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Sample records for denitrifying bacterium pseudomonas

  1. Potential application of aerobic denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 in nitrogen oxides (NOx) removal from flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Maosheng; Li, Can; Liu, Shufeng; Gui, Mengyao; Ni, Jinren

    2016-11-15

    Conventional biological removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas has been severely restricted by the presence of oxygen. This paper presents an efficient alternative for NOx removal at varying oxygen levels using the newly isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 which was capable of aerobic and anoxic denitrification. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO), as the obligatory intermediate, was negligibly accumulated during nitrate and nitrite reduction. Moreover, normal nitrate reduction with decreasing NO accumulation was realized under O2 concentration ranging from 0 to 100%. Reverse transcription and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis revealed that high efficient NO removal was attributed to the coordinate regulation of gene expressions including napA (for periplasmic nitrate reductase), nirS (for cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase) and cnorB (for NO reductase). Further batch experiments demonstrated the immobilized strain PCN-2 possessed high capability of removing NO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at O2 concentration of 0-10%. A biotrickling filter established with present strain achieved high NOx removal efficiencies of 91.94-96.74% at inlet NO concentration of 100-500ppm and O2 concentration of 0-10%, which implied promising potential applications in purifying NOx contaminated flue gas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nitrogen-removal efficiency of a novel aerobic denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas stutzeri strain ZF31, isolated from a drinking-water reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tinglin; Guo, Lin; Zhang, Haihan; Su, Junfeng; Wen, Gang; Zhang, Kai

    2015-11-01

    An aerobic denitrifier, identified as Pseudomonas stutzeri strain ZF31, was isolated from the Zhoucun drinking-water reservoir. Strain ZF31 removed 97% of nitrate nitrogen after 16h, without nitrite accumulation. Sequence amplification indicated the presence of the denitrification genes napA, nirS, norB, and nosZ. Nitrogen balance analysis revealed that approximately 75% of the initial nitrogen was removed as gas products. Response surface methodology (RSM) experiments showed that maximum removal of total nitrogen (TN) occurred at pH 8.23, a C/N ratio of 6.68, temperature of 27.72°C, and with shaking at 54.15rpm. The TN removal rate at low C/N ratio (i.e., 3) and low temperature (i.e., 10°C) was 73.30% and 60.08%, respectively. These results suggest that strain ZF31 has potential applications for the bioremediation of slightly polluted drinking-water reservoirs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pseudomonas yangmingensis sp. nov., an alkaliphilic denitrifying species isolated from a hot spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Biing-Teo; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2014-01-01

    This study isolated and identified a facultative, alkaliphilic, denitrifying Pseudomonas strain designed as CRS1 from a hot spring, Yang-Ming Mountain, Taiwan. The biochemical characterization, phenotypic characteristics and phylogenetic relationship of strain CRS1 were studied. On the basis of the 16S rRNA sequence similarity, phenotypic and genotypic characteristics and chemotaxonomic data, the strain CRS1 represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas yangmingensis sp. nov., is proposed. The strain CRS1 is a facultative autotrophic bacterium that has capability of mixotrophic and heterotrophic denitrification. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Identification and function test of an alkali-tolerant denitrifying bacterium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ru; Zheng, Ping; Li, Wei; Chen, Hui; Chen, Tingting; Ghulam, Abbas

    2013-04-04

    We obtained an alkali-tolerant denitrifying bacterium, and determined its denitrifying activity and alkali-tolerance. An alkali-tolerant denitrifying bacterial strain was obtained by isolation and purification. We identified the bacterial strain by morphological observation, physiological test and 16S rRNA analysis. We determined the denitrifying activity and alkali-tolerance by effects of initial nitrate concentration and initial pH on denitrification. An alkali-tolerant denitrifier strain R9 was isolated from the lab-scale high-rate denitrifying reactor, and it was identified as Diaphorobater nitroreducens. The strain R9 grew heterotrophically with methanol as the electron donor and nitrate as the electron acceptor. The nitrate conversion was 93.25% when strain R9 was cultivated for 288 h with initial nitrate concentration 50 mg/L and initial pH 9.0. The denitrification activity could be inhibited at high nitrate concentration with a half inhibition constant of 202.73 mg N/L. Strain R9 showed a good alkali tolerance with the nitrate removal rate at pH 11.0 remained 86% of that at pH 9.0. Strain R9 was identified as Diaphorobater nitroreducens, and it was an alkali-tolerant denitrifying bacterium with optimum pH value of 9.0.

  5. Draft genome sequence of a denitrifying bacterium Paracoccus marcusii PAMC 22219 isolated from Arctic marine sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, In-Tae; Song, Eun-Ji; Seok, Yoon Ji; Lee, Hyunjin; Park, Inhye; Lee, Yoo Kyung; Roh, Seong Woon; Choi, Hak-Jong; Nam, Young-Do; Seo, Myung-Ji

    2015-06-01

    A denitrifying bacterium, Paracoccus marcusii PAMC 22219, was isolated from Arctic marine sediment in Svalbard, Norway. The obtained contigs were 265 with genome size of 4.0Mb and G+C content of 66.1%. This bacterial genome revealed that it had nitrate and nitrite ammonification genes involved in the denitrification process, suggesting that P. marcusii PAMC 22219 is a denitrifying bacterium. This is the first genome that has been sequenced in the genus Paracoccus, isolated from an Arctic environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Halobacterium denitrificans sp. nov., an extremely halophilic denitrifying bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Jahnke, L. L.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Halobacterium denitrificans was one of several carbohydrate-utilizing, denitrifying, extremely halophilic bacteria isolated by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. Anaerobic growth took place only when nitrate (or nitrite) was present and was accompanied by the production of dinitrogen. In the presence of high concentrations of nitrate (i.e., 0.5 percent), nitrous oxide and nitrite were also detected. When grown aerobically in a mineral-salts medium containing 0.005 percent yeast extract, H. denitrificans utilized a variety of carbohydrates as sources of carbon and energy. In every case, carbohydrate utilization was accompanied by acid production.

  7. Halobacterium denitrificans sp. nov. - An extremely halophilic denitrifying bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Jahnke, L. L.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1986-01-01

    Halobacterium denitrificans was one of several carbohydrate-utilizing, denitrifying, extremely halophilic bacteria isolated by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. Anaerobic growth took place only when nitrate (or nitrite) was present and was accompanied by the production of dinitrogen. In the presence of high concentrations of nitrate (i.e., 0.5 percent), nitrous oxide and nitrite were also detected. When grown aerobically in a mineral-salts medium containing 0.005 percent yeast extract, H. denitrificans utilized a variety of carbohydrates as sources of carbon and energy. In every case, carbohydrate utilization was accompanied by acid production.

  8. Differential Isotopic Fractionation during Cr(VI) Reduction by an Aquifer-Derived Bacterium under Aerobic versus Denitrifying Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, R.; Qin, L.; Brown, S. T.; Christensen, J. N.; Beller, H. R.

    2012-01-27

    We studied Cr isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2. Finally, despite the fact that strain RCH2 reduces Cr(VI) cometabolically under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions and at similar specific rates, fractionation was markedly different under these two conditions (ε was ~2‰ aerobically and ~0.4‰ under denitrifying conditions).

  9. Coupled carbon, sulfur and nitrogen cycles of mixotrophic growth of Pseudomonas sp. C27 under denitrifying sulfide removal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongliang; Chen, Chuan; Lee, Duu-Jong; Wang, Aijie; Gao, Dawen; Ren, Nanqi

    2014-11-01

    Pseudomonas sp. C27 is a facultative autotrophic bacterium (FAB) that can effectively conduct mixotrophic denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) reactions using organic matters and sulfide as electron donors. Quantitative proteomics analysis of C27 using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and bioinformatics techniques identified 1916 unique proteins, based on which a novel pathway utilizing couple carbon, sulfide and nitrogen cycles for mixotrophic growth of C27. DSR experiments at different C/N ratios confirmed the presence of the new pathway. This novel pathway may be of great significance for C27-alike strains to conduct sulfide and nitrate removals in biological treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Screening and characterizing a denitrifying phosphorus-accumulating bacterium isolated from a circular plug-flow reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, En; Ding, Aizhong; Zheng, Lei; Dou, Junfeng; Anderson, Bruce; Huang, Xiaolong; Jing, Ruoting

    2016-11-01

    Denitrifying phosphorus-accumulating organisms (DNPAO) are viewed as one of the most effective means to solve the removal contradiction of nitrogen and phosphorus in wastewater treatment. In this study, we isolated a DNPAO (C-17, accession number: KU745702) from activated sludge in a patented circular plug-flow reactor, physiologically to Pseudomonas sp. based on 16S rRNA sequence and phenotypic characteristics. The results of denitrifying phosphorus-accumulating experiment showed that Pseudomonas C-17 has high removal efficiencies for [Formula: see text] and NO3-N, 75% and 87%, respectively. The ratio of phosphorus release was 25.0 mg [Formula: see text] (with anabolism) and 26.8 mg [Formula: see text] (without anabolism), respectively. Our results indicated that Pseudomonas C-17 had strong capacity of phosphorus release, and its uptake is often imprecisely evaluated by ignoring the part of metabolic consumption. Pseudomonas C-17 is capable of utilizing oxygen, nitrate and nitrite as electron acceptors under experimental conditions.

  11. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  12. Novel Metal Cation Resistance Systems from Mutant Fitness Analysis of Denitrifying Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Brian J; Lancaster, W Andrew; Thorgersen, Michael P; Zane, Grant M; Younkin, Adam D; Kazakov, Alexey E; Wetmore, Kelly M; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam P; Novichkov, Pavel S; Wall, Judy D; Adams, Michael W W

    2016-10-01

    Metal ion transport systems have been studied extensively, but the specificity of a given transporter is often unclear from amino acid sequence data alone. In this study, predicted Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) resistance systems in Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2 are compared with those experimentally implicated in Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) resistance, as determined by using a DNA-barcoded transposon mutant library. Mutant fitness data obtained under denitrifying conditions are combined with regulon predictions to yield a much more comprehensive picture of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) resistance in strain RCH2. The results not only considerably expand what is known about well-established metal ion exporters (CzcCBA, CzcD, and CusCBA) and their accessory proteins (CzcI and CusF), they also reveal that isolates with mutations in some predicted Cu(2+) resistance systems do not show decreased fitness relative to the wild type when exposed to Cu(2+) In addition, new genes are identified that have no known connection to Zn(2+) (corB, corC, Psest_3226, Psest_3322, and Psest_0618) or Cu(2+) resistance (Mrp antiporter subunit gene, Psest_2850, and Psest_0584) but are crucial for resistance to these metal cations. Growth of individual deletion mutants lacking corB, corC, Psest_3226, or Psest_3322 confirmed the observed Zn-dependent phenotypes. Notably, to our knowledge, this is the first time a bacterial homolog of TMEM165, a human gene responsible for a congenital glycosylation disorder, has been deleted and the resulting strain characterized. Finally, the fitness values indicate Cu(2+)- and Zn(2+)-based inhibition of nitrite reductase and interference with molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis for nitrate reductase. These results extend the current understanding of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) efflux and resistance and their effects on denitrifying metabolism. In this study, genome-wide mutant fitness data in P. stutzeri RCH2 combined with regulon predictions identify several proteins of unknown function that are

  13. Active efflux systems in the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the research presented in this thesis was to study the molecular mechanisms of organic solvent tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12. This bacterium is capable of growth at saturated solvent concentrations, which are lethal to normal bacteria. Organic

  14. Engineering the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas putida for Arsenic Methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jian; Qin, Jie; Zhu, Yong-Guan; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Rosen, Barry P.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of arsenic has potential health risks through consumption of food. Here, we inserted the arsenite [As(III)] S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase (ArsM) gene into the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Recombinant bacteria methylate inorganic arsenic into less toxic organoarsenicals. This has the potential for bioremediation of environmental arsenic and reducing arsenic contamination in food.

  15. Pseudomonas kunmingensis sp. nov., an exopolysaccharide-producing bacterium isolated from a phosphate mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fuhong; Ma, Huan; Quan, Shujing; Liu, Dehai; Chen, Guocan; Chao, Yapeng; Qian, Shijun

    2014-02-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, exopolysaccharide-producing, strictly aerobic bacterium with a single polar flagellum, designated strain HL22-2(T), was isolated from a phosphate mine situated in a suburb of Kunmming in Yunnan province in south-western China. The taxonomic status of this strain was evaluated by using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain HL22-2(T) was related to members of the genus Pseudomonas. 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities between strain HL22-2(T) and Pseudomonas xanthomarina KMM 1447(T), Pseudomonas alcaliphila AL15-21(T) and Pseudomonas stutzeri ATCC 17588(T) were 98.9, 98.10% and 98.06%, respectively. The major cellular fatty acids were C(18 : 1)ω7c, C(16 : 0) and summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)ω7c and/or C(16 : 1)ω6c). The DNA G+C content was 60.3 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analysis and DNA-DNA relatedness values, strain HL22-2(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas kunmingensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HL22-2(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12273(T) = DSM 25974(T)).

  16. Pseudomonas sagittaria sp. nov., a siderophore-producing bacterium isolated from oil-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yao; Hameed, Asif; Liu, You-Cheng; Hsu, Yi-Han; Lai, Wei-An; Chen, Wen-Ming; Shen, Fo-Ting; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2013-07-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped bacterium with a single polar flagellum, designated CC-OPY-1(T), was isolated from an oil-contaminated site in Taiwan. CC-OPY-1(T) produces siderophores, and can grow at temperatures of 25-37 °C and pH 5.0-9.0 and tolerate Pseudomonas alcaligenes BCRC 11893(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas. alcaliphila DSM 17744(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas tuomuerensis JCM 14085(T) (97.1 %), Pseudomonas toyotomiensis JCM 15604(T) (96.9 %) and lower sequence similarity to remaining species of the genus Pseudomonas. The phylogenetic trees reconstructed based on gyrB and rpoB gene sequences supported the classification of CC-OPY-1(T) as a novel member of the genus Pseudomonas. The predominant quinone system of strain CC-OPY-1T was ubiquinone (Q-9) and the DNA G+C content was 68.4 ± 0.3 mol%. The major fatty acids were C12 : 0, C16 : 0, C17 : 0 cyclo and summed features 3 and 8 consisting of C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c and C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c, respectively. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), diphosphatidylglycerol (DPG), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and two unknown phospholipids (PL1-2). Due to distinct phylogenetic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic features, CC-OPY-1(T) is proposed to represent a novel species within the genus Pseudomonas for which the name Pseudomonas sagittaria sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-OPY-1(T) ( = BCRC 80399(T) = JCM 18195(T)).

  17. Copper homeostasis networks in the bacteriumPseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Julia; Novoa-Aponte, Lorena; Argüello, José M

    2017-09-22

    Bacterial copper (Cu + ) homeostasis enables both precise metallation of diverse cuproproteins and control of variable metal levels. To this end, protein networks mobilize Cu + to cellular targets with remarkable specificity. However, the understanding of these processes is rather fragmented. Here, we use genome-wide transcriptomic analysis by RNA-Seq to characterize the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to external 0.5 mm CuSO 4 , a condition that did not generate pleiotropic effects. Pre-steady-state (5-min) and steady-state (2-h) Cu + fluxes resulted in distinct transcriptome landscapes. Cells quickly responded to Cu 2+ stress by slowing down metabolism. This was restored once steady state was reached. Specific Cu + homeostasis genes were strongly regulated in both conditions. Our system-wide analysis revealed induction of three Cu + efflux systems (a P 1B -ATPase, a porin, and a resistance-nodulation-division (RND) system) and of a putative Cu + -binding periplasmic chaperone and the unusual presence of two cytoplasmic CopZ proteins. Both CopZ chaperones could bind Cu + with high affinity. Importantly, novel transmembrane transporters probably mediating Cu + influx were among those largely repressed upon Cu + stress. Compartmental Cu + levels appear independently controlled; the cytoplasmic Cu + sensor CueR controls cytoplasmic chaperones and plasma membrane transporters, whereas CopR/S responds to periplasmic Cu + Analysis of Δ copR and Δ cueR mutant strains revealed a CopR regulon composed of genes involved in periplasmic Cu + homeostasis and its putative DNA recognition sequence. In conclusion, our study establishes a system-wide model of a network of sensors/regulators, soluble chaperones, and influx/efflux transporters that control the Cu + levels in P. aeruginosa compartments. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Isolation and Characterization of Novel Denitrifying Bacterium sp. SG-01 Strain from Wood Chips Composted with Swine Manure

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    Seung-Hak Yang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate contamination in ground and surface water is an increasingly serious environmental problem and only a few bacterial strains have been identified that have the ability to remove nitrogen pollutants from wastewater under thermophilic conditions. We therefore isolated thermophilic facultative bacterial strains from wood chips that had been composted with swine manure under aerated high temperature conditions so as to identify strains with denitrifying ability. Nine different colonies were screened and 3 long rod-shaped bacterial strains designated as SG-01, SG-02, and SG-03 were selected. The strain SG-01 could be differentiated from SG-02 and SG-03 on the basis of the method that it used for sugar utilization. The 16S rRNA genes of this strain also had high sequence similarity with Geobacillus thermodenitrificans 465T (99.6%. The optimal growth temperatures (55°C, pH values (pH 7.0, and NaCl concentrations (1% required for the growth of strain SG-01 were established. This strain reduced 1.18 mM nitrate and 1.45 mM nitrite in LB broth after 48 h of incubation. These results suggest that the G. thermodenitrificans SG-01 strain may be useful in the removal of nitrates and nitrites from wastewater generated as a result of livestock farming.

  19. Pseudomonas glareae sp. nov., a marine sediment-derived bacterium with antagonistic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Tanaka, Naoto; Svetashev, Vassilii I; Mikhailov, Valery V

    2015-06-01

    An aerobic, Gram-negative, motile, rod-shaped bacterium designated KMM 9500(T) was isolated from a sediment sample collected from the Sea of Japan seashore. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis affiliated strain KMM 9500(T) to the genus Pseudomonas as a distinct subline clustered with Pseudomonas marincola KMM 3042(T) and Pseudomonas segetis KCTC 12331(T) sharing the highest similarities of 98 and 97.9 %, respectively. Strain KMM 9500(T) was characterized by mainly possessing ubiquinone Q-9, and by the predominance of C18:1 ω7c, C16:1 ω7c, and C16:0 followed by C12:0 in its fatty acid profile. Polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unknown aminophospholipid, and unknown phospholipids. Strain KMM 9500(T) was found to inhibit growth of Gram-negative and Gram-positive indicatory microorganisms. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and distinctive phenotypic characteristics, strain 9500(T) is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas glareae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the species is strain KMM 9500(T) (=NRIC 0939(T)).

  20. Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas azotoformans S4, a potential biocontrol bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yang; Wu, Lijuan; Chen, Guoqing; Feng, Guozhong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas azotoformans is a Gram-negative bacterium and infects cereal grains, especially rice. P. azotoformans S4 from soil sample derived from Lijiang, Yunnan Province, China, appeared to be strong inhibitory activity against Fusarium fujikurio, a serious rice fungal pathogen. Here, we present the complete genome of P. azotoformans S4, which consists of 6,859,618 bp with a circle chromosome, 5991 coding DNA sequences, 70 tRNA and 19 rRNA. The genomic analysis revealed that 9 candidate gene clusters are involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. PMID:27080451

  1. Mutagenesis and reparation processes in the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas methanolica after UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naumov, G.N.; Bokhan, I.K.; Multykh, I.G.

    1986-01-01

    High resistance of cells of methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas methanolica to bactericidal and mutagenous effects of ultraviolet irradiation is shown as well as activity of reparation processes after UV irradiation. The presence of low photoreactivating activity in P. methanolica is shown as well. Observed recovery in innutritious medium and decrease of irradiated cells survival rates under effect of reparation inhibitors (coffeine and acriflavine) testify to activity of excision reparation and, perhaps, recombination branch of postreplicative reparation. No manifestation of inducible reparation system is discovered. It is concluded that increased resistance of P. methanolica cells to bactericidal and mutagenous effects of short-wave ultraviolet radiation is related to activity of exact reparation systems

  2. Pseudomonas aestus sp. nov., a plant growth-promoting bacterium isolated from mangrove sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Rafael L F; Santos, Suikinai Nobre; Zucchi, Tiago Domingues; Silva, Fábio Sérgio Paulino; Souza, Danilo Tosta; Melo, Itamar Soares

    2017-10-01

    Strain CMAA 1215 T , a Gram-reaction-negative, aerobic, catalase positive, polarly flagellated, motile, rod-shaped (0.5-0.8 × 1.3-1.9 µm) bacterium, was isolated from mangrove sediments, Cananéia Island, Brazil. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain CMAA 1215 T forms a distinct phyletic line within the Pseudomonas putida subclade, being closely related to P. plecoglossicida ATCC 700383 T , P. monteilii NBRC 103158 T , and P. taiwanensis BCRC 17751 T of sequence similarity of 98.86, 98.73, and 98.71%, respectively. Genomic comparisons of the strain CMAA 1215 T with its closest phylogenetic type strains using average nucleotide index (ANI) and DNA:DNA relatedness approaches revealed 84.3-85.3% and 56.0-63.0%, respectively. A multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) performed concatenating 16S rRNA, gyrB and rpoB gene sequences from the novel species was related with Pseudomonas putida subcluster and formed a new phylogenetic lineage. The phenotypic, physiological, biochemical, and genetic characteristics support the assignment of CMAA 1215 T to the genus Pseudomonas, representing a novel species. The name Pseudomonas aestus sp.nov. is proposed, with CMAA 1215 T (=NRRL B-653100 T  = CBMAI 1962 T ) as the type strain.

  3. Simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification by the marine origin bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ADN-42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ruofei; Liu, Tianqi; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Huang, Jianyu; Wang, Aijie

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has highlighted the existence of some bacteria that are capable of performing heterotrophic nitrification and have a phenomenal ability to denitrify their nitrification products under aerobic conditions. A high-salinity-tolerant strain ADN-42 was isolated from Hymeniacidon perleve and found to display high heterotrophic ammonium removal capability. This strain was identified as Pseudomonas sp. via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Gene cloning and sequencing analysis indicated that the bacterial genome contains N2O reductase function (nosZ) gene. NH3-N removal rate of ADN-42 was very high. And the highest removal rate was 6.52 mg/L · h in the presence of 40 g/L NaCl. Under the condition of pure oxygen (DO >8 mg/L), NH3-N removal efficiency was 56.9 %. Moreover, 38.4 % of oxygen remained in the upper gas space during 72 h without greenhouse gas N2O production. Keeping continuous and low level of dissolved oxygen (DO <3 mg/L) was helpful for better denitrification performance. All these results indicated that the strain has heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities, which guarantee future application in wastewater treatment.

  4. The complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4.

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    Jin Duan

    Full Text Available The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated "housekeeping" genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup.

  5. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jin; Jiang, Wei; Cheng, Zhenyu; Heikkila, John J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs) were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated “housekeeping” genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD) of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup. PMID:23516524

  6. Bidirectional gene sequences with similar homology to functional proteins of alkane degrading bacterium pseudomonas fredriksbergensis DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megeed, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    The potential for two overlapping fragments of DNA from a clone of newly isolated alkanes degrading bacterium Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis encoding sequences with similar homology to two parts of functional proteins is described. One strand contains a sequence with high homology to alkanes monooxygenase (alkB), a member of the alkanes hydroxylase family, and the other strand contains a sequence with some homology to alcohol dehydrogenase gene (alkJ). Overlapping of the genes on opposite strands has been reported in eukaryotic species, and is now reported in a bacterial species. The sequence comparisons and ORFS results revealed that the regulation and the genes organization involved in alkane oxidation represented in Pseudomonas frederiksberghensis varies among the different known alkane degrading bacteria. The alk gene cluster containing homologues to the known alkane monooxygenase (alkB), and rubredoxin (alkG) are oriented in the same direction, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase (alkJ) is oriented in the opposite direction. Such genomes encode messages on both strands of the DNA, or in an overlapping but different reading frames, of the same strand of DNA. The possibility of creating novel genes from pre-existing sequences, known as overprinting, which is a widespread phenomenon in small viruses. Here, the origin and evolution of the gene overlap to bacteriophages belonging to the family Microviridae have been investigated. Such a phenomenon is most widely described in extremely small genomes such as those of viruses or small plasmids, yet here is a unique phenomenon. (author)

  7. Degradation of Reactive Black 5 dye by a newly isolated bacterium Pseudomonas entomophila BS1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sana; Malik, Abdul

    2016-03-01

    The textile and dye industries are considered as one of the major sources of environmental pollution. The present study was conducted to investigate the degradation of the azo dye Reactive Black 5 (RB 5) using a bacterium isolated from soil samples collected around a textile industry. The bacterial strain BS1 capable of degrading RB 5 was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas entomophila on the basis of 16S rDNA sequencing. The effects of different parameters on the degradation of RB 5 were studied to find out the optimal conditions required for maximum degradation, which was 93% after 120 h of incubation. Static conditions with pH in the range of 5-9 and a temperature of 37 °C were found to be optimum for degrading RB 5. Enzyme assays demonstrated that P. entomophila possessed azoreductase, which played an important role in degradation. The enzyme was dependent on flavin mononucleotide and NADH for its activity. Furthermore, a possible degradation pathway of the dye was proposed through gas chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis, which revealed that the metabolic products were naphthalene-1,2-diamine and 4-(methylsulfonyl) aniline. Thus the ability of this indigenous bacterial isolate for simultaneous decolorization and degradation of the azo dye signifies its potential application for treatment of industrial wastewaters containing azo dyes.

  8. Three Alginate Lyases from Marine Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens HZJ216: Purification and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liyan, Li [Ocean University of China, Qingdao, PRC; Jiang, Xiaolu [Ocean University of China, Qingdao, PRC; Wang, Peng [Ocean University of China, Qingdao, PRC; Guan, Huashi [Ocean University of China, Qingdao, PRC; Guo, Hong [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Three alginate lyases (A, B, and C) from an alginate-degrading marine bacterium strain HZJ216 isolated from brown seaweed in the Yellow Sea of China and identified preliminarily as Pseudomonas fluorescens are purified, and their biochemical properties are described. Molecular masses of the three enzymes are determined by SDS-PAGE to be 60.25, 36, and 23 kDa with isoelectric points of 4, 4.36, and 4.59, respectively. Investigations of these enzymes at different pH and temperatures show that they are most active at pH 7.0 and 35 C. Alginate lyases A and B are stable in the pH range of 5.0 9.0, while alginate lyase C is stable in the pH range of 5.0 7.0. Among the metal ions tested, additions of Na+, K+, and Mg2+ ions can enhance the enzyme activities while Fe2+, Fe3+, Ba2+, and Zn2+ ions show inhibitory effects. The substrate specificity results demonstrate that alginate lyase C has the specificity for G block while alginate lyases A and B have the activities for both M and G blocks. It is the first report about extracellular alginate lyases with high alginate-degrading activity from P. fluorescens.

  9. Mechanism of biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3, a psychrotrophic bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, M.; Fukunaga, N.; Sasaki, S. (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan))

    1989-08-01

    Biosynthesis of palmitic, palmitoleic, and cis-vaccenic acids in Pseudomonas sp. strain E-3 was investigated with in vitro and in vivo systems. (1-{sup 14}C)palmitic acid was aerobically converted to palmitoleate and cis-vaccenate, and the radioactivities on their carboxyl carbons were 100 and 43%, respectively, of the total radioactivity in the fatty acids. Palmitoyl coenzyme A desaturase activity was found in the membrane fraction. (1-{sup 14}C)stearic acid was converted to octadecenoate and C16 fatty acids. The octadecenoate contained oleate and cis-vaccenate, but only oleate was produced in the presence of cerulenin. (1-{sup 14}C)lauric acid was aerobically converted to palmitate, palmitoleate, and cis-vaccenate. Under anaerobic conditions, palmitate (62%), palmitoleate (4%), and cis-vaccenate (34%) were produced from (1-{sup 14}C)acetic acid, while they amounted to 48, 39, and 14%, respectively, under aerobic conditions. In these incorporation experiments, 3 to 19% of the added radioactivity was detected in released {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, indicating that part of the added fatty acids were oxidatively decomposed. Partially purified fatty acid synthetase produced saturated and unsaturated fatty acids with chain lengths of C10 to C18. These results indicated that both aerobic and anaerobic mechanisms for the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid are operating in this bacterium.

  10. [Effects of methyl bromide fumigation on community structure of denitrifying bacteria with nitrousoxide reductase gene (nosZ) in soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Pingmei; Qiao, Hongping; Zhao, Wenjing; Chen, Yanfei; Shan, Shuhua; Cao, Aocheng

    2015-01-04

    We studied the effect of methyl bromide fumigation on soil edaphic denitrification. We adopted nosZ-PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) method, nosZ-MPN-PCR (Most-Probable-Number- PCR) counting method and soil nitrate elimination rate method, to explore the effect of methyl bromide fumigation on community structure, quantity and activity of denitrifying bacteria in soil. After methyl bromide fumigating soil for 100 d, soil denitrification did not change obviously (P > 0. 05). Margalef index, Shannon-wiener index and Evenness index had no significant difference (P > 0.05) in nosZ denitrifying bacterial communities between fumigated soil and the control. There were Rhodopsendomonas, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Herbacspirillum, uncultured bacterium partial in both of them. However, Azospirillum, Rhizobium melibei, Nitrosospira multiformis were exclusively found in the control, and Uncultured Azospirillum sp, Mesorhizobium sp were in fumigated one. Moreover, the number of denitrifying bacteria in the control resolved by nosZ-MPN-PCR (Most-Probable-Number-PCR) was 1.4 times higher than that of the fumigated one. After 100 d fumigating soil, the composition of nosZ denitrifying microbial community and the population of denitrifying bacteria changed. Furthermore, there was no difference in denitrification between the fumigated soil and the control.

  11. Toxicity of Phenol and Salt on the Phenol-Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Phenolic compounds, phenol and phenol derivatives are environmental contaminants in some industrial effluents. Entrance of such substances into the environment causes severe environmental pollution, especially pollution of water resources. Biological treatment is a method that uses the potential of microorganisms to clean up contaminated environments. Among microorganisms, bacteria play an important role in treating wastewater contaminated with phenol. Objectives This study aimed to examine the effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on degradation of phenol in wastewater contaminated with this pollutant. Methods In this method, the growth rate of P. aeruginosa bacteria was investigated using different concentrations of salt and phenol. This is an experimental study conducted as a pilot in a batch reactor with different concentrations of phenol (25, 50, 100, 150, 300 and 600 mg L-1 and salt (0%, 0.5%, 1%, 2.5% and 5% during 9, 12 and 15 hours. During three days, from 5 experimental and 3 control samples, 18 samples were taken a day forming a sample size of 54 samples for each phenol concentration. Given the number of phenol concentrations (n = 6, a total of 324 samples were analyzed using a spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 600 nm. Results The phenol concentration of 600 mg L-1 was toxic for P. aeruginosa. However, at a certain concentration, it acts as a carbon source for P. aeruginosa. During investigations, it was found that increasing the concentration of phenol increases the rate of bacteria growth. The highest bacteria growth rate occurred was at the salt concentration of zero and phenol concentration of 600 mg L-1. Conclusions The findings of the current study indicate that at high concentrations of salt, the growth of bacteria reduces so that it stops at a concentration of 50 mg L-1 (5%. Thus, the bacterium is halotolerant or halophilic. With an increase in phenol concentration, the growth rate increased. Phenol toxicity appears

  12. Experimental investigation of activities and tolerance of denitrifying bacteria under alkaline and reducing condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mine, Tatsuya; Mihara, Morihiro; Ooi, Takao

    2000-07-01

    In the geological disposal system of TRU wastes, nitrogen generation by denitrifying bacteria could provide significant impact on the assessment of this system, because nitrate contained in process concentrated liquid waste might be electron acceptor for denitrifying bacteria. In this study, the activities and tolerance of denitrifying under disposal condition were investigated. Pseudomonas denitrificans as denitrifying bacteria was used. The results showed that Pseudomonas denitrificans had activity under reducing condition, but under high pH condition (pH>9.5), the activity of Pseudomonas denitrificans was not detected. It is possible that the activity of Pseudomonas denitrificans would be low under disposal condition. (author)

  13. Engineering mediator-based electroactivity in the obligate aerobic bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    OpenAIRE

    Simone eSchmitz; Salome eNies; Nick eWierckx; Lars M Blank; Miriam A. Rosenbaum

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains are being developed as microbial production hosts for production of a range of amphiphilic and hydrophobic biochemicals. P. putida's obligate aerobic growth thereby can be an economical and technical challenge because it requires constant rigorous aeration and often causes reactor foaming. Here, we engineered a strain of P. putida KT2440 that can produce phenazine redox-mediators from Pseudomonas aeruginosa to allow partial redox balancing with an electrode under ox...

  14. Complete genome sequence of the caprolactam-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas mosselii SJ10 isolated from wastewater of a nylon 6 production plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gun-Seok; Chu, Ji-Hun; Hong, Sung-Jun; Kwak, Yunyoung; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Jung, Byung Kwon; Ullah, Ihsan; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2014-12-20

    Pseudomonas mosselii strain SJ10 is a caprolactam-degrading bacterium belonging to the class Gammaproteobacteria, which was isolated from wastewater of the nylon 6 producing Seongseo industrial complex in Daegu, Republic of Korea. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the strain, providing genetic information for biodegradation of aromatic compounds.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Phosphate-Solubilizing Bacterium Pseudomonas argentinensis Strain SA190 Isolated from the Desert Plant Indigofera argentea

    KAUST Repository

    Lafi, Feras Fawzi

    2016-12-23

    Pseudomonas argentinensis strain SA190 is a plant endophytic-inhabiting bacterium that was isolated from root nodules of the desert plant Indigofera argentea collected from the Jizan region of Saudi Arabia. Here, we report the genome sequence of SA190, highlighting several functional genes related to plant growth-promoting activity, environment adaption, and antifungal activity.

  16. Crystal structures of complexes of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenase from methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 with formate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippova, E. V.; Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Stekhanova, T. N.; Boiko, K. M.; Sadykhov, I. G.; Tishkov, V. I.; Popov, V. O.; Labru, N.

    2006-01-01

    Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) from the methylotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 catalyzes oxidation of formate to NI 2 with the coupled reduction of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ). The three-dimensional structures of the apo form (the free enzyme) and the holo form (the ternary FDH-NAD + -azide complex) of FDH have been established earlier. In the present study, the structures of FDH complexes with formate are solved at 2.19 and 2.28 A resolution by the molecular replacement method and refined to the R factors of 22.3 and 20.5%, respectively. Both crystal structures contain four protein molecules per asymmetric unit. These molecules form two dimers identical to the dimer of the apo form of FDH. Two possible formatebinding sites are found in the active site of the FDH structure. In the complexes the sulfur atom of residue Cys354 exists in the oxidized state

  17. Further characterization of o-nitrobenzaldehyde degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ONBA-17 and deduction on its metabolic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fang-Bo; Li, Xiao-Dan; Ali, Shinawar Waseem; Shan, Sheng-Dao; Luo, Lin-Ping; Guan, Li-Bo

    2014-01-01

    A previously reported o-nitrobenzaldehyde (ONBA) degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ONBA-17 was further identified and characterized. Based on results of DNA base composition and DNA-DNA hybridization, the strain was identified as P. putida. Its degradation effect enhanced with increase of inoculum amount and no lag phase was observed. Higher removal rate was achieved under shaking conditions. All tested ONBA with different initial concentrations could be completely degraded within 5 d. In addition, degradative enzyme(s) involved was confirmed as intra-cellular distributed and constitutively expressed. Effects of different compounds on relative activity of degradative enzyme(s) within cell-free extract were also evaluated. Finally, 2-nitrobenzoic acid and 2, 3-dihydroxybenzoic acid were detected as metabolites of ONBA degradation by P. putida ONBA-17, and relevant metabolic pathway was preliminary proposed. This study might help with future research in better understanding of nitroaromatics biodegradation.

  18. The efficiency of gamma irradiation on the bacterium pseudomonas fluorescence (Migh) against the mediterranean fruit fly ceratitis capitata (wiedemann)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadel, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency of the bacterium pseudomonas fluorescence against the mediterranean fruit fly ceratitis capitata (Wied.) was investigated. Adult emergence was significantly reduced by applying the wild and gamma irradiated strain (150 and 300 Gy). The highest reduction occurred by the mutant P1 and the highest concentration (10 8 ). The activity of this bacteria increased by gamma irradiation compared to that of the wild isolate. The reduction in adult survival of both males and females was highly significant by applying the irradiated bacteria with the two doses of gamma radiation and different concentration (10 8 , 10 6 and 10 4 ) of bacterial suspension. Applying the bacteria as a culture filtrate reduced adult survival of wild strain significantly, while the irradiated strain recorded a significant reduction in males and females with the highest concentration (100 %) and by applying the two doses of gamma radiation (150 and 300 Gy) and in females only at the concentration 50% by using the dose of 150 Gy

  19. Responses of a soil bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 to commercial metal oxide nanoparticles compared with responses to metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimkpa, Christian O.; Calder, Alyssa; Britt, David W.; McLean, Joan E.; Anderson, Anne J.

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of commercially-available CuO and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) to pathogenic bacteria was compared for a beneficial rhizosphere isolate, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. The NPs aggregated, released ions to different extents under the conditions used for bacterial exposure, and associated with bacterial cell surface. Bacterial surface charge was neutralized by NPs, dependent on pH. The CuO NPs were more toxic than the ZnO NPs. The negative surface charge on colloids of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was reduced by Cu ions but not by CuO NPs; the EPS protected cells from CuO NPs-toxicity. CuO NPs-toxicity was eliminated by a Cu ion chelator, suggesting that ion release was involved. Neither NPs released alkaline phosphatase from the cells' periplasm, indicating minimal outer membrane damage. Accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species was correlated with CuO NPs lethality. Environmental deposition of NPs could create niches for ion release, with impacts on susceptible soil microbes. - Highlights: → Toxicity of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) was evaluated in a beneficial bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 (PcO6). → Aggregated commercial CuO and ZnO NPs released Cu and Zn ions and changed bacterial surface charge, depending on pH. → The NPs were toxic to PcO6 through NP-specific, but also ion release mechanisms. → Reactive oxygen species were produced by CuO NP and Cu ion at lethal concentrations, but bacterial EPS protected against Cu. → The periplasmic marker, alkaline phosphate, activity was increased by the NPs and ions. - Aggregated CuO and ZnO nanoparticles release ions and cause different toxicities in a beneficial soil bacterium.

  20. Physiological and biochemical characterization of a novel nicotine-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas geniculata N1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanghui Liu

    Full Text Available Management of solid wastes with high nicotine content, such as those accumulated during tobacco manufacturing, poses a major challenge, which can be addressed by using bacteria such as Pseudomonas and Arthrobacter. In this study, a new species of Pseudomonas geniculata, namely strain N1, which is capable of efficiently degrading nicotine, was isolated and identified. The optimal growth conditions for strain N1 are a temperature of 30°C, and a pH 6.5, at a rotation rate of 120 rpm min(-1 with 1 g l(-1 nicotine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Myosmine, cotinine, 6-hydroxynicotine, 6-hydroxy-N-methylmyosmine, and 6-hydroxy-pseudooxynicotine were detected as the five intermediates through gas chromatography-mass and liquid chromatography-mass analyses. The identified metabolites were different from those generated by Pseudomonas putida strains. The analysis also highlighted the bacterial metabolic diversity in relation to nicotine degradation by different Pseudomonas strains.

  1. Evolutionary history of the phl gene cluster in the plant-associated bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moynihan, J.A.; Morrissey, J.P.; Coppoolse, E.; Stiekema, W.J.; O'Gara, F.; Boyd, E.F.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is of agricultural and economic importance as a biological control agent largely because of its plant-association and production of secondary metabolites, in particular 2, 4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2, 4-DAPG). This polyketide, which is encoded by the eight gene phl cluster,

  2. Description of Pseudomonas gregormendelii sp. nov., a Novel Psychrotrophic Bacterium from James Ross Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosina, Marcel; Švec, Pavel; Černohlávková, Jitka; Barták, Miloš; Snopková, Kateřina; De Vos, Paul; Sedláček, Ivo

    2016-07-01

    During the microbiological research performed within the scope of activities of Czech expeditions based at the Johann Gregor Mendel Station at James Ross Island, Antarctica, two psychrotrophic gram-stain negative non-fluorescent strains CCM 8506T and CCM 8507 from soil were extensively characterized using genotypic and phenotypic methods. Initial characterization using ribotyping with HindIII restriction endonuclease and phenotyping implies that both isolates belong to a single Pseudomonas species. Sequencing of rrs, rpoB, rpoD and glnA genes of strain CCM 8506(T) confirmed affiliation of investigated strains within the genus Pseudomonas. Further investigation using automated ribotyping with EcoRI (RiboPrinter(®) Microbial Characterisation System), whole-cell protein profiling using the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer system, extensive biochemical testing and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments confirmed that both investigated strains are members of a single taxon which is clearly separated from all hitherto described Pseudomonas spp. Based on all findings, we describe a novel species Pseudomonas gregormendelii sp. nov. with the type strain CCM 8506(T) (=LMG 28632T).

  3. Pseudomonas yamanorum sp. nov., a psychrotolerant bacterium isolated from a subantarctic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnau, Víctor Gonzalo; Sánchez, Leandro Arturo; Delgado, Osvaldo Daniel

    2015-02-01

    A psychrotolerant strain, 8H1(T), was isolated from soil samples collected in Isla de los Estados, Ushuaia, Argentina. Cells were Gram-negative, aerobic, straight rods, occurring singly or in pairs, non-spore-forming and motile by means of two polar flagella. The isolate was able to grow in the range 4-35 °C, with optimum growth at 28 °C. The predominant cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c), C16 : 0 and summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω6c and/or C18 : 1ω7c). The polar lipid pattern of strain 8H1(T) comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and an unknown phospholipid. Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the predominant lipoquinone. The DNA G+C content was 59.8 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence-based phylogeny suggested the affiliation of strain 8H1(T) to the 'Pseudomonas fluorescens group', displaying ≥98.5 % sequence similarity to 29 type strains. A multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) study performed by concatenating 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoD and rpoB gene sequences showed that isolate 8H1(T) could be discriminated from closely related species of the genus Pseudomonas and placed in the 'Pseudomonas gessardii subgroup', including the species with the highest MLSA sequence similarities: Pseudomonas brenneri (96.2 %), P. gessardii (96.1 %), P. proteolytica (96.0 %), P. meridiana (96.0 %) and P. mucidolens (95.4 %). DNA-DNA hybridization analysis between 8H1(T) and the type strains of these closely related species revealed relatedness values of 27.0, 8.8, 41.2, 39.7 and 46.1 %, respectively. These results, together with differences in several phenotypic features, support the classification of a novel species, for which the name Pseudomonas yamanorum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 8H1(T) ( = DSM 26522(T) = CCUG 63249(T) = LMG 27247(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  4. Soil components mitigate the antimicrobial effects of silver nanoparticles towards a beneficial soil bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calder, Alyssa J.; Dimkpa, Christian O.; McLean, Joan E.; Britt, David W.; Johnson, William; Anderson, Anne J.

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are widely used for their antimicrobial activity and consequently the particles will become environmental contaminants. This study evaluated in sand and soil matrices the toxicity of 10 nm spherical Ag NPs (1 and 3 mg Ag/L) toward a beneficial soil bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. In sand, both NP doses resulted in loss in bacterial culturability whereas in a loam soil, no cell death was observed. Amendments of sand with clays (30% v/v kaolinite or bentonite) did not protect the bacterium when challenged with Ag NPs. However, culturability of the bacterium was maintained when the Ag NP-amended sand was mixed with soil pore water or humic acid. Imaging by atomic force microscopy revealed aggregation of single nanoparticles in water, and their embedding into background material when suspended in pore water and humic acids. Zeta potential measurements supported aggregation and surface charge modifications with pore water and humic acids. Measurement of soluble Ag in the microcosms and geochemical modeling to deduce the free ion concentration revealed bacterial culturability was governed by the predicted free Ag ion concentrations. Our study confirmed the importance of Ag NPs as a source of ions and illustrated that processes accounting for protection in soil against Ag NPs involved distinct NP- and ion-effects. Processes affecting NP bioactivity involved surface charge changes due to sorption of Ca 2+ from the pore water leading to agglomeration and coating of the NPs with humic acid and other organic materials. Removal of bioactive ions included the formation of soluble Ag complexes with dissolved organic carbon and precipitation of Ag ions with chloride in pore water. We conclude that mitigation of toxicity of Ag NPs in soils towards a soil bacterium resides in several interactions that differentially involve protection from the Ag NPs or the ions they produce. - Highlights: ► Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are widely used for

  5. Draft genome sequence of a caprolactam degrader bacterium: Pseudomonas taiwanensis strain SJ9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Jun; Park, Gun-Seok; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Jung, Byung Kwon; Shin, Jae-Ho

    Pseudomonas taiwanensis strain SJ9 is a caprolactam degrader, isolated from industrial wastewater in South Korea and considered to have the potential for caprolactam bioremediation. The genome of this strain is approximately 6.2 Mb (G+C content, 61.75%) with 6,010 protein-coding sequences (CDS), of which 46% are assigned to recognized functional genes. This draft genome of strain SJ9 will provide insights into the genetic basis of its caprolactam-degradation ability. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Draft genome sequence of a caprolactam degrader bacterium: Pseudomonas taiwanensis strain SJ9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jun Hong

    Full Text Available Abstract Pseudomonas taiwanensis strain SJ9 is a caprolactam degrader, isolated from industrial wastewater in South Korea and considered to have the potential for caprolactam bioremediation. The genome of this strain is approximately 6.2 Mb (G + C content, 61.75% with 6,010 protein-coding sequences (CDS, of which 46% are assigned to recognized functional genes. This draft genome of strain SJ9 will provide insights into the genetic basis of its caprolactam-degradation ability.

  7. Engineering mediator-based electroactivity in the obligate aerobic bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eSchmitz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas putida strains are being developed as microbial production hosts for production of a range of amphiphilic and hydrophobic biochemicals. P. putida’s obligate aerobic growth thereby can be an economical and technical challenge because it requires constant rigorous aeration and often causes reactor foaming. Here, we engineered a strain of P. putida KT2440 that can produce phenazine redox-mediators from Pseudomonas aeruginosa to allow partial redox balancing with an electrode under oxygen-limited conditions. P. aeruginosa is known to employ its phenazine-type redox mediators for electron exchange with an anode in bioelectrochemical systems. We transferred the seven core phenazine biosynthesis genes phzA-G and the two specific genes phzM and phzS required for pyocyanin synthesis from P. aeruginosa on two inducible plasmids into P. putida KT2440. The best clone, P. putida pPhz, produced 45 mg/ L pyocyanin over 25 h of growth, which was visible as blue color formation and is comparable to the pyocyanin production of P. aeruginosa. This new strain was then characterized under different oxygen-limited conditions with electrochemical redox control and changes in central energy metabolism were evaluated in comparison to the unmodified P. putida KT2440. In the new strain, phenazine synthesis with supernatant concentrations up to 33 µg/ mL correlated linearly with the ability to discharge electrons to an anode, whereby phenazine-1-carboxylic acid served as the dominating redox mediator. P. putida pPhz sustained strongly oxygen-limited metabolism for up to 2 weeks at up to 12 µA/ cm² anodic current density. Together, this work lays a foundation for future oxygen-limited biocatalysis with P. putida strains.

  8. Engineering mediator-based electroactivity in the obligate aerobic bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Simone; Nies, Salome; Wierckx, Nick; Blank, Lars M.; Rosenbaum, Miriam A.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains are being developed as microbial production hosts for production of a range of amphiphilic and hydrophobic biochemicals. P. putida's obligate aerobic growth thereby can be an economical and technical challenge because it requires constant rigorous aeration and often causes reactor foaming. Here, we engineered a strain of P. putida KT2440 that can produce phenazine redox-mediators from Pseudomonas aeruginosa to allow partial redox balancing with an electrode under oxygen-limited conditions. P. aeruginosa is known to employ its phenazine-type redox mediators for electron exchange with an anode in bioelectrochemical systems (BES). We transferred the seven core phenazine biosynthesis genes phzA-G and the two specific genes phzM and phzS required for pyocyanin synthesis from P. aeruginosa on two inducible plasmids into P. putida KT2440. The best clone, P. putida pPhz, produced 45 mg/L pyocyanin over 25 h of growth, which was visible as blue color formation and is comparable to the pyocyanin production of P. aeruginosa. This new strain was then characterized under different oxygen-limited conditions with electrochemical redox control and changes in central energy metabolism were evaluated in comparison to the unmodified P. putida KT2440. In the new strain, phenazine synthesis with supernatant concentrations up to 33 μg/mL correlated linearly with the ability to discharge electrons to an anode, whereby phenazine-1-carboxylic acid served as the dominating redox mediator. P. putida pPhz sustained strongly oxygen-limited metabolism for up to 2 weeks at up to 12 μA/cm2 anodic current density. Together, this work lays a foundation for future oxygen-limited biocatalysis with P. putida strains. PMID:25914687

  9. Screening, identification and culture optimization of a newly isolated aromatic nitrilase-producing bacterium--Pseudomonas putida CGMCC3830.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoyan; Gong, Jinsong; Li, Heng; Lu, Zhenming; Zhou, Zhemin; Shi, Jinsong; Xu, Zhenghong

    2014-03-01

    Microbial nitrilases have attracted increasing attention in nitrile hydrolysis for carboxylic acid production in recent years. A bacterium with nitrilase activity was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas putida CGMCC3830 based on its morphology, physiological and biochemical characteristics, as well as 16S rRNA gene sequence. The nitrilase production was optimized by varying culture conditions using the one-factor-at-a-time method and response surface methodology. Glycerol 13.54 g/L, tryptone 11.59 g/L, yeast extract 5.21 g/L, KH2PO4 1 g/L, NaCl 1 g/L, urea 1 g/L, initial pH 6.0 and culture temperature 30 degrees C were proved to be the optimal culture conditions. It resulted in the maximal nitrilase production of 36.12 U/mL from 2.02 U/mL. Investigations on substrate specificity demonstrate P. putida nitrilase preferentially hydrolyze aromatic nitriles. When applied in nicotinic acid synthesis, 2 mg/mL P. putida cells completely hydrolyzed 20.8 g/L 3-cyanopyridine into nicotinic acid in 90 min. The results indicated P. putida CGMCC3830 displayed potential for industrial production of nicotinic acid.

  10. Interaction of Pb(II) and biofilm associated extracellular polymeric substances of a marine bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes NP103

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Supriya; Mangwani, Neelam; Das, Surajit

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to evaluate the interaction of biofilm associated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of a marine bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes NP103 with lead [Pb(II)]. EEM fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed the presence of one protein-like fluorophore in the EPS of P. pseudoalcaligenes NP103. Stern-Volmer equation indicated the existence of only one binding site (n = 0.789) in the EPS of P. pseudoalcaligenes NP103. The interaction of Pb(II) with EPS was spontaneous at room temperature (Δ G = - 2.78 kJ/K/mol) having binding constant (Kb) of 2.59 M- 1. ATR-FTIR analysis asserted the involvement of various functional groups such as sulphydryl, phosphate and hydroxyl and amide groups of protein in Pb(II) binding. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy analysis displayed reduced growth of biofilm with altered surface topology in Pb(II) supplemented medium. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis revealed the entrapment of Pb in the EPS. Uronic acid, a characteristic functional group of biofilm, was observed in 1H NMR spectroscopy. The findings suggest that biofilm associated EPS are perfect organic ligands for Pb(II) complexation and may significantly augment the bioavailability of Pb(II) in the metal contaminated environment for subsequent sequestration.

  11. Impact of a Recombinant Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78, on Microbial Community in Tomato Rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Gi Kong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78 is an effective biocontrol agent for soil-borne fungal diseases. We previously constructed a P43-gfp tagged biocontrol bacteria P. fluorescens pc78-48 to investigate bacterial traits in natural ecosystem and the environmental risk of genetically modified biocontrol bacteria in tomato rhizosphere. Fluctuation of culturable bacteria profile, microbial community structure, and potential horizontal gene transfer was investigated over time after the bacteria treatment to the tomato rhizosphere. Tagged gene transfer to other organisms such as tomato plants and bacteria cultured on various media was examined by polymerase chain reaction, using gene specific primers. Transfer of chromosomally integrated P43-gfp from pc78 to other organisms was not apparent. Population and colony types of culturable bacteria were not significantly affected by the introduction of P. fluorescens pc78 or pc78-48 into tomato rhizosphere. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were investigated to estimate the influence on the microbial community structure in tomato rhizosphere between non-treated and pc78-48-treated samples. Interestingly, rhizosphere soil treated with strain pc78-48 exhibited a significantly different bacterial community structure compared to that of non-treated rhizosphere soil. Our results suggest that biocontrol bacteria treatment influences microbial community in tomato rhizosphere, while the chromosomally modified biocontrol bacteria may not pose any specific environmental risk in terms of gene transfer.

  12. Inoculating plants with the endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. Ph6-gfp to reduce phenanthrene contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Liu, Juan; Gao, Yanzheng; Sheng, Yuehui; Kang, Fuxing; Waigi, Michael Gatheru

    2015-12-01

    Plant organic contamination poses a serious threat to the safety of agricultural products and human health worldwide, and the association of endophytic bacteria with host plants may decrease organic pollutants in planta. In this study, we firstly determined the growth response and biofilm formation of endophytic Pseudomonas sp. Ph6-gfp, and then systematically evaluated the performance of different plant colonization methods (seed soaking (SS), root soaking (RS), leaf painting (LP)) for circumventing the risk of plant phenanthrene (PHE) contamination. After inoculation for 48 h, strain Ph6-gfp grew efficiently with PHE, oxalic acid, or malic acid as the sole sources of carbon and energy. Moreover, strain Ph6-gfp could form robust biofilms in LB medium. In greenhouse hydroponic experiments, strain Ph6-gfp could actively colonize inoculated plants internally, and plants colonized with Ph6-gfp showed a higher capacity for PHE removal. Compared with the Ph6-gfp-free treatment, the accumulations of PHE in Ph6-gfp-colonized plants via SS, RS, and LP were 20.1, 33.1, and 7.1 %, respectively, lower. Our results indicate that inoculating plants with Ph6-gfp could lower the risk of plant PHE contamination. RS was most efficient for improving PHE removal in whole plant bodies by increasing the cell numbers of Ph6-gfp in plant roots. The findings in this study provide an optimized method to strain Ph6-gfp reduce plant PAH residues, which may be applied to agricultural production in PAH-contaminated soil.

  13. Impact of a Recombinant Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78, on Microbial Community in Tomato Rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hyun Gi; Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Seung Yeup; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78 is an effective biocontrol agent for soil-borne fungal diseases. We previously constructed a P43-gfp tagged biocontrol bacteria P. fluorescens pc78-48 to investigate bacterial traits in natural ecosystem and the environmental risk of genetically modified biocontrol bacteria in tomato rhizosphere. Fluctuation of culturable bacteria profile, microbial community structure, and potential horizontal gene transfer was investigated over time after the bacteria treatment to the tomato rhizosphere. Tagged gene transfer to other organisms such as tomato plants and bacteria cultured on various media was examined by polymerase chain reaction, using gene specific primers. Transfer of chromosomally integrated P43-gfp from pc78 to other organisms was not apparent. Population and colony types of culturable bacteria were not significantly affected by the introduction of P. fluorescens pc78 or pc78-48 into tomato rhizosphere. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were investigated to estimate the influence on the microbial community structure in tomato rhizosphere between non-treated and pc78-48-treated samples. Interestingly, rhizosphere soil treated with strain pc78-48 exhibited a significantly different bacterial community structure compared to that of non-treated rhizosphere soil. Our results suggest that biocontrol bacteria treatment influences microbial community in tomato rhizosphere, while the chromosomally modified biocontrol bacteria may not pose any specific environmental risk in terms of gene transfer.

  14. Getting the ecology into interactions between plants and the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, W H Gera; Bezemer, T Martijn; Biere, Arjen

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are increasingly appreciated for their contributions to primary productivity through promotion of growth and triggering of induced systemic resistance in plants. Here we focus on the beneficial effects of one particular species of PGPR (Pseudomonas fluorescens) on plants through induced plant defense. This model organism has provided much understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of PGPR-induced plant defense. However, this knowledge can only be appreciated at full value once we know to what extent these mechanisms also occur under more realistic, species-diverse conditions as are occurring in the plant rhizosphere. To provide the necessary ecological context, we review the literature to compare the effect of P. fluorescens on induced plant defense when it is present as a single species or in combination with other soil dwelling species. Specifically, we discuss combinations with other plant mutualists (bacterial or fungal), plant pathogens (bacterial or fungal), bacterivores (nematode or protozoa), and decomposers. Synergistic interactions between P. fluorescens and other plant mutualists are much more commonly reported than antagonistic interactions. Recent developments have enabled screenings of P. fluorescens genomes for defense traits and this could help with selection of strains with likely positive interactions on biocontrol. However, studies that examine the effects of multiple herbivores, pathogens, or herbivores and pathogens together on the effectiveness of PGPR to induce plant defenses are underrepresented and we are not aware of any study that has examined interactions between P. fluorescens and bacterivores or decomposers. As co-occurring soil organisms can enhance but also reduce the effectiveness of PGPR, a better understanding of the biotic factors modulating P. fluorescens-plant interactions will improve the effectiveness of introducing P. fluorescens to enhance plant production and defense.

  15. Beneficial Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis OS261 Augments Salt Tolerance and Promotes Red Pepper Plant Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulami Chatterjee

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity, being a part of natural ecosystems, is an increasing problem in agricultural soils throughout the world. Pseudomonas frederiksbergensis OS261 has already been proved to be an effective bio-inoculant for enhancing cold stress tolerance in plants, however, its effect on salt stress tolerance is unknown. The main aim of the present study was to elucidate P. frederiksbergensis OS261 mediated salt stress tolerance in red pepper. The plants were exposed to a salt stress using NaCl at the concentrations of 50, 100, and 150 mM after 12 days of transplantation, while plant growth and enzyme activity were estimated 50 days after sowing. The height in P. frederiksbergensis OS261 inoculated plants was significantly increased by 19.05, 34.35, 57.25, and 61.07% compared to un-inoculated controls at 0, 50, 100, and 150 mM of NaCl concentrations, respectively, under greenhouse conditions. The dry biomass of the plants increased by 31.97, 37.47, 62.67, and 67.84% under 0, 50, 100, and 150 mM of NaCl concentrations, respectively. A high emission of ethylene was observed in un-inoculated red pepper plants under salinity stress. P. frederiksbergensis OS261 inoculation significantly reduced ethylene emission by 20.03, 18.01, and 20.07% at 50, 100, and 150 mM of NaCl concentrations, respectively. Furthermore, the activity of antioxidant enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase also varied in the inoculated red pepper plants. Salt stress resistance in the bacterized plants was evident from the improved antioxidant activity in leaf tissues and the decreased hydrogen ion concentration. Thus, we conclude that P. frederiksbergensis OS261 possesses stress mitigating property which can enhance plant growth under high soil salinity by reducing the emission of ethylene and regulating antioxidant enzymes.

  16. Pyoverdine synthesis by the Mn(II-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Lundquist Parker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When iron-starved, the Mn(II-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas putida strains GB-1 and MnB1 produce pyoverdines (PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1, siderophores that both influence iron uptake and inhibit manganese(II oxidation by these strains. To explore the properties and genetics of a PVD that can affect manganese oxidation, LC-MS/MS and various siderotyping techniques were used to identify the peptides of PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1 as being (for both PVDs: chromophore-Asp-Lys-OHAsp-Ser-Gly-aThr-Lys-cOHOrn, resembling a structure previously reported for P. putida CFML 90-51, which does not oxidize Mn. All three strains also produced an azotobactin and a sulfonated PVD, each with the peptide sequence above, but with unknown regulatory or metabolic effects. Bioinformatic analysis of the sequenced genome of P. putida GB-1 suggested that a particular non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, coded by the operon PputGB1_4083-4086, could produce the peptide backbone of PVDGB-1. To verify this prediction, plasmid integration disruption of PputGB1_4083 was performed and the resulting mutant failed to produce detectable PVD. In silico analysis of the modules in PputGB1_4083-4086 predicted a peptide sequence of Asp-Lys-Asp-Ser-Ala-Thr-Lsy-Orn, which closely matches the peptide determined by MS/MS. To extend these studies to other organisms, various Mn(II-oxidizing and non-oxidizing isolates of P. putida, P. fluorescens, P. marincola, P. fluorescens-syringae group, P. mendocina-resinovorans group and P. stutzerii group were screened for PVD synthesis. The PVD producers (12 out of 16 tested strains were siderotyped and placed into four sets of differing PVD structures, some corresponding to previously characterized PVDs and some to novel PVDs. These results combined with previous studies suggested that the presence of OHAsp or the flexibility of the pyoverdine polypeptide may enable efficient binding of Mn(III.

