acid-base resistant zone (ABRZ) of two dualcuring core systems to dentin using four curing modes. Sixty-four caries-free human molars were randomly divided into two groups according to two dual-curing resin core systems: (1) Clearfil DC Core Automix; (2) Estelite Core Quick. For each core system, four different curing modes were applied to the adhesive and core resin: (1) dual-cured and dual-cured (DD); (2) chemically cured and dual-cured (CD); (3) dual-cured and chemically cured (DC); (4) chemically cured and chemically cured (CC). The specimens were sectioned into sticks (n = 20 for each group) for the microtensile bond test. μTBS data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and the Dunnett T3 test. Failure patterns were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to determine the proportion of each mode. Dentin sandwiches were produced and subjected to an acid-base challenge. After argon-ion etching, the ultrastructure of ABRZ was observed using SEM. For Clearfil DC Core Automix, the μTBS values in MPa were as follows: DD: 29.1 ± 5.4, CD: 21.6 ± 5.6, DC: 17.9 ± 2.8, CC: 11.5 ± 3.2. For Estelite Core Quick, they were: DD: 48.9 ±5.7, CD: 20.5 ± 4.7, DC: 41.4 ± 8.3, CC: 19.1 ± 6.0. The bond strength was affected by both material and curing mode, and the interaction of the two factors was significant (p core systems affects bond strength to dentin, but has no significant effect on the formation of ABRZ.

  12. Geologic, structural, and thermochronologic constraints on the tectonic evolution of the Sierra Mazatán core complex, Sonora, Mexico: New insights into metamorphic core complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin S.; Gans, Phillip B.

    2008-08-01

    The Sierra Mazatán in northwestern Mexico is the southernmost metamorphic core complex in the North American Cordillera. Large-magnitude Tertiary extension at Sierra Mazatán involved both ductile and brittle slip along a major normal fault that presently dips 10°-15° west. Extension was polyphase and involved an early period of extension from 25 to 23 Ma followed by major slip from 21 to 16 Ma. Total slip was ≤20 km and occurred at rates of 3-4 mm/a. This extension predated the plate boundary change to transtension at ˜12 Ma and was largely decoupled from relative Pacific-North American plate motion. Numerous lines of evidence suggest that the presently low-angle normal fault initiated at a steep dip (50°-60°) and was rotated to lower angles during slip. When corrected for this tilting, fault corrugations at Sierra Mazatán had a similar geometry to the segmentation of many active normal faults, which is compatible with their origin as primary fault features. Many aspects of the Sierra Mazatán are comparable to large active normal faults, indicating that this core complex formed owing to prolonged extension on an otherwise typical high-angle normal fault. Therefore, core complexes need not represent a fundamentally unique mode of crustal extension.

  13. Theoretical and computational comparison of models for dislocation dissociation and stacking fault/core formation in fcc crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mianroodi, J. R.; Hunter, A.; Beyerlein, I. J.; Svendsen, B.

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the current work is the theoretical and computational comparison of selected models for the energetics of dislocation dissociation resulting in stacking fault and partial dislocation (core) formation in fcc crystals as based on the (generalized) Peierls-Nabarro (GPN: e.g., Xiang et al., 2008; Shen et al., 2014), and phase-field (PF: e.g., Shen and Wang, 2004; Hunter et al., 2011, 2013; Mianroodi and Svendsen, 2015), methodologies (e.g., Wang and Li, 2010). More specifically, in the current work, the GPN-based model of Xiang et al. (2008) is compared theoretically with the PF-based models of Shen and Wang (2004), Hunter et al. (2011, 2013), and Mianroodi and Svendsen (2015). This is carried out here with the help of a unified formulation for these models via a generalization of the approach of Cahn and Hilliard (1958) to mechanics. Differences among these include the model forms for the free energy density ψela of the lattice and the free energy density ψsli associated with dislocation slip. In the PF-based models, for example, ψela is formulated with respect to the residual distortion HR due to dislocation slip (e.g., Khachaturyan, 1983; Mura, 1987), and with respect to the dislocation tensor curl HR in the GPN model (e.g., Xiang et al., 2008). As shown here, both model forms for ψela are in fact mathematically equal and so physically equivalent. On the other hand, model forms for ψsli differ in the assumed dependence on the phase or disregistry fields ϕ, whose spatial variation represents the transition from unslipped to slipped regions in the crystal. In particular, Xiang et al. (2008) and Hunter et al. (2011, 2013) work with ψsli(ϕ). On the other hand, Shen and Wang (2004) and Mianroodi and Svendsen (2015) employ ψsli(ϕ , ∇ ϕ). To investigate the consequences of these differences for the modeling of the dislocation core, dissociation, and stacking fault formation, predictions from the models of Hunter et al. (2011, 2013) and Mianroodi

  14. Continental rifting and metamorphic core complex formation ahead of the Woodlark spreading ridge, D'Entrecasteaux Islands, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Timothy A.; Baldwin, S. L.; Fitzgerald, P. G.; Monteleone, B.

