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Sample records for denisesite dna interactive

  1. Stacking interactions and DNA intercalation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dr. Shen [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Cooper, Valentino R [ORNL; Thonhauser, Prof. Timo [Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC; Lundqvist, Prof. Bengt I. [Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden; Langreth, David C. [Rutgers University

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between stacking interactions and the intercalation of proflavine and ellipticine within DNA is investigated using a nonempirical van der Waals density functional for the correlation energy. Our results, employing a binary stack model, highlight fundamental, qualitative differences between base-pair base-pair interactions and that of the stacked intercalator base pair system. Most notable result is the paucity of torque which so distinctively defines the Twist of DNA. Surprisingly, this model, when combined with a constraint on the twist of the surrounding base-pair steps to match the observed unwinding of the sugar-phosphate backbone, was sufficient for explaining the experimentally observed proflavine intercalator configuration. Our extensive mapping of the potential energy surface of base-pair intercalator interactions can provide valuable information for future nonempirical studies of DNA intercalation dynamics.

  2. Repulsive DNA-DNA interactions accelerate viral DNA packaging in phage phi29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Nicholas; delToro, Damian; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    We use optical tweezers to study the effect of attractive versus repulsive DNA-DNA interactions on motor-driven viral packaging. Screening of repulsive interactions accelerates packaging, but induction of attractive interactions by spermidine3+ causes heterogeneous dynamics. Acceleration is observed in a fraction of complexes, but most exhibit slowing and stalling, suggesting that attractive interactions promote nonequilibrium DNA conformations that impede the motor. Thus, repulsive interactions facilitate packaging despite increasing the energy of the theoretical optimum spooled DNA conformation. PMID:24996111

  3. Repulsive DNA-DNA interactions accelerate viral DNA packaging in phage Phi29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Nicholas; delToro, Damian; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Smith, Douglas E

    2014-06-20

    We use optical tweezers to study the effect of attractive versus repulsive DNA-DNA interactions on motor-driven viral packaging. Screening of repulsive interactions accelerates packaging, but induction of attractive interactions by spermidine(3+) causes heterogeneous dynamics. Acceleration is observed in a fraction of complexes, but most exhibit slowing and stalling, suggesting that attractive interactions promote nonequilibrium DNA conformations that impede the motor. Thus, repulsive interactions facilitate packaging despite increasing the energy of the theoretical optimum spooled DNA conformation.

  4. Interaction of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to fibronectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.C.; Simpson, W.A.; Raghow, R.; Hasty, K.

    1986-03-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is a large multidomain glycoprotein found in the basement membrane, on cell surface and in plasma. The interactions of Fn with DNA may be significant in glomerular deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The authors examined the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn by a solid phase assay in which Fn was coated to microtiter plates and reacted with (/sup 3/H)DNA or DNA complexes with a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody. The optimal interaction of DNA with Fn occurs at <0.1M NaCl suggesting that the binding is charge dependent; the specificity of this binding was shown by competitive inhibition and locking experiments using anti-Fn. The binding was maximum at pH 6.5 and in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. The addition of Clq enhanced the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn, whereas heparan sulfate inhibited such binding. The monomeric or aggregated IgC did not bind Fn but aggregated IgG bound to Fn in the presence of Clq. Furthermore, DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from active SLE patients bound Fn which was enhanced in the presence of Clq; DNase abolished this binding indicating that the interaction of these complexes was mediated by DNA. These observations may partially explain the molecular mechanism(s) of the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in basement membrane.

  5. Repulsive DNA-DNA interactions accelerate viral DNA packaging in phage phi29

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Nicholas; delToro, Damian; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    We use optical tweezers to study the effect of attractive versus repulsive DNA-DNA interactions on motor-driven viral packaging. Screening of repulsive interactions accelerates packaging, but induction of attractive interactions by spermidine3+ causes heterogeneous dynamics. Acceleration is observed in a fraction of complexes, but most exhibit slowing and stalling, suggesting that attractive interactions promote nonequilibrium DNA conformations that impede the motor. Thus, repulsive interacti...

  6. DNA Interaction Studies of Selected Polyamine Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szumilak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of polyamine conjugates with DNA double helix has been studied. Binding properties were examined by ethidium bromide (EtBr displacement and DNA unwinding/topoisomerase I/II (Topo I/II activity assays, as well as dsDNA thermal stability studies and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Genotoxicity of the compounds was estimated by a comet assay. It has been shown that only compound 2a can interact with dsDNA via an intercalative binding mode as it displaced EtBr from the dsDNA-dye complex, with Kapp = 4.26 × 106 M−1; caused an increase in melting temperature; changed the circular dichroism spectrum of dsDNA; converted relaxed plasmid DNA into a supercoiled molecule in the presence of Topo I and reduced the amount of short oligonucleotide fragments in the comet tail. Furthermore, preliminary theoretical study has shown that interaction of the discussed compounds with dsDNA depends on molecule linker length and charge distribution over terminal aromatic chromophores.

  7. DNA Interaction Studies of Selected Polyamine Conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumilak, Marta; Merecz, Anna; Strek, Malgorzata; Stanczak, Andrzej; Inglot, Tadeusz W.; Karwowski, Boleslaw T.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of polyamine conjugates with DNA double helix has been studied. Binding properties were examined by ethidium bromide (EtBr) displacement and DNA unwinding/topoisomerase I/II (Topo I/II) activity assays, as well as dsDNA thermal stability studies and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Genotoxicity of the compounds was estimated by a comet assay. It has been shown that only compound 2a can interact with dsDNA via an intercalative binding mode as it displaced EtBr from the dsDNA-dye complex, with Kapp = 4.26 × 106 M−1; caused an increase in melting temperature; changed the circular dichroism spectrum of dsDNA; converted relaxed plasmid DNA into a supercoiled molecule in the presence of Topo I and reduced the amount of short oligonucleotide fragments in the comet tail. Furthermore, preliminary theoretical study has shown that interaction of the discussed compounds with dsDNA depends on molecule linker length and charge distribution over terminal aromatic chromophores. PMID:27657041

  8. Polyomavirus interaction with the DNA damage response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua; L.Justice; Brandy; Verhalen; Mengxi; Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that subvert cellular metabolism and pathways to mediate their own replication—normally at the expense of the host cell. Polyomaviruses are a group of small DNA viruses, which have long been studied as a model for eukaryotic DNA replication. Polyomaviruses manipulate host replication proteins, as well as proteins involved in DNA maintenance and repair, to serve as essential cofactors for productive infection. Moreover, evidence suggests that polyomavirus infection poses a unique genotoxic threat to the host cell. In response to any source of DNA damage, cells must initiate an effective DNA damage response(DDR) to maintain genomic integrity, wherein two protein kinases, ataxia telangiectasia mutated(ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related(ATR), are major regulators of DNA damage recognition and repair. Recent investigation suggests that these essential DDR proteins are required for productive polyomavirus infection. This review will focus on polyomaviruses and their interaction with ATMand ATR-mediated DNA damage responses and the effect of this interaction on host genomic stability.

  9. Effective interactions of DNA-stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaurrea Velasco, Clara; Likos, Christos N.; Kahl, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    We put forward a model that allows the calculation of the effective potential of two interacting DNA-stars, i.e., three-armed, Y-shaped, charged macromolecules, built up by three intertwined single-stranded DNAs. These particles are assumed to float on a flat interface separating two media with different dielectric properties. As the only input, our model requires the charge density along the branches and the interaction between two infinitesimally short segments, along two interacting rods. With this effective interaction at hand, a detailed investigations of the self-assembly scenarios of these molecules either via computer simulations or via theoretical frameworks comes within reach.

  10. Interaction of sulforaphane with DNA and RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Abassi Joozdani

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN is an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activities. However, the antioxidant and anticancer mechanism of sulforaphane is not well understood. In the present research, we reported binding modes, binding constants and stability of SFN-DNA and -RNA complexes by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and UV-Visible spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed DNA intercalation with some degree of groove binding. SFN binds minor and major grooves of DNA and backbone phosphate (PO2, while RNA binding is through G, U, A bases with some degree of SFN-phosphate (PO2 interaction. Overall binding constants were estimated to be K(SFN-DNA=3.01 (± 0.035×10(4 M(-1 and K(SFN-RNA= 6.63 (±0.042×10(3 M(-1. At high SFN concentration (SFN/RNA = 1/1, DNA conformation changed from B to A occurred, while RNA remained in A-family structure.

  11. Interaction of Sulforaphane with DNA and RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassi Joozdani, Farzaneh; Yari, Faramarz; Abassi Joozdani, Parvaneh; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activities. However, the antioxidant and anticancer mechanism of sulforaphane is not well understood. In the present research, we reported binding modes, binding constants and stability of SFN–DNA and -RNA complexes by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV–Visible spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed DNA intercalation with some degree of groove binding. SFN binds minor and major grooves of DNA and backbone phosphate (PO2), while RNA binding is through G, U, A bases with some degree of SFN–phosphate (PO2) interaction. Overall binding constants were estimated to be K(SFN–DNA)=3.01 (± 0.035)×104 M-1 and K(SFN–RNA)= 6.63 (±0.042)×103 M-1. At high SFN concentration (SFN/RNA = 1/1), DNA conformation changed from B to A occurred, while RNA remained in A-family structure. PMID:26030290

  12. Preliminary Study on Cordycepin-DNA Interaction by Raman Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Ya LING; Qin Zheng YANG; Shan Shan LUO; Yan LI; Chang Kai ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of cordycepin with calf thymus DNA was investigated at physiological pH with drug/DNA molar ratio of 8. The Raman spectroscopy results indicated that the intercalation of high concentration cordycepin and the interaction of cordycepin with PO2 group led to a major reduction of B-form DNA structure in favor of A-form DNA.

  13. Daunomycin, an antitumor DNA intercalator, influences histone-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Krzysztof; Zarębski, Mirosław; Cossarizza, Andrea; Dobrucki, Jurek W

    2013-09-01

    Although daunomycin and adriamycin are considered effective antitumor drugs and have been used in the clinic for over 40 years, their mechanism of action is still a matter of debate. We investigated the influence of daunomycin on interaction between linker or core histones and DNA in live HeLa cells in vitro, using image and flow cytometry. Exposure to daunomycin at clinically relevant concentrations (25-250 nM) caused dissociation of wild-type H1.1 as well as 4 H1 point mutants from DNA, followed by their accumulation in nucleoli and aggregation of chromatin. A detectable dissociation of H2B core histones occurred only at much higher concentrations of the drug (500 nM). Replication of DNA and synthesis of RNA were not halted by daunomycin (up to 2500 nM); however the characteristic subnuclear distribution of sites of transcription and replication was lost. Dissociation of the H1.1 linker histones and subsequent loss of higher order chromatin structures may constitute an important component of the mechanism of cytotoxicity of daunomycin.

  14. Photosensitive surfactants: micellization and interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Roxlau, Julian; Brezesinski, Gerald; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-28

    Recently, photosensitive surfactants have re-attracted considerable attention. It has been shown that their association with oppositely charged biologically important polyelectrolytes, such as DNA or microgels, can be efficiently manipulated simply by light exposure. In this article, we investigate the self-assembly of photosensitive surfactants as well as their interactions with DNA by calorimetric and spectroscopic methods. Critical micelle concentration (CMC), standard micellization enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy were determined in different conditions (ionic strengths and temperatures) for a series of cationic surfactants with an azobenzene group in their tail. It is shown, that aggregation forces of photosensitive units play an important role in the micellization giving the major contribution to the micellization enthalpy. The onset of the aggregation can be traced from shift of the absorption peak position in the UV-visible spectrum. Titration UV-visible spectroscopy is used as an alternative, simple, and sensitive approach to estimate CMC. The titration UV-visible spectroscopy was also employed to investigate interactions (CAC: critical aggregation concentration, precipitation, and colloidal stabilization) in the DNA-surfactant complex.

  15. Photosensitive surfactants: Micellization and interaction with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Roxlau, Julian; Brezesinski, Gerald; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    Recently, photosensitive surfactants have re-attracted considerable attention. It has been shown that their association with oppositely charged biologically important polyelectrolytes, such as DNA or microgels, can be efficiently manipulated simply by light exposure. In this article, we investigate the self-assembly of photosensitive surfactants as well as their interactions with DNA by calorimetric and spectroscopic methods. Critical micelle concentration (CMC), standard micellization enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy were determined in different conditions (ionic strengths and temperatures) for a series of cationic surfactants with an azobenzene group in their tail. It is shown, that aggregation forces of photosensitive units play an important role in the micellization giving the major contribution to the micellization enthalpy. The onset of the aggregation can be traced from shift of the absorption peak position in the UV-visible spectrum. Titration UV-visible spectroscopy is used as an alternative, simple, and sensitive approach to estimate CMC. The titration UV-visible spectroscopy was also employed to investigate interactions (CAC: critical aggregation concentration, precipitation, and colloidal stabilization) in the DNA-surfactant complex.

  16. Interactions within the mammalian DNA methyltransferase family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrenhofer-Murray Ann E

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammals, epigenetic information is established and maintained via the postreplicative methylation of cytosine residues by the DNA methyltransferases Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Dnmt1 is required for maintenance methylation whereas Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b are responsible for de novo methylation. Contrary to Dnmt3a or Dnmt3b, the isolated C-terminal region of Dnmt1 is catalytically inactive, despite the presence of the sequence motifs typical of active DNA methyltransferases. Deletion analysis has revealed that a large part of the N-terminal domain is required for enzymatic activity. Results The role played by the N-terminal domain in this regulation has been investigated using the yeast two-hybrid system. We show here the presence of an intra-molecular interaction in Dnmt1 but not in Dnmt3a or Dnmt3b. This interaction was confirmed by immunoprecipitation and was localized by deletion mapping. Furthermore, a systematic analysis of interactions among the Dnmt family members has revealed that DNMT3L interacts with the C-terminal domain of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Conclusions The lack of methylating ability of the isolated C-terminal domain of Dnmt1 could be explained in part by a physical interaction between N- and C-terminal domains that apparently is required for activation of the catalytic domain. Our deletion analysis suggests that the tertiary structure of Dnmt1 is important in this process rather than a particular sequence motif. Furthermore, the interaction between DNMT3L and the C-terminal domains of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b suggests a mechanism whereby the enzymatically inactive DNMT3L brings about the methylation of its substrate by recruiting an active methylase.

  17. Pharmacogenomic study using bio- and nanobioelectrochemistry: Drug-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin

    2016-04-01

    Small molecules that bind genomic DNA have proven that they can be effective anticancer, antibiotic and antiviral therapeutic agents that affect the well-being of millions of people worldwide. Drug-DNA interaction affects DNA replication and division; causes strand breaks, and mutations. Therefore, the investigation of drug-DNA interaction is needed to understand the mechanism of drug action as well as in designing DNA-targeted drugs. On the other hand, the interaction between DNA and drugs can cause chemical and conformational modifications and, thus, variation of the electrochemical properties of nucleobases. For this purpose, electrochemical methods/biosensors can be used toward detection of drug-DNA interactions. The present paper reviews the drug-DNA interactions, their types and applications of electrochemical techniques used to study interactions between DNA and drugs or small ligand molecules that are potentially of pharmaceutical interest. The results are used to determine drug binding sites and sequence preference, as well as conformational changes due to drug-DNA interactions. Also, the intention of this review is to give an overview of the present state of the drug-DNA interaction cognition. The applications of electrochemical techniques for investigation of drug-DNA interaction were reviewed and we have discussed the type of qualitative or quantitative information that can be obtained from the use of each technique.

  18. Screening for protein-DNA interactions by automatable DNA-protein interaction ELISA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luise H Brand

    Full Text Available DNA-binding proteins (DBPs, such as transcription factors, constitute about 10% of the protein-coding genes in eukaryotic genomes and play pivotal roles in the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression by binding to short stretches of DNA. Despite their number and importance, only for a minor portion of DBPs the binding sequence had been disclosed. Methods that allow the de novo identification of DNA-binding motifs of known DBPs, such as protein binding microarray technology or SELEX, are not yet suited for high-throughput and automation. To close this gap, we report an automatable DNA-protein-interaction (DPI-ELISA screen of an optimized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA probe library that allows the high-throughput identification of hexanucleotide DNA-binding motifs. In contrast to other methods, this DPI-ELISA screen can be performed manually or with standard laboratory automation. Furthermore, output evaluation does not require extensive computational analysis to derive a binding consensus. We could show that the DPI-ELISA screen disclosed the full spectrum of binding preferences for a given DBP. As an example, AtWRKY11 was used to demonstrate that the automated DPI-ELISA screen revealed the entire range of in vitro binding preferences. In addition, protein extracts of AtbZIP63 and the DNA-binding domain of AtWRKY33 were analyzed, which led to a refinement of their known DNA-binding consensi. Finally, we performed a DPI-ELISA screen to disclose the DNA-binding consensus of a yet uncharacterized putative DBP, AtTIFY1. A palindromic TGATCA-consensus was uncovered and we could show that the GATC-core is compulsory for AtTIFY1 binding. This specific interaction between AtTIFY1 and its DNA-binding motif was confirmed by in vivo plant one-hybrid assays in protoplasts. Thus, the value and applicability of the DPI-ELISA screen for de novo binding site identification of DBPs, also under automatized conditions, is a promising approach for a

  19. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen;

    2005-01-01

    in a denaturation bubble are shown to involve an interesting competition of time scales, varying between kinetic blocking of protein binding up to full binding protein-induced denaturation of the DNA. We will also address the potential to use DNA physics for the design of nanosensors. Finally, we report recent...... findings on the search process of proteins for a specific target on the DNA. © 2006 Materials Research Society....

  20. A novel interaction between DNA ligase III and DNA polymerase gamma plays an essential role in mitochondrial DNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Ananya; Campbell, Colin

    2007-02-15

    The data in the present study show that DNA polymerase gamma and DNA ligase III interact in mitochondrial protein extracts from cultured HT1080 cells. An interaction was also observed between the two recombinant proteins in vitro. Expression of catalytically inert versions of DNA ligase III that bind DNA polymerase gamma was associated with reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number and integrity. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type DNA ligase III had no effect on mitochondrial DNA copy number or integrity. Experiments revealed that wild-type DNA ligase III facilitates the interaction of DNA polymerase gamma with a nicked DNA substrate in vitro, and that the zinc finger domain of DNA ligase III is required for this activity. Mitochondrial protein extracts prepared from cells overexpressing a DNA ligase III protein that lacked the zinc finger domain had reduced base excision repair activity compared with extracts from cells overexpressing the wild-type protein. These data support the interpretation that the interaction of DNA ligase III and DNA polymerase gamma is required for proper maintenance of the mammalian mitochondrial genome.

  1. DNA-Conjugated Organic Chromophores in DNA Stacking Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard

    2009-01-01

    Since the discovery of the intercalation of acridine derivatives into DNA (1961), chemists have synthesized many intercalators tethered to DNA. Advances in the chemical synthesis of modified nucleosides along with progress in oligonucleotide synthesis have made it possible to introduce organic...... review presents those efforts in the design of intercalators/organic chromophores as oligonucleotide conjugates that form a foundation for the generation of novel nucleic acid architectures...