  17. Pyoverdine synthesis by the Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Lee, Sung-Woo; Geszvain, Kati; Davis, Richard E.; Gruffaz, Christelle; Meyer, Jean-Marie; Torpey, Justin W.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2014-01-01

    When iron-starved, the Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas putida strains GB-1 and MnB1 produce pyoverdines (PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1), siderophores that both influence iron uptake and inhibit manganese(II) oxidation by these strains. To explore the properties and genetics of a PVD that can affect manganese oxidation, LC-MS/MS, and various siderotyping techniques were used to identify the peptides of PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1 as being (for both PVDs): chromophore-Asp-Lys-OHAsp-Ser-Gly-aThr-Lys-cOHOrn, resembling a structure previously reported for P. putida CFML 90-51, which does not oxidize Mn. All three strains also produced an azotobactin and a sulfonated PVD, each with the peptide sequence above, but with unknown regulatory or metabolic effects. Bioinformatic analysis of the sequenced genome of P. putida GB-1 suggested that a particular non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), coded by the operon PputGB1_4083-4086, could produce the peptide backbone of PVDGB-1. To verify this prediction, plasmid integration disruption of PputGB1_4083 was performed and the resulting mutant failed to produce detectable PVD. In silico analysis of the modules in PputGB1_4083-4086 predicted a peptide sequence of Asp-Lys-Asp-Ser-Ala-Thr-Lsy-Orn, which closely matches the peptide determined by MS/MS. To extend these studies to other organisms, various Mn(II)-oxidizing and non-oxidizing isolates of P. putida, P. fluorescens, P. marincola, P. fluorescens-syringae group, P. mendocina-resinovorans group, and P. stutzerii group were screened for PVD synthesis. The PVD producers (12 out of 16 tested strains) were siderotyped and placed into four sets of differing PVD structures, some corresponding to previously characterized PVDs and some to novel PVDs. These results combined with previous studies suggested that the presence of OHAsp or the flexibility of the pyoverdine polypeptide may enable efficient binding of Mn(III). PMID:24847318

  18. A Cyanide-Induced 3-Cyanoalanine Nitrilase in the Cyanide-Assimilating Bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes Strain CECT 5344.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acera, Felipe; Carmona, María Isabel; Castillo, Francisco; Quesada, Alberto; Blasco, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 is a bacterium able to assimilate cyanide as a sole nitrogen source. Under this growth condition, a 3-cyanoalanine nitrilase enzymatic activity was induced. This activity was encoded by nit4 , one of the four nitrilase genes detected in the genome of this bacterium, and its expression in Escherichia coli enabled the recombinant strain to fully assimilate 3-cyanoalanine. P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 showed a weak growth level with 3-cyanoalanine as the N source, unless KCN was also added. Moreover, a nit4 knockout mutant of P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 became severely impaired in its ability to grow with 3-cyanoalanine and cyanide as nitrogen sources. The native enzyme expressed in E. coli was purified up to electrophoretic homogeneity and biochemically characterized. Nit4 seems to be specific for 3-cyanoalanine, and the amount of ammonium derived from the enzymatic activity doubled in the presence of exogenously added asparaginase activity, which demonstrated that the Nit4 enzyme had both 3-cyanoalanine nitrilase and hydratase activities. The nit4 gene is located downstream of the cyanide resistance transcriptional unit containing cio1 genes, whose expression levels are under the positive control of cyanide. Real-time PCR experiments revealed that nit4 expression was also positively regulated by cyanide in both minimal and LB media. These results suggest that this gene cluster including cio1 and nit4 could be involved both in cyanide resistance and in its assimilation by P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344. IMPORTANCE Cyanide is a highly toxic molecule present in some industrial wastes due to its application in several manufacturing processes, such as gold mining and the electroplating industry. The biodegradation of cyanide from contaminated wastes could be an attractive alternative to physicochemical treatment. P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 is a bacterial strain able to assimilate cyanide under alkaline conditions, thus

  19. The biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 induces systemic defense responses in aerial tissues upon colonization of olive roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eGómez-Lama Cabanás

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, a native olive root endophyte and effective biocontrol agent (BCA against Verticillium wilt of olive, is able to trigger a broad range of defense responses in root tissues of this woody plant. In order to elucidate whether strain PICF7 also induces systemic defense responses in above-ground organs, aerial tissues of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after root bacterization with this endophytic BCA. A suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH cDNA library, enriched in up-regulated genes, was generated. This strategy enabled the identification of 376 ESTs (99 contigs and 277 singlets, many of them related to response to different stresses. Five ESTs, involved in defense responses, were selected to carry out time-course quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR experiments aiming to: (i validate the induction of these genes, and (ii shed light on their expression pattern along time (from 1 to 15 days. Induction of olive genes potentially coding for lypoxigenase 2, catalase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase and phenylananine ammonia-lyase was thus confirmed at some time points. Computational analysis also revealed that different transcription factors were up-regulated in olive aerial tissues (i.e. jerf, bHLH, WRKYs, as previously reported for roots. Results confirmed that root colonization by this endophytic bacterium does not only trigger defense responses in this organ but also mount a wide array of systemic defense responses in distant tissues (stems, leaves. This sheds light on how olive plants respond to the ‘non-hostile’ colonization by a bacterial endophyte and how induced defense response can contribute to the biocontrol activity of strain PICF7.

  20. The biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 induces systemic defense responses in aerial tissues upon colonization of olive roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Lama Cabanás, Carmen; Schilirò, Elisabetta; Valverde-Corredor, Antonio; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, a native olive root endophyte and effective biocontrol agent (BCA) against Verticillium wilt of olive, is able to trigger a broad range of defense responses in root tissues of this woody plant. In order to elucidate whether strain PICF7 also induces systemic defense responses in above-ground organs, aerial tissues of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after root bacterization with this endophytic BCA. A suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library, enriched in up-regulated genes, was generated. This strategy enabled the identification of 376 ESTs (99 contigs and 277 singlets), many of them related to response to different stresses. Five ESTs, involved in defense responses, were selected to carry out time-course quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments aiming to: (1) validate the induction of these genes, and (2) shed light on their expression pattern along time (from 1 to 15 days). Induction of olive genes potentially coding for lipoxygenase 2, catalase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase, and phenylananine ammonia-lyase was thus confirmed at some time points. Computational analysis also revealed that different transcription factors were up-regulated in olive aerial tissues (i.e., JERF, bHLH, WRKY), as previously reported for roots. Results confirmed that root colonization by this endophytic bacterium does not only trigger defense responses in this organ but also mounts a wide array of systemic defense responses in distant tissues (stems, leaves). This sheds light on how olive plants respond to the "non-hostile" colonization by a bacterial endophyte and how induced defense response can contribute to the biocontrol activity of strain PICF7.

  1. Ability of the marine bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BA3SM1 to counteract the toxicity of CdSe nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Isabelle; Kuhn, Lauriane; Demortière, Arnaud; Mirvaux, Boris; Hammann, Philippe; Chicher, Johana; Caplat, Christelle; Pallud, Marie; Bertrand, Martine

    2016-10-04

    In the marine environment, bacteria from estuarine and coastal sediments are among the first targets of nanoparticle pollution; it is therefore relevant to improve the knowledge of interactions between bacteria and nanoparticles. In this work, the response of the marine bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BA3SM1 to CdSe nanocrystals (CdSe NPs) of 3nm (NP3) and 8nm (NP8) in diameter was evaluated through microscopic, physiological, biochemical and proteomic approaches. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that NP3 were able to penetrate the bacteria, while NP8 were highly concentrated around the cells, embedded in large exopolysaccharides. In our experimental conditions, both CdSe NP sizes induced a decrease in respiration during the stationary growth phase, while only NP8 caused growth retardation and a decrease in pyoverdine production. Proteomic analyses highlighted that the strain responded to CdSe NP toxicity by inducing various defence mechanisms such as cell aggregation, extracellular CdSe NP sequestration, effective protection against oxidative stress, modifications of envelope organization and properties, and cadmium export. In addition, BA3SM1 presented a biosorption capacity of 1.6×10(16)NP3/g dry weight and 1.7×10(15)NP8/g dry weight. This strain therefore appears as a promising agent for NP bioremediation processes. Proteomic data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004012. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report focussing on the effects of CdSe colloidal nanocrystals (CdSe NPs) on a marine strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens. CdSe NPs are extensively used in the industry of renewable energies and it is regrettably expected that these pollutants will sometime soon appear in the marine environment through surface runoff, urban effluents and rivers. Bacteria living in estuarine and coastal sediments will be among the first targets of these new pollutants. The pseudomonads are frequently found in these ecosystems

  2. Enrichment of denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria from municipal wastewater sludge in a membrane bioreactor at 20 °C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, C.; Temmink, B.G.; Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Zeeman, G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous nitrogen and methane removal by the slow growing denitrifying methanotrophic bacterium ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera’ offers opportunities for a new approach to wastewater treatment. However, volumetric nitrite consumption rates should be increased by an order of magnitude before

  3. Sequential interactions of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO2NC) with cell wall, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Jiya, J.; Rameez, M.J.; Anand, P.B.; Anantharaman, M.R.; Nair, S.

    The study was carried out to understand the effect of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO sub(2)NC) on the cell wall integrity, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple drug-resistant bacterium Bacterial sensitivity...

  4. Sequential interactions of silver-silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO2 NC) with cell wall, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple antibiotic-resistant bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anas, A.; Jiya, J.; Rameez, M.J.; Anand, P.B.; Anantharaman, M.R.; Nair, S.

    The study was carried out to understand the effect of silver–silica nanocomposite (Ag-SiO sub(2)NC) on the cell wall integrity, metabolism and genetic stability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a multiple drug-resistant bacterium. Bacterial sensitivity...

  5. Microarray-mediated transcriptome analysis of the tributyltin (TBT)-resistant bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa 25W in the presence of TBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Santosh K; Tokashiki, Tsutomu; Suzuki, Satoru

    2006-04-01

    The tributyltin (TBT)-resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 25W, which was isolated in seawater from the Arabian Sea, was subjected to transcriptome analysis in the presence of high concentrations of TBT. Only slight effects were observed at TBT concentration of 50 microM, but exposure to 500 microM resulted in the upregulation of 6 genes and the downregulation of 75. Among the 75 downregulated genes, 53% (40 out of 75) were of hypothetical function, followed by 14 transcriptional regulation- and translation-associated genes. The results of this study indicated that although the 25W strain was highly resistant to TBT, high concentrations of TBT result in toxic effect on the transcriptional and translational levels. The target genes likely belong to a specific category of transcription- and translation-associated genes rather than to other gene categories.

  6. Getting the ecology into the interactions between plants and the plant-growth promoting bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, W.H.G.; Bezemer, T.M.; Biere, A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are increasingly appreciated for their contributions to primary productivity through promotion of growth and triggering of induced systemic resistance in plants. Here we focus on the beneficial effects of one particular species of PGPR (Pseudomonas

  7. Molecular stress responses to nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccà, Maria Ludovica; Fajardo, Carmen; Martinez-Gomariz, Montserrat; Costa, Gonzalo; Nande, Mar; Martin, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Nanotoxicological studies were performed in vitro using the common soil bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri to assess the potentially toxic impact of commercial nano-sized zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles, which are currently used for environmental remediation projects. The phenotypic response of P. stutzeri to nZVI toxicity includes an initial insult to the cell wall, as evidenced by TEM micrographs. Transcriptional analyses using genes of particular relevance in cellular activity revealed that no significant changes occurred among the relative expression ratios of narG, nirS, pykA or gyrA following nZVI exposure; however, a significant increase in katB expression was indicative of nZVI-induced oxidative stress in P. stutzeri. A proteomic approach identified two major defence mechanisms that occurred in response to nZVI exposure: a downregulation of membrane proteins and an upregulation of proteins involved in reducing intracellular oxidative stress. These biomarkers served as early indicators of nZVI response in this soil bacterium, and may provide relevant information for environmental hazard assessment.

  8. Pseudomonas sp. ZXY-1, a newly isolated and highly efficient atrazine-degrading bacterium, and optimization of biodegradation using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinyue; Wang, Li; Ma, Fang; Bai, Shunwen; Yang, Jixian; Qi, Shanshan

    2017-04-01

    Atrazine, a widely used herbicide, is increasing the agricultural production effectively, while also causing great environmental concern. Efficient atrazine-degrading bacterium is necessary to removal atrazine rapidly to keep a safe environment. In the present study, a new atrazine-degrading strain ZXY-1, identified as Pseudomonas, was isolated. This new isolated strain has a strong ability to biodegrade atrazine with a high efficiency of 9.09mg/L/hr. Temperature, pH, inoculum size and initial atrazine concentration were examined to further optimize the degradation of atrazine, and the synthetic effect of these factors were investigated by the response surface methodology. With a high quadratic polynomial mathematical model (R 2 =0.9821) being obtained, the highest biodegradation efficiency of 19.03mg/L/hr was reached compared to previous reports under the optimal conditions (30.71°C, pH7.14, 4.23% (V/V) inoculum size and 157.1mg/L initial atrazine concentration). Overall, this study provided an efficient bacterium and approach that could be potentially useful for the bioremediation of wastewater containing atrazine. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Display of a thermostable lipase on the surface of a solvent-resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas putida GM730, and its applications in whole-cell biocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Seok-Joon

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole-cell biocatalysis in organic solvents has been widely applied to industrial bioprocesses. In two-phase water-solvent processes, substrate conversion yields and volumetric productivities can be limited by the toxicity of solvents to host cells and by the low mass transfer rates of the substrates from the solvent phase to the whole-cell biocatalysts in water. Results To solve the problem of solvent toxicity, we immobilized a thermostable lipase (TliA from Pseudomonas fluorescens on the cell surface of a solvent-resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas putida GM730. Surface immobilization of enzymes eliminates the mass-transfer limitation imposed by the cell wall and membranes. TliA was successfully immobilized on the surface of P. putida cells using the ice-nucleation protein (INP anchoring motif from Pseudomonas syrinage. The surface location was confirmed by flow cytometry, protease accessibility and whole-cell enzyme activity using a membrane-impermeable substrate. Three hundred and fifty units of whole-cell hydrolytic activity per gram dry cell mass were obtained when the enzyme was immobilized with a shorter INP anchoring motif (INPNC. The surface-immobilized TliA retained full enzyme activity in a two-phase water-isooctane reaction system after incubation at 37°C for 12 h, while the activity of the free form enzyme decreased to 65% of its initial value. Whole cells presenting immobilized TliA were shown to catalyze three representative lipase reactions: hydrolysis of olive oil, synthesis of triacylglycerol and chiral resolution. Conclusion In vivo surface immobilization of enzymes on solvent-resistant bacteria was demonstrated, and appears to be useful for a variety of whole-cell bioconversions in the presence of organic solvents.

  10. Display of a thermostable lipase on the surface of a solvent-resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas putida GM730, and its applications in whole-cell biocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Heung-Chae; Kwon, Seok-Joon; Pan, Jae-Gu

    2006-01-01

    Background Whole-cell biocatalysis in organic solvents has been widely applied to industrial bioprocesses. In two-phase water-solvent processes, substrate conversion yields and volumetric productivities can be limited by the toxicity of solvents to host cells and by the low mass transfer rates of the substrates from the solvent phase to the whole-cell biocatalysts in water. Results To solve the problem of solvent toxicity, we immobilized a thermostable lipase (TliA) from Pseudomonas fluorescens on the cell surface of a solvent-resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas putida GM730. Surface immobilization of enzymes eliminates the mass-transfer limitation imposed by the cell wall and membranes. TliA was successfully immobilized on the surface of P. putida cells using the ice-nucleation protein (INP) anchoring motif from Pseudomonas syrinage. The surface location was confirmed by flow cytometry, protease accessibility and whole-cell enzyme activity using a membrane-impermeable substrate. Three hundred and fifty units of whole-cell hydrolytic activity per gram dry cell mass were obtained when the enzyme was immobilized with a shorter INP anchoring motif (INPNC). The surface-immobilized TliA retained full enzyme activity in a two-phase water-isooctane reaction system after incubation at 37°C for 12 h, while the activity of the free form enzyme decreased to 65% of its initial value. Whole cells presenting immobilized TliA were shown to catalyze three representative lipase reactions: hydrolysis of olive oil, synthesis of triacylglycerol and chiral resolution. Conclusion In vivo surface immobilization of enzymes on solvent-resistant bacteria was demonstrated, and appears to be useful for a variety of whole-cell bioconversions in the presence of organic solvents. PMID:16620394

  11. Genome mining and metabolic profiling of the rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 for antimicrobial compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menno evan der Voort

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The plant microbiome represents an enormous untapped resource for discovering novel genes and bioactive compounds. Previously, we isolated Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 from the rhizosphere of sugar beet plants grown in a soil suppressive to the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani and showed that its antifungal activity is, in part, attributed to the production of the chlorinated 9-amino-acid lipopeptide thanamycin (Mendes et al. 2011. Science. To get more insight into its biosynthetic repertoire, the genome of Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52 was sequenced and subjected to in silico, mutational and functional analyses. The sequencing revealed a genome size of 6.3 Mb and 5,579 predicted ORFs. Phylogenetic analysis placed strain SH-C52 within the Pseudomonas corrugata clade. In silico analysis for secondary metabolites revealed a total of six nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS gene clusters, including the two previously described NRPS clusters for thanamycin and the 2-amino acid antibacterial lipopeptide brabantamide. Here we show that thanamycin also has activity against an array of other fungi and that brabantamide A exhibits anti-oomycete activity and affects phospholipases of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Most notably, mass spectrometry led to the discovery of a third LP, designated thanapeptin, with a 22-amino-acid peptide moiety. Seven structural variants of thanapeptin were found with varying degrees of activity against P. infestans. Of the remaining four NRPS clusters, one was predicted to encode for yet another and unknown lipopeptide with a predicted peptide moiety of 8-amino acids. Collectively, these results show an enormous metabolic potential for Pseudomonas sp. SH-C52, with at least three structurally diverse lipopeptides, each with a different antimicrobial activity spectrum.

  12. Comparative genome analysis of Pseudomonas knackmussii B13, the first bacterium known to degrade chloroaromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Ryo; Bertelli, Claire; Benaglio, Paola; Canton, Jonas; De Coi, Nicoló; Gharib, Walid H; Gjoksi, Bebeka; Goesmann, Alexander; Greub, Gilbert; Harshman, Keith; Linke, Burkhard; Mikulic, Josip; Mueller, Linda; Nicolas, Damien; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; Rivolta, Carlo; Roggo, Clémence; Roy, Shantanu; Sentchilo, Vladimir; Siebenthal, Alexandra Von; Falquet, Laurent; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas knackmussii B13 was the first strain to be isolated in 1974 that could degrade chlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons. This discovery was the prologue for subsequent characterization of numerous bacterial metabolic pathways, for genetic and biochemical studies, and which spurred ideas for pollutant bioremediation. In this study, we determined the complete genome sequence of B13 using next generation sequencing technologies and optical mapping. Genome annotation indicated that B13 has a variety of metabolic pathways for degrading monoaromatic hydrocarbons including chlorobenzoate, aminophenol, anthranilate and hydroxyquinol, but not polyaromatic compounds. Comparative genome analysis revealed that B13 is closest to Pseudomonas denitrificans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The B13 genome contains at least eight genomic islands [prophages and integrative conjugative elements (ICEs)], which were absent in closely related pseudomonads. We confirm that two ICEs are identical copies of the 103 kb self-transmissible element ICEclc that carries the genes for chlorocatechol metabolism. Comparison of ICEclc showed that it is composed of a variable and a 'core' region, which is very conserved among proteobacterial genomes, suggesting a widely distributed family of so far uncharacterized ICE. Resequencing of two spontaneous B13 mutants revealed a number of single nucleotide substitutions, as well as excision of a large 220 kb region and a prophage that drastically change the host metabolic capacity and survivability. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Novel Essential Role of Ethanol Oxidation Genes at Low Temperature Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis in the Antarctic Bacterium Pseudomonas extremaustralis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribelli, Paula Maria; Solar Venero, Esmeralda C.; Ricardi, Martiniano M

    2015-01-01

    up-regulated genes, those coding for transcriptional regulatory and signal transduction proteins were over-represented at cold conditions. Remarkably, we found that genes involved in ethanol oxidation, exaA, exaB and exaC, encoding a pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent ethanol dehydrogenase...... grown at 8°C support the conclusion that this pathway is important under cold conditions. The obtained results have led to the identification of novel components involved in cold adaptation mechanisms in this bacterium, suggesting for the first time a role of the ethanol oxidation pathway for bacterial...

  14. Genetic responses induced in olive roots upon colonization by the biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Schilirò

    Full Text Available Knowledge on the genetic basis underlying interactions between beneficial bacteria and woody plants is still very limited, and totally absent in the case of olive. We aimed to elucidate genetic responses taking place during the colonization of olive roots by the native endophyte Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, an effective biocontrol agent against Verticillium wilt of olive. Roots of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after PICF7 inoculation. A Suppression Subtractive Hybridization cDNA library enriched in induced genes was generated. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis validated the induction of selected olive genes. Computational analysis of 445 olive ESTs showed that plant defence and response to different stresses represented nearly 45% of genes induced in PICF7-colonized olive roots. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis confirmed induction of lipoxygenase, phenylpropanoid, terpenoids and plant hormones biosynthesis transcripts. Different classes of transcription factors (i.e., bHLH, WRKYs, GRAS1 were also induced. This work highlights for the first time the ability of an endophytic Pseudomonas spp. strain to mount a wide array of defence responses in an economically-relevant woody crop such as olive, helping to explain its biocontrol activity.

  15. Analysis of the phylogenetic relationships of strains of Burkholderia solanacearum, Pseudomonas syzygii, and the blood disease bacterium of banana based on 16S rRNA gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, M; Hayward, C; Sly, L I; Fegan, M

    1996-01-01

    We determined nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequences for 19 isolates of Burkholderia solanacearum, three isolates of the blood disease bacterium of bananas, and two isolates of Pseudomonas syzygii, the cause of Sumatra disease of cloves. The dendrogram produced by comparing all of these sequences revealed that there were two divisions, which corresponded to the results obtained previously in a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (D. Cook, E. Barlow, and L. Sequeira, Mol. Plant Microbe Interact. 2:113-121, 1989) and a total 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence analysis of four isolates representing four biovars of B. solanacearum (X. Li, M. Dorsch, T. Del Dot, L. I. Sly, E. Stackebrandt, and A. C. Hayward, J. Appl. Bacteriol. 74:324-329, 1993). Division 1 comprised biovars 3, 4, and 5 and an aberrant biovar 2 isolate (strain ACH0732), and division 2 included biovars 1, 2, and N2, the blood disease bacterium, and P. syzygii. Specific nucleotides at positions 458 to 460 (UUC) and 474 (A) characterized division 2, whereas in division 1 the nucleotides at these positions were ACU and U, respectively. However, strain ACH0732 had a U at position 458, as did division 2 isolates, and G instead of U at position 474. Division 2 consisted of two subdivisions; one subdivision contained two B. solanacearum isolates that originated from Indonesia, P. syzygii strains, and blood disease bacterium strains, and the other subdivision contained all of the other division 2 isolates. Within division 1, the level of 16S rDNA sequence similarity ranged from 99.8 to 100%, and within division 2, the levels of 16S rDNA sequence similarity ranged from 99.1 to 100%. The division 1 isolates exhibited an average level of 16S rDNA sequence similarity to division 2 isolates of 99.3% (range, 99.1 to 99.5%). The occurrence of consistent polymorphisms in the 16S rDNA sequences of B. solanacearum strains, in particular unique 16S rDNA sequence differences in aberrant biovar 2 isolate ACH

  16. The Sensor Kinase GacS Negatively Regulates Flagellar Formation and Motility in a Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Soo Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The GacS/GacA two component system regulates various traits related to the biocontrol potential of plant-associated pseudomonads. The role of the sensor kinase, GacS, differs between strains in regulation of motility. In this study, we determined how a gacS mutation changed cell morphology and motility in Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6. The gacS mutant cells were elongated in stationary-phase compared to the wild type and the complemented gacS mutant, but cells did not differ in length in logarithmic phase. The gacS mutant had a two-fold increase in the number of flagella compared with the wild type strain; flagella number was restored to that of the wild type in the complemented gacS mutant. The more highly flagellated gacS mutant cells had greater swimming motilities than that of the wild type strain. Enhanced flagella formation in the gacS mutant correlated with increased expression of three genes, fleQ, fliQ and flhF, involved in flagellar formation. Expression of these genes in the complemented gacS mutant was similar to that of the wild type. These findings show that this root-colonizing pseudomonad adjusts flagella formation and cell morphology in stationary-phase using GacS as a major regulator.

  17. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles from deep sea bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa JQ989348 for antimicrobial, antibiofilm, and cytotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, V; Rajaram, R; PremKumar, C; Santhanam, P; Dhinesh, P; Vinothkumar, S; Kaleshkumar, K

    2014-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (JQ989348) was isolated from deep sea water sample and used for synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). AgNPs were confirmed by analyzing surface plasmon resonance using UV-visible spectrophotometer at 420 nm. Further scanning electron microscope analysis confirmed the range of particle size between 13 and 76 nm and XRD pattern authorizes the anisotropic crystalline nature of AgNPs. Fourier transform infrared spectrum endorsed the presence of high amount of proteins and other secondary metabolites in synthesized AgNPs influence the reduction process and stabilization of nanoparticles. The inhibitory activity of AgNPs was tested against human pathogens showed high activity against Eschericia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Aeromonas sp., and Cornebacterium sp. demonstrating its antimicrobial value against pathogenic diseases. Additionally, biologically synthesized AgNPs have notable anti-biofilm activity against primary biofilm forming bacteria P. aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The MTT assay method was evaluated using human cervical cancer cells exposed the AgNPs have excellent cytotoxic activity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Biosurfactant-producing bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MA01 isolated from spoiled apples: physicochemical and structural characteristics of isolated biosurfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Habib; Hamedi, Mir Manochehr; Lotfabad, Tayebe Bagheri; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Masoomi, Fatemeh; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Ortiz, Antonio; Amanlou, Massoud; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari

    2012-02-01

    An extensive investigation was conducted to isolate indigenous bacterial strains with outstanding performance for biosurfactant production from different types of spoiled fruits, food-related products and food processing industries. An isolate was selected from 800 by the highest biosurfactant yield in soybean oil medium and it was identified by 16S rRNA and the two most relevant hypervariable regions of this gene; V3 and V6 as Pseudomonas aeruginosa MA01. The isolate was able to produce 12 g/l of a glycolipid-type biosurfactant and generally less efficient to emulsify vegetable oils compared to hydrocarbons and could emulsify corn and coconut oils more than 50%. However, emulsification index (E(24)) of different hydrocarbons including hexane, toluene, xylene, brake oil, kerosene and hexadecane was between 55.8% and 100%. The surface tension of pure water decreased gradually with increasing biosurfactant concentration to 32.5 mNm(-1) with critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 10.1mg/l. Among all carbon substrates examined, vegetable oils were the most effective on biosurfactant production. Two glycolipid fractions were purified from the biosurfactant crude extracts, and FTIR and ES-MS were used to determine the structure of these compounds. The analysis indicated the presence of three major monorhamnolipid species: R(1)C(10)C(10), R(1)C(10)C(12:1), and R(1)C(10)C(12); as well as another three major dirhamnolipid species: R(2)C(10)C(10), R(2)C(10)C(12:1), and R(2)C(10)C(12). The strain sweep experiment for measuring the linear viscoelastic of biosurfactant showed that typical behavior characteristics of a weak viscoelastic gel, with storage modulus greater than loss modulus at all frequencies examined, both showing some frequency dependence. Copyright © 2011 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Visualization and direct counting of individual denitrifying bacterial cells in soil by nirK-targeted direct in situ PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryuda, Noriko; Hashimoto, Tomoyoshi; Ueno, Daisuke; Inoue, Koichi; Someya, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    The abundance of denitrifying bacteria in soil has been determined primarily by the conventional most probable number (MPN) method. We have developed a single-cell identification technique that is culture-independent, direct in situ PCR, to enumerate denitrifying bacteria in soils. The specificity of this method was evaluated with six species of denitrifying bacteria using nirK as the target gene; Escherichia coli was used as a negative control. Almost all (97.3%-100%) of the nirK-type denitrifying bacteria (Agromonas oligotrophica, Alcaligenes faecalis, Achromobacter denitrificans, Bradyrhizobium japonicum, and Pseudomonas chlororaphis) were detected by direct in situ PCR, whereas no E. coli cells and only a few cells (2.4%) of nirS-type denitrifying bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were detected. Numbers of denitrifying bacteria in upland and paddy soil samples quantified by this method were 3.3 × 10(8) to 2.6 × 10(9) cells g(-1) dry soil. These values are approximately 1,000 to 300,000 times higher than those estimated by the MPN method. These results suggest that direct in situ PCR is a better tool for quantifying denitrifying bacteria in soil than the conventional MPN method.

  20. Heterotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas saponiphila and sunlight as impact factors on organo-mineral colloids transformations in boreal humic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinikova, Olga; Drozdova, Olga; Shirokova, Liudmila; Lapitskiy, Sergey; Bychkov, Andrew; Pokrovsky, Oleg

    2017-04-01

    Two of the main factors of carbon balance in high latitudes, known to govern the CO2 flux from the lakes and rivers to the atmosphere, are bacterial mineralization (respiration) of allochthonous dissolved organic matter (DOM) and photochemical degradation of DOM. Yet, in contrast to large numbers of experimental and field studies on these factors impact on the utilization of DOM of different origin, the fate of metals bound to colloids during bacterial processing of DOM and behavior of trace element (TE) during photodegradation of DOM remains poorly constrained. This is especially important in view of essentially organic and organo-mineral colloidal status of TE in most boreal waters. To answer this questions, a monoculture of Pseudomonas saponiphila from a boreal creek in NW Karelia (Russia) was separated and allowed to interact with boreal peat leachate in nutrient-free media. We quantified colloidal transformation of the peat leachate during 5-days activity of live bacteria using 3 kDa, 50 kDa Amicon® centrifugal filtration and 0.45 µm syringe filtration. The total net decrease of the concentration of Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) over 93 h of exposure was within 5% of the initial value for all fractions except low molecular weight one (bio-uptake or coagulation. Elements most affected by bacterial presence were Al, Mn, (Ni), Cu, Ga, REEs, Y, U which exhibited essentially the adsorption at the cell surface over first hrs of reaction, and Fe, Ti, (Zr), and Nb showing short-term adsorption and long-term assimilation. Towards a better understanding of concentration, size fractionation and speciation change of TE in boreal waters subjected to solar radiation, we conducted on-site photo-degradation experiments in stream and bog water from pristine zone of Northern Karelia (Russian subarctic). After 5 days of exposure, the DOM in stream photodegraded in a much smaller degree than that in the bog water with 25 and 60% removal of initial DOC, respectively. Specific

  1. Endophytic Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens RG11 May Transform Tryptophan to Melatonin and Promote Endogenous Melatonin Levels in the Roots of Four Grape Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yaner; Jiao, Jian; Fan, Xiucai; Sun, Haisheng; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Jianfu; Liu, Chonghuai

    2016-01-01

    Endophytes have been verified to synthesize melatonin in vitro and promote abiotic stress-induced production of endogenous melatonin in grape ( Vitis vinifera L.) roots. This study aimed to further characterize the biotransformation of tryptophan to melatonin in the endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens RG11 and to investigate its capacity for enhancing endogenous melatonin levels in the roots of different grape cultivars. Using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry combined with 15N double-labeled L -tryptophan as the precursor for melatonin, we detected isotope-labeled 5-hydroxytryptophan, serotonin, N -acetylserotonin, and melatonin, but tryptamine was not detected during the in vitro incubation of P. fluorescens RG11. Furthermore, the production capacity of these four compounds peaked during the exponential growth phase. RG11 colonization increased the endogenous levels of 5-hydroxytryptophan, N -acetylserotonin, and melatonin, but reduced those of tryptamine and serotonin, in the roots of the Red Globe grape cultivar under salt stress conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that RG11 reduced the transcription of grapevine tryptophan decarboxylase and serotonin N -acetyltransferase genes when compared to the un-inoculated control. These results correlated with decreased reactive oxygen species bursts and cell damage, which were alleviated by RG11 colonization under salt stress conditions. Additionally, RG11 promoted plant growth and enhanced the levels of endogenous melatonin in different grape cultivars. Intraspecific variation in the levels of melatonin precursors was found among four grape cultivars, and the associated root crude extracts appeared to significantly induce RG11 melatonin biosynthesis in vitro . Overall, this study provides useful information that enhances the existing knowledge of a potential melatonin synthesis pathway in rhizobacteria, and it reveals plant-rhizobacterium interactions that affect

  2. Protection of Tomato Seedlings against Infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato by Using the Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Azospirillum brasilense†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashan, Yoav; de-Bashan, Luz E.

    2002-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, the causal agent of bacterial speck of tomato, and the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense were inoculated onto tomato plants, either alone, as a mixed culture, or consecutively. The population dynamics in the rhizosphere and foliage, the development of bacterial speck disease, and their effects on plant growth were monitored. When inoculated onto separate plants, the A. brasilense population in the rhizosphere of tomato plants was 2 orders of magnitude greater than the population of P. syringae pv. tomato (107 versus 105 CFU/g [dry weight] of root). Under mist chamber conditions, the leaf population of P. syringae pv. tomato was 1 order of magnitude greater than that of A. brasilense (107 versus 106 CFU/g [dry weight] of leaf). Inoculation of seeds with a mixed culture of the two bacterial strains resulted in a reduction of the pathogen population in the rhizosphere, an increase in the A. brasilense population, the prevention of bacterial speck disease development, and improved plant growth. Inoculation of leaves with the mixed bacterial culture under mist conditions significantly reduced the P. syringae pv. tomato population and significantly decreased disease severity. Challenge with P. syringae pv. tomato after A. brasilense was established in the leaves further reduced both the population of P. syringae pv. tomato and disease severity and significantly enhanced plant development. Both bacteria maintained a large population in the rhizosphere for 45 days when each was inoculated separately onto tomato seeds (105 to 106 CFU/g [dry weight] of root). However, P. syringae pv. tomato did not survive in the rhizosphere in the presence of A. brasilense. Foliar inoculation of A. brasilense after P. syringae pv. tomato was established on the leaves did not alleviate bacterial speck disease, and A. brasilense did not survive well in the phyllosphere under these conditions, even in a mist chamber. Several applications

  3. Who is actively denitrifying in activated sludge?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund

    Denitrification is of crucial importance in nitrogen removal from wastewater. However, due to the polyphyletic taxonomy of denitrifiers, little is known about the composition and ecophysiology of the actively denitrifying community in activated sludge. To identify the active denitrifiers in a full......-scale wastewater treatment plant the transcripts (mRNA) of the nirS, nirK and nosZ denitrification genes expressed under acetate or amino acid consumption were amplified, sequenced and identified. This revealed that the majority of the denitrifiers belonged to Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria, while only few...

  4. Whole-Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida Strain UASWS0946, a Highly Ammonia-Tolerant Nitrifying Bacterium Isolated from Sewage Sludge Aerobic Granules

    OpenAIRE

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Cochard, Bastien; Chablais, Romain; Grizard, Damien; Berthon, Jean-Yves; Lefort, François

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome of Pseudomonas putida strain UASWS0946, a highly ammonia-tolerant nitrifying strain isolated from sewage sludge aerobic granules, which displays adequate genetic equipment for soil depollution, sludge treatment, and biological fertilization in agriculture.

  5. Whole-Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida Strain UASWS0946, a Highly Ammonia-Tolerant Nitrifying Bacterium Isolated from Sewage Sludge Aerobic Granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Cochard, Bastien; Chablais, Romain; Grizard, Damien; Berthon, Jean-Yves; Lefort, François

    2015-10-08

    We report here the genome of Pseudomonas putida strain UASWS0946, a highly ammonia-tolerant nitrifying strain isolated from sewage sludge aerobic granules, which displays adequate genetic equipment for soil depollution, sludge treatment, and biological fertilization in agriculture. Copyright © 2015 Crovadore et al.

  6. In situ detection of denitrifying bacteria by mRNA-targeted nucleic acid probes and catalyzed reporter deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Michael Vedel; Stief, Peter; Poulsen, Morten

    and catalyzed fluorescent reporter deposition (CARD-FISH). The general feasibility of the approach was first tested with pure cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri and various denitrifying and nitrate-reducing isolates. Detailed studies of probe specificity and hybridization conditions using Clone-FISH of nar...... can be designed to target a broader range of denitrifying bacteria; however, they require two-pass CARD-FISH, which may result in (too) high background fluorescence. In a first application example, habitat-specific polynucleotide probes were used to quantify bacteria expressing narG and nos...

  7. High quality draft genome sequence of the type strain of Pseudomonas lutea OK2(T), a phosphate-solubilizing rhizospheric bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yunyoung; Park, Gun-Seok; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas lutea OK2(T) (=LMG 21974(T), CECT 5822(T)) is the type strain of the species and was isolated from the rhizosphere of grass growing in Spain in 2003 based on its phosphate-solubilizing capacity. In order to identify the functional significance of phosphate solubilization in Pseudomonas Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, we describe here the phenotypic characteristics of strain OK2(T) along with its high-quality draft genome sequence, its annotation, and analysis. The genome is comprised of 5,647,497 bp with 60.15 % G + C content. The sequence includes 4,846 protein-coding genes and 95 RNA genes.

  8. Performance of denitrifying microbial fuel cell with biocathode over nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao eHuimin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cell (MFC with nitrite as an electron acceptor in cathode provided a new technology for nitrogen removal and electricity production simultaneously. The influences of influent nitrite concentration and external resistance on the performance of denitrifying MFC were investigated. The optimal effectiveness were obtained with the maximum total nitrogen (TN removal rate of 54.80±0.01 g m-3 d-1. It would be rather desirable for the TN removal than electricity generation at lower external resistance. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis suggested that Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum, accounting for 35.72%. Thiobacillus and Afipia might benefit to nitrite removal. The presence of nitrifying Devosia indicated that nitrite was oxidized to nitrate via a biochemical mechanism in the cathode. Ignavibacterium and Anaerolineaceae was found in the cathode as a heterotrophic bacterium with sodium acetate as substrate, which illustrated that sodium acetate in anode was likely permeated through proton exchange membrane to the cathode .

  9. Microbial characterization of toluene-degrading denitrifying consortia obtained from terrestrial and marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Y-J; Joo, Y-H; Hong, I-Y; Ryu, H-W; Cho, K-S

    2004-10-01

    The degradation characteristics of toluene coupled to nitrate reduction were investigated in enrichment culture and the microbial communities of toluene-degrading denitrifying consortia were characterized by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) technique. Anaerobic nitrate-reducing bacteria were enriched from oil-contaminated soil samples collected from terrestrial (rice field) and marine (tidal flat) ecosystems. Enriched consortia degraded toluene in the presence of nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor. The degradation rate of toluene was affected by the initial substrate concentration and co-existence of other hydrocarbons. The types of toluene-degrading denitrifying consortia depended on the type of ecosystem. The clone RS-7 obtained from the enriched consortium of the rice field was most closely related to a toluene-degrading and denitrifying bacterium, Azoarcus denitrificians (A. tolulyticus sp. nov.). The clone TS-11 detected in the tidal flat enriched consortium was affiliated to Thauera sp. strain S2 (T. aminoaromatica sp. nov.) that was able to degrade toluene under denitrifying conditions. This indicates that environmental factors greatly influence microbial communities obtained from terrestrial (rice field) and marine (tidal flat) ecosystems.

  10. Major cereal crops benefit from biological nitrogen fixation when inoculated with the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 X940.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ana Romina; Soto, Gabriela; Valverde, Claudio; Russo, Daniela; Lagares, Antonio; Zorreguieta, Ángeles; Alleva, Karina; Pascuan, Cecilia; Frare, Romina; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Dixon, Ray; Ayub, Nicolás Daniel

    2016-10-01

    A main goal of biological nitrogen fixation research has been to expand the nitrogen-fixing ability to major cereal crops. In this work, we demonstrate the use of the efficient nitrogen-fixing rhizobacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 X940 as a chassis to engineer the transfer of nitrogen fixed by BNF to maize and wheat under non-gnotobiotic conditions. Inoculation of maize and wheat with Pf-5 X940 largely improved nitrogen content and biomass accumulation in both vegetative and reproductive tissues, and this beneficial effect was positively associated with high nitrogen fixation rates in roots. 15 N isotope dilution analysis showed that maize and wheat plants obtained substantial amounts of fixed nitrogen from the atmosphere. Pf-5 X940-GFP-tagged cells were always reisolated from the maize and wheat root surface but never from the inner root tissues. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed root surface colonization of Pf-5 X940-GFP in wheat plants, and microcolonies were mostly visualized at the junctions between epidermal root cells. Genetic analysis using biofilm formation-related Pseudomonas mutants confirmed the relevance of bacterial root adhesion in the increase in nitrogen content, biomass accumulation and nitrogen fixation rates in wheat roots. To our knowledge, this is the first report of robust BNF in major cereal crops. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Indarchand R. [Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, S.G.B. Amravati University, Amravati 444602, Maharashtra (India); Department of Biotechnology, Institute of Science, Nipat Niranjan Nagar, Caves Road, Aurangabad 431004, Maharashtra (India); Anderson, Anne J. [Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84321 (United States); Rai, Mahendra, E-mail: mahendrarai@sgbau.ac.in [Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, S.G.B. Amravati University, Amravati 444602, Maharashtra (India); Laboratório de Química Biológica, Instituto de Química, UNICAMP, Cidade Universitária “Zefferino Vaz” Barão Geraldo, CEP 13083-970, Caixa Postal 6150, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • This study incorporates the mycosynthesis of AgNPs and their characterisation by various methods. • A first attempt demonstrating the toxicity assessment of AgNPs on beneficial soil microbe. • Use of biosensor in Pseudomonas putida KT2440, gave accurate antimicrobial results. - Abstract: Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV–vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20 – a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity.

  12. Studies on the O-specific polysaccharide of the lipopolysaccharide from the Pseudomonas mediterranea strain C5P1rad1, a bacterium pathogenic of tomato and chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdorovenko, Evelina L; Cimmino, Alessio; Marchi, Guido; Shashkov, Alexander S; Fiori, Mario; Knirel, Yuriy A; Evidente, Antonio

    2017-08-07

    An O-specific polysaccharide (OPS) was isolated from the lipopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas mediterranea strain C5P1rad1, the causal agents of tomato pith necrosis and Chrysanthemum stem rot, and studied by one- and two-dimensional 1 H and 13 C NMR spectroscopy. The following structure of the trisaccharide repeating unit of the OPS was established, which, to our knowledge, is unique among the known bacterial polysaccharide structures: →4)-β-d-ManpNAc3NAcA-(1 → 4)-β-d-ManpNAc3NAcA-(1 → 3)-α-d-QuipNAc4NAc-(1→ where QuiNAc4NAc and ManNAc3NAcA indicate 2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxyglucose and 2,3-diacetamido-2,3-dideoxymannuronic acid, respectively. Pre-treatment of leaves with LPS or OPS preparations at 250 and 50 μg mL -1 did not inhibit development of a hypersensitivity reaction induced by P. mediterranea C5P1rad1 on tobacco, tomato and chrysanthemum plants. The same preparations at 250 μg mL -1 partially prevented elicitation of the hypersensitivity reaction by Pseudomonas syringae KVPT7RC on chrysanthemum but not tobacco and tomato. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is implicated in many chronic infections and is readily isolated from chronic wounds, medical devices, and the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa is believed to persist in the host organism due to its capacity to form...

  14. The stack: a new bacterial structure analyzed in the Antarctic bacterium Pseudomonas deceptionensis M1(T by transmission electron microscopy and tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Delgado

    Full Text Available In recent years, improvements in transmission electron microscopy (TEM techniques and the use of tomography have provided a more accurate view of the complexity of the ultrastructure of prokaryotic cells. Cryoimmobilization of specimens by rapid cooling followed by freeze substitution (FS and sectioning, freeze fracture (FF and observation of replica, or cryoelectron microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS now allow visualization of biological samples close to their native state, enabling us to refine our knowledge of already known bacterial structures and to discover new ones. Application of these techniques to the new Antarctic cold-adapted bacterium Pseudomonasdeceptionensis M1(T has demonstrated the existence of a previously undescribed cytoplasmic structure that does not correspond to known bacterial inclusion bodies or membranous formations. This structure, which we term a "stack", was mainly visualized in slow growing cultures of P. deceptionensis M1(T and can be described as a set of stacked membranous discs usually arranged perpendicularly to the cell membrane, but not continuous with it, and found in variable number in different locations within the cell. Regardless of their position, stacks were mostly observed very close to DNA fibers. Stacks are not exclusive to P. deceptionensis M1(T and were also visualized in slow-growing cultures of other bacteria. This new structure deserves further study using cryoelectron tomography to refine its configuration and to establish whether its function could be related to chromosome dynamics.

  15. Genome-wide investigation and functional characterization of the β-ketoadipate pathway in the nitrogen-fixing and root-associated bacterium Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Lizhao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soil microorganisms are mainly responsible for the complete mineralization of aromatic compounds that usually originate from plant products or environmental pollutants. In many cases, structurally diverse aromatic compounds can be converted to a small number of structurally simpler intermediates, which are metabolized to tricarboxylic acid intermediates via the β-ketoadipate pathway. This strategy provides great metabolic flexibility and contributes to increased adaptation of bacteria to their environment. However, little is known about the evolution and regulation of the β-ketoadipate pathway in root-associated diazotrophs. Results In this report, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the benzoate and 4-hydroxybenzoate catabolic pathways of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501, with a focus on the functional characterization of the β-ketoadipate pathway. The P. stutzeri A1501 genome contains sets of catabolic genes involved in the peripheral pathways for catabolism of benzoate (ben and 4-hydroxybenzoate (pob, and in the catechol (cat and protocatechuate (pca branches of the β-ketoadipate pathway. A particular feature of the catabolic gene organization in A1501 is the absence of the catR and pcaK genes encoding a LysR family regulator and 4-hydroxybenzoate permease, respectively. Furthermore, the BenR protein functions as a transcriptional activator of the ben operon, while transcription from the catBC promoter can be activated in response to benzoate. Benzoate degradation is subject to carbon catabolite repression induced by glucose and acetate in A1501. The HPLC analysis of intracellular metabolites indicated that low concentrations of 4-hydroxybenzoate significantly enhance the ability of A1501 to degrade benzoate. Conclusions The expression of genes encoding proteins involved in the β-ketoadipate pathway is tightly modulated by both pathway-specific and catabolite repression controls in A1501. This strain provides an ideal

  16. Sequence and Role in Virulence of the Three Plasmid Complement of the Model Tumor-Inducing Bacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardaji, Leire; Pérez-Martínez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Moreno, Luis; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Sundin, George W.; Ramos, Cayo; Murillo, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 is a model for the study of the molecular basis of disease production and tumor formation in woody hosts, and its draft genome sequence has been recently obtained. Here we closed the sequence of the plasmid complement of this strain, composed of three circular molecules of 78,357 nt (pPsv48A), 45,220 nt (pPsv48B), and 42,103 nt (pPsv48C), all belonging to the pPT23A-like family of plasmids widely distributed in the P. syringae complex. A total of 152 coding sequences were predicted in the plasmid complement, of which 38 are hypothetical proteins and seven correspond to putative virulence genes. Plasmid pPsv48A contains an incomplete Type IVB secretion system, the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector gene hopAF1, gene ptz, involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, and three copies of a gene highly conserved in plant-associated proteobacteria, which is preceded by a hrp box motif. A complete Type IVA secretion system, a well conserved origin of transfer (oriT), and a homolog of the T3SS effector gene hopAO1 are present in pPsv48B, while pPsv48C contains a gene with significant homology to isopentenyl-diphosphate delta-isomerase, type 1. Several potential mobile elements were found on the three plasmids, including three types of MITE, a derivative of IS801, and a new transposon effector, ISPsy30. Although the replication regions of these three plasmids are phylogenetically closely related, their structure is diverse, suggesting that the plasmid architecture results from an active exchange of sequences. Artificial inoculations of olive plants with mutants cured of plasmids pPsv48A and pPsv48B showed that pPsv48A is necessary for full virulence and for the development of mature xylem vessels within the knots; we were unable to obtain mutants cured of pPsv48C, which contains five putative toxin-antitoxin genes. PMID:22022435

  17. Isolation and Physiological Characterization of Psychrophilic Denitrifying Bacteria from Permanently Cold Arctic Fjord Sediments (Svalbard, Norway)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canion, Andy; Prakash, Om; Green, Stefan J.; Jahnke, Linda; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of reactive nitrogen loss from polar sediments is mediated by denitrification, but microorganisms mediating denitrification in polar environments remain poorly characterized. A combined approach of most-probable-number (MPN) enumeration, cultivation and physiological characterization was used to describe psychrophilic denitrifying bacterial communities in sediments of three Arctic fjords in Svalbard (Norway). A MPN assay showed the presence of 10(sup 3)-10(sup 6) cells of psychrophilic nitrate-respiring bacteria g(sup -1) of sediment. Fifteen strains within the Proteobacteria were isolated using a systematic enrichment approach with organic acids as electron donors and nitrate as an electron acceptor. Isolates belonged to five genera, including Shewanella, Pseudomonas, Psychromonas (Gammaproteobacteria), Arcobacter (Epsilonproteobacteria) and Herminiimonas (Betaproteobacteria). All isolates were denitrifiers, except Shewanella, which exhibited the capacity for dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). Growth from 0 to 40 degC demonstrated that all genera except Shewanella were psychrophiles with optimal growth below 15 degC, and adaptation to low temperature was demonstrated as a shift from primarily C16:0 saturated fatty acids to C16:1 monounsaturated fatty acids at lower temperatures. This study provides the first targeted enrichment and characterization of psychrophilic denitrifying bacteria from polar sediments, and two genera, Arcobacter and Herminiimonas, are isolated for the first time from permanently cold marine sediments.

  18. Relationships Between Denitrifier Abundance, Denitrifier Diversity and Denitrification in Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, L. M.; Childs, C.; MacAuley, S.

    2002-12-01

    The largest zone of anthropogenic bottom water hypoxia in the Western Hemisphere occurs seasonally in the northern Gulf of Mexico. This hypoxic zone reaches its greatest extent in the summer months and is a consequence of seasonal stratification of the water column combined with the decomposition of organic matter derived from accelerated rates of primary production. The enhanced primary production is driven by inorganic nitrogen input from the Mississippi River and these conditions would seem ideal for supporting high levels of denitrification. Yet sediment denitrification exhibited a wide range, even at the height of the seasonal hypoxia. Therefore, we compared benthic denitrifier abundances and denitrifier diversity at several stations over two seasons exhibiting extremes in denitrification to evaluate the relationship between abundances, diversity and denitrification levels. Sediment denitrification ranged from 20 to 100 umol m-2 h-1, with rates in July, 2000 approximately half that observed in July, 2001. The highest rates were generally observed at stations with bottom water DO concentrations between 1 and 3 mg l-1. Relative denitrifier abundances, using nirS and nirK as proxies for denitrifiers, suggested a direct relationship between abundances and denitrification while denitrifier diversity, measured by T-RFLPs of nirS and nirK, suggested an inverse relationship between diversity and denitrification. These results suggest that several factors are important in understanding what controls denitrification in Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone sediments.

  19. IDENTIFICATION AND ECOPHYSIOLOGY OF ACTIVE DENITRIFIERS IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Le-Quy, Vang; Nielsen, Kåre Lehmann

    reactor studies. To obtain better identification of active denitrifying communities in full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) we applied DNA-SIP with 13C-labelled substrates, and RT-PCR of expressed denitrification genes (nirS, nirK and nosZ) upon various substrate-inductions. To come around...... the bias of horizontal gene transfer, the identities were verified by microautoradiography (MAR) combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with incorporation of radio-labelled substrates under denitrifying conditions. The in situ abundances of the identified denitrifiers in different WWTPs...... were determined with quantitative FISH, while their active metabolic pathways were investigated directly in activated sludge with a tag-based metatranscriptomic approach under acetate-utilizing and denitrifying conditions. The different methods revealed a majority of denitrifiers in all WWTPs belonging...

  20. Nitrous oxide emission by the non-denitrifying, nitrate ammonifier Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yihua; De Vos, Paul; Heylen, Kim

    2016-01-19

    Firmicutes have the capacity to remove excess nitrate from the environment via either denitrification, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium or both. The recent renewed interest in their nitrogen metabolism has revealed many interesting features, the most striking being their wide variety of dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways. In the present study, nitrous oxide production from Bacillus licheniformis, a ubiquitous Gram-positive, spore-forming species with many industrial applications, is investigated. B. licheniformis has long been considered a denitrifier but physiological experiments on three different strains demonstrated that nitrous oxide is not produced from nitrate in stoichiometric amounts, rather ammonium is the most important end-product, produced during fermentation. Significant strain dependency in end-product ratios, attributed to nitrite and ammonium, and medium dependency in nitrous oxide production were also observed. Genome analyses confirmed the lack of a nitrite reductase to nitric oxide, the key enzyme of denitrification. Based on the gene inventory and building on knowledge from other non-denitrifying nitrous oxide emitters, hypothetical pathways for nitrous oxide production, involving NarG, NirB, qNor and Hmp, are proposed. In addition, all publically available genomes of B. licheniformis demonstrated similar gene inventories, with specific duplications of the nar operon, narK and hmp genes as well as NarG phylogeny supporting the evolutionary separation of previously described distinct BALI1 and BALI2 lineages. Using physiological and genomic data we have demonstrated that the common soil bacterium B. licheniformis does not denitrify but is capable of fermentative dissimilatory nitrate/nitrite reduction to ammonium (DNRA) with concomitant production of N2O. Considering its ubiquitous nature and non-fastidious growth in the lab, B. licheniformis is a suitable candidate for further exploration of the actual mechanism of N2O

  1. Enhanced denitrification of Pseudomonas stutzeri by a bioelectrochemical system assisted with solid-phase humin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhixing; Awata, Takanori; Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Chunfang; Li, Zhiling; Katayama, Arata

    2016-07-01

    The denitrification reactions performed by Pseudomonas stutzeri JCM20778 were enhanced electrochemically with the use of solid-phase humin, although P. stutzeri itself was incapable of receiving electrons directly from the graphite electrode. Electrochemically reduced humin enhanced the microbial, but not abiotic, denitrification reactions. Electric current and cyclic voltammetry analyses suggested that the solid-phase humin functioned as an electron donor for the denitrification reactions of P. stutzeri. Nitrogen balance study and the estimation of the first-order rate constants of the consecutive denitrification reactions suggested that the solid-phase humin enhanced all reducing reactions from nitrate to nitrogen gas. Considering the wide distribution of humin in the environment, the findings that solid-phase humin can assist in electron transfer, from the electrode to a denitrifying bacterium that has little ability to directly utilize external electrons, has important implications for the widespread application of bioelectrochemical systems assisted by solid-phase humin for enhancing microbial denitrification. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Denitrifying haloarchaea: sources and sinks of nitrogenous gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa-Crespo, Javier; Bergaust, Linda; Pire, Carmen; Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María

    2018-02-01

    Haloarchaea thrive under saline and hypersaline conditions and often dominate microbial communities in saltmarshes, salted lakes/soils and some oceanic areas. Some of the predominant species show denitrifying capabilities, although it remains unclear whether they are complete or partial denitrifiers. As complete denitrifiers, they could play important roles buffering ecosystems in which nitrate and nitrite appear as contaminants. However, partial denitrifying haloarchaea could contribute to the emission of nitrogenous gasses, thus acting as drivers of climate change and ozone depletion. In this review, we summarise some recent results on denitrification in haloarchaea, discuss the environmental implications and outline possible applications in mitigation. Finally, we list questions to be addressed in the near future, facilitating increased understanding of the role of these organisms in N turnover in arid and hypersaline environments. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. A Mathematical model to investigate quorum sensing regulation and its heterogenecity in pseudomonas syringae on leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a plant-pathogen, which through quorum sensing (QS), controls virulence. In this paper, by means of mathematical modeling, we investigate QS of this bacterium when living on leaf surfaces. We extend an existing stochastic model for the formation of Pseudomonas s...

  4. Whole-genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens EK007-RG4, a promising biocontrol agent against a broad range of bacteria, including the fire blight bacterium Erwinia amylovora

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habibi, Roghayeh; Tarighi, Saeed; Behravan, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report the first draft whole-genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain EK007-RG4, which was isolated from the phylloplane of a pear tree. P. fluorescens EK007-RG4 displays strong antagonism against Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent for fire blight disease, in addition to several...

  5. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phelps, T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  6. Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas putida WLY for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using the BMM medium containing 100 mg/L of reactive brilliant red X-3B, a decolorizing bacterium with higher decolorization activity was isolated and it showed a decolorization zone of 10 mm; this decolorizing bacterium was identified as Pseudomonas putida WLY based on physiological and biochemical characteristics ...

  7. Heavy Metal uptake Potentials of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uptake of heavy metals, silver and cadmium by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (a Gram negative bacterium) and Micrococcus luteus (a Gram positive bacterium) was investigated in Cadmium and Silver stock solution using ion selective electrodes. Silver and cadmium uptake by the two organisms was described by Langmuir ...

  8. Pseudomonas Exotoxin A: optimized by evolution for effective killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eMichalska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas Exotoxin A (PE is the most toxic virulence factor of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review describes current knowledge about the intoxication pathways of PE. Moreover, PE represents a remarkable example for pathoadaptive evolution, how bacterial molecules have been structurally and functionally optimized under evolutionary pressure to effectively impair and kill their host cells.

  9. Novel Targets for Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infection in all parts of the human body. The bacterium is naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. In addition to resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps, the ability to form aggregates, known as biofilm, further reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa...

  10. Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas resistant to heavy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    represented high potential to grow in medium supplemented with copper and phenanthrene. Isolated bacterium was identified as Pseudomonas sp. by biochemical tests. Over 70% of copper sorbed on Pseudomonas sp. within 150 min. In addition, about 96.52% of initial concentration of phenanthrene was degraded during ...

  11. Optimizing BTEX biodegradation under denitrifying conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    Leaking underground storage tanks are a major source of ground water contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons. Gasoline and other fuels contain benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (collectively known as BTEX), which are hazardous compounds, regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Laboratory tests were conducted to determine optimum conditions for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (collectively known as BTEX) biodegradation by aquifer microorganisms under denitrifying conditions. Microcosms, constructed with aquifer samples from Traverse City, Michigan, were amended with selected concentrations of nutrients and one or more hydrocarbons. Toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and p-xylene, were degraded to below 5 micrograms/L when present as sole source substrates; stoichiometric calculations indicated that nitrate removal was sufficient to account for 70 to 80% of the compounds being mineralized. o-Xylene was recalcitrant when present as a sole source substrate, but was slowly degraded in the presence of the other hydrocarbons. Benzene was not degraded within one year, regardless of whether it was available as a sole source substrate or in combination with toluene, phenol, or catechol. Pre-exposure to low levels of BTEX and nutrients had variable effects, as did the addition of different concentrations of ammonia and phosphate. Nitrate concentrations as high as 500 mg/L NO3-N were slightly inhibitory. These data indicate that nitrate-mediated biodegradation of BTEX at Traverse City can occur under a variety of environmental conditions with rates relatively independent of nutrient concentrations. However, the data reaffirm that benzene is recalcitrant under strictly anaerobic conditions in these samples

  12. Diversity and activity of denitrifiers of Chilean arid soil ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta eOrlando

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Chilean sclerophyllous matorral is a Mediterranean semiarid ecosystem affected by erosion, with low soil fertility and limited by nitrogen. However, limitation of resources is even more severe for desert soils such as from the Atacama Desert, one of the most extreme arid deserts on Earth. Topsoil organic matter, nitrogen and moisture content were significantly higher in the semiarid soil compared to the desert soil. Although the most significant loss of biologically preferred nitrogen from terrestrial ecosystems occurs via denitrification, virtually nothing is known on the activity and composition of denitrifier communities thriving in arid soils. In this study, we explored denitrifier communities from two soils with profoundly distinct edaphic factors. While denitrification activity in the desert soil was below detection limit, the semiarid soil sustained denitrification activity. To elucidate the genetic potential of the soils to sustain denitrification processes we performed community analysis of denitrifiers based on nitrite reductase (nirK and nirS genes as functional marker genes for this physiological group. Presence of nirK-type denitrifiers in both soils was demonstrated but failure to amplify nirS from the desert soil suggests very low abundance of nirS-type denitrifiers shedding light on the lack of denitrification activity. Phylogenetic analysis showed a very low diversity of nirK with only three distinct genotypes in the desert soil which conditions presumably exert a high selection pressure. While nirK diversity was also limited to only few, albeit distinct genotypes, the semiarid matorral soil showed a surprisingly broad genetic variability of the nirS gene. The Chilean matorral is a shrub land plant community which form vegetational patches stabilizing the soil and increasing its nitrogen and carbon content. These islands of fertility may sustain the development and activity of the overall microbial community and of

  13. Diversity and activity of denitrifiers of chilean arid soil ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Julieta; Carú, Margarita; Pommerenke, Bianca; Braker, Gesche

    2012-01-01

    The Chilean sclerophyllous matorral is a Mediterranean semiarid ecosystem affected by erosion, with low soil fertility, and limited by nitrogen. However, limitation of resources is even more severe for desert soils such as from the Atacama Desert, one of the most extreme arid deserts on Earth. Topsoil organic matter, nitrogen and moisture content were significantly higher in the semiarid soil compared to the desert soil. Although the most significant loss of biologically preferred nitrogen from terrestrial ecosystems occurs via denitrification, virtually nothing is known on the activity and composition of denitrifier communities thriving in arid soils. In this study we explored denitrifier communities from two soils with profoundly distinct edaphic factors. While denitrification activity in the desert soil was below detection limit, the semiarid soil sustained denitrification activity. To elucidate the genetic potential of the soils to sustain denitrification processes we performed community analysis of denitrifiers based on nitrite reductase (nirK and nirS) genes as functional marker genes for this physiological group. Presence of nirK-type denitrifiers in both soils was demonstrated but failure to amplify nirS from the desert soil suggests very low abundance of nirS-type denitrifiers shedding light on the lack of denitrification activity. Phylogenetic analysis showed a very low diversity of nirK with only three distinct genotypes in the desert soil which conditions presumably exert a high selection pressure. While nirK diversity was also limited to only few, albeit distinct genotypes, the semiarid matorral soil showed a surprisingly broad genetic variability of the nirS gene. The Chilean matorral is a shrub land plant community which form vegetational patches stabilizing the soil and increasing its nitrogen and carbon content. These islands of fertility may sustain the development and activity of the overall microbial community and of denitrifiers in particular.