    2007-02-01

    We evaluate the role of a metamorphic core complex (MCC) on Normanby Island in the Woodlark rift. Located 1 km thickness of blueschist-derived mylonites formed in a midcrustal shear zone during the Pliocene at ˜400-500°C. This top-to-the-north zone appears to have reactivated the gently dipping base of the Papuan ophiolite (Papuan Ultramafic Body, PUB), and its continued activity appears to control the north dipping asymmetry of active half grabens to the north of the MCC and rapid subsidence of the Woodlark Rise. Mylonites in the MCC's lower plate have been exhumed along a detachment as a result of >50 km of slip at rates of >12 mm/yr. The inactive, back-tilted detachment preserves fault surface megamullions and mylonitic lineations parallel to the Plio-Pleistocene plate motion. A second SE vergent detachment has been established on the opposite flank of this rolling-hinge style MCC, probably since 0.8) at depth, and provide a sufficient mechanism for activating low-angle normal faults in the rift. MCC inception was not localized to the tip of the Woodlark MOR. Instead, extreme crustal thinning near the MCC preconditioned later continental breakup. The lower crust appears to be weak, thickening beneath unloaded footwalls to uplift MCCs above sea level, and flowing laterally to even out regional crustal thickness contrasts on a 1-6 m.y. timescale. Deep-seated transforms separate rheologically distinct domains in which extension has been localized along the weak PUB to cause MCC formation, vs. those in which slip is distributed across an imbricate zone of more uniform strength normal faults. The Trobriand fault connects in the eastern Woodlark rift to the Owen Stanley fault in the Papuan Ranges, which is probably moving at nearly the full plate velocity.

  15. Stable chromium isotopic composition of meteorites and metal-silicate experiments: Implications for fractionation during core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnand, P.; Williams, H. M.; Parkinson, I. J.; Wood, B. J.; Halliday, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    We present new mass independent and mass dependent Cr isotope compositions for meteorites measured by double spike thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. Small differences in both mass independent 53Cr and 54Cr relative to the Bulk Silicate Earth are reported and are very similar to previously published values. Carbonaceous chondrites are characterised by an excess in 54Cr compared to ordinary and enstatite chondrites which make mass independent Cr isotopes a useful tool for distinguishing between meteoritic groups. Mass dependent stable Cr isotope compositions for the same samples are also reported. Carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites are identical within uncertainty with average δ53 Cr values of - 0.118 ± 0.040 ‰ and - 0.143 ± 0.074 ‰ respectively. The heaviest isotope compositions are recorded by an enstatite chondrite and a CO carbonaceous chondrite, both of which have relatively reduced chemical compositions implying some stable Cr isotope fractionation related to redox processes in the circumstellar disk. The average δ53 Cr values for chondrites are within error of the estimate for the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) also determined by double spiking. The lack of isotopic difference between chondritic material and the BSE provides evidence that Cr isotopes were not fractionated during core formation on Earth. A series of high-pressure experiments was also carried out to investigate stable Cr isotope fractionation between metal and silicate and no demonstrable fractionation was observed, consistent with our meteorites data. Mass dependent Cr isotope data for achondrites suggest that Cr isotopes are fractionated during magmatic differentiation and therefore further work is required to constrain the Cr isotopic compositions of the mantles of Vesta and Mars.