  2. Spectroscopic Electrochemical Studies of Interaction Between Fuchsin Basic DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Visible spectroscopic and electrochemical methods were used to study the interactions between DNA and fuchsin basic(FB). FB has an irreversible electro-oxidation peak in 5 mmol/L Tris-HCl buffer solution at pH = 7.4 on a glassy carbon electrode(GCE). After adding certain concentration of dsDNA, the oxidation peak current of FB decreases, but the peak potential hardly changs. The visible absorption spectroscopic study shows that the binding mode of FB to dsDNA is intercalative binding and electrostatic binding when the ratio of the concentration of dsDNA to FB is smaller than 0. 2, and a new substance, which produces a new absorption peak, is obtained via a covalent binding between dsDNA and FB apart from intercalative binding and electrostatic binding when the ratio of the concentration of dsDNA to FB is larger than 0. 2. The visible absorption spectra varies no longer when the ratio of the concentration of dsDNA to FB is larger than 1.5. A mean binding ratio of dsDNA to FB was determined to be 1.4: 1,suggesting that two complexes FB-dsDNA and FB-2dsDNA be formed. The interaction between FB and ssDNA was only electrostatic binding. The more powerful interaction of FB with dsDNA than with ssDNA may be applied for the recognition of dsDNA and ssDNA, and in DNA biosensor as hybridization indicator.

  3. Studies of interaction between two alkaloids and double helix DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yantao [Key Laboratory of Preparation and Applications of Environmentally Friendly Materials (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education China, Siping 136000 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Peng, Tingting [College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); College of Chemistry, Baicheng Normal University, Baicheng, 130032 (China); Zhao, Lei [Siping Institute for Food and Drug Control, Siping 136000 (China); Jiang, Dayu [Key Laboratory of Preparation and Applications of Environmentally Friendly Materials (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education China, Siping 136000 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Cui, Yuncheng, E-mail: 1979yanzi@163.com [Key Laboratory of Preparation and Applications of Environmentally Friendly Materials (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education China, Siping 136000 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China)

    2014-12-15

    This article presents the study on the interaction of two alkaloids (matrine and evodiamine) and hs-DNA by absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), DNA melting and viscosity experiments. The spectroscopic studies suggested that two alkaloids can bind to DNA through an intercalative mode. The viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation also indicated that two alkaloids can intercalate to DNA. The binding constants (K{sub A}) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined. At the same time, some significant thermodynamic parameters of the binding of the alkaloids to DNA were obtained. Competitive binding studies revealed that alkaloids had an effect on ethidium bromide (EB) bound DNA. In addition, it was also proved that the fluorescence quenching was influenced by ionic strength. - Highlights: • Interaction between two alkaloids and DNA is studied by spectral methods. • The binding constant and the binding sites between two alkaloids and DNA are obtained. • There are a classical intercalative mode between alkaloids and DNA. • The binding of matrine with DNA is weaker than that of evodiamine. • It is important for us to understand the alkaloids–DNA interactions at a molecular level.

  4. Polyamine-DNA interactions and development of gene delivery vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, T J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A; Thomas, Thresia

    2016-10-01

    Polyamines are positively charged organic cations under physiologic ionic and pH conditions and hence they interact with negatively charged macromolecules such as DNA and RNA. Although electrostatic interaction is the predominant mode of polyamine-nucleic acid interactions, site- and structure-specific binding has also been recognized. A major consequence of polyamine-DNA interaction is the collapse of DNA to nanoparticles of approximately 100 nm diameter. Electron and atomic force microscopic studies have shown that these nanoparticles are spheroids, toroids and rods. DNA transport to cells for gene therapy applications requires the condensation of DNA to nanoparticles and hence the study of polyamines and related compounds with nucleic acids has received technological importance. In addition to natural and synthetic polyamines, several amine-terminated or polyamine-substituted agents are under intense investigation for non-viral gene delivery vehicles.

  5. On the ion-mediated interaction between protein and DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Barbi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism allowing a protein to search of a target sequence on DNA is currently described as an intermittent process composed of 3D diffusion in bulk and 1D diffusion along the DNA molecule. Due to the relevant charge of protein and DNA, electrostatic interaction should play a crucial role during this search. In this paper, we explicitly derive the mean field theory allowing for a description of the protein-DNA electrostatics in solution. This approach leads to a unified model of the search process, where 1D and 3D diffusion appear as a natural consequence of the diffusion on an extended interaction energy profile.

  6. DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masudur Rahman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a long history of the study of the interaction of DNA with carbon surfaces, limited information exists regarding the interaction of complex DNA-based nanostructures with the important material graphite, which is closely related to graphene. In view of the capacity of DNA to direct the assembly of proteins and optical and electronic nanoparticles, the potential for combining DNA-based materials with graphite, which is an ultra-flat, conductive carbon substrate, requires evaluation. A series of imaging studies utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy has been applied in order to provide a unified picture of this important interaction of structured DNA and graphite. For the test structure examined, we observe a rapid destabilization of the complex DNA origami structure, consistent with a strong interaction of single-stranded DNA with the carbon surface. This destabilizing interaction can be obscured by an intentional or unintentional primary intervening layer of single-stranded DNA. Because the interaction of origami with graphite is not completely dissociative, and because the frustrated, expanded structure is relatively stable over time in solution, it is demonstrated that organized structures of pairs of the model protein streptavidin can be produced on carbon surfaces using DNA origami as the directing material.

  7. Detection of regional DNA methylation using DNA-graphene affinity interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Md Hakimul; Gopalan, Vinod; Yadav, Sharda; Islam, Md Nazmul; Eftekhari, Ehsan; Li, Qin; Carrascosa, Laura G; Nguyen, Nam-Trung; Lam, Alfred K; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A

    2017-01-15

    We report a new method for the detection of regional DNA methylation using base-dependent affinity interaction (i.e., adsorption) of DNA with graphene. Due to the strongest adsorption affinity of guanine bases towards graphene, bisulfite-treated guanine-enriched methylated DNA leads to a larger amount of the adsorbed DNA on the graphene-modified electrodes in comparison to the adenine-enriched unmethylated DNA. The level of the methylation is quantified by monitoring the differential pulse voltammetric current as a function of the adsorbed DNA. The assay is sensitive to distinguish methylated and unmethylated DNA sequences at single CpG resolution by differentiating changes in DNA methylation as low as 5%. Furthermore, this method has been used to detect methylation levels in a collection of DNA samples taken from oesophageal cancer tissues.

  8. Cooperative binding interaction of ethidium with allosteric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, D

    1999-09-30

    The specific association of drugs with deoxyoligonucleotides, containing a B-Z junction between left-handed Z-DNA and right-handed B-DNA, was examined by fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) technique. Ethidium was chosen for a simple DNA binding compound because it binds to right-handed DNA and hybrid B-Z forms containing a B-Z junction in a highly cooperative manner. The binding isotherms were analyzed by an allosteric model in order to describe the cooperativity of association. Binding of ethidium to the DNA that are initially in the hybrid B-Z forms showed over an order of magnitude higher affinity than other DNA which were entirely in the B-form. The conformational transitions of deoxyoligonucleotides containing a B-Z junction as a result of ethidium binding were monitored by CD and the influence of NaCl on the complex formation was also determined by the CD spectra. The singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis was used to characterize a family of CD spectra of the species in binding equilibria. The results of SVD analysis showed a strikingly complex thermodynamic equilibria of cooperative binding of drugs to the allosterically converted DNA forms. The results also showed that these DNA forms in low- and high-salt were different in the absence or presence of drug. These results demonstrate that DNA-binding-drugs can preferentially interact with specific DNA structures and that these interactions are accompanied by allosteric changes of DNA conformations.

  9. Non-covalent Interaction of Perfluorooctanoic Acid with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG, Xian; SHEN, Rong; CHEN, Ling

    2009-01-01

    Health risk from exposure of perfluorochemicals to wildlife and human has been a subject of concern in many fields such as environmental ecology, toxicology, pathology and life sciences. The interactions of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) with DNA were investigated by equilibrium dialysis, circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry techniques under normal physiological conditions in vitro. The binding of PFOA to DNA was a non-covalent interaction and corresponded to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm in a two-step binding model, in which PFOA climbed along the backbones of DNA and then interacted with the homolateral bases via hydrophobic interactions. The saturation number of PFOA was calculated to be 0.64 per base-pair of DNA. Such an interaction caused the enhancement of circular dichroism spectra of DNA at both 245 and 275 nm, indicating the change of DNA conformation. The acidic media, low electrolyte and temperature ≤35 ℃ are comparatively more favorable for PFOA binding to DNA. This work provides a useful experimental strategy for studying the interactions of perfluorochemicals with biomacromolecules, aiming at a better understanding of the gene toxicity mechanism of perfluorochemicals.

  10. An ancient protein-DNA interaction underlying metazoan sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Mark W; Lee, John K; Rojo, Sandra; Gearhart, Micah D; Kurahashi, Kayo; Banerjee, Surajit; Loeuille, Guy-André; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Kenneth; Zarkower, David; Aihara, Hideki; Bardwell, Vivian J

    2015-06-01

    DMRT transcription factors are deeply conserved regulators of metazoan sexual development. They share the DM DNA-binding domain, a unique intertwined double zinc-binding module followed by a C-terminal recognition helix, which binds a pseudopalindromic target DNA. Here we show that DMRT proteins use a unique binding interaction, inserting two adjacent antiparallel recognition helices into a widened DNA major groove to make base-specific contacts. Versatility in how specific base contacts are made allows human DMRT1 to use multiple DNA binding modes (tetramer, trimer and dimer). Chromatin immunoprecipitation with exonuclease treatment (ChIP-exo) indicates that multiple DNA binding modes also are used in vivo. We show that mutations affecting residues crucial for DNA recognition are associated with an intersex phenotype in flies and with male-to-female sex reversal in humans. Our results illuminate an ancient molecular interaction underlying much of metazoan sexual development.

  11. Functional interactions of DNA topoisomerases with a human replication origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurashidova, Gulnara; Radulescu, Sorina; Sandoval, Oscar; Zahariev, Sotir; Danailov, Miltcho B; Demidovich, Alexander; Santamaria, Laura; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Riva, Silvano; Falaschi, Arturo

    2007-02-21

    The human DNA replication origin, located in the lamin B2 gene, interacts with the DNA topoisomerases I and II in a cell cycle-modulated manner. The topoisomerases interact in vivo and in vitro with precise bonds ahead of the start sites of bidirectional replication, within the pre-replicative complex region; topoisomerase I is bound in M, early G1 and G1/S border and topoisomerase II in M and the middle of G1. The Orc2 protein competes for the same sites of the origin bound by either topoisomerase in different moments of the cell cycle; furthermore, it interacts on the DNA with topoisomerase II during the assembly of the pre-replicative complex and with DNA-bound topoisomerase I at the G1/S border. Inhibition of topoisomerase I activity abolishes origin firing. Thus, the two topoisomerases are closely associated with the replicative complexes, and DNA topology plays an essential functional role in origin activation.

  12. Interaction of DNA with Bis(diiminosuccinonitrilo)platinum(Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-Gang; SUN Yuan-Yuan; JIANG Xiao-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Interaction of DNA with bis(diiminosuccinonitrilo)platinum(Ⅱ) has been studied by UV-visible absorbance spectra, fluorescence spectra and viscosity measurements. The UV-visible absorption spectra of the metal complex exhibit hypochromism with a small blue shift on interaction with DNA. Scatchard plot analyses indicate that the binding sites of the metal complex on DNA are different from those of ethidium bromide. Viscosity experiments reveal that the binding of the metal complex decreases the relative viscosity of DNA. These results suggest that the platinum diimine complex interact with DNA by surface binding. These studies are helpful for us to understand the action mechanism of bis(diiminosuccinonitrilo)platinum(Ⅱ) as a potential photodynamic therapeutic agent, and further to develop it.

  13. TFinDit: transcription factor-DNA interaction data depository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the crucial steps in regulation of gene expression is the binding of transcription factor(s to specific DNA sequences. Knowledge of the binding affinity and specificity at a structural level between transcription factors and their target sites has important implications in our understanding of the mechanism of gene regulation. Due to their unique functions and binding specificity, there is a need for a transcription factor-specific, structure-based database and corresponding web service to facilitate structural bioinformatics studies of transcription factor-DNA interactions, such as development of knowledge-based interaction potential, transcription factor-DNA docking, binding induced conformational changes, and the thermodynamics of protein-DNA interactions. Description TFinDit is a relational database and a web search tool for studying transcription factor-DNA interactions. The database contains annotated transcription factor-DNA complex structures and related data, such as unbound protein structures, thermodynamic data, and binding sequences for the corresponding transcription factors in the complex structures. TFinDit also provides a user-friendly interface and allows users to either query individual entries or generate datasets through culling the database based on one or more search criteria. Conclusions TFinDit is a specialized structural database with annotated transcription factor-DNA complex structures and other preprocessed data. We believe that this database/web service can facilitate the development and testing of TF-DNA interaction potentials and TF-DNA docking algorithms, and the study of protein-DNA recognition mechanisms.

  14. Microwave Interaction with DNA in Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-10

    DNA fibers. In this contract, we found that the interpretation of the EDSS experimental resonances required a rather small but not unimaginably small...challanged by others who have been unable to reproduce the EDSS results. The resonances may not ultimately stand the test of history. Our analysis shows

  15. DNA condensation by high-affinity interaction with avidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morpurgo, Margherita; Radu, Aurelian; Bayer, Edward A; Wilchek, Meir

    2004-01-01

    Avidin, the basic biotin-binding glycoprotein from chicken egg white, is known to interact with DNA, whereas streptavidin, its neutral non-glycosylated bacterial analog, does not. In the present study we investigated the DNA-binding properties of avidin. Its affinity for DNA in the presence and absence of biotin was compared with that of other positively charged molecules, namely the protein lysozyme, the cationic polymers polylysine and polyarginine and an avidin derivative with higher isoelectric point (pI approximately 11) in which most of the lysine residues were converted to homoarginines. Gel-shift assays, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering experiments demonstrated an unexpectedly strong interaction between avidin and DNA. The most pronounced gel-shift retardation occurred with the avidin-biotin complex, followed by avidin alone and then guanidylated avidin. Furthermore, ultrastructural and light-scattering studies showed that avidin assembles on the DNA molecule in an organized manner. The assembly leads to the formation of nanoparticles that are about 50-100 nm in size (DNA approximately 5 kb) and have a rod-like or toroidal shape. In these particles the DNA is highly condensed and one avidin is bound to each 18 +/- 4 DNA base pairs. The complexes are very stable even at high dilution ([DNA] =10 pM) and are not disrupted in the presence of buffers or salt (up to 200 mM NaCl). The other positively charged molecules also condense DNA and form particles with a globular shape. However, in this case, these particles disassemble by dilution or in the presence of low salt concentration. The results indicate that the interaction of avidin with DNA may also occur under physiological conditions, further enhanced by the presence of biotin. This DNA-binding property of avidin may thus shed light on a potentially new physiological role for the protein in its natural environment.

  16. REVIEW ARTICLE: DNA protein interactions and bacterial chromosome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavans, Joel; Oppenheim, Amos

    2006-12-01

    Bacteria, like eukaryotic organisms, must compact the DNA molecule comprising their genome and form a functional chromosome. Yet, bacteria do it differently. A number of factors contribute to genome compaction and organization in bacteria, including entropic effects, supercoiling and DNA-protein interactions. A gamut of new experimental techniques have allowed new advances in the investigation of these factors, and spurred much interest in the dynamic response of the chromosome to environmental cues, segregation, and architecture, during both exponential and stationary phases. We review these recent developments with emphasis on the multifaceted roles that DNA-protein interactions play.

  17. Structural features of DNA interaction with caffeine and theophylline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali; Varavipour, Maryam

    2008-03-01

    Caffeine and theophylline are strong antioxidants that prevent DNA damage. The anticancer and antiviral activities of these natural products are implicated in their mechanism of actions. However, there has been no information on the interactions of these xanthine derivatives with individual DNA at molecular level. The aim of this study was to examine the stability and structural features of calf-thymus DNA complexes with caffeine and theophylline in aqueous solution, using constant DNA concentration (6.25 mM) and various caffeine or theophylline/DNA(P) ratios of 1/80, 1/40, 1/20, 1/10, 1/5, 1/2 and 1/1. FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopic methods were used to determine the ligand external binding modes, the binding constant and the stability of caffeine, theophylline-DNA complexes in aqueous solution. Spectroscopic evidence showed that the complexation of caffeine and theophylline with DNA occurred via G-C and A-T and PO 2 group with overall binding constants of K(caffeine-DNA) = 9.7 × 10 3 M -1 and K(theophylline-DNA) = 1.7 × 10 4 M -1. The affinity of ligand-DNA binding is in the order of theophylline > caffeine. A partial B to A-DNA transition occurs upon caffeine and theophylline complexation.

  18. Study of DNA interaction with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershina, A G; Sazonov, A E; Novikov, D V; Knyazev, A S; Izaak, T I; Itin, V I; Naiden, E P; Magaeva, A A; Terechova, O G

    2011-03-01

    Interaction of cobalt ferrite nanopowder and nucleic acid was investigated. Superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (6-12 nm) were prepared by mechanochemical synthesis. Structure of the nanopowder was characterized using X-ray diffraction. It was shown that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were associated with ssDNA and dsDNA in Tris-buffer resulting in bionanocomposite formation with mass weight relation nanoparticles: DNA 1:(0.083 +/- 0.003) and 1:(0.075 +/- 0.003) respectively. The mechanism of interaction between a DNA and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was considered basing on the whole set of obtained data: FTIR-spectroscopy, analyzing desorption of DNA from the surface of the particles while changing the chemical content of the medium, and on the modeling interaction of specific biomolecule fragments with surface of a inorganic material. It was supposed that the linkage was based on coordination interaction of the phosphate groups and oxygen atoms heterocyclic bases of DNA with metal ions on the particle surface. These data can be used to design specific magnetic DNA-nanoparticles hybrid structures.

  19. Water-mediated correlations in DNA-enzyme interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Capolupo, A; Kurian, P; Vitiello, G

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we consider dipole-mediated correlations between DNA and enzymes in the context of their water environment. Such correlations emerge from electric dipole-dipole interactions between aromatic ring structures in DNA and in enzymes, and they are mediated by radiative fields that stimulate transitions between the $l=0$ and $l=1$ rotational levels of the molecular water electric dipoles. We show that there are matching collective modes between DNA and enzyme dipole fields, and that a dynamic time-averaged polarization vanishes in the water dipole field only if either DNA, enzyme, or both are absent from the sample. This persistent field may serve as the electromagnetic image that, in popular colloquialisms about DNA biochemistry, allows enzymes to "scan" or "read" the double helix. Topologically nontrivial configurations in the coherent ground state requiring clamplike enzyme behavior on the DNA may stem, ultimately, from spontaneously broken gauge symmetries.