  14. Transformation of carbon tetrachloride by Pseudomonas sp. strain KC under denitrification conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criddle, C.S.; DeWitt, J.T.; Grbic-Galic, D.; McCarty, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    A denitrifying Pseudomonas sp. (strain KC) capable of transforming carbon tetrachloride (CT) was isolated from groundwater aquifer solids. Major products of the transformation of 14 C-labeled CT by Pseudomonas strain KC under denitrification conditions were 14 CO 2 and an unidentified water-soluble fraction. Little or no chloroform was produced. Addition of dissolved trace metals, notably, ferrous iron and cobalt, to the growth medium appeared to enhance growth of Pseudomonas strain KC while inhibiting transformation of CT. It is hypothesized that transformation of CT by this organism is associated with the mechanism of trace-metal scavenging

  15. Denitrification and Biodiversity of Denitrifiers in a High-Mountain Mediterranean Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Castellano-Hinojosa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wet deposition of reactive nitrogen (Nr species is considered a main factor contributing to N inputs, of which nitrate (NO3− is usually the major component in high-mountain lakes. The microbial group of denitrifiers are largely responsible for reduction of nitrate to molecular dinitrogen (N2 in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, but the role of denitrification in removal of contaminant nitrates in high-mountain lakes is not well understood. We have used the oligotrophic, high-altitude La Caldera lake in the Sierra Nevada range (Spain as a model to study the role of denitrification in nitrate removal. Dissolved inorganic Nr concentration in the water column of la Caldera, mainly nitrate, decreased over the ice-free season which was not associated with growth of microbial plankton or variations in the ultraviolet radiation. Denitrification activity, estimated as nitrous oxide (N2O production, was measured in the water column and in sediments of the lake, and had maximal values in the month of August. Relative abundance of denitrifying bacteria in sediments was studied by quantitative polymerase chain reaction of the 16S rRNA and the two phylogenetically distinct clades nosZI and nosZII genes encoding nitrous oxide reductases. Diversity of denitrifiers in sediments was assessed using a culture-dependent approach and after the construction of clone libraries employing the nosZI gene as a molecular marker. In addition to genera Polymorphum, Paracoccus, Azospirillum, Pseudomonas, Hyphomicrobium, Thauera, and Methylophaga, which were present in the clone libraries, Arthrobacter, Burkholderia, and Rhizobium were also detected in culture media that were not found in the clone libraries. Analysis of biological activities involved in the C, N, P, and S cycles from sediments revealed that nitrate was not a limiting nutrient in the lake, allowed N2O production and determined denitrifiers’ community structure. All these results indicate that

  16. Effect of various sources of organic carbon and high nitrite and nitrate concentrations on the selection of denitrifying bacteria. I. Stationary cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błaszczyk, M; Mycielski, R; Jaworowska-Deptuch, H; Brzostek, K

    1980-01-01

    The effect of methanol, ethanol, acetic acid and glucose together with NaNO2 or KNO3 (1,000 mg N/l) on the intensity of denitrification and selection of denitrifying bacteria from the bottom sludge of nitrogenous wastewater reservoir was examined. Denitrification was found to be the most efficient in medium with ethanol or acetic acid. The presence of glucose facilitated the selection of Alcaligenes faecalis whereas the other carbon sources enabled the selection of bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas: methanol -- P. fluorescens, ethanol -- P. mendocina. In medium with acetic acid species selection depends on the form of nitrogen: NaNO2 -- P. fluorescens, KNO3 -- P. aeruginosa.

  17. Anaerobic degradation of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) by denitrifying bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, A.; Plugge, C.M.; Garcia Encina, P.A.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Two denitrifying bacteria were isolated using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as substrate. Strains SN1 and SN2 were isolated from an activated sludge reactor of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) with Anaerobic–Anoxic–Oxic (A2/O) steps. Based on 16S rRNA gene analysis strain SN1 is 99% similar to

  18. Pseudomonas - Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2012-01-01

    Fact sheet on Pseudomonas, including:What is Pseudomonas?What infections does it cause?Who is susceptible to pseudomonas infection?How will I know if I have pseudomonas infection?How can Pseudomonas be prevented from spreading?How can I protect myself from Pseudomonas?How is Pseudomonas infection treated?

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing modulates immune responses: An updated review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminik, Ashraf; Baseri-Salehi, Majid; Kheirkhah, Babak

    2017-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterium which induces some complications in immunocompromised patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a quorum-sensing using bacterium which regulates its genes expression. The bacterium uses two famous pathways for quorum sensing entitled LasI/LasR and RhlI/RhlR systems. It has been documented that the bacteria which use quorum sensing are able to overcome immune responses. This review article aims to present recent information regarding the effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems on the host immune responses. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessing the activity and diversity of fumarate-fed denitrifying bacteria by performing field single-well push-pull tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Hoon; Ha, Chul-Yoon; Oa, Seong-Wook; Lee, Jin-Woo; Park, Sun-Hwa; Kwon, Soo-Youl; Kim, Sungpyo; Kim, Young

    2011-01-01

    In situ biological denitrification has been proposed as an important metabolic activity in the remediation of nitrate-contaminated groundwater. In this study, the effects of fumarate, an electron donor for biological denitrification, on the in situ denitrifying activity were determined by using three types of single-well push-pull tests; transport, biostimulation and activity tests. During the tests, changes in microbial community composition were also investigated using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes. Transport test demonstrated that non-reactive tracer and biologically reactive solutes behaved similarly. A biostimulation test was conducted to stimulate the denitrifying activities of native microorganisms, which were monitored by detecting the simultaneous production of CO(2) and drastic degradations of both nitrate and fumarate after the injection of fumarate as an electron donor and/or carbon source, with nitrate as an electron acceptor. A phylogenetic analysis suggested that the taxonomic affiliation of the dominant species before biostimulation was γ-Proteobacteria, including Acinetobacter species and Pseudomonas fluorescens, while the dominant species after biostimulation were affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides and high G+C gram-positive bacteria. These results suggest that the analyses of groundwater samples using a combination of single well push pull tests with DGGE can be applied to investigate the activity, diversity and composition shift of denitrifying bacteria in a nitrate-contaminated aquifer.

  1. The optimal ecological factors and the denitrification populationof a denitrifying process for sulfate reducing bacteriainhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunying

    2018-02-01

    SRB have great negative impacts on the oil production in Daqing Oil field. A continuous-flow anaerobic baffled reactors (ABR) are applied to investigate the feasibility and optimal ecological factors for the inhibition of SRB by denitrifying bacteria (DNB). The results showed that the SO42- to NO3- concentration ratio (SO42-/NO3-) are the most important ecological factor. The input of NO3- and lower COD can enhance the inhibition of S2-production effectively. The effective time of sulfate reduction is 6 h. Complete inhibition of SRB is obtained when the influent COD concentration is 600 mg/L, the SO42-/NO3- is 1/1 (600 mg/L for each), N is added simultaneously in the 2# and the 5# ABR chambers. By extracting the total DNA of wastewater from the effective chamber, 16SrDNA clones of a bacterium had been constructed. It is showed that the Proteobacteria accounted for eighty- four percent of the total clones. The dominant species was the Neisseria. Sixteen percent of the total clones were the Bacilli of Frimicutes. It indicated that DNB was effective and feasible for SRB inhibition.

  2. Denitrification by Pseudomonas stutzeri coupled with CO2 reduction by Sporomusa ovata with hydrogen as an electron donor assisted by solid-phase humin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhixing; Awata, Takanori; Zhang, Dongdong; Katayama, Arata

    2016-09-01

    A co-culture system comprising an acetogenic bacterium, Sporomusa ovata DSMZ2662, and a denitrifying bacterium, Pseudomonas stutzeri JCM20778, enabled denitrification using H2 as the sole external electron donor and CO2 as the sole external carbon source. Acetate produced by S. ovata supported the heterotrophic denitrification of P. stutzeri. A nitrogen balance study showed the reduction of nitrate to nitrogen gas without the accumulation of nitrite and nitrous oxide in the co-culture system. S. ovata did not show nitrate reduction to ammonium in the co-culture system. Significant proportions of the consumed H2 were utilized for denitrification: 79.9 ± 4.6% in the co-culture system containing solid-phase humin and 62.9±11.1% in the humin-free co-culture system. The higher utilization efficiency of hydrogen in the humin-containing system was attributed to the higher denitrification activity of P. stutzeri under the acetate deficient conditions. The nitrogen removal rate of the humin-containing co-culture system reached 0.19 kg NO3(-)-N·m(-3)·d(-1). Stable denitrification activity for 61 days of successive sub-culturing suggested the robustness of this co-culture system. This study provides a novel strategy for the in situ enhancement of microbial denitrification. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Nitrate removal, spatiotemporal communities of denitrifiers and the importance of their genetic potential for denitrification in novel denitrifying bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimin; Wang, Longmian; Han, Wei; Wang, Xu; Guo, Zhaobing; Peng, Fuquan; Yang, Fei; Kong, Ming; Gao, Yuexiang; Chao, Jianying; Wu, Dan; Xu, Bin; Zhu, Yueming

    2017-10-01

    Nitrate treatment performance and denitrification activity were compared between denitrifying biological filters (DNBFs) based on dewatered alum sludge (DAS) and neutralized used acid (NUA). The spatiotemporal distribution of denitrifying genes and the genetic potential associated with denitrification activity and nitrate removal in both DNBFs were also evaluated. The removal efficiency of NUA-DNBF increased by 8% compared with that of DAS-DNBF, and the former NUA-DNBF emitted higher amount of N 2 O. Analysis of abundance and composition profiles showed that denitrifying gene patterns varied more or less in two matrices with different depths at three sampling times. Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, and Rhizobiales were the most commonly detected in both media during stable periods. Denitrification was determined by the abundance of specific genes or their ratios as revealed by controlling factors. The enhanced nitrate removal could be due to increasing qnosZ or decreasing ∑qnir/qnosZ. Furthermore, NUA-DNBF solely reduced nitrate by increasing the denitrification enzyme activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Coexistence of nitrifying, anammox and denitrifying bacteria in a sequencing batch reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela eLangone

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Elevated nitrogen removal efficiencies from ammonium-rich wastewaters have been demonstrated by several applications, that combine nitritation and anammox processes. Denitrification will occur simultaneously when organic carbon is also present. In this study, the activity of aerobic ammonia oxidizing, anammox and denitrifying bacteria in a full scale Sequencing Batch Reactor, treating digester supernatants, was studied by means of batch-assays. AOB and anammox activities were maximum at pH of 8.0 and 7.8-8.0, rispectively. Short term effect of nitrite on anammox activity was studied, showing nitrite up to 42 mg/L did not result in inhibition. Both denitrification via nitrate and nitrite were measured. To reduce nitrite-oxidizing activity, high of NH3 – N (1.9-10 mg N-NH3/L and low nitrite (3-8 mg TNN/L are required conditions during the whole SBR cycle.Molecular analysis showed the nitritation-anammox sludge harbored a high microbial diversity, where each microorganism has a specific role. Using ammonia monooxygenase α –subunit (amoA gene as a marker, our analyses suggested different macro- and micro-environments in the reactor strongly affect the AOB community, allowing the development of different AOB species, such as N. europaea/eutropha and N. oligotropha groups, which improve the stability of nitritation process. A specific PCR primer set, used to target the 16S rRNA gene of anammox bacteria, confirmed the presence of the Ca. Brocadia fulgida type, able to grow in precence of organic matter and to tolerate high nitrite concentrations. The diversity of denitrifiers was assessed by using dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nirS gene-based analyses, who showed denitifiers were related to different betaproteobacterial genera, such as Thauera, Pseudomonas, Dechloromonas and Aromatoleum, able to assist in forming microbial aggregates. Concerning possible secondary processes, no n-damo bacteria were found while NOB from the genus of Nitrobacter

  5. Identification of quorum-sensing regulated proteins in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arevalo-Ferro, C.; Hentzer, Morten; Reil, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen which is responsible for severe nosocomial infections in immunocompromised patients and is the major pathogen in cystic fibrosis. The bacterium utilizes two interrelated quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which rely o...

  6. Detectie en beheersing van bacterierot veroorzaakt door Pseudomonas cattleyae in Phalaenopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludeking, D.J.W.; Hamelink, R.; Kromwijk, J.A.M.; Schenk, M.F.; Vermunt, A.; Woets, F.

    2011-01-01

    Phalaenopsis growers suffer from mayor losses up to 20% due to bacterial spot. This bacterial infection in caused by the Acidovorax avenae subsp. cattleyae. In practice this bacterial disease is also known as Pseudomonas. This bacterium is causing black leaf spots with a yellow border. Pseudomonas

  7. Investigations into the biosynthesis, regulation, and self-resistance of toxoflavin in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philmus, B.; Shaffer, B.T.; Kidarsa, T.A.; Yan, Q.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; Begley, T.P.; Loper, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas spp. are prolific producers of natural products from many structural classes. Here we show that the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 is capable of producing trace levels of the triazine natural product toxoflavin (1) under microaerobic conditions. We evaluated toxoflavin

  8. Isolation and characterization of arsenite oxidizing Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A bacterium, Pseudomonas lubricans, isolated from heavy metal laden industrial wastewater, has been shown to tolerate multiple heavy metals suggesting its importance in bioremediation of industrial effluents. P. lubricans tolerated As(III) up to 3 mg ml-1, Cu2+ up to 0.7 mg ml-1, Hg2+ up to 0.4 mg ml-1, Ni2+ up to 0.4 mg ...

  9. Effect of temperature on denitrifying methanotrophic activity of 'Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, C.; Piai, L.; Hendrickx, T.L.G.; Temmink, B.G.; Zeeman, G.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2014-01-01

    The activity of denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria at 11-30 degrees C was assessed in short-term experiments. The aim was to determine the feasibility of applying denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria in low-temperature anaerobic wastewater treatment. This study showed that biomass enriched at 21

  10. Nitrogen removal from synthetic wastewater using single and mixed culture systems of denitrifying fungi, bacteria, and actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenfeng; Cao, Lixiang; Tan, Hongming; Zhang, Renduo

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of single and mixed culture of denitrifying fungi, bacteria, and actinobacteria on nitrogen removal and N 2 O emission in treatment of wastewater. Denitrifying endophytes of Pseudomonas sp. B2, Streptomyces sp. A9, and Fusarium sp. F3 isolated from rice plants were utilized for treatment of synthetic wastewater containing nitrate and nitrite. Experiments were conducted under shaking and static conditions. Results showed that under the static condition, more than 97 % of nitrate removal efficiencies were reached in all the treatments containing B2. The nitrate removal rates within the first 12 h in the treatments of B2, B2+A9, B2+F3, and B2+A9+F3 were 7.3, 9.8, 11, and 11 mg L -1  h -1 , respectively. Under the shaking condition, 100 % of nitrite was removed in all the treatments containing B2. The presence of A9 and F3 with B2 increased the nitrite removal rates under both the shaking and static conditions. Compared to the B2 system, the mixed systems of B2+A9, B2+F3, and B2+A9+F3 reduced N 2 O emission (78.4 vs. 19.4, 1.80, and 0.03 μM in 4 weeks, respectively). Our results suggested that B2 is an important strain that enhances nitrogen removal from wastewater. Mixed cultures of B2 with A9 and F3 can remove more nitrate and nitrite from wastewater and reduce nitrite accumulation and N 2 O emission in the denitrification process.

  11. Hydrolytic potential of a psychrotrophic Pseudomonas isolated from refrigerated raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula F. Corrêa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of extracellular hydrolases by a psychrotrophic bacterium isolated from refrigerated raw milk, and identified as a Pseudomonas sp. belonging to the Pseudomonas jenssenii group, was studied. This bacterium produced proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes in all media investigated (skim milk, cheese whey, casein broth, and tryptone soy broth. High levels of α-glucosidase were produced in skim milk broth. Hydrolytic enzymes detected in skim milk broth are of particular concern, indicating that these enzymes could be produced by Pseudomonas sp. during the cold storage of raw milk, contributing to the spoilage problem in milk and dairy products.

  12. Warming-induced changes in denitrifier community structure modulate the ability of phototrophic river biofilms to denitrify

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulêtreau, Stéphanie, E-mail: stephanie.bouletreau@univ-tlse3.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, EcoLab, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Lyautey, Emilie [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, EcoLab, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Dubois, Sophie [Université de Bordeaux, EPOC - OASU, UMR 5805, Station Marine d' Arcachon, 2 rue du Professeur Jolyet, 33120 Arcachon (France); Compin, Arthur [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, EcoLab, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Delattre, Cécile; Touron-Bodilis, Aurélie [EDF Recherche et Développement, LNHE (Laboratoire National d' Hydraulique et Environnement), 6 quai Watier, F-78401 Chatou (France); Mastrorillo, Sylvain [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INP, EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, EcoLab, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Garabetian, Frédéric [Université de Bordeaux, EPOC - OASU, UMR 5805, Station Marine d' Arcachon, 2 rue du Professeur Jolyet, 33120 Arcachon (France)

    2014-01-01

    Microbial denitrification is the main nitrogen removing process in freshwater ecosystems. The aim of this study was to show whether and how water warming (+ 2.5 °C) drives bacterial diversity and structuring and how bacterial diversity affects denitrification enzymatic activity in phototrophic river biofilms (PRB). We used water warming associated to the immediate thermal release of a nuclear power plant cooling circuit to produce natural PRB assemblages on glass slides while testing 2 temperatures (mean temperature of 17 °C versus 19.5 °C). PRB were sampled at 2 sampling times during PRB accretion (6 and 21 days) in both temperatures. Bacterial community composition was assessed using ARISA. Denitrifier community abundance and denitrification gene mRNA levels were estimated by q-PCR and qRT-PCR, respectively, of 5 genes encoding catalytic subunits of the denitrification key enzymes. Denitrification enzyme activity (DEA) was measured by the acetylene-block assay at 20 °C. A mean water warming of 2.5 °C was sufficient to produce contrasted total bacterial and denitrifier communities and, therefore, to affect DEA. Indirect temperature effect on DEA may have varied between sampling time, increasing by up to 10 the denitrification rate of 6-day-old PRB and decreasing by up to 5 the denitrification rate of 21-day-old PRB. The present results suggest that indirect effects of warming through changes in bacterial community composition, coupled to the strong direct effect of temperature on DEA already demonstrated in PRB, could modulate dissolved nitrogen removal by denitrification in rivers and streams. - Highlights: •We produced river biofilms in 2 mean temperature conditions: 17 vs 19.5 °C. •We compared their denitrifiers' structuring and functioning in 6d- and 21d-old biofilms. •A difference of 2.5 °C produced contrasted denitrifier communities. •The indirect temperature effect on denitrification activity shifted between biofilm age.

  13. Genotypic and phenotypic analyses of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa chronic bronchiectasis isolate reveal differences from cystic fibrosis and laboratory strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varga, J.J.; Barbier, Mariette; Mulet, Xavier; Bielecki, Piotr; Bartell, J.A.; Owings, J.P.; Martinez-Ramos, Inmaculada; Hittle, L.E.; Davis, M.R.; Damron, F.H.; Liechti, G.W.; Puchałka, Jacek; Martins dos Santos, Vitor; Ernst, R.K.; Papin, J.A.; Albertí, Sebastian; Oliver, Antonio; Goldberg, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an environmentally ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterium and important opportunistic human pathogen, causing severe chronic respiratory infections in patients with underlying conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF) or bronchiectasis. In order to identify

  14. A denitrifying community associated with a major, marine nitrogen fixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Christopher J; Wyman, Michael

    2017-12-01

    The diazotrophic cyanobacterium, Trichodesmium, is an integral component of the marine nitrogen cycle and contributes significant amounts of new nitrogen to oligotrophic, tropical/subtropical ocean surface waters. Trichodesmium forms macroscopic, fusiform (tufts), spherical (puffs) and raft-like colonies that provide a pseudobenthic habitat for a host of other organisms including marine invertebrates, microeukaryotes and numerous other microbes. The diversity and activity of denitrifying bacteria found in association with the colonies was interrogated using a series of molecular-based methodologies targeting the gene encoding the terminal step in the denitrification pathway, nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ). Trichodesmium spp. sampled from geographically isolated ocean provinces (the Atlantic Ocean, the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean) were shown to harbor highly similar, taxonomically related communities of denitrifiers whose members are affiliated with the Roseobacter clade within the Rhodobacteraceae (Alphaproteobacteria). These organisms were actively expressing nosZ in samples taken from the mid-Atlantic Ocean and Red Sea implying that Trichodesmium colonies are potential sites of nitrous oxide consumption and perhaps earlier steps in the denitrification pathway also. It is proposed that coupled nitrification of newly fixed N is the most likely source of nitrogen oxides supporting nitrous oxide cycling within Trichodesmium colonies. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chitinase, a Gradually Secreted Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folders, J. (Jindra); Algra, J. (Jon); Roelofs, M.S. (Marc); Loon, L.C. van; Tommassen, J.P.M.; Bitter, Wilbert

    2001-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes many proteins into its extracellular environment via the type I, II, and III secretion systems. In this study, a gene, chiC, coding for an extracellular chitinolytic enzyme, was identified. The chiC gene encodes a polypeptide of 483 amino

  16. Dechlorination of 1,2– dichloroethane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of our attempt at isolating and stocking some indigenous microbial species, we isolated a bacterium from a waste dumpsite with appreciable dechlorination activity. 16S rDNA profiling revealed the isolate to be a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the sequence has been deposited in the NCBI nucleotide ...

  17. Enhanced alpha-galactosidase expression in pseudomonas chlororaphis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis is a non-pathogenic bacterium useful for fermentative production of biopolymer (i.e., poly(hydroxyalkanoates); PHA) and biosurfactant (i.e., rhamnolipid; RhL). In order to enable P. chlororaphis to better fermentatively utilize the residual soy sugars in soy molasses – a lo...

  18. Assessing carbon source-dependent phenotypic variability in Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikel, Pablo Ivan; de Lorenzo, Victor

    2018-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida is rapidly becoming a platform of choice for applications that require a microbial host highly resistant to different types of stresses and elevated rates of reducing power regeneration. P. putida is capable of growing in a wide variety of carbon sources...

  19. Enhanced performance of denitrifying sulfide removal process under micro-aerobic condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chuan; Ren Nanqi; Wang Aijie; Liu Lihong; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2010-01-01

    The denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) process with bio-granules comprising both heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrifiers can simultaneously convert nitrate, sulfide and acetate into di-nitrogen gas, elementary sulfur and carbon dioxide, respectively, at high loading rates. This study determines the reaction rate of sulfide oxidized into sulfur, as well as the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, would be enhanced under a micro-aerobic condition. The presence of limited oxygen mitigated the inhibition effects of sulfide on denitrifier activities, and enhanced the performance of DSR granules. The advantages and disadvantages of applying the micro-aerobic condition to the DSR process are discussed.

  20. Nitrogen removal from wastewater by anaerobic methane-driven denitrification in a lab-scale reactor: heterotrophic denitrifiers associated with denitrifying methanotrophs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhanfei; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Xu; Cai, Chaoyang; Geng, Sha; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Xinhua; Hu, Baolan

    2015-12-01

    Nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (n-damo) is a newly discovered bioprocess that reduces nitrite to dinitrogen with methane as electron donor, which has promising potential to remove nitrogen from wastewater. In this work, a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated for 609 days with methane as the sole external electron donor. In the SBR, nitrite in synthetic wastewater was removed continuously; the final volumetric nitrogen removal rate was 12.22±0.02 mg N L(-1) day(-1) and the percentage of nitrogen removal was 98.5 ± 0.2 %. Microbial community analysis indicated that denitrifying methanotrophs dominated (60-70 %) the population of the final sludge. Notably, activity testing and microbial analysis both suggested that heterotrophic denitrifiers existed in the reactor throughout the operation period. After 609 days, the activity testing indicated the nitrogen removal percentage of heterotrophic denitrification was 17 ± 2 % and that of n-damo was 83 ± 2 %. A possible mutualism may be developed between the dominated denitrifying methanotrophs and the associated heterotrophs through cross-feed. Heterotrophs may live on the microbial products excreted by denitrifying methanotrophs and provide growth factors that are required by denitrifying methanotrophs.

  1. Disruption of transporters affiliated with enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis gene cluster of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 has pleiotropic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluorescens) is a biocontrol bacterium that produces the siderophore enantio-pyochelin under conditions of iron starvation in a process that is often accompanied by the secretion of its biosynthesis intermediates, salicylic acid and dihydroaeruginoic ...

  2. Identification of active denitrifiers in full-scale nutrient removal wastewater treatment systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Szyszka, Anna; Starnawski, Piotr Marian

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is essential to the removal of nitrogen from wastewater during treatment, yet an understanding of the diversity of the active denitrifying bacteria responsible in full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) is lacking. In this study stable isotope probing (SIP) was applied...... in combination with microautoradiography (MAR)-fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) to identify the active denitrifiers in a full-scale WWTP with biological N and P removal. Recognising that a range of carbon sources likely drive denitrification, a fully 13 C-labelled complex substrate was used for SIP...... for their in situ characterisation. FISH and MAR confirmed that they were core active denitrifiers in the community. The SIP clone library was additionally represented by a phylogenetically diverse group of organisms, with many previously not considered as important denitrifiers. The combined approach of SIP...

  3. A preliminary study of anaerobic thiosulfate-oxidising bacteria as denitrifiers in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Chandramohan, D.; Nair, S.

    Bacteria which oxidize thiosulfate and reduce nitrate (TONRB) and bacteria which oxidize thiosulfate and denitrify (TODB) sampled at 5-, 100-, 200-and 300-m depths were enumerated in agar shake cultures by colony counting and by applying MPN...

  4. Elimination of pharmaceuticals in single- and three-stage pre-denitrifying MBBR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polesel, Fabio; Torresi, Elena; Loreggian, L.

    This study investigated the elimination of pharmaceuticals in pre-denitrifying moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) in single- and three-stage configurations. Under batch conditions, biotransformation and retransformation of two pharmaceuticals (trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole) occurred at comparab...

  5. Identification of the autotrophic denitrifying community in nitrate removal reactors by DNA-stable isotope probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wei; Li, Jinlong; Cong, Yuan; Gao, Wei; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Desheng

    2017-04-01

    Autotrophic denitrification has attracted increasing attention for wastewater with insufficient organic carbon sources. Nevertheless, in situ identification of autotrophic denitrifying communities in reactors remains challenging. Here, a process combining micro-electrolysis and autotrophic denitrification with high nitrate removal efficiency was presented. Two batch reactors were fed organic-free nitrate influent, with H 13 CO 3 - and H 12 CO 3 - as inorganic carbon sources. DNA-based stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) was used to obtain molecular evidence for autotrophic denitrifying communities. The results showed that the nirS gene was strongly labeled by H 13 CO 3 - , demonstrating that the inorganic carbon source was assimilated by autotrophic denitrifiers. High-throughput sequencing and clone library analysis identified Thiobacillus-like bacteria as the most dominant autotrophic denitrifiers. However, 88% of nirS genes cloned from the 13 C-labeled "heavy" DNA fraction showed low similarity with all culturable denitrifiers. These findings provided functional and taxonomical identification of autotrophic denitrifying communities, facilitating application of autotrophic denitrification process for wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatial variation in the bacterial and denitrifying bacterial community in a biofilter treating subsurface agricultural drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, J Malia; Porter, Matthew D; Rodríguez, Luis F; Kuehlhorn, Timothy; Cooke, Richard A C; Zhang, Yuanhui; Kent, Angela D; Zilles, Julie L

    2014-02-01

    Denitrifying biofilters can remove agricultural nitrates from subsurface drainage, reducing nitrate pollution that contributes to coastal hypoxic zones. The performance and reliability of natural and engineered systems dependent upon microbially mediated processes, such as the denitrifying biofilters, can be affected by the spatial structure of their microbial communities. Furthermore, our understanding of the relationship between microbial community composition and function is influenced by the spatial distribution of samples.In this study we characterized the spatial structure of bacterial communities in a denitrifying biofilter in central Illinois. Bacterial communities were assessed using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis for bacteria and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of nosZ for denitrifying bacteria.Non-metric multidimensional scaling and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) analyses indicated that bacteria showed statistically significant spatial structure by depth and transect,while denitrifying bacteria did not exhibit significant spatial structure. For determination of spatial patterns, we developed a package of automated functions for the R statistical environment that allows directional analysis of microbial community composition data using either ANOSIM or Mantel statistics.Applying this package to the biofilter data, the flow path correlation range for the bacterial community was 6.4 m at the shallower, periodically in undated depth and 10.7 m at the deeper, continually submerged depth. These spatial structures suggest a strong influence of hydrology on the microbial community composition in these denitrifying biofilters. Understanding such spatial structure can also guide optimal sample collection strategies for microbial community analyses.

  7. Pyruvic oxime nitrification and copper and nickel resistance by a Cupriavidus pauculus, an active heterotrophic nitrifier-denitrifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Miguel; Obrzydowski, Jennifer; Ayers, Mary; Virparia, Sonia; Wang, Meijing; Stefan, Kurtis; Linchangco, Richard; Castignetti, Domenic

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrophic nitrifiers synthesize nitrogenous gasses when nitrifying ammonium ion. A Cupriavidus pauculus, previously thought an Alcaligenes sp. and noted as an active heterotrophic nitrifier-denitrifier, was examined for its ability to produce nitrogen gas (N2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) while heterotrophically nitrifying the organic substrate pyruvic oxime [CH3-C(NOH)-COOH]. Neither N2 nor N2O were produced. Nucleotide and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the organism is a member of a genus (Cupriavidus) known for its resistance to metals and its metabolism of xenobiotics. The microbe (a Cupriavidus pauculus designated as C. pauculus strain UM1) was examined for its ability to perform heterotrophic nitrification in the presence of Cu(2+) and Ni(2+) and to metabolize the xenobiotic phenol. The bacterium heterotrophically nitrified well when either 1 mM Cu(2+) or 0.5 mM Ni(2+) was present in either enriched or minimal medium. The organism also used phenol as a sole carbon source in either the presence or absence of 1 mM Cu(2+) or 0.5 mM Ni(2+). The ability of this isolate to perform a number of different metabolisms, its noteworthy resistance to copper and nickel, and its potential use as a bioremediation agent are discussed.

  8. Pyruvic Oxime Nitrification and Copper and Nickel Resistance by a Cupriavidus pauculus, an Active Heterotrophic Nitrifier-Denitrifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ramirez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterotrophic nitrifiers synthesize nitrogenous gasses when nitrifying ammonium ion. A Cupriavidus pauculus, previously thought an Alcaligenes sp. and noted as an active heterotrophic nitrifier-denitrifier, was examined for its ability to produce nitrogen gas (N2 and nitrous oxide (N2O while heterotrophically nitrifying the organic substrate pyruvic oxime [CH3–C(NOH–COOH]. Neither N2 nor N2O were produced. Nucleotide and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the organism is a member of a genus (Cupriavidus known for its resistance to metals and its metabolism of xenobiotics. The microbe (a Cupriavidus pauculus designated as C. pauculus strain UM1 was examined for its ability to perform heterotrophic nitrification in the presence of Cu2+ and Ni2+ and to metabolize the xenobiotic phenol. The bacterium heterotrophically nitrified well when either 1 mM Cu2+ or 0.5 mM Ni2+ was present in either enriched or minimal medium. The organism also used phenol as a sole carbon source in either the presence or absence of 1 mM Cu2+ or 0.5 mM Ni2+. The ability of this isolate to perform a number of different metabolisms, its noteworthy resistance to copper and nickel, and its potential use as a bioremediation agent are discussed.

  9. Denitrification potential evaluation of a newly indigenous aerobic denitrifier isolated from largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides culture pond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuicui; Zhang, Kai; Xie, Jun; Liu, Qigen; Yu, Deguang; Wang, Guangjun; Yu, Ermeng; Gong, Wangbao; Li, Zhifei

    2017-10-01

    This work evaluates the application potential of a new indigenous aerobic denitrifier, strain Pseudomonas CW-2, isolated from a largemouth bass culture pond. The rate of ammonium-N removal by strain CW-2 was approximately 97% at a DO concentration of 5.2 mg/L. Furthermore, when nitrate and ammonia coexisted, the strain gave priority to assimilating ammonia, and thereafter to denitrification. Under optimal cultivation conditions, citrate and acetate were the carbon resources, C/N was 8, dissolved oxygen was 5.2 mg/L, and pH was 7; the removal rate of ammonium reached nearly 90%. The changing patterns of different bacteria in strain CW-2-treated and the control pond water were also compared. Lower levels of ammonia, nitrite, and phosphates were observed in the treated water as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, phylum-level distributions of the bacterial OTUs revealed that Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, and Nitrospirae continuously changed their relative abundances in relation to carbon and the addition of strain CW-2; this finding implies that the conventional denitrification process was weakened under the effects of carbon or the presence of strain CW-2. We propose that strain CW-2 is a promising organism for the removal of ammonium in intensive fish culture systems, according to our evaluations of its denitrification performance.

  10. Analysis of denitrifier community in a bioaugmented sequencing batch reactor for the treatment of coking wastewater containing pyridine and quinoline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yaohui; Xing, Rui; Wen, Donghui; Tang, Xiaoyan [Peking Univ., Beijing (CN). Key Lab. of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education); Sun, Qinghua [Peking Univ., Beijing (CN). Key Lab. of Water and Sediment Sciences (Ministry of Education); Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing (China). Inst. of Environmental Health and Related Product Safety

    2011-05-15

    The denitrifier community and associated nitrate and nitrite reduction in the bioaugmented and general sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) during the treatment of coking wastewater containing pyridine and quinoline were investigated. The efficiency and stability of nitrate and nitrite reduction in SBR was considerably improved after inoculation with four pyridine- or quinoline-degrading bacterial strains (including three denitrifying strains). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) based on the nosZ gene revealed that the structures of the denitrifier communities in bioaugmented and non-bioaugmented reactors were distinct and varied during the course of the experiment. Bioaugmentation protected indigenous denitrifiers from disruptions caused by pyridine and quinoline. Clone library analysis showed that one of the added denitrifiers comprised approximately 6% of the denitrifier population in the bioaugmented sludge. (orig.)

  11. Correlation of denitrification-accepted fraction of electrons with NAD(P)H fluorescence for Pseudomonas aeruginosa performing simultaneous denitrification and respiration at extremely low dissolved oxygen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fan; Xia, Qing; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2004-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis airway infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms a microaerobic biofilm and undergoes significant physiological changes. It is important to understand the bacterium's metabolism at microaerobic conditions. In this work, the culture properties and two indicators (the denitrification-accepted e- fraction and an NAD(P)H fluorescence fraction) for the culture's "fractional approach" to a fully anaerobic denitrifying state were examined in continuous cultures with practically zero DO but different aeration rates. With decreasing aeration, specific OUR decreased while specific NAR and NIR increased and kept Y(ATP/S) relatively constant. P. aeruginosa thus appeared to effectively compensate for energy generation at microaerobic conditions with denitrification. At the studied dilution rate of 0.06 h(-1), the maximum specific OUR was 2.8 mmol O2/g cells-h and the Monod constant for DO, in the presence of nitrate, was extremely low (Y(X/S) increased significantly (from 0.24 to 0.34) with increasing aeration, attributed to a roughly opposite trend of Y(ATP/X) (ATP generation required for cell growth). As for the denitrification-accepted e- fraction and the fluorescence fraction, both decreased with increasing aeration as expected. The two fractions, however, were not directly proportional. The fluorescence fraction changed more rapidly than the e- fraction at very low aeration rates, whereas the opposite was true at higher aeration. The results demonstrated the feasibility of using online NAD(P)H fluorescence to monitor sensitive changes of cellular physiology and provided insights to the shift of e- -accepting mechanisms of P. aeruginosa under microaerobic conditions.

  12. Pseudomonas matsuisoli sp. nov., isolated from a soil sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yao; Hameed, Asif; Hung, Mei-Hua; Liu, You-Cheng; Hsu, Yi-Han; Young, Li-Sen; Young, Chiu-Chung

    2015-03-01

    An aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped and polar-flagellated bacterium, designated strain CC-MHH0089(T), was isolated from a soil sample taken on Matsu Island (Taiwan). Strain CC-MHH0089(T) grew at 15-30 °C and pH 5.0-10.0 and tolerated ≤8 % (w/v) NaCl. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed high pairwise sequence similarity to Pseudomonas azotifigens 6H33b(T) (97.3 %) and Pseudomonas balearica SP1402(T) (96.7 %) and lower sequence similarity to other strains (Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas matsuisoli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CC-MHH0089(T) ( = BCRC 80771(T) = JCM 30078(T)). © 2015 IUMS.

  13. Isolation and characteristic of an aerobic denitrifier with high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... nitrate loads, the cell exhibits different degree of autolysis which may be caused by the high pH produced by the denitrification and the toxicity of the high concentration of nitrite. Utilization of nitrite under aerobic conditions. Nitrite is one of the main intermediate of denitrification and toxic to the bacterium.

  14. Detection of Tox A Gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Dairy Products Using PCR and Determining the Antibiotic Resistance Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faeze Zadsafar

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: Due to high presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in raw milk and existence of antibiotic resistance genes in this bacterium, applying appropriate strategies for hygiene control in animal husbandries, is necessary to prevent the spread of bacteria.

  15. Effect of pH on the denitrifying enzyme activity in pasture soils in relation to the intrinsic differences in denitrifier communities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čuhel, Jiří; Šimek, Miloslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 3 (2011), s. 230-235 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06066; GA AV ČR IAA600660605 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : pH * denitrifying enzyme activity * pasture soils Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.677, year: 2011

  16. Mechanisms of nitrous oxide (N2O) formation and reduction in denitrifying biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabba, Fabrizio; Picioreanu, Cristian; Nerenberg, Robert

    2017-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) is a potent greenhouse gas that can be formed in wastewater treatment processes by ammonium oxidizing and denitrifying microorganisms. While N 2 O emissions from suspended growth systems have been extensively studied, and some recent studies have addressed emissions from nitrifying biofilms, much less is known about N 2 O emissions from denitrifying biofilm processes. This research used modeling to evaluate the mechanisms of N 2 O formation and reduction in denitrifying biofilms. The kinetic model included formation and consumption of key denitrification species, including nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), nitric oxide (NO), and N 2 O. The model showed that, in presence of excess of electron donor, denitrifying biofilms have two distinct layers of activity: an outer layer where there is net production of N 2 O and an inner layer where there is net consumption. The presence of oxygen (O 2 ) had an important effect on N 2 O emission from suspended growth systems, but a smaller effect on biofilm systems. The effects of NO3- and O 2 differed significantly based on the biofilm thickness. Overall, the effects of biofilm thickness and bulk substrate concentrations on N 2 O emissions are complex and not always intuitive. A key mechanism for denitrifying biofilms is the diffusion of N 2 O and other intermediates from one zone of the biofilm to another. This leads to zones of N 2 O formation or consumption transformations that would not exist in suspended growth systems. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Impact of Land Use Management and Soil Properties on Denitrifier Communities of Namibian Savannas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braker, Gesche; Matthies, Diethart; Hannig, Michael; Brandt, Franziska Barbara; Brenzinger, Kristof; Gröngröft, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We studied potential denitrification activity and the underlying denitrifier communities in soils from a semiarid savanna ecosystem of the Kavango region in NE Namibia to help in predicting future changes in N(2)O emissions due to continuing changes of land use in this region. Soil type and land use (pristine, fallow, and cultivated soils) influenced physicochemical characteristics of the soils that are relevant to denitrification activity and N(2)O fluxes from soils and affected potential denitrification activity. Potential denitrification activity was assessed by using the denitrifier enzyme activity (DEA) assay as a proxy for denitrification activity in the soil. Soil type and land use influenced C and N contents of the soils. Pristine soils that had never been cultivated had a particularly high C content. Cultivation reduced soil C content and the abundance of denitrifiers and changed the composition of the denitrifier communities. DEA was strongly and positively correlated with soil C content and was higher in pristine than in fallow or recently cultivated soils. Soil type and the composition of both the nirK- and nirS-type denitrifier communities also influenced DEA. In contrast, other soil characteristics like N content, C:N ratio, and pH did not predict DEA. These findings suggest that due to greater availability of soil organic matter, and hence a more effective N cycling, the natural semiarid grasslands emit more N(2)O than managed lands in Namibia.

  18. PutidaNET: Interactome database service and network analysis of Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Seong-Jin; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Jho, Seong-Woong; Ryu, Jea-Woon; Park, Daeui; Lee, Kyung-A; Bhak, Jong; Kim, Seung Il

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Pseudomonas putida KT2440 (P. putida KT2440) is a highly versatile saprophytic soil bacterium. It is a certified bio-safety host for transferring foreign genes. Therefore, the bacterium is used as a model organism for genetic and physiological studies and for the development of biotechnological applications. In order to provide a more systematic application of the organism, we have constructed a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis system of P. putida KT2440....

  19. Abundance and diversity of denitrifying and anammox bacteria in seasonally hypoxic and sulfidic sediments of the saline lake grevelingen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipsewers, Yvonne A.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Meysman, Filip J.R.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Villanueva, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Denitrifying and anammox bacteria are involved in the nitrogen cycling in marine sediments but the environmental factors that regulate the relative importance of these processes are not well constrained. Here, we evaluated the abundance, diversity, and potential activity of denitrifying, anammox,

  20. Abundance and Diversity of Denitrifying and Anammox Bacteria in Seasonally Hypoxic and Sulfidic Sediments of the Saline Lake Grevelingen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipsewers, Y.A.; Hopmans, E.C.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Villanueva, L.

    2016-01-01

    Denitrifying and anammox bacteria are involved in the nitrogen cycling in marine sediments but the environmental factors that regulate the relative importance of these processes are not well constrained. Here, we evaluated the abundance, diversity, and potential activity of denitrifying, anammox,

  1. Genetic characterization of denitrifier communities with contrasting intrinsic functional traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braker, Gesche; Dörsch, Peter; Bakken, Lars R

    2012-02-01

    Microorganisms capable of denitrification are polyphyletic and exhibit distinct denitrification regulatory phenotypes (DRP), and thus, denitrification in soils could be controlled by community composition. In a companion study (Dörsch et al., 2012) and preceding work, ex situ denitrification assays of three organic soils demonstrated profoundly different functional traits including N(2) O/N(2) ratios. Here, we explored the composition of the underlying denitrifier communities by analyzing the abundance and structure of denitrification genes (nirK, nirS, and nosZ). The relative abundance of nosZ (vs. nirK + nirS) was similar for all communities, and hence, the low N(2) O reductase activity in one of the soils was not because of the lack of organisms with this gene. Similarity in community composition between the soils was generally low for nirK and nirS, but not for nosZ. The community with the most robust denitrification (consistently low N(2) O/N(2) ) had the highest diversity/richness of nosZ and nirK, but not of nirS. Contrary results found for a second soil agreed with impaired denitrification (low overall denitrification activity, high N(2) O/N(2) ). In conclusion, differences in community composition and in the absolute abundance of denitrification genes clearly reflected the functional differences observed in laboratory studies and may shed light on differences in in situ N(2) O emission of the soils. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Concurrent activity of anammox and denitrifying bacteria in the Black Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, John B; Fuchsman, Clara A; Yakushev, Evgeniy; Staley, James T; Murray, James W

    2012-01-01

    After the discovery of ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation (anammox) in the environment, the role of heterotrophic denitrification as the main marine pathway for fixed N loss has been questioned. A 3 part, 15 month time series investigating nitrite reductase (nirS) mRNA transcripts at a single location in the Black Sea was conducted in order to better understand the activity of anammox and denitrifying bacteria. Here we show that both of these groups were active, as well as being concurrent in the lower suboxic zone over this time span. Their distributions, however, differed in that only expression of denitrification-type nirS was seen in the upper suboxic zone, where geochemistry was variable. Depth profiles covering the suboxic zone showed that the four groups of anammox-type sequences were expressed consistently in the lower suboxic zone, and were consistent with anammox 16 S rDNA gene profiles. By contrast, denitrifier-type nirS sequence groups were mixed; some groups exhibited consistent expression in the lower suboxic zone, while others appeared less consistent. Co-occurrence of both anammox and denitrifier expression was common and ongoing. Both types of transcripts were also found in samples with low concentrations of sulfide (>2 μM). Six major groups of denitrifier-type nirS transcripts were identified, and several groups of denitrifier-type nirS transcripts were closely related to sequences from the Baltic Sea. An increase in denitrifier-type nirS transcript diversity and depth range in October 2007 corresponded to a small increase in mixed layer net community productivity (NCP) as measured by O(2)/Ar gas ratios, as well as to an increase in N(2) concentrations in the suboxic zone. Taken together, the variations in expression patterns between anammox and denitrification provide one possible explanation as to how near instantaneous rate measurements, such as isotope spike experiments, may regularly detect anammox activity but underreport denitrification.

  3. Concurrent Activity of Anammox and Denitrifying Bacteria in the Black Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Kirkpatrick

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available After the discovery of ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation (anammox in the Black Sea in 2003, the role of heterotrophic denitrification as the main marine pathway for fixed N loss was questioned. A 3 part, 15 month time series investigating Black Sea nitrite reductase (nirS mRNA transcripts at a single location was conducted in order to better understand the activity of anammox and denitrifying bacteria. Here we show that both of these groups were active, as well as being concurrent in the lower suboxic zone over this time span. Their distributions, however, were fundamentally different; denitrification expression was much more variable. Depth profiles covering the suboxic zone showed that the four groups of anammox-type sequences were expressed consistently in the lower suboxic zone, and were consistent with anammox 16S rDNA gene profiles. By contrast, denitrifier-type nirS sequence groups were mixed; half of the groups exhibited consistent expression in the lower suboxic zone, while others varied between season and depth. Co-occurrence of both anammox and denitrifier expression was common and ongoing. Both types of transcripts were also found in samples with low concentrations of sulfide ( >2 μM. 6 major groups of denitrifier-type nirS transcripts were identified, making these transcripts more diverse than previous DNA clone libraries. Several groups of denitrifier-type nirS transcripts were closely related to sequences from the Baltic Sea. An increase in denitrifier-type nirS transcript diversity and depth range in October 2007 corresponded to an increase in mixed layer net community productivity as measured by O2/Ar gas ratios, as well as to an increase in N2 concentrations in the upper suboxic zone. Taken together, the variations in expression patterns between anammox and denitrification provide one explanation as to how near instantaneous rate measurements, such as isotope spike experiments, may regularly detect anammox activity but underreport

  4. Soil properties impacting denitrifier community size, structure, and activity in New Zealand dairy-grazed pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Neha; Saggar, Surinder; Giltrap, Donna; Tillman, Russ; Deslippe, Julie

    2017-09-01

    Denitrification is an anaerobic respiration process that is the primary contributor of the nitrous oxide (N2O) produced from grassland soils. Our objective was to gain insight into the relationships between denitrifier community size, structure, and activity for a range of pasture soils. We collected 10 dairy pasture soils with contrasting soil textures, drainage classes, management strategies (effluent irrigation or non-irrigation), and geographic locations in New Zealand, and measured their physicochemical characteristics. We measured denitrifier abundance by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and assessed denitrifier diversity and community structure by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of the nitrite reductase (nirS, nirK) and N2O reductase (nosZ) genes. We quantified denitrifier enzyme activity (DEA) using an acetylene inhibition technique. We investigated whether varied soil conditions lead to different denitrifier communities in soils, and if so, whether they are associated with different denitrification activities and are likely to generate different N2O emissions. Differences in the physicochemical characteristics of the soils were driven mainly by soil mineralogy and the management practices of the farms. We found that nirS and nirK communities were strongly structured along gradients of soil water and phosphorus (P) contents. By contrast, the size and structure of the nosZ community was unrelated to any of the measured soil characteristics. In soils with high water content, the richnesses and abundances of nirS, nirK, and nosZ genes were all significantly positively correlated with DEA. Our data suggest that management strategies to limit N2O emissions through denitrification are likely to be most important for dairy farms on fertile or allophanic soils during wetter periods. Finally, our data suggest that new techniques that would selectively target nirS denitrifiers may be the most effective for limiting N2O

  5. Nitrous oxide emission and denitrifier communities in drip-irrigated calcareous soil as affected by chemical and organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Rui; Wakelin, Steven A; Liang, Yongchao; Hu, Baowei; Chu, Guixin

    2018-01-15

    The effects of consecutive application of chemical fertilizer with or without organic fertilizer on soil N 2 O emissions and denitrifying community structure in a drip-irrigated field were determined. The four fertilizer treatments were (i) unfertilized, (ii) chemical fertilizer, (iii) 60% chemical fertilizer plus cattle manure, and (iv) 60% chemical fertilizer plus biofertilizer. The treatments with organic amendments (i.e. cattle manure and biofertilizer) reduced cumulative N 2 O emissions by 4.9-9.9%, reduced the N 2 O emission factor by 1.3-42%, and increased denitrifying enzyme activities by 14.3-56.2%. The nirK gene copy numbers were greatest in soil which received only chemical fertilizer. In contrast, nirS- and nosZ-copy numbers were greatest in soil amended with chemical fertilizer plus biofertilizer. Chemical fertilizer application with or without organic fertilizer significantly changed the community structure of nirK-type denitrifiers relative to the unfertilized soil. In comparison, the nirS- and nosZ-type denitrifier genotypes varied in treatments receiving organic fertilizer but not chemical fertilizer alone. The changes in the denitrifier communities were closely associated with soil organic carbon (SOC), NO 3 - , NH 4 + , water holding capacity, and soil pH. Modeling indicated that N 2 O emissions in this soil were primarily associated with the abundance of nirS type denitrifying bacteria, SOC, and NO 3 - . Overall, our findings indicate that (i) the organic fertilizers increased denitrifying enzyme activity, increased denitrifying-bacteria gene copy numbers, but reduced N 2 O emissions, and (ii) nirS- and nosZ-type denitrifiers were more sensitive than nirK-type denitrifiers to the organic fertilizers. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Characterization of the denitrifying fraction of phosphate accumulating organisms in biological phosphate removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinhold, Jens; Filipe, Carlos D.M.; Daigger, Glen T.

    1999-01-01

    Results of experimental investigations are presented that strongly support the hypothesis that PAO from activated sludge systems consist of two groups: a) denitrifying PAO (DNPAO) capable of using oxygen and nitrate and b) non-denitrifying PAO (non-DNPAO) only able to use oxygen. Batch experiments...... fractions of PAO are performed and compared. This study extends on previously reported results (Kerrn-Jespersen and Henze, 1993) in that the pH was controlled to around pH 7 to assure that phosphate precipitation was minimal, and in the measurement of PHB and PHV. With regards to the latter, the paper also...... Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sepsis Sharps Safety - CDC Transplant Safety Vaccine Safety Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... and/or help treat infections? What is a Pseudomonas infection? Pseudomonas infection is caused by strains of ...

  8. Chemical and Metabolic Aspects of Antimetabolite Toxins Produced by Pseudomonas syringae Pathovars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Arrebola

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae is a phytopathogenic bacterium present in a wide variety of host plants where it causes diseases with economic impact. The symptoms produced by Pseudomonas syringae include chlorosis and necrosis of plant tissues, which are caused, in part, by antimetabolite toxins. This category of toxins, which includes tabtoxin, phaseolotoxin and mangotoxin, is produced by different pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae. These toxins are small peptidic molecules that target enzymes of amino acids’ biosynthetic pathways, inhibiting their activity and interfering in the general nitrogen metabolism. A general overview of the toxins’ chemistry, biosynthesis, activity, virulence and potential applications will be reviewed in this work.

  9. Structural characterization of pyoverdines produced by Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baune, Matthias; Qi, Yulin; Scholz, Karen; Volmer, Dietrich A; Hayen, Heiko

    2017-08-01

    The previously unknown sequences of several pyoverdines (PVD) produced by a biotechnologically-relevant bacterium, namely, Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120, were characterized by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The same structural characterization scheme was checked before by analysis of Pseudomonas sp. putida KT2440 samples with known PVDs. A new sample preparation strategy based on solid-phase extraction was developed, requiring significantly reduced sample material as compared to existing methods. Chromatographic separation was performed using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with gradient elution. Interestingly, no signals for apoPVDs were detected in these analyses, only the corresponding aluminum(III) and iron(III) complexes were seen. The chromatographic separation readily enabled separation of PVD complexes according to their individual structures. HPLC-HRMS and complementary fragmentation data from collision-induced dissociation and electron capture dissociation enabled the structural characterization of the investigated pyoverdines. In Pseudomonas sp. putida KT2240 samples, the known pyoverdines G4R and G4R A were readily confirmed. No PVDs have been previously described for Pseudomonas sp. taiwanensis VLB120. In our study, we identified three new PVDs, which only differed in their acyl side chains (succinic acid, succinic amide and malic acid). Peptide sequencing by MS/MS provided the sequence Orn-Asp-OHAsn-Thr-AcOHOrn-Ser-cOHOrn. Of particular interest is the presence of OHAsn, which has not been reported as PVD constituent before.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of an Active Heterotrophic Nitrifier-Denitrifier, Cupriavidus pauculus UM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putonti, Catherine; Polley, Nathaniel; Castignetti, Domenic

    2018-02-08

    Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Cupriavidus pauculus UM1, a metal-resistant heterotrophic nitrifier-denitrifier capable of synthesizing nitrite from pyruvic oxime. The size of the genome is 7,402,815 bp with a GC content of 64.8%. This draft assembly consists of 38 scaffolds. Copyright © 2018 Putonti et al.

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of an Active Heterotrophic Nitrifier-Denitrifier, Cupriavidus pauculus UM1

    OpenAIRE

    Putonti, Catherine; Polley, Nathaniel; Castignetti, Domenic

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we present the draft genome sequence of Cupriavidus pauculus UM1, a metal-resistant heterotrophic nitrifier-denitrifier capable of synthesizing nitrite from pyruvic oxime. The size of the genome is 7,402,815 bp with a GC content of 64.8%. This draft assembly consists of 38 scaffolds.

  12. nirS-type denitrifying bacterial assemblages respond to environmental conditions of a shallow estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa, Jessica A; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B; Song, Bongkeun

    2017-12-01

    Molecular analysis of dissimilatory nitrite reductase genes (nirS) was conducted using a customized microarray containing 165 nirS probes (archetypes) to identify members of sedimentary denitrifying communities. The goal of this study was to examine denitrifying community responses to changing environmental variables over spatial and temporal scales in the New River Estuary (NRE), NC, USA. Multivariate statistical analyses revealed three denitrifier assemblages and uncovered 'generalist' and 'specialist' archetypes based on the distribution of archetypes within these assemblages. Generalists, archetypes detected in all samples during at least one season, were commonly world-wide found in estuarine and marine ecosystems, comprised 8%-29% of the abundant NRE archetypes. Archetypes found in a particular site, 'specialists', were found to co-vary based on site specific conditions. Archetypes specific to the lower estuary in winter were designated Cluster I and significantly correlated by sediment Chl a and porewater Fe 2+ . A combination of specialist and more widely distributed archetypes formed Clusters II and III, which separated based on salinity and porewater H 2 S respectively. The co-occurrence of archetypes correlated with different environmental conditions highlights the importance of habitat type and niche differentiation among nirS-type denitrifying communities and supports the essential role of individual community members in overall ecosystem function. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Plastic biofilm carrier after corn cobs reduces nitrate loading in laboratory denitrifying bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrate-nitrogen removal rates can be increased substantially in denitrifying bioreactors with a corn cob bed medium compared to woodchips; however, additional organic carbon (C) is released into the effluent. This laboratory column experiment was conducted to test the performance of a post-bed cha...

  14. Optimizing hydraulic retention times in denitrifying woodchip bioreactors treating recirculating aquaculture system wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    The performance of wood-based denitrifying bioreactors to treat high-nitrate wastewaters from aquaculture systems has not previously been demonstrated. Four pilot-scale woodchip bioreactors (approximately 1:10 scale) were constructed and operated for 268 d to determine the optimal range of design hy...

  15. Pseudomonads Isolated from Pristine Background Groundwater Proliferate More Effectively in Co-culture than in Monoculture Under Denitrifying Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaring, A. B.; Lancaster, A.; Novichkov, P.; Adams, M. W. W.; Deutschbauer, A. M.; Chakraborty, R.

    2016-12-01

    As part of the Ecosystems and Networks Integrated with Genes and Molecular Assemblies (ENIGMA) consortium, we study the microbial community at the U.S. Department of Energy's Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge. The groundwater at this site contains plumes of nitrate with concentrations up to 14,000mg/L among other contaminants, though molybdenum concentrations are low. Because molybdenum is essential to nitrate reduction, this can be inhibitory to growth. Several strains of Pseudomonas were isolated from the same background groundwater sample. These isolates utilized diverse carbon sources ranging from acetate to glucose while growing under denitrifying conditions. The strains were also screened for nitrate tolerance and a couple of them were shown to be tolerant to 300-400 mM nitrate under anaerobic conditions. In the field site the bacteria live in consortia rather than in isolation, therefore we hypothesized that growth of these strains will be more robust in co-culture, as the denitrification pathway was segmented between the species. Three of the isolates (Pseudomonas fluorescens strains N1B4, N2E2, N2E3) were selected for in-depth analysis based on growth in pairwise co-cultures relative to monocultures, and the availability of the relevant genetic tools, such as transposon mutant libraries. Full genome sequencing showed that strain N2E3 has a truncated dentrification pathway: it lacks nitrous oxide reductase. Our results show strain N2E2 grow to maximum cell density an average of 45 hours more quickly when grown with strain N2E3 than in monoculture. Utilizing RB-TnSeq libraries of our strains, it was also found that some genes involved in nitrate reduction, sulfate permeability, molybdenum utilization, and anaerobic reduction are important for growth under these conditions. In addition, a few unexpected genes were also shown to be positively correlated to growth, such as genes homologous to genes for DNA proofreading or antibiotic production. These

  16. Abundance and Diversity of Denitrifying and Anammox Bacteria in Seasonally Hypoxic and Sulfidic Sediments of the Saline Lake Grevelingen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsewers, Yvonne A.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Meysman, Filip J. R.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Villanueva, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Denitrifying and anammox bacteria are involved in the nitrogen cycling in marine sediments but the environmental factors that regulate the relative importance of these processes are not well constrained. Here, we evaluated the abundance, diversity, and potential activity of denitrifying, anammox, and sulfide-dependent denitrifying bacteria in the sediments of the seasonally hypoxic saline Lake Grevelingen, known to harbor an active microbial community involved in sulfur oxidation pathways. Depth distributions of 16S rRNA gene, nirS gene of denitrifying and anammox bacteria, aprA gene of sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and ladderane lipids of anammox bacteria were studied in sediments impacted by seasonally hypoxic bottom waters. Samples were collected down to 5 cm depth (1 cm resolution) at three different locations before (March) and during summer hypoxia (August). The abundance of denitrifying bacteria did not vary despite of differences in oxygen and sulfide availability in the sediments, whereas anammox bacteria were more abundant in the summer hypoxia but in those sediments with lower sulfide concentrations. The potential activity of denitrifying and anammox bacteria as well as of sulfur-oxidizing, including sulfide-dependent denitrifiers and sulfate-reducing bacteria, was potentially inhibited by the competition for nitrate and nitrite with cable and/or Beggiatoa-like bacteria in March and by the accumulation of sulfide in the summer hypoxia. The simultaneous presence and activity of organoheterotrophic denitrifying bacteria, sulfide-dependent denitrifiers, and anammox bacteria suggests a tight network of bacteria coupling carbon-, nitrogen-, and sulfur cycling in Lake Grevelingen sediments. PMID:27812355

  17. Abundance and diversity of denitrifying and anammox bacteria in seasonally hypoxic and sulfidic sediments of the saline Lake Grevelingen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne A. Lipsewers

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Denitrifying and anammox bacteria are involved in the nitrogen cycling in marine sediments but the environmental factors that regulate the relative importance of these processes are not well constrained. Here, we evaluated the abundance, diversity and potential activity of denitrifying, anammox, and sulfide-dependent denitrifying bacteria in the sediments of the seasonally hypoxic saline Lake Grevelingen, known to harbor an active microbial community involved in sulfur oxidation pathways. Depth distributions of 16S rRNA gene, nirS gene of denitrifying and anammox bacteria, aprA gene of sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and ladderane lipids of anammox bacteria were studied in sediments impacted by seasonally hypoxic bottom waters. Samples were collected down to 5 cm depth (1 cm resolution at three different locations before (March and during summer hypoxia (August. The abundance of denitrifying bacteria did not vary despite of differences in oxygen and sulfide availability in the sediments, whereas anammox bacteria were more abundant in the summer hypoxia but in those sediments with lower sulfide concentrations. The potential activity of denitrifying and anammox bacteria as well as of sulfur-oxidizing, including sulfide-dependent denitrifiers and sulfate-reducing bacteria, was potentially inhibited by the competition for nitrate and nitrite with cable and/or Beggiatoa-like bacteria in March and by the accumulation of sulfide in the summer hypoxia. The simultaneous presence and activity of organoheterotrophic denitrifying bacteria, sulfide-dependent denitrifiers and anammox bacteria suggests a tight network of bacteria coupling carbon-, nitrogen- and sulfur cycling in Lake Grevelingen sediments.

  18. C1 compounds as auxiliary substrate for engineered Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, F.W.; De Winde, J.H.; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered to efficiently utilize the C1 compounds methanol and formaldehyde as auxiliary substrate. The hps and phi genes of Bacillus brevis, encoding two key steps of the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway, were introduced to construct a

  19. Rhizoplane colonisation of peas by Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae and a deleterious Pseudomonas putida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berggren, I.; Alstrom, S.; Vuurde, van J.W.L.; Martensson, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain angstrom 313, a deleterious rhizosphere bacterium, reduced pea nitrogen content when inoculated alone or in combination with Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae on plants in the presence of soil under greenhouse conditions. When plants were grown gnotobiotically in liquid

  20. Complete genome sequence of the naphthalene-degrading Pseudomonas putida strain ND6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanshan; Zhao, Huabing; Li, Yaxiao; Niu, Shumin; Cai, Baoli

    2012-09-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain ND6 is an efficient naphthalene-degrading bacterium. The complete genome of strain ND6 was sequenced and annotated. The genes encoding the enzymes involved in catechol degradation by the ortho-cleavage pathway were found in the chromosomal sequence, which indicated that strain ND6 is able to metabolize naphthalene by the catechol meta- and ortho-cleavage pathways.

  1. Establishment of oxidative D-xylose metabolism in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijnen, J.P.; Winde, J.H. de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative D-xylose catabolic pathway of Caulobacter crescentus, encoded by the xylXABCD operon, was expressed in the gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12. This engineered transformant strain was able to grow on D-xylose as a sole carbon source with a biomass yield of 53% (based on g

  2. The rare codon AGA is involved in regulation of pyoluteorin biosynthesis in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 can colonize root and seed surfaces of many plants, protecting them from infection by plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. This capacity to suppress disease is attributed in part to Pf-5’s production of a large spectrum of antibiotics, which is controll...

  3. Engineering Pseudomonas putida S12 for efficient utilization of D-Xylose and L-Arabinose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijnen, J.P.; Winde, J.H. de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    The solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered to utilize xylose as a substrate by expressing xylose isomerase (XylA) and xylulokinase (XylB) from Escherichia coli. The initial yield on xylose was low (9% [g CDW g substrate−1], where CDW is cell dry weight), and the growth rate

  4. Genomics-guided discovery of secondary metabolites and their regulation in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a well-characterized rhizosphere bacterium known for its production of a diverse spectrum of secondary metabolites and its capacity to suppress plant diseases caused by soilborne fungal, bacterial and oomycete pathogens. Metabolites produced by Pf-5 include 2,4-...

  5. Characterization of the epoxide hydrolase from an epichlorohydrin-degrading Pseudomonas sp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Mariken H.J.; van den Wijngaard, Abraham; Pentenga, Marjan; Janssen, Dick B.

    1991-01-01

    An epoxide hydrolase was purified to homogeneity from the epichlorohydrin-utilizing bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain AD1. The enzyme was found to be a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 35 kDa. With epichlorohydrin as the substrate, the enzyme followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a Km

  6. Ni 2-uptake in Pseudomonas putida strain S4: a possible role of Mg ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Essential metal ion homeostasis is based on regulated uptake of metal ions, both during its scarcity and abundance. Pseudomonas putida strain S4, a multimetal resistant bacterium, was employed to investigate Ni2+ entry into cells. It was observed that Mg2+ regulates the entry of Ni2+ and by this plays a protective role to ...