  16. Core-Shell Fibers Electrospun from Phase-Separated Blend Solutions: Fiber Formation Mechanism and Unique Energy Dissipation for Synergistic Fiber Toughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi; Hsiue, Ting-Ting

    2017-09-11

    Through single-tube electrospinning, the biodegradable core-shell fibers of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) and poly(d,l-lactic acid) (PDLLA) were obtained from blend solutions with different compositions at a total polymer concentration of 7 wt %. Regardless whether PHB is the major or minor component (PHB/PDLLA = 90/10, 75/25, 50/50, and 25/75 wt. ratio), these phase-separated solutions all yielded core-shell fibers with PHB as core and PDLLA as shell. A new scenario of core-shell fiber formation was proposed on the basis of the relative magnitude of the intrinsic relaxation rate of fluids and external extension rate during electrospinning. The effects of blend compositions on the morphologies of the Taylor cone, whipping jet, and as-spun fibers were investigated. The diameters of core-shell fibers can be tailored by simply varying the PHB/PDLLA ratios. Two scaling laws describing the apparent viscosity (ηo) dependence of the outer fiber diameter (dfo) and core fiber diameter (dfc) were derived. That is, dfo ∼ ηo(0.38) and dfc ∼ ηo(0.86). The microstructures of the as-spun fibers were determined by differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and synchrotron wide-angle and small-angle X-ray scatterings. Results showed that the PDLLA component was in the amorphous state, and the crystallizability of PHB component remained unchanged, except the amorphous 10/90 fibers electrospun from a miscible solution state. The synergistic mechanical properties of the core-shell fibers were obtained, along with the ductile PDLLA shell enclosing the brittle PHB core. The enhanced toughness was attributed to the fragmentation of the brittle PHB core and necking fracture of the ductile PDLLA shell, which served as an effective route for energy dissipation. Compared with the neat PHB fiber, the 90/10 and 75/25 core-shell fibers possessed larger elastic moduli, which was attributed to the high PHB crystal orientation in their core sections despite

  17. The initial conditions of isolated star formation - X. A suggested evolutionary diagram for pre-stellar cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, R. J.; Johnstone, D.; Nutter, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Whitworth, A. P.

    2011-10-01

    We propose an evolutionary path for pre-stellar cores on the radius-mass diagram, which is analogous to stellar evolutionary paths on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Using James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) observations of L1688 in the Ophiuchus star-forming complex, we analyse the HCO+ (J= 4 → 3) spectral line profiles of pre-stellar cores. We find that of the 58 cores observed, 14 show signs of infall in the form of a blue-asymmetric double-peaked line profile. These 14 cores all lie beyond the Jeans mass line for the region on a radius-mass plot. Furthermore, another 10 cores showing tentative signs of infall, in their spectral line profile shapes, appear on or just over the Jeans mass line. We therefore propose the manner in which a pre-stellar core evolves across this diagram. We hypothesize that a core is formed in the low-mass, low-radius region of the plot. It then accretes quasi-statically, increasing in both mass and radius. When it crosses the limit of gravitational instability, it begins to collapse, decreasing in radius, towards the region of the diagram where protostellar cores are seen.

  18. Measurement and analysis of fractures in vertical, slant, and horizontal core, with examples from the Mesaverde formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Hill, R.E. (CER Corp., Las Vegas, NV (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Optimum analysis of natural fracture characteristics and distributions in reservoirs requires conscientious supervision of coring operations, on-site core processing, careful layout and marketing of the core, and detailed measurement of fracture characteristics. Natural fractures provide information on the in situ permeability system, and coring-induced fractures provide data on the in situ stresses. Fracture data derived from vertical core should include fracture height, type and location of fracture terminations with respect to lithologic heterogeneity, fracture planatary and roughness, and distribution with depth. Fractures in core from either a vertical or a deviated well will yield information on dip, dip azimuth, strike, mineralization, and the orientation of fractures relative to the in situ stresses. Only measurements of fractures in core from a deviated/horizontal well will provide estimates of fracture spacing and porosity. These data can be graphed and cross-plotted to yield semi-quantitative fracture characteristics for reservoir models. Data on the orientations of fractures relative to each other in unoriented core can be nearly as useful as the absolute orientations of fractures. A deviated pilot hole is recommended for fracture assessment prior to a drilling horizontal production well because it significantly enhances the chances of fracture intersection, and therefore of fracture characterization. 35 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Magnetic fields and massive star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qizhou; Keto, Eric; Ho, Paul T. P.; Ching, Tao-Chung; Chen, How-Huan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Qiu, Keping [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 22 Hankou Road, Nanjing 210093 (China); Girart, Josep M.; Juárez, Carmen [Institut de Ciències de l' Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciències, C5p 2, E-08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Liu, Hauyu; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Rao, Ramprasad; Lai, Shih-Ping [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhi-Yun [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Frau, Pau [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Alfonso XII, 3 E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Li, Hua-Bai [Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Padovani, Marco [Laboratoire de Radioastronomie Millimétrique, UMR 8112 du CNRS, École Normale Supérieure et Observatoire de Paris, 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Bontemps, Sylvain [OASU/LAB-UMR5804, CNRS, Université Bordeaux 1, F-33270 Floirac (France); Csengeri, Timea, E-mail: qzhang@cfa.harvard.edu [Max Planck Institute for Radioastronomy, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2014-09-10