  20. New Environment-Sensitive Multichannel DNA Fluorescent Label for Investigation of the Protein-DNA Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra A.; Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Vorobjev, Yuri N.; Barthes, Nicolas P. F.; Benoît Y Michel; Alain Burger; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC) to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu), pyrrolocytosine (Cpy) and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO). For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5'-side of the damaged nucleoside...

  1. Interaction mechanism of 2-aminobenzothiazole with herring sperm DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Yajing [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Ji Fanying [Affiliated Hospital of Shandong University, People' s Hospital of Linyi City, No. 27 Jiefang, Road, Linyi, Shandong Province 276003 (China); Liu Rutao, E-mail: rutaoliu@sdu.edu.cn [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Lin Jing; Xu Qifei; Gao Canzhu [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2012-02-15

    The toxic interaction of 2-aminobenzothiazole (2-ABT) with herring sperm DNA (hs-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated that 2-ABT interacted with hs-DNA in a minor groove binding mode. The binding constant and the number of binding sites were 7.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} L mol{sup -1} and 0.95, respectively. Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) was employed to measure the conformation change of hs-DNA in the presence of 2-ABT, which verified the minor groove binding mode. The molecular modeling results illustrated that 2-ABT tended to bind in the region of rich A-T base pairs through the hydrogen bond between A 18 and amino group of 2-ABT. Sequence specificity was confirmed by comparison on the interactions of 2-ABT with four kinds of bases. This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the toxic interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with biomacromolecules, which contributes to clarify the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2-ABT interacts with hs-DNA in minor groove binding mode to form complex in the ratio 1:1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA conformation changes after binding with 2-ABT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ABT-DNA complex is simulated using Autodock and binding free energy is also calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Besides Van der Waals force, hydrogen bond between adenine and 2-ABT plays an important role. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequence specificity of the binding is verified by the effect of DNA bases on 2-ABT.

  2. Effect of DNA methylation on protein-DNA interaction of HL-60 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何忠效; 白坚石; 张昱

    1999-01-01

    HL-60 cells have been induced with differentiation index 16 % by S-adenosyl-L-rnethionine (SAM) as inducer in the presence of optimum conceptration of 10 μmol/L. The methylation level of genorne DNA determined by HPLC is increased during cell differentiation. When restriction endonuclease Hae Ⅲ, Sma I, Sal I, XhoI and Hind Ⅲ which are sensitive to 5-methylcytosine were used to cleave the genorne DNA, a resistance effect was found. The interaction between DNA and DNA binding proteins is changed by using gel retarding test.

  3. The interaction of amino acids, peptides, and proteins with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyev, Andrey Y; Tarnovskaya, Svetlana I; Chernova, Irina A; Shataeva, Larisa K; Skorik, Yury A

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids that carry charges on their side groups can bind to double stranded DNA (dsDNA) and change the strength of the double helix. Measurement of the DNA melting temperature (Tm) confirmed that acidic amino acids (Glu, Asp) weaken the H-bonds between DNA strands, whereas basic amino acids (Arg, Lys) strengthen the interaction between the strands. A rank correlation exists between the amino acid isoelectric points and the observed changes in Tm. A similar dependence of the hyperchromic effect on the isoelectric point of a protein (pepsin, insulin, cortexin, and protamine) was observed for DNA-protein complexes at room temperature. Short peptides (KE, AEDG, and KEDP) containing a mixture of acidic and basic amino acid residues also affect Tm and the stability of the double helix. A model for binding Glu and Lys to dsDNA was explored by a docking simulation. The model shows that Glu, in an untwisted shape, binds to dsDNA in its major groove and disrupts three H-bonds between the strands, thereby destabilizing the double helix. Lys, in an untwisted shape, binds to the external side of the dsDNA and forms two bonds with O atoms of neighboring phosphodiester groups, thereby strengthening the DNA helix.

  4. Probing DNA-DNA Interactions with a Combination of Quadruple-Trap Optical Tweezers and Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Ineke; King, Graeme A; Heller, Iddo; Biebricher, Andreas S; Peterman, Erwin J G; Wuite, Gijs J L

    2017-01-01

    DNA metabolism and DNA compaction in vivo involve frequent interactions of remote DNA segments, mediated by proteins. In order to gain insight into such interactions, quadruple-trap optical tweezers have been developed. This technique provides an unprecedented degree of control through the ability to independently manipulate two DNA molecules in three dimensions. In this way, discrete regions of different DNA molecules can be brought into contact with one another, with a well-defined spatial configuration. At the same time, the tension and extension of the DNA molecules can be monitored. Furthermore, combining quadruple-trap optical tweezers with microfluidics makes fast buffer exchange possible, which is important for in situ generation of the dual DNA-protein constructs needed for these kinds of experiments. In this way, processes such as protein-mediated inter-DNA bridging can be studied with unprecedented control. This chapter provides a step-by-step description of how to perform a dual DNA manipulation experiment using combined quadruple-trap optical tweezers and microfluidics.

  5. Multiple DNA Interactions Contribute to the Initiation of Telomerase Elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademir Andersson, Ahu; Gustafsson, Cecilia; Krishnankutty, Roopesh; Cohn, Marita

    2017-07-07

    Telomerase maintains telomere length and chromosome integrity by adding short tandem repeats of single-stranded DNA to the 3' ends, via reverse transcription of a defined template region of its RNA subunit. To further understand the telomerase elongation mechanism, we studied the primer utilization and extension activity of the telomerase from the budding yeast Naumovozyma castellii (Saccharomyces castellii), which displays a processive nucleotide and repeat addition polymerization. For the efficient initiation of canonical elongation, telomerase required 4-nt primer 3' end complementarity to the template RNA. This DNA-RNA hybrid formation was highly important for the stabilization of an initiation-competent telomerase-DNA complex. Anchor site interactions with the DNA provided additional stabilization to the complex. Our studies indicate three additional separate interactions along the length of the DNA primer, each providing different and distinct contributions to the initiation event. A sequence-independent anchor site interaction acts immediately adjacent to the base-pairing 3' end, indicating a protein anchor site positioned very close to the catalytic site. Two additional anchor regions further 5' on the DNA provide sequence-specific contributions to the initiation of elongation. Remarkably, a non-telomeric sequence in the distal 25- to 32-nt region negatively influences the initiation of telomerase elongation, suggesting an anchor site with a regulatory role in the telomerase elongation decision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis, DNA interaction and antimicrobial activities of three rimantadine analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bing-Mi; Zhang, Jun [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Wang, Xin, E-mail: wangxinlnu@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Zhang, Li-Ping; Liu, Yang [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Niu, Hua-Ying [Jinan Dachpharm Development Co., Ltd., Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Bin, E-mail: liubinzehao@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2015-03-15

    The interactions of three rimantadine analogues (RAs) with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct-DNA) in buffer solution (pH 7.4) were investigated using berberine (BR) as a probe by various methods. Fluorescence studies revealed that the RAs interacted with DNA in vitro and the quenchings were all static. Furthermore, the binding modes of these compounds to DNA were disclosed as groove binding supported by absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement and denatured DNA experiment. The antimicrobial activities of the RAs were also evaluated in Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and they all exhibited good bacteriostasic effects. The results might provide an important reference for investigation of the molecular mechanism associated with the DNA binding of the RAs. - Highlights: • Three rimantadine analogues were synthesized. • The RAs effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of DNA via a static combination. • These analogues can bind to DNA via groove binding mode. • The antimicrobial activities of three analogues were also evaluated by the disk diffusion method.

  7. Energetics of the protein-DNA-water interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marabotti Anna

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand the energetics of the interaction between protein and DNA we analyzed 39 crystallographically characterized complexes with the HINT (Hydropathic INTeractions computational model. HINT is an empirical free energy force field based on solvent partitioning of small molecules between water and 1-octanol. Our previous studies on protein-ligand complexes demonstrated that free energy predictions were significantly improved by taking into account the energetic contribution of water molecules that form at least one hydrogen bond with each interacting species. Results An initial correlation between the calculated HINT scores and the experimentally determined binding free energies in the protein-DNA system exhibited a relatively poor r2 of 0.21 and standard error of ± 1.71 kcal mol-1. However, the inclusion of 261 waters that bridge protein and DNA improved the HINT score-free energy correlation to an r2 of 0.56 and standard error of ± 1.28 kcal mol-1. Analysis of the water role and energy contributions indicate that 46% of the bridging waters act as linkers between amino acids and nucleotide bases at the protein-DNA interface, while the remaining 54% are largely involved in screening unfavorable electrostatic contacts. Conclusion This study quantifies the key energetic role of bridging waters in protein-DNA associations. In addition, the relevant role of hydrophobic interactions and entropy in driving protein-DNA association is indicated by analyses of interaction character showing that, together, the favorable polar and unfavorable polar/hydrophobic-polar interactions (i.e., desolvation mostly cancel.

  8. Lichen secondary metabolites as DNA-interacting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plsíkova, J; Stepankova, J; Kasparkova, J; Brabec, V; Backor, M; Kozurkova, M

    2014-03-01

    A series of lichen secondary metabolites (parietin, atranorin, usnic and gyrophoric acid) and their interactions with calf thymus DNA were investigated using molecular biophysics and biochemical methods. The binding constants K were estimated to range from 4.3×10(5) to 2.4×10(7)M(-1) and the percentage of hypochromism was found to be 16-34% (from spectral titration). The results of spectral measurement indicate that the compounds act as effective DNA-interacting agents. Electrophoretic separation studies prove that from all the metabolites tested in this study, only gyrophoric acid exhibited an inhibitory effect on Topo I (25μM).

  9. Allosteric interactions of DNA and nucleotides with S. cerevisiae RSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Shuja Shafi; Rich, Evan; Viswanathan, Ramya; Cairns, Bradley R; Fischer, Christopher J

    2011-09-20

    RSC (remodel the structure of chromatin) is an essential chromatin remodeler of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that has been shown to have DNA translocase properties. We studied the DNA binding properties of a "trimeric minimal RSC" (RSCt) of the RSC chromatin remodeling complex and the effect of nucleotides on this interaction using fluorescence anisotropy. RSCt binds to 20 bp fluorescein-labeled double-stranded DNA with a K(d) of ∼100 nM. The affinity of RSCt for DNA is reduced in the presence of AMP-PNP and ADP in a concentration-dependent manner with the addition of AMP-PNP having more pronounced effect. These differences in the magnitude at which the binding of ADP and AMP-PNP affects the affinity of DNA binding by RSCt suggest that the physical movement of the enzyme along DNA begins between the binding of ATP and its subsequent hydrolysis. Furthermore, the fact that the highest affinity for DNA binding by RSCt occurs in the absence of bound nucleotide offers a mechanistic explanation for the apparent low processivity of DNA translocation by the enzyme.

  10. DNA interaction with saffron's secondary metabolites safranal, crocetin, and dimethylcrocetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakis, Charalabos D; Tarantilis, Petros A; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali; Polissiou, Moschos G

    2007-01-01

    Saffron comes from the dried red stigmas of the Crocus sativus L. flower. Except for its use in cooking and in traditional medicine, it has numerous applications as an antitoxic, antioxidant, and anticancer agent due to its secondary metabolites and their derivatives (safranal, crocins, crocetin, dimethylcrocetin). However, there has been no information on the interactions of these secondary metabolites with individual DNA at molecular level. This study was designed to examine the interaction of safranal, crocetin (CRT), and dimethylcrocetin (DMCRT) with calf-thymus DNA in aqueous solution at physiological conditions, using constant DNA concentration (6.25 mM) and various drug/DNA(phosphate) molar ratios from 1/48 to 1/2. FTIR and UV-visible difference spectroscopic methods are used to determine the drug binding sites, the binding constants, and the effects of carotenoids and safranal complexation on the stability and conformation of DNA duplex. Both intercalative and external binding modes were observed, with overall binding constants K(safranal) = 1.24 x 10(3) M(-1), K(CRT) = 6.2 x 10(3) M(-1) and K(DMCRT) = 1.85 x 10(5) M(-1) A partial B- to A-DNA transition occurs at high carotenoids and safranal concentrations.

  11. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA barcoded proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing1, high-throughput protein analyses2-4 are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule (SM) protein detection achieved using optical methods5 is limited by the number of spectrally nonoverlapping chromophores. Here, we introduce a single molecular interaction-sequencing (SMI-Seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling le...

  12. Physical interactions between DNA and sepiolite nanofibers, and potential application for DNA transfer into mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Smirnov, Fidel Antonio; Piétrement, Olivier; Aranda, Pilar; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Ayache, Jeanne; Le Cam, Eric; Ruiz-Hitzky, Eduardo; Lopez, Bernard S.

    2016-01-01

    Nanofibers of sepiolite, a natural silicate belonging to the clay minerals family, might constitute a potential promising nanocarrier for the non-viral transfer of bio-molecules. We show here that sepiolite nanofibers efficiently bind different types of DNA molecules through electrostatic interactions, hydrogen bonding, cation bridges, and van der Waals forces. Moreover, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy identified the external silanol groups as the main sites of interaction with the DNA. Furthermore, as a proof of concept, we show that sepiolite is able to stably transfer plasmid DNA into mammalian cells and that the efficiency can be optimized. Indeed, sonication of sepiolite 100-fold stimulated DNA transfection efficiency. These results open the way to the use of sepiolite-based biohybrids as a novel class of nanoplatform for gene transfer with potential clinical applications. PMID:27808269

  13. Interaction of Rheumatoid Factor with Immobilized ss-DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lian-yong; LU Jing; YU Yao-ting

    2004-01-01

    Rheumatoid factors(RFs) are the characteristic autoantibodies of rheumatoid arthritis. Recent researches in our laboratory showed that the immobilized single-stranded DNA(ss-DNA) immunoadsorbent can selectively remove RFs from the serum of patients. In the present paper are studied the modification of argininine, tryptophan, lysine residues and carboxyl terminus of IgGRF, which was separated from patients′ serum, with 1,2-cyclohexanedione(CHD), N-bromosuccinimide(NBS), pyridoxal 5′-phosphate(PP) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide(EDC) respectively, and their effects on the adsorption capacity of the immobilized ss-DNA immunoadsorbent for IgGRF. After the specific modification, the corresponding adsorption capacities of the adsorbents were changed from 48%, 46%, 44% and 54% to 84%, 14%, 21% and 81%, respectively. These results indicate that the electrostatic or ionic-bonding is essential for the interaction between ss-DNA and IgGRF.

  14. DNA-graphene interactions during translocation through nanogaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hiral N.; Carroll, Ian; Lopez, Rodolfo; Sankararaman, Sandeep; Etienne, Charles; Kodigala, Subba Ramaiah; Paul, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    We study how double-stranded DNA translocates through graphene nanogaps. Nanogaps are fabricated with a novel capillary-force induced graphene nanogap formation technique. DNA translocation signatures for nanogaps are qualitatively different from those obtained with circular nanopores, owing to the distinct shape of the gaps discussed here. Translocation time and conductance values vary by ∼ 100%, which we suggest are caused by local gap width variations. We also observe exponentially relaxing current traces. We suggest that slow relaxation of the graphene membrane following DNA translocation may be responsible. We conclude that DNA-graphene interactions are important, and need to be considered for graphene-nanogap based devices. This work further opens up new avenues for direct read of single molecule activitities, and possibly sequencing. PMID:28158244

  15. Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on chlorambucil interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charak, Sonika; Shandilya, Manish; Tyagi, Gunjan; Mehrotra, Ranjana

    2012-11-01

    Chlorambucil (CMB) is an anticancer drug used for the treatment of variety of cancers. Structural and conformational changes associated with DNA after binding with CMB were explored using spectroscopic techniques to get insight into the mechanism of action of CMB at molecular level. Different molar ratios of CMB-DNA complex were prepared with constant DNA concentration under physiological conditions. FTIR spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, CD spectroscopy and molecular docking studies were employed to determine the binding site and binding constant of CMB with DNA. The results show CMB binds DNA through nitrogenous bases (thymine, guanine and cytosine). The binding constant was calculated to be 1.3 × 10³ M⁻¹, which suggests weak binding of CMB with DNA double helix. FTIR and CD results show that CMB do not disturb native B-conformation of DNA and it continues to remain in its B conformation even at higher concentrations of CMB. The molecular docking results are in corroboration with our experimental results and provides structural insight into the interaction site. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling the interaction of DNA with alternating fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bergues-Pupo, Ana Elisa; Falo, Fernando; 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.022703

    2013-01-01

    We study the influence of a THz field on thermal properties of DNA molecules. A Peyrard- Bishop-Dauxois model with the inclusion of a solvent interaction term is considered. The THz field is included as a sinusoidal driven force in the equation of mo tion. We show how under certain field and system parameters, melting transition and bubble formation are modified.

  17. Differential interactions of plasmid DNA, RNA and genomic DNA with amino acid-based affinity matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Angela; Sousa, Fani; Queiroz, João A

    2010-09-01

    The development of a strategy to plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification has become necessary for the development of gene therapy and DNA vaccine production processes in recent years, since this nucleic acid and most of contaminants, such as RNA, genomic DNA and endotoxins, are negatively charged. An ideal separation methodology may be achieved with the use of affinity interactions between immobilized amino acids and nucleic acids. In this study, the binding behaviour of nucleic acids under the influence of different environmental conditions, such as the composition and ionic strength of elution buffer, and the temperature, is compared with various amino acids immobilized on chromatography resins. Supercoiled (sc) plasmid isoform was isolated with all matrices used, but in some cases preferential interactions with other nucleic acids were found. Particularly, lysine chromatography showed to be an ideal technology mainly on RNA purification using low salt concentration. On the other hand, arginine ligands have shown a greater ability to retain the sc isoform comparatively to the other nucleic acids retention, becoming this support more adequate to sc pDNA purification. The temperature variation, competitive elution and oligonucleotides affinity studies also allowed to recognize the dominant interactions inherent to biorecognition of pDNA molecule and the affinity matrices.

  18. Structural and functional interaction between the human DNA repair proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peï-Yu; Frit, Philippe; Meesala, SriLakshmi; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Modesti, Mauro; Andres, Sara N; Huang, Ying; Sekiguchi, JoAnn; Calsou, Patrick; Salles, Bernard; Junop, Murray S

    2009-06-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  19. Structural and Functional Interaction Between the Human DNA Repair Proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P.; Meesala, S; Dauvillier, S; Modesti, M; Andres, S; Huang, Y; Sekiguchi, J; Calsou, P; Salles, B; Junop, M

    2009-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  20. New environment-sensitive multichannel DNA fluorescent label for investigation of the protein-DNA interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A Kuznetsova

    Full Text Available Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu, pyrrolocytosine (Cpy and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO. For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5'-side of the damaged nucleoside 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU, which is specifically recognized and removed by Endonuclease VIII. These fluorophores demonstrated different sensitivities to the DNA helix conformational changes. The highest sensitivity and the most detailed information about the conformational changes of DNA induced by protein binding and processing were obtained using the 3HC probe. The application of this new artificial fluorescent DNA base is a very useful tool for the studies of complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Using 3HC biosensor, the kinetic mechanism of Endonuclease VIII action was specified.