  7. Genome-wide identification of tolerance mechanisms towards p-coumaric acid in Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calero, Patricia; Jensen, Sheila I.; Bojanovič, Klara

    2017-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 has gained increasing biotechnological interest due to its ability to tolerate different types of stress. Here, the tolerance of P. putida KT2440 towards eleven toxic chemical compounds was investigated. P. putida was found to be significantly more...

  8. Pseudomonas screening assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Ruth (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A method for the detection of Pseudomonas bacteria is described where an Azurin-specific antibody is employed for detecting the presence of Azurin in a test sample. The detection of the presence of Azurin in the sample is a conclusive indicator of the presence of the Pseudomonas bacteria since the Azurin protein is a specific marker for this bacterial strain.

  9. High-rate biological denitrification in the cyclic rotating-bed biological reactor: Effect of COD/NO3(-), nitrate concentration and salinity and the phylogenetic analysis of denitrifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Seyed Javad; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Yaghmaeian, Kamyar

    2015-12-01

    The effects of COD/NO3(-) ratio, nitrate concentration and salinity was tested on the performance of the CRBR in denitrification with catechol as carbon source. The maximum nitrate reduction attained at COD/NO3(-) ratio of 1. The CRBR operated at optimum COD/NO3(-) ratio could completely denitrify the nitrate at inlet concentration up to 1250mg/L without nitrite accumulation. The maximum denitrification rate in the CRBR was 3.56kgNO3(-)/m(3)d with a nitrate reduction efficiency of 99% when the bioreactor was operated at inlet nitrate loading rate of 3.6kgNO3(-)/m(3)d. The denitrification performance of the CRBR was not affected significantly by NaCl concentrations up to 20g/L. 16S rRNA fragment and phylogenetic analysis identified Pseudomonas resinovorans, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Bacillus cereus as the most abundant denitrifiers in biomass. Accordingly, the CRBR is a high-rate bioreactor and appropriate technology for treatment of nitrate-laden industrial wastewaters containing phenolic compounds and salinity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Soil denitrifier community size changes with land use change to perennial bioenergy cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Karen A.; Deen, Bill; Dunfield, Kari E.

    2016-10-01

    Dedicated biomass crops are required for future bioenergy production. However, the effects of large-scale land use change (LUC) from traditional annual crops, such as corn-soybean rotations to the perennial grasses (PGs) switchgrass and miscanthus, on soil microbial community functioning is largely unknown. Specifically, ecologically significant denitrifying communities, which regulate N2O production and consumption in soils, may respond differently to LUC due to differences in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) inputs between crop types and management systems. Our objective was to quantify bacterial denitrifying gene abundances as influenced by corn-soybean crop production compared to PG biomass production. A field trial was established in 2008 at the Elora Research Station in Ontario, Canada (n  =  30), with miscanthus and switchgrass grown alongside corn-soybean rotations at different N rates (0 and 160 kg N ha-1) and biomass harvest dates within PG plots. Soil was collected on four dates from 2011 to 2012 and quantitative PCR was used to enumerate the total bacterial community (16S rRNA) and communities of bacterial denitrifiers by targeting nitrite reductase (nirS) and N2O reductase (nosZ) genes. Miscanthus produced significantly larger yields and supported larger nosZ denitrifying communities than corn-soybean rotations regardless of management, indicating large-scale LUC from corn-soybean to miscanthus may be suitable in variable Ontario climatic conditions and under varied management, while potentially mitigating soil N2O emissions. Harvesting switchgrass in the spring decreased yields in N-fertilized plots, but did not affect gene abundances. Standing miscanthus overwinter resulted in higher 16S rRNA and nirS gene copies than in fall-harvested crops. However, the size of the total (16S rRNA) and denitrifying bacterial communities changed differently over time and in response to LUC, indicating varying controls on these communities.

  11. Complete genome of Pseudomonas sp. strain L10.10, a psychrotolerant biofertilizer that could promote plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See-Too, Wah Seng; Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; Convey, Peter; Pearce, David A; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok Gan

    2016-03-20

    Pseudomonas sp. strain L10.10 (=DSM 101070) is a psychrotolerant bacterium which was isolated from Lagoon Island, Antarctica. Analysis of its complete genome sequence indicates its possible role as a plant-growth promoting bacterium, including nitrogen-fixing ability and indole acetic acid (IAA)-producing trait, with additional suggestion of plant disease prevention attributes via hydrogen cyanide production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pseudomonas oryzihabitans sepsis in a 1-year-old child with multiple skin rashes: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, Michael; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Acheampong, Godfred; Osei, Isaac; Amuasi, John; Sarpong, Nimako; Annan, Augustina; Chiang, Hsin-Ying; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Park, Se Eun; Marks, Florian; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw

    2017-03-23

    Pseudomonas oryzihabitans is a Pseudomonas bacterial organism rarely implicated in human infections. The bacterium has been isolated in a few reported cases of neurosurgical infections and patients with end-stage cirrhosis, sickle cell disease, and community-acquired urinary tract infections. Limited information exists in developing countries, however, because of the lack of advanced microbiological tools for identification and characterization of this bacterium. This case report describes the isolation of a rare Pseudomonas bacterium in a patient presenting with sepsis and skin infection. A 1-year-old girl was presented to a hospital in the northeastern part of Ghana with a 1-week history of pustular rashes on her scalp and neck, which occasionally ruptured, along with discharge of yellowish purulent fluid. The child is of Mole-Dagbon ethnicity and hails from the northern part of Ghana. Pseudomonas oryzihabitans was identified in the patient's blood culture using the 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid sequencing technique. The rash on the patient's scalp and skin resolved after continuous treatment with gentamicin while her condition improved clinically. This finding suggests the potential of this bacterium to cause disease in unsuspected situations and emphasizes the need to have evidence for the use of the appropriate antibiotic in clinical settings, particularly in rural settings in Africa. It also brings to the fore the unreliability of conventional methods for identification of Pseudomonas bacteria in clinical samples and thus supports the use of 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid in making the diagnosis.

  13. Mutation Rate, Spectrum, Topology, and Context-Dependency in the DNA Mismatch Repair-Deficient Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC948

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Hongan; Sung, Way; Miller, Samuel F.; Ackerman, Matthew S.; Doak, Thomas G.; Lynch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    High levels of genetic diversity exist among natural isolates of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens, and are especially elevated around the replication terminus of the genome, where strain-specific genes are found. In an effort to understand the role of genetic variation in the evolution of Pseudomonas, we analyzed 31,106 base substitutions from 45 mutation accumulation lines of P. fluorescens ATCC948, naturally deficient for mismatch repair, yielding a base-substitution mutation rate of 2...

  14. Bioactivities by a crude extract from the Greenlandic Pseudomonas sp. In5 involves the nonribosomal peptides, nunamycin and nunapeptin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenlund Michelsen, Charlotte; Jensen, Helle; Venditto, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive microbial metabolites provide a successful source of novel compounds with pharmaceutical potentials. The bacterium Pseudomonas sp. In5 is a biocontrol strain isolated from a plant disease suppressive soil in Greenland, which produces two antimicrobial nonribosomal peptides (NRPs), nunap......), nunapeptin and nunamycin. In this study, we used in vitro antimicrobial and anticancer bioassays to evaluate the potential bioactivities of both a crude extract derived from Pseudomonas sp. In5 and NRPs purified from the crude extract....

  15. Insight into the short- and long-term effects of Cu(II) on denitrifying biogranules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hui; Chen, Qian-Qian; Jiang, Xiao-Yan; Hu, Hai-Yan; Shi, Man-Ling; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • It is the first time to evaluate the effect of Cu 2+ on denitrifying biogranules. • A high level of Cu(II) was investigated during batch assays and continuous tests. • Mechanisms of the effects of Cu 2+ on denitrifying biogranules were discussed. • Effects of pre-exposure to Cu 2+ and starvation treatments were investigated. - Abstract: This study aimed to investigate the short- and long-term effects of Cu 2+ on the activity and performance of denitrifying bacteria. The short-term effects of various concentrations of Cu 2+ on the denitrifying bacteria were evaluated using batch assays. The specific denitrifying activity (SDA) decreased from 14.3 ± 2.2 (without Cu 2+ ) to 6.1 ± 0.1 mg N h −1 g −1 VSS (100 mgCu 2+ L −1 ) when Cu 2+ increased from 0 to 100 mg L −1 with an increment of 10 mgCu 2+ L −1 . A non-competitive inhibition model was used to calculate the 50% inhibition concentration (IC 50 ) of Cu 2+ on denitrifying sludge (30.6 ± 2.5 mg L −1 ). Monod and Luong models were applied to investigate the influence of the initial substrate concentration, and the results suggested that the maximum substrate removal rate would be reduced with Cu 2+ supplementation. Pre-exposure to Cu 2+ could lead to an 18.2–46.2% decrease in the SDA and decreasing percentage of the SDA increased with both exposure time and concentration. In the continuous-flow test, Cu 2+ concentration varied from 1 to 75 mg L −1 ; however, no clear deterioration was observed in the reactor, and the reactor was kept stable, with the total nitrogen removal efficiency and total organic carbon efficiency greater than 89.0 and 85.0%, respectively. The results demonstrated the short-term inhibition of Cu 2+ upon denitrification, and no notable adversity was observed during the continuous-flow test after long-term acclimation.

  16. Pseudomonas soli sp. nov., a novel producer of xantholysin congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Javier; García-López, Marina; Carmona, Cristina; Sousa, Thiciana da S; de Pedro, Nuria; Cautain, Bastien; Martín, Jesús; Vicente, Francisca; Reyes, Fernando; Bills, Gerald F; Genilloud, Olga

    2014-09-01

    A chemoorganotrophic Gram-negative bacterium was isolated by means of a diffusion sandwich system from a soil sample from the Sierra Nevada National Park, Spain. Strain F-279,208(T) was oxidase and catalase positive, strictly aerobic, non-spore-forming and motile by single polar flagellum. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD genes revealed that strain F-279,208(T) belongs to the Pseudomonas putida group with Pseudomonas mosselii and Pseudomonas entomophila as its closest relatives. DNA-DNA hybridization assays and phenotypic traits confirmed that this strain belongs to a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas soli sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is F-279,208(T) (=DSM 28043(T)=LMG 27941(T)), and during fermentation it produces xantholysins, a family of lipodepsipeptides. The major compound, xantholysin A, showed an interesting activity in a RCC4 kidney tumor cell line with inactivation of VHL linked with the HIF pathway, without any cytotoxic effects against other human tumor cell lines tested including, liver, pancreas and breast. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Lactococcus lactis - a diploid bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Hansen, Flemming G.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    the next division. Thus, the regions of the chromosome that are the last to be replicated are haploid even in fast-growing bacteria. In contrast to this general rule for bacteria, we found that Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium which has been exploited for thousands of years for the production of fermented...... milk products, is born with two complete non-replicating chromosomes. L. lactis therefore remain diploid throughout its entire life cycle....

  18. Pseudomonas Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Lise

    Pseudomonas lipopetide biosurfactants are amphiphilic molecules with a broad range of natural functions. Due to their surface active properties, it has been suggested that Pseudomonas lipopetides potentially play a role in biodegradation of hydrophobic compounds and have essential functions...... lipopetide biosurfactants in pollutant biodegradation and natural roles in biofilm formation. The work presented is a combination of environmental microbiology and exploiting genetic manipulation of pure cultures to achieve insightinto the effects and mechanisms of lipopeptides on microbial processes...

  19. Isolation of the acrylamide denitrifying bacteria from a wastewater treatment system manufactured with polyacrylonitrile fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Lee, Chi-Mei

    2007-10-01

    Acrylamide has carcinogenicity and toxicity, so its discharge to natural water and soil systems might have an adverse impact on water quality, endangering public health and welfare. The investigation attempts to isolate acrylamide denitrifying bacteria from a wastewater treatment system manufactured with polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber. The goal is to elucidate the effectiveness of isolated pure strain and PAN mixed strains in treating acrylamide from synthetic wastewater. The results reveal that Ralstonia eutropha TDM-3 was isolated from the wastewater treatment system manufactured with PAN fiber. The PAN mixed strains and R. eutropha TDM-3 can consume up to 1446 mg/L acrylamide to denitrify from synthetic wastewater. Complete acrylamide removal depended on the supply of sufficient electron acceptors (nitrate). Strain R. eutropha TDM-3, Azoarcus sp. pF6, Azoarcus sp. T, and Herbaspirillum sp. G8A1 are related closely, according to the phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA sequences.

  20. Storage and growth of denitrifiers in aerobic granules: part II. model calibration and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Yu, Han-Qing; Xie, Wen-Ming

    2008-02-01

    A mathematical model to describe the simultaneous storage and growth activities of denitrifiers in aerobic granules under anoxic conditions has been developed in an accompanying article. The sensitivity of the nitrate uptake rate (NUR) toward the stoichiometric and kinetic coefficients is analyzed in this article. The model parameter values are estimated by minimizing the sum of squares of the deviations between the measured and model-predicted values. The model is successfully calibrated and a set of stoichiometric and kinetic parameters for the anoxic storage and growth of the denitrifiers are obtained. Thereafter, the model established is verified with three set of experimental data. The comparison between the model established with the ASM1 model and ASM3 shows that the present model is appropriate to simulate and predict the performance of a granule-based denitrification system. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Isolation, genetic and functional characterization of novel soil nirK-type denitrifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Silke; Liu, Binbin; Braker, Gesche

    2010-10-01

    Denitrification, the reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO(3)(-) and NO(2)(-)) to N(2) via the intermediates NO and N(2)O, is crucial for nitrogen turnover in soils. Cultivation-independent approaches that applied nitrite reductase genes (nirK/nirS) as marker genes to detect denitrifiers showed a predominance of genes presumably derived from as yet uncultured organisms. However, the phylogenetic affiliation of these organisms remains unresolved since the ability to denitrify is widespread among phylogenetically unrelated organisms. In this study, denitrifiers were cultured using a strategy to generally enrich soil microorganisms. Of 490 colonies screened, eight nirK-containing isolates were phylogenetically identified (16S rRNA genes) as members of the Rhizobiales. A nirK gene related to a large cluster of sequences from uncultured bacteria mainly retrieved from soil was found in three isolates classified as Bradyrhizobium sp. Additional isolates were classified as Bradyrhizobium japonicum and Bosea sp. that contained nirK genes also closely related to the nirK from these strains. These isolates denitrified, albeit with different efficiencies. In Devosia sp., nirK was the only denitrification gene detected. Two Mesorhizobium sp. isolates contained a nirK gene also related to nirK from cultured Mesorhizobia and uncultured soil bacteria but no gene encoding nitric oxide or nitrous oxide reductase. These isolates accumulated NO under nitrate-reducing conditions without growth, presumably due to the lethal effects of NO. This showed the presence of a functional nitrite reductase but lack of a nitric oxide reductase. In summary, similar nirK genotypes recurrently detected mainly in soils likely originated from Rhizobia, and functional differences were presumably strain-dependent. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Denitrifying woodchip bioreactor and phosphorus filter pairing to minimize pollution swapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Laura E.; Lepine, Christine; Sibrell, Philip; Penn, Chad J.; Summerfelt, Steven T.

    2017-01-01

    Pairing denitrifying woodchip bioreactors and phosphorus-sorbing filters provides a unique, engineered approach for dual nutrient removal from waters impaired with both nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). This column study aimed to test placement of two P-filter media (acid mine drainage treatment residuals and steel slag) relative to a denitrifying system to maximize N and P removal and minimize pollution swapping under varying flow conditions (i.e., woodchip column hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 7.2, 18, and 51 h; P-filter HRTs of 7.6–59 min). Woodchip denitrification columns were placed either upstream or downstream of P-filters filled with either medium. The configuration with woodchip denitrifying systems placed upstream of the P-filters generally provided optimized dissolved P removal efficiencies and removal rates. The P-filters placed upstream of the woodchip columns exhibited better P removal than downstream-placed P-filters only under overly long (i.e., N-limited) retention times when highly reduced effluent exited the woodchip bioreactors. The paired configurations using mine drainage residuals provided significantly greater P removal than the steel slag P-filters (e.g., 25–133 versus 8.8–48 g P removed m−3 filter media d−1, respectively), but there were no significant differences in N removal between treatments (removal rates: 8.0–18 g N removed m−3 woodchips d−1; N removal efficiencies: 18–95% across all HRTs). The range of HRTs tested here resulted in various undesirable pollution swapping by-products from the denitrifying bioreactors: nitrite production when nitrate removal was not complete and sulfate reduction, chemical oxygen demand production and decreased pH during overly long retention times. The downstream P-filter placement provided a polishing step for removal of chemical oxygen demand and nitrite.

  3. Engineering Pseudomonas stutzeri as a biogeochemical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, L.; Cheng, H. Y.; Del Valle, I.; Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycles are being drastically altered as a result of anthropogenic activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels and the industrial production of ammonia. We know microbes play a major part in these cycles, but the extent of their biogeochemical roles remains largely uncharacterized due to inadequacies with culturing and measurement. While metagenomics and other -omics methods offer ways to reconstruct microbial communities, these approaches can only give an indication of the functional roles of microbes in a community. These -omics approaches are rapidly being expanded to the point of outpacing our knowledge of functional genes, which highlights an inherent need for analytical methods that non-invasively monitor Earth's processes in real time. Here we aim to exploit synthetic biology methods in order to engineer a ubiquitous denitrifying microbe, Pseudomonas stutzeri that can act as a biosensor in soil and marine environments. By using an easily cultivated microbe that is also common in many environments, we hope to develop a tool that allows us to zoom in on specific aspects of the nitrogen cycle. In order to monitor processes occurring at the genetic level in environments that cannot be resolved with fluorescence-based methods, such as soils, we have developed a system that instead relies on gas production by engineered microbial biosensors. P. stutzeri has been successfully engineered to release a gas, methyl bromide, which can continuously and non-invasively be measured by GC-MS. Similar to using Green Fluorescent Protein, GFP, in the biological sciences, the gene controlling gas production can be linked to those involved in denitrification, thereby creating a quantifiable gas signal that is correlated with microbial activity in the soil. Synthetically engineered microbial biosensors could reveal key aspects of metabolism in soil systems and offer a tool for characterizing the scope and degree of microbial impact on major biogeochemical cycles.

  4. Bioavailability and biodegradation of weathered diesel fuel in aquifer material under denitrifying conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregnard, T.P.A.; Hoehener, P.; Zeyer, J.

    1998-01-01

    During the in situ bioremediation of a diesel fuel-contaminated aquifer in Menziken, Switzerland, aquifer material containing weathered diesel fuel (WDF) and indigenous microorganisms was excavated. This material was used to identify factors limiting WDF biodegradation under denitrifying conditions. Incubations of this material for 360 to 390 d under denitrifying conditions resulted in degradation of 23% of the WDF with concomitant consumption of NO 3 - and production of inorganic carbon. The biodegradation of WDF and the rate of NO 3 - consumption was stimulated by agitation of the microcosms. Biodegradation was not stimulated by the addition of a biosurfactant (rhamnolipids) or a synthetic surfactant (Triton X-100) at concentrations above their critical micelle concentrations. The rhamnolipids were biodegraded preferentially to WDF, whereas Triton X-100 was not degraded. Both surfactants reduced the surface tension of the growth medium from 72 to <35 dynes/cm and enhanced the apparent aqueous solubility of the model hydrocarbon n-hexadecane by four orders of magnitude. Solvent-extracted WDF, added at a concentration equal to that already present in the aquifer material, was also biodegraded by the microcosms, but not at a higher rate than the WDF already present in the material. The results show that the denitrifying biodegradation of WDF is not necessarily limited by bioavailability but rather by the inherent recalcitrance of WDF

  5. Disentangling the rhizosphere effect on nitrate reducers and denitrifiers: insight into the role of root exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, S; Texier, S; Hallet, S; Bru, D; Dambreville, C; Chèneby, D; Bizouard, F; Germon, J C; Philippot, L

    2008-11-01

    To determine to which extent root-derived carbon contributes to the effects of plants on nitrate reducers and denitrifiers, four solutions containing different proportions of sugar, organic acids and amino acids mimicking maize root exudates were added daily to soil microcosms at a concentration of 150 microg C g(-1) of soil. Water-amended soils were used as controls. After 1 month, the size and structure of the nitrate reducer and denitrifier communities were analysed using the narG and napA, and the nirK, nirS and nosZ genes as molecular markers respectively. Addition of artificial root exudates (ARE) did not strongly affect the structure or the density of nitrate reducer and denitrifier communities whereas potential nitrate reductase and denitrification activities were stimulated by the addition of root exudates. An effect of ARE composition was also observed on N(2)O production with an N(2)O:(N(2)O + N(2)) ratio of 0.3 in microcosms amended with ARE containing 80% of sugar and of 1 in microcosms amended with ARE containing 40% of sugar. Our study indicated that ARE stimulated nitrate reduction or denitrification activity with increases in the range of those observed with the whole plant. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the composition of the ARE affected the nature of the end-product of denitrification and could thus have a putative impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

  6. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae...

  7. Genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida S12, a potential platform strain for industrial production of valuable chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Fei; Shen, Yaling; Fan, Ziqi; Tang, Hongzhi; Xu, Ping

    2012-11-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain S12, a well-studied solvent-tolerant bacterium, is considered a platform strain for the production of many chemicals. Here, we present a 6.28-Mb assembly of its genome sequence. We have annotated 32 coding sequences (CDSs) encoding efflux systems of organic compounds and 195 CDSs responsible for the metabolism of aromatic compounds.

  8. Roles of Rhizoxin and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol in Suppression of Fusarium spp. by the Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that acts as a biocontrol agent of soilborne plant diseases and produces at least 10 different secondary metabolites, including several with antifungal properties. We derived site-directed mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutatio...

  9. Expression of the recA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO is inducible by DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.V.; Kokjohn, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    Western (immunoblot) analysis using Escherichia coli anti-RecA antiserum revealed that expression of the RecA protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO is induced upon exposure of the bacterium to UV irradiation or norfloxacin, a quinolone related to nalidixic acid

  10. Draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas mosselii Gil3, isolated from catfish and antagonistic against hypervirulent Aeromonas hydrophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas mosselii Gil3 was isolated from a catfish that survived from lethal challenge with hypervirulent Aeromonas hydrophila (vAh). When assayed in vitro, the bacterium showed antagonism against vAh. Sequence analysis revealed that the genome of P. mosselii Gil3 encodes numerous aromatic metabo...

  11. Rhizoxin analogs, orfamide A and chitinase production contribute to the toxicity of Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 to Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a soil bacterium that was first described for its activity in biological control of plant diseases and has since been shown to be lethal to certain insects. Among these is the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a well-established model organism for studies evalu...

  12. TrgI, toluene repressed gene I, a novel gene involved in toluene-tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, R.J.M.; Ballerstedt, H.; Ruijssenaars, H.; Bont, J.A.M. de; Winde, J.H. de; Wery, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is well known for its remarkable solvent tolerance. Transcriptomics analysis of this bacterium grown in toluene-containing chemostats revealed the differential expression of 253 genes. As expected, the genes encoding one of the major solvent tolerance mechanisms, the solvent

  13. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    -up of the extracellular matrix encasing the biofilm-associated bacteria as well as the elaborate signaling mechanisms employed by the bacterium enables it to withstand the continuous stresses imposed by the immune defense and administered antibiotics resulting in a state of chronic inflammation that damages the host......Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity...... of infection in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients and in chronic wounds. In this review we address the molecular basis of biofilm development by P. aeruginosa as well as the mechanisms employed by this bacterium in the increased tolerance displayed against antimicrobials. The complex build...

  14. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity......-up of the extracellular matrix encasing the biofilm-associated bacteria as well as the elaborate signaling mechanisms employed by the bacterium enables it to withstand the continuous stresses imposed by the immune defense and administered antibiotics resulting in a state of chronic inflammation that damages the host...

  15. The Transcriptional Landscape of the Production Organism Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arrigo, Isotta

    Bacterial cell factories represent a valid alternative to fossil fuel-based production. A promising bacterium that can be optimized as cell factory is Pseudomonas putida. However, its development in bioproduction applications poses some challenges including a clear understanding of the bacterial...... such as riboswitches and small RNAs (sRNAs), metabolic pathways and transporter systems. The results reported here significantly increase knowledge of the P. putida transcriptome, adaptation mechanisms, and reveal novel bacterial features that will aid the design and optimization of the bacterium as a cell factory....

  16. Elaboration of Methods for Detection of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. phaseolicola on Bean Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelica Balaž

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. phaseolicola detection on artificially inoculated bean seeds was investigated. The method of the International Seed Federation – ISF (2006 was used. It includes bacteria extraction from seeds, isolation on semiselective media and checking the pathogenicity of investigated isolates. For verification of results, quick new methods of investigation were used (ELISA test and PCR. The results show that semiselective media MT (Milk Tween Agar and MSP (Modified Sucrose Peptone Agar can be appropriate for isolation of this bacterium. Pathogenicity of theinvestigated isolates was confirmed on cotyledon leaves of bean. ELISA test and PCR confirmed that all investigated isolates and reisolates belong to the bacterium P. s. pv. phaseolicola.

  17. Molecular identification of phosphate solubilizing bacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A phosphate solubilizing bacterium was isolated from the rhizosphere soil of upland rice and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The gene sequence showed 99% homology with Alcaligenes faecalis. Based on the gene sequence homology, it was identified as A. faecalis. Interaction effect of this bacterium on growth ...

  18. Are Isotopologue Signatures of N2O from Bacterial Denitrifiers Indicative of NOR Type?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Well, R.; Braker, G.; Giesemann, A.; Flessa, H.

    2010-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from soils result from its production by nitrification and denitrification and reduction during denitrification. The structure of the denitrifying microbial community contributes to the control of net N2O fluxes. Although molecular techniques are promising for identifying the active community of N2O producers, there are few data until now because methods to explore gene expression of N2O production are laborious and disregard regulation of activity at the enzyme level. The isotopologue signatures of N2O including δ18O, average δ15N (δ15Nbulk) and 15N site preference (SP = difference in δ15N between the central and peripheral N positions of the asymmetric N2O molecule) have been used to estimate the contribution of partial processes to net N2O fluxes to the atmosphere. However, the use of this approach to study N2O dynamics in soils requires knowledge of isotopic signatures of N2O precursors and isotopologue fractionation factors (ɛ) of all processes of N2O production and consumption. In contrast to δ18O and δ15Nbulk, SP is independent of precursor signatures and hence is a promising parameter here. It is assumed that SP of produced N2O is almost exclusively controlled by the enzymatic isotope effects of NO reductases (NOR). These enzymes are known to be structurally different between certain classes of N2O producers with each class causing different isotope effects (Schmidt et al., 2004). The NH2OH-to-N2O step of nitrifiers and the NO3-to-N2O step of fungal denitrifiers are associated with large site-specific 15N effects with SP of 33 to 37 ‰ (Sutka et al., 2006, 2008) while the few tested species of gram-negative bacterial denitrifiers (cNOR group) exhibited low SP of -5 to 0‰ (Sutka et al., 2006; Toyoda et al., 2005). The aim of our study was to determine site-specific fractionation factors of the NO3-to-N2O step (ɛSP) for several species of denitrifiers representing each of the known NOR-types of bacteria, i.e. cNOR, q

  19. Gentamicin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infections by Ps. aeruginosa is contra-indicated. In our study only 2,3 % of the Ps. aeruginosa strains were resistant to gentamicin (MIC 25 Ilg/ml). In view of the synergy reported for combined gentamicin and carbeni- cillin therapy," a combination of these two drugs may be recommended in the treatment of all Pseudomonas.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  1. Dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides by an Aerobic Bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurice, P.

    2004-01-01

    This project investigated the effects of an aerobic Pseudomonas mendocina bacterium on the dissolution of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides. The research is important because metals and radionuclides that adsorb to Fe(III)(hydr)oxides could potentially be remobilized by dissolving bacteria. We showed that P. mendocina is capable of dissolving Fe-bearing minerals by a variety of mechanisms, including production of siderophores, pH changes, and formation of reductants. The production of siderophores by P. mendocina was quantified under a variety of growth conditions. Finally, we demonstrated that microbial siderophores may adsorb to and enhance dissolution of clay minerals

  2. Relating phylogenetic and functional diversity among denitrifiers and quantifying their capacity to predict community functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana eFalcão Salles

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity of phylogenetic or functional markers is widely used as a proxy of microbial diversity. However, it remains unclear at what extent functional diversity, gene sequence diversity and community functioning are linked. We analysed, for a range of denitrifying bacteria, the relationships between (i the similarity of functional traits evaluated from metabolic profiles (BIOLOG plates or from N2O accumulation patterns on different C sources, and (ii the similarity of phylogenetic (16S rRNA gene or functional (nir gene markers. We also calculated different proxies for the diversity of denitrifier community based on taxa richness, phylogenetic or functional similarities, and evaluated their performance in inferring the functioning of assembled denitrifying communities. For individual strains, the variation in the 16S rRNA gene sequence explained only 10% of the variation in metabolic patterns and were not related to N2O accumulation. The latter was correlated with the similarity of nitrite reductase residues. When nir genes were analysed separately, the similarity in amino acids coded by the nirS genes accounted for 48% of the variance of the observed pattern of N2O accumulation, whereas nirK amino acid residues were unrelated to N2O accumulation. For bacterial assemblages, phylogenetic diversity and mean community dissimilarity, calculated using 16S rRNA gene sequences, and functional diversity measures associated with BIOLOG, predicted poorly the variation in the functioning of assembled communities (below 15%. In contrast, the proxies of functional diversity based on N2O accumulation patterns performed better and explained from 23 to 42% of the variation in community functioning. Amongst those, community niche was the best metric, indicating the importance of complementarity for carbon resources among taxa in the context of denitrification.

  3. Concurrent Activity of Anammox and Denitrifying Bacteria in the Black Sea

    OpenAIRE

    John B. Kirkpatrick; John B. Kirkpatrick; Clara A. Fuchsman; Evgeniy eYakushev; James T. Staley; James W. Murray

    2012-01-01

    After the discovery of ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation (anammox) in the Black Sea in 2003, the role of heterotrophic denitrification as the main marine pathway for fixed N loss was questioned. A 3 part, 15 month time series investigating Black Sea nitrite reductase (nirS) mRNA transcripts at a single location was conducted in order to better understand the activity of anammox and denitrifying bacteria. Here we show that both of these groups were active, as well as being concurrent in the lower s...

  4. Concurrent activity of anammox and denitrifying bacteria in the Black Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, John B.; Fuchsman, Clara A.; Yakushev, Evgeniy; Staley, James T.; Murray, James W.

    2012-01-01

    After the discovery of ANaerobic AMMonium OXidation (anammox) in the environment, the role of heterotrophic denitrification as the main marine pathway for fixed N loss has been questioned. A 3 part, 15 month time series investigating nitrite reductase (nirS) mRNA transcripts at a single location in the Black Sea was conducted in order to better understand the activity of anammox and denitrifying bacteria. Here we show that both of these groups were active, as well as being concurrent in the l...

  5. Development of Denitrifying and Nitrifying Bacteria and Their Co-occurrence in Newly Created Biofilms in Urban Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaessen, T. N.; Martí Roca, E.; Pinay, G.; Merbt, S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Biofilms play a pivotal role on nutrient cycling in streams, which ultimately dictates the export of nutrients to downstream ecosystems. The extent to which biofilms influence the concentration of dissolved nutrients, oxygen and pH in the water column may be determined by the composition of the microbial assemblages and their activity. Evidence of biological interactions among bacteria and algae are well documented. However, the development, succession and co-occurence of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria remain poorly understood. These bacteria play a relevant role on the biogeochemical process associated to N cycling, and their relative abundance can dictate the fate of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in streams. In particular, previous studies indicated that nitrifiers are enhanced in streams receiving inputs from wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents due to both increases in ammonium concentration and inputs of nitrifiers. However, less is known about the development of denitrifiers in receiving streams, although environmental conditions seem to favor it. We conducted an in situ colonization experiment in a stream receiving effluent from a WWTP to examine how this input influences the development and co-occurrence of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria. We placed artificial substrata at different locations relative to the effluent and sampled them over time to characterize the developed biofilm in terms of bulk measurements (organic matter content and algae) as well as in terms of abundance of nitrifiers and denitrifiers (using qPCR). The results of this study contribute to a better understanding of the temporal dynamics of denitrifiers and nitrifiers in relation to the developed organic matter, dissolved oxygen and pH and the biomass accrual in stream biofilms under the influence of nutrients inputs from WWTP effluent. Ultimately, the results provide insights on the potential role of nitrifiers and denitrifiers on N cycling in WWTP effluent receiving

  6. Pseudomoniasis phytotherapy: A review on most important Iranian medicinal plants effective on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Bahmani; Mahmoud Rafieian-Kopaei; Hassan Hassanzadazar; Morovat Taherikalani

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium found in water and soil. It is a normal flora in skin and gastrointestinal tract of human beings. P. aeruginosa as an opportunistic pathogen involved in nosocomial infections having multiple pathogenic factors and shows high rate of resistance to different antibiotics. The aim of this study was to identify the most important native medicinal plants of Iran effective on P. aeruginosa.Materials and Methods: ...

  7. Truncation of type IV pilin induces mucoidy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO579

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan Withers, T; Heath Damron, F; Yin, Yeshi; Yu, Hongwei D

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram negative, opportunistic pathogen that uses the overproduction of alginate, a surface polysaccharide, to form biofilms in vivo. Overproduction of alginate, also known as mucoidy, affords the bacterium protection from the host's defenses and facilitates the establishment of chronic lung infections in individuals with cystic fibrosis. Expression of the alginate biosynthetic operon is primarily controlled by the alternative sigma factor AlgU (AlgT/?22). In a nonmu...

  8. Synthetic biology approaches to shape bacteriophages towards Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm control

    OpenAIRE

    Pires, Diana Priscila Penso

    2016-01-01

    Dissertation for Ph.D. degree in Biomedical Engineering. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a relevant opportunistic pathogen frequently involved in healthcareassociated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract and surgical site infections. Most of the infections caused by this bacterium are particularly difficult to treat, especially due to its great capacity to form biofilms in a wide variety of surfaces, which often display high tolerance to antibiotics. As a result...

  9. Community size and composition of ammonia oxidizers and denitrifiers in an alluvial intertidal wetland ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziye eHu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Global nitrogen cycling is mainly mediated by the activity of microorganisms. Nitrogen cycle processes are mediated by functional groups of microorganisms that are affected by constantly changing environmental conditions and substrate availability. In this study, we investigated the temporal and spatial patterns of nitrifier and denitrifier communities in an intertidal wetland. Soil samples were collected over four distinct seasons from three locations with different vegetative cover. Multiple environmental factors and process rates were measured and analyzed together with the community size and composition profiles. We observed that the community size and composition of the nitrifiers and denitrifiers are affected significantly by seasonal factors, while vegetative cover affected the community composition. The seasonal impacts on the community size of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA are much higher than that of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB. The seasonal change was a more important indicator for AOA community composition patterns, while vegetation was more important for the AOB community patterns. The microbial process rates were correlated with both the community size and composition.

  10. Inhibitory Effect of Gamma-Irradiated Chitosan on the Growth of Denitrifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Vilcáez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to find an environmentally benign substitute to hazardous inhibitory agents, the inhibitory effect of -irradiated chitosans against a mixed culture of denitrifying bacteria was experimentally evaluated. Unlike other studies using pure aerobic cultures, the observed effect was not a complete inhibition but a transient inhibition reflected by prolonged lag phases and reduced growth rates. Raw chitosan under acid conditions (pH 6.3 exerted the strongest inhibition followed by the 100 kGy and 500 kGy irradiated chitosans, respectively. Therefore, because the molecular weight of chitosan decreases with the degree of -irradiation, the inhibitory properties of chitosan due to its high molecular weight were more relevant than the inhibitory properties gained due to the modification of the surface charge and/or chemical structure by -irradiation. High dosage of -irradiated appeared to increase the growth of mixed denitrifying bacteria in acid pH media. However, in neutral pH media, high dosage of -irradiation appeared to enhance the inhibitory effect of chitosan.

  11. Effect of plant-based carbon sources on denitrifying microorganisms in a vertical flow constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guiping; Huangshen, Linkun; Guo, Zhipeng; Zhou, Qiaohong; Wu, Zhenbin

    2017-01-01

    The effects of supplementing plant-based carbon sources, fermented tissues of Arundo donax and Pontederia cordata, and a combination of the two plants, on the nitrogen removal efficiency and microbial composition in a vertical flow constructed wetland (VFCW) were examined. The results showed that the addition of the composite carbon source produced the highest removal efficiencies of NH 4 + -N 91.5%, NO 3 - -N 94.5% and TN 92.8% in VFCW. The detected abundance of amoA, nirS, and nxrA genes indicated that ammonia oxidation bacteria and denitrifying bacteria were more abundant than the nitrite oxidation bacteria. Furthermore, the addition of the composite carbon source significantly promoted the growth of the denitrifying bacteria in VFCW. The results indicated that supplementing the system with plant-based carbon sources achieved partial nitrification and denitrification, as well as classic denitrification in VFCWs. The study suggested that multiple nitrogen removal pathways were required to feasibly and efficiently remove nitrogen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Boolean network model of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallidis, Stylianos E; Karafyllidis, Ioannis G

    2014-09-01

    To coordinate their behavior and virulence and to synchronize attacks against their hosts, bacteria communicate by continuously producing signaling molecules (called autoinducers) and continuously monitoring the concentration of these molecules. This communication is controlled by biological circuits called quorum sensing (QS) circuits. Recently QS circuits and have been recognized as an alternative target for controlling bacterial virulence and infections without the use of antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects insects, plants, animals and humans and can cause acute infections. This bacterium has three interconnected QS circuits that form a very complex and versatile QS system, the operation of which is still under investigation. Here we use Boolean networks to model the complete QS system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and we simulate and analyze its operation in both synchronous and asynchronous modes. The state space of the QS system is constructed and it turned out to be very large, hierarchical, modular and scale-free. Furthermore, we developed a simulation tool that can simulate gene knock-outs and study their effect on the regulons controlled by the three QS circuits. The model and tools we developed will give to life scientists a deeper insight to this complex QS system.

  13. Isolation and evaluation of potent Pseudomonas species for bioremediation of phorate in amended soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jariyal, Monu; Gupta, V K; Jindal, Vikas; Mandal, Kousik

    2015-12-01

    Use of phorate as a broad spectrum pesticide in agricultural crops is finding disfavor due to persistence of both the principal compound as well as its toxic residues in soil. Three phorate utilizing bacterial species (Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 4.3, Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.1, Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.2) were isolated from field soils. Comparative phorate degradation analysis of these species in liquid cultures identified Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.1 to cause complete metabolization of phorate during seven days as compared to the other two species in 13 days. In soils amended with phorate at different levels (100, 200, 300 mg kg(-1) soil), Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.1 resulted in active metabolization of phorate by between 94.66% and 95.62% establishing the same to be a potent bacterium for significantly relieving soil from phorate residues. Metabolization of phorate to these phorate residues did not follow the first order kinetics. This study proves that Pseudomonas sp. strain Imbl 5.1 has huge potential for active bioremediation of phorate both in liquid cultures and agricultural soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Short exposure to acetylene to distinguish between nitrifier and denitrifier nitrous oxide production in soil and sediment samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, R.A.; Boer, W. de; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution of nitrifiers and denitrifiers to the nitrous oxide production in slurries of calcareous silt loam and river bank sediment at different oxygen concentrations was determined using acetylene as nitrification inhibitor. The addition of 10 Pa acetylene resulted in inhibition of

  15. Short exposure to acetylene to distinguish between nitrifier and denitrifier nitrous oxide production in soil and sediment samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kester, R.A.; De Boer, W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution of nitrifiers and denitrifiers to the nitrous oxide production in slurries of calcareous silt loam and river bank sediment at different oxygen concentrations was determined using acetylene as nitrification inhibitor. The addition of 10 Pa acetylene resulted in inhibition of nitrous

  16. Edaphic Conditions Regulate Denitrification Directly and Indirectly by Altering Denitrifier Abundance in Wetlands along the Han River, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ziqian; Guo, Laodong; Zhang, Quanfa; Liu, Guihua; Liu, Wenzhi

    2017-05-16

    Riparian wetlands play a critical role in retaining nitrogen (N) from upland runoff and improving river water quality, mainly through biological processes such as soil denitrification. However, the relative contribution of abiotic and biotic factors to riparian denitrification capacity remains elusive. Here we report the spatiotemporal dynamics of potential and unamended soil denitrification rates in 20 wetlands along the Han River, an important water source in central China. We also quantified the abundance of soil denitrifying microorganisms using nirK and nirS genes. Results showed that soil denitrification rates were significantly different between riparian and reservoir shoreline wetlands, but not between mountain and lowland wetlands. In addition, soil denitrification rates showed strong seasonality, with higher values in August (summer) and April (spring) but lower values in January (winter). The potential and unamended denitrification rates were positively correlated with edaphic conditions (moisture and carbon concentration), denitrifier abundance, and plant species richness. Path analysis further revealed that edaphic conditions could regulate denitrification rates both directly and indirectly through their effects on denitrifier abundance. Our findings highlight that not only environmental factors, but also biotic factors including denitrifying microorganisms and standing vegetation, play an important role in regulating denitrification rate and N removal capacity in riparian wetlands.

  17. Toxic effects exerted on methanogenic, nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria by chemicals used in a milk analysis laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez-Fiuza, J.; Buys, B.; Mosquera-Corral, A.; Omil, F.; Mendez, R.

    2002-01-01

    The toxic effects caused by the chemicals contained in wastewaters generated by laboratories involved in raw milk analyses were assessed using batch assays. These assays were carried out separately with methanogenic, ammonium-oxidizing, nitrite-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria. Since sodium azide

  18. Silver nanotoxicity using a light-emitting biosensor Pseudomonas putida isolated from a wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dams, R I; Biswas, A; Olesiejuk, A; Fernandes, T; Christofi, N

    2011-11-15

    The effect of silver ions, nano- and micro-particles on a luminescent biosensor bacterium Pseudomonas putida originally isolated from activated sludge was assessed. The bacterium carrying a stable chromosomal copy of the lux operon (luxCDABE) was able to detect toxicity of ionic and particulate silver over short term incubations ranging from 30 to 240 min. The IC(50) values obtained at different time intervals showed that highest toxicity (lowest IC(50)) was obtained after 90 min incubation for all toxicants and this is considered the optimum incubation for testing. The data show that ionic silver is the most toxic followed by nanosilver particles with microsilver particles being least toxic. Release of nanomaterials is likely to have an effect on the activated sludge process as indicated by the study using a common sludge bacterium involved in biodegradation of organic wastes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Production of rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inhibited by H2S but resumes in a co-culture with P. stutzeri: applications for microbial enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Ma, Fang; Shi, Rongjiu; Zhang, Jie; Han, Siqin; Zhang, Ying

    2015-09-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria and H2S exist widely in oil production systems, and in situ production of rhamnolipids is promising for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). However, information of the effect of S(2-) on rhamnolipids production is scarce. Two facultative anaerobic rhamnolipids-producing bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG and WJ-1, were used. Above 10 mg S(2-)/l, both cell growth and rhamnolipids production were inhibited. A large inoculum (9%, v/v) failed to completely relieve the inhibitory effect of 10 mg S(2-)/l. Below 30 mg S(2-)/l, both strains resumed rhamnolipid production through co-culturing with the denitrifying and sulphide-removing strain Pseudomonas stutzeri DQ1. H2S has a direct but reversible inhibitory effect on rhamnolipids production. Control of H2S in oilfields is indispensable to MEOR, and the co-culture method is effective in restoring rhamnolipid production in presence of S(2-).

  20. Expression and surface display of Cellulomonas endoglucanase in the ethanologenic bacterium Zymobacter palmae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Motoki; Akahoshi, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Kenji; Yanase, Hideshi

    2012-11-01

    In order to reduce the cost of bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass, we developed a tool for cell surface display of cellulolytic enzymes on the ethanologenic bacterium Zymobacter palmae. Z. palmae is a novel ethanol-fermenting bacterium capable of utilizing a broad range of sugar substrates, but not cellulose. Therefore, to express and display heterologous cellulolytic enzymes on the Z. palmae cell surface, we utilized the cell-surface display motif of the Pseudomonas ice nucleation protein Ina. The gene encoding Ina from Pseudomonas syringae IFO3310 was cloned, and its product was comprised of three functional domains: an N-terminal domain, a central domain with repeated amino acid residues, and a C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain of Ina was shown to function as the anchoring motif for a green fluorescence protein fusion protein in Escherichia coli. To express a heterologous cellulolytic enzyme extracellularly in Z. palmae, we fused the N-terminal coding sequence of Ina to the coding sequence of an N-terminal-truncated Cellulomonas endoglucanase. Z. palmae cells carrying the fusion endoglucanase gene were shown to degrade carboxymethyl cellulose. Although a portion of the expressed fusion endoglucanase was released from Z. palmae cells into the culture broth, we confirmed the display of the protein on the cell surface by immunofluorescence microscopy. The results indicate that the N-terminal anchoring motif of Ina from P. syringae enabled the translocation and display of the heterologous cellulase on the cell surface of Z. palmae.

  1. Isolation of a soil bacterium capable of biodegradation and detoxification of endosulfan and endosulfan sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Bok; Sohn, Ho-Yong; Shin, Kee-Sun; Jo, Min-Sub; Kim, Jang-Eok; Lee, Se-Won; Shin, Ji-Won; Kum, Eun-Joo; Kwon, Gi-Seok

    2006-11-15

    Endosulfan, an endocrine disrupting chemical, is a widely used cyclodiene organochlorine pesticide worldwide, and it blocks neuronal GABA(A)-gated chloride channels in mammals and aquatic organisms. Endosulfan and its metabolites, such as endosulfan sulfate, are persistent in environments and are considered as toxic chemicals. For bioremediation of endosulfan, in this study, an attempt was made to isolate an endosulfan and endosulfan sulfate degrading bacterium from endosulfan-polluted agricultural soil. Through repetitive enrichment and successive subculture using endosulfan or endosulfan sulfate as the sole carbon source, a bacterium KS-2P was isolated. The KS-2P was identified as Pseudomonas sp. on the basis of the results of a 16S rDNA sequencing analysis and MIDI test. The degradation ratios for endosulfan or endosulfan sulfate in minimal medium containing endosulfan (23.5 microg mL(-1)) or endosulfan sulfate (21 microg mL(-1)) were 52% and 71%, respectively. Our results suggest that Pseudomonas sp. KS-2P has potential as a biocatalyst for endosulfan bioremediation.

  2. Expression and surface display of Cellulomonas endoglucanase in the ethanologenic bacterium Zymobacter palmae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Motoki; Akahoshi, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Kenji; Yanase, Hideshi [Tottori Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Chemistry and Biotechnology

    2012-11-15

    In order to reduce the cost of bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass, we developed a tool for cell surface display of cellulolytic enzymes on the ethanologenic bacterium Zymobacter palmae. Z. palmae is a novel ethanol-fermenting bacterium capable of utilizing a broad range of sugar substrates, but not cellulose. Therefore, to express and display heterologous cellulolytic enzymes on the Z. palmae cell surface, we utilized the cell-surface display motif of the Pseudomonas ice nucleation protein Ina. The gene encoding Ina from Pseudomonas syringae IFO3310 was cloned, and its product was comprised of three functional domains: an N-terminal domain, a central domain with repeated amino acid residues, and a C-terminal domain. The N-terminal domain of Ina was shown to function as the anchoring motif for a green fluorescence protein fusion protein in Escherichia coli. To express a heterologous cellulolytic enzyme extracellularly in Z. palmae, we fused the N-terminal coding sequence of Ina to the coding sequence of an N-terminal-truncated Cellulomonas endoglucanase. Z. palmae cells carrying the fusion endoglucanase gene were shown to degrade carboxymethyl cellulose. Although a portion of the expressed fusion endoglucanase was released from Z. palmae cells into the culture broth, we confirmed the display of the protein on the cell surface by immunofluorescence microscopy. The results indicate that the N-terminal anchoring motif of Ina from P. syringae enabled the translocation and display of the heterologous cellulase on the cell surface of Z. palmae. (orig.)

  3. Bioremediation of coractive blue dye by using Pseudomonas spp. isolated from the textile dye wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunar, N. M.; Mon, Z. K.; Rahim, N. A.; Leman, A. M.; Airish, N. A. M.; Khalid, A.; Ali, R.; Zaidi, E.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2018-04-01

    Wastewater released from the textile industry contains variety substances, mainly dyes that contains a high concentration of color and organic. In this study the potential for bacterial decolorization of coractive blue dye was examined that isolated from textile wastewater. The optimum conditions were determined for pH, temperature and initial concentration of the dye. The bacteria isolated was Pseudomonas spp. The selected bacterium shows high decolorization in static condition at an optimum of pH 7.0. The Pseudomonas spp. could decolorize coractive blue dye by 70% within 24 h under static condition, with the optimum of pH 7.0. Decolorization was confirmed by using UV-VIS spectrophotometer. This present study suggests the potential of Pseudomonas spp. as an approach in sustainable bioremediation that provide an efficient method for decolorizing coractive blue dye.

  4. Acetone and Butanone Metabolism of the Denitrifying Bacterium “Aromatoleum aromaticum” Demonstrates Novel Biochemical Properties of an ATP-Dependent Aliphatic Ketone Carboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schühle, Karola

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic and aerobic metabolism of acetone and butanone in the betaproteobacterium “Aromatoleum aromaticum” is initiated by their ATP-dependent carboxylation to acetoacetate and 3-oxopentanoic acid, respectively. Both reactions are catalyzed by the same enzyme, acetone carboxylase, which was purified and characterized. Acetone carboxylase is highly induced under growth on acetone or butanone and accounts for at least 5.5% of total cell protein. The enzyme consists of three subunits of 85, 75, and 20 kDa, respectively, in a (αβγ)2 composition and contains 1 Zn and 2 Fe per heterohexamer but no organic cofactors. Chromatographic analysis of the ATP hydrolysis products indicated that ATP was exclusively cleaved to AMP and 2 Pi. The stoichiometry was determined to be 2 ATP consumed per acetone carboxylated. Purified acetone carboxylase from A. aromaticum catalyzes the carboxylation of acetone and butanone as the only substrates. However, the enzyme shows induced (uncoupled) ATPase activity with many other substrates that were not carboxylated. Acetone carboxylase is a member of a protein family that also contains acetone carboxylases of various other organisms, acetophenone carboxylase of A. aromaticum, and ATP-dependent hydantoinases/oxoprolinases. While the members of this family share several characteristic features, they differ with respect to the products of ATP hydrolysis, subunit composition, and metal content. PMID:22020645

  5. Ralstonia (Pseudomonas) solanacearum race 3 (biovar 2) in surface water and natural weed hosts: First report on stinging nettle (Urtica dioica)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenneker, M.; Verdel, M.S.W.; Groeneveld, R.M.W.; Kempenaar, C.; Beuningen, van A.R.; Janse, J.D.

    1999-01-01

    The population dynamics of the brown rot bacterium Ralstonia (Pseudomonas) solanacearum in surface water of two selected water-areas were monitored over a two-year period. In some cases during summer, high bacterial numbers (up to 106 cfu l−1) were observed. In a host plant survey a few plants of

  6. An inter-species signaling system mediated by fusaric acid has parallel effects on antifungal metabolite production by Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 and antibiosis of Fusarium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas protegens strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere bacterium that acts as a biocontrol agent of soilborne plant diseases, and produces at least seven different secondary metabolites with antifungal properties. We derived site-directed mutants of Pf-5 with single and multiple mutations in the biosynt...

  7. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth performance of Lycopersicon esculentum in Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani infested soil. Biochemical characteristics of fluorescent Pseudomonas showed that all ten isolates were positive ...

  8. Sediment denitrifier community composition and nirS gene expression investigated with functional gene microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, C.A.; Jackson, G.A.; Ward, B.B.

    2008-01-01

    A functional gene microarray was used to investigate denitrifier community composition and nitrite reductase (nirS) gene expression in sediments along the estuarine gradient in Chesapeake Bay, USA. The nirS oligonucleotide probe set was designed to represent a sequence database containing 539...... Chesapeake Bay clones, as well as sequences from many other environments. Greatest nirS diversity was detected at the freshwater station at the head of the bay and least diversity at the higher salinity station near the mouth of the Bay. The most common OTUs from the sequence database were detected...... on the array with high signal strength in most samples. One of the most abundant OTUs, CB2-S-138, was identified as dominant at the mid-bay site by both microarray and quantitative PCR assays, but it comprised a much smaller fraction of the assemblage in the north and south bay samples. cDNA (transcribed from...

  9. Soil functional operating range linked to microbial biodiversity and community composition using denitrifiers as model guild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Sara; Welsh, Allana; Stenström, John; Hallet, Stephanie; Enwall, Karin; Bru, David; Philippot, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Soil microorganisms are key players in biogeochemical cycles. Yet, there is no consistent view on the significance of microbial biodiversity for soil ecosystem functioning. According to the insurance hypothesis, declines in ecosystem functioning due to reduced biodiversity are more likely to occur under fluctuating, extreme or rapidly changing environmental conditions. Here, we compare the functional operating range, a new concept defined as the complete range of environmental conditions under which soil microbial communities are able to maintain their functions, between four naturally assembled soil communities from a long-term fertilization experiment. A functional trait approach was adopted with denitrifiers involved in nitrogen cycling as our model soil community. Using short-term temperature and salt gradients, we show that the functional operating range was broader and process rates were higher when the soil community was phylogenetically more diverse. However, key bacterial genotypes played an important role for maintaining denitrification as an ecosystem functioning under certain conditions.

  10. Significance of denitrifying enzyme dynamics in biological nitrogen removal processes: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D U; Casasús-Zambrana, A; Hamilton, R; Svoronos, S; Lee, S I; Koopman, B

    2004-01-01

    Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1) was extended to include the enzyme kinetics of denitrifying bacteria switching between oxygen and nitrate as electron acceptors. The extended ASM1 (eASM1) model was applied to two different periodic process configurations, fed-batch and Biodenipho, commonly used for nitrogen removal from wastewater. Predictions of optimal unaerated volume fraction (UVF) by eASM1 were similar to those by ASM1 for both the fed-batch and Biodenipho processes. However, eASM1 predicted substantially longer optimal cycle lengths than ASM1 for both processes. Predictions of optimal UVF and cycle length for the Biodenipho process by eASM1 were closer to current operational values for the University of Florida Biodenipho process than predictions by ASM1.

  11. IDENTIFICATION AND PATHOGENICITY OF ISOLATE OF BACTERIUM CAUSED LEAF BLIGHT DISEASE ON Maranta arundinacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriadi Supriadi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea L is a multi-functional plant used as a source of medicinal, carbohydrate (especially the green leaf type and also as ornamental plant (the streaked white leaf type. A leaf blight disease is recently found on the streaked white type in Bogor. Preliminary observation indicated that the disease was associated with bacterial infection. The cause of the disease has not been studied. This study was aimed to identify the cause of bacterial leaf blight disease. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory of Research Institute for Spice and Medicinal Crops in Bogor. Suspected bacteria were isolated from diseased leaves. The results showed that the bacterium produced white to brownish colonies on rich agar media containing peptone or cassamino acid. 3-5 mm in diameter, circular, and did not yield fluorescent pigment on King’s B medium. The bacterium formed rod cells, Gram negative, accumulated poly β hydroxybutyrate, utilized glucose under aerobic condition, not hydrolyse arginine and starch, positive catalase, insensitive to tetrazolium salt (0.1%, and grew at 35oC. The bacterium neither producted xanthomonadin pigment nor reduced nitrate to nitrite. The pathogen was tolerant to penicillin and oxolinic acid, but sensitive to streptomycin and oxytetracycline at high concentration (1.000 ppm. These characteristics met to those of Pseudomonas cepacia. Pathogenicity test on detached leaves showed that the typical symptom of blight was similar to that of natural infection on arrowroot. This is the first report on occurrence of P cepacia on arrowroot plant.

  12. [Identification and antagonistic activities of an endophytic bacterium MGP3 isolated from papaya fruit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingying; Liu, Aiyuan; Li, Xueping; Chen, Weixin

    2011-09-01

    Postharvest decay resulted from anthracnose caused by pathogens Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and blight diseases caused by Phytophthora nicotianae leads to significant loss of papaya fruits. In order to reduce such loss, we isolated endophytic bacteria that may possess powerful antagonistic activities toward these pathogens for effective biological control of anthracnose and blight diseases. The methods of dilution and inhibition circle were used for isolating and screening endophytic bacteria from papaya fruit. Based on morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, and homology analysis of the partial sequence of 16S rDNA, an endophytic bacterium was identified. The colonization of the antagonistic endophyte in papaya was detected by inoculating suspension of strains in caudices of papaya plant after Rifampicin-resistant mutants (rif(r)) induction. The effects on diseases caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Phytophthora nicotianae were tested by preharvest and postharvest experiments. One of the endophytic bacteria named MGP3 was selected from the papaya pericarp and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Accession No. JF708186). This bacterium was able to colonize in the laminae, leafstalk or pericarp of papaya, and strongly inhibit 10 phytopathogens. In the postharvest experiment, MGP3 inhibited 50% anthracnose and 71% blight of harvested papaya fruits. The application of MGP3 at five preharvest stages of papaya significantly reduced latent infection rate of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and disease index of anthracnose. Antagonistic endophytic bacterium MGP3 isolated from papaya fruit had potential application value as a biological control agent.

  13. DRIVERS OF THE DYNAMICS OF DIAZOTROPHS AND DENITRIFIERS IN NORTH SEA BOTTOM WATERS AND SEDIMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas eStal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The fixation of dinitrogen (N2 and denitrification are two opposite processes in the nitrogen cycle. The former transfers atmospheric dinitrogen gas into bound nitrogen in the biosphere, while the latter returns this bound nitrogen back to atmospheric dinitrogen. It is unclear whether or not these processes are intimately connected in any microbial ecosystem or that they are spatially and/or temporally separated. Here, we measured seafloor nitrogen fixation and denitrification as well as pelagic nitrogen fixation by using the stable isotope technique. Alongside, we measured the diversity, abundance, and activity of nitrogen-fixing and denitrifying microorganisms at three stations in the southern North Sea. Nitrogen fixation ranged from undetectable to 2.4 nmol N L-1 d-1 and from undetectable to 8.2 nmol N g-1 d-1 in the water column and seafloor, respectively. The highest rates were measured in August at Doggersbank, both for the water column and for the seafloor. Denitrification ranged from 1.7 to 208.8 µmol m-2 d-1 and the highest rates were measured in May at the Oyster Grounds. DNA sequence analysis showed sequences of nifH, a structural gene for nitrogenase, related to sequences from anaerobic sulfur/iron reducers and sulfate reducers. Sequences of the structural gene for nitrite reductase, nirS, were related to environmental clones from marine sediments. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR data revealed the highest abundance of nifH and nirS genes at the Oyster Grounds. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR data revealed the highest nifH expression at Doggersbank and the highest nirS expression at the Oyster Grounds. The distribution of the diazotrophic and denitrifying communities seems to be subject to different selecting factors, leading to spatial and temporal separation of nitrogen fixation and denitrification. These selecting factors include temperature, organic matter availability, and

  14. Antivirulence activity of azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eImperi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics represent our bulwark to combat bacterial infections, but the spread of antibiotic resistance compromises their clinical efficacy. Alternatives to conventional antibiotics are urgently needed in order to complement the existing antibacterial arsenal. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example of an unconventional antibacterial drug. Besides its growth-inhibiting activity, AZM displays potent anti-inflammatory properties, as well as antivirulence activity on some intrinsically resistant bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this bacterium, the antivirulence activity of AZM mainly relies on its ability to interact with the ribosome, resulting in direct and/or indirect repression of specific subsets of genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and intrinsic antibiotic resistance. Both clinical experience and clinical trials have shown the efficacy of AZM in the treatment of chronic pulmonary infections caused by P. aeruginosa. The aim of this review is to combine results from laboratory studies with evidence from clinical trials in order to unify the information on the in vivo mode of action of AZM in P. aeruginosa infection.

  15. Maturation of the cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase NirS from Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires transient interactions between the three proteins NirS, NirN and NirF.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicke, Tristan; Schnitzer, Tobias; Münch, Karin; Adamczack, Julia; Haufschildt, Kristin; Buchmeier, Sabine; Kucklick, Martin; Felgenträger, Undine; Jänsch, Lothar; Riedel, Katharina; Layer, Gunhild

    2013-01-01

    The periplasmic cytochrome cd 1 nitrite reductase NirS occurring in denitrifying bacteria such as the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa contains the essential tetrapyrrole cofactors haem c and haem d 1. Whereas the haem?c is incorporated into NirS by the cytochrome c maturation system I, nothing is known about the insertion of the haem d 1 into NirS. Here, we show by co-immunoprecipitation that NirS interacts with the potential haem d 1 insertion protein NirN in?vivo. This NirS?NirN inter...

  16. Biodegradation of endosulfan by a soil bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaramaiah, H M; Kennedy, I R

    2006-01-01

    A bacterium capable of metabolizing endosulfan (6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9-methano-2,4,3-benzodioxathiepine3-oxide) was isolated from cotton-growing soil and effectively shown to degrade endosulfan into endosulfan sulfate. The bacterium degraded 50% of the compound within 3 days of incubation. Endosulfan sulfate was the only terminal product and no other metabolites were formed during the incubation. Endosulfan and its metabolites were analyzed by gas chromatography. The metabolites formed indicated that the organism follows an oxidative pathway for metabolism of this pesticide. Therefore, the present study, microbial degradation of endosulfan by a soil bacterium, may provide a basis for the development of bioremediation strategies to remediate the pollutants in the environment.

  17. Pseudomonas oceani sp. nov., isolated from deep seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Qing; Sun, Li

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we identified a novel Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, motile, and rod-shaped bacterium, strain KX 20T, isolated from the deep seawater in Okinawa Trough, northwestern Pacific Ocean. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain KX 20T was related to members of the genus Pseudomonas and shares the highest sequence identities with Pseudomonas aestusnigri CECT 8317T (99.4 %) and Pseudomonas pachastrellae JCM 12285T (98.5 %). The 16S rRNA gene sequence identities between strain KX 20T and other members of the genus Pseudomonaswere below 96.6 %. The gyrB and rpoD genes of strain KX 20T shared 82.0 to 89.3 % sequence identity with the gyrB and rpoD genes of the closest phylogenetic neighbours of KX 20T. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain KX 20T were summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c) (29.2 %), C16 : 0 (24.5 %), summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) (21.5 %) and C12 : 0 (8.2 %). The major polar lipids of strain KX 20T were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and unknown phospholipids. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain KX 20T was 62.9 mol%. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic characteristics, a novel species, Pseudomonas oceani sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is KX 20T (=CGMCC 1.15195T=DSM 100277T).