    Massive stars (M > 8 M {sub ☉}) typically form in parsec-scale molecular clumps that collapse and fragment, leading to the birth of a cluster of stellar objects. We investigate the role of magnetic fields in this process through dust polarization at 870 μm obtained with the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA observations reveal polarization at scales of ≲0.1 pc. The polarization pattern in these objects ranges from ordered hour-glass configurations to more chaotic distributions. By comparing the SMA data with the single dish data at parsec scales, we found that magnetic fields at dense core scales are either aligned within 40° of or perpendicular to the parsec-scale magnetic fields. This finding indicates that magnetic fields play an important role during the collapse and fragmentation of massive molecular clumps and the formation of dense cores. We further compare magnetic fields in dense cores with the major axis of molecular outflows. Despite a limited number of outflows, we found that the outflow axis appears to be randomly oriented with respect to the magnetic field in the core. This result suggests that at the scale of accretion disks (≲ 10{sup 3} AU), angular momentum and dynamic interactions possibly due to close binary or multiple systems dominate over magnetic fields. With this unprecedentedly large sample of massive clumps, we argue on a statistical basis that magnetic fields play an important role during the formation of dense cores at spatial scales of 0.01-0.1 pc in the context of massive star and cluster star formation.

  20. FORMATION OF FLOWER-LIKE AGGREGATES FROM SELF-ASSEMBLING OF MICELLES WITH PEO SHELLS AND CROSS-LINKED POLYACRYLAMIDE CORES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-qun Huang; Chun-yan Hong; Cai-yuan Pan

    2008-01-01

    Amphiphilic block copolymers, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(N-acryloxysuccinimide) (PEO-b-PNAS) with various molecular weights have been successfully synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of NAS using functionalized PEO (PEO-Br) as ATRP macroinitiator. The self-assembling of the block copolymers in water, which is a good solvent for PEO and a non-solvent for PNAS, yielded spherical core-shell micelles with PNAS as core and PEO as shell. The cross-linked reaction of oxysuccinimide in PNAS chains with ethylenediamine occurred in the core of micelles,and the core cross-linked micelles were formed. The flower-like and dendritic aggregates were formed by self-assembling of the core cross-linked micelles on the glass slides or silicon wafers. Longer PNAS block in the block copolymers and higher evaporation temperature formed bigger spherical particles. The optical microscope was used to follow the formation and growth of the flower-like aggregates from the colloidal solution and the main driving forces for the self-assembling are solution fluid and interactions between PEO chains.

  1. Very cold and massive cores near ISOSS J18364-0221: Implications for the initial conditions of high-mass star-formation

    CERN Document Server

    Birkmann, S M; Lemke, D; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Krause, Oliver; Lemke, Dietrich

    2006-01-01

    We report the discovery of two very cold and massive molecular cloud cores in the region ISOSS J18364-0221. The object has been identified by a systematic search for very early evolutionary stages of high-mass stars using the 170 micron ISOPHOT Serendipity Survey (ISOSS). Submm continuum and molecular line measurements reveal two compact cores within this region. The first core has a temperature of 16.5 K, shows signs of ongoing infall and outflows, has no NIR or MIR counterpart and is massive enough (M ~ 75 M_sun) to form at least one O star with an associated cluster. It is therefore considered a candidate for a genuine high-mass protostar and a high-mass analog to the Class 0 objects. The second core has an average gas and dust temperature of only ~ 12 K and a mass of M ~ 280 M_sun. Its temperature and level of turbulence are below the values found for massive cores so far and are suggested to represent the initial conditions from which high-mass star formation occurs.

  2. Dense Axion Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure.If the axion mass energy is $mc^2= 10^{-4}$ eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about $10^{-14} M_\\odot$. We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If $mc^2 = 10^{-4}$ eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mas...