  1. New environment-sensitive multichannel DNA fluorescent label for investigation of the protein-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Vorobjev, Yuri N; Barthes, Nicolas P F; Michel, Benoît Y; Burger, Alain; Fedorova, Olga S

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC) to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu), pyrrolocytosine (Cpy) and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO). For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5'-side of the damaged nucleoside 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU), which is specifically recognized and removed by Endonuclease VIII. These fluorophores demonstrated different sensitivities to the DNA helix conformational changes. The highest sensitivity and the most detailed information about the conformational changes of DNA induced by protein binding and processing were obtained using the 3HC probe. The application of this new artificial fluorescent DNA base is a very useful tool for the studies of complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Using 3HC biosensor, the kinetic mechanism of Endonuclease VIII action was specified.

  2. Attenuation of acridine mutagen ICR-191--DNA interactions and DNA damage by the mutagen interceptor chlorophyllin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzak, Monika; Halicka, H Dorota; Wieczorek, Zbigniew; Wieczorek, Jolanta; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2008-06-01

    We have investigated the ability of chlorophyllin (CHL) to interact with acridine mutagen ICR-191 (2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-(3-(2-chloroethyl)aminopropylamino)acridine) and also its ability to decrease binding of ICR-191 to DNA in a simple three-component competition system: CHL-ICR-DNA. Our data indicate a strong association of ICR-191 with CHL, stronger even than the association of ICR-191 with DNA. Calculations based on the measured affinity data show that a two- to three-fold excess of CHL reduces by about two-fold the concentration of the mutagen-DNA complex. We also exposed human leukemic HL-60 cells to ICR-191 in the absence and presence of CHL and measured the mutagen-induced DNA damage. The extent of DNA damage was assessed by analysis of histone H2AX phosphorylation. While ICR-191 induced significant increase in expression of phosphorylated H2AX (gammaH2AX), particularly in DNA replicating cells, this increase was totally abolished in the cells treated with ICR-191 in the presence of CHL.

  3. Interaction of water-soluble bridged porphyrin with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai WANG; Zhi ZHANG; Qianni GUO; Xiaoping BAO; Zaoying LI

    2008-01-01

    A water-soluble porphyrin dimer (Por Dimer) containing eight positive charges, bridged by 4,4'-dicarboxy-2,2'-bipyridine, has been synthesized. With Meso-tetrakis(N-methyl-pyridium-4-yl)porphyrin (H2TMPyP) as the reference compound, the water-sol-uble porphyrin dimer was investigated for its inter-action with DNA by absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The apparent affinity binding constant (Kapp= 1.2×106) of Por Dimer binding to CT DNA was measured by a com-petition method with ethidium bromide (EB) (that of H2TMPyP was 6.9×106). The cleavage ability of Por Dimer to pBR322 plasmid DNA was studied by gel electrophoresis. The results suggest that the binding modes of Por Dimer were complex and involve both intercalation and outside binding.

  4. Studies on sildenafil citrate (Viagra) interaction with DNA using electrochemical DNA biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Sakandar; Nawaz, Haq; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Ghauri, Muhammad A; Khalid, Ahmad M

    2007-05-15

    The interaction of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) with DNA was studied by using an electrochemical DNA biosensor. The binding mechanism of sildenafil citrate was elucidated by using constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry at DNA-modified glassy carbon electrode. The decrease in the guanine oxidation peak area or peak current was used as an indicator for the interaction in 0.2M acetate buffer (pH 5). The binding constant (K) values obtained were 2.01+/-0.05 x 10(5) and 1.97+/-0.01 x 10(5)M(-1) with constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry, respectively. A linear dependence of the guanine peak area or peak current was observed within the range of 1-40 microM sildenafil citrate with slope=-2.74 x 10(-4)s/microM, r=0.989 and slope=-2.78 x 10(-3)microA/microM, r=0.995 by using constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry, respectively. Additionally, binding constant values for sildenafil citrate-DNA interaction were determined for the pH range of 4-8 and in biological fluids (serum and urine) at pH 5. The influence of sodium and calcium ions was also studied to elucidate the mechanism of sildenafil citrate-DNA interaction under different solution conditions. The present study may prove to be helpful in extending our understanding of the anticancer activity of sildenafil citrate from cellular to DNA level.

  5. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy, E-mail: yuriy.zakrevskyy@fh-koeln.de; Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana, E-mail: santer@uni-potsdam.de [Experimental Physics, Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd [Physical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes’ properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate – for the first time – complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules.

  6. Interaction of photosensitive surfactant with DNA and poly acrylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Cywinski, Piotr; Cywinska, Magdalena; Paasche, Jens; Lomadze, Nino; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate interactions and phase transitions in polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes formed between a cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant and two types of polyelectrolytes: natural (DNA) or synthetic (PAA: poly acrylic acid). The construction of a phase diagram allowed distancing between four major phases: extended coil conformation, colloidally stable compacted globules, colloidal instability range, and surfactant-stabilized compact state. Investigation on the complexes' properties in different phases and under irradiation with UV light provides information about the role of the surfactant's hydrophobic trans isomers both in the formation and destruction of DNA and PAA globules as well as in their colloidal stabilization. The trans isomer shows much stronger affinity to the polyelectrolytes than the hydrophilic cis counterpart. There is no need for complete compensation of the polyelectrolyte charges to reach the complete compaction. On contrary to the findings previously reported in the literature, we demonstrate - for the first time - complete polyelectrolyte compaction which occurs already at 20% of DNA (and at 50% of PAA) charge compensation. The trans isomer plays the main role in the compaction. The aggregation between azobenzene units in the photosensitive surfactant is a driving force of this process. The decompaction can be realized during UV light irradiation and is strongly influenced by the interplay between surfactant-surfactant and surfactant-DNA interactions in the compacted globules.

  7. Micromechanical study of protein-DNA interactions and chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John

    I will discuss micromechanics experiments that our group has used to analyze protein-DNA interactions and chromosome organization. In single-DNA experiments we have found that a feature of protein-DNA complexes is that their dissociation rates can depend strikingly on bulk solution concentrations of other proteins and DNA segments; I will describe experiments which demonstrate this effect, which can involve tens-fold changes in off-rates with submicromolar changes in solution concentrations. Second, I will discuss experiments aimed at analyzing large-scale human chromosome structure; we isolate metaphase chromosomes, which in their native form behave as remarkably elastic networks of chromatin. Exposure to DNA-cutting restriction enzymes completely eliminates this elasticity, indicating that there is not a mechanically contiguous protein ''scaffold'' from which the chromosome gains its stability. I will show results of siRNA experiments indicating that depletion of condensin proteins leads to destabilization of chromosome mechanics, indicating condensin's role as the major chromatin ''cross-linker'' in metaphase chromosomes. Finally I will discuss similar experiments on human G1 nuclei, where we use genetic and chemical modifications to separate the contributions of the nuclear lamina and chromatin to the mechanical stiffness of the nucleus as a whole. Supported by the NSF (DMR-1206868, MCB-1022117) and the NIH (GM105847, CA193419).

  8. Titantium Dioxide Nanoparticles Assembled by DNA Molecules Hybridization and Loading of DNA Interacting Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Aiguo; Paunesku, Tatjana; Brown, Eric M B; Babbo, Angela; Cruz, Cecille; Aslam, Mohamed; Dravid, Vinayak; Woloschak, Gayle E

    2008-02-01

    This work demonstrates the assembly of TiO(2) nanoparticles with attached DNA oligonucleotides into a 3D mesh structure by allowing base pairing between oligonucleotides. A change of the ratio of DNA oligonucleotide molecules and TiO(2) nanoparticles regulates the size of the mesh as characterized by UV-visible light spectra, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. This type of 3D mesh, based on TiO(2)-DNA oligonucleotide nanoconjugates, can be used for studies of nanoparticle assemblies in material science, energy science related to dye-sensitized solar cells, environmental science as well as characterization of DNA interacting proteins in the field of molecular biology. As an example of one such assembly, proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein (PCNA) was cloned, its activity verified, and the protein was purified, loaded onto double strand DNA oligonucleotide-TiO(2) nanoconjugates, and imaged by atomic force microscopy. This type of approach may be used to sample and perhaps quantify and/or extract specific cellular proteins from complex cellular protein mixtures affinity based on their affinity for chosen DNA segments assembled into the 3D matrix.

  9. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Detecting molecules and their interactions lies at the heart of all biosensor devices, which have important applications in health, environmental monitoring and biomedicine. Achieving biosensing capability at the single molecule level is, moreover, a particularly important goal since single molecule biosensors would not only operate at the ultimate detection limit by resolving individual molecular interactions, but they could also monitor biomolecular properties which are otherwise obscured in ensemble measurements. For example, a single molecule biosensor could resolve the fleeting interaction kinetics between a molecule and its receptor, with immediate applications in clinical diagnostics. We have now developed a label-free biosensing platform that is capable of monitoring single DNA molecules and their interaction kinetics[1], hence achieving an unprecedented sensitivity in the optical domain, Figure 1. We resolve the specific contacts between complementary oligonucleotides, thereby detecting DNA strands with less than 2.4 kDa molecular weight. Furthermore we can discern strands with single nucleotide mismatches by monitoring their interaction kinetics. Our device utilizes small glass microspheres as optical transducers[1,2, 3], which are capable of increasing the number of interactions between a light beam and analyte molecules. A prism is used to couple the light beam into the microsphere. Ourr biosensing approach resolves the specific interaction kinetics between single DNA fragments. The optical transducer is assembled in a simple three-step protocol, and consists of a gold nanorod attached to a glass microsphere, where the surface of the nanorod is further modified with oligonucleotide receptors. The interaction kinetics of an oligonucleotide receptor with DNA fragments in the surrounding aqueous solution is monitored at the single molecule level[1]. The light remains confined inside the sphere where it is guided by total internal reflections along a

  10. Nonlinear Model of the Specificity of DNA-Protein Interactions and Its Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwiputra, D.; Hidayat, W.; Khairani, R.; Zen, F. P.

    2016-08-01

    Specific DNA-protein interactions are fundamental processes of living cells. We propose a new model of DNA-protein interactions to explain the site specificity of the interactions. The hydrogen bonds between DNA base pairs and between DNA-protein peptide groups play a significant role in determination of the specific binding site. We adopt the Morse potential with coupling terms to construct the Hamiltonian of coupled oscillators representing the hydrogen bonds in which the depth of the potentials vary in the DNA chain. In this paper we investigate the stability of the model to determine the conditions satisfying the biological circumstances of the DNA-protein interactions.

  11. Defining interactions between DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hsin-Ling; Yannone, Steven M.; Chen, David J.

    2001-04-10

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), ligase IV, and XRCC4 are all critical components of the NHEJ repair pathway. DNA-PK is composed of a heterodimeric DNA-binding component, Ku, and a large catalytic subunit, DNA-PKcs. Ligase IV and XRCC4 associate to form a multimeric complex that is also essential for NHEJ. DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4 interact at DNA termini which results in stimulated ligase activity. Here we define interactions between the components of these two essential complexes, DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4. We find that ligase IV/XRCC4 associates with DNA-PK in a DNA-independent manner. The specific protein-protein interactions that mediate the interaction between these two complexes are further identified. Direct physical interactions between ligase IV and Ku as well as between XRCC4 and DNA-PKcs are shown. No direct interactions are observed between ligase IV and DNA-PKcs or between XRCC4 and Ku. Our data defines the specific protein pairs involved in the association of DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4, and suggests a molecular mechanism for coordinating the assembly of the DNA repair complex at DNA breaks.

  12. Unique and universal features of Epsilonproteobacterial origins of chromosome replication and DnaA-DnaA box interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Jaworski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria, chromosome replication is initiated by the interaction of the initiator protein DnaA with a defined region of a chromosome at which DNA replication starts (oriC. While DnaA proteins share significant homology regardless of phylogeny, oriC regions exhibit more variable structures. The general architecture of oriCs is universal, i.e. they are composed of a cluster of DnaA binding sites, a DNA-unwinding element, and sequences that bind regulatory proteins. However, detailed structures of oriCs are shared by related species while being significantly different in unrelated bacteria. In this work, we characterised Epsilonproteobacterial oriC regions. Helicobacter pylori was the only species of the class for which oriC was characterised. A few unique features were found such as bipartite oriC structure, not encountered in any other Gram-negative species, and topology-sensitive DnaA-DNA interactions, which have not been found in any other bacterium. These unusual H. pylori oriC features raised questions of whether oriC structure and DnaA-DNA interactions are unique to this bacterium or they are common to related species. By in silico and in vitro analyses we identified putative oriCs in three Epsilonproteobacterial species: pathogenic Arcobacter butzleri, symbiotic Wolinella succinogenes and free-living Sulfurimonas denitrificans. We propose that oriCs typically co-localize with ruvC-dnaA-dnaN in Epsilonproteobacteria, with the exception of Helicobacteriaceae species. The clusters of DnaA boxes localize upstream (oriC1 and downstream (oriC2 of dnaA, and they likely constitute bipartite origins. In all cases, DNA unwinding was shown to occur in oriC2. Unlike the DnaA box pattern, which is not conserved in Epsilonproteobacterial oriCs, the consensus DnaA box sequences and the mode of DnaA-DnaA box interactions are common to the class. We propose that the typical Epsilonproteobacterial DnaA box consists of the core nucleotide sequence 5

  13. Unique and Universal Features of Epsilonproteobacterial Origins of Chromosome Replication and DnaA-DnaA Box Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Pawel; Donczew, Rafal; Mielke, Thorsten; Thiel, Marcel; Oldziej, Stanislaw; Weigel, Christoph; Zawilak-Pawlik, Anna

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, chromosome replication is initiated by the interaction of the initiator protein DnaA with a defined region of a chromosome at which DNA replication starts (oriC). While DnaA proteins share significant homology regardless of phylogeny, oriC regions exhibit more variable structures. The general architecture of oriCs is universal, i.e., they are composed of a cluster of DnaA binding sites, a DNA-unwinding element, and sequences that bind regulatory proteins. However, detailed structures of oriCs are shared by related species while being significantly different in unrelated bacteria. In this work, we characterized Epsilonproteobacterial oriC regions. Helicobacter pylori was the only species of the class for which oriC was characterized. A few unique features were found such as bipartite oriC structure, not encountered in any other Gram-negative species, and topology-sensitive DnaA-DNA interactions, which have not been found in any other bacterium. These unusual H. pylori oriC features raised questions of whether oriC structure and DnaA-DNA interactions are unique to this bacterium or whether they are common to related species. By in silico and in vitro analyses we identified putative oriCs in three Epsilonproteobacterial species: pathogenic Arcobacter butzleri, symbiotic Wolinella succinogenes, and free-living Sulfurimonas denitrificans. We propose that oriCs typically co-localize with ruvC-dnaA-dnaN in Epsilonproteobacteria, with the exception of Helicobacteriaceae species. The clusters of DnaA boxes localize upstream (oriC1) and downstream (oriC2) of dnaA, and they likely constitute bipartite origins. In all cases, DNA unwinding was shown to occur in oriC2. Unlike the DnaA box pattern, which is not conserved in Epsilonproteobacterial oriCs, the consensus DnaA box sequences and the mode of DnaA-DnaA box interactions are common to the class. We propose that the typical Epsilonproteobacterial DnaA box consists of the core nucleotide sequence 5′-TTCAC-3

  14. Interaction of novel bis(platinum) complexes with DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, J D; Van Houten, B; Qu, Y; Farrell, N P

    1989-01-01

    Bis(platinum) complexes [[cis-PtCl2(NH3)]2H2N(CH2)nNH2] are a novel series of potential anticancer agents in which two cis-diamine(platinum) groups are linked by an alkyldiamine of variable length. These complexes are potentially tetrafunctional, a unique feature in comparison with known anticancer agents. Studies of DNA interactions of bis(platinum) complexes in comparison with cisplatin demonstrate significant differences. Investigations of interstrand crosslink formation in which crosslink...

  15. Interaction between Escherichia coli DNA polymerase IV and single-stranded DNA-binding protein is required for DNA synthesis on SSB-coated DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukohri, Asako; Nishikawa, Yoshito; Akiyama, Masahiro Tatsumi; Maki, Hisaji

    2012-07-01

    DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV) is one of three translesion polymerases in Escherichia coli. A mass spectrometry study revealed that single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB) in lysates prepared from exponentially-growing cells has a strong affinity for column-immobilized Pol IV. We found that purified SSB binds directly to Pol IV in a pull-down assay, whereas SSBΔC8, a mutant protein lacking the C-terminal tail, failed to interact with Pol IV. These results show that the interaction between Pol IV and SSB is mediated by the C-terminal tail of SSB. When polymerase activity was tested on an SSBΔC8-coated template, we observed a strong inhibition of Pol IV activity. Competition experiments using a synthetic peptide containing the amino acid sequence of SSB tail revealed that the chain-elongating capacity of Pol IV was greatly impaired when the interaction between Pol IV and SSB tail was inhibited. These results demonstrate that Pol IV requires the interaction with the C-terminal tail of SSB to replicate DNA efficiently when the template ssDNA is covered with SSB. We speculate that at the primer/template junction, Pol IV interacts with the tail of the nearest SSB tetramer on the template, and that this interaction allows the polymerase to travel along the template while disassembling SSB.

  16. Thermochemical and kinetic evidence for nucleotide-sequence-dependent RecA-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittung, P; Ellouze, C; Maraboeuf, F; Takahashi, M; Nordèn, B

    1997-05-01

    RecA catalyses homologous recombination in Escherichia coli by promoting pairing of homologous DNA molecules after formation of a helical nucleoprotein filament with single-stranded DNA. The primary reaction of RecA with DNA is generally assumed to be unspecific. We show here, by direct measurement of the interaction enthalpy by means of isothermal titration calorimetry, that the polymerisation of RecA on single-stranded DNA depends on the DNA sequence, with a high exothermic preference for thymine bases. This enthalpic sequence preference of thymines by RecA correlates with faster binding kinetics of RecA to thymine DNA. Furthermore, the enthalpy of interaction between the RecA x DNA filament and a second DNA strand is large only when the added DNA is complementary to the bound DNA in RecA. This result suggests a possibility for a rapid search mechanism by RecA x DNA filaments for homologous DNA molecules.

  17. Biophysics of DNA-Protein Interactions From Single Molecules to Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Mark C

    2011-01-01

    This book presents a concise overview of current research on the biophysics of DNA-protein interactions. A wide range of new and classical methods are presented by authors investigating physical mechanisms by which proteins interact with DNA. For example, several chapters address the mechanisms by which proteins search for and recognize specific binding sites on DNA, a process critical for cellular function. Single molecule methods such as force spectroscopy as well as fluorescence imaging and tracking are described in these chapters as well as other parts of the book that address the dynamics of protein-DNA interactions. Other important topics include the mechanisms by which proteins engage DNA sequences and/or alter DNA structure. These simple but important model interactions are then placed in the broader biological context with discussion of larger protein-DNA complexes . Topics include replication forks, recombination complexes, DNA repair interactions, and ultimately, methods to understand the chromatin...