  18. Rôles du facteur sigma à fonction extracytoplasmique SigX dans l'adaptation, la formation de biofilm et la réponse à des stress de l'enveloppe chez Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Duchesne, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major opportunistic pathogen causing many infectious diseases in immunocompromised patients. Widely studied because of its involvement in lung infections of cysticfibrosis suffering patients, this bacterium is a major public health challenge. P. aeruginosa persistence is largely due to its ability to adopt a multicellular lifestyle called biofilm. P. aeruginosa genome encodes numerous genes predicted to be involved in signal transduction allowing this bacterium to ...

  19. Pseudomonas A1 influences the formation of hydroxyapatite and degrades bioglass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou, E. [Laboratory of General Microbiology, Section of Genetics, Development and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Papadopoulou, L. [School of Geology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Paraskevopoulos, K.M. [Physics Department Solid State Physics Section, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Koidis, P. [Department of Fixed Prosthesis and Implant Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Sivropoulou, A., E-mail: asivropo@bio.auth.g [Laboratory of General Microbiology, Section of Genetics, Development and Molecular Biology, School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2009-12-15

    Bacterial infections frequently lead to hard tissue destructions. The purpose of the present study was to address the question as to how the bacteria destroy hard tissues with the use of an in vitro system. A bacterium was isolated from a solution simulating body fluid which was identified as Pseudomonas A1, and is able to solubilize tricalcium phosphate when it grows in IP broth. The presence of Pseudomonas A1 resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of the formation of hydroxyapatite layer, on the surface of bioglass specimens immersed in SBF solution, in contrast to the control. When the bioglass specimens were immersed in IP broth without Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, so as to be present the appropriate inorganic ions for the survival of Pseudomonas but the only source of phosphate be derived from bioactive glass specimens, the formation of hydroxyapatite layer was not observed in any specimen. Additionally the presence of Pseudomonas resulted in 93.4% (w/w) and 85.9% (w/w) reduction on the surface composition of Ca and P, respectively, and further the rate of the decrease of specimen's weight was almost 50% higher in the presence of Pseudomonas compared with the control.

  20. Pseudomonas A1 influences the formation of hydroxyapatite and degrades bioglass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulou, E.; Papadopoulou, L.; Paraskevopoulos, K.M.; Koidis, P.; Sivropoulou, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial infections frequently lead to hard tissue destructions. The purpose of the present study was to address the question as to how the bacteria destroy hard tissues with the use of an in vitro system. A bacterium was isolated from a solution simulating body fluid which was identified as Pseudomonas A1, and is able to solubilize tricalcium phosphate when it grows in IP broth. The presence of Pseudomonas A1 resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of the formation of hydroxyapatite layer, on the surface of bioglass specimens immersed in SBF solution, in contrast to the control. When the bioglass specimens were immersed in IP broth without Ca 3 (PO 4 ) 2 , so as to be present the appropriate inorganic ions for the survival of Pseudomonas but the only source of phosphate be derived from bioactive glass specimens, the formation of hydroxyapatite layer was not observed in any specimen. Additionally the presence of Pseudomonas resulted in 93.4% (w/w) and 85.9% (w/w) reduction on the surface composition of Ca and P, respectively, and further the rate of the decrease of specimen's weight was almost 50% higher in the presence of Pseudomonas compared with the control.

  1. Pseudomonas tarimensis sp. nov., an endophytic bacteria isolated from Populus euphratica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Nusratgul; Rozahon, Manziram; Zayadan, Bolatkhan; Mamtimin, Hormathan; Abdurahman, Mehfuzem; Kurban, Marygul; Abdurusul, Mihribangul; Mamtimin, Tursunay; Abdukerim, Muhtar; Rahman, Erkin

    2017-11-01

    An endophytic bacterium, MA-69 T , was isolated from the storage liquid in the stems of Populuseuphratica trees at the ancient Ugan River in Xinjiang, PR China. Strain MA-69 T was found to be short rod-shaped, Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, aerobic and motile by means of a monopolar flagellum. According to phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, strain MA-69 T was assigned to the genus Pseudomonas with highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 97.5 % to Pseudomonas azotifigens JCM 12708 T , followed by Pseudomonas matsuisoli JCM 30078 T (97.5 %), Pseudomonas balearica DSM 6083 T (97.1 %), Azotobacter salinestris ATCC 49674 T (96.1 %) and Pseudomonas indica DSM 14015 T (95.9 %). Analysis of strain MA-69 T based on the three housekeeping genes, rpoB, rpoD and gyrB, further confirmed the isolate to be distinctly delineated from species of the genus Pseudomonas. The DNA G+C content of strain MA-69 T was 64.1 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization with Pseudomonas azotifigens JCM 12708 T , Pseudomonas matsuisoli JCM 30078 T and Pseudomonas balearica DSM 6083 T revealed 62.9, 60.1 and 49.0 % relatedness, respectively. The major fatty acids in strain MA-69 T were summed feature 3 (25.7 %), summed feature 8 (24.0 %), C19 : 0cyclo ω8c (19.9 %), C16 : 0 (14.6 %) and C12 : 0 (6.3 %). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. Q-9 was the major quinone in strain MA-69 T . Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties, strain MA-69 T represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas tarimensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MA-69 T (=CCTCC AB 2013065 T =KCTC 42447 T ).

  2. Pyruvic Oxime Nitrification and Copper and Nickel Resistance by a Cupriavidus pauculus, an Active Heterotrophic Nitrifier-Denitrifier

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Miguel; Obrzydowski, Jennifer; Ayers, Mary; Virparia, Sonia; Wang, Meijing; Stefan, Kurtis; Linchangco, Richard; Castignetti, Domenic

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrophic nitrifiers synthesize nitrogenous gasses when nitrifying ammonium ion. A Cupriavidus pauculus, previously thought an Alcaligenes sp. and noted as an active heterotrophic nitrifier-denitrifier, was examined for its ability to produce nitrogen gas (N2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) while heterotrophically nitrifying the organic substrate pyruvic oxime [CH3–C(NOH)–COOH]. Neither N2 nor N2O were produced. Nucleotide and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the organism is a member of a g...

  3. Degradation of toluene and m-xylene and transformation of o-xylene by denitrifying enrichment cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, P J; Mang, D T; Young, L Y

    1991-01-01

    Seven different sources of inocula that included sediments, contaminated soils, groundwater, process effluent, and sludge were used to establish enrichment cultures of denitrifying bacteria on benzene, toluene, and xylenes in the absence of molecular oxygen. All of the enrichment cultures demonstrated complete depletion of toluene and partial depletion of o-xylene within 3 months of incubation. The depletion of o-xylene was correlated to and dependent on the metabolism of toluene. No losses o...

  4. Zymomonas mobilis: a bacterium for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baratti, J.C.; Bu' Lock, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a facultative anaerobic gram negative bacterium first isolated in tropical countries from alcoholic beverages like the African palm wine, the Mexican pulque and also as a contaminant of cider (cider sickness) or beer in the European countries. It is one of the few facultative anaerobic bacteria degrading glucose by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway usually found in strictly aerobic microorganisms. Some work was devoted to this bacterium in the 50s and 60s and was reviewed by Swings and De Ley in their classical paper published in 1977. During the 70s there was very little work on the bacterium until 1979 and the first report by the Australian group of P.L. Rogers on the great potentialities of Z. mobilis for ethanol production. At that time the petroleum crisis had led the developed countries to search for alternative fuel from renewable resources. The Australian group clearly demonstrated the advantages of the bacterium compared to the yeasts traditionally used for the alcoholic fermentation. As a result, there was a considerable burst in the Zymomonas literature which started from nearly zero in the late 70s to attain 70 papers published in the field in 1984. In this article, papers published from 1982 to 1986 are reviewed.

  5. Pseudomonas coleopterorum sp nov., a cellulase-producing bacterium isolated from the bark beetle Hylesinus fraxini

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menéndez, E.; Ramírez-Bahena, M.H.; Fabryová, Anna; Igual, J.M.; Benada, Oldřich; Mateos, P.; Peix, A.; Kolařík, Miroslav; García-Fraile, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 65, September (2015), s. 2852-2858 ISSN 1466-5026 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : CURCULIONIDAE SCOLYTINAE * NUCLEOTIDE-SEQUENCES * DENDROCTONUS-RHIZOPHAGUS Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.439, year: 2015

  6. Pseudomonas coleopterorum sp nov., a cellulase-producing bacterium isolated from the bark beetle Hylesinus fraxini

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menéndez, E.; Ramírez-Bahena, M.H.; Fabryová, A.; Igual, J.M.; Benada, Oldřich

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 65, SEP 2015 (2015), s. 2852-2858 ISSN 1466-5026 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : CURCULIONIDAE SCOLYTINAE * NUCLEOTIDE-SEQUENCES * DENDROCTONUS-RHIZOPHAGUS Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.439, year: 2015

  7. Aerobic degradation of highly chlorinated polychlorobiphenyls by a marine bacterium, Pseudomonas CH07

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    De, J.; Ramaiah, N.; Sarkar, A.

    .J. & Maccubbin, A. 1987 32P-postlabelling analysis of aromatic DNA adducts in fish from polluted water. Cancer Research 47, 6543-6548. 11. Everaarts, J.M., Sleiderink, H.M., Besten, P.J.D., Halbrook, R.S. & Shugart, L.R. 1994 Molecular responses as indicators...

  8. Characterization of Denitrifying Phosphorus Removal Microorganisms in a Novel Two-Sludge Process by Combining Chemical with Microbial Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiming Zou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work focuses on the investigation of denitrifying phosphorus removal organisms (DPB in a novel two-sludge denitrifying phosphorus removal process by combining chemical with microbial analysis. When the two-sludge process operated stably over one year, good phosphorus (P release and P uptake performance of activated sludge samples collected from this process were present in anaerobic and anoxic conditions, respectively, via batch test, showing that the ratio of P release specific rate to P uptake specific rate was 1.31. The analysis of energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS showed that P content of activated sludge samples collected at the end of anoxic phase was 12.3% of dry weight, further demonstrating the existence of microorganisms responsible for phosphorus removal in this two-sludge process. From polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE analysis, the presence of microorganisms mostly belonging to the phyla Firmicutes and Proteobacteria was observed, previously evidenced in the phosphorus removal wastewater treatment process. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH quantitative analysis showed that Accumulibacter responsible for phosphorus removal was dominant in this two-sludge process, accounting for 69.7% of all bacteria in activated sludge. These results obtained from chemical and microbial analysis in this study suggested that denitrifying phosphorus removal microorganisms were completely enriched in the two-sludge process proposed here.

  9. Denitrifying capability and community dynamics of glycogen accumulating organisms during sludge granulation in an anaerobic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Zhang; Bin, Xue; Zhigang, Qiu; Zhiqiang, Chen; Junwen, Li; Taishi, Gong; Wenci, Zou; Jingfeng, Wang

    2015-01-01

    Denitrifying capability of glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) has received great attention in environmental science and microbial ecology. Combining this ability with granule processes would be an interesting attempt. Here, a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated to enrich GAOs and enable sludge granulation. The results showed that the GAO granules were cultivated successfully and the granules had denitrifying capability. The batch experiments demonstrated that all NO3−-N could be removed or reduced, some amount of NO2−-N were accumulated in the reactor, and N2 was the main gaseous product. SEM analysis suggested that the granules were tightly packed with a large amount of tetrad-forming organisms (TFOs); filamentous bacteria served as the supporting structures for the granules. The microbial community structure of GAO granules was differed substantially from the inoculant conventional activated sludge. Most of the bacteria in the seed sludge grouped with members of Proteobacterium. FISH analysis confirmed that GAOs were the predominant members in the granules and were distributed evenly throughout the granular space. In contrast, PAOs were severely inhibited. Overall, cultivation of the GAO granules and utilizing their denitrifying capability can provide us with a new approach of nitrogen removal and saving more energy. PMID:26257096

  10. Simultaneous pollutant removal and electricity generation in denitrifying microbial fuel cell with boric acid-borate buffer solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shaohui; Li, Meng; Wei, Yan

    2015-01-01

    A double-chamber denitrifying microbial fuel cell (MFC), using boric acid-borate buffer solution as an alternative to phosphate buffer solution, was set up to investigate the influence of buffer solution concentration, temperature and external resistance on electricity generation and pollutant removal efficiency. The result revealed that the denitrifying MFC with boric acid-borate buffer solution was successfully started up in 51 days, with a stable cell voltage of 205.1 ± 1.96 mV at an external resistance of 50 Ω. Higher concentration of buffer solution favored nitrogen removal and electricity generation. The maximum power density of 8.27 W/m(3) net cathodic chamber was obtained at a buffer solution concentration of 100 mmol/L. An increase in temperature benefitted electricity generation and nitrogen removal. A suitable temperature for this denitrifying MFC was suggested to be 25 °C. Decreasing the external resistance favored nitrogen removal and organic matter consumption by exoelectrogens.

  11. Effect of CO2 on NADH production of denitrifying microbes via inhibiting carbon source transport and its metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Rui; Chen, Yinguang; Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Huang, Haining

    2018-06-15

    The potential effect of CO 2 on environmental microbes has drawn much attention recently. As an important section of the nitrogen cycle, biological denitrification requires electron donor to reduce nitrogen oxide. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which is formed during carbon source metabolism, is a widely reported electron donor for denitrification. Here we studied the effect of CO 2 on NADH production and carbon source utilization in the denitrifying microbe Paracoccus denitrificans. We observed that NADH level was decreased by 45.5% with the increase of CO 2 concentration from 0 to 30,000ppm, which was attributed to the significantly decreased utilization of carbon source (i.e., acetate). Further study showed that CO 2 inhibited carbon source utilization because of multiple negative influences: (1) suppressing the growth and viability of denitrifier cells, (2) weakening the driving force for carbon source transport by decreasing bacterial membrane potential, and (3) downregulating the expression of genes encoding key enzymes involved in intracellular carbon metabolism, such as citrate synthase, aconitate hydratase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and fumarate reductase. This study suggests that the inhibitory effect of CO 2 on NADH production in denitrifiers might deteriorate the denitrification performance in an elevated CO 2 climate scenario. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeet Kumar Meher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms.

  13. Effects of Bubble-Mediated Processes on Nitrous Oxide Dynamics in Denitrifying Bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, P. M.; Falk, L. M.; Reid, M. C.

    2017-12-01

    To mitigate groundwater and surface water impacts of reactive nitrogen (N), agricultural and stormwater management practices can employ denitrifying bioreactors (DNBs) as low-cost solutions for enhancing N removal. Due to the variable nature of hydrologic events, DNBs experience dynamic flows which can impact physical and biological processes within the reactors and affect performance. A particular concern is incomplete denitrification, which can release the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere. This study aims to provide insight into the effects of varying hydrologic conditions upon the operation of DNBs by disentangling abiotic and biotic controls on denitrification and N2O dynamics within a laboratory-scale bioreactor. We hypothesize that under transient hydrologic flows, rising water levels lead to air entrapment and bubble formation within the DNB porous media. Mass transfer of oxygen (O2) between trapped gas and liquid phases creates aerobic microenvironments that can inhibit N2O reductase (NosZ) enzymes and lead to N2O accumulation. These bubbles also retard N2O transport and make N2O unavailable for biological reduction, further enhancing atmospheric fluxes when water levels fall. The laboratory-scale DNB permits measurements of longitudinal and vertical profiles of dissolved constituents as well as trace gas concentrations in the reactor headspace. We describe a set of experiments quantifying denitrification pathway biokinetics under steady-state and transient hydrologic conditions and evaluate the role of bubble-mediated processes in enhancing N2O accumulation and fluxes. We use sulfur hexafluoride and helium as dissolved gas tracers to examine the impact of bubble entrapment upon retarded gas transport and enhanced trace gas fluxes. A planar optode sensor within the bioreactor provides near-continuous 2-D profiles of dissolved O2 within the bioreactor and allows for identification of aerobic microenvironments. We use qPCR to

  14. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea are more resistant than denitrifiers to seasonal precipitation changes in an acidic subtropical forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie

    2017-04-01

    More frequent droughts and storms will occur globally in the prediction of global climate change model, which will influence soil microorganisms and nutrient cycles. Understanding the resistance of soil functional microorganisms and the associated biogeochemical cycles to such climate changes is important in evaluating responses of ecosystem functioning. In order to clarify the responses of soil functional microorganisms involved in nitrogen (N) cycle to the predicted precipitation scenarios, two contrasting precipitation manipulation experiments were conducted in an acidic subtropical forest soil. One experiment manipulated drier dry-season and wetter wet-season (DD) by reducing dry-season rainfall and adding the equivalently reduced rainfall to wet-season. Another experiment manipulated extending dry-season and wetter wet-season (ED) by reducing spring-season rainfall and adding the equivalent rainfall in the late wet-season. The resistance index of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) amoA and denitrifying (nirK, nirS and nosZ) genes abundance, soil net N mineralization and nitrification rates were calculated during experiments to examine their responses to precipitation changes. As the results, the resistance index of functional microbial abundance (-0.03 ± 0.08) was much lower than that of net N transformation rates (0.55 ± 0.02), indicating more sensitive of functional microorganisms in response to precipitation changes than the related N processes. Extending dry-season showed greater effects on both AOA amoA and denitrifying genes abundance than drier dry-season, with significant increases of these microbial abundance after extending dry-season. This was mainly due to the interaction effects of soil water content (SWC), dissolve organic carbon (DOC) and NH4+ concentration during rainfall reduction in spring-season. Interestingly, the resistance index of AOA amoA abundance was significantly higher than that of denitrifying gene abundance, indicating more

  15. Correcting for background nitrate contamination in KCl-extracted samples during isotopic analysis of oxygen and nitrogen by the denitrifier method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Michael D; Sickman, James O

    2014-03-15

    Previous research has shown that the denitrifying bacteria Pseudomonas chlororaphis ssp. aureofaciens (P. aureofaciens) can be used to measure the δ(15)N and δ(18)O values of extracted soil nitrate (NO3(-)) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. We discovered that N2O production from reference blanks made in 1 M KCl increased relative to blanks made of deionized water (DIW). Further investigation showed that isotopic standards made in KCl yielded δ(15)N and δ(18)O values different from the standards prepared in DIW. Three grades of crystalline KCl were dissolved in DIW to create solutions of increasing molarity (0.1 M to 2 M), which were added to P. aureofaciens broth and measured as blanks. Reference standards USGS-32, USGS-34, and USGS-35 were then dissolved in a range of KCl concentrations to measure isotopic responses to changing KCl molarity. Reference blanks and standards created in DIW were analyzed as controls to measure the impact of KCl on the δ(15)N and δ(18)O values. The amount of N2O in the KCl blanks increased linearly with increasing molarity, but at different rates for each KCl grade. The isotopic values of the reference standards measured in KCl were systematically different from those measured in DIW, suggesting contamination by background NO3(-) in the KCl reagents. However, we also noted reduced conversion of NO3(-) into N2O as the KCl molarity increased, suggesting there is a physiological response of P. aureofaciens to KCl. There is a small amount of NO3(-) present in crystalline KCl, which can bias isotopic measurement of NO3(-) at low sample concentrations. This can be minimized by making standards and blanks in the same KCl as is used in samples, diluting all samples and standards to the appropriate NO3(-) concentration using matched KCl solutions, and adding samples and standards to the broth at a constant volume to standardize the KCl molarity in the reaction vial. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Cyclohexane-1,2-Dione Hydrolase from Denitrifying Azoarcus sp. Strain 22Lin, a Novel Member of the Thiamine Diphosphate Enzyme Family▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Alma K.; Fraas, Sonja; Harder, Jens; Tabbert, Anja; Brinkmann, Henner; Meyer, Axel; Ermler, Ulrich; Kroneck, Peter M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Alicyclic compounds with hydroxyl groups represent common structures in numerous natural compounds, such as terpenes and steroids. Their degradation by microorganisms in the absence of dioxygen may involve a C—C bond ring cleavage to form an aliphatic intermediate that can be further oxidized. The cyclohexane-1,2-dione hydrolase (CDH) (EC 3.7.1.11) from denitrifying Azoarcus sp. strain 22Lin, grown on cyclohexane-1,2-diol as a sole electron donor and carbon source, is the first thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme characterized to date that cleaves a cyclic aliphatic compound. The degradation of cyclohexane-1,2-dione (CDO) to 6-oxohexanoate comprises the cleavage of a C—C bond adjacent to a carbonyl group, a typical feature of reactions catalyzed by ThDP-dependent enzymes. In the subsequent NAD+-dependent reaction, 6-oxohexanoate is oxidized to adipate. CDH has been purified to homogeneity by the criteria of gel electrophoresis (a single band at ∼59 kDa; calculated molecular mass, 64.5 kDa); in solution, the enzyme is a homodimer (∼105 kDa; gel filtration). As isolated, CDH contains 0.8 ± 0.05 ThDP, 1.0 ± 0.02 Mg2+, and 1.0 ± 0.015 flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) per monomer as a second organic cofactor, the role of which remains unclear. Strong reductants, Ti(III)-citrate, Na+-dithionite, and the photochemical 5-deazaflavin/oxalate system, led to a partial reduction of the FAD chromophore. The cleavage product of CDO, 6-oxohexanoate, was also a substrate; the corresponding cyclic 1,3- and 1,4-diones did not react with CDH, nor did the cis- and trans-cyclohexane diols. The enzymes acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, pyruvate oxidase (POX) from Lactobacillus plantarum, benzoylformate decarboxylase from Pseudomonas putida, and pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis were identified as the closest relatives of CDH by comparative amino acid sequence analysis, and a ThDP binding motif and a 2-fold Rossmann fold for

  17. Outer Membrane Protein D Gene in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and its Role in Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Motaghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of nosocomial infection. OprD protein is a specific protein regulating the uptake of carbapenem antibiotic. Loss of OprD is the main mechanism of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa resistance to carbapenem. In this study, the presence of OprD gene is investigated in isolated Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in burn patients of Ghotboddin hospital in Shiraz. Material & Methods: 66 Pseudomonas Aeruginosa were isolated from wound specimens of 250 burn patients. Strain characteristics were confirmed by biochemical tests. Antibiogram was done via disc diffusion method. Finally, OprD gene was investigated by PCR. Results: Isolated Pseudomonas Aeruginosa showed more sensitivity to chloramphenicol and colicitin and more resistance  to ciprofloxacin, gentamycin, cefotaxim, ceftazidin, imipenem, meropenem, and erythromycin. 61 percent of isolates were positive for OprD gene by PCR. Conclusion: The findings of this study revealed that Colicitin and chloramphenicol are more effective in treatment of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa infections in burn patients, and deletion and mutation in OprD gene cause bacterium resistance to carbapenem antibiotic.

  18. Pseudomonas granadensis sp. nov., a new bacterial species isolated from the Tejeda, Almijara and Alhama Natural Park, Granada, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Javier; García-López, Marina; Bills, Gerald F; Genilloud, Olga

    2015-02-01

    During the course of screening bacterial isolates as sources of as-yet unknown bioactive compounds with pharmaceutical applications, a chemo-organotrophic, Gram-negative bacterium was isolated from a soil sample taken from the Tejeda, Almijara and Alhama Natural Park, Granada, Spain. Strain F-278,770(T) was oxidase- and catalase-positive, aerobic, with a respiratory type of metabolism with oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor, non-spore-forming and motile by one polar flagellum, although some cells had two polar flagella. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD genes revealed that strain F-278,770(T) belongs to the Pseudomonas koreensis subgroup (Pseudomonas fluorescens lineage), with Pseudomonas moraviensis, P. koreensis, P. baetica and P. helmanticensis as its closest relatives. Chemotaxonomic traits such as polar lipid and fatty acid compositions and G+C content of genomic DNA corroborated the placement of strain F-278,770(T) in the genus Pseudomonas. DNA-DNA hybridization assays and phenotypic traits confirmed that this strain represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas granadensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is F-278,770(T) ( = DSM 28040(T) = LMG 27940(T)). © 2015 Fundacion MEDINA, Centro de Excelencia en Investigacion de Medicamentos Innovadores en Andalucia.

  19. Evaluating the efficiency of carbon utilisation via bioenergetics between biological aerobic and denitrifying phosphorus removal systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Jin

    Full Text Available There are two biological systems available for removing phosphorus from waste water, conventional phosphorus removal (CPR and denitrifying phosphorus removal (DPR systems, and each is characterized by the type of sludge used in the process. In this study, we compared the characteristics associated with the efficiency of carbon utilization between CPR and DPR sludge using acetate as a carbon source. For DPR sludge, the heat emitted during the phosphorus release and phosphorus uptake processes were 45.79 kJ/mol e- and 84.09 kJ/mol e-, respectively. These values were about 2 fold higher than the corresponding values obtained for CPR sludge, suggesting that much of the energy obtained from the carbon source was emitted as heat. Further study revealed a smaller microbial mass within the DPR sludge compared to CPR sludge, as shown by a lower sludge yield coefficient (0.05 gVSS/g COD versus 0.36 gVSS/g COD, a result that was due to the lower energy capturing efficiency of DPR sludge according to bioenergetic analysis. Although the efficiency of anoxic phosphorus removal was only 39% the efficiency of aerobic phosphorus removal, the consumption of carbon by DPR sludge was reduced by 27.8% compared to CPR sludge through the coupling of denitrification with dephosphatation.

  20. Thermal characterization during dehydration of nitrifying and denitrifying microbiological mud encapsulated in silica gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, G.; Arriola, G.; Gomez-Hernandez, J.; Lopez, T.; Picquart, M.; Aguilar, D.H.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado-Gil, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative method to diminish the nitrogen pollutant levels in waste waters is to encapsulate microorganisms whitin ceramic materials. The sol-gel method has been extensively used for the preparation of such kind of materials permitting a higher stability and viability of useful organisms. In this work, the thermal characterization during dehydration of nitrifying and denitrifying aqueous emulsions of mud encapsulated in sol-gel silica is presented during the process of dehydration in ambient conditions and as a function of temperature. The characterization was performed by a photopyroelectric (PPE) technique, whose detector was made with a 110 mm polyvinyldifluoride (PVDF). The cell was constructed in such a way that the sample was inside the cell, and the bottom of the cell was closed by the PVDF foil. Thermal effusivity as a function of temperature was obtained illuminating the PVDF directly by a modulated 1W tungsten lamp. The sample is enclosed inside a chamber, using a Peltier cell that controls temperature in a range from 40 to 27 deg. C. The sample is on top of the PVDF, which is illuminated by the modulated tungsten lamp

  1. Quorum sensing and policing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa social cheaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meizhen; Schaefer, Amy L; Dandekar, Ajai A; Greenberg, E Peter

    2015-02-17

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that uses a quorum sensing signal cascade to activate expression of dozens of genes when sufficient population densities have been reached. Quorum sensing controls production of several key virulence factors, including secreted proteases such as elastase. Cooperating groups of bacteria growing on protein are susceptible to social cheating by quorum-sensing defective mutants. A possible way to restrict cheater emergence is by policing where cooperators produce costly goods to sanction or punish cheats. The P. aeruginosa LasR-LasI quorum sensing system controls genes including those encoding proteases and also those encoding a second quorum-sensing system, the RhlR-RhlI system, which controls numerous genes including those for cyanide production. By using RhlR quorum sensing mutants and cyanide synthesis mutants, we show that cyanide production is costly and cyanide-producing cooperators use cyanide to punish LasR-null social cheaters. Cooperators are less susceptible to cyanide than are LasR mutants. These experiments demonstrate policing in P. aeruginosa, provide a mechanistic understanding of policing, and show policing involves the cascade organization of the two quorum sensing systems in this bacterium.

  2. Pseudomonas salina sp. nov., isolated from a salt lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Hou, Ting-Ting; Liu, Hong-Can; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Wang, Fang; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2015-09-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, facultatively aerobic bacterium, strain XCD-X85(T), was isolated from Xiaochaidan Lake, a salt lake (salinity 9.9%, w/v) in Qaidam basin, Qinghai province, China. Its taxonomic position was determined by using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain XCD-X85(T) were non-endospore-forming rods, 0.4-0.6 μm wide and 1.0-1.6 μm long, and motile by means of a single polar flagellum. Strain XCD-X85(T) was catalase- and oxidase-positive. Growth was observed in the presence of 0-12.0% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 1.0-2.0%) and at 4-35 °C (optimum, 25-30 °C) and pH 6.5-10.5 (optimum, pH 8.0-8.5). Strain XCD-X85(T) contained (>10%) summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c), C12 : 0, C16 : 0 and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or C16 : 1ω6c) as the predominant fatty acids. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 9 (Q-9). The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. The DNA G+C content was 57.4 mol%. Phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain XCD-X85(T) was associated with the genus Pseudomonas, and showed highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities to Pseudomonas pelagia CL-AP6(T) (99.0%) and Pseudomonas bauzanensis BZ93(T) (96.8%). DNA-DNA relatedness of strain XCD-X85T to P. pelagia JCM 15562(T) was 19 ± 1%. On the basis of the data presented above, it is concluded that strain XCD-X85(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas salina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is XCD-X85(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12482(T) = JCM 19469(T)).

  3. Study on Antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas aeruginosa NO4 Strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Ji Young; Kim, Jin Kyu

    2011-01-01

    As important human and veterinary medicines, antibiotics are being produced and consumed in large quantities around the world. For example, more than 50 million pounds (22,000 tons) of antibiotics are produced in the U.S. each year and annual production in Germany is about 2,000 tons. Antibiotics are low molecular weight microbial metabolites that at low concentrations inhibit the growth of other microorganisms. Resistant bacteria may also spread and become broader infection-control problems, not only within health care institutions, but in communities as well. Clinically important bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a common cause of infection among hospitalized patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of opportunistic infections among immunocompromised individuals. The spread of this organism in health care settings is often difficult to control due to the presence of multiple intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we isolated novel bacterium which had strong antagonistic activity and separated antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas sp., and analyzed characteristics and molecular weight of the antibiotic compound

  4. Anthranilate degradation by a cold-adapted Pseudomonas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dockyu; Yoo, Miyoun; Kim, Eungbin; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2015-03-01

    An alpine soil bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25931 was characterized as eurypsychrophilic (both psychrophilic and mesotolerant) with a broad temperature range of 5-30 °C both for anthranilate (2-aminobenzoate) degradation and concomitant cell growth. Two degradative gene clusters (antABC and catBCA) were detected from a fosmid clone in the PAMC 25931 genomic library; each cluster was confirmed to be specifically induced by anthranilate. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant AntABC (anthranilate 1,2-dioxygenase, AntDO) converted anthranilate into catechol, exhibiting strict specificity toward anthranilate. Recombinant CatA (catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, C12O) from the organism was active over a broad temperature range (5-37 °C). However, CatA rapidly lost the enzyme activity when incubated at above 25 °C. For example, 1 h-preincubation at 37 °C resulted in 100% loss of enzyme activity, while a counterpart from mesophilic Pseudomonas putida mt-2 did not show any negative effect on the initial enzyme activity. These results suggest that CatA is a new cold-adapted thermolabile enzyme, which might be a product through the adaptation process of PAMC 25931 to naturally cold environments and contribute to its ability to grow on anthranilate there. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Study on Antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas aeruginosa NO4 Strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Young; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    As important human and veterinary medicines, antibiotics are being produced and consumed in large quantities around the world. For example, more than 50 million pounds (22,000 tons) of antibiotics are produced in the U.S. each year and annual production in Germany is about 2,000 tons. Antibiotics are low molecular weight microbial metabolites that at low concentrations inhibit the growth of other microorganisms. Resistant bacteria may also spread and become broader infection-control problems, not only within health care institutions, but in communities as well. Clinically important bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a common cause of infection among hospitalized patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of opportunistic infections among immunocompromised individuals. The spread of this organism in health care settings is often difficult to control due to the presence of multiple intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we isolated novel bacterium which had strong antagonistic activity and separated antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas sp., and analyzed characteristics and molecular weight of the antibiotic compound

  6. Responses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji eMorita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa often are hard to treat; inappropriate chemotherapy readily selects multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. This organism can be exposed to a wide range of concentrations of antimicrobials during treatment; learning more about the responses of P. aeruginosa to antimicrobials is therefore important. We review here responses of the bacterium P. aeruginosa upon exposure to antimicrobials at levels below the inhibitory concentration.Carbapenems (e.g., imipenem have been shown to induce the formation of thicker and more robust biofilms, while fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin and aminoglycosides (e.g., tobramycin have been shown to induce biofilm formation. Ciprofloxacin also has been demonstrated to enhance the frequency of mutation to carbapenem resistance. Conversely, although macrolides (e.g., azithromycin typically are not effective against P. aeruginosa because of the pseudomonal outer-membrane impermeability and efflux, macrolides do lead to a reduction in virulence factor production. Similarly, tetracycline is not very effective against this organism, but is known to induce the type-III secretion system and consequently enhance cytotoxicity of P. aeruginosa in vivo. Of special note are the effects of antibacterials and disinfectants on pseudomonal efflux systems. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of protein synthesis inhibitors (aminoglycosides, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, etc. induce the MexXY multidrug efflux system. This response is known to be mediated by interference with the translation of the leader peptide PA5471.1, with consequent effects on expression of the PA5471 gene product. Additionally, induction of the MexCD-OprJ multidrug efflux system is observed upon exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of disinfectants such as chlorhexidine and benzalkonium. This response is known to be dependent upon the AlgU stress response factor.Altogether, these biological responses of P. aeruginosa

  7. Hot Tub Rash (Pseudomonas Dermatitis/Folliculitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page] Español [PDF – 1 page] “Hot Tub Rash” ( Pseudomonas Dermatitis / Folliculitis) If contaminated water comes in contact ... is often caused by infection with the germ Pseudomonas aeruginosa . This germ is common in the environment ( ...

  8. Investigation Of The Primary Transcriptome Of The Production Organism Pseudomonas Putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arrigo, Isotta; Bojanovic, Klara; Long, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pseudomonas putida is a nonpathogenic, Gram-negative bacterium and an excellent model organism for biotechnological applications. Due to its metabolic versatility, P. putida can grow in different environments including in extreme conditions. It has several genes to degrade xenobiotic...... compounds, a capability that renders the bacterium useful in bioremediation. Finally, P. putida shows a high potential as a cell factory for the production of several compounds. Methods: Here, a differential RNA-sequencing approach (dRNA-seq) is used to gain new insights into the organization of the P....... putida KT2440 transcriptome, in the presence of citrate or glucose as sole carbon source. Results: A total of 7937 putative transcription start sites (TSSs) have been identified. 5’ RACE experiments have been performed to confirm putative TSSs, and 5’ UTR regions have been investigated for conservative...

  9. Novel small protein identification and quantitative proteomic analysis in Pseudomonas putida KT-­2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaochen

    .This thesis investigated an industrial bacterium, Pseudomonas putida KT-2440, in two aspects. First, the research focused on discovering novel small proteins (s-proteins) in the bacterium. With large-scale approaches for gene identification, groups of novel s-proteins were identified and validated from...... level under different environmental conditions. The results yield insights intothe adaptation of P. putida KT-2440 in different environments.Based on bioinformatic, proteomic and transcriptomic approaches, global gene expression was analyzed on both transcriptional and translational levels. Our research...... for the first time validates novel s-proteins in P. putida KT-2440, and significantly increases the knowledge of P.putida protein expression and environmental adaptation....

  10. Evolution of Transcriptional Regulatory Networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa During Long Time Growth in Human Hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Eva Kammer

    are subjected to forces that allow the bacteria to break genomic constraints, remodel existing regulatory networks, and colonise new environments. While experimental evolution studies have documented that global regulators of gene expression are indeed targets for adaptive mutations, it is less clear to which...... extent these observations relate to natural microbial populations. The focus of this thesis has been to study how regulatory networks evolve in natural systems. By using a particular infectious disease scenario (human associated persistent airway infections caused by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... in global regulator genes facilitate the generation of novel phenotypes which again facilitate the shift in life-style of the bacterium from an environmental opportunistic pathogen to a human airway specific pathogen. These findings are not only applicable to P. aeruginosa specific studies, but suggest that...

  11. Identification of quorum-sensing regulated proteins in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arevalo-Ferro, C.; Hentzer, Morten; Reil, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen which is responsible for severe nosocomial infections in immunocompromised patients and is the major pathogen in cystic fibrosis. The bacterium utilizes two interrelated quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which rely......Ap, are components of the two distinct haem-uptake systems present in P. aeruginosa. In agreement with the finding that both proteins are positively regulated by the QS cascade, we show that the lasI rhlI double mutant grows poorly with haemoglobin as the only iron source when compared with the wild type....... These results add haemoglobin utilization to the list of phenotypes controlled through QS in P. aeruginosa. The surprisingly high number of AHL-regulated proteins relative to the number of regulated genes suggests that quorum-sensing control also operates via post-transcriptional mechanisms. To strengthen...

  12. The RNA chaperone Hfq enables the environmental stress tolerance super-phenotype of Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Calles, Belén; Nikel, Pablo I; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2016-10-01

    The natural physiological regime of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida involves incessant exposure to endogenous metabolic conflicts and environmental physicochemical insults. Yet, the role of assisted small RNA-mRNA pairing in the stress tolerance super-phenotype that is the trademark of this bacterium has not been accredited. We have thoroughly explored the physiological consequences -in particular those related to exogenous stress - of deleting the hfq gene of P. putida, which encodes the major RNA chaperone that promotes sRNA-target mRNA interactions. While the overall trend was a general weakening of every robustness descriptor of the Δhfq strain, growth parameters and production of central metabolic enzymes were comparatively less affected than other qualities that depend directly on energy status (e.g. motility, DNA repair). The overall catalytic vigour of the mutant decreased to putida. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Study on screening of anti-predator rhizosphere bacterium against Caenorhabditis elegans and its anti predation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Qingling

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Althoughmicrobial fertilizer is multi-effect,environmental friendly and long-term efficient,its practical application effect is but decreased for being prey by the other creators living in soil frequently.Many bacterium have developed their mechanisms that expel or kill worms to defend themselves from predators.Screening of anti-predator rhizosphere bacterium helps us to find out competitive plant growth promoting rhizobacteria(PGPR.Using Caenorhabditis elegans as sample,this study roughly observed two strains of biocontrol:Pseudomonas aurantiaca JD37 and Pseudomonas fluorescens P13.Using Escherichia coli OP50 as control group,we find the preference order of worms,from highest to lowest,is P13,OP50 and JD37.In slow killing assay,the death rate of worms for JD37 and P13 are 26.12% and 18.66% respectively.The activity and reproduction rate of C.elegans decrease when it is fed on JD37.The results of chemical and micro-biological study show that JD37 cannot produce any currently studied second metabolites which kill worms,while P13 can produce Hydrogen cyanide (HCN.All these results show that JD37 has the ability of anti-predator,and is more competitive under predation pressure,which suggests its broad application prospect as microbial fertilizer.

  14. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Pseudomonas veronii AS41G inhabiting Annona squamosa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Syed; Satish, Sreedharamurthy

    2015-11-05

    Biogenic principles to nanotechnology have generated tremendous attention in recent past owing eco friendly benign process for synthesis of nanoparticles. Present investigation reports extracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles using cell free supernatant of Pseudomonas veronii AS 41G, a novel endophyte isolated from Annona squamosa L. Gold nanoparticles formation was confirmed with UV-Visible spectrophotometer. FTIR analysis predicted various functional groups responsible for reduction of metal salts and stabilization of gold nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were crystalline in nature as shown in XRD pattern. TEM analysis revealed morphological characteristics of nanoparticles with different size. Thus the present study attributes for facile process for synthesis of gold nanoparticles as an alternative for conventional methods. The study also highlights the new role of novel bacterium Pseudomonas veronii AS41G which will be very valuable as a record for the researchers working on it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antifungal Activity of Selected Indigenous Pseudomonas and Bacillus from the Soybean Rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. García

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to isolate and select indigenous soil Pseudomonas and Bacillus bacteria capable of developing multiple mechanisms of action related to the biocontrol of phytopathogenic fungi affecting soybean crops. The screening procedure consisted of antagonism tests against a panel of phytopathogenic fungi, taxonomic identification, detection by PCR of several genes related to antifungal activity, in vitro detection of the antifungal products, and root colonization assays. Two isolates, identified and designated as Pseudomonas fluorescens BNM296 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens BNM340, were selected for further studies. These isolates protected plants against the damping-off caused by Pythium ultimum and were able to increase the seedling emergence rate after inoculation of soybean seeds with each bacterium. Also, the shoot nitrogen content was higher in plants when seeds were inoculated with BNM296. The polyphasic approach of this work allowed us to select two indigenous bacterial strains that promoted the early development of soybean plants.

  16. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facts About “Hot Tub Rash” and “Swimmer’s Ear” (Pseudomonas) What is Pseudomonas and how can it affect me? Pseudomonas (sue-doh- ... a major cause of infections commonly known as “hot tub rash” and “swimmer’s ear.” This germ is ...

  17. Inhibition of Cell Differentiation in Bacillus subtilis by Pseudomonas protegens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Matthew J.; Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo; Bowers, Albert A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interspecies interactions have been described for numerous bacterial systems, leading to the identification of chemical compounds that impact bacterial physiology and differentiation for processes such as biofilm formation. Here, we identified soil microbes that inhibit biofilm formation and sporulation in the common soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We did so by creating a reporter strain that fluoresces when the transcription of a biofilm-specific gene is repressed. Using this reporter in a coculture screen, we identified Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas protegens as bacteria that secrete compounds that inhibit biofilm gene expression in B. subtilis. The active compound produced by P. protegens was identified as the antibiotic and antifungal molecule 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG). Colonies of B. subtilis grown adjacent to a DAPG-producing P. protegens strain had altered colony morphologies relative to B. subtilis colonies grown next to a DAPG-null P. protegens strain (phlD strain). Using a subinhibitory concentration of purified DAPG in a pellicle assay, we saw that biofilm-specific gene transcription was delayed relative to transcription in untreated samples. These transcriptional changes also corresponded to phenotypic alterations: both biofilm biomass and spore formation were reduced in B. subtilis liquid cultures treated with subinhibitory concentrations of DAPG. Our results add DAPG to the growing list of antibiotics that impact bacterial development and physiology at subinhibitory concentrations. These findings also demonstrate the utility of using coculture as a means to uncover chemically mediated interspecies interactions between bacteria. IMPORTANCE Biofilms are communities of bacteria adhered to surfaces by an extracellular matrix; such biofilms can have important effects in both clinical and agricultural settings. To identify chemical compounds that inhibited biofilm formation, we used a fluorescent reporter to screen for bacteria that

  18. Interaction between Pseudomonas and CXC Chemokines Increases Risk of Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome and Death in Lung Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Weigt, S. Sam; Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav; Lynch, Joseph P.; Ross, David J.; Kubak, Bernard M.; Saggar, Rajan; Fishbein, Michael C.; Ardehali, Abbas; Li, Gang; Elashoff, Robert; Belperio, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly isolated gram-negative bacterium after lung transplantation and has been shown to up-regulate glutamic acid–leucine–arginine–positive (ELR+) CXC chemokines associated with bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), but the effect of pseudomonas on BOS and death has not been well defined. Objectives: To determine if the influence of pseudomonas isolation and ELR+ CXC chemokines on the subsequent development of BOS and the occurrence of death is time dependent. Methods: A three-state model was developed to assess the likelihood of transitioning from lung transplant (state 1) to BOS (state 2), from transplant (state 1) to death (state 3), and from BOS (state 2) to death (state 3). This Cox semi-Markovian approach determines state survival rates and cause-specific hazards for movement from one state to another. Measurements and Main Results: The likelihood of transition from transplant to BOS was increased by acute rejection, CXCL5, and the interaction between pseudomonas and CXCL1. The pseudomonas effect in this transition was due to infection rather than colonization. Movement from transplant to death was facilitated by pseudomonas infection and single lung transplant. Transition from BOS to death was affected by the length of time in state 1 and by the interactions between any pseudomonas isolation and CXCL5 and aspergillus, either independently or in combination. Conclusions: Our model demonstrates that common post-transplantation events drive movement from one post-transplantation state to another and influence outcomes differently depending upon when after transplantation they occur. Pseudomonas and the ELR+ CXC chemokines may interact to negatively influence lung transplant outcomes. PMID:23328531

  19. Data supporting functional diversity of the marine bacterium Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Balabanova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Data is presented in support of functionality of hyper-diverse protein families encoded by the Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296 (formerly Cobetia marina KMM 296 genome (“The genome of the marine bacterium Cobetia marina KMM 296 isolated from the mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (Dunker, 1853” [1] providing its nutritional versatility, adaptability and biocontrol that could be the basis of the marine bacterium evolutionary and application potential. Presented data include the information of growth and biofilm-forming properties of the food-associated isolates of Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Listeria, Salmonella and Staphylococcus under the conditions of their co-culturing with C. amphilecti KMM 296 to confirm its high inter-species communication and anti-microbial activity. Also included are the experiments on the crude petroleum consumption by C. amphilecti KMM 296 as the sole source of carbon in the presence of sulfate or nitrate to ensure its bioremediation capacity. The multifunctional C. amphilecti KMM 296 genome is a promising source for the beneficial psychrophilic enzymes and essential secondary metabolites.

  20. Dual Effect of the Cubic Ag₃PO₄ Crystal on Pseudomonas syringae Growth and Plant Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Kyung Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously found that the antibacterial activity of silver phosphate crystals on Escherichia coli depends on their structure. We here show that the cubic form of silver phosphate crystal (SPC can also be applied to inhibit the growth of a plant-pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae bacterium. SPC pretreatment resulted in reduced in planta multiplication of P. syringae. Induced expression of a plant defense marker gene PR1 by SPC alone is suggestive of its additional plant immunity-stimulating activity. Since SPC can simultaneously inhibit P. syringae growth and induce plant defense responses, it might be used as a more effective plant disease-controlling agent.

  1. The Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sams, Thomas; Baker, Ysobel; Hodgkinson, James

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistichuman pathogen that routinely appears near the top ofpublic health threat lists worldwide. P. aeruginosa causes in-fections by secreting a wealth of exceptionally active exo-products, leading to tissue damage. The synthesis of manyof these virulence factors...... is now known to be under the con-trol of the quorum sensing (QS) system. Over the last15 years, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) has beenfound to play a crucial role in QS by linking the two seg-ments (las and rhl) of the P. aeruginosa N-acylhomoserinelactone-dependent QS signaling pathways. Herein...

  2. Study on bioremediation of Lead by exopolysaccharide producing metallophilic bacterium isolated from extreme habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debajit Kalita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Lead released from manufacturing factories, recycling plants, automobile company and landfill leachate is abundantly found in wastewater. An efficient bioremediating agent for lead removal from wastewater is expected to ease the ever increasing problem. The present study reports Pseudomonas sp. W6 isolated from extreme habitat of hot water spring of North–East India evaluated for its Lead biosorption property. The bacterium showed capacity to resist 1.0 mM lead in both solid and liquid minimal media. Epifluorescence microscopy reveal the viability of bacterial cells under metal stress condition. ICP-MS analysis revealed 65% and 61.2% removal of lead from the Synthetic Bangladesh Ground Water medium in batch culture and column study respectively which was higher when compared to biosorption capacity of P. aeruginosa MTCC2474, P. alcaligenes MJ7 from forest soil and P. ficuserectae PKRS11 from uranium rich soil. Exopolysaccharide released by the isolate which influenced biosorption revealed the presence of ligands assayed using microbial hydrophobicity and FTIR. The extremophilic isolate is proposed as a choice for efficient bioremediation of lead contaminated wastewater. Keywords: Extremophile, Pseudomonas, Lead bioremediation, Epifluorescence microscopy, ICP-MS, FTIR

  3. Nitrogen Removal from Micro-Polluted Reservoir Water by Indigenous Aerobic Denitrifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Lin Huang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of micro-polluted source water is receiving increasing attention because of environmental awareness on a global level. We isolated and identified aerobic denitrifying bacteria Zoogloea sp. N299, Acinetobacter sp. G107, and Acinetobacter sp. 81Y and used these to remediate samples of their native source water. We first domesticated the isolated strains in the source water, and the 48-h nitrate removal rates of strains N299, G107, and 81Y reached 33.69%, 28.28%, and 22.86%, respectively, with no nitrite accumulation. We then conducted a source-water remediation experiment and cultured the domesticated strains (each at a dry cell weight concentration of 0.4 ppm together in a sample of source water at 20–26 °C and a dissolved oxygen concentration of 3–7 mg/L for 60 days. The nitrate concentration of the system decreased from 1.57 ± 0.02 to 0.42 ± 0.01 mg/L and that of a control system decreased from 1.63 ± 0.02 to 1.30 ± 0.01 mg/L, each with no nitrite accumulation. Total nitrogen of the bacterial system changed from 2.31 ± 0.12 to 1.09 ± 0.01 mg/L, while that of the control system changed from 2.51 ± 0.13 to 1.72 ± 0.06 mg/L. The densities of aerobic denitrification bacteria in the experimental and control systems ranged from 2.8 × 104 to 2 × 107 cfu/mL and from 7.75 × 103 to 5.5 × 105 cfu/mL, respectively. The permanganate index in the experimental and control systems decreased from 5.94 ± 0.12 to 3.10 ± 0.08 mg/L and from 6.02 ± 0.13 to 3.61 ± 0.11 mg/L, respectively, over the course of the experiment. Next, we supplemented samples of the experimental and control systems with additional bacteria or additional source water and cultivated the systems for another 35 days. The additional bacteria did little to improve the water quality. The additional source water provided supplemental carbon and brought the nitrate removal rate in the experimental system to 16.97%, while that in the control system reached only 3

  4. Ferric-Pyoverdine Recognition by Fpv Outer Membrane Proteins of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartney, Sierra L.; Mazurier, Sylvie; Girard, Maëva K.; Mehnaz, Samina; Davis, Edward W.; Gross, Harald; Lemanceau, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (previously called P. fluorescens Pf-5) produces two siderophores, enantio-pyochelin and a compound in the large and diverse pyoverdine family. Using high-resolution mass spectroscopy, we determined the structure of the pyoverdine produced by Pf-5. In addition to producing its own siderophores, Pf-5 also utilizes ferric complexes of some pyoverdines produced by other strains of Pseudomonas spp. as sources of iron. Previously, phylogenetic analysis of the 45 TonB-dependent outer membrane proteins in Pf-5 indicated that six are in a well-supported clade with ferric-pyoverdine receptors (Fpvs) from other Pseudomonas spp. We used a combination of phylogenetics, bioinformatics, mutagenesis, pyoverdine structural determinations, and cross-feeding bioassays to assign specific ferric-pyoverdine substrates to each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. We identified at least one ferric-pyoverdine that was taken up by each of the six Fpvs of Pf-5. Functional redundancy of the Pf-5 Fpvs was also apparent, with some ferric-pyoverdines taken up by all mutants with a single Fpv deletion but not by a mutant having deletions in two of the Fpv-encoding genes. Finally, we demonstrated that phylogenetically related Fpvs take up ferric complexes of structurally related pyoverdines, thereby establishing structure-function relationships that can be employed in the future to predict the pyoverdine substrates of Fpvs in other Pseudomonas spp. PMID:23222724

  5. Enrichment of denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria for application after direct low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampman, Christel; Hendrickx, Tim L.G.; Luesken, Francisca A.; Alen, Theo A. van; Op den Camp, Huub J.M.; Jetten, Mike S.M.; Zeeman, Grietje; Buisman, Cees J.N.; Temmink, Hardy

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new concept for low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment is proposed. ► In this concept, denitrification and methane oxidation are performed by Methylomirabilis oxyfera. ► The bacteria were enriched from fresh water sediment using sequencing fed-batch reactors. ► The volumetric consumption rate has to be increased by an order of magnitude for practical application. ► Further research should focus on systems with improved biomass retention. - Abstract: Despite many advantages of anaerobic sewage treatment over conventional activated sludge treatment, it has not yet been applied in temperate zones. This is especially because effluent from low-temperature anaerobic treatment contains nitrogen and dissolved methane. The presence of nitrogen and methane offers the opportunity to develop a reactor in which methane is used as electron donor for denitrification. Such a reactor could be used in a new concept for low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment, consisting of a UASB-digester system, a reactor for denitrification coupled to anaerobic methane oxidation, and a nitritation reactor. In the present study denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria similar to ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera’ were enriched. Maximum volumetric nitrite consumption rates were 33.5 mg NO 2 − -N/L d (using synthetic medium) and 37.8 mg NO 2 − -N/L d (using medium containing effluent from a sewage treatment plant), which are similar to the maximum rate reported so far. Though the goal was to increase the rates, in both reactors, after reaching these maximum rates, volumetric nitrite consumption rates decreased in time. Results indicate biomass washout may have significantly decelerated enrichment. Therefore, to obtain higher volumetric consumption rates, further research should focus on systems with complete biomass retention.

  6. Enrichment of denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria for application after direct low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampman, Christel, E-mail: christel.kampman@wur.nl [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands); Hendrickx, Tim L.G. [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands); Luesken, Francisca A.; Alen, Theo A. van; Op den Camp, Huub J.M.; Jetten, Mike S.M. [Department of Microbiology, Institute for Water and Wetland Research, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Zeeman, Grietje; Buisman, Cees J.N.; Temmink, Hardy [Sub-department of Environmental Technology, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new concept for low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this concept, denitrification and methane oxidation are performed by Methylomirabilis oxyfera. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bacteria were enriched from fresh water sediment using sequencing fed-batch reactors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The volumetric consumption rate has to be increased by an order of magnitude for practical application. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Further research should focus on systems with improved biomass retention. - Abstract: Despite many advantages of anaerobic sewage treatment over conventional activated sludge treatment, it has not yet been applied in temperate zones. This is especially because effluent from low-temperature anaerobic treatment contains nitrogen and dissolved methane. The presence of nitrogen and methane offers the opportunity to develop a reactor in which methane is used as electron donor for denitrification. Such a reactor could be used in a new concept for low-temperature anaerobic sewage treatment, consisting of a UASB-digester system, a reactor for denitrification coupled to anaerobic methane oxidation, and a nitritation reactor. In the present study denitrifying methanotrophic bacteria similar to 'Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera' were enriched. Maximum volumetric nitrite consumption rates were 33.5 mg NO{sub 2}{sup -}-N/L d (using synthetic medium) and 37.8 mg NO{sub 2}{sup -}-N/L d (using medium containing effluent from a sewage treatment plant), which are similar to the maximum rate reported so far. Though the goal was to increase the rates, in both reactors, after reaching these maximum rates, volumetric nitrite consumption rates decreased in time. Results indicate biomass washout may have significantly decelerated enrichment. Therefore, to obtain higher volumetric consumption rates, further research should focus on systems with complete biomass

  7. Optimizing Hydraulic Retention Times in Denitrifying Woodchip Bioreactors Treating Recirculating Aquaculture System Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepine, Christine; Christianson, Laura; Sharrer, Kata; Summerfelt, Steven

    2016-05-01

    The performance of wood-based denitrifying bioreactors to treat high-nitrate wastewaters from aquaculture systems has not previously been demonstrated. Four pilot-scale woodchip bioreactors (approximately 1:10 scale) were constructed and operated for 268 d to determine the optimal range of design hydraulic retention times (HRTs) for nitrate removal. The bioreactors were operated under HRTs ranging from 6.6 to 55 h with influent nitrate concentrations generally between 20 and 80 mg NO-N L. These combinations resulted in N removal rates >39 g N m d, which is greater than previously reported. These high removal rates were due in large part to the relatively high chemical oxygen demand and warm temperature (∼19°C) of the wastewater. An optimized design HRT may not be the same based on metrics of N removal rate versus N removal efficiency; longer HRTs demonstrated higher removal efficiencies, and shorter HRTs had higher removal rates. When nitrate influent concentrations were approximately 75 mg NO-N L ( = 6 sample events), the shortest HRT (12 h) had the lowest removal efficiency (45%) but a significantly greater removal rate than the two longest HRTs (42 and 55 h), which were N limited. Sulfate reduction was also observed under highly reduced conditions and was exacerbated under prolonged N-limited environments. Balancing the removal rate and removal efficiency for this water chemistry with a design HRT of approximately 24 h would result in a 65% removal efficiency and removal rates of at least 18 g N m d. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  8. Nitrogen loading affects microbes, nitrifiers and denitrifiers attached to submerged macrophyte in constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liying; Zhang, Songhe; Lin, Da; Guo, Chuan; Yan, Lingling; Wang, Supeng; He, Zhenli

    2018-05-01

    Submerged macrophytes and biofilms are important components of wetlands. However, little is known about the changes of microbes in biofilms attached to submerged macrophytes upon nitrogen loading. This study investigated the changes of microbes, algae, nitrifiers and denitrifiers in biofilms attached to the leaves of artificial plants (AP), Potamogeton malaianus (PM), Vallisneria natans (VN) and Hydrilla verticillata (HV) under varied initial concentrations of total nitrogen (TN). Nitrogen addition increased biofilm biomass and changed dissolved oxygen concentrations and pH values in overlaying water. Epiphytic algal densities showed the same trend at the same N level:AP>PM>VN>HV. As revealed by cluster analysis at phylum level, algae compositions in biofilm from four plants showed some host-specific at 2 and 12mgL -1 TN, but was clustered in the same group at 22mgL -1 TN regardless of plant species. Submerged macrophytes had better performance in total N removal than AP. In general, N application significantly increased the abundance of amoA, nirK, nirS, napA and cnorB in biofilm. The abundance of the denitrification genes (nirK, nirS, napA, narG and cnorB) was positively correlated with nitrogen application, while amoA was correlated with concentration of dissolved oxygen. These results indicate that N loadings stimulated the growth of biofilms attached to submerged macrophyte and the removal of total N can be partially ascribed to the synergistic interactions of submerged macrophyte and biofilms in wetlands. These results highlight the ecological role of submerged macrophyte-biofilm system in nitrogen removal in wetlands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Holistic Evaluation of Field-Scale Denitrifying Bioreactors as a Basis to Improve Environmental Sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Owen; Healy, Mark G; Brennan, Fiona P; Thornton, Steven F; Lanigan, Gary J; Ibrahim, Tristan G

    2016-05-01

    Denitrifying bioreactors convert nitrate-nitrogen (NO-N) to di-nitrogen and protect water quality. Herein, the performance of a pilot-scale bioreactor (10 m long, 5 m wide, 2 m deep) containing seven alternating cells filled with either sandy loam soil or lodgepole pine woodchip and with a novel "zig-zag" flow pattern was investigated. The influent water had an average NO-N concentration of 25 mg L. The performance of the bioreactor was evaluated in two scenarios. In Scenario 1, only NO-N removal was evaluated; in Scenario 2, NO-N removal, ammonium-N (NH-N), and dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) generation was considered. These data were used to generate a sustainability index (SI), which evaluated the overall performance taking these parameters into account. In Scenario 1, the bioreactor was a net reducer of contaminants, but it transformed into a net producer of contaminants in Scenario 2. Inquisition of the data using these scenarios meant that an optimum bioreactor design could be identified. This would involve reduction to two cells: a single sandy loam soil cell followed by a woodchip cell, which would remove NO-N and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and DRP losses. An additional post-bed chamber containing media to eliminate NH-N and surface capping to reduce GHG emissions further is advised. Scenario modeling, such as that proposed in this paper, should ideally include GHG in the SI, but because different countries have different emission targets, future work should concentrate on the development of geographically appropriate weightings to facilitate the incorporation of GHG into a SI. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Ecology of Nitrogen Fixing, Nitrifying, and Denitrifying Microorganisms in Tropical Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajares, Silvia; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Soil microorganisms play important roles in nitrogen cycling within forest ecosystems. Current research has revealed that a wider variety of microorganisms, with unexpected diversity in their functions and phylogenies, are involved in the nitrogen cycle than previously thought, including nitrogen-fixing bacteria, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea, heterotrophic nitrifying microorganisms, and anammox bacteria, as well as denitrifying bacteria, archaea, and fungi. However, the vast majority of this research has been focused in temperate regions, and relatively little is known regarding the ecology of nitrogen-cycling microorganisms within tropical and subtropical ecosystems. Tropical forests are characterized by relatively high precipitation, low annual temperature fluctuation, high heterogeneity in plant diversity, large amounts of plant litter, and unique soil chemistry. For these reasons, regulation of the nitrogen cycle in tropical forests may be very different from that of temperate ecosystems. This is of great importance because of growing concerns regarding the effect of land use change and chronic-elevated nitrogen deposition on nitrogen-cycling processes in tropical forests. In the context of global change, it is crucial to understand how environmental factors and land use changes in tropical ecosystems influence the composition, abundance and activity of key players in the nitrogen cycle. In this review, we synthesize the limited currently available information regarding the microbial communities involved in nitrogen fixation, nitrification and denitrification, to provide deeper insight into the mechanisms regulating nitrogen cycling in tropical forest ecosystems. We also highlight the large gaps in our understanding of microbially mediated nitrogen processes in tropical forest soils and identify important areas for future research. PMID:27468277

  11. DECREASING OF SODIUM NITRITE CONTENT IN COOKED SAUSAGES USING DENITRIFYING MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal-Prylypko L. V.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to study reduction of sodium nitrite in cooked sausages by adding of the optimized amount of denitrifying microorganisms to the bacterial preparation maintaining quality characteristics of the product. To develop biotechnology of boiled sausages «Naturel» we selected bacterial preparation based on nitrite-reducing strains of Staphylococcus carnosus and S. carnosus ssp.utilis. It was used generally accepted and special methods. The content of total pigments and nitrozopigments was determined by a method based on the extraction of meat pigments by aqueous acetone; color stability of final products was evaluated as the difference in optical density of nitroso pigment extracts before and after exposure (40 min of the sample under the light source; analytical processing of the experimental data was carried out using modern software; quantitative evaluation of color characteristics was performed in the RGB using a multifunctional device Epson Stylus TX400. Mathematical modeling was carried out on the basis of full factorial experiment such as 22, the optimization was performed by Box–Wilson. According to the study, using of the bacterial preparation based on nitrite-reducing strains of Staphylococcus carnosus and S. carnosus ssp. utilis in biotechnology of boiled sausages «Naturel» has a positive effect on the formation of the complex of required color characteristics of final products (for prototypes of sausages the index redness was 1. 61 times higher compared to the control. Degradation of sodium nitrite and formation of nitroso pigments were intensified that improved the stability of color during the storage (the index of color fastness of experimental cooked sausages was higher by 19%. The results of performed investigations illustrate the possibility of production of cooked sausages with a minimized content of synthetic food additives and ingredients.