  3. Dense Axion Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Eric; Mohapatra, Abhishek; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-01

    If the dark matter particles are axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound systems of axions. In the previously known solutions for axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. The mass of these dilute axion stars cannot exceed a critical mass, which is about 10-14M⊙ if the axion mass is 10-4 eV . We study axion stars using a simple approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. We find a new branch of dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion Bose-Einstein condensate. The mass on this branch ranges from about 10-20M⊙ to about M⊙ . If a dilute axion star with the critical mass accretes additional axions and collapses, it could produce a bosenova, leaving a dense axion star as the remnant.

  4. Dense Axion Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Abhishek; Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. If the axion mass energy is mc2 =10-4 eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about 10-14M⊙ . We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If mc2 =10-4 4 eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mass ranging from about 10-11M⊙ toabout M⊙.

  5. DENSE MEDIUM CYCLONE OPTIMIZATON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald H. Luttrell; Chris J. Barbee; Peter J. Bethell; Chris J. Wood

    2005-06-30

    Dense medium cyclones (DMCs) are known to be efficient, high-tonnage devices suitable for upgrading particles in the 50 to 0.5 mm size range. This versatile separator, which uses centrifugal forces to enhance the separation of fine particles that cannot be upgraded in static dense medium separators, can be found in most modern coal plants and in a variety of mineral plants treating iron ore, dolomite, diamonds, potash and lead-zinc ores. Due to the high tonnage, a small increase in DMC efficiency can have a large impact on plant profitability. Unfortunately, the knowledge base required to properly design and operate DMCs has been seriously eroded during the past several decades. In an attempt to correct this problem, a set of engineering tools have been developed to allow producers to improve the efficiency of their DMC circuits. These tools include (1) low-cost density tracers that can be used by plant operators to rapidly assess DMC performance, (2) mathematical process models that can be used to predict the influence of changes in operating and design variables on DMC performance, and (3) an expert advisor system that provides plant operators with a user-friendly interface for evaluating, optimizing and trouble-shooting DMC circuits. The field data required to develop these tools was collected by conducting detailed sampling and evaluation programs at several industrial plant sites. These data were used to demonstrate the technical, economic and environmental benefits that can be realized through the application of these engineering tools.

  6. Primordial Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Schild, Rudolph E

    2010-01-01

    Recent spacecraft observations exploring solar system properties impact standard paradigms of the formation of stars, planets and comets. We stress the unexpected cloud of microscopic dust resulting from the DEEP IMPACT mission, and the existence of molten nodules in STARDUST samples. And the theory of star formation does not explain the common occurrence of binary and multiple star systems in the standard gas fragmentation scenario. No current theory of planet formation can explain the iron core of the earth, under oceans of water. These difficulties are avoided in a scenario where the planet mass objects form primordially and are today the baryonic dark matter. They have been detected in quasar microlensing and anomalous quasar radio brightening bursts. The primordial planets often concentrate together to form a star, with residual matter seen in pre-stellar accretion discs around the youngest stars. These primordial planet mass bodies were formed of hydrogen-helium, aggregated in dense clumps of a trillion...

  7. A parallel solver for huge dense linear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, J. M.; Movilla, J. L.; Climente, J. I.; Castillo, M.; Marqués, M.; Mayo, R.; Quintana-Ortí, E. S.; Planelles, J.

    2011-11-01

    HDSS (Huge Dense Linear System Solver) is a Fortran Application Programming Interface (API) to facilitate the parallel solution of very large dense systems to scientists and engineers. The API makes use of parallelism to yield an efficient solution of the systems on a wide range of parallel platforms, from clusters of processors to massively parallel multiprocessors. It exploits out-of-core strategies to leverage the secondary memory in order to solve huge linear systems O(100.000). The API is based on the parallel linear algebra library PLAPACK, and on its Out-Of-Core (OOC) extension POOCLAPACK. Both PLAPACK and POOCLAPACK use the Message Passing Interface (MPI) as the communication layer and BLAS to perform the local matrix operations. The API provides a friendly interface to the users, hiding almost all the technical aspects related to the parallel execution of the code and the use of the secondary memory to solve the systems. In particular, the API can automatically select the best way to store and solve the systems, depending of the dimension of the system, the number of processes and the main memory of the platform. Experimental results on several parallel platforms report high performance, reaching more than 1 TFLOP with 64 cores to solve a system with more than 200 000 equations and more than 10 000 right-hand side vectors. New version program summaryProgram title: Huge Dense System Solver (HDSS) Catalogue identifier: AEHU_v1_1 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHU_v1_1.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 87 062 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 069 110 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran90, C Computer: Parallel architectures: multiprocessors, computer clusters Operating system