  18. Nonlinear effects in the torsional adjustment of interacting DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornyshev, A A; Wynveen, A

    2004-04-01

    DNA molecules in solution, having negatively charged phosphates and countercations readsorbed on its surface, possess a distinct charge separation motif to interact electrostatically. If their double-helical structure were ideal, duplexes in parallel juxtaposition could choose azimuthal alignment providing attraction, or at least a reduction of repulsion, between them. But duplexes are not perfect staircases and the distortions of their helical structure correlate with their base pair texts. If the patterns of distortions on the opposing molecules are uncorrelated, the mismatch will accumulate as a random walk and attraction vanishes. Based on this idea, a model of recognition of homologous sequences has been proposed [A. A. Kornyshev and S. Leikin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3666 (2001)]. But DNA has torsional elasticity. How will this help to relax a mismatch between the charge distributions on two nonhomologous DNA's? In the same work, the solution of this problem has been mapped onto a frustrated sine Gordon equation in a nonlocal random field (where the latter represents a pattern of twist angle distortions on the opposing molecules), but the results had been obtained in the limit of torsionally rigid molecules. In the present paper, by solving this equation numerically, we find a strongly nonlinear relaxation mechanism which utilizes static kink-soliton modes triggered by the "random field." In the range of parameters where the solitons do not emerge, we find good agreement with the results of a variational study [A. G. Cherstvy, A. A. Kornyshev, and S. Leikin, J. Phys. Chem. B (to be published)]. We reproduce the first-order transitions in the interaxial separation dependence, but detect also second-order or weak first-order transitions for shorter duplexes. The recognition energy between two nonhomologous DNA sequences is calculated as a function of interaxial separation and the length of juxtaposition. The soliton-caused kinky length dependence is discussed in

  19. Programing the formation of DNA and PNA quadruplexes by pi-pi-stacking interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sourav; Cai, Jianfeng; Eiler, Daniel; Hamilton, Andrew D

    2010-03-14

    Guanine (G) rich G(4)T(4)G(4) DNA and homologous PNA strands tend to form antiparallel dimeric quadruplexes. In contrast, the same DNA strands carrying planar aromatic 5'-residues preferentially form parallel DNA quadruplex. Conformation and composition of the DNA quadruplexes can be programed by pi-pi-stacking interaction exerted by the 5'-residues.

  20. Design, Synthesis and DNA Interaction Study of New Potential DNA Bis-Intercalators Based on Glucuronic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiuyang; Li, Wei; Ma, Rui; Chen, Shaopeng; Ren, Sumei; Jiang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    A series of novel potential DNA bis-intercalators were designed and synthesized, in which two glucuronic acids were linked by ethylenediamine, and the glucuronic acid was coupled with various chromophores, including quinoline, acridine, indole and purine, at the C-1 position. The preliminary binding properties of these compounds to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) have been investigated by UV-absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results indicated that all the target compounds can interact with CT-DNA, and the acridine derivative, 3b, showed the highest key selection vector (KSV) value, which suggested that compound 3b binds most strongly to CT-DNA. PMID:23955268

  1. Fabrication of Unimolecular Double-stranded DNA Microarrays on Solid Surfaces for Probing DNA-Protein/Drug Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhong Lu

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for fabricating unimole cular double-stranded DNA microarrays on solid surfaces, which were used to probe sequence-specific DNA/protein interactions. For manufacturing the unimolecular double-stranded DNA microarrays, two kinds of special single-stranded oligonucleotides, constant oligonucleotide and target oligonucleotide, were chemically synthesized. The constant oligonucleotides with internal aminated dT were used to capture and immobilize the target oligonucleotides onto the solid surface, and also to provide a primer for later enzymatic extension reactions, while target oligonucleotides took the role of harbouring DNA-binding sites of DNA-binding proteins. The variant target oligonucleotides were annealed and ligated with the constant oligonucleotides to form the new unimolecular oligonucleotides for microspotting. The prepared unimolecular oligonucleotides were microspotted on aldehyde-derivatized glass slides to make partial-dsDNA microarrays. Finally, the partial-dsDNA microarrays were converted into a unimolecular complete-dsDNA microarray by a DNA polymerase extension reaction. The efficiency and accuracy of the polymerase synthesis were demonstrated by the fluorescent-labeled dUTP incorporation in the enzymatic extension reaction and the restriction endonuclease digestion of the fabricated unimolecular complete-dsDNA microarray. The accessibility and specificity of the sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins binding to the immobilized unimolecular dsDNA probes were demonstrated by the binding of Cy3 labeled NF-?B (p50·p50 to the unimolecular dsDNA microarray. This unimolecular dsDNA microarray provides a general technique for high-throughput DNA-protein or DNA-drugs interactions.

  2. Helical chirality: a link between local interactions and global topology in DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youri Timsit

    Full Text Available DNA supercoiling plays a major role in many cellular functions. The global DNA conformation is however intimately linked to local DNA-DNA interactions influencing both the physical properties and the biological functions of the supercoiled molecule. Juxtaposition of DNA double helices in ubiquitous crossover arrangements participates in multiple functions such as recombination, gene regulation and DNA packaging. However, little is currently known about how the structure and stability of direct DNA-DNA interactions influence the topological state of DNA. Here, a crystallographic analysis shows that due to the intrinsic helical chirality of DNA, crossovers of opposite handedness exhibit markedly different geometries. While right-handed crossovers are self-fitted by sequence-specific groove-backbone interaction and bridging Mg(2+ sites, left-handed crossovers are juxtaposed by groove-groove interaction. Our previous calculations have shown that the different geometries result in differential stabilisation in solution, in the presence of divalent cations. The present study reveals that the various topological states of the cell are associated with different inter-segmental interactions. While the unstable left-handed crossovers are exclusively formed in negatively supercoiled DNA, stable right-handed crossovers constitute the local signature of an unusual topological state in the cell, such as the positively supercoiled or relaxed DNA. These findings not only provide a simple mechanism for locally sensing the DNA topology but also lead to the prediction that, due to their different tertiary intra-molecular interactions, supercoiled molecules of opposite signs must display markedly different physical properties. Sticky inter-segmental interactions in positively supercoiled or relaxed DNA are expected to greatly slow down the slithering dynamics of DNA. We therefore suggest that the intrinsic helical chirality of DNA may have oriented the early

  3. Balancing the Interactions of Ions, Water, and DNA in the Drude Polarizable Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently we presented a first-generation all-atom Drude polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model, focusing on optimization of key dihedral angles followed by extensive validation of the force field parameters. Presently, we describe the procedure for balancing the electrostatic interactions between ions, water, and DNA as required for development of the Drude force field for DNA. The proper balance of these interactions is shown to impact DNA stability and...

  4. Interactions between DNA and histones- a dynamic process of nucleosome formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李伟; 王鹏业; 窦硕星; 童培庆

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the dynamic process of interactions between a DNA chain and a histone octamer by numerical simulations. It is found that DNA indeed may wrap around the histone octaner about two turns as in the actual situations. The simulation shows that the interaction potential between DNA and histone is a key factor for the wrapping of DNA, and the temperature is also an important parameter in the process.

  5. Nonlinear effects in the torsional adjustment of interacting DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornyshev, A. A.; Wynveen, A.

    2004-04-01

    DNA molecules in solution, having negatively charged phosphates and countercations readsorbed on its surface, possess a distinct charge separation motif to interact electrostatically. If their double-helical structure were ideal, duplexes in parallel juxtaposition could choose azimuthal alignment providing attraction, or at least a reduction of repulsion, between them. But duplexes are not perfect staircases and the distortions of their helical structure correlate with their base pair texts. If the patterns of distortions on the opposing molecules are uncorrelated, the mismatch will accumulate as a random walk and attraction vanishes. Based on this idea, a model of recognition of homologous sequences has been proposed [A. A. Kornyshev and S. Leikin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3666 (2001)]. But DNA has torsional elasticity. How will this help to relax a mismatch between the charge distributions on two nonhomologous DNA’s? In the same work, the solution of this problem has been mapped onto a frustrated sine Gordon equation in a nonlocal random field (where the latter represents a pattern of twist angle distortions on the opposing molecules), but the results had been obtained in the limit of torsionally rigid molecules. In the present paper, by solving this equation numerically, we find a strongly nonlinear relaxation mechanism which utilizes static kink-soliton modes triggered by the “random field.” In the range of parameters where the solitons do not emerge, we find good agreement with the results of a variational study [A. G. Cherstvy, A. A. Kornyshev, and S. Leikin, J. Phys. Chem. B (to be published)]. We reproduce the first-order transitions in the interaxial separation dependence, but detect also second-order or weak first-order transitions for shorter duplexes. The recognition energy between two nonhomologous DNA sequences is calculated as a function of interaxial separation and the length of juxtaposition. The soliton-caused kinky length dependence is

  6. Highly cytotoxic DNA-interacting copper(II) coordination compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissos, Rosa F; Torrents, Ester; dos Santos Mello, Francyelli Mariana; Carvalho Pires, Wanessa; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de Paula; Caballero, Ana B; Caubet, Amparo; Massera, Chiara; Roubeau, Olivier; Teat, Simon J; Gamez, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    Four new Schiff-base ligands have been designed and prepared by condensation reaction between hydrazine derivatives (i.e. 2-hydrazinopyridine or 2-hydrazinoquinoline) and mono- or dialdehyde (3-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 5-tert-butyl-2-hydroxyisophthalaldehyde, respectively). Six copper(II) coordination compounds of various nuclearities have been obtained from these ligands, which are formulated as [Cu(L1)Cl](CH3OH) (1), [Cu(L2)NO3] (2), [Cu2(L3)(ClO4)2(CH3O)(CH3OH)](CH3OH) (3), [Cu2(L4)(ClO4)(OH)(CH3OH)](ClO4) (4), [Cu8(L3)4(NO3)4(OH)5](NO3)3(CH3OH)5(H2O)8 (5) and [Cu3(HL2')4Cl6](CH3OH)6 (6), as revealed by single-crystal X-ray studies. Their DNA-interacting abilities have been investigated using different characterization techniques, which suggest that the metal complexes act as efficient DNA binders. Moreover, cytotoxicity assays with several cancer cell lines show that some of them are very active, as evidenced by the sub-micromolar IC50 values achieved in some cases.

  7. Study on the interaction of anticancer drug mitoxantrone with DNA by fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingjuan Tang; Zhenrong Sun; Jianyu Guo; Zugeng Wang

    2006-01-01

    @@ Mitoxantrone, a clinically useful antitumour antibiotic for leukaemia and breast cancer, has received more attentions. In this paper, the interaction between mitoxantrone and calf thymus DNA is investigated by Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies, and the binding site of mitoxantrone to calf thymus DNA is explored. The results showed that mitoxantrone interacts with calf thymus DNA bases by the intercalation of anthracycline into the base pair plane of adenine (A) and thymine (T), and it results in the disruption of the hydrogen bonds between calf thymus DNA bases, and thus the calf thymus DNA double-strand can be disrupted into the B-form DNA double-strand segments.

  8. Cytotoxic and DNA-topoisomerase effects of lapachol amine derivatives and interactions with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Esteves-Souza

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxic activity of amino (3a-e, aza-1-antraquinone (4a-e lapachol derivatives against Ehrlich carcinoma and human K562 leukemia cells was investigated. Cell viability was determined using MTT assay, after 48 (Ehrlich or 96 h (K562 of culture, and vincristine (for K562 leukemia and quercetin (for Ehrlich carcinoma were used as positive controls. The results showed dose-dependent growth-inhibiting activities and that the amino derivatives were active against the assayed cells, whereas the 4a-e derivatives were not. The allylamine derivative 3a was the most active against Ehrlich carcinoma, with IC50 = 16.94 ± 1.25 µM, and against K562 leukemia, with IC50 = 14.11 ± 1.39 µM. The analogous lawsone derivative, 5a, was also active against Ehrlich carcinoma (IC50 = 23.89 ± 2.3 µM, although the 5d and 5e derivatives showed lower activity. The interaction between 3a-d and calf thymus DNA was investigated by fluorimetric titration and the results showed a hyperchromic effect indicating binding to DNA as presented of ethidium bromide, used as positive control. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase II-a was also evaluated by a relaxation assay of supercoiled DNA plasmid, and the etoposide (200 µM was used as positive control. Significant inhibitory activities were observed for 3a-d at 200 µM and a partial inhibitory action was observed for lapachol and methoxylapachol.

  9. Study on the Interaction between Antitumor Drug Daunomycin and DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Gui-Fang; ZHAO Jie; TU Yong-Hua; HE Pin-Gang; FANG Yu-Zhi

    2005-01-01

    A detection of anthracycline antitumor drug daunomycin (DNR) reacting with DNA in simulate metabolism in vitro has been made. It was found that DNR could react with DNA to form DNR-DNA adducts. The adduct compositions of DNR with fish sperm DNA and thermally denaturated DNA were determined. The equilibrium association constant K of DNR with fish sperm DNA is 1.98 × 105 L/mol and that of DNR with denaturated DNA is 2.29 × 104 L/mol. Semiquinone free radicals, metabolic products of DNR, can destroy both fish sperm DNA and its thermally denaturated DNA. It is verified by hyperchromic effect increase observed in UV spectrum and AFM experiments. The mechanism of DNA degradation has also been investigated. Results obtained allow one to explain the reason of side effect of anthracycline drug and give the way to depress, which were of clinical significance.

  10. DNA interaction studies of a platinum (II) complex containing an antiviral drug, ribavirin: the effect of metal on DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Mirzaei kalar, Zeinab; Moghadam, Neda Hosseinpour

    2012-10-01

    The water-soluble Pt (II) complex, [PtCl (DMSO)(N(4)N(7)-ribavirin)]· H(2)O (ribavirin is an antiviral drug) has been synthesized and characterized by physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding interactions of this complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated using fluorimetry, spectrophotometry, circular dichroism and viscosimetry. The complex binds to CT-DNA in an intercalative mode. The calculated binding constant, K(b), was 7.2×10(5) M(-1). In fluorimetric studies, the enthalpy (ΔH0) changes of the reaction between the Pt (II) complex with CT-DNA showed hydrophobic interaction. In addition, CD study showed stabilization of the right-handed B form of CT-DNA. All these results prove that the complex interacts with CT-DNA via intercalative mode of binding. In comparison with the previous study of the DNA interaction with ribavirin, these results show that platinum complex has greater affinity to CT-DNA.

  11. Spectrophotometric Studies on the Thermodynamics of the ds-DNA Interaction with Irinotecan for a Better Understanding of Anticancer Drug-DNA Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Hajian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ds-DNA binding properties of irinotecan (CPT-11 including binding constant, thermodynamic parameter, and thermal denaturation (Tm have been systematically studied by spectrophotometric methods. The binding of CPT-11 to ds-DNA is quite strong as indicated by its remarkable hypochromicity and equilibrium binding constant (Kb. The van't Hoff plot of 1/T versus ln Kb suggests that the CPT-11 binds endothermically to ct-DNA which is characterized by large positive enthalpy and entropy changes. According to the polyelectrolyte theory, the charge release (Z, when ct-DNA interacts with CPT-11, is +0.98, which corresponds very well to the one positive charge carried by CPT-11. The Kb at a low concentration of salt is dominated by electrostatic interaction (98.5% while that at a high concentration of salt is weakly controlled by nonelectrostatic processes (19.0%. A moderate stabilization of the double helix ds-DNA occurs when CPT-11 binds to ds-DNA as indicated by the increase in Tm of ct-DNA by approximately 15°C in the presence of CPT-11. The CPT-11 is stabilized by intercalation in the DNA (binding constant, K [irinotecan-DNA] = 5.8 × 104 mol−1 L and displaces the NR dye from the NR-DNA complex (K [NR-DNA] = 2.7 × 104 mol−1 L in a competitive reaction.

  12. Visualization of interaction between ribosome-inactivating proteins and supercoiled DNA with an atomic force microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴晓华; 刘望夷; 欧阳振乾; 李民乾

    1997-01-01

    The interaction between ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) and supercoiled DNA was observed with an atomic force microscope (AFM). It was found that RIPs can bind to both supercoiled DNA and the unwound double stranded loop region in supercoiled DNA. The RIPs hound to the supercoils can induce the conformational change of supercoiled DNA. Furthermore, the supercoiled DNA was relaxed and cleaved into nick or linear form by RIPs. It indicated that RIP seemed to be a supercoil-dependent DNA binding protein and exhibited the activity of su-percoil-dependent DNA endonuclease.

  13. Affinity modification of EcoRII DNA methyltransferase by the dialdehyde-substituted DNA duplexes: mapping the enzyme region that interacts with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Oksana M; Koudan, Elizaveta V; Mikhailov, Sergey N; Ermolinsky, Boris S; Van Aerschot, Arthur; Herdewijn, Piet; Gromova, Elizaveta S

    2002-01-01

    Affinity modification of EcoRII DNA methyltransferase (M x EcoRII) by DNA duplexes containing oxidized 2'-O-beta-D-ribofuranosylcytidine (Crib*) or 1-(beta-D-galactopyranosyl)thymine (Tgal*) residues was performed. Cross-linking yields do not change irrespective of whether active Crib* replaces an outer or an inner (target) deoxycytidine within the EcoRII recognition site. Chemical hydrolysis of M x EcoRII in the covalent cross-linked complex with the Tgal*-substituted DNA indicates the region Gly268-Met391 of the methylase that is likely to interact with the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. Both specific and non-specific DNA interact with the same M x EcoRII region. Our results support the theoretically predicted DNA binding region of M x EcoRII.

  14. Predicting functionality of protein-DNA interactions by integrating diverse evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ucar, Duygu; Beyer, A.; Parthasarathy, S.

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip) experiments enable capturing physical interactions between regulatory proteins and DNA in vivo. However, measurement of chromatin binding alone is not sufficient to detect regulatory interactions. A detected binding event may not be biologically relevant...

  15. New spiro-acridines: DNA interaction, antiproliferative activity and inhibition of human DNA topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Sinara Mônica Vitalino de; Lafayette, Elizabeth Almeida; Silva, Willams Leal; Lima Serafim, Vanessa de; Menezes, Thais Meira; Neves, Jorge Luiz; Ruiz, Ana Lucia Tasca Gois; Carvalho, João Ernesto de; Moura, Ricardo Olímpio de; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; Carvalho Júnior, Luiz Bezerra de; Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves de

    2016-11-01

    Two new spiro-acridines were synthesized by introducing cyano-N-acylhydrazone between the acridine and phenyl rings followed by spontaneous cyclization. The final compounds (E)-1'-(benzylideneamino)-5'-oxo-1',5'-dihydro-10H-spiro[acridine-9,2'-pyrrole]-4'-carbonitrile (AMTAC-01) and (E)-1'-((4-methoxybenzylidene)amino)-5'-oxo-1',5'-dihydro-10H-spiro[acridine-9,2'-pyrrole]-4'-carbonitrile (AMTAC-02) were evaluated for their interactions with calf thymus DNA, antiproliferative and human topoisomerase I and IIα inhibitory activities. Both compounds presented ability to bind DNA. The binding constant determined by UV-vis spectroscopy was found to be 10(4)M(-1). Antiproliferative assay demonstrated that AMTAC-01 and AMTAC-02 were most active against prostate and melanoma tumor cell lines, respectively. The compound did not present Topo I inhibitory activity. However, both derivatives displayed topoisomerase IIα inhibitory activity comparable to amsacrine, and AMTAC-02 was more potent than AMTAC-01 with methoxy substituent group on phenyl ring. This study demonstrates that the new derivatives are promising molecules with topoisomerase IIα inhibitory and antiproliferative activities.