  12. The role of paraffin oil on the interaction between denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation and Anammox processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Ding, Jing; Zhang, Fang; Zeng, Raymond J

    2015-10-01

    Methane is sparingly soluble in water, resulting in a slow reaction rate in the denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) process. The slow rate limits the feasibility of research to examine the interaction between the DAMO and the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process. In this study, optimized 5 % (v/v) paraffin oil was added as a second liquid phase to improve methane solubility in a reactor containing DAMO and Anammox microbes. After just addition, methane solubility was found to increase by 25 % and DAMO activity was enhanced. After a 100-day cultivation, the paraffin reactor showed almost two times higher consumption rates of NO3 (-) (0.2268 mmol/day) and NH4 (+) (0.1403 mmol/day), compared to the control reactor without paraffin oil. The microbes tended to distribute in the oil-water interface. The quantitative (q) PCR result showed the abundance of gene copies of DAMO archaea, DAMO bacteria, and Anammox bacteria in the paraffin reactor were higher than those in the control reactor after 1 month. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that the percentages of the three microbes were 55.5 and 77.6 % in the control and paraffin reactors after 100 days, respectively. A simple model of mass balance was developed to describe the interactions between DAMO and Anammox microbes and validate the activity results. A mechanism was proposed to describe the possible way that paraffin oil enhanced DAMO activity. It is quite clear that paraffin oil enhances not only DAMO activity but also Anammox activity via the interaction between them; both NO3 (-) and NH4 (+) consumption rates were about two times those of the control.

  13. Decaying cyanobacteria decrease N2O emissions related to diversity of intestinal denitrifiers of Chironomus plumosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Sun

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O emission of fresh invertebrates has too long been neglected in eutrophic lakes, although the sediments these animals inhabit are presumably hot spots of N2O emission. Thus, the experiment in this research was designed to gain insight into the influence of cyanobacterial degradation on the N2O emission by fresh water invertebrates (Chironomus plumosus. The presence of decaying cyanobacteria in Lake Taihu decreased the N2O emission rate of Chironomus plumosus larvae from the larvae body by almost 400% for the larvae as a whole. The N2O emission rate decreased by 350% based on readings from studies of their gut, which was mostly due to stimulation of intestinal complete denitrification. The quantitative PCR results showed that intestinal gene abundance of nirK, nosZ (encoding the copper nitrite reductase and N2O reductase, respectively were significantly increased with the presence of decaying cyanobacteria. In contrast nirS (encoding the cytochrome cd1 heme nitrite reductase and the total bacteria decreased. In the gut of Chironomus plumosus, the diversity and richness of nosZ and nirK were lower with the cyanobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of the intestinal function genes (nosZ and nirK showed that the nosZ- and nirK-type denitrifying bacterial sequences were related to different phylotypes. Hence, additional cyanobacteria increased the abundance, but decreased the richness and diversity of intestinal nitrate-reducing bacteria, probably by providing more carbon source in the gut. The data obtained in this study elucidates that the decaying cyanobacteria decreased the emissions of N2O by the aquatic invertebrates in freshwater sediment and could serve as a valuable resource for nitrogen removal affecting greenhouse gas emissions.

  14. Abundance, composition and activity of ammonia oxidizer and denitrifier communities in metal polluted rice paddies from South China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    Full Text Available While microbial nitrogen transformations in soils had been known to be affected by heavy metal pollution, changes in abundance and community structure of the mediating microbial populations had been not yet well characterized in polluted rice soils. Here, by using the prevailing molecular fingerprinting and enzyme activity assays and comparisons to adjacent non-polluted soils, we examined changes in the abundance and activity of ammonia oxidizing and denitrifying communities of rice paddies in two sites with different metal accumulation situation under long-term pollution from metal mining and smelter activities. Potential nitrifying activity was significantly reduced in polluted paddies in both sites while potential denitrifying activity reduced only in the soils with high Cu accumulation up to 1300 mg kg-1. Copy numbers of amoA (AOA and AOB genes were lower in both polluted paddies, following the trend with the enzyme assays, whereas that of nirK was not significantly affected. Analysis of the DGGE profiles revealed a shift in the community structure of AOA, and to a lesser extent, differences in the community structure of AOB and denitrifier between soils from the two sites with different pollution intensity and metal composition. All of the retrieved AOB sequences belonged to the genus Nitrosospira, among which species Cluster 4 appeared more sensitive to metal pollution. In contrast, nirK genes were widely distributed among different bacterial genera that were represented differentially between the polluted and unpolluted paddies. This could suggest either a possible non-specific target of the primers conventionally used in soil study or complex interactions between soil properties and metal contents on the observed community and activity changes, and thus on the N transformation in the polluted rice soils.

  15. [Shortcut Nitrosation-Denitrifying Phosphorus Removal Based on High-quality Carbon Source in Combined Process of CAMBR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ji-hui; Wu, Peng; Cheng, Chao-yang; Shen, Yao-liang

    2015-12-01

    The volatile fatty acids (VFAs) are high-quality carbon source which can be utilized in the process of denitrifying phosphorus removal. Therefore, a combined process of anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) with microbial phase separation and membrane bioreactor (MBR), i. e. CAMBR, with high-quality effluent was investigated in this experiment for highly efficient denitrifying phosphorus removal through providing high-quality carbon source by optimizing operational conditions such as hydraulic retention time (HRT) in the ABR. The results indicated that sufficient high-quality carbon source VFA could be acquired when the HRT of ABR was 4.8 h. The consumption of VFA was 56. 1 mg · L⁻¹ while the release of phosphorus was 10.43 mg · L⁻¹ showing that 5.38 mg of VFA was required to release 1 mg PO₄³⁻-P. Meanwhile, the uptake of phosphorus was 12. 35 mg · L⁻¹, while the uptake of phosphorus of MBR tank was 1.33 mg · L⁻¹. In the process of shortcut nitrification, 0.62 mg NOx⁻-N was needed when 1 mg PO₄³⁻-P was taken up, and 1.67 to 2.04 mg NO₂⁻-N was required when 1 mg PO₄³⁻-P was taken up, and the combined system achieved stable effluent quality. The average removal rates of COD, TN and soluble PO₄³⁻-P were 91%, 84% and 93%, respectively, correspondingly the average effluent concentrations were 30, 7.15 and 0.55 mg · L⁻¹, respectively. The results stated that the CAMBR achieved stable and highly efficient denitrifying phosphorus removal in domestic sewage treatment.

  16. Diversity of Nitrate-Reducing and Denitrifying Bacteria in a Marine Aquaculture Biofilter and their Response to Sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krieger, Bärbel; Schwermer, Carsten U.; Rezakhani, Nastaran

    2006-01-01

    was developed containing a 3-stage biofilter for nitrification, denitrification/anaerobic sludge digestion, and sulfide oxidation. Sulfate reduction in the anaerobic part of the system leads to sulfide concentrations exceeding 5 mM, which may affect nitrate reduction and denitrification. Sulfide can inhibit...... nitrous oxide reductase, trigger a shift from denitrification to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA), or be used as electron donor for nitrate reduction. The goal of this study was to identify and isolate nitrate-reducing and denitrifying bacteria from the biofilter and to investigate...

  17. Nitrogen removal and microbial community shift in an aerobic denitrification reactor bioaugmented with a Pseudomonas strain for coal-based ethylene glycol industry wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Cong; Cui, Chong-Wei; Qiu, Shan; Shi, Sheng-Nan; Li, Ang; Ma, Fang

    2017-04-01

    An aerobic denitrification system, initially bioaugmented with Pseudomonas strain T13, was established to treat coal-based ethylene glycol industry wastewater, which contained 3219 ± 86 mg/L total nitrogen (TN) and 1978 ± 14 mg/L NO 3 - -N. In the current study, a stable denitrification efficiency of 53.7 ± 4.7% and nitrite removal efficiency of 40.1 ± 2.7% were achieved at different diluted influent concentrations. Toxicity evaluation showed that a lower toxicity of effluent was achieved when industry wastewater was treated by stuffing biofilm communities compared to suspended communities. Relatively high TN removal (~50%) and chemical oxygen demand removal percentages (>65%) were obtained when the influent concentration was controlled at below 50% of the raw industry wastewater. However, a further increased concentration led to a 20-30% decrease in nitrate and nitrite removal. Microbial network evaluation showed that a reduction in Pseudomonas abundance was induced during the succession of the microbial community. The napA gene analysis indicated that the decrease in nitrate and nitrite removal happened when abundance of Pseudomonas was reduced to less than 10% of the overall stuffing biofilm communities. Meanwhile, other denitrifying bacteria, such as Paracoccus, Brevundimonas, and Brucella, were subsequently enriched through symbiosis in the whole microbial network.

  18. Phosphatidylcholine synthesis is essential for HrpZ harpin secretion in plant pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae and non-pathogenic Pseudomonas sp. 593.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Min; Long, Deliang; He, Huoguang; Li, Yang; Li, Yadong; Wang, Xingguo

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae van Hall is important phytopathogenic bacterium of stone fruit trees, and able to elicit hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost plants. The HrpZ, secreted via type III secretion system (T3SS) to the extracellular space of the plant, is a T3SS-dependent protein and a sole T3SS effector able to induce the host defense response outside host cells. We deleted the phosphatidylcholine synthase gene (pcs) of P. syringae pv. syringae van Hall CFCC 1336, and found that the 1336 pcs(-) mutant was unable to synthesize phosphatidylcholine and elicit a typical HR in soybean. Further studies showed that the 1336 pcs(-) mutant was unable to secrete HrpZ harpin but could express HrpZ protein in cytoplasm as effectively as the wild type. To confirm if phosphatidylcholine affects HrpZ harpin secretion, we introduced the hrpZ gene into the soil-dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 593 and the 593 pcs(-) mutant, which were unable to express HrpZ harpin and elicit HR in tobacco or soybean. Western blotting and HR assay showed that the 593H not only secreted HrpZ harpin but also caused a strong HR in tobacco and soybean. In contrast, the 593 pcs(-)H only expressed HrpZ protein in its cytoplasm at the wild type level, but did not secrete HrpZ harpin or elicit HR reaction. Our results demonstrate that phosphatidylcholine is essential for the secretion of HrpZ harpin in P. syringae pv. syringae van Hall and other Pseudomonas strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Isolation of the epsilon-caprolactam denitrifying bacteria from a wastewater treatment system manufactured with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Lee, Chi-Mei

    2007-06-25

    epsilon-Caprolactam has high COD and toxicity, so its discharge to natural water and soil systems may lead to an adverse environmental effect on water quality, endangering public health and welfare. This investigation attempts to isolate epsilon-caprolactam denitrifying bacteria from a wastewater treatment system manufactured with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin. The goal is to elucidate the effectiveness of isolated pure strain and ABS mixed strains in treating epsilon-caprolactam from synthetic wastewater. The results reveal that Paracoccus versutus MDC-3 was isolated from the wastewater treatment system manufactured with ABS resin. The ABS mixed strains and P. versutus MDC-3 can consume up to 1539mg/l epsilon-caprolactam to denitrify from synthetic wastewater. Complete epsilon-caprolactam removal depended on the supply of sufficient electron acceptors (nitrate). Strain P. versutus MDC-3, Hyphomicrobium sp. HM, Methylosinus pucelana and Magnetospirillum sp. CC-26 are related closely, according to the phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA sequences.

  20. Isolation of the {epsilon}-caprolactam denitrifying bacteria from a wastewater treatment system manufactured with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.-C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hungkuang University, Shalu, Taichung 433, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: chunchin@sunrise.hk.edu.tw; Lee, C.-M. [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China)

    2007-06-25

    {epsilon}-Caprolactam has high COD and toxicity, so its discharge to natural water and soil systems may lead to an adverse environmental effect on water quality, endangering public health and welfare. This investigation attempts to isolate {epsilon}-caprolactam denitrifying bacteria from a wastewater treatment system manufactured with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) resin. The goal is to elucidate the effectiveness of isolated pure strain and ABS mixed strains in treating {epsilon}-caprolactam from synthetic wastewater. The results reveal that Paracoccus versutus MDC-3 was isolated from the wastewater treatment system manufactured with ABS resin. The ABS mixed strains and P. versutus MDC-3 can consume up to 1539 mg/l {epsilon}-caprolactam to denitrify from synthetic wastewater. Complete {epsilon}-caprolactam removal depended on the supply of sufficient electron acceptors (nitrate). Strain P. versutus MDC-3, Hyphomicrobium sp. HM, Methylosinus pucelana and Magnetospirillum sp. CC-26 are related closely, according to the phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA sequences.

  1. Denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter dominate bacterial communities in the highly contaminated subsurface of a nuclear legacy waste site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Stefan [Florida State University; Prakash, Om [Florida State University; Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University; Overholt, Will [Florida State University; Cardenas, Erick [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University; Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Watson, David B [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Kostka, Joel [Florida State University

    2011-01-01

    The effect of long-term mixed-waste contamination, particularly uranium and nitrate, on the microbial community in the terrestrial subsurface was investigated at the field scale at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site in Oak Ridge, TN. The abundance, community composition, and distribution of groundwater microorganisms were examined across the site during two seasonal sampling events. At representative locations, subsurface sediment was also examined from two boreholes, one sampled from the most heavily contaminated area of the site and another from an area with low contamination. A suite of DNA- and RNA-based molecular tools were employed for community characterization, including quantitative PCR of ribosomal RNA and nitrite reductase genes, community composition fingerprinting analysis, and high-throughput pyrotag sequencing of rRNA genes. The results demonstrate that pH is a major driver of the subsurface microbial community structure, and denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter (class Gammaproteobacteria) dominate at low pH. The relative abundance of bacteria from this genus was positively correlated with lower pH conditions, and these bacteria were abundant and active in the most highly contaminated areas. Other factors, such as concentration of nitrogen species, oxygen and sampling season did not appear to strongly influence the distribution of Rhodanobacter. Results indicate that these organisms are acid-tolerant denitrifiers, well suited to the acidic, nitrate-rich subsurface conditions, and pH is confirmed as a dominant driver of bacterial community structure in this contaminated subsurface environment.

  2. Effect of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate as inorganic carbon sources on growth and adaptation of autohydrogenotrophic denitrifying bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghafari, Shahin; Hasan, Masitah; Aroua, Mohamed Kheireddine

    2009-01-01

    Acclimation of autohydrogenotrophic denitrifying bacteria using inorganic carbon source (CO 2 and bicarbonate) and hydrogen gas as electron donor was performed in this study. In this regard, activated sludge was used as the seed source and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) technique was applied for accomplishing the acclimatization. Three distinct strategies in feeding of carbon sources were applied: (I) continuous sparging of CO 2 , (II) bicarbonate plus continuous sparging of CO 2 , and (III) only bicarbonate. The pH-reducing nature of CO 2 showed an unfavorable impact on denitrification rate; however bicarbonate resulted in a buffered environment in the mixed liquor and provided a suitable mean to maintain the pH in the desirable range of 7-8.2. As a result, bicarbonate as the only carbon source showed a faster adaptation, while carbon dioxide as the only carbon source as well as a complementary carbon source added to bicarbonate resulted in longer acclimation period. Adapted hydrogenotrophic denitrifying bacteria, using bicarbonate and hydrogen gas in the aforementioned pH range, caused denitrification at a rate of 13.33 mg NO 3 - -N/g MLVSS/h for degrading 20 and 30 mg NO 3 - -N/L and 9.09 mg NO 3 - -N/g MLVSS/h for degrading 50 mg NO 3 - -N/L

  3. Effect of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate as inorganic carbon sources on growth and adaptation of autohydrogenotrophic denitrifying bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafari, Shahin; Hasan, Masitah [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Aroua, Mohamed Kheireddine [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)], E-mail: mk_aroua@um.edu.my

    2009-03-15

    Acclimation of autohydrogenotrophic denitrifying bacteria using inorganic carbon source (CO{sub 2} and bicarbonate) and hydrogen gas as electron donor was performed in this study. In this regard, activated sludge was used as the seed source and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) technique was applied for accomplishing the acclimatization. Three distinct strategies in feeding of carbon sources were applied: (I) continuous sparging of CO{sub 2}, (II) bicarbonate plus continuous sparging of CO{sub 2}, and (III) only bicarbonate. The pH-reducing nature of CO{sub 2} showed an unfavorable impact on denitrification rate; however bicarbonate resulted in a buffered environment in the mixed liquor and provided a suitable mean to maintain the pH in the desirable range of 7-8.2. As a result, bicarbonate as the only carbon source showed a faster adaptation, while carbon dioxide as the only carbon source as well as a complementary carbon source added to bicarbonate resulted in longer acclimation period. Adapted hydrogenotrophic denitrifying bacteria, using bicarbonate and hydrogen gas in the aforementioned pH range, caused denitrification at a rate of 13.33 mg NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N/g MLVSS/h for degrading 20 and 30 mg NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N/L and 9.09 mg NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N/g MLVSS/h for degrading 50 mg NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N/L.

  4. Effects of Selected Root Exudate Components on Nitrogen Removal and Development of Denitrifying Bacteria in Constructed Wetlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailu Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Root exudates, particularly low molecular weight carbon (LMWC substrates, are major drivers of bacterial diversity and activity in the rhizosphere environment. However, it is not well understood how specific LMWC compounds—such as organic acids, soluble sugars, and amino acids—influence the community structures of denitrifying bacteria or if there are specific functions of LMWC substrates that preferentially respond to nitrogen (N removal in constructed wetlands (CWs. To address these knowledge gaps, we added mixtures of artificial exudates to CW microcosms containing N pollutant. N removal efficiency was observed over a 48-h experimental period, and at the end of the experiment, DNA was extracted from microbial samples for assessment of the bacterial community. The removal efficiencies of TN for the exudates treatments were higher than for control groups by 47.1–58.67%. Organic acid and soluble sugar treatments increased N removal, while amino acids were negative to N removal. The microbial community was changed when artificial exudates were added, but there were no significant relationships between LMWC compounds and bacterial community composition. These results indicate that although the responses of community structures of denitrifying bacteria to LMWC additions are still uncertain, there is evidence for N removal in response to exudate additions across LMWC types.

  5. Nitrate removal, communities of denitrifiers and adverse effects in different carbon substrates for use in denitrification beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warneke, Sören; Schipper, Louis A.; Matiasek, Michael G.; Scow, Kate M.; Cameron, Stewart; Bruesewitz, Denise A.; McDonald, Ian R.

    2012-01-01

    Denitrification beds are containers filled with wood by-products that serve as a carbon and energy source to denitrifiers, which reduce nitrate ( NO3−) from point source discharges into non-reactive dinitrogen (N2) gas. This study investigates a range of alternative carbon sources and determines rates, mechanisms and factors controlling NO3− removal, denitrifying bacterial community, and the adverse effects of these substrates. Experimental barrels (0.2 m3) filled with either maize cobs, wheat straw, green waste, sawdust, pine woodchips or eucalyptus woodchips were incubated at 16.8 °C or 27.1 °C (outlet temperature), and received NO3− enriched water (14.38 mg N L−1 and 17.15 mg N L−1). After 2.5 years of incubation measurements were made of NO3−−N removal rates, in vitro denitrification rates (DR), factors limiting denitrification (carbon and nitrate availability, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, and concentrations of NO3−, nitrite and ammonia), copy number of nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK ) and nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ ) genes, and greenhouse gas production (dissolved nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane), and carbon (TOC) loss. Microbial denitrification was the main mechanism for NO3−−N removal. Nitrate–N removal rates ranged from 1.3 (pine woodchips) to 6.2 g N m−3 d−1 (maize cobs), and were predominantly limited by C availability and temperature (Q10 = 1.2) when NO3−−N outlet concentrations remained above 1 mg L−1. The NO3−−N removal rate did not depend directly on substrate type, but on the quantity of microbially available carbon, which differed between carbon sources. The abundance of denitrifying genes (nirS, nirK and nosZ ) was similar in replicate barrels under cold incubation, but varied substantially under warm incubation, and between substrates. Warm incubation enhanced growth of nirS containing bacteria and bacteria that lacked the nosZ gene, potentially explaining the greater N2O emission in warmer

  6. Comparative Genome Analysis of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Reveals Genes Within Newly Identified High Variability Regions Associated With Drug Resistance Development

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Hsun-Cheng; Khatun, Jainab; Kanavy, Dona M.; Giddings, Morgan C.

    2013-01-01

    The alarming rise of ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been reported in several clinical studies. Though the mutation of resistance genes and their role in drug resistance has been researched, the process by which the bacterium acquires high-level resistance is still not well understood. How does the genomic evolution of P. aeruginosa affect resistance development? Could the exposure of antibiotics to the bacteria enrich genomic variants that lead to the development of resist...

  7. Submerged macrophytes shape the abundance and diversity of bacterial denitrifiers in bacterioplankton and epiphyton in the Shallow Fresh Lake Taihu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhou; Han, Rui-Ming; Ma, Jie; Wang, Guo-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    nirK and nirS genes are important functional genes involved in the denitrification pathway. Recent studies about these two denitrifying genes are focusing on sediment and wastewater microbe. In this study, we conducted a comparative analysis of the abundance and diversity of denitrifiers in the epiphyton of submerged macrophytes Potamogeton malaianus and Ceratophyllum demersum as well as in bacterioplankton in the shallow fresh lake Taihu, China. Results showed that nirK and nirS genes had significant different niches in epiphyton and bacterioplankton. Bacterioplankton showed greater abundance of nirK gene in terms of copy numbers and lower abundance of nirS gene. Significant difference in the abundance of nirK and nirS genes also existed between the epiphyton from different submerged macrophytes. Similar community diversity yet different community abundance was observed between epiphytic bacteria and bacterioplankton. No apparent seasonal variation was found either in epiphytic bacteria or bacterioplankton; however, environmental parameters seemed to have direct relevancy with nirK and nirS genes. Our study suggested that submerged macrophytes have greater influence than seasonal parameters in shaping the presence and abundance of bacterial denitrifiers. Further investigation needs to focus on the potential contact and relative contribution between denitrifiers and environmental factors.

  8. Identification of active denitrifiers by DNA-stable isotope probing and amplicon sequencing reveals Betaproteobacteria as responsible for attenuation of nitrate contamination in a low impacted aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, M Inés; Kumaresan, Deepak; Tarlera, Silvana; Murrell, J Colin; Fernández-Scavino, Ana

    2018-02-01

    Groundwater reservoirs constitute important freshwater resources. However, these ecosystems are highly vulnerable to contamination and have to rely on the resident microbiota to attenuate the impact of this contamination. Nitrate is one of the main contaminants found in groundwater, and denitrification is the main process that removes the compound. In this study, the response to nutrient load on indigenous microbial communities in groundwater from a low impacted aquifer in Uruguay was evaluated. Denitrification rates were measured in groundwater samples from three different sites with nitrate, acetate and pyrite amendments. Results showed that denitrification is feasible under in situ nitrate and electron donor concentrations, although the lack of readily available organic energy source would limit the attenuation of higher nitrate concentrations. DNA-stable isotope probing, combined with amplicon sequencing of 16S rRNA, nirS and nirK genes, was used to identify the active denitrifiers. Members of the phylum Betaproteobacteria were the dominant denitrifiers in two of three sites, with different families being observed; members of the genus Vogesella (Neisseriaceae) were key denitrifiers at one site, while the genera Dechloromonas (Rhodocyclaceae) and Comamonas (Comamonadaceae) were the main denitrifiers detected at the other sites. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Degradation of (-)-ephedrine by Pseudomonas putida. Detection of (-)-ephedrine: NAD+-oxidoreductase from Arthrobacter globiformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klamann, E; Lingens, F

    1980-01-01

    A bacterium utilizing the alkaloid (-)-ephedrine as its sole source of carbon was isolated by an enrichment-culture technique from soil supplemented with 4-benzoyl-1,3-oxazolidinon-(2). The bacterium was indentified as Pseudomonas putida by morphological and physiological studies. The following metabolites were isolated from the culture fluid: methylamine, formaldehyde, methylbenzoylcarbinol (2-hydroxy-1-oxo-1 phenylpropane), benzoid acid, pyrocatechol and cis, cis-muconic acid. A pathway for the degradation of (-)-ephedrine by Pseudomonas putida is proposed and compared with the degradative pathway in Arthrobacter globiformis. The enzyme, which is responsible for the first step in the catabolism of (-)-ephedrine could be demonstrated in extracts from Arthrobacter globiformis. This enzyme catalyses the dehydrogenation of (-)-ephedrine yielding phenylacetylcarbinol/methylbenzoylcarbinol and methylamine. It requires NAD+ as cofactor and exhibits optimal activity at pH 11 in 0.1 M glycine/NaOH buffer. The Km value for (-)-ephedrine is 0.02 mM and for NAD+ 0.11 mM, respectively. No remarkable loss of activity is observed following treatment with EDTA. The enzyme has been shown to react with a wide range of ethanolamines. A slight enrichment was obtained by ammonium sulphate precipitation. The name (-)-ephedrine: NAD+-oxidoreductase (deaminating) is proposed.

  10. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a diazotrophic bacterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanvinde, L.; Sastry, G.R.K.

    1990-01-01

    This is the first report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens can fix nitrogen in a free-living condition as shown by its abilities to grown on nitrogen-free medium, reduce acetylene to ethylene, and incorporate 15 N supplied as 15 N 2 . As with most other well-characterized diazotrophic bacteria, the presence of NH 4 + in the medium and aerobic conditions repress nitrogen fixation by A. tumefaciens. The system requires molybdenum. No evidence for nodulation was found with pea, peanut, or soybean plants. Further understanding of the nitrogen-fixing ability of this bacterium, which has always been considered a pathogen, should cast new light on the evolution of a pathogenic versus symbiotic relationship

  11. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  12. Effects of temperatures near the freezing point on N2O emissions, denitrification and on the abundance and structure of nitrifying and denitrifying soil communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Sophie; Goyer, Claudia; Zebarth, Bernie J; Burton, David L; Tatti, Enrico; Chantigny, Martin H; Filion, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming in temperate regions may lead to decreased soil temperatures over winter as a result of reduced snow cover. We examined the effects of temperatures near the freezing point on N(2)O emissions, denitrification, and on the abundance and structure of soil nitrifiers and denitrifiers. Soil microcosms supplemented with NO3 - and/or NO3 - plus red clover residues were incubated for 120 days at -4 °C, -1 °C, +2 °C or +5 °C. Among microcosms amended with residues, N(2)O emission and/or denitrification increased with increasing temperature on Days 2 and 14. Interestingly, N(2)O emission and/or denitrification after Day 14 were the greatest at -1 °C. Substantial N(2) O emissions were only observed on Day 2 at +2 °C and +5 °C, while at -1 °C, N(2)O emissions were consistently detected over the duration of the experiment. Abundances of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), Nitrospira-like bacteria and nirK denitrifiers were the lowest in soils at -4 °C, while abundances of Nitrobacter-like bacteria and nirS denitrifiers did not vary among temperatures. Community structures of nirK and nirS denitrifiers and Nitrobacter-like bacteria shifted between below-zero and above-zero temperatures. Structure of AOA and AOB communities also changed but not systematically among frozen and unfrozen temperatures. Results indicated shifts in some nitrifier and denitrifier communities with freezing and a surprising stimulation of N(2)O emissions at -1 °C when NO3 - and C are present. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Multiple Signaling Systems Regulating Virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal Jimenez, Pol; Koch, Gudrun; Thompson, Jessica A.; Xavier, Karina B.; Cool, Robbert H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Cell-to-cell communication is a major process that allows bacteria to sense and coordinately react to the fluctuating conditions of the surrounding environment. In several pathogens, this process triggers the production of virulence factors and/or a switch in bacterial lifestyle that is a major determining factor in the outcome and severity of the infection. Understanding how bacteria control these signaling systems is crucial to the development of novel antimicrobial agents capable of reducing virulence while allowing the immune system of the host to clear bacterial infection, an approach likely to reduce the selective pressures for development of resistance. We provide here an up-to-date overview of the molecular basis and physiological implications of cell-to-cell signaling systems in Gram-negative bacteria, focusing on the well-studied bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All of the known cell-to-cell signaling systems in this bacterium are described, from the most-studied systems, i.e., N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), the 4-quinolones, the global activator of antibiotic and cyanide synthesis (GAC), the cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) systems, and the alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp), to less-well-studied signaling molecules, including diketopiperazines, fatty acids (diffusible signal factor [DSF]-like factors), pyoverdine, and pyocyanin. This overview clearly illustrates that bacterial communication is far more complex than initially thought and delivers a clear distinction between signals that are quorum sensing dependent and those relying on alternative factors for their production. PMID:22390972

  14. Do freshwater macrophytes influence the community structure of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying bacteria in the rhizospere?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Martina; Schramm, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    DO FRESHWATER MACROPHYTES INFLUENCE THE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF AMMONIA-OXIDIZING AND DENITRIFYING BACTERIA IN THE RHIZOSPHERE? M. Herrmann, A. Schramm Department of Biological Sciences, Microbiology, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark Aquatic macrophytes such as Littorella uniflora and Lobelia...... to unvegetated sediment, especially with respect to the availability of oxygen, organic carbon, and inorganic nitrogen. We hypothesize that macrophyte species create specific niches for ammonia oxidizing and nitrate-reducing bacteria in their rhizosphere, leading to plant-dependant differences in abundance......-denitrification using the 15N isotope pairing technique. Ammonia-oxidizing and nitrate-reducing populations are analyzed based on the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA) and the nitrate reductase gene (narG) as functional markers. Preliminary data indicate that there in fact exist differences in the community composition...

  15. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manash C.; Sandhu, Padmani; Gupta, Priya; Rudrapaul, Prasenjit; de, Utpal C.; Tribedi, Prosun; Akhter, Yusuf; Bhattacharjee, Surajit

    2016-03-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin. Vitexin shows minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at 260 μg/ml. It’s antibiofilm activity was evaluated by safranin staining, protein extraction, microscopy methods, quantification of EPS and in vivo models using several sub-MIC doses. Various quorum sensing (QS) mediated phenomenon such as swarming motility, azocasein degrading protease activity, pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, LasA and LasB activity of the bacteria were also evaluated. Results showed marked attenuation in biofilm formation and QS mediated phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of 110 μg/ml vitexin in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin separately. Molecular docking of vitexin with QS associated LuxR, LasA, LasI and motility related proteins showed high and reasonable binding affinity respectively. The study explores the antibiofilm potential of vitexin against P. aeruginosa which can be used as a new antibiofilm agent against microbial biofilm associated pathogenesis.

  16. Genome-scale reconstruction of the metabolic network in Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Parizad; Marashi, Sayed-Amir; Asad, Sedigheh

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 is an endophytic bacterium capable of nitrogen fixation. This strain has been isolated from the rice rhizosphere and provides the plant with fixed nitrogen and phytohormones. These interesting features encouraged us to study the metabolism of this microorganism at the systems-level. In this work, we present the first genome-scale metabolic model (iPB890) for P. stutzeri, involving 890 genes, 1135 reactions, and 813 metabolites. A combination of automatic and manual approaches was used in the reconstruction process. Briefly, using the metabolic networks of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida as templates, a draft metabolic network of P. stutzeri was reconstructed. Then, the draft network was driven through an iterative and curative process of gap filling. In the next step, the model was evaluated using different experimental data such as specific growth rate, Biolog substrate utilization data and other experimental observations. In most of the evaluation cases, the model was successful in correctly predicting the cellular phenotypes. Thus, we posit that the iPB890 model serves as a suitable platform to explore the metabolism of P. stutzeri.

  17. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manash C.; Sandhu, Padmani; Gupta, Priya; Rudrapaul, Prasenjit; De, Utpal C.; Tribedi, Prosun; Akhter, Yusuf; Bhattacharjee, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin. Vitexin shows minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at 260 μg/ml. It’s antibiofilm activity was evaluated by safranin staining, protein extraction, microscopy methods, quantification of EPS and in vivo models using several sub-MIC doses. Various quorum sensing (QS) mediated phenomenon such as swarming motility, azocasein degrading protease activity, pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, LasA and LasB activity of the bacteria were also evaluated. Results showed marked attenuation in biofilm formation and QS mediated phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of 110 μg/ml vitexin in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin separately. Molecular docking of vitexin with QS associated LuxR, LasA, LasI and motility related proteins showed high and reasonable binding affinity respectively. The study explores the antibiofilm potential of vitexin against P. aeruginosa which can be used as a new antibiofilm agent against microbial biofilm associated pathogenesis. PMID:27000525

  18. New emulsifying and cryoprotective exopolysaccharide from Antarctic Pseudomonas sp. ID1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Ornella; Delgado, Lidia; Mercade, Elena

    2015-03-06

    Pseudomonas sp. ID1 is a cold-adapted bacterium isolated from a marine sediment sample collected from South Shetland Islands (Antarctica) that is noted for the highly mucous appearance of its colonies. In this work, we have characterized an exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by this strain, which is mainly composed of glucose, galactose and fucose, and has a molecular mass higher than 2×10(6) Da. We have also studied its potential biotechnological applications as an emulsifier and cryoprotectant agent. The EPS emulsifying activity against different food and cosmetic oils was much higher than commercial gums such as xanthan gum and arabic gum, and surfarctants such as Span 20. It formed highly stable emulsions against the cosmetic oil cetiol V, exhibiting pseudoplastic flow behavior, low thixotrophy and yield stress. The EPS of Pseudomonas sp. ID1 conferred significant cryoprotection for the strain itself as well as for other bacteria, including Escherichia coli, suggesting a universal cryoprotectant role. The cryoprotective activity of the EPS showed a clear dose-response relation at -20 °C and -80 °C and was significantly higher than that observed for the membrane stabilizer fetal bovine serum (FBS). These properties make the EPS of Pseudomonas sp. ID1 a promising alternative to commercial polysaccharides as an emulsifier and cryoprotectant agent for food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Transitions in nirS-type denitrifier diversity, community composition, and biogeochemical activity along the Chesapeake Bay estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Christopher A; O'Mullan, Gregory D; Cornwell, Jeffrey C; Ward, Bess B

    2013-01-01

    Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in North America, can be characterized as having steep and opposing gradients in salinity and dissolved inorganic nitrogen along the main axis of the Bay. In this study, the diversity of nirS gene fragments (encoding cytochrome cd 1-type nitrite reductase), physical/chemical parameters, and benthic N2-fluxes were analyzed in order to determine how denitrifier communities and biogeochemical activity vary along the estuary salinity gradient. The nirS gene fragments were PCR-amplified, cloned, and sequenced from sediment cores collected at five stations. Sequence analysis of 96-123 nirS clones from each station revealed extensive overall diversity in this estuary, as well as distinct spatial structure in the nirS sequence distributions. Both nirS-based richness and community composition varied among stations, with the most dramatic shifts occurring between low-salinity (oligohaline) and moderate-salinity (mesohaline) sites. For four samples collected in April, the nirS-based richness, nitrate concentrations, and N2-fluxes all decreased in parallel along the salinity gradient from the oligohaline northernmost station to the highest salinity (polyhaline) station near the mouth of the Bay. The vast majority of the 550 nirS sequences were distinct from cultivated denitrifiers, although many were closely related to environmental clones from other coastal and estuarine systems. Interestingly, 8 of the 172 OTUs identified accounted for 42% of the total nirS clones, implying the presence of a few dominant and many rare genotypes, which were distributed in a non-random manner along the salinity gradient of Chesapeake Bay. These data, comprising the largest dataset to investigate nirS clone sequence diversity from an estuarine environment, also provided information that was required for the development of nirS microarrays to investigate the interaction of microbial diversity, environmental gradients, and biogeochemical activity.

  20. Transitions in nirS-type Denitrifier Diversity, Community Composition, and Biogeochemical Activity along the Chesapeake Bay Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Francis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in North America, can be characterized as having steep and opposing gradients in salinity and dissolved inorganic nitrogen along the main axis of the Bay. In this study, the diversity of nirS gene fragments (encoding cytochrome cd1-type nitrite reductase, physical/chemical parameters, and benthic N2-fluxes were analyzed in order to determine how denitrifier communities and biogeochemical activity vary along the estuary salinity gradient. The nirS gene fragments were PCR-amplified, cloned, and sequenced from sediment cores collected at five stations. Sequence analysis of 96 to 123 nirS clones from each station revealed extensive overall diversity in this estuary, as well as distinct spatial structure in the nirS sequence distributions. Both nirS-based richness and community composition varied among stations, with the most dramatic shifts occurring between low-salinity (oligohaline and moderate-salinity (mesohaline sites. For four samples collected in April, the nirS-based richness, nitrate concentrations, and N2-fluxes all decreased in parallel along the salinity gradient from the oligohaline northernmost station to the highest salinity (polyhaline station near the mouth of the Bay. The vast majority of the 550 nirS sequences were distinct from cultivated denitrifiers, although many were closely related to environmental clones from other coastal and estuarine systems. Interestingly, 8 of the 172 OTUs identified accounted for 42% of the total nirS clones, implying the presence of a few dominant and many rare genotypes, which were distributed in a non-random manner along the salinity gradient of Chesapeake Bay. These data, comprising the largest dataset to investigate nirS clone sequence diversity from an estuarine environment, also provided information that was required for the development of nirS microarrays to investigate the interaction of microbial diversity, environmental gradients, and biogeochemical

  1. Denitrification of groundwater using a sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying anaerobic fluidized-bed MBR: performance and bacterial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Chengzhi; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigates a novel sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying anaerobic fluidized bed membrane bioreactor (AnFB-MBR) that has the potential to overcome the limitations of conventional sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification systems. The AnFB-MBR produced consistent high-quality product water when fed by a synthetic groundwater with NO3 (-)-N ranging 25-80 mg/L and operated at hydraulic retention times of 0.5-5.0 h. A nitrate removal rate of up to 4.0 g NO3 (-)-N/Lreactord was attained by the bioreactor, which exceeded any reported removal capacity. The flux of AnFB-MBR was maintained in the range of 1.5-15 L m(-2) h(-1). Successful membrane cleaning was practiced with cleaning cycles of 35-81 days, which had no obvious effect on the AnFB-MBR performance. The (15) N-tracer analyses elucidated that nitrogen was converted into (15) N2-N and (15) N-biomass accounting for 88.1-93.1 % and 6.4-11.6 % of the total nitrogen produced, respectively. Only 0.3-0.5 % of removed nitrogen was in form of (15)N2O-N in sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification process, reducing potential risks of a significant amount of N2O emissions. The sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying bacterial consortium was composed mainly of bacteria from Proteobacteria, Chlorobi, and Chloroflexi phyla, with genera Thiobacillus, Sulfurimonas, and Ignavibacteriales dominating the consortium. The pyrosequencing assays also suggested that the stable microbial communities corresponded to the elevated performance of the AnFB-MBR. Overall, this research described relatively high nitrate removal, acceptable flux, indicating future potential for the technology in practice.

  2. Denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter dominate bacterial communities in the highly contaminated subsurface of a nuclear legacy waste site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Stefan J; Prakash, Om; Jasrotia, Puja; Overholt, Will A; Cardenas, Erick; Hubbard, Daniela; Tiedje, James M; Watson, David B; Schadt, Christopher W; Brooks, Scott C; Kostka, Joel E

    2012-02-01

    The effect of long-term mixed-waste contamination, particularly uranium and nitrate, on the microbial community in the terrestrial subsurface was investigated at the field scale at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site in Oak Ridge, TN. The abundance, community composition, and distribution of groundwater microorganisms were examined across the site during two seasonal sampling events. At representative locations, subsurface sediment was also examined from two boreholes, one sampled from the most heavily contaminated area of the site and another from an area with low contamination. A suite of DNA- and RNA-based molecular tools were employed for community characterization, including quantitative PCR of rRNA and nitrite reductase genes, community composition fingerprinting analysis, and high-throughput pyrotag sequencing of rRNA genes. The results demonstrate that pH is a major driver of the subsurface microbial community structure and that denitrifying bacteria from the genus Rhodanobacter (class Gammaproteobacteria) dominate at low pH. The relative abundance of bacteria from this genus was positively correlated with lower-pH conditions, and these bacteria were abundant and active in the most highly contaminated areas. Other factors, such as the concentration of nitrogen species, oxygen level, and sampling season, did not appear to strongly influence the distribution of Rhodanobacter bacteria. The results indicate that these organisms are acid-tolerant denitrifiers, well suited to the acidic, nitrate-rich subsurface conditions, and pH is confirmed as a dominant driver of bacterial community structure in this contaminated subsurface environment.

  3. Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea Are More Resistant Than Denitrifiers to Seasonal Precipitation Changes in an Acidic Subtropical Forest Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal precipitation changes are increasingly severe in subtropical areas. However, the responses of soil nitrogen (N cycle and its associated functional microorganisms to such precipitation changes remain unclear. In this study, two projected precipitation patterns were manipulated: intensifying the dry-season drought (DD and extending the dry-season duration (ED but increasing the wet-season storms following the DD and ED treatment period. The effects of these two contrasting precipitation patterns on soil net N transformation rates and functional gene abundances were quantitatively assessed through a resistance index. Results showed that the resistance index of functional microbial abundance (-0.03 ± 0.08 was much lower than that of the net N transformation rate (0.55 ± 0.02 throughout the experiment, indicating that microbial abundance was more responsive to precipitation changes compared with the N transformation rate. Spring drought under the ED treatment significantly increased the abundances of both nitrifying (amoA and denitrifying genes (nirK, nirS, and nosZ, while changes in these gene abundances overlapped largely with control treatment during droughts in the dry season. Interestingly, the resistance index of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA amoA abundance was significantly higher than that of the denitrifying gene abundances, suggesting that AOA were more resistant to the precipitation changes. This was attributed to the stronger environmental adaptability and higher resource utilization efficiency of the AOA community, as indicated by the lack of correlations between AOA gene abundance and environmental factors [i.e., soil water content, ammonium (NH4+ and dissolved organic carbon concentrations] during the experiment.

  4. De novo production of the monoterpenoid geranic acid by metabolically engineered Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Jia; Becher, Daniela; Lubuta, Patrice; Dany, Sarah; Tusch, Kerstin; Schewe, Hendrik; Buchhaupt, Markus; Schrader, Jens

    2014-12-04

    Production of monoterpenoids as valuable chemicals using recombinant microbes is a growing field of interest. Unfortunately, antimicrobial activity of most monoterpenoids hampers a wide application of microorganisms for their production. Strains of Pseudomonas putida, a fast growing and metabolically versatile bacterium, often show an outstanding high tolerance towards organic solvents and other toxic compounds. Therefore, Pseudomonas putida constitutes an attractive alternative host in comparison to conventionally used microorganisms. Here, metabolic engineering of solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida as a novel microbial cell factory for de novo production of monoterpenoids is reported for the first time, exemplified by geranic acid production from glycerol as carbon source. The monoterpenoic acid is an attractive compound for application in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetics and agro industries. A comparison between Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas putida concerning the ability to grow in the presence of geranic acid revealed that the pseudomonad bears a superior resilience compared to the conventionally used microbes. Moreover, Pseudomonas putida DSM 12264 wildtype strain efficiently oxidized externally added geraniol to geranic acid with no further degradation. Omitting external dosage of geraniol but functionally expressing geraniol synthase (GES) from Ocimum basilicum, a first proof-of-concept for de novo biosynthesis of 1.35 mg/L geranic acid in P. putida DSM 12264 was achieved. Doubling the amount of glycerol resulted in twice the amount of product. Co-expression of the six genes of the mevalonate pathway from Myxococcus xanthus to establish flux from acetyl-CoA to the universal terpenoid precursor isopentenylpyrophosphate yielded 36 mg/L geranic acid in shake flask experiments. In the bioreactor, the recombinant strain produced 193 mg/L of geranic acid under fed-batch conditions within 48 h. Metabolic engineering turned Pseudomonas

  5. Pseudomonas-follikulitis efter badning i spabad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall Pallesen, Kristine Appel; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mørtz, Charlotte Gotthard

    2012-01-01

    . We describe a 23-year-old healthy woman who developed a pustular rash and general malaise after using a spa bath contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacterial culture from a pustule confirmed Pseudomonas folliculitis and the patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with rapid good effect....

  6. Petroleum-hydrocarbons biodegradation by Pseudomonas strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many indigenous microorganisms in water and soil are capable of degrading hydrocarbon contaminants. In this study, two bacterial strains were isolated from a contaminated soil of a refinery of Arzew (Oran). The isolated strains were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P3) and Pseudomonas fluoresens (P4).

  7. Pseudomonas Septic Arthritis | Thanni | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Septic arthritis due to pseudomonas species is unusual and when it occurs, there is often an underlying cause like immune depression, intravenous drug abuse or a penetrating injury. PATIENT AND METHOD: We report a case of pseudomonas septic arthritis complicating cannulation of a leg vein following ...

  8. Genome-enabled studies of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation in the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry R Beller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Thiobacillus denitrificans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV and Fe(II oxidation, both of which can strongly influence the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium in contaminated aquifers. We previously identified two c-type cytochromes involved in nitrate-dependent U(IV oxidation in T. denitrificans and hypothesized that c-type cytochromes would also catalyze Fe(II oxidation, as they have been found to play this role in anaerobic phototrophic Fe(II-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report on efforts to identify genes associated with nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation, namely (a whole-genome transcriptional studies [using FeCO3, Fe2+, and U(IV oxides as electron donors under denitrifying conditions], (b Fe(II oxidation assays performed with knockout mutants targeting primarily highly expressed or upregulated c-type cytochromes, and (c random transposon-mutagenesis studies with screening for Fe(II oxidation. Assays of mutants for 26 target genes, most of which were c-type cytochromes, indicated that none of the mutants tested were significantly defective in nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation. The non-defective mutants included the c1-cytochrome subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III, which has relevance to a previously proposed role for this complex in nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation and to current concepts of reverse electron transfer. A transposon mutant with a disrupted gene associated with NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I was ~35% defective relative to the wild-type strain; this strain was similarly defective in nitrate reduction with thiosulfate as the electron donor. Overall, our results indicate that nitrate-dependent Fe(II oxidation in T. denitrificans is not catalyzed by the same c-type cytochromes involved in U(IV oxidation, nor have other c-type cytochromes yet been implicated in the process.

  9. Metagenome analysis of a complex community reveals the metabolic blueprint of anammox bacterium ‘Candidatus Jettenia asiatica’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziye eHu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Anammox bacteria are key players in the global nitrogen cycle and responsible for up to 50% of global nitrogen loss. Because of their cost effective application in anaerobic nitrogen removal, the anammox bacteria are widely implemented in wastewater treatment. Currently, five genera of anammox bacteria have been identified, together forming a deep branching order in the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobium- Chlamydiae (PVC superphylum. Members of all genera have been detected in wastewater treatment plants, but metagenomic information is not yet available for all genera. Here we report the metagenomic analysis of an enrichment dominated by ‘Candidatus Jettenia asiatica’. The whole microbial community of a granular sludge anammox reactor was sequenced using both illumina and 454 pyrosequencing. The sludge was previously shown to have a ~50% enrichment of the anammox bacterium ‘Candidatus Jettenia asiatica’ by 16S rRNA gene analysis. After de novo assembly 37,432 contigs with an average length of 571 nt were obtained. The contigs were then analyzed by BLASTx searches against the protein sequences of ‘Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis’ and a set of 25 genes essential in anammox metabolism were detected. Additionally all reads were mapped to the genome of an anammox strain KSU-1 and de novo assembly was performed again using the reads that could be mapped on KSU-1. Using this approach, a gene encoding copper-containing nitrite reductase NirK was identified in the genome, instead of cytochrome cd1-type nitrite reductase NirS that is responsible for the nitrite reduction of ‘Ca. Kuenenia stuttgartiensis’ and ‘Ca. Scalindua profunda’. Finally, the community composition was investigated through MetaCluster analysis, 16S rRNA gene analysis and read mapping, which showed the presence of other important community members such as aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, methane producing microorganisms and denitrifying methanotroph 'Ca

  10. Successful antibiotic treatment of Pseudomonas stutzeri-induced peritonitis without peritoneal dialysis catheter removal in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Wook Park

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas stutzeri is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, motile, single polar-flagellated, soil bacterium that was first isolated from human spinal fluid and is widely distributed in the environment. It was isolated as an uncommon opportunistic pathogen from humans, and a few cases of P. stutzeri-induced peritonitis have been reported in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD. Catheter removal with antibiotic treatment is generally recommended because peritonitis by Pseudomonas species is commonly associated with catheter-related infection. Here, we describe the first case of P. stutzeri-induced peritonitis in an 82-year-old woman in Korea. She had received two antipseudomonal antibiotics, an aminoglycoside (isepamicin, Yuhan corporation, Seoul, Korea and a fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin, and was successfully treated without removal of the CAPD catheter.

  11. Experimental evolution of aging in a bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stearns Stephen C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging refers to a decline in reproduction and survival with increasing age. According to evolutionary theory, aging evolves because selection late in life is weak and mutations exist whose deleterious effects manifest only late in life. Whether the assumptions behind this theory are fulfilled in all organisms, and whether all organisms age, has not been clear. We tested the generality of this theory by experimental evolution with Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium whose asymmetric division allows mother and daughter to be distinguished. Results We evolved three populations for 2000 generations in the laboratory under conditions where selection was strong early in life, but very weak later in life. All populations evolved faster growth rates, mostly by decreasing the age at first division. Evolutionary changes in aging were inconsistent. The predominant response was the unexpected evolution of slower aging, revealing the limits of theoretical predictions if mutations have unanticipated phenotypic effects. However, we also observed the spread of a mutation causing earlier aging of mothers whose negative effect was reset in the daughters. Conclusion Our results confirm that late-acting deleterious mutations do occur in bacteria and that they can invade populations when selection late in life is weak. They suggest that very few organisms – perhaps none- can avoid the accumulation of such mutations over evolutionary time, and thus that aging is probably a fundamental property of all cellular organisms.

  12. Pseudomonas alkylphenolica sp. nov., a bacterial species able to form special aerial structures when grown on p-cresol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulet, Magdalena; Sánchez, David; Lalucat, Jorge; Lee, Kyoung; García-Valdés, Elena

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas sp. KL28T is an aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that was isolated from the soil of Changwon, South Korea, based on its ability to grow in the presence of linear alkylphenols (C1-C5). Despite several studies on strain KL28T, it could not be assigned to any known species in the genus Pseudomonas. The name 'Pseudomonas alkylphenolia' was proposed for KL28T, but the strain had not until now been characterized taxonomically and the name currently has no standing in the bacterial nomenclature. A 16S rRNA gene sequence based phylogenetic analysis suggested an affiliation of strain KL28T with the Pseudomonas putida group, with Pseudomonas vranovensis DSM 16006T as the most closely related type strain (99.1 % similarity). A multilocus phylogenetic sequence analysis performed by concatenating 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoD and rpoB partial gene sequences showed that isolate KL28T could be differentiated from P. vranovensis DSM 16006T (sequence similarity 93.7 %). Genomic comparisons of strain KL28T with the type strains of the species in the P. putida group using average nucleotide index based on blast (ANIb) and genome-to genome distances (GGDC) revealed 87.06 % and 32.20 % similarities with P. vranovensis DSM 16006T, respectively, as the closest type strain. Both values are far from the thresholds established for species differentiation. These results, together with differences in phenotypic features and chemotaxonomic analyses [fatty acids and whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS], support the proposal of strain KL28T ( = JCM 16553T = KCTC 22206T) as the type strain of a novel species, for which the formerly proposed name, 'P. alkylphenolia', is correctly latinized as Pseudomonas alkylphenolica sp. nov.

  13. A Novel Denitrifying Extreme Halophile That Grows in a Simple Mineral Salts Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Oremland, R. S.; Gherna, R.; Cote, R.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    An extremely halophilic bacterium (strain CH-1) was isolated from a saltern adjacent to San Francisco Bay. It grew in a mineral salts medium with ammonium and glucose as sole sources of nitrogen and carbon as well as energy, respectively Cells lysed at less than 10% NaCl and growth was most rapid in medium containing 20% NaCl. Cells were pieomorphic ranging from disc to ovoid-shaved and used a variety of carbohydrates as sole carbon sources. the utilization of certain carbon sources was controlled by temperature with some used at 37 degrees but not 45 C. CH-1 grew between 30 degrees and 50 C with the optimum at 45 C in the presence of 20% NaCl. CH-1 contained 2,3-di-O-isoprenyl glcerol diethers and was sensitive to aphidicofin. The major polar lipid was glucosyl-mannosyl-alucosyl diether, which is diagnostic of the Haloarcula. Thus CH-1 is an extreme halophile and a member of this genus. Among the novel characteristics of this organism was its ability to grow anaerobically in synthetic medium when nitrate was present which was only reduced to nitrous oxide. This organism should prove useful for studying denitrification and carbohydrate metabolism in the extreme halophiles; and to be a valuable resource for generic studies.

  14. The clonal antibody response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa heat shock protein is highly diverse in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulanova, M; Petersen, T D; Ciofu, O

    1997-01-01

    The GroEL protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa belongs to the bacterial 60-65 kDa heat shock protein family. A strong antibody response to GroEL has been found in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic pulmonary infection caused by P. aeruginosa. Clonotypes of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies against Gro...... antibody clones against GroEL. The appearance of new clones with time reflected the long duration of the chronic infection. A striking addition of new clonotypes during the observation period occurred when a new unrelated bacterium (Burkholderia cepacia) had become established as a cause of the pulmonary...

  15. The Identification and Validation of Novel Small Proteins in Pseudomonas Putida KT-2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Long, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    and activities and may lead to the discovery of novel antimicrobial agents. Our project focuses on the identification, validation and characterization of novel s-­‐proteins in the bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT-­2440. As there is virtually no information on s-­‐proteins in pseudomonads, the first step......, total protein samples are prepared, fractionated, and analyzed with mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The MS/MS data are compared to a custom database containing >80000 putative sORF sequences to identify candidates for validation. A total of 56 and 22 putative sORFs were obtained from MS/MS data...

  16. A dynamic and intricate regulatory network determines Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically versatile bacterium that is found in a wide range of biotic and abiotic habitats. It is a major human opportunistic pathogen causing numerous acute and chronic infections. The critical traits contributing to the pathogenic potential of P. aeruginosa are the production of a myriad of virulence factors, formation of biofilms and antibiotic resistance. Expression of these traits is under stringent regulation, and it responds to largely unidentified environmental signals. This review is focused on providing a global picture of virulence gene regulation in P. aeruginosa. In addition to key regulatory pathways that control the transition from acute to chronic infection phenotypes, some regulators have been identified that modulate multiple virulence mechanisms. Despite of a propensity for chaotic behaviour, no chaotic motifs were readily observed in the P. aeruginosa virulence regulatory network. Having a ‘birds-eye’ view of the regulatory cascades provides the forum opportunities to pose questions, formulate hypotheses and evaluate theories in elucidating P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in making P. aeruginosa a successful pathogen is essential in helping devise control strategies. PMID:23143271

  17. Pseudomonas toxin pyocyanin triggers autophagy: Implications for pathoadaptive mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhong-Shan; Ma, Lan-Qing; Zhu, Kun; Yan, Jin-Yuan; Bian, Li; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Zou, Cheng-Gang

    2016-06-02

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can establish life-long chronic infection in patients with cystic fibrosis by generating genetic loss-of-function mutations, which enhance fitness of the bacterium in the airways. However, the precise role of the pathoadaptive mutations in persistence in chronic airways infection remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that pyocyanin, a well-described P. aeruginosa virulence factor that plays an important role in the initial infection, promotes autophagy in bronchial epithelial cells. Disruption of phzM, which is required for pyocyanin biosynthesis, leads to a significant reduction in autophagy in Beas-2B cells and lung tissues. Pyocyanin-induced autophagy is mediated by the EIF2AK4/GCN2-EIF2S1/eIF2α-ATF4 pathway. Interestingly, rats infected with the phzMΔ mutant strain have high mortality rate and numbers of colony-forming units, compared to those infected with wild-type (WT) P. aeruginosa PA14 strain, during chronic P. aeruginosa infection. In addition, the phzMΔ mutant strain induces more extensive alveolar wall thickening than the WT strain in the pulmonary airways of rats. As autophagy plays an essential role in suppressing bacterial burden, our findings provide a detailed understanding of why reduction of pyocyanin production in P. aeruginosa in chronic airways infections has been associated with better host adaptation and worse outcomes in cystic fibrosis.

  18. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Arat

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2, nitric oxide (NO and nitrous oxide (N2O. This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2, nitrate (NO3, and phosphate (PO4 suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA. Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide.

  19. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3), and phosphate (PO4) suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide.

  20. Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenazines that kill Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezairliyan, Brent; Vinayavekhin, Nawaporn; Grenfell-Lee, Daniel; Yuen, Grace J; Saghatelian, Alan; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes employ a variety of methods to overcome host defenses, including the production and dispersal of molecules that are toxic to their hosts. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium, is a pathogen of a diverse variety of hosts including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we identify three small molecules in the phenazine class that are produced by P. aeruginosa strain PA14 that are toxic to C. elegans. We demonstrate that 1-hydroxyphenazine, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, and pyocyanin are capable of killing nematodes in a matter of hours. 1-hydroxyphenazine is toxic over a wide pH range, whereas the toxicities of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin are pH-dependent at non-overlapping pH ranges. We found that acidification of the growth medium by PA14 activates the toxicity of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is the primary toxic agent towards C. elegans in our assay. Pyocyanin is not toxic under acidic conditions and 1-hydroxyphenazine is produced at concentrations too low to kill C. elegans. These results suggest a role for phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in mammalian pathogenesis because PA14 mutants deficient in phenazine production have been shown to be defective in pathogenesis in mice. More generally, these data demonstrate how diversity within a class of metabolites could affect bacterial toxicity in different environmental niches.

  1. Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenazines that kill Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent Cezairliyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic microbes employ a variety of methods to overcome host defenses, including the production and dispersal of molecules that are toxic to their hosts. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium, is a pathogen of a diverse variety of hosts including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we identify three small molecules in the phenazine class that are produced by P. aeruginosa strain PA14 that are toxic to C. elegans. We demonstrate that 1-hydroxyphenazine, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, and pyocyanin are capable of killing nematodes in a matter of hours. 1-hydroxyphenazine is toxic over a wide pH range, whereas the toxicities of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin are pH-dependent at non-overlapping pH ranges. We found that acidification of the growth medium by PA14 activates the toxicity of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is the primary toxic agent towards C. elegans in our assay. Pyocyanin is not toxic under acidic conditions and 1-hydroxyphenazine is produced at concentrations too low to kill C. elegans. These results suggest a role for phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in mammalian pathogenesis because PA14 mutants deficient in phenazine production have been shown to be defective in pathogenesis in mice. More generally, these data demonstrate how diversity within a class of metabolites could affect bacterial toxicity in different environmental niches.

  2. Genetic and Functional Diversity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Joseph S; Taylor, Véronique L; Islam, Salim T; Hao, Youai; Kocíncová, Dana

    2011-01-01

    Lipopolysccharide (LPS) is an integral component of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell envelope, occupying the outer leaflet of the outer membrane in this Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen. It is important for bacterium-host interactions and has been shown to be a major virulence factor for this organism. Structurally, P. aeruginosa LPS is composed of three domains, namely, lipid A, core oligosaccharide, and the distal O antigen (O-Ag). Most P. aeruginosa strains produce two distinct forms of O-Ag, one a homopolymer of D-rhamnose that is a common polysaccharide antigen (CPA, formerly termed A band), and the other a heteropolymer of three to five distinct (and often unique dideoxy) sugars in its repeat units, known as O-specific antigen (OSA, formerly termed B band). Compositional differences in the O units among the OSA from different strains form the basis of the International Antigenic Typing Scheme for classification via serotyping of different strains of P. aeruginosa. The focus of this review is to provide state-of-the-art knowledge on the genetic and resultant functional diversity of LPS produced by P. aeruginosa. The underlying factors contributing to this diversity will be thoroughly discussed and presented in the context of its contributions to host-pathogen interactions and the control/prevention of infection.

  3. Mechanisms of resistance to chloramphenicol in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Matilde; Conde, Susana; de la Torre, Jesús; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Ramos, Juan-Luis; Duque, Estrella

    2012-02-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a chloramphenicol-resistant bacterium that is able to grow in the presence of this antibiotic at a concentration of up to 25 μg/ml. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that the expression profile of 102 genes changed in response to this concentration of chloramphenicol in the culture medium. The genes that showed altered expression include those involved in general metabolism, cellular stress response, gene regulation, efflux pump transporters, and protein biosynthesis. Analysis of a genome-wide collection of mutants showed that survival of a knockout mutant in the TtgABC resistance-nodulation-division (RND) efflux pump and mutants in the biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline (PQQ) were compromised in the presence of chloramphenicol. The analysis also revealed that an ABC extrusion system (PP2669/PP2668/PP2667) and the AgmR regulator (PP2665) were needed for full resistance toward chloramphenicol. Transcriptional arrays revealed that AgmR controls the expression of the pqq genes and the operon encoding the ABC extrusion pump from the promoter upstream of open reading frame (ORF) PP2669.

  4. Swimming pattern of Pseudomonas putida - navigating with stops and reversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintsche, Marius; Waljor, Veronika; Alirezaeizanjani, Zahra; Theves, Matthias; Beta, Carsten

    Bacterial swimming strategies depend on factors such as the chemical and physical environment, as well as the flagellation pattern of a species. For some bacteria the motility pattern and the underlying flagellar dynamics are well known, such as the classical run-and-tumble behavior of E. coli. Here we study the swimming motility and chemotactic behavior of the polar, multi-flagellated soil dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas putida. Compared to E. coli, its motility pattern is more diverse. In addition to different speed levels, P. putida exhibits two types of reorientation events, stops and reversals, the occurrence of which is modulated according to the growth conditions. We also analyzed the swimming pattern in the presence of chemical gradients. Using benzoate as a chemoattractant, we measured key motility parameters in order to characterize P. putida's chemotaxis strategy and to quantify the directional bias in its random walk. Our results indicate a change in the reversal frequency depending on changes in the chemoattractant concentration consistent with the classical scenario of temporal sensing. DFG.