  8. Mantle formation, coagulation and the origin of cloud/core shine: I. Modelling dust scattering and absorption in the infra-red

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, A P; Ysard, N; Dartois, E; Godard, M; Gavilan, L

    2016-01-01

    Context. The observed cloudshine and coreshine (C-shine) have been explained in terms of grain growth leading to enhanced scatter- ing from clouds in the J, H and K photometric bands and the Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 {\\mu}m bands. Aims. Using our global dust modelling approach THEMIS (The Heterogeneous dust Evolution Model at the IaS) we explore the effects of dust evolution in dense clouds, through aliphatic-rich carbonaceous mantle formation and grain-grain coagulation. Methods. We model the effects of wide band gap a-C:H mantle formation and the low-level aggregation of diffuse interstellar medium dust in the moderately-extinguished outer regions of molecular clouds. Results. The formation of wide band gap a-C:H mantles on amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon (a-C) grains leads to a decrease in their absorption cross-sections but no change in their scattering cross-sections at near-IR wavelengths, resulting in higher albedos. Conclusions. The evolution of dust, with increasing density and extinction in t...

  9. Spontaneous formation of GaN/AlN core-shell nanowires on sapphire by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trassoudaine, Agnès; Roche, Elissa; Bougerol, Catherine; André, Yamina; Avit, Geoffrey; Monier, Guillaume; Ramdani, Mohammed Réda; Gil, Evelyne; Castelluci, Dominique; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.

    2016-11-01

    Spontaneous GaN/AlN core-shell nanowires with high crystal quality were synthesized on sapphire substrates by vapor-liquid-solid hydride vapor phase epitaxy (VLS-HVPE) without any voluntary aluminum source. Deposition of aluminum is difficult to achieve in this growth technique which uses metal-chloride gaseous precursors: the strong interaction between the AlCl gaseous molecules and the quartz reactor yields a huge parasitic nucleation on the walls of the reactor upstream the substrate. We open up an innovative method to produce GaN/AlN structures by HVPE, thanks to aluminum etching from the sapphire substrate followed by redeposition onto the sidewalls of the GaN core. The paper presents the structural characterization of GaN/AlN core-shell nanowires, speculates on the growth mechanism and discusses a model which describes this unexpected behavior.

  10. Effect of Silicon on Activity Coefficients of Platinum in Liquid Fe-Si, With Application to Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L. R.; Humayun, M.

    2017-01-01

    Earth's core contains approximately 10% of a light element that is likely a combination of S, C, Si, and O, with Si possibly being the most abundant light element. Si dissolved into Fe liquids can have a large effect on the magnitude of the activity coefficient of siderophile elements (SE) in Fe liquids, and thus the partitioning behavior of those elements between core and mantle. The effect of Si can be small such as for Ni and Co, or large such as for Mo, Ge, Sb, As. The effect of Si on many siderophile elements is unknown yet could be an important, and as yet unquantified, influence on the core-mantle partitioning of SE. Here we report new experiments designed to quantify the effect of Si on the partitioning of Pt (with Re and Ru in progress or planned) between metal and silicate melt. The results will be applied to Earth, for which we have excellent constraints on the mantle Pt concentrations.

  11. Hyperons in dense matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dapo, Haris

    2009-01-28

    The hyperon-nucleon YN low momentum effective interaction (V{sub low} {sub k}) allows for an extensive study of the behavior of hyperons in dense matter, together with an investigation of effects of the presence of hyperons on dense matter. The first step towards this goal is the construction of the matrix elements for the hyperon-nucleon low momentum potential. In order to assess the different properties of hyperons within these potentials we calculate the hyperon single-particle potentials in the Hartree-Fock approximation for all of the interactions. Their dependence on both momentum and density, is studied. The single-particle potentials are then used to determine the chemical potential of hyperons in neutron stars. For nucleonic properties, the nucleon-nucleon V{sub low} {sub k} can be used with the caveat that the calculation of the ground-state energy of symmetric nuclear matter does not correctly reproduce the properties of matter at saturation. With the nucleon-nucleon V{sub low} {sub k} one is unable to reach the densities needed for the calculation of neutron star masses. To circumvent this problem we use two approaches: in the first one, we parametrize the entire nucleonic sector. In the second one, we replace only the three-body force. The former will enable us to study neutron star masses, and the latter for studying the medium's response to the external probe. In this thesis we take the external probe to be the neutrino. By combining this parametrization with the YN V{sub low} {sub k} potential, we calculate the equation of state of equilibrated matter. Performing the calculation in the Hartree-Fock approximation at zero temperature, the concentrations of all particles are calculated. From these we can ascertain at which densities hyperons appear for a wide range of parameters. Finally, we calculate the masses of neutron stars with these concentrations. For the calculation of the medium's response to an external probe, we replace the three