  16. Mapping DNA-Lac repressor interaction with ultra-fast optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monico, Carina; Tempestini, Alessia; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.; Capitanio, Marco

    2015-03-01

    The lac operon is a well-known example of gene expression regulation, based on the specific interaction of Lac repressor protein (LacI) with its target DNA sequence (operator). We recently developed an ultrafast force-clamp laser trap technique capable of probing molecular interactions with sub-ms temporal resolution, under controlled pN-range forces. With this technique, we tested the interaction of LacI with different DNA constructs. Based on position along the DNA sequence, the observed interactions can be interpreted as specific binding to operator sequences and transient interactions with nonspecific sequences.

  17. Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on the interaction of troxerutin with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subastri, A; Ramamurthy, C H; Suyavaran, A; Mareeswaran, R; Lokeswara Rao, P; Harikrishna, M; Suresh Kumar, M; Sujatha, V; Thirunavukkarasu, C

    2015-01-01

    Troxerutin (TXER) is a derivative of naturally occurring bioflavonoid rutin. It possesses different biological activities in rising clinical world. The biological activity possessed by most of the drugs mainly targets on macromolecules. Hence, in the current study we have examined the interaction mechanism of TXER with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) by using various spectroscopic methods, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and molecular docking studies. Further, DNA cleavage study was carried out to find the DNA protection activity of TXER. UV-absorption and emission spectroscopy showed low binding constant values via groove binding. Circular dichroism study indicates that TXER does not modify native B-form of DNA, and it retains the native B-conformation. Furthermore, no effective positive potential peak shift was observed in TXER-DNA complex during electrochemical analysis by which it represents an interaction of TXER with DNA through groove binding. Molecular docking study showed thymine guanine based interaction with docking score -7.09 kcal/mol. This result was compared to experimental ITC value. The DNA cleavage study illustrates that TXER does not cause any DNA damage as well as TXER showed DNA protection against hydroxyl radical induced DNA damage. From this study, we conclude that TXER interacts with DNA by fashion of groove binding.

  18. Sliding Clamp–DNA Interactions Are Required for Viability and Contribute to DNA Polymerase Management in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heltzel, J.; Scouten Ponticelli, S; Sanders, L; Duzen, J; Cody, V; Pace, J; Snell, E; Sutton, M

    2009-01-01

    Sliding clamp proteins topologically encircle DNA and play vital roles in coordinating the actions of various DNA replication, repair, and damage tolerance proteins. At least three distinct surfaces of the Escherichia coli {beta} clamp interact physically with the DNA that it topologically encircles. We utilized mutant {beta} clamp proteins bearing G66E and G174A substitutions ({beta}159), affecting the single-stranded DNA-binding region, or poly-Ala substitutions in place of residues 148-HQDVR-152 ({beta}148-152), affecting the double-stranded DNA binding region, to determine the biological relevance of clamp-DNA interactions. As part of this work, we solved the X-ray crystal structure of {beta}148-152, which verified that the poly-Ala substitutions failed to significantly alter the tertiary structure of the clamp. Based on functional assays, both {beta}159 and {beta}148-152 were impaired for loading and retention on a linear primed DNA in vitro. In the case of {beta}148-152, this defect was not due to altered interactions with the DnaX clamp loader, but rather was the result of impaired {beta}148-152-DNA interactions. Once loaded, {beta}148-152 was proficient for DNA polymerase III (Pol III) replication in vitro. In contrast, {beta}148-152 was severely impaired for Pol II and Pol IV replication and was similarly impaired for direct physical interactions with these Pols. Despite its ability to support Pol III replication in vitro, {beta}148-152 was unable to support viability of E. coli. Nevertheless, physiological levels of {beta}148-152 expressed from a plasmid efficiently complemented the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of a strain expressing {beta}159 (dnaN159), provided that Pol II and Pol IV were inactivated. Although this strain was impaired for Pol V-dependent mutagenesis, inactivation of Pol II and Pol IV restored the Pol V mutator phenotype. Taken together, these results support a model in which a sophisticated combination of competitive clamp-DNA

  19. High-Density Noncovalent Functionalization of DNA by Electrostatic Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Gerasimov, Jennifer Y; Zhao, Pei; Liu, Kai; Herrmann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Preserving DNA hybridization in organic solvents could someday serve to significantly extend the applicability of DNA-based technologies. Here, we present a method that can be used to solubilize double-stranded DNA at high concentrations in organic media. This method requires first precipitating a

  20. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of sodium benzoate, a food preservative, with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guowen; Ma, Yadi

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between sodium benzoate (SB) and calf thymus DNA in simulated physiological buffer (pH 7.4) using acridine orange (AO) dye as a fluorescence probe, was investigated by UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy along with DNA melting studies and viscosity measurements. An expanded UV-Vis spectral data matrix was resolved by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) approach. The equilibrium concentration profiles and the pure spectra for SB, DNA and DNA-SB complex from the high overlapping composite response were simultaneously obtained. The results indicated that SB could bind to DNA, and hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds played a vital role in the binding process. Moreover, SB was able to quench the fluorescence of DNA-AO complex through a static procedure. The quenching observed was indicative of an intercalative mode of interaction between SB and DNA, which was supported by melting studies, viscosity measurements and CD analysis.

  1. DNA interactions with a Methylene Blue redox indicator depend on the DNA length and are sequence specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjami, Elaheh; Clima, Lilia; Gothelf, Kurt V; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2010-06-01

    A DNA molecular beacon approach was used for the analysis of interactions between DNA and Methylene Blue (MB) as a redox indicator of a hybridization event. DNA hairpin structures of different length and guanine (G) content were immobilized onto gold electrodes in their folded states through the alkanethiol linker at the 5'-end. Binding of MB to the folded hairpin DNA was electrochemically studied and compared with binding to the duplex structure formed by hybridization of the hairpin DNA to a complementary DNA strand. Variation of the electrochemical signal from the DNA-MB complex was shown to depend primarily on the DNA length and sequence used: the G-C base pairs were the preferential sites of MB binding in the duplex. For short 20 nts long DNA sequences, the increased electrochemical response from MB bound to the duplex structure was consistent with the increased amount of bound and electrochemically readable MB molecules (i.e. MB molecules that are available for the electron transfer (ET) reaction with the electrode). With longer DNA sequences, the balance between the amounts of the electrochemically readable MB molecules bound to the hairpin DNA and to the hybrid was opposite: a part of the MB molecules bound to the long-sequence DNA duplex seem to be electrochemically mute due to long ET distance. The increasing electrochemical response from MB bound to the short-length DNA hybrid contrasts with the decreasing signal from MB bound to the long-length DNA hybrid and allows an "off"-"on" genosensor development.

  2. Triple helix DNA alters nucleosomal histone-DNA interactions and acts as a nucleosome barrier.

    OpenAIRE

    Westin, L; Blomquist, P; Milligan, J F; Wrange, O

    1995-01-01

    Oligonucleotides which form triple helical complexes on double-stranded DNA have been previously reported to selectively inhibit transcription both in vitro and in vivo by physically blocking RNA polymerase or transcription factor access to the DNA template. Here we show that a 16mer oligonucleotide, which forms triple helix DNA by binding to a 16 bp homopurine segment, alters the formation of histone-DNA contacts during in vitro nucleosome reconstitution. This effect was DNA sequence-specifi...

  3. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays for the analysis of DNA-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Manon; Gingras, Marie-Eve; Lessard, Maryse; Leclerc, Steeve; Guérin, Sylvain L

    2009-01-01

    Electromobility shift assay is a simple, efficient, and rapid method for the study of specific DNA-protein interactions. It relies on the reduction in the electrophoretic mobility conferred to a DNA fragment by an interacting protein. The technique is suitable to qualitative, quantitative, and kinetic analyses. It can also be used to analyze conformational changes.

  4. Evaluation of small ligand-protein interaction by ligation reaction with DNA-modified ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Rie; Mie, Masayasu; Funabashi, Hisakage; Kobatake, Eiry

    2010-01-01

    A method for the evaluation of interactions between protein and ligand using DNA-modified ligands, including signal enhancement of the DNA ligation reactions, is described. For proof of principle, a DNA probe modified by biotin was used. Two DNA probes were prepared with complementary sticky-ends. While one DNA probe was modified at the 5'-end of the sticky-end, the other was not modified. The probes could be ligated together by T4 DNA ligase along the strand without biotin modification. However, in the presence of streptavidin or anti-biotin Fab, the ligation reaction joining the two probes could not occur on either strand.

  5. Interaction of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and aflatoxin B1 in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is an important environmental carcinogen and can induce DNA damage and involve in the carcinogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The deficiency of DNA repair capacity related to the polymorphisms of DNA repair genes might play a central role in the process of HCC tumorigenesis. However, the interaction of DNA repair gene polymorphisms and AFB1 in the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma has not been elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether six polymorphisms (i...

  6. Intrinsic histone-DNA interactions are not the major determinant of nucleosome positions in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Y; Moqtaderi, Z.; Rattner, BP; Euskirchen, G.; Snyder, M; Kadonaga, JT; Liu, XS; Struhl, K

    2009-01-01

    We assess the role of intrinsic histone-DNA interactions by mapping nucleosomes assembled in vitro on genomic DNA. Nucleosomes strongly prefer yeast DNA over Escherichia coli DNA, indicating that the yeast genome evolved to favor nucleosome formation. Many yeast promoter and terminator regions intrinsically disfavor nucleosome formation, and nucleosomes assembled in vitro show strong rotational positioning. Nucleosome arrays generated by the ACF assembly factor have fewer nucleosome-free regi...

  7. Influence of the Amino Substituents in the Interaction of Ethidium Bromide with DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Garbett, Nichola C.; Hammond, Nicholas B.; Graves, David E.

    2004-01-01

    A key step in the rational design of new DNA binding agents is to obtain a complete thermodynamic characterization of small molecule-DNA interactions. Ethidium bromide has served as a classic DNA intercalator for more than four decades. This work focuses on delineating the influence(s) of the 3- and 8-amino substituents of ethidium on the energetic contributions and concomitant fluorescent properties upon DNA complex formation. Binding affinities decrease by an order of magnitude upon the rem...

  8. Evaluation of The Interaction between Netropsin and Double Stranded DNA by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) was applied to study the interaction between netropsin and a 14mer double stranded DNA (dsDNA). The binding constant of this interaction calculated from Scatchard plot was (1.07±0.10)×105 (mol/L)-1. The binding stoichiometry was 1:1. The use of polyacrylamide coated capillary showed better effect in the analysis of DNA than noncoated capillary.

  9. Genome-Wide Mapping of in Vivo Protein-DNA Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, David S.; Mortazavi, Ali; Myers, Richard M.; Wold, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    In vivo protein-DNA interactions connect each transcription factor with its direct targets to form a gene network scaffold. To map these protein-DNA interactions comprehensively across entire mammalian genomes, we developed a large-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIPSeq) based on direct ultrahigh-throughput DNA sequencing. This sequence census method was then used to map in vivo binding of the neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF; also known as REST, for repressor element–1 si...

  10. Simulating Molecular Interactions of Carbon Nanoparticles with a Double-Stranded DNA Fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interactions between carbon nanoparticles (CNPs and a double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA fragment were investigated using molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Six types of CNPs including fullerenes (C60 and C70, (8,0 single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT, (8,0 double-walled carbon nanotube (DWNT, graphene quantum dot (GQD, and graphene oxide quantum dot (GOQD were studied. Analysis of the best geometry indicates that the dsDNA fragment can bind to CNPs through pi-stacking and T-shape. Moreover, C60, DWNT, and GOQD bind to the dsDNA molecules at the minor groove of the nucleotide, and C70, SWNT, and GQD bind to the dsDNA molecules at the hydrophobic ends. Estimated interaction energy implies that van der Waals force may mainly contribute to the mechanisms for the dsDNA-C60, dsDNA-C70, and dsDNA-SWNT interactions and electrostatic force may contribute considerably to the dsDNA-DWNT, dsDNA-GQD, and dsDNA-GOQD interactions. On the basis of the results from large-scale MD simulations, it was found that the presence of the dsDNA enhances the dispersion of C60, C70, and SWNT in water and has a slight impact on DWNT, GQD, and GOQD.

  11. Comparison on the interaction of Al3+/nano-Al13 with calf thymus DNA /salmon sperm DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Ma, Yue; Du, Changwen; Yang, Xiaodi; Shen, Renfang

    2015-11-01

    The conformation change, binding mode and binding site between Al3+/nano-Al13 and calf thymus DNA/salmon sperm DNA were investigated by UV-vis absorption, FTIR spectra, Raman spectroscopy and CD spectra, as well as melting curves measurement. The UV-vis spectra and circular dichroism spectra results suggested that the phosphate group structure was changed when Al3+ interacted with DNA, while the double-helix was distorted when nano-Al13 interacted with DNA. The FTIR and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the binding sites were Al3+ … PO2, Al3+ … N7/guanine PO2 … Al13 … N7-C8/guanine with calf thymus DNA, and Al3+ … N3-O2/cytosine, Al3+ … N7-C8/guanine, PO2 … Al13 … N7-C8/guanine, PO2 … Al13 … N1/adenine with salmon sperm DNA, respectively. The electrostatic binding was existed between Al3+ and DNA, and the electrostatic binding and complexing were found between nano-Al13 and DNA.

  12. Paramutation-like interaction of T-DNA loci in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiya Xue

    Full Text Available In paramutation, epigenetic information is transferred from one allele to another to create a gene expression state which is stably inherited over generations. Typically, paramutation describes a phenomenon where one allele of a gene down-regulates the expression of another allele. Paramutation has been described in several eukaryotes and is best understood in plants. Here we describe an unexpected paramutation-like trans SALK T-DNA interaction in Arabidopsis. Unlike most of the previously described paramutations, which led to gene silencing, the trans SALK T-DNA interaction caused an increase in the transcript levels of the endogenous gene (COBRA where the T-DNA was inserted. This increased COBRA expression state was stably inherited for several generations and led to the partial suppression of the cobra phenotype. DNA methylation was implicated in this trans SALK T-DNA interaction since mutation of the DNA methyltransferase 1 in the suppressed cobra caused a reversal of the suppression. In addition, null mutants of the DNA demethylase ROS1 caused a similar COBRA transcript increase in the cobra SALK T-DNA mutant as the trans T-DNA interaction. Our results provide a new example of a paramutation-like trans T-DNA interaction in Arabidopsis, and establish a convenient hypocotyl elongation assay to study this phenomenon. The results also alert to the possibility of unexpected endogenous transcript increase when two T-DNAs are combined in the same genetic background.

  13. Interaction of vasicine with calf thymus DNA: Molecular docking, spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S., Sai Murali; R. S., Sai Siddhardha; Rajesh Babu, D.; Venketesh, S.; Basavaraju, R.; Nageswara Rao, G.

    2017-06-01

    The present study brings out the interaction between vasicine, an alkaloid and Adhatoda vasica Nees with double stranded DNA. The physico-chemical interaction between small molecules and nucleic acids is a major area of focus in screening drugs against various cancers. Molecular probing in our study using Molecular Operating Environment (MOE) has revealed interaction of vasicine with DNA double helix. Here we report the interaction of vasicine with Calf thymus DNA. We present for the first time the results obtained from UV-visible, fluorescence spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric techniques that suggest a moderate to strong electrostatic, hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions mediating the DNA binding properties of vasicine, leading to disruption of DNA secondary structure.

  14. MITOMI: a microfluidic platform for in vitro characterization of transcription factor-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockel, Sylvie; Geertz, Marcel; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2012-01-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) consist of transcription factors (TFs) that determine the level of gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences. Mapping all TF-DNA interactions and elucidating their dynamics is a major goal to generate comprehensive models of GRNs. Measuring quantitative binding affinities of large sets of TF-DNA interactions requires the application of novel tools and methods. These tools need to cope with the difficulties related to the facts that TFs tend to be expressed at low levels in vivo, and often form only transient interactions with both DNA and their protein partners. Our approach describes a high-throughput microfluidic platform with a novel detection principle based on the mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions (MITOMI). MITOMI allows the detection of transient and low-affinity TF-DNA interactions in high-throughput.

  15. Interaction of the Ku heterodimer with the DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex and its regulation by DNA-PK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Silvia; Woodbine, Lisa; Andreoli, Lucia; Jeggo, Penny A; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2007-06-01

    DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a major mechanism for repairing DNA double-stranded (ds) breaks in mammalian cells. Here, we characterize the interaction between two key components of the NHEJ machinery, the Ku heterodimer and the DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex. Our results demonstrate that Ku interacts with DNA ligase IV via its tandem BRCT domain and that this interaction is enhanced in the presence of Xrcc4 and dsDNA. Moreover, residues 644-748 of DNA ligase IV encompassing the first BRCT motif are necessary for binding. We show that Ku needs to be in its heterodimeric form to bind DNA ligase IV and that the C-terminal tail of Ku80, which mediates binding to DNA-PKcs, is dispensable for DNA ligase IV recognition. Although the interaction between Ku and DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 occurs in the absence of DNA-PKcs, the presence of the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK kinase enhances complex formation. Previous studies have shown that DNA-PK kinase activity causes disassembly of DNA-PKcs from Ku at the DNA end. Here, we show that DNA-PK kinase activity also results in disassembly of the Ku/DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex. Collectively, our findings provide novel information on the protein-protein interactions that regulate NHEJ in cells.

  16. Structural Analysis of DNA Interactions with Magnesium Ion Studied by Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ponkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In the present study, FT Raman spectroscopy had been used to extend our knowledge about Magnesium ion - DNA interactions at various volume ratios (1:50, 1:20, 1:10 and 1:5. Approach: The analysis of FT Raman data supported the existence of structural specificities in the interaction and also the stability of DNA secondary structure. Results: Results from the Raman spectra clearly indicate that the interaction of Magnesium ion with DNA is mainly through the phosphate groups of DNA with negligible change of the B-conformation of DNA at all the volume ratios studied. For example, band at 1079 cm-1 assigned to the symmetrical stretching vibration of the nucleic acid phosphodioxy (PO-2 group. This band in the order 1079¨ 1075¨ 1070¨ 1066¨ 1063 cm-1 at all Magnesium ion DNA concentrations studied. Similarly, Raman band at 845 cm-1 due to antisymmetrical phosphodiester (O-P-O stretching of DNA. Conclusion: Magnesium ion interaction with the DNA phosphate is weak in comparison to interactions with the bases. On the other hand, the Raman signature of B-DNA is largely unperturbed by magnesium ion, suggesting much weaker interactions.