  5. The cost of multiple drug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, H; Perron, G G; Maclean, R C

    2009-05-01

    The spread of bacterial antibiotic resistance mutations is thought to be constrained by their pleiotropic fitness costs. Here we investigate the fitness costs of resistance in the context of the evolution of multiple drug resistance (MDR), by measuring the cost of acquiring streptomycin resistance mutations (StrepR) in independent strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa carrying different rifampicin resistance (RifR) mutations. In the absence of antibiotics, StrepR mutations are associated with similar fitness costs in different RifR genetic backgrounds. The cost of StrepR mutations is greater in a rifampicin-sensitive (RifS) background, directly demonstrating antagonistic epistasis between resistance mutations. In the presence of rifampicin, StrepR mutations have contrasting effects in different RifR backgrounds: StrepR mutations have no detectable costs in some RifR backgrounds and massive fitness costs in others. Our results clearly demonstrate the importance of epistasis and genotype-by-environment interactions for the evolution of MDR.

  6. Mechanism of Enhanced Activity of Liposome-Entrapped Aminoglycosides against Resistant Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugabe, Clement; Halwani, Majed; Azghani, Ali O.; Lafrenie, Robert M.; Omri, Abdelwahab

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is inherently resistant to most conventional antibiotics. The mechanism of resistance of this bacterium is mainly associated with the low permeability of its outer membrane to these agents. We sought to assess the bactericidal efficacy of liposome-entrapped aminoglycosides against resistant clinical strains of P. aeruginosa and to define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions. Aminoglycosides were incorporated into liposomes, and the bactericidal efficacies of both free and liposomal drugs were evaluated. To define the mechanism of liposome-bacterium interactions, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), flow cytometry, lipid mixing assay, and immunocytochemistry were employed. Encapsulation of aminoglycosides into liposomes significantly increased their antibacterial activity against the resistant strains used in this study (MICs of ≥32 versus ≤8 μg/ml). TEM observations showed that liposomes interact intimately with the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa, leading to the membrane deformation. The flow cytometry and lipid mixing assays confirmed liposome-bacterial membrane fusion, which increased as a function of incubation time. The maximum fusion rate was 54.3% ± 1.5% for an antibiotic-sensitive strain of P. aeruginosa and 57.8% ± 1.9% for a drug-resistant strain. The fusion between liposomes and P. aeruginosa significantly enhanced the antibiotics' penetration into the bacterial cells (3.2 ± 2.3 versus 24.2 ± 6.2 gold particles/bacterium, P ≤ 0.001). Our data suggest that liposome-entrapped antibiotics could successfully resolve infections caused by antibiotic-resistant P. aeruginosa through an enhanced mechanism of drug entry into the bacterial cells. PMID:16723560

  7. Small-scale, hydrogen-oxidizing-denitrifying bioreactor for treatment of nitrate-contaminated drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.L.; Buckwalter, S.P.; Repert, D.A.; Miller, D.N.

    2005-01-01

    Nitrate removal by hydrogen-coupled denitrification was examined using flow-through, packed-bed bioreactors to develop a small-scale, cost effective system for treating nitrate-contaminated drinking-water supplies. Nitrate removal was accomplished using a Rhodocyclus sp., strain HOD 5, isolated from a sole-source drinking-water aquifer. The autotrophic capacity of the purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium made it particularly adept for this purpose. Initial tests used a commercial bioreactor filled with glass beads and countercurrent, non-sterile flow of an autotrophic, air-saturated, growth medium and hydrogen gas. Complete removal of 2 mM nitrate was achieved for more than 300 days of operation at a 2-h retention time. A low-cost hydrogen generator/bioreactor system was then constructed from readily available materials as a water treatment approach using the Rhodocyclus strain. After initial tests with the growth medium, the constructed system was tested using nitrate-amended drinking water obtained from fractured granite and sandstone aquifers, with moderate and low TDS loads, respectively. Incomplete nitrate removal was evident in both water types, with high-nitrite concentrations in the bioreactor output, due to a pH increase, which inhibited nitrite reduction. This was rectified by including carbon dioxide in the hydrogen stream. Additionally, complete nitrate removal was accomplished with wastewater-impacted surface water, with a concurrent decrease in dissolved organic carbon. The results of this study using three chemically distinct water supplies demonstrate that hydrogen-coupled denitrification can serve as the basis for small-scale remediation and that pilot-scale testing might be the next logical step.

  8. A Study of the Patterns, Stoichiometry, and Kinetics of Microbial BTX Degradation Under Denitrifying Conditions by an Activated Sludge Consortium Receiving a Mixed Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Fettig, James Drew

    1998-01-01

    The patterns, stoichiometry, and kinetics of microbial benzene, toluene, p-xylene, m-xylene, and o-xylene degradation by a denitrifying activated sludge consortium was investigated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) receiving a mixed waste. After six months of acclimation, toluene and m-xylene were routinely degraded to below detection. Both toluene and m-xylene could serve as sole carbon and energy sources. The removal of o-xylene was also possible; however, its transformation was dependent...

  9. Soil environmental conditions and microbial build-up mediate the effect of plant diversity on soil nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activities in temperate grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Le Roux

    Full Text Available Random reductions in plant diversity can affect ecosystem functioning, but it is still unclear which components of plant diversity (species number - namely richness, presence of particular plant functional groups, or particular combinations of these and associated biotic and abiotic drivers explain the observed relationships, particularly for soil processes. We assembled grassland communities including 1 to 16 plant species with a factorial separation of the effects of richness and functional group composition to analyze how plant diversity components influence soil nitrifying and denitrifying enzyme activities (NEA and DEA, respectively, the abundance of nitrifiers (bacterial and archaeal amoA gene number and denitrifiers (nirK, nirS and nosZ gene number, and key soil environmental conditions. Plant diversity effects were largely due to differences in functional group composition between communities of identical richness (number of sown species, though richness also had an effect per se. NEA was positively related to the percentage of legumes in terms of sown species number, the additional effect of richness at any given legume percentage being negative. DEA was higher in plots with legumes, decreased with increasing percentage of grasses, and increased with richness. No correlation was observed between DEA and denitrifier abundance. NEA increased with the abundance of ammonia oxidizing bacteria. The effect of richness on NEA was entirely due to the build-up of nitrifying organisms, while legume effect was partly linked to modified ammonium availability and nitrifier abundance. Richness effect on DEA was entirely due to changes in soil moisture, while the effects of legumes and grasses were partly due to modified nitrate availability, which influenced the specific activity of denitrifiers. These results suggest that plant diversity-induced changes in microbial specific activity are important for facultative activities such as denitrification

  10. Growth of Pseudomonas spp. in cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Dalgaard, Paw

    of spoilage microorganisms in cottage cheese can cause undesirable alterations in flavour, odour, appearance and texture. Contamination and growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads including Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas putida has been reported for cottage cheese but the influence of these bacteria...... (pH 7.0) showed interesting results. Despite a lower pH value in the cottage cheese, compared to the dressing, more rapid growth was observed. This may be caused by insufficient amounts of oxygen in the cream dressing having a negative effect on growth of Pseudomonas spp. At 15˚C growth...

  11. Emission of nitrous oxide and dinitrogen by diverse earthworm families from Brazil and resolution of associated denitrifying and nitrate-dissimilating taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depkat-Jakob, Peter S; Brown, George G; Tsai, Siu M; Horn, Marcus A; Drake, Harold L

    2013-02-01

    The anoxic earthworm gut augments the activity of ingested microorganisms capable of anaerobiosis. Small earthworms (Lumbricidae) emit denitrification-derived N(2)O, whereas the large Octochaetus multiporus (Megascolecidae) does not. To examine this paradox, differently sized species of the families Glossoscolecidae (Rhinodrilus, Glossoscolex, Pontoscolex), Megascolecidae (Amynthas, Perionyx), Acanthodrilidae (Dichogaster), and Eudrilidae (Eudrilus) from Brazil were analyzed. Small species and the large Rhinodrilus alatus emitted N(2)O, whereas the large Glossoscolex paulistus did not, even though its gut could denitrify. N(2) and N(2)O were emitted concomitantly, and R. alatus emitted the highest amount of N(2). Denitrifiers and dissimilatory nitrate reducers were analyzed by barcoded amplicon pyrosequencing of narG, nirK, and nosZ. Gene sequences in gut and soil of the large G. paulistus were similar, whereas sequences in gut and soil of the small Amynthas gracilis were different and were also different compared with those of the gut and soil of G. paulistus. However, the denitrifying gut microbiota for both earthworms appeared to be soil-derived and dominated by Rhizobiales. The results demonstrated that (1) the emission of denitrification-derived N(2)O is widespread in different earthworm families, (2) large earthworms can also emit nitrogenous gases, and (3) ingested members of Rhizobiales are associated with this emission. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Abundance and diversity of bacterial nitrifiers and denitrifiers and their functional genes in tannery wastewater treatment plants revealed by high-throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Wang

    Full Text Available Biological nitrification/denitrification is frequently used to remove nitrogen from tannery wastewater containing high concentrations of ammonia. However, information is limited about the bacterial nitrifiers and denitrifiers and their functional genes in tannery wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs due to the low-throughput of the previously used methods. In this study, 454 pyrosequencing and Illumina high-throughput sequencing, combined with molecular methods, were used to comprehensively characterize structures and functions of nitrification and denitrification bacterial communities in aerobic and anaerobic sludge of two full-scale tannery WWTPs. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that Proteobacteria and Synergistetes dominated in the aerobic and anaerobic sludge, respectively. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB amoA gene cloning revealed that Nitrosomonas europaea dominated the ammonia-oxidizing community in the WWTPs. Metagenomic analysis showed that the denitrifiers mainly included the genera of Thauera, Paracoccus, Hyphomicrobium, Comamonas and Azoarcus, which may greatly contribute to the nitrogen removal in the two WWTPs. It is interesting that AOB and ammonia-oxidizing archaea had low abundance although both WWTPs demonstrated high ammonium removal efficiency. Good correlation between the qPCR and metagenomic analysis is observed for the quantification of functional genes amoA, nirK, nirS and nosZ, indicating that the metagenomic approach may be a promising method used to comprehensively investigate the abundance of functional genes of nitrifiers and denitrifiers in the environment.

  13. Effects of carbon-to-sulfur (C/S) ratio and nitrate (N) dosage on Denitrifying Sulfur cycle-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (DS-EBPR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mei; Lu, Hui; Wu, Di; Zhao, Qing; Meng, Fangang; Wang, Yudan; Hao, Xiaodi; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-03-17

    In this study, the Denitrifying Sulfur cycle-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorous Removal (DS-EBPR) with 20 mg P/L/d of the volumetric P removal rate was successfully achieved in a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR). The effects of carbon-to-sulfur (C/S) mass ratio and nitrate (N) dosage were investigated through two batch tests to reveal the role of wastewater compositions in DS-EBPR performance. The optimal specific P release and uptake rates (0.4 and 2.4 mg P/g VSS/h, respectively) were achieved at C/S/P/N mass ratio of 150/200/20/20, and poly-S is supplied as a potential electron and energy storage. The nitrate dosage in a range of 10-50 mg N/L had no significant influence on P uptake rates (2.1 ~ 2.4 mg P/g VSS/h), but significantly affected the storage of inclusion poly-S, the poly-S oxidation rate was increased about 16% while dosing nitrate from 20 to 30 mg N/L. It implies that nitrate is denitrified in the P uptake phase, and excess nitrate is further consumed by poly-S. Moreover, the microbial analysis showed that the functional bacteria should mostly belong to denitrifying bacteria or Unclassified genera.

  14. The influence of complex fermentation broth on denitrification of saline sewage in constructed wetlands by heterotrophic nitrifying/aerobic denitrifying bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guiping; Yu, Tianyu; Huangshen, Linkun; Han, Jingyi

    2017-11-21

    An experimental vertical-flow constructed wetland (CW) was tested to treat salt-containing sewage. CW clogging deposits and withered Pontederia cordata L. were collected into a complex fermentation broth to serve as the carbon source and its effects on the denitrification capacity and microbial composition of the CW were examined. Addition of the complex fermentation broth into the CW influent (1.8% salinity) led to high removal efficiencies of NH 4 + -N > 99.82 ± 0.00% and TN > 90.39 ± 0.05%. Heterotrophic nitrifiers and aerobic denitrifiers were entirely dominant in the middle and upper layers of the CW, where obligate halophilic, aerobic denitrifiers Zobellella occurred. The CW successfully cultivated and enriched heterotrophic nitrifying-aerobic denitrifying bacteria, overcoming the effects of salinity and insufficient organic carbon sources on the denitrification capacity of CW. This type of complex carbon sources can also facilitate the utilization of waste resources, such as CW clogging deposits and withered wetland plants. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. A doubling of microphytobenthos biomass coincides with a tenfold increase in denitrifier and total bacterial abundances in intertidal sediments of a temperate estuary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Decleyre

    Full Text Available Surface sediments are important systems for the removal of anthropogenically derived inorganic nitrogen in estuaries. They are often characterized by the presence of a microphytobenthos (MPB biofilm, which can impact bacterial communities in underlying sediments for example by secretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS and competition for nutrients (including nitrogen. Pyrosequencing and qPCR was performed on two intertidal surface sediments of the Westerschelde estuary characterized by a two-fold difference in MPB biomass but no difference in MPB composition. Doubling of MPB biomass was accompanied by a disproportionately (ten-fold increase in total bacterial abundances while, unexpectedly, no difference in general community structure was observed, despite significantly lower bacterial richness and distinct community membership, mostly for non-abundant taxa. Denitrifier abundances corresponded likewise while community structure, both for nirS and nirK denitrifiers, remained unchanged, suggesting that competition with diatoms for nitrate is negligible at concentrations in the investigated sediments (appr. 1 mg/l NO3-. This study indicates that MPB biomass increase has a general, significantly positive effect on total bacterial and denitrifier abundances, with stimulation or inhibition of specific bacterial groups that however do not result in a re-structured community.

  16. Study on bioremediation of Lead by exopolysaccharide producing metallophilic bacterium isolated from extreme habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Debajit; Joshi, S R

    2017-12-01

    Lead released from manufacturing factories, recycling plants, automobile company and landfill leachate is abundantly found in wastewater. An efficient bioremediating agent for lead removal from wastewater is expected to ease the ever increasing problem. The present study reports Pseudomonas sp. W6 isolated from extreme habitat of hot water spring of North-East India evaluated for its Lead biosorption property. The bacterium showed capacity to resist 1.0 mM lead in both solid and liquid minimal media. Epifluorescence microscopy reveal the viability of bacterial cells under metal stress condition. ICP-MS analysis revealed 65% and 61.2% removal of lead from the Synthetic Bangladesh Ground Water medium in batch culture and column study respectively which was higher when compared to biosorption capacity of P. aeruginosa MTCC 2474, P. alcaligenes MJ7 from forest soil and P. ficuserectae PKRS11 from uranium rich soil. Exopolysaccharide released by the isolate which influenced biosorption revealed the presence of ligands assayed using microbial hydrophobicity and FTIR. The extremophilic isolate is proposed as a choice for efficient bioremediation of lead contaminated wastewater.

  17. Biomimetic Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Endosymbiotic Bacterium Inhabiting Euphorbia hirta L. and Their Bactericidal Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker Syed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aims to evaluate biomimetic synthesis of silver nanoparticles using endophytic bacterium EH 419 inhabiting Euphorbia hirta L. The synthesized nanoparticles were initially confirmed with change in color from the reaction mixture to brown indicating the synthesis of nanoparticles. Further confirmation was achieved with the characteristic absorption peak at 440 nm using UV-Visible spectroscopy. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were subjected to biophysical characterization using hyphenated techniques. The possible role of biomolecules in mediating the synthesis was depicted with FTIR analysis. Further crystalline nature of synthesized nanoparticles was confirmed using X-ray diffraction (XRD with prominent diffraction peaks at 2θ which can be indexed to the (111, (200, (220, and (311 reflections of face centered cubic structure (fcc of metallic silver. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed morphological characteristics of synthesized silver nanoparticles to be polydisperse in nature with size ranging from 10 to 60 nm and different morphological characteristics such as spherical, oval, hexagonal, and cubic shapes. Further silver nanoparticles exhibited bactericidal activity against panel of significant pathogenic bacteria among which Pseudomonas aeruginosa was most sensitive compared to other pathogens. To the best of our knowledge, present study forms first report of bacterial endophyte inhabiting Euphorbia hirta L. in mediating synthesizing silver nanoparticles.

  18. Biomimetic Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Endosymbiotic Bacterium Inhabiting Euphorbia hirta L. and Their Bactericidal Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Baker; Yashavantha Rao, Hoovinakola Chinnappa; Nagendra-Prasad, Mysore Nagalingaswamy; Prasad, Ashwini; Harini, Ballagere Puttaraju; Azmath, Pasha; Rakshith, Devaraju; Satish, Sreedharamurthy

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation aims to evaluate biomimetic synthesis of silver nanoparticles using endophytic bacterium EH 419 inhabiting Euphorbia hirta L. The synthesized nanoparticles were initially confirmed with change in color from the reaction mixture to brown indicating the synthesis of nanoparticles. Further confirmation was achieved with the characteristic absorption peak at 440 nm using UV-Visible spectroscopy. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were subjected to biophysical characterization using hyphenated techniques. The possible role of biomolecules in mediating the synthesis was depicted with FTIR analysis. Further crystalline nature of synthesized nanoparticles was confirmed using X-ray diffraction (XRD) with prominent diffraction peaks at 2θ which can be indexed to the (111), (200), (220), and (311) reflections of face centered cubic structure (fcc) of metallic silver. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed morphological characteristics of synthesized silver nanoparticles to be polydisperse in nature with size ranging from 10 to 60 nm and different morphological characteristics such as spherical, oval, hexagonal, and cubic shapes. Further silver nanoparticles exhibited bactericidal activity against panel of significant pathogenic bacteria among which Pseudomonas aeruginosa was most sensitive compared to other pathogens. To the best of our knowledge, present study forms first report of bacterial endophyte inhabiting Euphorbia hirta L. in mediating synthesizing silver nanoparticles.

  19. Pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severiche, Diego

    1998-01-01

    This is the first published case report en Colombia about pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia. This uncommon pathogen is from the epidemiological standpoint a very important one and medical community should be aware to look after it in those patients where no other etiological pathogen is recovered. A brief summary about epidemiology is showed, emphasizing those regions where it can be found. Likewise, comments about the differential diagnosis are important since it should be considered in those patients where tuberculosis is suspected. This is particularly representative for countries with high tuberculosis rates. Furthermore, a microbiological review is shown, emphasizing on isolation techniques, descriptions about therapeutics and other regarding treatment issues according international standards. Finally; a description about the clinical picture, laboratory findings, treatment and evolution of the case reported are shown for discussion

  20. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Kristiansen, S.

    2007-01-01

    Silver has been recognized for its antimicrobial properties for centuries. Most studies on the antibacterial efficacy of silver, with particular emphasis on wound healing, have been performed on planktonic bacteria. Our recent studies, however, strongly suggest that colonization of wounds involves...... bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa......, but that the silver concentration is important. A concentration of 5-10 ig/mL silver sulfadiazine eradicated the biofilm whereas a lower concentration (1 ig/mL) had no effect. The bactericidal concentration of silver required to eradicate the bacterial biofilm was 10-100 times higher than that used to eradicate...

  1. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  2. Production and characterization of biosurfactant from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further characterization of biosurfactant using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed it as a rhamnolipid. Keywords: Mangrove ecosystems, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, biosurfactant, critical micelle concentration (CMC), FT-IR fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). African Journal of Biotechnology, ...

  3. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids...

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Family Pseudomonadaceae) is an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Family Pseudomonadaceae) is an obligate aerobic, motile, gram negative bacillus.which is able to grow and survive in almost any environment and resistant to temperature extremes. It is involved in the etiology of several diseases i.

  5. Stratified growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, E.; Roe, F.; Bugnicourt, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, stratified patterns of protein synthesis and growth were demonstrated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Spatial patterns of protein synthetic activity inside biofilms were characterized by the use of two green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene constructs. One construct...

  6. Multilocus sequence typing of carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen that exhibits multiple drug resistance with increasing frequency, especially to carbapenems making patient treatment difficult. Carbapenem-resistance may be caused by porin gene mutations, active drug efflux, and carbapenemase production.

  7. Legacy effects of simulated short-term climate change on ammonia oxidisers, denitrifiers, and nitrous oxide emissions in an acid soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoya; Liu, Xiaorui; Li, Yong; Ran, Yu; Liu, Yapeng; Zhang, Qichun; Li, Zheng; He, Yan; Xu, Jianming; Di, Hongjie

    2017-04-01

    Although the effect of simulated climate change on nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions and on associated microbial communities has been reported, it is not well understood if these effects are short-lived or long-lasting. Here, we conducted a field study to determine the interactive effects of simulated warmer and drier conditions on nitrifier and denitrifier communities and N 2 O emissions in an acidic soil and the longevity of the effects. A warmer (+2.3 °C) and drier climate (-7.4% soil moisture content) was created with greenhouses. The variation of microbial population abundance and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), bacteria (AOB), and denitrifiers (nirK/S, nosZ) were determined using real-time PCR and high-throughput sequencing. The results showed that the simulated warmer and drier conditions under the greenhouse following urea application significantly increased N 2 O emissions. There was also a moderate legacy effect on the N 2 O emissions when the greenhouses were removed in the urea treatment, although this effect only lasted a short period of time (about 60 days). The simulated climate change conditions changed the composition of AOA with the species affiliated to marine group 1.1a-associated lineage increasing significantly. The abundance of all the functional denitrifier genes decreased significantly under the simulated climate change conditions and the legacy effect, after the removal of greenhouses, significantly increased the abundance of AOB, AOA (mainly the species affiliated to marine group 1.1a-associated lineage), and nirK and nosZ genes in the urea-treated soil. In general, the effect of the simulated climate change was short-lived, with the denitrifier communities being able to return to ambient levels after a period of adaptation to ambient conditions. Therefore, the legacy effect of simulated short-time climate change conditions on the ammonia oxidizer and denitrifier communities and N 2 O emissions were temporary and

  8. Dialogue inter-règne entre Pseudomonas aeruginosa et les cellules de l'immunité innée. Rôle de la production de L-kynurénine par les bactéries

    OpenAIRE

    Genestet , Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is responsible for persistent infections in cystic fibrosis patients, suggesting an ability to circumvent innate immune defenses. Many host cells produce kynurenine, which is known to control immune system homeostasis. Interestingly this bacterium uses the kynurenine pathway to catabolize tryptophan. In addition, preliminary results of our laboratory showed that during acute pulmonary infection in mice with a strain of P. aeruginosa which does not produce kynurenine, th...

  9. Induced systemic resistance by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. have been studied for decades for their plant growth-promoting effects through effective suppression of soilborne plant diseases. The modes of action that play a role in disease suppression by these bacteria include siderophore-mediated competition for iron, antibiosis, production of lytic enzymes, and induced systemic resistance (ISR). The involvement of ISR is typically studied in systems in which the Pseudomonas bacteria and the pathogen are inoculated and rema...

  10. Isolation of a novel amylase and lipase-producing Pseudomonas luteola strain: study of amylase production conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    An amylase and lipase producing bacterium (strain C2) was enriched and isolated from soil regularly contaminated with olive washing wastewater in Sfax, Tunisia. Cell was aerobic, mesophilic, Gram-negative, motile, non-sporulating bacterium, capable of growing optimally at pH 7 and 30°C and tolerated maximally 10% (W/V) NaCl. The predominant fatty acids were found to be C18:1ω7c (32.8%), C16:1ω7c (27.3%) and C16:0 (23.1%). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that this strain belonging to the genus Pseudomonas. Strain C2 was found to be closely related to Pseudomonas luteola with more than 99% of similarity. Amylase optimization extraction was carried out using Box Behnken Design (BBD). Its maximal activity was found when the pH and temperature ranged from 5.5 to 6.5 and from 33 to 37°C, respectively. Under these conditions, amylase activity was found to be about 9.48 U/ml. PMID:24405763

  11. Passive Protection of Diabetic Rats with Antisera Specific for the Polysaccharide Portion of the Lipopolysaccharide Isolated from Pseudomonas pseudomallei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry E Bryan

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyclonal and monoclonal antisera raised to tetanus toxoid-conjugated polysaccharide of lipopolysaccharide (lps and purified lps of Pseudomonas pseudomallei that reacted with a collection of 41 strains of this bacterium from 23 patients are described. The common antigen recognized by these sera was within the polysaccharide component of the lps of the cells. The sera were specific for P pseudomallei in that none of 37 strains of other bacteria, including 20 Gram-negative and three Gram-positive species, were recognized, although cross-reaction occurred using the anticonjugate serum with some strains of Pseudomonas cepacia serotype A, a closely related bacterium. Passive protection studies using a diabetic rat model of P pseudomallei infection showed that partially purified rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antisera were protective when the median lethal dose was raised by four to five orders of magnitude. The wide distribution of the polysaccharide antigen among isolates of P pseudomallei used in this study and the protective role of antibody to the conjugated polysaccharide antigen suggest potential as a vaccine.

  12. Implications of a novel Pseudomonas species on low density polyethylene biodegradation: an in vitro to in silico approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Mayuri; Girdhar, Amandeep; Tiwari, Archana; Nayarisseri, Anuraj

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of Petroleum-plastics like Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) is a budding challenge due to increasing white pollution. The present investigation has focused the aspect through microbial assisted biodegradation. Various indigenous microorganisms were isolated from collected municipal landfill soil. Growth medium enriched with 0.2 g of LDPE powder was used to screen the soil bacteria with biodegradation potential. The screened bacteria were subjected to biodegradation assay in presence of LDPE sheets in growth medium. Four strains gave 5%, 17.8%, 0.9% and 0.6% degradation rate based on weight loss in the conducted in vitro assay for four days. The maximum degraded sheet was analyzed through Scanning Electron Microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Thermogravimetry, taking undegraded LDPE sheet as control. Results illustrated one-step weight loss with control and three-step weight loss with test. Thus, it proved the efficacy of isolated strain. The strain identification was carried out by genomic DNA isolation followed by PCR and 16S rRNA sequencing. Genotypic identification revealed the bacterium as Pseudomonas citronellolis. BLAST gave a similarity with the database of 96%, thus phylogenetic assessment clarified the bacterium as a novel strain. The isolate was named as Pseudomonas citronellolis EMBS027 and sequence was deposited as LDPE degrading species, in GenBank with accession number KF361478.

  13. Performance of a reactor containing denitrifying immobilized biomass in removing ethanol and aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) in a short operating period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusmao, Valquiria Ribeiro; Chinalia, Fabio Alexandre; Sakamoto, Isabel Kimiko; Varesche, Maria Bernadete Amancio

    2007-01-01

    A horizontal-flow anaerobic immobilized biomass reactor (HAIB) containing denitrifying biomass was evaluated with respect to its ability to remove, separately and in a short operating period (30 days), organic matter, nitrate, and the hydrocarbons benzene (41.4 mg L -1 ), toluene (27.8 mg L -1 ), ethylbenzene (31.1 mg L -1 ), o-xylene (28.5 mg L -1 ), m-xylene (28.4 mg L -1 ) and p-xylene (32.1 mg L -1 ). The purified culture, which was grown in the presence of the specific hydrocarbon, was used as the source of cells to be immobilized in the polyurethane foam. After 30 days of operation, the foam was removed and a new immobilized biomass was grown in the presence of another hydrocarbon. The average hydrocarbon removal efficiency attained was 97%. The organic matter, especially ethanol, was removed with an average efficiency of 83% at a mean influent concentration of 1185.0 mg L -1 . A concomitant removal of 97% of nitrate was observed for a mean influent concentration of 423.4 mg L -1 . The independent removal of each hydrocarbon demonstrated that these contaminants can be biodegraded separately, without the need for a compound to be the primary substrate for the degradation of another. This study proposes the application of the system for treatment of areas contaminated with these compounds, with substitution and formation of a biofilm in a 30-day period

  14. Degradation of toluene and m-xylene and transformation of o-xylene by denitrifying enrichment cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, P J; Mang, D T; Young, L Y

    1991-01-01

    Seven different sources of inocula that included sediments, contaminated soils, groundwater, process effluent, and sludge were used to establish enrichment cultures of denitrifying bacteria on benzene, toluene, and xylenes in the absence of molecular oxygen. All of the enrichment cultures demonstrated complete depletion of toluene and partial depletion of o-xylene within 3 months of incubation. The depletion of o-xylene was correlated to and dependent on the metabolism of toluene. No losses of benzene, p-xylene, or m-xylene were observed in these initial enrichment cultures. However, m-xylene was degraded by a subculture that was incubated on m-xylene alone. Complete carbon, nitrogen, and electron balances were determined for the degradation of toluene and m-xylene. These balances showed that these compounds were mineralized with greater than 50% conversion to CO2 and significant assimilation into biomass. Additionally, the oxidation of these compounds was shown to be dependent on nitrate reduction and denitrification. These microbial degradative capabilities appear to be widespread, since the widely varied inoculum sources all yielded similar results. PMID:2014990

  15. Nitrogen source effects on the denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation culture and anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria enrichment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Ding, Jing; Lu, Yong-Ze; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-05-01

    The co-culture system of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) has a potential application in wastewater treatment plant. This study explored the effects of permutation and combination of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium on the culture enrichment from freshwater sediments. The co-existence of NO 3 - , NO 2 - , and NH 4 + shortened the enrichment time from 75 to 30 days and achieved a total nitrogen removal rate of 106.5 mg/L/day on day 132. Even though ammonium addition led to Anammox bacteria increase and a higher nitrogen removal rate, DAMO bacteria still dominated in different reactors with the highest proportion of 64.7% and the maximum abundance was 3.07 ± 0.25 × 10 8 copies/L (increased by five orders of magnitude) in the nitrite reactor. DAMO bacteria showed greater diversity in the nitrate reactor, and one was similar to M. oxyfera; DAMO bacteria in the nitrite reactor were relatively unified and similar to M. sinica. Interestingly, no DAMO archaea were found in the nitrate reactor. This study will improve the understanding of the impact of nitrogen source on DAMO and Anammox co-culture enrichment.

  16. Environmental evaluation of coexistence of denitrifying anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea and bacteria in a paddy field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jing; Fu, Liang; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Lu, Yong-Ze; Cheng, Shuk H; Zeng, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    The nitrate-dependent denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) process, which is metabolized together by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea and NC10 phylum bacteria, is expected to be important for the global carbon and nitrogen cycles. However, there are little studies about the existence of this process and the functional microbes in environments. Therefore, the coexistence of DAMO archaea and bacteria in a paddy field was evaluated in this study. Next-generation sequencing showed that the two orders, Methanosarcinales and Nitrospirales, to which DAMO archaea and DAMO bacteria belong, were detected in the four soil samples. Then the in vitro experiments demonstrated both of nitrite- and nitrate-dependent DAMO activities, which confirmed the coexistence of DAMO archaea and DAMO bacteria. It was the first report about the coexistence of DAMO archaea and bacteria in a paddy field. Furthermore, anammox bacteria were detected in two of the four samples. The in vitro experiments did not show anammox activity in the initial period but showed low anammox activity after 20 days' enrichment. These results implicated that anammox bacteria may coexist with DAMO microorganisms in this field, but at a very low percentage.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of peptide deformylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Wook; Han, Byung Woo; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Yang, Jin Kuk; Lee, Byung Il; Lee, Hyung Ho; Ahn, Hyung Jun; Suh, Se Won

    2002-10-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) from the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and crystallized in the presence of its inhibitor actinonin at 297 K using polyethylene glycol (PEG) 4000 as a precipitant. The diffraction limit and the spot shape of the crystals could be slightly improved by the crystal annealing/dehydration procedure. X-ray diffraction data to 1.85 A have been collected using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belongs to the orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 68.75, b = 74.46, c = 77.18 A. The asymmetric unit contains two subunits of peptide deformylase, with a corresponding crystal volume per protein mass (V(M)) of 2.45 A(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 49.8%.

  18. The life history of Pseudomonas syringae: linking agriculture to earth system processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Cindy E; Monteil, Caroline L; Berge, Odile

    2013-01-01

    The description of the ecology of Pseudomonas syringae is moving away from that of a ubiquitous epiphytic plant pathogen to one of a multifaceted bacterium sans frontières in fresh water and other ecosystems linked to the water cycle. Discovery of the aquatic facet of its ecology has led to a vision of its life history that integrates spatial and temporal scales spanning billions of years and traversing catchment basins, continents, and the planet and that confronts the implication of roles that are potentially conflicting for agriculture (as a plant pathogen and as an actor in processes leading to rain and snowfall). This new ecological perspective has also yielded insight into epidemiological phenomena linked to disease emergence. Overall, it sets the stage for the integration of more comprehensive contexts of ecology and evolutionary history into comparative genomic analyses to elucidate how P. syringae subverts the attack and defense responses of the cohabitants of the diverse environments it occupies.

  19. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause...... skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation...... at a dose of 20000J/m2 on mature biofilms (72h grown) resulted in a 3.9 log killing efficacy. The fact that the wavelength of 296nm exists in daylight and has such disinfection ability on biofilms gives new perspectives for applications within disinfection at hospitals....

  20. HETEROLOGOUS EXPRESSION OF A CHITINASE GENE FROM AEROMONAS CAVIAEIN PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTONIUS SUWANTO

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A transcriptional fusion for an Aeromonas caviae chitinase gene was constructed under the control of a constitutive promoter of the kanaraycin resistance gene (PKmR. The construct was inserted into a medium copy number broad host range plasmid vector to yield recombinant plasmid pAM340, which harbored transcriptional fusion PKmR- chi. Another transcriptional fusion, Ptac-chi, in a recombinant plasmid pAM630, was conducted as comparison. Triparental mating of E. coli carrying the recombinant plasmids with Pseudomotws fluorescens 5100, a phyllosphere bacterium, was performed. Pseudomonas fluorescens 5100 exconjugants were examined for constitutive expression of chitinase employing a spectrophotometric assay; they showed stronger chitin degradation activity than Escherichia coli transformants. Using a fungal antagonism plate assay, this chitinolytic P. fluorescens, however, could not inhibit selected phytopathogenic fungi.

  1. Small RNA-Controlled Gene Regulatory Networks in Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojanovic, Klara

    Bacteria commonly encounter stressful conditions during growth in their natural environments and in industrial biotechnology applications such as the biobased production of chemicals. As the coordinated regulation of gene expression is necessary to adapt to changing environments, bacteria have...... such as sRNAs and riboswitches. Further, the sRNAome during the growth of bacteria was investigatedand compared to the strain without Hfq protein. Hfq has a big impact on sRNAs and gene expression in P. putida, hence many Hfq-associated sRNAs and mRNAs were found. Together, the results reported here...... response of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 in different conditions via identification ofdifferentially expressed mRNAs and sRNAs. P. putida is a soil bacterium with a versatile metabolism and innate stress endurance traits, which makes it suitable as future cell factory for the production of valuable compounds...

  2. Volatile Compounds Emitted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Stimulate Growth of the Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Briard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lung infections with opportunistic bacterial and fungal pathogens are a major cause of morbidity and mortality especially in patients with cystic fibrosis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently colonizing bacterium in these patients, and it is often found in association with the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. P. aeruginosa is known to inhibit the growth of A. fumigatus in situations of direct contact, suggesting the existence of interspecies communication that may influence disease outcome. Our study shows that the lung pathogens P. aeruginosa and A. fumigatus can interact at a distance via volatile-mediated communication and expands our understanding of interspecific signaling in microbial communities.

  3. Interaction of the psychrotroph Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 with phytopathogens in cold soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Olsson, Stefan; Stougaard, Peter

    Aim: Potato cultivation in southwest Greenland, at Inneruulalik, omits the use of pesticides while relying on limited crop rotations and despite the presence of plant pathogens in the soil does not suffer from major disease outbreaks. Previously, we have shown that the soil at Inneruulalik...... is disease suppressive owing to the presence of diverse antimicrobial microorganisms. Using culture-based approaches, the psychrotroph Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 was previously isolated from the soil microbiome. The aim of this study is to unravel key biocontrol traits underpinning the antagonistic activity...... of this cold-active bacterium against phytopathogens. Method: A combination of different technologies including genomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics are being used to explore the interaction of the psychrotroph P. fluorescens In5 in dual-culture with diverse plant pathogens. To date, molecular genetics...

  4. Comparison of UVB and UVC irradiation disinfection efficacies on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argyraki, Aikaterini; Markvart, M.; Nielsen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Disinfection routines are important in all clinical applications. The uprising problem of antibiotic resistance has driven major research efforts towards alternative disinfection approaches, involving light-based solutions. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium that can cause...... skin, soft tissue, lungs, kidney and urinary tract infections. Moreover, it can be found on and in medical equipment causing often cross infections in hospitals. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency, of two different light-based disinfection treatments, namely UVB and UVC irradiation......, on P. aeruginosa biofilms at different growth stages. In our experiments a new type of UV light emitting diodes (LEDs) were used to deliver UV irradiation on the biofilms, in the UVB (296nm) and UVC (266nm) region. The killing rate was studied as a function of dose for 24h grown biofilms. The dose...

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa mastitis in two goats associated with an essential oil-based teat dip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, E Jane; Wilson, David J

    2016-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that has been associated with mastitis in dairy animals, including goats. Often, the environmental sources of the bacteria are water-related (such as hoses and muddy pastures). Mastitis attributable to P. aeruginosa was identified in 2 goats in a small herd. Efforts were made to identify environmental sources of the pathogen. Multiple samples from the goats' environment were cultured, including water from the trough, bedding, the hose used to wash udders, and the teat dip and teat dip containers. The bacterium was isolated from the teat dip and the teat dip container. The teat dip consisted of water, liquid soap, and several drops of essential oils (including tea tree, lavender, and peppermint). This case illustrates a potential problem that may arise as a result of the use of unconventional ingredients in teat dips. The use of alternative products by goat producers is likely to increase in the future. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. The influence of the marine aerobic Pseudomonas strain on the corrosion of 70/30 Cu-Ni alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, S.J.; Choong, Amy M.F.; Pehkonen, S.O.

    2007-01-01

    A comparative study of the corrosion behavior of the 70/30 Cu-Ni alloy in a nutrient-rich simulated seawater-based nutrient-rich medium in the presence and the absence of a marine aerobic Pseudomonas bacterium was carried out by electrochemical experiments, microscopic methods and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results of Tafel plot measurements showed the noticeable increase in the corrosion rate of the alloy in the presence of the Pseudomonas bacteria as compared to the corresponding control samples. The E1S data demonstrated that the charge transfer resistance, R ct , and the resistance of oxide film, R f , gradually increased with time in the abiotic medium; whereas, both of them dramatically decreased with time in the biotic medium inoculated with the Pseudomonas, indicative of the acceleration of corrosion rates of the alloy. The bacterial cells preferentially attached themselves to the alloy surface to form patchy or blotchy biofilms, as observed by fluorescent microscopy (FM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images revealed the occurrence of micro-pitting corrosion underneath the biofilms on the alloy surface after the biofilm removal. XPS studies presented the evolution of the passive film on the alloy surface with time in the presence and the absence of the Pseudomonas bacteria under experimental conditions, and further revealed that the presence of the Pseudomonas cells and its extra-cellular polymers (EPS) on the alloy surface retarded the formation process or impaired the protective nature of the oxide film. Furthermore, XPS results verified the difference in the chelating functional groups between the conditioning layers and the bacterial cells and the EPS in the biofilms, which was believed to connect with the loss of the passivity of the protective oxide film

  7. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  8. Light spectrum modifies the utilization pattern of energy sources in Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaie, Samareh; Vaas, Lea A I; Rosberg, Anna Karin; Windstam, Sofia T; Karlsson, Maria E; Bergstrand, Karl-Johan; Khalil, Sammar; Wohanka, Walter; Alsanius, Beatrix W

    2017-01-01

    Despite the overruling impact of light in the phyllosphere, little is known regarding the influence of light spectra on non-phototrophic bacteria colonizing the leaf surface. We developed an in vitro method to study phenotypic profile responses of bacterial pure cultures to different bands of the visible light spectrum using monochromatic (blue: 460 nm; red: 660 nm) and polychromatic (white: 350-990 nm) LEDs, by modification and optimization of a protocol for the Phenotype MicroArray™ technique (Biolog Inc., CA, USA). The new protocol revealed high reproducibility of substrate utilization under all conditions tested. Challenging the non-phototrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09 with white, blue, and red light demonstrated that all light treatments affected the respiratory profile differently, with blue LED having the most decisive impact on substrate utilization by impairing respiration of 140 substrates. The respiratory activity was decreased on 23 and 42 substrates under red and white LEDs, respectively, while utilization of one, 16, and 20 substrates increased in the presence of red, blue, and white LEDs, respectively. Interestingly, on four substrates contrasting utilization patterns were found when the bacterium was exposed to different light spectra. Although non-phototrophic bacteria do not rely directly on light as an energy source, Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09 changed its respiratory activity on various substrates differently when exposed to different lights. Thus, ability to sense and distinguish between different wavelengths even within the visible light spectrum must exist, and leads to differential regulation of substrate usage. With these results, we hypothesize that different light spectra might be a hitherto neglected key stimulus for changes in microbial lifestyle and habits of substrate usage by non-phototrophic phyllospheric microbiota, and thus might essentially stratify leaf microbiota composition and diversity.

  9. Light spectrum modifies the utilization pattern of energy sources in Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samareh Gharaie

    Full Text Available Despite the overruling impact of light in the phyllosphere, little is known regarding the influence of light spectra on non-phototrophic bacteria colonizing the leaf surface. We developed an in vitro method to study phenotypic profile responses of bacterial pure cultures to different bands of the visible light spectrum using monochromatic (blue: 460 nm; red: 660 nm and polychromatic (white: 350-990 nm LEDs, by modification and optimization of a protocol for the Phenotype MicroArray™ technique (Biolog Inc., CA, USA. The new protocol revealed high reproducibility of substrate utilization under all conditions tested. Challenging the non-phototrophic bacterium Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09 with white, blue, and red light demonstrated that all light treatments affected the respiratory profile differently, with blue LED having the most decisive impact on substrate utilization by impairing respiration of 140 substrates. The respiratory activity was decreased on 23 and 42 substrates under red and white LEDs, respectively, while utilization of one, 16, and 20 substrates increased in the presence of red, blue, and white LEDs, respectively. Interestingly, on four substrates contrasting utilization patterns were found when the bacterium was exposed to different light spectra. Although non-phototrophic bacteria do not rely directly on light as an energy source, Pseudomonas sp. DR 5-09 changed its respiratory activity on various substrates differently when exposed to different lights. Thus, ability to sense and distinguish between different wavelengths even within the visible light spectrum must exist, and leads to differential regulation of substrate usage. With these results, we hypothesize that different light spectra might be a hitherto neglected key stimulus for changes in microbial lifestyle and habits of substrate usage by non-phototrophic phyllospheric microbiota, and thus might essentially stratify leaf microbiota composition and diversity.

  10. OXIDATION OF POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS BY PSEUDOMONAS SP. STRAIN LB400 AND PSEUDOMONAS PSEUDOALCALIGENES KF707

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biphenyl-grown cells and cell extracts prepared from biphenyl-grown cells of Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 oxidize a much wider range of chlorinated biphenyls than do analogous preparations from Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707. These results are attributed to differences in th...

  11. Active Immunization with Lipopolysaccharide Pseudomonas Antigen for Chronic Pseudomonas Bronchopneumonia in Guinea Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Pennington, James E.; Hickey, William F.; Blackwood, Linda L.; Arnaut, M. Amin

    1981-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading clinical problem among patients with cystic fibrosis. Because antimicrobial agents are usually ineffective in eradicating these infections, additional therapeutic or prophylactic measures should be considered. In this study, an experimental guinea pig model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa bronchopneumonia was utilized to determine whether active immunization with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) P. aeruginosa antigen may favorab...

  12. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nirakar; Dipasquale, Laura; d’Ippolito, Giuliana; Panico, Antonio; Lens, Piet N. L.; Esposito, Giovanni; Fontana, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production. PMID:26053393

  13. Hydrogen Production by the Thermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirakar Pradhan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As the only fuel that is not chemically bound to carbon, hydrogen has gained interest as an energy carrier to face the current environmental issues of greenhouse gas emissions and to substitute the depleting non-renewable reserves. In the last years, there has been a significant increase in the number of publications about the bacterium Thermotoga neapolitana that is responsible for production yields of H2 that are among the highest achievements reported in the literature. Here we present an extensive overview of the most recent studies on this hyperthermophilic bacterium together with a critical discussion of the potential of fermentative production by this bacterium. The review article is organized into sections focused on biochemical, microbiological and technical issues, including the effect of substrate, reactor type, gas sparging, temperature, pH, hydraulic retention time and organic loading parameters on rate and yield of gas production.

  14. No apparent costs for facultative antibiotic production by the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbeva, P.V.; Tyc, O.; Remus-Emsermann, M.N.P.; Van der Wal, A.; Vos, M.; Silby, M.W.; De Boer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Many soil-inhabiting bacteria are known to produce secondary metabolites that can suppress microorganisms competing for the same resources. The production of antimicrobial compounds is expected to incur fitness costs for the producing bacteria. Such costs form the basis for models on the

  15. No Apparent Costs for Facultative Antibiotic Production by the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1

    OpenAIRE

    Garbeva, Paolina; Tyc, Olaf; Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N. P.; van der Wal, Annemieke; Vos, Michiel; Silby, Mark; de Boer, Wietse

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many soil-inhabiting bacteria are known to produce secondary metabolites that can suppress microorganisms competing for the same resources. The production of antimicrobial compounds is expected to incur fitness costs for the producing bacteria. Such costs form the basis for models on the co-existence of antibiotic-producing and non-antibiotic producing strains. However, so far studies quantifying the costs of antibiotic production by bacteria are scarce. The current study reports ...

  16. Iron reductases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, C D

    1980-01-01

    Cell-free extracts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contain enzyme activities which reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II) when iron is provided in certain chelates, but not when the iron is uncomplexed. Iron reductase activities for two substrates, ferripyochelin and ferric citrate, appear to be separate enzymes because of differences in heat stabilities, in locations in fractions of cell-free extracts, in reductant specificity, and in apparent sizes during gel filtration chromatography. Ferric citrate iron reductase is an extremely labile activity found in the cytoplasmic fraction, and ferripyochelin iron reductase is a more stable activity found in the periplasmic as well as cytoplasmic fraction of extracts. A small amount of activity detectable in the membrane fraction seemed to be loosely associated with the membranes. Although both enzymes have highest activity reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced glutathione also worked with ferripyochelin iron reductase. In addition, oxygen caused an irreversible loss of a percentage of the ferripyochelin iron reductase following sparge of reaction mixtures, whereas the reductase for ferric citrate was not appreciably affected by oxygen. PMID:6766439

  17. Capsule production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Mucoid strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, associated almost exclusively with chronic respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis, possess a capsule composed of alginic acid similar to one produced by Azotobacter vinelandii. Recent reports have provided evidence that the biosynthetic pathway for alginate in P. aeruginosa may differ from the pathway proposed for A. vinelandii in that synthesis in P. aeruginosa may occur by way of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. Incorporation of isotope from (6-/sup 14/C)glucose into alginate by both P. aueroginosa and A. vinelandii was 10-fold greater than that from either (1-/sup 14/C)/sup -/ or (2-/sup 14/C)glucose, indicating preferential utilization of the bottom half of the glucose molecule for alginate biosynthesis. These data strongly suggest that the Entner-Doudoroff pathway plays a major role in alginate synthesis in both P. aeruginosa and A. vinelandii. The enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in mucoid strains of P. aeruginosa appear to be unchanged whether alignate is actively produced or not and activities do not differ significantly from nonmucoid strain PAO.

  18. The chitinase C gene PsChiC from Pseudomonas sp. and its synergistic effects on larvicidal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanfang Zhong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas sp. strain TXG6-1, a chitinolytic gram-negative bacterium, was isolated from a vegetable field in Taixing city, Jiangsu Province, China. In this study, a Pseudomonas chitinase C gene (PsChiC was isolated from the chromosomal DNA of this bacterium using a pair of specific primers. The PsChiC gene consisted of an open reading frame of 1443 nucleotides and encoded 480 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 51.66 kDa. The deduced PsChiC amino acid sequence lacked a signal sequence and consisted of a glycoside hydrolase family 18 catalytic domain responsible for chitinase activity, a fibronectin type III-like domain (FLD and a C-terminal chitin-binding domain (ChBD. The amino acid sequence of PsChiCshowed high sequence homology (> 95% with chitinase C from Serratia marcescens. SDS-PAGE showed that the molecular mass of chitinase PsChiC was 52 kDa. Chitinase assays revealed that the chitobiosidase and endochitinase activities of PsChiCwere 51.6- and 84.1-fold higher than those of pET30a, respectively. Although PsChiC showed little insecticidal activity towards Spodoptera litura larvae, an insecticidal assay indicated that PsChiC increased the insecticidal toxicity of SpltNPV by 1.78-fold at 192 h and hastened death. These results suggest that PsChiC from Pseudomonas sp. could be useful in improving the pathogenicity of baculoviruses.

  19. RNAi screen reveals an Abl kinase-dependent host cell pathway involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa internalization.

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    Julia F Pielage

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Internalization of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by non-phagocytic cells is promoted by rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, but the host pathways usurped by this bacterium are not clearly understood. We used RNAi-mediated gene inactivation of approximately 80 genes known to regulate the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila S2 cells to identify host molecules essential for entry of P. aeruginosa. This work revealed Abl tyrosine kinase, the adaptor protein Crk, the small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42, and p21-activated kinase as components of a host signaling pathway that leads to internalization of P. aeruginosa. Using a variety of complementary approaches, we validated the role of this pathway in mammalian cells. Remarkably, ExoS and ExoT, type III secreted toxins of P. aeruginosa, target this pathway by interfering with GTPase function and, in the case of ExoT, by abrogating P. aeruginosa-induced Abl-dependent Crk phosphorylation. Altogether, this work reveals that P. aeruginosa utilizes the Abl pathway for entering host cells and reveals unexpected complexity by which the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system modulates this internalization pathway. Our results furthermore demonstrate the applicability of using RNAi screens to identify host signaling cascades usurped by microbial pathogens that may be potential targets for novel therapies directed against treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections.

  20. Metabolic and regulatory rearrangements underlying glycerol metabolism in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikel, Pablo I; Kim, Juhyun; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    While the natural niches of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida are unlikely to include significant amounts of free glycerol as a growth substrate, this bacterium is genetically equipped with the functions required for its metabolism. We have resorted to deep sequencing of the transcripts in glycerol-grown P. putida KT2440 cells to gain an insight into the biochemical and regulatory components involved in the shift between customary C sources (e.g. glucose or succinate) to the polyol. Transcriptomic results were contrasted with key enzymatic activities under the same culture conditions. Cognate expression profiles revealed that genes encoding enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff route and other catabolic pathways, e.g. the gluconate and 2-ketogluconate loops, were significantly downregulated on glycerol. Yet, the compound simultaneously elicited a gluconeogenic response that indicated an efficient channelling of C skeletons back to biomass build-up through the glyoxylate shunt rather than energization of the cells through downwards pathways, i.e. tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. The simultaneous glycolytic and gluconeogenic metabolic regimes on glycerol, paradoxical as they seem, make sense from an ecological point of view by favouring prevalence versus exploration. This metabolic situation was accompanied by a considerably low expression of stress markers as compared with other C sources. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Pseudomonas putida-a versatile host for the production of natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeschcke, Anita; Thies, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    The biosynthesis of natural products by heterologous expression of biosynthetic pathways in amenable production strains enables biotechnological access to a variety of valuable compounds by conversion of renewable resources. Pseudomonas putida has emerged as a microbial laboratory work horse, with elaborated techniques for cultivation and genetic manipulation available. Beyond that, this bacterium offers several particular advantages with regard to natural product biosynthesis, notably a versatile intrinsic metabolism with diverse enzymatic capacities as well as an outstanding tolerance to xenobiotics. Therefore, it has been applied for recombinant biosynthesis of several valuable natural products. This review provides an overview of applications of P. putida as a host organism for the recombinant biosynthesis of such natural products, including rhamnolipids, terpenoids, polyketides and non-ribosomal peptides, and other amino acid-derived compounds. The focus is on de novo natural product synthesis from intrinsic building blocks by means of heterologous gene expression and strain engineering. Finally, the future potential of the bacterium as a chassis organism for synthetic microbiology is pointed out.

  2. A Pseudomonas putida strain genetically engineered for 1,2,3-trichloropropane bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Ghufrana; Pavlova, Martina; Arif, M Irfan; Postema, Christiaan P; Damborsky, Jiri; Janssen, Dick B

    2014-09-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a toxic compound that is recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Attempts to isolate TCP-degrading organisms using enrichment cultivation have failed. A potential biodegradation pathway starts with hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP), followed by oxidative metabolism. To obtain a practically applicable TCP-degrading organism, we introduced an engineered haloalkane dehalogenase with improved TCP degradation activity into the DCP-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida MC4. For this purpose, the dehalogenase gene (dhaA31) was cloned behind the constitutive dhlA promoter and was introduced into the genome of strain MC4 using a transposon delivery system. The transposon-located antibiotic resistance marker was subsequently removed using a resolvase step. Growth of the resulting engineered bacterium, P. putida MC4-5222, on TCP was indeed observed, and all organic chlorine was released as chloride. A packed-bed reactor with immobilized cells of strain MC4-5222 degraded >95% of influent TCP (0.33 mM) under continuous-flow conditions, with stoichiometric release of inorganic chloride. The results demonstrate the successful use of a laboratory-evolved dehalogenase and genetic engineering to produce an effective, plasmid-free, and stable whole-cell biocatalyst for the aerobic bioremediation of a recalcitrant chlorinated hydrocarbon. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Carbazole degradation by Pseudomonas sp. LD2: metabolic characteristics and the identification of some metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieg, L.M.; Otter, A.; Fedorak, P.M. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Depts. of Biological Sciences and Chemistry

    1996-02-01

    A carbazole-degrading bacterium was isolated by enrichment from a creosote-contaminated soil. This organism, designated Pseudomonas sp. LD2, utilized carbazole as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. When isolate LD2 was grown in nitrogen-free mineral medium with {sup 14}C labeled carbazole, 43% was recovered as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} after 3 days of incubation. Numerous aromatic and heterocyclic compounds were tested as growth substrates for isolate LD2, but few supported the growth of this bacterium. Anthranilic acid and catechol served as growth substrates and were positively identified as intermediates of carbazole degradation by isolate LD2. In addition, 10 nitrogen-containing metabolites were observed in acidified extracts of LD2 culture supernatants, four of which were unequivocally identified. These included indole-3-acetic acid, 5-(2-aminophenyl)-5-oxopentanoic acid, and the cyclized products of 5-(2-aminophenyl)-5-oxopent-3-enoic acid and 6-(2-aminophenyl)-2-hydroxy-6-oxohexa-2,4-dienoic acid. 63refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Genome‐wide identification of tolerance mechanisms toward p‐coumaric acid in Pseudomonas putida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, Patricia; Jensen, Sheila I.; Bojanovič, Klara; Lennen, Rebecca M.; Koza, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 has gained increasing biotechnological interest due to its ability to tolerate different types of stress. Here, the tolerance of P. putida KT2440 toward eleven toxic chemical compounds was investigated. P. putida was found to be significantly more tolerant toward three of the eleven compounds when compared to Escherichia coli. Increased tolerance was for example found toward p‐coumaric acid, an interesting precursor for polymerization with a significant industrial relevance. The tolerance mechanism was therefore investigated using the genome‐wide approach, Tn‐seq. Libraries containing a large number of miniTn5‐Km transposon insertion mutants were grown in the presence and absence of p‐coumaric acid, and the enrichment or depletion of mutants was quantified by high‐throughput sequencing. Several genes, including the ABC transporter Ttg2ABC and the cytochrome c maturation system (ccm), were identified to play an important role in the tolerance toward p‐coumaric acid of this bacterium. Most of the identified genes were involved in membrane stability, suggesting that tolerance toward p‐coumaric acid is related to transport and membrane integrity. PMID:29131301

  5. Uranium biomineralization by a metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from contaminated mine waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Sar, Pinaki

    2011-02-15

    Uranium biomineralization by a metal-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain isolated from uranium mine waste was characterized for its potential in bioremediation. Uranium resistance, its cellular localization and chemical nature of uranium-bacteria interaction were elucidated. Survival and uranium biomineralization from mine water were investigated using microcosm experiments. The selected bacterium showed U resistance and accumulation (maximum of 275 mg U g(-1)cell dry wt.) following incubation in 100 mg U L(-1), pH 4.0, for 6 h. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that bioaccumulated uranium was deposited within the cell envelope as needle shaped U-phosphate compounds that attain crystallinity only at pH 4.0. A synergistic involvement of deprotonated phosphate and carboxyl moieties in facilitating bioprecipitation of uranium was evident from FTIR analysis. Based on these findings we attribute the localized U sequestration by this bacterium as innocuous complex to its possible mechanism of uranium resistance. Microcosm data confirmed that the strain can remove soluble uranium (99%) and sequester it as U oxide and phosphate minerals while maintaining its viability. The study showed that indigenous bacteria from contaminated site that can survive uranium and other heavy metal toxicity and sequester soluble uranium as biominerals could play important role in uranium bioremediation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pseudomonas songnenensis sp. nov., isolated from saline and alkaline soils in Songnen Plain, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Pan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Kaibiao; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Shuang; Fu, Xiaowei; Zhang, Cheng; Jiang, Juquan

    2015-03-01

    The strain NEAU-ST5-5(T) was isolated from the saline and alkaline soil in Songnen Plain, North East of China. The bacterium was found to be aerobic, Gram-stain negative, rod-shaped and motile by means of several polar flagella. It forms yellow-orange colonies with a radial wrinkled surface. Phylogenetic analyses based on the separate 16S rRNA gene sequences and concatenated 16S rRNA, gyrB and rpoD gene sequences indicated that it belongs to the genus Pseudomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria. Strain NEAU-ST5-5(T) shows gene sequence similarities of 98.8-97.1 % for 16S rRNA, 90.5-78.4 % for gyrB and 90.4-71.1 % for rpoD with type strains of the closely related species of the genus Pseudomonas, respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization relatedness between strain NEAU-ST5-5(T) and type strains of the most closely related species, Pseudomonas stutzeri DSM 5190(T), P. xanthomarina DSM 18231(T), P. kunmingensis CGMCC 1.12273(T), P. alcaliphila DSM 17744(T) and P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis DSM 21016(T) were 43 ± 1 to 25 ± 2 %. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were determined to be C18:1 ω7c/C18:1 ω6c, C16:1 ω7c/C16:1 ω6c and C16:0, the predominant respiratory quinone was identified as ubiquinone 9 and polar lipids were found to consist of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, one unknown phospholipid, one unidentified aminophospholipid and one unknown lipid. The genotypic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic analysis indicated that strain NEAU-ST5-5(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas songnenensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NEAU-ST5-5(T) (=ACCC 06361(T) = DSM 27560(T)).

  7. Plant growth promoting potential of pseudomonas sp. SP0113 isolated from potable water from a closed water well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemieniecki Wojciech Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas sp. SP0113 strain from a partially closed aquatic environment was identified as a plant growth promoting bacterium (PGPB. Laboratory tests revealed that PS0113 has multiple plant growth promoting traits, including mineral phosphate solubilizing ability, ammonifying ability that increases nitrogen availability for plants via the root system, and phosphatase activity that plays an important role in organic phosphorus mineralization. Tricalcium phosphate (Ca3(PO42 solubilizing ability was described as average (2-3 mm after 7 days of incubation and as high (>3 mm after 14 days of incubation. The analyzed bacterium was an antagonist of major crop pathogenic fungi. A high degree of pathogen growth inhibition was reported with regard to Rhizoctonia solani (38%, whereas the tested strain's ability to inhibit the growth of fungi of the genera Fusarium and Microdochium nivalis was somewhat lower at 20-29%. The bacterium proliferated in Roundup 360 SL solutions with concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10 mg•ml-1.

  8. Unravelling the gallic acid degradation pathway in bacteria: the gal cluster from Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Juan; Canales, Angeles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Serra, Beatriz; Pingarrón, José Manuel; García, José Luis; Díaz, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, GA) is widely distributed in nature, being a major phenolic pollutant and a commonly used antioxidant and building-block for drug development. We have characterized the first complete cluster (gal genes) responsible for growth in GA in a derivative of the model bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. GalT mediates specific GA uptake and chemotaxis, and highlights the critical role of GA transport in bacterial adaptation to GA consumption. The proposed GA degradation via the central intermediate 4-oxalomesaconic acid (OMA) was revisited and all enzymes involved have been identified. Thus, GalD is the prototype of a new subfamily of isomerases that catalyses a biochemical step that remained unknown, i.e. the tautomerization of the OMAketo generated by the GalA dioxygenase to OMAenol. GalB is the founding member of a new family of zinc-containing hydratases that converts OMAenol into 4-carboxy-4-hydroxy-2-oxoadipic acid (CHA). galC encodes the aldolase catalysing CHA cleavage to pyruvic and oxaloacetic acids. The presence of homologous gal clusters outside the Pseudomonas genus sheds light on the evolution and ecology of the gal genes in GA degraders. The gal genes were used for expanding the metabolic abilities of heterologous hosts towards GA degradation, and for engineering a GA cellular biosensor. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Survival of a Rifampicin-Resistant Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain in Nine Mollisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tami L. Stubbs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens strain D7 (P.f. D7 is a naturally occurring soil bacterium that shows promise as a biological herbicide to inhibit growth of annual grass weeds, including downy brome (Bromus tectorum L., in crop- and rangelands. Pseudomonas fluorescens strain D7rif (P.f. D7rif is a rifampicin-resistant strain of P.f. D7. One of the greatest obstacles to successful biological weed control is survival of the organism under field conditions. Nine soils in the taxonomic order of Mollisols, collected from downy brome-infested areas of the Western and Central United States, were inoculated with P.f. D7rif and incubated in the laboratory to determine the effects of soil type, soil properties, incubation temperature, and soil water potential on survival of P.f. D7rif over 63 days. Silt loam soils from Lind, Washington, and Moro, Oregon, sustained the highest P.f. D7rif populations, and recovery was the lowest from Pendleton, Oregon soil. Survival and recovery of P.f. D7rif varied with soil type and temperature but not with the two soil water potentials tested. After 63 days, P.f. D7rif was recovered at levels greater than log 5.5 colony forming units (CFU g−1 soil from five of the nine test soils, a level adequate to suppress downy brome under field or range conditions.