  12. Orbital circularization of a planet accreting disk gas: the formation of distant jupiters in circular orbits based on a core accretion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Akihiro; Higuchi, Arika [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ida, Shigeru, E-mail: kikuchi.a@geo.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: higuchia@geo.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: ida@elsi.jp [Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2014-12-10

    Recently, gas giant planets in nearly circular orbits with large semimajor axes (a ∼ 30-1000 AU) have been detected by direct imaging. We have investigated orbital evolution in a formation scenario for such planets, based on a core accretion model. (1) Icy cores accrete from planetesimals at ≲ 30 AU, (2) they are scattered outward by an emerging nearby gas giant to acquire highly eccentric orbits, and (3) their orbits are circularized through the accretion of disk gas in outer regions, where they spend most of their time. We analytically derived equations to describe the orbital circularization through gas accretion. Numerical integrations of these equations show that the eccentricity decreases by a factor of more than 5 while the planetary mass increases by a factor of 10. Because runaway gas accretion increases planetary mass by ∼10-300, the orbits are sufficiently circularized. On the other hand, a is reduced at most only by a factor of two, leaving the planets in the outer regions. If the relative velocity damping by shock is considered, the circularization slows down, but is still efficient enough. Therefore, this scenario potentially accounts for the formation of observed distant jupiters in nearly circular orbits. If the apocenter distances of the scattered cores are larger than the disk sizes, their a shrink to a quarter of the disk sizes; the a-distribution of distant giants could reflect the outer edges of the disks in a similar way that those of hot jupiters may reflect inner edges.

  13. The Early Gulf of Mexico as a Subaerial Basin Below Sea Level (SABSEL) Basin. Evidence from Stratigraphy and Facies of Luanne salt, Norphlet sandstone and Smackover Brown Dense Formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    Many workers recognize that large salt deposits form in post-rift sag basins which were subaerial and susceptible to rapid flooding from adjacent oceansl. I have termed these basins "subaerial basins below sea level" or "SABSEL" basins. A key marker of SABSEL basins are terrestrial sediments immediately overlain by deepwater sediments with no transition. Desert deposits -including Aeolian dunes- are preserved in the adiabatically heated depression. Dunes are not eroded by transgressing seas but are drowned by rising water as in a bath tub. They maintain their shape. Deepwater marine black shales or limestones drape the dunes. The Southern North sea is an example. Above the original marine shale over the dunes are evaporites. Winds descending into the basin were heated by adiabatic compression providing the very hot air need to allow survival of potassium salts. A similar situation was probably active during the Messinian salinity crisis in the Mediterranean basin, and the opening of the South Atlantic. In the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) a desert is on the Louann salt. Here the sea invaded the lows first to deposit the salt overlying tilted fault blocks of the opening basin, as in the Afar Triangle of Africa. In the GOM entry to the west fed in sea water, then closed. The Norphlet desert formed. Streams carried sands to the basin to be spread by winds where they willed, not limited to sand entry areas. Upon deposition their original weight depressed the salt. Seismic shows depressions in the salt but the dunes are high at the top Norphlet, forming distinctive small "eyes" at the top salt. The 600 foot dunes are draped by deep water dolomitic finely laminated organic rich black/ brown shale, the Brown Dense Facies of the Smackover formation. The lack of reworking of the dunes found by detailed seismic is distinctive of deposition in a SABSEL basin. The overlap of terrestrial sediments by deep water deposition is good evidence of sudden flooding. In summary this vertical

  14. Co-axial superposed folding and inverted regional metamorphism in the Tonga Formation: Cretaceous accretionary thrust tectonics in the Cascades crystalline core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Jensen; Lebit, Hermann; Paterson, Scott; Miller, Robert; Vernon, Ron