  17. Interactions of quercetin-uranium complexes with biomembranes and DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, Enas Mohammed Hassan

    2014-07-21

    has been also confirmed from the DFT calculations. Finally, interaction experiments of uranyl-quercetin complex with DNA have been performed to assess an alternative uranyl-trapping and photoreduction system. The data show that consecutive addition of quercetin and uranyl destabilizes DNA. However, a preformed uranyl quercetin complex has very little effect on DNA structure. On the other hand, quercetin and uranyl appear to bind to DNA as a preformed complex in the loop portion of hairpin DNA. Therefore, also HP DNA is expected to be a suitable but less effective trapping system for the uranyl quercetin complex and its potential photoproducts.

  18. Interaction of Neuronal Tau with DNA in Nano-Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qu M.H.; Hua Q.; Li H.; He R.Q.

    2004-01-01

    @@ In this study, the binding of tau to DNA is investigated by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Using polynucleotide as probe, we find that tau bound to double-stranded DNA but not to single-stranded DNA. Formation of tau-polynucleotide complex is interfered at alkaline pH and high concentration of NaC1, but is not affected by dithiothreiotol.

  19. Interaction of Neuronal Tau with DNA in Nano-Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qu; M.H.; Hua; Q.; Li; H.; He; R.Q.

    2004-01-01

      In this study, the binding of tau to DNA is investigated by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Using polynucleotide as probe, we find that tau bound to double-stranded DNA but not to single-stranded DNA. Formation of tau-polynucleotide complex is interfered at alkaline pH and high concentration of NaC1, but is not affected by dithiothreiotol.……

  20. An Investigation on the Fundamental Interaction between Abeta Peptides and the AT-Rich DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li Na; Zheng, Jie; Chew, Lock Yue; Mu, Yuguang

    2015-07-01

    DNA damage is ubiquitous in all mammalian cells with the occurrence of more than 60,000 times per day per cell. In particular, DNA damage in neurons is found to accumulate with age and has been suggested to interfere with the synthesis of functional proteins. Moreover, recent studies have found through transgenic mice that human amyloid precursor protein causes an increase in DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with the effect of a prolongation in DNA repair. It is surmised that amyloid β (Aβ) exacerbates the DNA DSBs in neurons, possibly engendering neuronal dysfunction as a result. However, a good understanding on the holistic interaction mechanisms and the manner in which Aβ intertwines with DNA damage is still in its infancy. In our study, we found that DNA with an AT-rich sequence has a very low binding affinity toward Aβ by means of molecular dynamics simulation. While we have pursued a particular sequence of DNA in this study, other DNA sequences are expected to affect the interaction and binding affinity between DNA and Aβ, and will be pursued in our further research. Nonetheless, we have uncovered favorable interaction between the positively charged side chain of Aβ and the two ends of DNA. The latest experiment reveals that many of the double-stranded breaks in neurons can be fixed via DNA repair mechanisms but not in the case that Aβs are present. It is found that the increased numbers of DSBs prevail in active neurons. Here, on the basis of the favorable interaction between Aβ and the two ends of DNA, we propose the possibility that Aβ prevents DNA repair via binding directly to the break ends of the DNA, which further exacerbates DNA damage. Moreover, we have found that the base pair oxygen of the DNA has a greater preference to form hydrogen bonds than the backbone oxygen with Aβ at the two ends. Thus, we postulate that Aβ could serve to prevent the repair of AT-rich DNA, and it is unlikely to cause its breakage or affect its binding toward

  1. Triple helix DNA alters nucleosomal histone-DNA interactions and acts as a nucleosome barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, L; Blomquist, P; Milligan, J F; Wrange, O

    1995-06-25

    Oligonucleotides which form triple helical complexes on double-stranded DNA have been previously reported to selectively inhibit transcription both in vitro and in vivo by physically blocking RNA polymerase or transcription factor access to the DNA template. Here we show that a 16mer oligonucleotide, which forms triple helix DNA by binding to a 16 bp homopurine segment, alters the formation of histone-DNA contacts during in vitro nucleosome reconstitution. This effect was DNA sequence-specific and required the oligonucleotide to be present during in vitro nucleosome reconstitution. Binding of the triple helix oligonucleotide on a 199 bp mouse mammary tumour virus promoter DNA fragment with a centrally located triplex DNA resulted in interruption of histone-DNA contacts flanking the triplex DNA segment. When nucleosome reconstitution is carried out on a longer, 279 bp DNA fragment with an asymmetrically located triplex site, nucleosome formation occurred at the border of the triple helical DNA. In this case the triplex DNA functioned as a nucleosome barrier. We conclude that triplex DNA cannot be accommodated within a nucleosome context and thus may be used to site-specifically manipulate nucleosome organization.

  2. Stretching and immobilization of DNA for studies of protein–DNA interactions at the single-molecule level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dukkipati VenkatRam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSingle-molecule studies of the interactions of DNA and proteins are important in a variety of biological or biotechnology processes ranging from the protein’s search for its DNA target site, DNA replication, transcription, or repair, and genome sequencing. A critical requirement for single-molecule studies is the stretching and immobilization of otherwise randomly coiled DNA molecules. Several methods for doing so have been developed over the last two decades, including the use of forces derived from light, magnetic and electric fields, and hydrodynamic flow. Here we review the immobilization and stretching mechanisms for several of these techniques along with examples of single-molecule DNA–protein interaction assays that can be performed with each of them.

  3. Drug-DNA interactions and their study by UV-Visible, fluorescence spectroscopies and cyclic voltametry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirajuddin, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; Badshah, Amin

    2013-07-05

    The present paper review the drug-DNA interactions, their types and applications of experimental techniques used to study interactions between DNA and small ligand molecules that are potentially of pharmaceutical interest. DNA has been known to be the cellular target for many cytotoxic anticancer agents for several decades. Understanding how drug molecules interact with DNA has become an active research area at the interface between chemistry, molecular biology and medicine. In this review article, we attempt to bring together topics that cover the breadth of this large area of research. The interaction of drugs with DNA is a significant feature in pharmacology and plays a vital role in the determination of the mechanisms of drug action and designing of more efficient and specifically targeted drugs with lesser side effects. Several instrumental techniques are used to study such interactions. In the present review, we will discuss UV-Visible spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The applications of spectroscopic techniques are reviewed and we have discussed the type of information (qualitative or quantitative) that can be obtained from the use of each technique. Not only have novel techniques been applied to study drug-DNA interactions but such interactions may also be the basis for the development of new assays. The interaction between DNA and drugs can cause chemical and conformational modifications and, thus, variation of the electrochemical properties of nucleobases.

  4. Mapping of protein-protein interactions within the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, D; Jackson, S P

    1999-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Ku and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) proteins are required for the correct and efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Ku comprises two tightly-associated subunits of approximately 69 and approximately 83 kDa, which are termed Ku70 and Ku80 (or Ku86), respectively. Previously, a number of regions of both Ku subunits have been demonstrated to be involved in their interaction, but the molecular mechanism of this interaction remains unknown. We have identified a region in Ku70 (amino acid residues 449-578) and a region in Ku80 (residues 439-592) that participate in Ku subunit interaction. Sequence analysis reveals that these interaction regions share sequence homology and suggests that the Ku subunits are structurally related. On binding to a DNA double-strand break, Ku is able to interact with DNA-PKcs, but how this interaction is mediated has not been defined. We show that the extreme C-terminus of Ku80, specifically the final 12 amino acid residues, mediates a highly specific interaction with DNA-PKcs. Strikingly, these residues appear to be conserved only in Ku80 sequences from vertebrate organisms. These data suggest that Ku has evolved to become part of the DNA-PK holo-enzyme by acquisition of a protein-protein interaction motif at the C-terminus of Ku80. PMID:10446239

  5. Study on the interaction of anthracenyl-methyl homospermidine conjugate (ANTMHspd) with DNA by spectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiyong; Zhao, Luyao; Dong, Huanyang; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yijuan; Ren, Qianlei; Shao, Shuangyu; Huang, Yingying; Song, Lina; Guo, Tao; Xu, Xuejun; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-04-01

    The interaction between anthracenyl-methyl homospermidine conjugate (ANTMHspd) with herring sperm DNA was investigated by UV/vis absorption, fluorescent spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and (1)HNMR under physiological conditions (pH=7.4). The observed hypochromism effect and fluorescence quenching of ANTMHspd by DNA, and the displacement of EB from DNA-EB system by ANTMHspd suggested that ANTMHspd might interact with DNA by the combined mode of intercalation and groove binding. Further fluorescent tests at different temperatures revealed that the quenching mechanism was a static type. The quenching constant, binding constant and thermodynamic parameter obtained from fluorescence showed that the type of interaction force included mainly hydrogen bonding and van der Waals, which promoted the binding process. The CD test revealed that ANTMHspd could cause the B to A-like conformational change while ANTMHspd is not a typical DNA intercalator. The (1)H NMR tests showed that ANTMHspd partially intercalated DNA. The effect of NaCl and KI on ANTMHspd-DNA interaction provided additional evidences of intercalation. Molecular docking simulation was carried out and the docking model in silico suggested that the binding modes of ANTMHspd and DNA were groove binding and intercalation, with the anthracene moiety inserted in DNA base pairs and the polyamine chain embedded in the DNA groove. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Cytotoxicity and DNA interaction of brucine and strychnine-Two alkaloids of semen strychni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Xiaolin; Han, Xu; Tan, Xiaoxin; Kang, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxicities of the two alkaloids strychnine and brucine from the seed of Strychnos nux-vomica and their interaction with DNA were investigated. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrasolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to examine the growth inhibitory effects of these alkaloids on Vero cells after 24, 48 and 72h of incubation. The cytotoxicities of strychnine and brucine were found to be time- and concentration-dependent. Strychnine was determined to be more toxic to Vero cells than brucine. At the same time, the interactions of strychnine and brucine with DNA were investigated using neutral red (NR) dye as a probe by UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and an examination of the ionic strength effect, and the effects of alkaloids on DNA melting were also examined. The results indicated that a DNA-brucine mixture but not a DNA-strychnine mixture could be extracted from Vero cells after treatment with brucine and strychnine, respectively. Brucine competitively intercalated into the DNA double-helix causing fluorescence quenching of the DNA-NR system. UV absorption spectroscopy and the melting temperature (Tm) curve also provided evidence that brucine interacted with DNA through intercalation. Furthermore, the results of the ionic strength effect experiment suggested that electrostatic interactions between brucine and phosphate groups in the DNA backbone might also play an important role in the binding of brucine to DNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA-HMGB1 interaction: The nuclear aggregates of polyamine mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacomino, Giuseppe; Picariello, Gianluca; Sbrana, Francesca; Raiteri, Roberto; D'Agostino, Luciano

    2016-10-01

    Nuclear aggregates of polyamines (NAPs) are supramolecular compounds generated by the self-assembly of protonated nuclear polyamines (spermine, spermidine and putrescine) and phosphate ions. In the presence of genomic DNA, the hierarchical process of self-structuring ultimately produces nanotube-like polymers that envelop the double helix. Because of their modular nature and their aggregation-disaggregation dynamics, NAPs confer plasticity and flexibility to DNA. Through the disposition of charges, NAPs also enable a bidirectional stream of information between the genome and interacting moieties. High mobility group (HMG) B1 is a non-histone chromosomal protein that binds to DNA and that influences multiple nuclear processes. Because genomic DNA binds to either NAPs or HMGB1 protein, we explored the ability of in vitro self-assembled NAPs (ivNAPs) to mediate the DNA-HMGB1 interaction. To this end, we structured DNA-NAPs-HMGB1 and DNA-HMGB1-NAPs ternary complexes in vitro through opportune sequential incubations. Mobility shift electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy showed that the DNA-ivNAPs-HGMB1 complex had conformational assets supposedly more suitable those of the DNA-HGMB1-ivNAPs to comply with the physiological and functional requirements of DNA. Our findings indicated that ivNAPs act as mediators of the DNA-HMGB1 interaction.

  8. DBD-Hunter: a knowledge-based method for the prediction of DNA-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2008-07-01

    The structures of DNA-protein complexes have illuminated the diversity of DNA-protein binding mechanisms shown by different protein families. This lack of generality could pose a great challenge for predicting DNA-protein interactions. To address this issue, we have developed a knowledge-based method, DNA-binding Domain Hunter (DBD-Hunter), for identifying DNA-binding proteins and associated binding sites. The method combines structural comparison and the evaluation of a statistical potential, which we derive to describe interactions between DNA base pairs and protein residues. We demonstrate that DBD-Hunter is an accurate method for predicting DNA-binding function of proteins, and that DNA-binding protein residues can be reliably inferred from the corresponding templates if identified. In benchmark tests on approximately 4000 proteins, our method achieved an accuracy of 98% and a precision of 84%, which significantly outperforms three previous methods. We further validate the method on DNA-binding protein structures determined in DNA-free (apo) state. We show that the accuracy of our method is only slightly affected on apo-structures compared to the performance on holo-structures cocrystallized with DNA. Finally, we apply the method to approximately 1700 structural genomics targets and predict that 37 targets with previously unknown function are likely to be DNA-binding proteins. DBD-Hunter is freely available at http://cssb.biology.gatech.edu/skolnick/webservice/DBD-Hunter/.

  9. Influence of salt bridge interactions on the gas-phase stability of DNA/peptide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Sandra; Woods, Amina; Delvolvé, Alice; Tabet, Jean Claude

    2008-12-01

    Negative ion mode electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used to study DNA duplexes-peptide interaction. In the present study, we show that peptides that contain two adjacent basic residues interact noncovalently with DNA single strand or duplex. Fragmentation of the complexes between peptides containing basic residues and DNA were studied under collisions and showed unexpected dissociation pathways, as previously reported for peptide-peptide interactions. The binary complexes are dissociated either along fragmentation of the covalent bonds of the peptide backbone and/or along the single DNA strand backbone cleavage without disruption of noncovalent interaction, which demonstrates the strong binding of peptide to the DNA strand. Sequential MS/MS and MSn were further performed on ternary complexes formed between duplexes and peptides to investigate the nature of interaction. The CID spectra showed as major pathway the disruption of the noncovalent interactions and the formation of binary complexes and single-strand ions, directed by the nucleic acid gas-phase acidity. Indeed, a preferential formation of complexes with thymidine containing single strands is observed. An alternative pathway is also detected, in which complexes are dissociated along the covalent bond of the peptide and/or DNA according to the basicity. Our experimental data suggest the presence of strong salt bridge interactions between DNA and peptides containing basic residues.

  10. Studies of interaction between safranine T and double helix DNA by spectral methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y; He, X W

    1998-06-01

    In this paper, the DNA affinity properties of Safranine T (ST), which features a phenazinyl group, were studied. The studies indicated that ST could intercalate into the stack base pairs of DNA. Intrinsic binding constants obtained by different spectral methods were consistent within experimental errors. They were of the order of 10(4) M-1 in DNA base pairs, and the binding site size was about 7 in DNA base pairs. Studies of fluorescence quenching by anionic quenchers and melting temperature of DNA all supported the intercalative binding of ST with DNA. The experiments also showed that electrostatic binding played an important role in the interaction of ST with DNA. This research offers a new intercalation functional group to DNA-targeted drug design.

  11. The role of monogamous bivalency and Fc interactions in the binding of anti-DNA antibodies to DNA antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Nancy A; Pisetsky, David S

    2016-05-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus. These antibodies can bind DNA avidly by monogamous bivalency, a mechanism which requires the interaction of both Fab combining regions with antigenic determinants on the same polynucleotide. To explore further this mechanism, we tested Fab and F(ab')2 fragments prepared from IgG from patient plasmas in an ELISA with native DNA antigen, detecting antibody with a peroxidase conjugated anti-Fab reagent. These studies showed that Fab fragments, which can only bind monovalently, had negligible activity. Although bivalent F(ab')2 fragments would be predicted to bind DNA, these fragments also showed poor anti-DNA activity. Control studies showed that the fragments retained antibody activity to tetanus toxoid and an EBV antigen preparation. Together, these findings suggest that anti-DNA avidity depends on monogamous bivalency, with the antibody Fc portion also influencing DNA binding, in a mechanism which can be termed Fc-dependent monogamous bivalency.

  12. Point Defects in Double Helix Induced by Interaction of Silver Nanoparticles with DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Bregadze, Vasil G; Giorgadze, Tamar G; Monaselidze, Jamlet R; Jaliashvili, Zaza V; Khuskivadze, Temur B

    2012-01-01

    Interaction of DNA-silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) complexes with H3O+, Cu2+ and Cl- has been studied by spectro-photometric, spectro-fluorimetric and differential scanning micro calorimetric methods. It is shown that DNA is a catalyst in redox reactions taking place in AgNPs adsorbed on its surface. We also demonstrate that Ag+ ions that are freed after corrosion of nanoparticles show absorption into the inner part of DNA double helix, i.e. they make the so-called cross-links between complementary base pairs of DNA. The cross-links present point defects of DNA which leads in-vivo to cell death.

  13. Interaction of DNA with aromatic hydrocarbons fraction in atmospheric particulates of Xigu District of Lanzhou, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Voluminously epidemiological studies show that the relationships exist between the air pollution and human health and cancer. Aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs) in air form a large class of organic pollutants, which are widely in environment and many of them are known to be carcinogenic and/or mutagenic and contribute to ambient air pollution. In the past decades, bioassays mainly have been used to evaluate the toxicity of chemical mixtures in atmospheric particulates or aqueous environment. However, it is well known that the covalent complexes formed by carcinogens with DNA may be exert negative results in bioassay. So the main aim of this paper is to develop an evaluation method of toxicity effects of chemical mixtures in atmospheric particulates from chemical standpoint. In this study, the in virto interaction of the AHs with DNA was investigated by absorption, fluorescence and resonance light scattering (RLS) spectroscopic techniques. The results showed that the AHs in the atmospheric particulates could combine with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) and herring sperm DNA (hsDNA) without being activated or metabolized by organism, respectively. Intercalation may be present in the mechanism of interaction. The binding constants of the AHs with ctDNA and hsDNA were 2.5×102 and 2.0×103, respectively, which indicated that the interaction of the AHs with hsDNA is stronger than that with ctDNA. In addition, the relationships of dose-effect between the total mole concentration of chemical components and the ability of binding ct DNA and hsDNA were confirmed. This research made it possible to study the toxicity effects of chemical mixtures in atmospheric particulates by chemical method. It is believed that the composition and contents of unknown AHs and the interaction of DNA with AHs in atmospheric particulates of Xigu District of Lanzhou City, China are first reported in the past twenty years.