  10. Rapid identification and quantitative validation of a caffeine-degrading pathway in Pseudomonas sp. CES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chi Li; Summers, Ryan M; Li, Yalan; Mohanty, Sujit Kumar; Subramanian, Mani; Pope, R Marshall

    2015-01-02

    Understanding the genes and enzymes involved in caffeine metabolism can lead to applications such as production of methylxanthines and environmental waste remediation. Pseudomonas sp. CES may provide insights into these applications, since this bacterium degrades caffeine and thrives in concentrations of caffeine that are three times higher (9.0 g L(-1)) than the maximum tolerable levels of other reported bacteria. We took a novel approach toward identifying the enzymatic pathways in Pseudomonas sp. CES that metabolize caffeine, which largely circumvented the need for exhaustive isolation of enzymes and the stepwise reconstitution of their activities. Here we describe an optimized, rapid alternative strategy based on multiplexed LC-MS/MS assays and show its application by discovering caffeine-degrading enzymes in the CES strain based on quantitative comparison of proteomes from bacteria grown in the absence and presence of caffeine, the latter condition of which was found to have a highly induced capacity for caffeine degradation. Comparisons were made using stable isotope dimethyl labeling, differences in the abundance of particular proteins were substantiated by reciprocal labeling experiments, and the role of the identified proteins in caffeine degradation was independently verified by genetic sequencing. Overall, multiple new components of a N-demethylase system were identified that resulted in rapid pathway validation and gene isolation using this new approach.

  11. Choosing an Appropriate Infection Model to Study Quorum Sensing Inhibition in Pseudomonas Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelina Papaioannou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, although considered for decades to be antisocial organisms whose sole purpose is to find nutrients and multiply are, in fact, highly communicative organisms. Referred to as quorum sensing, cell-to-cell communication mechanisms have been adopted by bacteria in order to co-ordinate their gene expression. By behaving as a community rather than as individuals, bacteria can simultaneously switch on their virulence factor production and establish successful infections in eukaryotes. Understanding pathogen-host interactions requires the use of infection models. As the use of rodents is limited, for ethical considerations and the high costs associated with their use, alternative models based on invertebrates have been developed. Invertebrate models have the benefits of low handling costs, limited space requirements and rapid generation of results. This review presents examples of such models available for studying the pathogenicity of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Quorum sensing interference, known as quorum quenching, suggests a promising disease-control strategy since quorum-quenching mechanisms appear to play important roles in microbe-microbe and host-pathogen interactions. Examples of natural and synthetic quorum sensing inhibitors and their potential as antimicrobials in Pseudomonas-related infections are discussed in the second part of this review.

  12. Survival and electrotransformation of Pseudomonas syringae strains under simulated cloud-like conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Laurine S; Monin, Anaïs; Ouertani, Hounaïda; Touaibia, Lamia; Michel, Elisa; Buret, François; Simonet, Pascal; Morris, Cindy E; Demanèche, Sandrine

    2017-05-01

    To diversify their genetic material, and thereby allow adaptation to environmental disturbances and colonization of new ecological niches, bacteria use various evolutionary processes, including the acquisition of new genetic material by horizontal transfer mechanisms such as conjugation, transduction and transformation. Electrotransformation mediated by lightning-related electrical phenomena may constitute an additional gene-transfer mechanism occurring in nature. The presence in clouds of bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae capable of forming ice nuclei that lead to precipitation, and that are likely to be involved in triggering lightning, led us to postulate that natural electrotransformation in clouds may contribute to the adaptive potential of these bacteria. Here, we quantify the survival rate of 10 P. syringae strains in liquid and icy media under such electrical pulses and their capacity to acquire exogenous DNA. In comparison to two other bacteria (Pseudomonas sp. N3 and Escherichia coli TOP10), P. syringae CC0094 appears to be best adapted for survival and for genetic electrotransformation under these conditions, which suggests that this bacterium would be able to survive and to get a boost in its adaptive potential while being transported in clouds and falling back to Earth with precipitation from storms. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Investigation of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 3JW1 on preventing and reducing aflatoxin contaminations in peanuts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Yang

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 3JW1, which has a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, was studied to investigate whether it affects the amounts of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 produced by Aspergillus flavus. It was found that the bacterium reduced the amounts of AFB1 in potato dextrose broth (PDB and peanut medium by 97.8% and 99.4%, respectively. It also reduced AFB1 by ~183 μg/kg (55.8% when applied onto peanut kernels. This strain reduced AFB1 via three mechanisms. First, it significantly inhibited A. flavus growth; second, our data showed that strain 3JW1 inhibits aflatoxin biosynthesis by A. flavus; and third, P. fluorescens strain 3JW1 is capable of degrading AFB1 at a rate as high as 88.3% in 96 hours. This is the first report demonstrating that Pseudomonas fluorescens can reduce toxin contamination caused by A. flavus on peanut kernels. Our findings indicate that P. fluorescens strain 3JW1 had multiple effects including reducing A. flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination. And the results also highlight the potential applications of the strain 3JW1 for the biological control of aflatoxin contamination in peanuts and other susceptible crops.

  14. Genome editing and transcriptional repression in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 via the type II CRISPR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Wang, Qingzhuo; Jiang, Yu; Wen, Zhiqiang; Yang, Lirong; Wu, Jianping; Yang, Sheng

    2018-03-13

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a "generally recognized as safe"-certified strain with robust property and versatile metabolism. Thus, it is an ideal candidate for synthetic biology, biodegradation, and other biotechnology applications. The known genome editing approaches of Pseudomonas are suboptimal; thus, it is necessary to develop a high efficiency genome editing tool. In this study, we established a fast and convenient CRISPR-Cas9 method in P. putida KT2440. Gene deletion, gene insertion and gene replacement could be achieved within 5 days, and the mutation efficiency reached > 70%. Single nucleotide replacement could be realized, overcoming the limitations of protospacer adjacent motif sequences. We also applied nuclease-deficient Cas9 binding at three locations upstream of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) for transcriptional inhibition, and the expression intensity of eGFP reduced to 28.5, 29.4, and 72.1% of the control level, respectively. Furthermore, based on this CRISPR-Cas9 system, we also constructed a CRISPR-Cpf1 system, which we validated for genome editing in P. putida KT2440. In this research, we established CRISPR based genome editing and regulation control systems in P. putida KT2440. These fast and efficient approaches will greatly facilitate the application of P. putida KT2440.

  15. Proteomic characterization of the outer membrane vesicle of Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chi-Won; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Yun, Sung Ho; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Lee, Yeol Gyun; Hong, Yeonhee; Park, Kyeong Ryang; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Kim, Seung Il

    2014-10-03

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are produced by various pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. In this study, we isolated OMVs from a representative soil bacterium, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, which has a biodegradative activity toward various aromatic compounds. Proteomic analysis identified the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) OprC, OprD, OprE, OprF, OprH, OprG, and OprW as major components of the OMV of P. putida KT2440. The production of OMVs was dependent on the nutrient availability in the culture media, and the up- or down-regulation of specific OMPs was observed according to the culture conditions. In particular, porins (e.g., benzoate-specific porin, BenF-like porin) and enzymes (e.g., catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, benzoate dioxygenase) for benzoate degradation were uniquely found in OMVs prepared from P. putida KT2440 that were cultured in media containing benzoate as the energy source. OMVs of P. putida KT2440 showed low pathological activity toward cultured cells that originated from human lung cells, which suggests their potential as adjuvants or OMV vaccine carriers. Our results suggest that the protein composition of the OMVs of P. putida KT2440 reflects the characteristics of the total proteome of P. putida KT2440.

  16. Prevalence and analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in chinchillas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoyama Naoki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chinchillas (Chinchilla laniger are popular as pets and are often used as laboratory animals for various studies. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major infectious agent that causes otitis media, pneumonia, septicaemia enteritis, and sudden death in chinchillas. This bacterium is also a leading cause of nosocomial infections in humans. To prevent propagation of P. aeruginosa infection among humans and animals, detailed characteristics of the isolates, including antibiotic susceptibility and genetic features, are needed. In this study, we surveyed P. aeruginosa distribution in chinchillas bred as pets or laboratory animals. We also characterized the isolates from these chinchillas by testing for antibiotic susceptibility and by gene analysis. Results P. aeruginosa was isolated from 41.8% of the 67 chinchillas included in the study. Slide agglutination and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis discriminated 5 serotypes and 7 unique patterns, respectively. For the antibiotic susceptibility test, 40.9% of isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, 77.3% to ciprofloxacin, 77.3% to imipenem, and 72.7% to ceftazidime. DNA analyses confirmed that none of the isolates contained the gene encoding extended-spectrum β-lactamases; however, 2 of the total 23 isolates were found to have a gene similar to the pilL gene that has been identified in the pathogenicity island of a clinical isolate of P. aeruginosa. Conclusions P. aeruginosa is widely spread in chinchillas, including strains with reduced susceptibility to the antibiotics and highly virulent strains. The periodic monitoring should be performed to help prevent the propagation of this pathogen and reduce the risk of infection from chinchillas to humans.

  17. Pyocyanin production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa confers resistance to ionic silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Michael; Merrett, Neil D

    2014-09-01

    Silver in its ionic form (Ag+), but not the bulk metal (Ag0), is toxic to microbial life forms and has been used for many years in the treatment of wound infections. The prevalence of bacterial resistance to silver is considered low due to the nonspecific nature of its toxicity. However, the recent increased use of silver as an antimicrobial agent for medical, consumer, and industrial products has raised concern that widespread silver resistance may emerge. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen that produces pyocyanin, a redox toxin and a reductant for molecular oxygen and ferric (Fe3+) ions. The objective of this study was to determine whether pyocyanin reduces Ag+ to Ag0, which may contribute to silver resistance due to lower bioavailability of the cation. Using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, pyocyanin was confirmed to be a reductant for Ag+, forming Ag0 nanoparticles and reducing the bioavailability of free Ag+ by >95% within minutes. Similarly, a pyocyanin-producing strain of P. aeruginosa (PA14) reduced Ag+ but not a pyocyanin-deficient (ΔphzM) strain of the bacterium. Challenge of each strain with Ag+ (as AgNO3) gave MICs of 20 and 5 μg/ml for the PA14 and ΔphzM strains, respectively. Removal of pyocyanin from the medium strain PA14 was grown in or its addition to the medium that ΔphzM mutant was grown in gave MICs of 5 and 20 μg/ml, respectively. Clinical isolates demonstrated similar pyocyanin-dependent resistance to Ag+. We conclude that pseudomonal silver resistance exists independently of previously recognized intracellular mechanisms and may be more prevalent than previously considered. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Regulatory tasks of the phosphoenolpyruvate-phosphotransferase system of Pseudomonas putida in central carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarría, Max; Kleijn, Roelco J; Sauer, Uwe; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    Two branches of the phosphoenolpyruvate-phosphotransferase system (PTS) operate in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. One branch encompasses a complete set of enzymes for fructose intake (PTS(Fru)), while the other (N-related PTS, or PTS(Ntr)) controls various cellular functions unrelated to the transport of carbohydrates. The potential of these two systems for regulating central carbon catabolism has been investigated by measuring the metabolic fluxes of isogenic strains bearing nonpolar mutations in PTS(Fru) or PTS(Ntr) genes and grown on either fructose (a PTS substrate) or glucose, the transport of which is not governed by the PTS in this bacterium. The flow of carbon from each sugar was distinctly split between the Entner-Doudoroff, pentose phosphate, and Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathways in a ratio that was maintained in each of the PTS mutants examined. However, strains lacking PtsN (EIIA(Ntr)) displayed significantly higher fluxes in the reactions of the pyruvate shunt, which bypasses malate dehydrogenase in the TCA cycle. This was consistent with the increased activity of the malic enzyme and the pyruvate carboxylase found in the corresponding PTS mutants. Genetic evidence suggested that such a metabolic effect of PtsN required the transfer of high-energy phosphate through the system. The EIIA(Ntr) protein of the PTS(Ntr) thus helps adjust central metabolic fluxes to satisfy the anabolic and energetic demands of the overall cell physiology. This study demonstrates that EIIA(Ntr) influences the biochemical reactions that deliver carbon between the upper and lower central metabolic domains for the consumption of sugars by P. putida. These findings indicate that the EIIA(Ntr) protein is a key player for orchestrating the fate of carbon in various physiological destinations in this bacterium. Additionally, these results highlight the importance of the posttranslational regulation of extant enzymatic complexes for increasing the robustness of the

  19. Bioreduction of Cu(II) by cell-free copper reductase from a copper resistant Pseudomonas sp. NA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreazza, Robson; Okeke, Benedict C; Pieniz, Simone; Brandelli, Adriano; Lambais, Mácio R; Camargo, Flávio A O

    2011-11-01

    Environmental copper contamination is a serious human health problem. Copper reductase is produced by microorganisms to facilitate copper uptake by ATPases into the cells increasing copper biosorption. This study assessed the reduction of Cu(II) by cell-free extracts of a highly copper-resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain NA, isolated from vineyard soil contaminated with copper. Both intact cells and cell-free extract of Pseudomonas sp. strain NA displayed substantial reduction of Cu(II). Intact cells reduced more then 80 mg L(-1) of Cu(II) from medium amended with 200 mg L(-1) of copper after 24 h of incubation. Cell-free extract of the isolate reduced more than 65% of the Cu(II) at initial copper concentration of 200 mg L(-1) after 24 h. Soluble protein production was high at 72 h of incubation at 100 mg L(-1) of copper, with more then 60 μg L(-1) of total soluble protein in cell-free extract recorded. Cu(II) reduction by isolate NA was increased when copper concentration increased for both intact cells and cell-free extract. Results indicate that Pseudomonas sp. strain NA produces copper reductase enzyme as the key mechanism of copper biotransformation.

  20. Comparative genomic and functional analyses: unearthing the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in Pseudomonas putida strain 1A00316

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jing; Jing, Xueping; Peng, Wen-Lei; Nie, Qiyu; Zhai, Yile; Shao, Zongze; Zheng, Longyu; Cai, Minmin; Li, Guangyu; Zuo, Huaiyu; Zhang, Zhitao; Wang, Rui-Ru; Huang, Dian; Cheng, Wanli; Yu, Ziniu; Chen, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Jibin

    2016-01-01

    We isolated Pseudomonas putida (P. putida) strain 1A00316 from Antarctica. This bacterium has a high efficiency against Meloidogyne incognita (M. incognita) in vitro and under greenhouse conditions. The complete genome of P. putida 1A00316 was sequenced using PacBio single molecule real-time (SMRT) technology. A comparative genomic analysis of 16 Pseudomonas strains revealed that although P. putida 1A00316 belonged to P. putida, it was phenotypically more similar to nematicidal Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) strains. We characterized the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in P. putida 1A00316 with comparative genomics and functional analysis, and found that P. putida 1A00316 has diverse nematicidal factors including protein alkaline metalloproteinase AprA and two secondary metabolites, hydrogen cyanide and cyclo-(l-isoleucyl-l-proline). We show for the first time that cyclo-(l-isoleucyl-l-proline) exhibit nematicidal activity in P. putida. Interestingly, our study had not detected common nematicidal factors such as 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) and pyrrolnitrin in P. putida 1A00316. The results of the present study reveal the diversity and specificity of nematicidal factors in P. putida strain 1A00316. PMID:27384076

  1. Evaluation of traditional plant extracts for innate immune mechanisms and disease resistance against fish bacterial Aeromonas hydrophila and Pseudomonas sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardi, E. H.; Saptiani, G.; Kusuma, I. W.; Suwinarti, W.; Nugroho, R. A.

    2018-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate effect of ethanol herbal extracts of Boesenbergia pandurata, Solanum ferox and Zingimber zerumbet on Tilapia (Oreochromis nilaticus) innate immune mechanisms and disease resistance against Aeromonas hydrophila and Pseudomonas sp. Fish were intramuscularly injected with 0.1 mL/fish (1010 CFU mL-1) of each bacterium on the day 6th of post treatment using extract by several methods (injection, oral administration and immersion). The doses of extract were 600 ppm of B. pandurata, 900 ppm S. ferox and 200 ppm of Z. zerumbet. The percentage mortality, Relative Percent Survival (RPS) and innate immune response were assessed on weeks 1, 2, 3 and 4. All the methods were effective to enhance the immune parameters after 2 weeks application and the RPS of treatment reached more than 90 %. The results showed that the injection method of extracts was the most effective method to control A. hydrophila and Pseudomonas sp. The result indicated that all the doses of extracts could be significantly influence the immune response and protect the health status of tilapia against A. hydrophila and Pseudomonas sp. infections.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing as a potential antimicrobial target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Roger S.; Iglewski, Barbara H.

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has two complete quorum-sensing systems. Both of these systems have been shown to be important for Pseudomonas virulence in multiple models of infection. Thus, these systems provide unique targets for novel antimicrobial drugs. PMID:14617745

  3. Genotypische diversiteit en rhizosfeerkolonisatie van DAPG-producerende Pseudomonas spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergsma-Vlami, M.

    2009-01-01

    Het antibioticum 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) speelt een belangrijke rol in biologische bestrijding van verschillende plantenpathogenen door fluorescerende Pseudomonas-soorten. DAPG-producerende Pseudomonas-stammen zijn effectief in biologische bestrijding, maar hun saprofytisch vermogen is

  4. Quantitative molecular biology and gas flux measurements demonstrate soil treatment and depth affects on the distribution and activity of denitrifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, M. M.; Jahangir, M.; Cardenas, L.; Khalil, M.; Richards, K. R.; O'Flaherty, V.

    2010-12-01

    The growing industrialisation of agriculture has led to a dramatic increase in organic and inorganic nitrogen (N) fertiliser inputs to agro-ecosystems. This increase has had negative effects on the quality of water ecosystems and greenhouse gas emissions.The study objective was to quantify denitrification and denitrifying microorganisms, using real-time PCR assays of the nitrite reductase(nir) and nitrous oxide reductase(nos) functional gene copy concentrations (GCC g[soil]-1) in Irish agricultural surface and subsoils. Soil cores from 3 soil horizons (A:0-10 cm; B:45-55 cm; C:120-130cm) were amended with 3 alternate N- and C-source amendments (NO3-; NO3-+glucose-C; NO3-+Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC). Real-time production of N2O and N2 was recorded by gas chromatography in a specialized He/O2 environment. N2O and Total Denitrification (TDN) (N2O+N2) production was generally greater in surface soil (2.052 mg/kg/d TDN) than in subsoils (0.120 mg/kg/d TDN). The abundance of denitrifying nirS, nirK (nir) and nos genes was higher in the surface soil, decreasing with soil depth, except in incubations amended with NO3- and DOC, where the carbon source directly positively affected gene copy numbers and fluxes of N2O and N2 production. C addition increased soil denitrification rates, and resulted in higher N2O/(N2O+N2) ratios in surface soil (0.39) than subsoils (0.005), indicating that the subsoil had higher potential for complete reduction of N2O to N2. In the subsoils, complete reduction of NO3- due to glucose-C and DOC addition was observed. Interestingly, at all 3 soil depths, lower nirK abundance (2.78 105 GCC) was recorded, compared to nirS (1.45 107 GCC), but the overall abundance of nir (S+K) i.e. (1.54 107GCC), corresponded with N2O emission fluxes (3.34 mg/kg/d) Statistical analysis indicates negative correlation between nirK GCC and N2O production, but a strong positive correlation was observed between nirS GCC and N2O. We therefore hypothesize that the

  5. The physiology of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkhuis, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the physiology of Microthrix parvicella. This filamentous bacterium often causes poor settleability of activated sludge in oxidation ditches supplied with domestic sewage. The organism was found to utilize only long chain fatty acids (preferably in

  6. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles by marine bacterium, Idiomarina ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metal-tolerant microorganisms have been exploited in recent years to synthesize nanoparticles due to their potential to offer better size control through peptide binding and compartmentalization. In this paper, we report the intracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) by the highly silver-tolerant marine bacterium, ...

  7. Control of magnetotactic bacterium in a micro-fabricated maze

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khalil, I.S.M.; Pichel, Marc Philippe; Pichel, M.P.; Reefman, B.A.; Sardan Sukas, Ö.; Abelmann, Leon; Misra, Sarthak

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the closed-loop control of a magnetotactic bacterium (MTB), i.e., Magnetospirillum magnetotacticum, within a micro-fabricated maze using a magneticbased manipulation system. The effect of the channel wall on the motion of the MTB is experimentally analyzed. This analysis is done by

  8. Amylase activity of a yellow pigmented bacterium isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the amylase activity of a yellow pigmented bacterium isolated from cassava wastes obtained from a dumpsite near a gari processing factory in Ibadan, Nigeria. Isolate was grown in nutrient broth containing 1% starch and then centrifuged at 5,000 rpm. Amylase activity was assayed using the DNSA ...

  9. Monitoring of a novel bacterium, Lactobacillus thermotolerans , in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. We successfully established fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method for specific detection and enumeration of a novel bacterium, Lactobacillus thermotolerans, in chicken feces. The specific FISH probes were designed based on the L. thermotolerans 16S rRNA gene sequences, and these sequences were ...

  10. Screening and characterization of petroleum-degrading bacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Petroleum-degrading bacterium JY6 was isolated from petroleum-contaminated soils in DaQing oil field. It was identified as Bacillus cereus based on its morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics, and analysis of its 16SrRNA gene. Biodegradation function of petroleum and oil degradation rates were ...

  11. Effect of land use on the density of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria in the Colombian Coffee Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallejo Quintero Victoria Eugenia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Soil microbial communities involved in the cycling of nitrogen (N are essential to maintaining and improving soil fertility, productivity and functionality of natural and agricultural ecosystems. However, some compounds generated during the metabolic processes performed by nitrifying (NB and denitrifying (DB bacteria are associated with the production of greenhouse gases, groundwater pollution and acidification. Therefore, the study of these bacteria is essential for economic and environmental sustainability. This study evaluated the effect of different land uses in two river basins (La Vieja and Otun on NB and DB densities. Two sampling events (SE were conducted by selecting the most representative land uses. Physicochemical (T °, pH, moisture and nitrate and microbiological properties (NB and DB densities were evaluated. In both SEs, significantly higher densities of NB and DB were observed in the land uses: pasture, guadua (DB only and unshaded coffee (La Vieja and onion (Otun. These land uses, excluding guadua, are dependent on nitrogen fertilizers, which together with the activities of grazing livestock on pastures may lead to greater availability of substrates for the NB. The use of agricultural machinery and overgrazing in pasture and onion uses generate compacted soil and other physical disturbances, encouraging the growth of DB. Forests had the lowest densities of NB and DB possibly due to a reduced availability of N and the releasing of allelopathic compounds from certain plants. Finally, the densities of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria had the greatest differences between the land uses evaluated, demonstrating its high sensitivity to agricultural management practices and livestock. We suggest that changes in the abundance of this community could

  12. Granulation of susceptible sludge under carbon deficient conditions: A case of denitrifying sulfur conversion-associated EBPR process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Gang; Wu, Di; Hao, Tianwei; Mackey, Hamish Robert; Wei, Li; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guanghao

    2016-10-15

    Sludge granulation has been recognized as a promising biotechnology in wastewater treatment. Whereas the granulation of susceptible sludge in particular with a very low organic loading rate (OLR) (≤0.6 kg COD/m(3)/day or ≤ 120 mg COD/g VSS/day) is a difficult task that has not been achieved in activated sludge systems yet. This study was aimed at exploring an effective strategy for sludge granulation in the recently developed Denitrifying Sulfur conversion-associated Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (DS-EBPR) process using a sequencing batch pump-lift reactor. Four strategies were studied by manipulating the factors of organic loading rate (OLR), superficial upflow velocity and sludge settling time individually or collectively. Increasing both the OLR and the superficial upflow velocity effectively promoted granule formation but at the same time led to unstable and even deteriorated reactor performance. The development of granules proceeded via several stages: formation, dispersion, reformation and stabilization. Gradually increasing the superficial upflow velocity from 5.1 to 6.8 m/h and keeping the OLR at 112.4 mg COD/g VSS/day proved to be most effective strategy for accelerating granulation while simultaneously achieving stable reactor performance. Under these conditions, the granules became stable with a diameter of 375-400 μm and displayed excellent settleability. The two major microbial groups, sulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfide-oxidizing bacteria, in the microbial community of the DS-EBPR granular sludge were enriched to 17.7% and 15.8% respectively. The newly developed DS-EBPR granular system was able to achieve an almost threefold improvement in phosphorus removal efficiency and 25% reduction in the operating cycle time compared with a flocculent DS-EBPR system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Strain-dependent induction of neutrophil histamine production and cell death by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Hong; Song, Yuanlin; Lynch, Susan V.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Wiener-Kronish, Jeanine P.; Caughey, George H.

    2012-01-01

    Airway diseases often feature persistent neutrophilic inflammation and infection. In cystic fibrosis bronchitis, for example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is isolated frequently. Previously, this laboratory revealed that neutrophils become major sources of histamine in mice with tracheobronchitis caused by the wall-less bacterium Mycoplasma pulmonis. To test the hypothesis that more-broadly pathogenic P. aeruginosa (which expresses cell wall-associated LPS and novel toxins) has similar effects, we incubated naïve mouse neutrophils with two strains of P. aeruginosa. Strain PAO1 greatly increased neutrophil histamine content and secretion, whereas strain PA103 depressed histamine production by killing neutrophils. The histamine-stimulating capacity of PAO1, but not PA103-mediated toxicity, persisted in heat-killed organisms. In PAO1-infected mice, lung and neutrophil histamine content increased. However, PAO1 did not alter production by mast cells (classical histamine reservoirs), which also resisted PA103 toxicity. To explore mechanisms of neutrophil-selective induction, we measured changes in mRNA encoding histidine decarboxylase (rate-limiting for histamine synthesis), probed involvement of endotoxin-TLR pathways in Myd88-deficient neutrophils, and examined contributions of pyocyanin and exotoxins. Results revealed that PAO1 increased histamine production by up-regulating histidine decarboxylase mRNA via pathways largely independent of TLR, pyocyanin, and type III secretion system exotoxins. PAO1 also increased histidine decarboxylase mRNA in neutrophils purified from infected lung. Stimulation required direct contact with neutrophils and was blocked by phagocytosis inhibitor cytochalasin D. In summary, Pseudomonas-augmented histamine production by neutrophils is strain-dependent in vitro and likely mediated by up-regulation of histidine decarboxylase. These findings raise the possibility that Pseudomonas-stimulated neutrophils can enhance airway inflammation by

  14. Gene cloning, identification, and characterization of the multicopper oxidase CumA from Pseudomonas sp. 593.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng; Long, Yan; Yan, Hong; Cai, Huawan; Li, Yadong; Wang, Xingguo

    2017-05-01

    The cumA, a gene encoding a multicopper oxidase (MCO), was cloned from the soil-dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 593. Its corresponding product was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) pLysS and purified to homogeneity through Ni-affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence of the CumA of Pseudomonas sp. 593 was strongly homologous to that of CumA as previously reported. The CumA was quite stable in neutral pH and had poor thermostability. Meanwhile, its optimum pH and temperature toward laccase substrates 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP), syringaldazine (SGZ), and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) were 5.0 and 55 °C, 7.5 and 60 °C, and 5.0 and 60 °C, respectively. Cu 2+ remarkably enhanced the activity of the CumA. By contrast, the activity of the CumA was inhibited by the addition of Fe 2+ . Kinetic studies gave the K m , k cat , and k cat /K m values of 0.438 mmol·L -1 , 0.056 Sec -1 , and 0.128 Sec -1 ·mmol -1 ·L for DMP; 0.017 mmol·L -1 , 0.031 Sec -1 , and 1.824 Sec -1 ·mmol -1 ·L for SGZ; and 0.101 mmol·L -1 , 0.393 Sec -1 , and 3.891 Sec -1 ·mmol -1 ·L for ABTS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of cloning, expressing in E. coli of the cumA from Pseudomonas and characterization of the CumA. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Pseudomonas sp. BUP6, a novel isolate from Malabari goat produces an efficient rhamnolipid type biosurfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priji, Prakasan; Sajith, Sreedharan; Unni, Kizhakkepowathial Nair; Anderson, Robin C; Benjamin, Sailas

    2017-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics of a biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas sp. BUP6, a rumen bacterium, and optimization of parameters required for its production. Initial screening of five parameters (pH, temperature, agitation, incubation, and substrate concentration) was carried out employing Plackett-Burman design, which reduced the number of parameters to 3 (pH, temperature, and incubation) according to their significance on the yield of biosurfactant. A suitable statistical model for the production of biosurfactant by Pseudomonas sp. BUP6 was established according to Box-Behnken design, which resulted in 11% increase (at pH 7, 35 °C, incubation 75 h) in the yield (2070 mg L -1 ) of biosurfactant. The biosurfactant was found stable at a wide range of pH (3-9) with 48 mg L -1 critical micelle concentration; and maintained over 90% of its emulsification ability even after boiling and in presence of sodium chloride (0.5%). The highest cell hydrophobicity (37%) and emulsification (69%) indices were determined with groundnut oil and kerosene, respectively. The biosurfactant was found to inhibit the growth and adhesion of E. coli and S. aureus significantly. From the phytotoxicity studies, the biosurfactant did not show any adverse effect on the germinating seeds of rice and green gram. The structural characterization of biosurfactant employing orcinol method, thin layer chromatography and FT-IR indicated that it is a rhamnolipid (glycolipid). Thus, Pseudomonas sp. BUP6, a novel isolate from Malabari goat is demonstrated as a producer of an efficient rhamnolipid type biosurfactant suitable for application in various industries. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Characterization of Pseudomonas monteilii CCM 3423 and its physiological potential for biodegradation of selected organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojtková, Hana; Kosina, Marcel; Sedláček, Ivo; Mašlaňová, Ivana; Harwotová, Markéta; Molinková, Veronika

    2015-09-01

    Pseudomonas monteilii CCM 3423 bacterial strain, deposited at the Czech Collection of Microorganisms, was originally isolated by Haľama and Augustín (1980) as a bacterium degrading aromatic hydrocarbons and derivates. A detailed study supported by a molecular genetics method of sequence analyses of rrs and rpoD genes was used to reclassify the strain, originally stored as 'Pseudomonas putida'. The physiological characteristics of the strain are complemented with research in the capacity to utilize selected organic pollutants (anthracene, benz[a]anthracene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, fluorene, naphthalene, phenanthrene). The obtained results point at very good biodegradation properties of the strain. Already after 7 days of the bacterial strain's action, there was a decrease in all the organic contaminants to 79.8 ± 2.6 %. In 14 days, the amount of organic contaminants dropped to 59.3 ± 2.8 %. After 21 days of biodegradation experiments, the overall quantity of the observed organic substances fell below the half limit to 45.7 ± 2.5 % of residuals. Finally, after 28 days, the residue was 35.4 ± 2.2 %, and after 35 days of the action of P. monteilii, the tested samples contained mere 27.8 ± 2.8 % of organic pollutants. The results imply that Pseudomonas monteilii CCM 3423 is a prospective strain in terms of further biotechnological application in contaminated environment.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicaemia in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, R K; Bang, R L; Sanyal, S C; Mokaddas, E; Lari, A R

    1999-11-01

    Out of 1415 patients treated as inpatients at Al-Babtain Center for Burns and Plastic Surgery, Ibn Sina Hospital, Kuwait spanning over a period of 6 years from June 1992 to June 1998, 102 developed clinically and microbiologically proven septicaemia. Only 15 out of them had either single or multiple episodes of septicaemia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and were studied during their stay in the hospital. Five of them were males and 10 females, with a mean age of 26 years (range 3-51 years) and mean total body surface area of burns (TBSA) of 66% (range 25-90%). All of them had flame burns and resuscitation was found to be difficult in eight patients either due to delayed hospitalization or accompanied inhalation injury. Seven patients were intubated, four due to inhalation injury and three for septicaemic complications. Among the 15 patients under study, a total of 36 septicaemic episodes were detected of which 21 were due to P. aeruginosa. This organism was found in the first episodes in nine patients, in second episodes in six, in third episodes in three and fourth, fifth and sixth episodes in one patient, each at a variable postburn day. Ten patients had 38 sessions of excision and skin grafting, six of them survived. Nine of the 15 patients under study died due to septicaemia, but only six of them had P. aeruginosa as the last isolate. Except for one, all patients had > 40% TBSA burn, two had difficult resuscitation and four were intubated. The day of death varied between 3 to 52 days postburn (mean 19 days). This study showed that females with flame burns are susceptible to P. aeruginosa septicaemia. Difficult resuscitation and intubation also proved to be important risk factors. Septicaemia could occur quite early in the postburn days and the mortality due to this organism was quite high. Early excision and grafting with other effective management may result in a better outcome.

  18. Co-composting of municipal solid waste mixed with matured sewage sludge: The relationship between N2O emissions and denitrifying gene abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Rongxing; Sun, Yingjie; Li, Weihua; Ma, Qiang; Chai, Xiaoli

    2017-12-01

    Aerobic composting is an alternative measure to the disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW). However, it produces nitrous oxide (N 2 O), a highly potent greenhouse via microbial nitrification and denitrification. In this study, the effects of matured sewage sludge (MSS) amendment on N 2 O emissions and the inter-relationships between N 2 O emissions and the abundance of denitrifying bacteria were investigated during aerobic composting of MSW. The results demonstrated that MSW composting with MSS amendments (C1, and C2, with a MSW to MSS ratio of 2:1 and 4:1, (v/v), respectively) significantly increased N 2 O emissions during the initial stage, yet contributed to the mitigation of N 2 O emissions during the cooling and maturation stage. MSS amended composting emitted a total of 18.4%-25.7% less N 2 O than the control treatment without MSS amendment (CK). Matured sewage sludge amendment also significantly altered the abundance of denitrifying bacteria. The quantification of denitrifying functional genes revealed that the N 2 O emission rate had a significant positive correlation with the abundance of the nirS, nirK genes in both treatments with MSS amendment. The nosZ/(nirS + nirK) ratio could be a good indicator for predicting N 2 O emissions. The higher N 2 O emission rate during the initial stage of composting mixed with MSS was characterized by lower nosZ/(nirS + nirK) ratios, compared to CK treatment. Higher ratios of nosZ/(nirS + nirK) were measured during the cooling and maturation stage in treatments with MSS which resulted in a reduction of the N 2 O emissions. These results demonstrated that MSS amendment could be a valid strategy for mitigating N 2 O emissions during MSW composting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Laboratory and field studies on BTEX biodegradation in a fuel-contaminated aquifer under denitrifying conditions. Book chapter, May 88-Dec 92

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, S.R.; Wilson, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Leaking underground storage tanks are a major source of groundwater contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons. Of the approximately 1.4 million underground tanks storing gasoline in the United States, some petroleum experts estimate that 75,000 to 100,000 are leaking (Feliciano 1984). Gasoline and other fuels contain benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (collectively known as BTEX), which are hazardous compounds regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1977). Laboratory studies were conducted in conjunction with a field demonstration project on nitrate-mediated biorestoration of a fuel-contaminated aquifer at a U.S. Coast Guard facility in Traverse City, MI. Microcosms were prepared under either aerobic or strictly anaerobic, denitrifying conditions using core samples aseptically obtained from the aquifer. The microcosms were spiked with aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) and incubated as 12 C. Virtually all of the aromatic hydrocarbons, including benzene, were degraded to below detection limits within seven days under aerobic conditions, although o-xylene was somewhat more recalcitrant. Under denitrifying conditions, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene were also degraded to below detection limits, although this occurred between two to three weeks. o-Xylene was only slowly degraded and benzene was recalcitrant under denitrifying conditions. In the field demonstration project, an infiltration gallery was used to recirculate water at a rate sufficient to create a water table mound encompassing the contaminated interval. After hydraulic equilbrium was achieved nitrate and nutrients were added to the recharge water. Benzene removal occurred before nitrate addition; mass balances indicated that sufficient oxygen was recirculated to account for complete biodegradation aerobically

  20. Genome Analysis of Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751: A Rhizobacterium that Controls Root Diseases and Alleviates Salt Stress for Its Plant Host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ting Cho

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751 is a rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of a greenhouse-grown tomato plant in Uzbekistan. It controls several plant root diseases caused by Fusarium fungi through the mechanism of competition for nutrients and niches (CNN. This mechanism does not rely on the production of antibiotics, so it avoids the concerns of resistance development and is environmentally safe. Additionally, this bacterium promotes plant growth by alleviating salt stress for its plant host. To investigate the genetic mechanisms that may explain these observations, we determined the complete genome sequence of this bacterium, examined its gene content, and performed comparative genomics analysis with other Pseudomonas strains. The genome of P. fluorescens PCL1751 consisted of one circular chromosome that is 6,143,950 base-pairs (bp in size; no plasmid was found. The annotation included 19 rRNA, 70 tRNA, and 5,534 protein-coding genes. The gene content analysis identified a large number of genes involved in chemotaxis and motility, colonization of the rhizosphere, siderophore biosynthesis, and osmoprotectant production. In contrast, the pathways involved in the biosynthesis of phytohormones or antibiotics were not found. Comparison with other Pseudomonas genomes revealed extensive variations in their genome size and gene content. The presence and absence of secretion system genes were highly variable. As expected, the synteny conservation among strains decreased as a function of phylogenetic divergence. The integration of prophages appeared to be an important driver for genome rearrangements. The whole-genome gene content analysis of this plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR provided some genetic explanations to its phenotypic characteristics. The extensive and versatile substrate utilization pathways, together with the presence of many genes involved in competitive root colonization, provided further support

  1. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed.......Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....

  2. Aspergillus triggers phenazine production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib

    Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen, commonly infecting cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Aspergilli, especially Aspergillus fumigatus, are also frequently isolated from CF patients. Our aim was to examine the possible interaction between P. aeruginosa and different...... in the contact area of A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, but not A. fumigatus. In addition, other metabolites with UV chromophores similar to the phenazines were only found in the contact zone between Aspergillus and Pseudomonas. No change in secondary metabolite profiles were seen for the Aspergilli, when...... comparing with or without the presence of Pseudomonas. Conclusion: All Aspergilli tested, with the exception of A. fumigatus, triggered the upregulation of phenazine-1-carboxamide and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid production by P. aeruginosa. Surprisingly no changes in secondary metabolite profiles were...

  3. Suppression of Aspergillus by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib

    Objectives: Cystic fibrosis patients are commonly infected by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but Aspergilli are also frequently isolated. Our aim was to examine the possible interaction between P. aeruginosa and different Aspergillus. Methods: A suspension of 106 fungal spores/ml was streaked onto WATM......, here among 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS). An unidentified green pseudomonas compound was also observed. Interestingly the P. aeruginosa mutant rpoN was unable to suppress A. fumigatus, but suppressed A. flavus, A. oryzae and A. niger. However several other P. aeruginosa mutants suppressed A....... fumigatus including flif, pilA, lasR, PVDA, PQSC and rhlA mutants indicating that phenazines may be involved in the suppressed growth of A. fumigatus. All pseudomonas mutants suppressed A. oryzae, A. niger and A. flavus. Conclusions: An increase in phenazine production by P. aeruginosa may contribute...

  4. Summary report on the aerobic degradation of diesel fuel and the degradation of toluene under aerobic, denitrifying and sulfate reducing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyne, P.; Smith, G.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains a number of studies that were performed to better understand the technology of the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. Topics of investigation include the following: diesel fuel degradation by Rhodococcus erythropolis; BTEX degradation by soil isolates; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-respirometry; aerobic degradation of diesel fuel-shake culture; aerobic toluene degradation by A3; effect of HEPES, B1, and myo-inositol addition on the growth of A3; aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation by contaminated soils; denitrifying bacteria MPNs; sulfate-reducing bacteria MPNs; and aerobic, DNB and SRB enrichments

  5. Biodegradation of 2 - methoxyethanol by a new bacterium isolate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    methoxyethanol for the total oxidation metabolism. (Table 2). These findings therefore support the proposed degradative metabolic pathways of 2- methoxyethanol under aerobic conditions by. Pseudomonas sp. Stain VB, which therefore accounts for its conversion to intermediary metabolites. Table 2: Oxygen consumption ...

  6. Active efflux of toluene in a solvent-resistant bacterium.

    OpenAIRE

    Isken, S; de Bont, J A

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms behind the organic-solvent resistance of the solvent-tolerant strain Pseudomonas putida S12. By use of 14C-labeled toluene, we obtained evidence that an energy-dependent export system may be responsible for this resistance to toluene.

  7. Dynamics of development and dispersal in sessile microbial communities: examples from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida model biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, M.; Gjermansen, Morten; Kreft, J.-U.

    2006-01-01

    Surface-associated microbial communities in many cases display dynamic developmental patterns. Model biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida in laboratory flow-chamber setups represent examples of such behaviour. Dependent on the experimental conditions the bacteria...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. 866.3415... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3415 Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents are devices that...

  9. Identification of a Third Mn(II) Oxidase Enzyme in Pseudomonas putida GB-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geszvain, Kati; Smesrud, Logan; Tebo, Bradley M

    2016-07-01

    The oxidation of soluble Mn(II) to insoluble Mn(IV) is a widespread bacterial activity found in a diverse array of microbes. In the Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida GB-1, two Mn(II) oxidase genes, named mnxG and mcoA, were previously identified; each encodes a multicopper oxidase (MCO)-type enzyme. Expression of these two genes is positively regulated by the response regulator MnxR. Preliminary investigation into putative additional regulatory pathways suggested that the flagellar regulators FleN and FleQ also regulate Mn(II) oxidase activity; however, it also revealed the presence of a third, previously uncharacterized Mn(II) oxidase activity in P. putida GB-1. A strain from which both of the Mn(II) oxidase genes and fleQ were deleted exhibited low levels of Mn(II) oxidase activity. The enzyme responsible was genetically and biochemically identified as an animal heme peroxidase (AHP) with domain and sequence similarity to the previously identified Mn(II) oxidase MopA. In the ΔfleQ strain, P. putida GB-1 MopA is overexpressed and secreted from the cell, where it actively oxidizes Mn. Thus, deletion of fleQ unmasked a third Mn(II) oxidase activity in this strain. These results provide an example of an Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium utilizing both MCO and AHP enzymes. The identity of the Mn(II) oxidase enzyme in Pseudomonas putida GB-1 has been a long-standing question in the field of bacterial Mn(II) oxidation. In the current work, we demonstrate that P. putida GB-1 employs both the multicopper oxidase- and animal heme peroxidase-mediated pathways for the oxidation of Mn(II), rendering this model organism relevant to the study of both types of Mn(II) oxidase enzymes. The presence of three oxidase enzymes in P. putida GB-1 deepens the mystery of why microorganisms oxidize Mn(II) while providing the field with the tools necessary to address this question. The initial identification of MopA as a Mn(II) oxidase in this strain required the deletion of FleQ, a

  10. Bacterial Feeders, the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the Flagellate Cercomonas longicauda, have different Effects on Outcome of Competition among the Pseudomonas Biocontrol Strains CHA0 and DSS73

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette; Nybroe, Ole; Winding, Anne

    2009-01-01

    50090 or one of two biocontrol strains P. fluorescens CHA0 or Pseudomonas sp. DSS73) or combinations of two bacterial strains. DSM50090 is a suitable food bacterium, DSS73 is of intermediate food quality, and CHA0 is inedible to the bacterial feeders. Bacterial and protozoan cell numbers were measured......How bacterial feeding fauna affects colonization and survival of bacteria in soil is not well understood, which constrains the applicability of bacterial inoculants in agriculture. This study aimed to unravel how food quality of bacteria and bacterial feeders with different feeding habits (the...

  11. Construction of a tomato leaf cDNA expression library and immunoscreening for the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HrpZ1 target protein

    OpenAIRE

    Österman, Janina

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is a Gram-negative plant pathogen that causes bacterial speck disease on tomato. The virulence of this bacterium is based on the type III secretion system (T3SS). Similar systems are also used by many other plant and animal pathogens, as well as symbiotic bacteria. The T3SS enables the transfer of specific bacterial virulence proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm into the host cell. This secretion is mediated by a needle-like structure that penetrates th...

  12. Antibiofilm activity of an exopolysaccharide from marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QY101.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jiang

    Full Text Available Bacterial exopolysaccharides have always been suggested to play crucial roles in the bacterial initial adhesion and the development of complex architecture in the later stages of bacterial biofilm formation. However, Escherichia coli group II capsular polysaccharide was characterized to exert broad-spectrum biofilm inhibition activity. In this study, we firstly reported that a bacterial exopolysaccharide (A101 not only inhibits biofilm formation of many bacteria but also disrupts established biofilm of some strains. A101 with an average molecular weight of up to 546 KDa, was isolated and purified from the culture supernatant of the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. QY101 by ethanol precipitation, iron-exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. High performance liquid chromatography traces of the hydrolyzed polysaccharides showed that A101 is primarily consisted of galacturonic acid, glucuronic acid, rhamnose and glucosamine. A101 was demonstrated to inhibit biofilm formation by a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria without antibacterial activity. Furthermore, A101 displayed a significant disruption on the established biofilm produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but not by Staphylococcus aureus. Importantly, A101 increased the aminoglycosides antibiotics' capability of killing P. aeruginosa biofilm. Cell primary attachment to surfaces and intercellular aggregates assays suggested that A101 inhibited cell aggregates of both P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, while the cell-surface interactions inhibition only occurred in S. aureus, and the pre-formed cell aggregates dispersion induced by A101 only occurred in P. aeruginosa. Taken together, these data identify the antibiofilm activity of A101, which may make it potential in the design of new therapeutic strategies for bacterial biofilm-associated infections and limiting biofilm formation on medical indwelling devices. The found of A101 antibiofilm activity may also promote a

  13. Genetic analysis of plant endophytic Pseudomonas putida BP25 and chemo-profiling of its antimicrobial volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheoran, Neelam; Valiya Nadakkakath, Agisha; Munjal, Vibhuti; Kundu, Aditi; Subaharan, Kesavan; Venugopal, Vibina; Rajamma, Suseelabhai; Eapen, Santhosh J; Kumar, Aundy

    2015-04-01

    Black pepper associated bacterium BP25 was isolated from root endosphere of apparently healthy cultivar Panniyur-5 that protected black pepper against Phytophthora capsici and Radopholus similis - the major production constraints. The bacterium was characterized and mechanisms of its antagonistic action against major pathogens are elucidated. The polyphasic phenotypic analysis revealed its identity as Pseudomonas putida. Multi locus sequence typing revealed that the bacterium shared gene sequences with several other isolates representing diverse habitats. Tissue localization assays exploiting green fluorescence protein expression clearly indicated that PpBP25 endophytically colonized not only its host plant - black pepper, but also other distantly related plants such as ginger and arabidopsis. PpBP25 colonies could be enumerated from internal tissues of plants four weeks post inoculation indicated its stable establishment and persistence in the plant system. The bacterium inhibited broad range of pathogens such as Phytophthora capsici, Pythium myriotylum, Giberella moniliformis, Rhizoctonia solani, Athelia rolfsii, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and plant parasitic nematode, Radopholus similis by its volatile substances. GC/MS based chemical profiling revealed presence of Heneicosane; Tetratetracontane; Pyrrolo [1,2-a] pyrazine-1,4-dione, hexahydro-3-(2-methylpropyl); Tetracosyl heptafluorobutyrate; 1-3-Eicosene, (E)-; 1-Heneicosanol; Octadecyl trifluoroacetate and 1-Pentadecene in PpBP25 metabolite. Dynamic head space GC/MS analysis of airborne volatiles indicated the presence of aromatic compounds such as 1-Undecene;Disulfide dimethyl; Pyrazine, methyl-Pyrazine, 2,5-dimethyl-; Isoamyl alcohol; Pyrazine, methyl-; Dimethyl trisulfide, etc. The work paved way for profiling of broad spectrum antimicrobial VOCs in endophytic PpBP25 for crop protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Pseudomonas helleri sp. nov. and Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis sp. nov., isolated from raw cow's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Neubeck, M; Huptas, C; Glück, C; Krewinkel, M; Stoeckel, M; Stressler, T; Fischer, L; Hinrichs, J; Scherer, S; Wenning, M

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of the microbiota of raw cow's milk and semi-finished milk products yielded seven isolates assigned to the genus Pseudomonas that formed two individual groups in a phylogenetic analysis based on partial rpoD and 16S rRNA gene sequences. The two groups could be differentiated from each other and also from their closest relatives as well as from the type species Pseudomonas aeruginosa by phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characterization and average nucleotide identity (ANIb) values calculated from draft genome assemblies. ANIb values within the groups were higher than 97.3 %, whereas similarity values to the closest relatives were 85 % or less. The major cellular lipids of strains WS4917T and WS4993T were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol; the major quinone was Q-9 in both strains, with small amounts of Q-8 in strain WS4917T. The DNA G+C contents of strains WS4917T and WS4993T were 58.08 and 57.30 mol%, respectively. Based on these data, strains WS4917T, WS4995 ( = DSM 29141 = LMG 28434), WS4999, WS5001 and WS5002 should be considered as representatives of a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas helleri sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Pseudomonas helleri is strain WS4917T ( = DSM 29165T = LMG 28433T). Strains WS4993T and WS4994 ( = DSM 29140 = LMG 28438) should be recognized as representing a second novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Pseudomonas weihenstephanensis is strain WS4993T ( = DSM 29166T = LMG 28437T).

  15. Azithromycin Retards Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Richard J.; Iglewski, Barbara H.

    2004-01-01

    Using a flow cell biofilm model, we showed that a sub-MIC of azithromycin (AZM) can delay but not inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and results in the development of a stable AZM resistance phenotype. Furthermore, mature biofilms were not affected by AZM. PMID:15583321

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein...

  17. Occurrence of Fusarium Oxysporum and Ralstonia (Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microflora associated with the root-surface of five tomato cultivars commonly cultivated in Edo State Nigeria, was investigated by inoculating serially washed 5 mm tomato root segments on potato dextrose agar (PDA) incubated at room temperature (28-30oC). Fusarium oxysporum and Ralstonia (pseudomonas) ...

  18. Biodegradation of phenol by Pseudomonas pictorum on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biodegradation of phenol using Pseudomonas pictorum (ATCC 23328) a potential biodegradant of phenol was investigated under different operating conditions. Chitin was chosen as a support material and then partially characterized physically and chemically. The pH of the solution was varied over a range of 7 – 9.

  19. Biodegradation of chlorpyrifos by bacterial genus Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Razia Alam; Rafique, Mazhar; Rehman, Abdul; Munis, Muhammad Farooq Hussain; Rehman, Shafiq Ur; Chaudhary, Hassan Javed

    2016-02-01

    Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphorus pesticide commonly used in agriculture. It is noxious to a variety of organisms that include living soil biota along with beneficial arthropods, fish, birds, humans, animals, and plants. Exposure to chlorpyrifos may cause detrimental effects as delayed seedling emergence, fruit deformities, and abnormal cell division. Contamination of chlorpyrifos has been found about 24 km from the site of its application. There are many physico-chemical and biological approaches to remove organophosphorus pesticides from the ecosystem, among them most promising is biodegradation. The 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and diethylthiophosphate (DETP) as primary products are made when chlorpyrifos is degraded by soil microorganisms which further break into nontoxic metabolites as CO(2), H(2)O, and NH(3). Pseudomonas is a diversified genus possessing a series of catabolic pathways and enzymes involved in pesticide degradation. Pseudomonas putida MAS-1 is reported to be more efficient in chlorpyrifos degradation by a rate of 90% in 24 h among Pseudomonas genus. The current review analyzed the comparative potential of bacterial species in Pseudomonas genus for degradation of chlorpyrifos thus, expressing an ecofriendly approach for the treatment of environmental contaminants like pesticides. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. strains of pseudomonas aeruginosa and bacillus cereus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    DETERMINATION OF THE GENETIC MARKER OF THE MUTAGENIZED. STRAINS OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND BACILLUS CEREUS. ISOLATED FROM EFFLUENT OF PETROLEUM REFINERY. Idise, O. E.1, Ameh, J.B.2 Yakubu, S.E. 2, Okuofu, C.A. 3 and Ado, S.A.2. 1 Department of Microbiology, Delta ...

  1. Induced systemic resistance by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Loon, L.C. van

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. have been studied for decades for their plant growth-promoting effects through effective suppression of soilborne plant diseases. The modes of action that play a role in disease suppression by these bacteria include siderophore-mediated competition for iron, antibiosis,

  2. Comparative evaluation of organic formulations of Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative evaluation of organic formulations of Pseudomonas fluorescens based biopesticides and their application in the management of bacterial wilt of brinjal ... Effective management of bacterial wilt of brinjal by P. fluorescens under local conditions signifies its potentiality and scope as a plant growth promoting ...

  3. Growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens on Cassava Starch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential of local strains of microorganism (Pseudomonas fluorescens) in polyhydroxbutyrate production was investigated in this study. This was with a view to establishing the capabilities of local strains of microorganisms on utilizing renewable and locally available substrates in polyhydroxybutyrate production.

  4. Antibiotics Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: This work investigated the prevalence and antibiotics sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from wounds of patients attending Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH), Zaria-Nigeria. One hundred Isolates were characterized and identified from the specimens using standard ...

  5. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...

  6. Evaluation of gamma irradiation effect and Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antagonistic effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens and influence of gamma irradiation on the development of Penicillium expansum, the causal agent of postharvest disease on apple fruit was studied. P. fluorescens was originally isolated from rhizosphere of the apple trees. Suspension of P. fluorescens and P. expansum ...

  7. Targeting quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    alternative antibacterial strategies. Here, we review state of the art research of quorum sensing inhibitors against the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is found in a number of biofilm-associated infections and identified as the predominant organism infecting the lungs of cystic...

  8. Extracytoplasmic function sigma factors in Pseudomonas syringae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Kristoffer; Oguiza, J.A.; Ussery, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    Genome analyses of the plant pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, pv. syringae B728a and pv. phaseolicola 1448A reveal fewer extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors than in related Pseudomonads with different lifestyles. We highlight the presence of a P. syringae-specific ECF...

  9. Characterization and identification of Pseudomonas fluorescens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Crystal violet (CV), a recalcitrant molecule, used commonly as biological stain and commercial dye, was subjected to biodegradation in this study by Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIM 2100 and its biodegraded metabolic products were identified by UV, 1HNMR and IR Spectrophotometry. During degradation process CV dye ...

  10. characterization of drug resistant pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    their dissemination to the public, sometimes through the food chain. Four multidrug resistant Gram negative pathogens including: 2 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 2 Proteus mirabilis characterized in this study were isolated from lizards captured from some poultry houses in Ibadan Oyo State, Nigeria. The four isolates were ...

  11. Coinfection pulmonaire par pneumocystis jirovecii et pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sous traitement, l'évolution a été favorable. Les coinfections morbides sont relativement fréquentes chez les patients vivant avec le VIH. Devant une symptomatologie respiratoire du sujet vivant avec le VIH, il faut savoir rechercher en plus du Bacille de Koch, Pneumocystis jirovecii et Pseudomonas aeruginosa par un ...

  12. Invasive behaviour and depolarization effect of Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of a constitutive calcium dependent NOS and that of an inducible NOS activated by LPS. Ours results also suggest that P. fluorescens cytotoxicity and invasion are not mutually exclusive events. Key Words: Cytotoxicity, Lipopolysaccharide, Patch-clamp, Invasion, Pseudomonas fluorescens. Afr. J. Clin. Exper. Microbiol.

  13. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A protease producing bacteria was isolated from meat waste contaminated soil and identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Optimization of the fermentation medium for maximum protease production was carried out. The culture conditions like inoculum concentration, incubation time, pH, temperature, carbon sources, ...

  14. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... the metal ions tested. Key words: Alkaline protease, casein agar, meat waste contaminated soil, Pseudomonas fluorescens. INTRODUCTION. Proteases are the most important industrial enzymes that execute a wide variety of functions and have various important biotechnological applications (Mohen et al.,.

  15. Transesterification of Jatropha oil using immobilized Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mild transesterification has become of much current interest for alternative fuel production. In the present study the ability of a commercial immobilized Pseudomonas fluorescens MTCC 103 to catalyze the transesterification of Jatropha oil and methanol was investigated. The cell of P. fluorescens was easily immobilized ...

  16. The contrast study of anammox-denitrifying system in two non-woven fixed-bed bioreactors (NFBR) treating different low C/N ratio sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fan; Zhang, Hanmin; Yang, Fenglin; Qiang, Hong; Zhang, Guangyi

    2012-06-01

    Two non-woven fixed-bed bioreactors (NFBR) based on different substrates (nitrite and nitrate) were constructed to study the environmental adaptability for temperature and organic matter of anammox-denitrifying system and nitrogen removal performance. The two reactors were successfully operated for 200 days. The average removal rates of nitrogen and COD of R2 were 81% and 93%, respectively. Besides, the nitrogen removal rate of R1 was 95% under not more than 105 mg/l of COD. The experimental results indicated that the R2 based on nitrate had a good nitrogen removal performance at room temperature (25 °C). Additionally, the analysis results of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) showed that the percentage compositions of anammox in R1 and R2 were 84% and 65% on day 189. Finally, the possible nitrogen removal model of anammox-denitrifying system was constructed. According to nitrogen balance and C/N ratios of denitrification, the nitrogen removal approaches of R1 and R2 were obtained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Construction of a landscaping-type wetland system for wastewater treatment construction of a landscaping-type wetland system for wastewater treatment and analysis of plant denitrifying effect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-li; Wu, Xiao-fu; Chen, Yong-hua; Jiang, Li-juan; Ji, Zhi-hui; Ma, Qun

    2010-03-01

    A pilot landscaping-type wetland system for wastewater treatment was constructed by introduction of 15 selected ornamental plant species (including 4 terrestrial plant species). The pilot system consists of 2 sequenced treatment units and 12 sub-units, i.e., a primary treatment unit with 4 parallel cells and a secondary treatment unit with 8 subsurface flow cells. Designed experiments were conducted in the established system to investigate the characteristics of nitrogen accumulation in different plants and the contribution of plant nitrogen uptake to total nitrogen removal of the constructed wetland system. The result shows that the direct contribution by plant uptake to the total nitrogen removal is low, ca. 1%-3% within the nitrogen concentration range 37.5-55.6 mg/L in the influent. Plant uptake does not fully reflect the important role of the plant species in the constructed wetland system for wastewater treatment as the function of the plant should include further its interaction with microorganisms and wetland fillers by enhancing microbial activities and filler adsorption capacities. The plant denitrifying effect, defined as the difference in nitrogen removal rates between units with and without plants, has been used to represent the contribution in nitrogen removal due to presence of plant in the system. The plant denitrifying effect thus includes both the plant nitrogen uptake and the interaction effect of plant with microorganisms and wetland fillers, the later being found to account for more than 80% of the total nitrogen removal in the established treatment system.

  18. Impact of electro-stimulation on denitrifying bacterial growth and analysis of bacterial growth kinetics using a modified Gompertz model in a bio-electrochemical denitrification reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hengyuan; Chen, Nan; Feng, Chuanping; Tong, Shuang; Li, Rui

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of electro-stimulation on denitrifying bacterial growth in a bio-electrochemical reactor, and the growth were modeled using modified Gompertz model under different current densities at three C/Ns. It was found that the similar optimum current density of 250mA/m 2 was obtained at C/N=0.75, 1.00 and 1.25, correspondingly the maximum nitrate removal efficiencies were 98.0%, 99.2% and 99.9%. Moreover, ATP content and cell membrane permeability of denitrifying bacteria were significantly increased at optimum current density. Furthermore, modified Gompertz model fitted well with the microbial growth curves, and the highest maximum growth rates (µ max ) and shorter lag time were obtained at the optimum current density for all C/Ns. This study demonstrated that the modified Gompertz model could be used for describing microbial growth under different current densities and C/Ns in a bio-electrochemical denitrification reactor, and it provided an alternative for improving the performance of denitrification process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Deep nirS amplicon sequencing of San Francisco Bay sediments enables prediction of geography and environmental conditions from denitrifying community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica A; Francis, Christopher A

    2017-12-01

    Denitrification is a dominant nitrogen loss process in the sediments of San Francisco Bay. In this study, we sought to understand the ecology of denitrifying bacteria by using next-generation sequencing (NGS) to survey the diversity of a denitrification functional gene, nirS (encoding cytchrome-cd 1 nitrite reductase), along the salinity gradient of San Francisco Bay over the course of a year. We compared our dataset to a library of nirS sequences obtained previously from the same samples by standard PCR cloning and Sanger sequencing, and showed that both methods similarly demonstrated geography, salinity and, to a lesser extent, nitrogen, to be strong determinants of community composition. Furthermore, the depth afforded by NGS enabled novel techniques for measuring the association between environment and community composition. We used Random Forests modelling to demonstrate that the site and salinity of a sample could be predicted from its nirS sequences, and to identify indicator taxa associated with those environmental characteristics. This work contributes significantly to our understanding of the distribution and dynamics of denitrifying communities in San Francisco Bay, and provides valuable tools for the further study of this key N-cycling guild in all estuarine systems. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Concurrent Haloalkanoate Degradation and Chlorate Reduction by Pseudomonas chloritidismutans AW-1T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Zheng, Ying; Koehorst, Jasper J; Schaap, Peter J; Stams, Alfons J M; Smidt, Hauke; Atashgahi, Siavash

    2017-06-15

    Haloalkanoates are environmental pollutants that can be degraded aerobically by microorganisms producing hydrolytic dehalogenases. However, there is a lack of information about the anaerobic degradation of haloalkanoates. Genome analysis of Pseudomonas chloritidismutans AW-1 T , a facultative anaerobic chlorate-reducing bacterium, showed the presence of two putative haloacid dehalogenase genes, the l-DEX gene and dehI , encoding an l-2-haloacid dehalogenase (l-DEX) and a halocarboxylic acid dehydrogenase (DehI), respectively. Hence, we studied the concurrent degradation of haloalkanoates and chlorate as a yet-unexplored trait of strain AW-1 T The deduced amino acid sequences of l-DEX and DehI revealed 33 to 37% and 26 to 86% identities with biochemically/structurally characterized l-DEX and the d- and dl-2-haloacid dehalogenase enzymes, respectively. Physiological experiments confirmed that strain AW-1 T can grow on chloroacetate, bromoacetate, and both l- and d-α-halogenated propionates with chlorate as an electron acceptor. Interestingly, growth and haloalkanoate degradation were generally faster with chlorate as an electron acceptor than with oxygen as an electron acceptor. In line with this, analyses of l-DEX and DehI dehalogenase activities using cell-free extract (CFE) of strain AW-1 T grown on dl-2-chloropropionate under chlorate-reducing conditions showed up to 3.5-fold higher dehalogenase activity than the CFE obtained from AW-1 T cells grown on dl-2-chloropropionate under aerobic conditions. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR showed that the l-DEX gene was expressed constitutively independently of the electron donor (haloalkanoates or acetate) or acceptor (chlorate or oxygen), whereas the expression of dehI was induced by haloalkanoates. Concurrent degradation of organic and inorganic halogenated compounds by strain AW-1 T represents a unique metabolic capacity in a single bacterium, providing a new piece of the puzzle of the microbial halogen cycle