    2017-04-01

    The Cascades crystalline core forms part of the Cretaceous magmatic belt of western North America and exposes a crustal section composed of primarily tonalitic plutons that intruded siliciclastic metasediments of an arc-derived accretional system, and local meta-basalt/chert sequences. This study is the first attempt to correlate the well understood intrusive and P-T-t history of the metasedimentary and plutonic terrane with the kinematics and tectonic boundary conditions by rigorous analysis of structures documented in the Tonga Formation exposed at the western edge of the core. The Tonga Formation comprises pelite-psammite metasediments, which increase from greenschist ( 300-350° C) to amphibolite grade ( 500-600° C) from south to north. This metamorphic gradient is inverted relative to a major westward verging and downward facing fold system that dominates the internal architecture of the formation and implies that the initial regional metamorphic signature was established prior to the early fold generation. Subsequent co-axial fold superposition is seen as a consequence of the persistent accretional west-vergent thrusting in the foreland of the magmatic arc. The central section of the Cascades Range, exposed in western Washington, forms part of the Cretaceous accretional/magmatic arc extending over 4,000 km along western North America from Baja California to British Columbia (Fig. 1a) (e.g. Misch, 1966; Brown, 1987; Tabor et al., 1989). Two models exist for the evolution of the Cascades crystalline core with one invoking magmatic loading (e.g. Brown and Walker, 1993) as the major cause for rapid loading, consequent regional metamorphism and vertical uplift (Evans and Berti, 1986). Conversely, other workers favor a model that suggests loading as a consequence of tectonic, thrust-related thickening, followed by rapid exhumation of the exposed crustal section of 10 to 40 km paleodepth (e.g. Matzel, 2004; Patterson et al., 2004; Stowell et al., 2007). In this

  15. Scalable Out-of-Core Solvers on Xeon Phi Cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Azevedo, Ed F [ORNL; Chan, Ki Shing [Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK); Su, Shiquan [Center for Computational Materials Science; Wong, Kwai [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This paper documents the implementation of a distributive out-of-core (OOC) solver for performing LU and Cholesky factorizations of a large dense matrix on clusters of many-core programmable co-processors. The out-of- core algorithm combines both the left-looking and right-looking schemes aimed to minimize the movement of data between the CPU host and the co-processor, optimizing data locality as well as computing throughput. The OOC solver is built to align with the format of the ScaLAPACK software library, making it readily portable to any existing codes using ScaLAPACK. A runtime analysis conducted on Beacon (an Intel Xeon plus Intel Xeon Phi cluster which composed of 48 nodes of multi-core CPU and MIC) at the Na- tional Institute for Computational Sciences is presented. Comparison of the performance on the Intel Xeon Phi and GPU clusters are also provided.

  16. Dense Plasma Focus Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Li, Shengtai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jungman, Gerard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Here we report on high-fidelity 2D and 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the LA-COMPASS code to study the pinch formation dynamics in a DPF and the associated instabilities and neutron production.

  17. Formation of Star-Like and Core-Shell AuAg Nanoparticles during Two- and Three-Step Preparation in Batch and in Microfluidic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael Köhler

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Regular dendrit-like metal nanoparticles and core-shell nanoparticles were formed by the reduction of mixtures of tetrachloroaurate and silver nitrate solutions with ascorbic acid at room temperature in two- and three-step procedures. The formation of these particles was found in batch experiments as well as in micro flow-through processes using static micromixers. The characteristic diameters of 4-branched star particles were in the range between 60 and 100 nm. The typical particles consist of four metal cores which are embedded in a common shell. Additionally, particles with five and more metallic cores were formed, to some extent, and aggregates of the 4-branched particles also were formed. Larger aggregates and network-like structures of connected star particles were formed after sedimentation. The properties of the formed particles are dependent on the educt concentrations as well as on the order of mixing steps and on the time interval between them. Obviously, the relation of nucleation and particle growth in relation to the concentrations of metal ions determines the composition and the properties of formed nanoparticles. So, star-like particles are observed in case of nucleation of Au in absence of silver ions but with silver deposition after short nucleation time. Spherical core shell particles are formed in case of silver salt addition after complete reduction of tetrachloroaurate in flow-through experiments with sufficient residence time between both mixing steps. Polymer layers are always found in the form of a second outer shell even if the polymer solutions are added in an early stage of particle