  14. The physics of protein-DNA interaction networks in the control of gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Leonor

    2012-05-01

    Protein-DNA interaction networks play a central role in many fundamental cellular processes. In gene regulation, physical interactions and reactions among the molecular components together with the physical properties of DNA control how genes are turned on and off. A key player in all these processes is the inherent flexibility of DNA, which provides an avenue for long-range interactions between distal DNA elements through DNA looping. Such versatility enables multiple interactions and results in additional complexity that is remarkably difficult to address with traditional approaches. This topical review considers recent advances in statistical physics methods to study the assembly of protein-DNA complexes with loops, their effects in the control of gene expression, and their explicit application to the prototypical lac operon genetic system of the E. coli bacterium. In the last decade, it has been shown that the underlying physical properties of DNA looping can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including the balance between robustness and sensitivity of the induction process. These physical properties are largely dependent on the free energy of DNA looping, which accounts for DNA bending and twisting effects. These new physical methods have also been used in reverse to uncover the actual in vivo free energy of looping double-stranded DNA in living cells, which was not possible with existing experimental techniques. The results obtained for DNA looping by the lac repressor inside the E. coli bacterium showed a more malleable DNA than expected as a result of the interplay of the simultaneous presence of two distinct conformations of looped DNA.

  15. Investigation on the toxic interaction of typical plasticizers with calf thymus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiaojing [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100, Shandong Province (China); Zong, Wansong, E-mail: gaocz@sdu.edu.cn [College of Population, Resources and Environment, Shandong Normal University, 88# East Wenhua Road, Jinan 250014 (China); Liu, Chunguang; Liu, Yang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100, Shandong Province (China); Gao, Canzhu, E-mail: rutaoliu@sdu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100, Shandong Province (China); Liu, Rutao [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100, Shandong Province (China)

    2015-05-15

    The interactions of typical plasticizers dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. Experimental results indicated that the characteristic fluorescence intensity of phthalic acid rose with the increase of DNA concentration; while the characteristic fluorescence intensities of plasticizers decreased with the increase of DNA concentration. Experiments on native and denatured DNA determined that plasticizers interacted with DNA both in groove and electrostatic binding mode. The molecular modeling results further illustrated that there is groove binding between them; hydrogen bonding and Van der Waals interactions were the main forces. With the extension of branched-chains, the binding effects between plasticizers and DNA were weakened, which could be related to the increased steric hindrance. - Highlights: • This work established the binding mode of plasticizers with DNA on molecular level. • The mechanism was explored by fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. • There are two kinds of binding mode between DMP, DEP, DBP and DNA, electrostatic and groove. • With the branched chain extension, the binding effect of plasticizers and DNA has been weakened.

  16. Genotoxicity of non-covalent interactions: DNA intercalators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, Lynnette R. [Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, Faculty of Medical and Health Science, University of Auckland (New Zealand)], E-mail: l.ferguson@auckland.ac.nz; Denny, William A. [Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, Faculty of Medical and Health Science, University of Auckland (New Zealand)

    2007-10-01

    This review provides an update on the mutagenicity of intercalating chemicals, as carried out over the last 17 years. The most extensively studied DNA intercalating agents are acridine and its derivatives, that bind reversibly but non-covalently to DNA. These are frameshift mutagens, especially in bacteria and bacteriophage, but do not otherwise show a wide range of mutagenic properties. Di-acridines or di-quinolines may be either mono- or bis-intercalators, depending upon the length of the alkyl chain separating the chromophores. Those which monointercalate appear as either weak frameshift mutagens in bacteria, or as non-mutagens. However, some of the bisintercalators act as 'petite' mutagens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that they may be more likely to target mitochondrial as compared with nuclear DNA. Some of the new methodologies for detecting intercalation suggest this may be a property of a wider range of chemicals than previously recognised. For example, quite a number of flavonoids appear to intercalate into DNA. However, their mutagenic properties may be dominated by the fact that many of them are also able to inhibit topoisomerase II enzymes, and this property implies that they will be potent recombinogens and clastogens. DNA intercalation may serve to position other, chemically reactive molecules, in specific ways on the DNA, leading to a distinctive (and wider) range of mutagenic properties, and possible carcinogenic potential.

  17. Binding characteristics and interactive region of 2-phenylpyrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yonghai; Zhong, Dandan; Luo, Jinhui; Tan, Hongliang; Chen, Shouhui; Li, Ping; Wang, Li; Wang, Tao

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between 2-phenylpyrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline (PQ) and DNA under physiological conditions was investigated using multi-spectroscopic techniques, atomic force microscopy and gel electrophoresis. The thermodynamic parameters were estimated and were discussed in detail. The results of fluorescence-quenching experiments indicated that the main interactive force between PQ and DNA was a hydrophobic interaction and that it was a static quenching process. Potassium iodide and single-strand (ss)DNA quenching studies, together with circular dichroism spectra implied groove binding of PQ with DNA. Atomic force microscopy and gel electrophoresis experiments suggested that there were no major conformational changes in DNA upon interaction with PQ. In addition, UV/vis absorption titration of DNA bases confirmed that PQ bound with DNA mainly through a minor groove interaction and preferentially interacted with adenine and thymine. We anticipate that this work will provide useful information for the application of quinazoline derivatives in the fields of medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry.

  18. Mechanics of protein-DNA interaction studied with ultra-fast optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monico, Carina; Tempestini, Alessia; Vanzi, Francesco; Pavone, Francesco S.; Capitanio, Marco

    2014-05-01

    The lac operon is a well known example of gene expression regulation, based on the specific interaction of Lac repressor protein (LacI) with its target DNA sequence (operator). LacI and other DNA-binding proteins bind their specific target sequences with rates higher than allowed by 3D diffusion alone. Generally accepted models predict a combination of free 3D diffusion and 1D sliding along non-specific DNA. We recently developed an ultrafast force-clamp laser trap technique capable of probing molecular interactions with sub-ms temporal resolution, under controlled pN-range forces. With this technique, we tested the interaction of LacI with two different DNA constructs: a construct with two copies of the O1 operator separated by 300 bp and a construct containing the native E.coli operator sequences. Our measurements show at least two classes of LacI-DNA interactions: long (in the tens of s range) and short (tens of ms). Based on position along the DNA sequence, the observed interactions can be interpreted as specific binding to operator sequences (long events) and transient interactions with nonspecific sequences (short events). Moreover, we observe continuous sliding of the protein along DNA, passively driven by the force applied with the optical tweezers.

  19. Interaction of carbon nano tubes with DNA segments; Interacao de nanotubos de carbono com segmentos de DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peressinotto, Valdirene Sullas Teixeira

    2007-07-01

    Single- and double-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules can strongly bind to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) via non-covalent interactions. Under certain conditions, the DNA molecule spontaneously self-assembles into a helical wrapping around the tubular structure of the carbon nanotubes to form DNA/SWNT hybrids, which are both stable and soluble in water. This system has recently received extensive attention, since, besides rendering SWNTs dispersible in water as individual tubes, the DNA hybrids are very promising candidates for many applications in nanotechnology and molecular biology. All the possible applications for DNA-SWNT hybrids require, however, a fully understanding of DNA-nanotube wrapping mechanism which is still lacking in the literature. In this context, the aim of this work was to investigate the non-covalent interaction in aqueous medium between SWNTs and synthetic DNA segments having a known nucleotide sequence. Initially, the study was focused on poly d(GT)n sequences (n = 10, 30 and 45) that contain a sequence of alternating guanine and thymine bases and for which the efficiency to disperse and separate carbon nanotubes has already been demonstrated. Besides the size of GT sequences, the effects of ionic strength and pH in the interaction were also investigated. Afterwards, we studied the interaction of SWNT with DNA molecules that contain only a single type of nitrogenous base (DNA homopolymers), which has not been reported in details in the literature. We investigated homopolymers of poly dA{sub 20}, poly dT{sub 20}, poly dC{sub 20} and the duplex poly dA{sub 20}:dT{sub 20}. Most of the study was carried out with small-diameter HiPco SWNTs (with diameters between 0.7 and 1.2 nm). In some studies, SWNTs with diameter around 1.4 nm, synthesized via laser ablation and arc-discharge methods, were also investigated. The arc-discharge nanotubes used in this study were functionalized with carboxylic groups (-COOH) due to their

  20. Studies on the Interaction between Zinc-Hydroxybenzoite Complex and Genomic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacali Necefoglu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Zinc-Hydroxybenzoite ([Zn (H206] (p-HO-C6H4COO22H20 complex which wassynthesized and characterized by instrumental methods and the DNA samples which hadbeen isolated from cattle were allowed to interact at 37 oC for different time periods. Theinteraction of genomic DNA with this complex has been followed by agarose gelelectrophoresis at 50 V for 2 h. When DNA samples were allowed to interact with this metalcomplex, it was found that band intensities changed with the concentrations of the complex.In the result of interaction between this complex and genomic DNA samples, it wasdetermined that the intensities of bands were changed at the different concentrations of thecomplex. The brightness of the bands was increased and mobility of the bands wasdecreased, indicating the occurrence of increased covalent binding of the metal complexwith DNA. In this study it was concluded that the damage effect of ascorbate was reducedby Zinc-Hydroxybenzoite.

  1. In Vitro Interactions between 17β-Estradiol and DNA Result in Formation of the Hormone-DNA Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbynek Heger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Beyond the role of 17β-estradiol (E2 in reproduction and during the menstrual cycle, it has been shown to modulate numerous physiological processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation and ion transport in many tissues. The pathways in which estrogens affect an organism have been partially described, although many questions still exist regarding estrogens’ interaction with biomacromolecules. Hence, the present study showed the interaction of four oligonucleotides (17, 20, 24 and/or 38-mer with E2. The strength of these interactions was evaluated using optical methods, showing that the interaction is influenced by three major factors, namely: oligonucleotide length, E2 concentration and interaction time. In addition, the denaturation phenomenon of DNA revealed that the binding of E2 leads to destabilization of hydrogen bonds between the nitrogenous bases of DNA strands resulting in a decrease of their melting temperatures (Tm. To obtain a more detailed insight into these interactions, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was employed. This study revealed that E2 with DNA forms non-covalent physical complexes, observed as the mass shifts for app. 270 Da (Mr of E2 to higher molecular masses. Taken together, our results indicate that E2 can affect biomacromolecules, as circulating oligonucleotides, which can trigger mutations, leading to various unwanted effects.

  2. DOMMINO 2.0: integrating structurally resolved protein-, RNA-, and DNA-mediated macromolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xingyan; Dhroso, Andi; Han, Jing Ginger; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Korkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are formed between proteins, DNA and RNA molecules. Being a principle building block in macromolecular assemblies and pathways, the interactions underlie most of cellular functions. Malfunctioning of macromolecular interactions is also linked to a number of diseases. Structural knowledge of the macromolecular interaction allows one to understand the interaction's mechanism, determine its functional implications and characterize the effects of genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, on the interaction. Unfortunately, until now the interactions mediated by different types of macromolecules, e.g. protein-protein interactions or protein-DNA interactions, are collected into individual and unrelated structural databases. This presents a significant obstacle in the analysis of macromolecular interactions. For instance, the homogeneous structural interaction databases prevent scientists from studying structural interactions of different types but occurring in the same macromolecular complex. Here, we introduce DOMMINO 2.0, a structural Database Of Macro-Molecular INteractiOns. Compared to DOMMINO 1.0, a comprehensive database on protein-protein interactions, DOMMINO 2.0 includes the interactions between all three basic types of macromolecules extracted from PDB files. DOMMINO 2.0 is automatically updated on a weekly basis. It currently includes ∼1,040,000 interactions between two polypeptide subunits (e.g. domains, peptides, termini and interdomain linkers), ∼43,000 RNA-mediated interactions, and ∼12,000 DNA-mediated interactions. All protein structures in the database are annotated using SCOP and SUPERFAMILY family annotation. As a result, protein-mediated interactions involving protein domains, interdomain linkers, C- and N- termini, and peptides are identified. Our database provides an intuitive web interface, allowing one to investigate interactions at three different resolution levels: whole subunit network

  3. INTERACTION OF CHALCONES WITH CT-DNA BY SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC ANALYSIS AND THEORETICALSIMULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Zarate

    Full Text Available Chalcones are open chain molecules precursors of flavonoids and isoflavonoids, found spread in edible plants. Because they are easily accessible trough Claisen Shmidt condensation, a great variety of derivatives are available. They have also shown potential in pharmacological and biological applications. It is known that chalcone derivatives display a role in the treatment of complex diseases such as cancer, among others, where the DNA is considered as the target for the action of these kinds of compounds. This action is commonly explained as the inhibition of the DNA replications and transcriptions through interactions. However, not conclusive associations between these DNA-Drug interactions and toxicity have been found. This research focuses on the capacity of a chalcone`s family to interact with DNA. Therefore, the binding constants for each compounds with Calf Thymus DNA [CT-DNA] were determined by spectrophotometric titration at room temperature. In addition, the effect of increasing the chalcone`s concentration over the relative viscosity of CT-DNA at room temperature was assessed. On the other hand, with the aim to find the optimal DNA-chalcone configurations, as well as consistently predict their binding, a computational work was undertaken. To accomplish these goals within a reasonable time framework, an empirical scoring function (AScore and a docking engine (ShapeDock were performed using the ArgusLab package. The results of viscosity and docking measurement provided structural insights which suggest that chalcones bind with DNA via interaction as well as intercalation. The presence of interactions is also evidenced by the spectrophotometric study which showed luminescence quenching of the chalcones upon interaction with CT-DNA.

  4. Are glutathione S transferases involved in DNA damage signalling? Interactions with DNA damage and repair revealed from molecular epidemiology studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusinska, Maria, E-mail: Maria.DUSINSKA@nilu.no [CEE-Health Effects Group, NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Staruchova, Marta; Horska, Alexandra [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Smolkova, Bozena [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Collins, Andrew [Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo (Norway); Bonassi, Stefano [Unit of Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology, IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Rome (Italy); Volkovova, Katarina [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multigene family of isoenzymes that are important in the control of oxidative stress and in phase II metabolism. Acting non-enzymically, GSTs can modulate signalling pathways of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis. Using a molecular epidemiology approach, we have investigated a potential involvement of GSTs in DNA damage processing, specifically the modulation of DNA repair in a group of 388 healthy adult volunteers; 239 with at least 5 years of occupational exposure to asbestos, stone wool or glass fibre, and 149 reference subjects. We measured DNA damage in lymphocytes using the comet assay (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis): strand breaks (SBs) and alkali-labile sites, oxidised pyrimidines with endonuclease III, and oxidised purines with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. We also measured GST activity in erythrocytes, and the capacity for base excision repair (BER) in a lymphocyte extract. Polymorphisms in genes encoding three GST isoenzymes were determined, namely deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and single nucleotide polymorphism Ile105Val in GSTP1. Consumption of vegetables and wine correlated negatively with DNA damage and modulated BER. GST activity correlated with oxidised bases and with BER capacity, and differed depending on polymorphisms in GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1. A significantly lower BER rate was associated with the homozygous GSTT1 deletion in all asbestos site subjects and in the corresponding reference group. Multifactorial analysis revealed effects of sex and exposure in GSTP1 Ile/Val heterozygotes but not in Ile/Ile homozygotes. These variants affected also SBs levels, mainly by interactions of GSTP1 genotype with exposure, with sex, and with smoking habit; and by an interaction between sex and smoking. Our results show that GST polymorphisms and GST activity can apparently influence DNA stability and repair of oxidised bases, suggesting a potential new role for these

  5. Electrostatic study of Alanine mutational effects on transcription: application to GATA-3:DNA interaction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Assaad, Atlal; Dawy, Zaher; Nemer, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Protein-DNA interaction is of fundamental importance in molecular biology, playing roles in functions as diverse as DNA transcription, DNA structure formation, and DNA repair. Protein-DNA association is also important in medicine; understanding Protein-DNA binding kinetics can assist in identifying disease root causes which can contribute to drug development. In this perspective, this work focuses on the transcription process by the GATA Transcription Factor (TF). GATA TF binds to DNA promoter region represented by `G,A,T,A' nucleotides sequence, and initiates transcription of target genes. When proper regulation fails due to some mutations on the GATA TF protein sequence or on the DNA promoter sequence (weak promoter), deregulation of the target genes might lead to various disorders. In this study, we aim to understand the electrostatic mechanism behind GATA TF and DNA promoter interactions, in order to predict Protein-DNA binding in the presence of mutations, while elaborating on non-covalent binding kinetics. To generate a family of mutants for the GATA:DNA complex, we replaced every charged amino acid, one at a time, with a neutral amino acid like Alanine (Ala). We then applied Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations feeding into free energy calculations, for each mutation. These calculations delineate the contribution to binding from each Ala-replaced amino acid in the GATA:DNA interaction. After analyzing the obtained data in view of a two-step model, we are able to identify potential key amino acids in binding. Finally, we applied the model to GATA-3:DNA (crystal structure with PDB-ID: 3DFV) binding complex and validated it against experimental results from the literature.

  6. Modification of gelatin-DNA interaction for optimised DNA extraction from gelatin and gelatin capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Nurhidayatul Asma; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; El Sheikha, Aly Farag; Khairil Mokhtar, Nur Fadhilah; Ismail, Amin; Ali, Md Eaqub

    2016-05-01

    Poor quality and quantity of DNA extracted from gelatin and gelatin capsules often causes failure in the determination of animal species using PCR. Gelatin, which is mainly derived from porcine and bovine, has been a matter of concern among customers in order to fulfill religious obligation and safety precaution against several transmissible infectious diseases associated with bovine species. Thus, optimised DNA extraction from gelatin is very important for successful real-time PCR detection of gelatin species. In this work, the DNA extraction method was optimised in terms of lysis incubation period and inclusion of pre-treatment pH modification of samples. The yield of DNA extracted from porcine gelatin was significantly increased when the pH of the samples was adjusted to pH 8.5 prior to DNA precipitation with isopropanol. The optimal pH for DNA precipitation from bovine gelatin solution was then determined at the original pH range of solution: pH 7.6 to 8. A DNA fragment of approximately 300 base pairs was available for PCR amplification. DNA extracted from gelatin and commercially available capsules has been successfully utilised for species detection using real-time PCR assay. However, significant adulterations of porcine and bovine in pure gelatin and capsules have been detected, which require further analytical techniques for validation. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Synthesis of Distamycin Analogs and Their Interactions withCalf Thymus DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖军华; 袁谷; 黄伟强; 杜卫红; 王保怀; 李芝芬

    2001-01-01

    Two distamycin analogs (PyPyPy-γ-Dp and PyPyPyPy-γ- Dp)were synthesized by a halform reaction and the DCC/HOBT coupling reaction in a simple and fast way without amino protection.By using calf thymus DNA,the interaction between the analogs and DNA duplex was studied by CD, and ITC.

  8. Investigation of the interaction between HIV-1 DNA and cyclic peptides by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Quan Liu; Hui Hui Li; Yun Hua Ye; Gu Yuan

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between HIV-I DNA and five cyclic peptides (CPI-CP5) was investigated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). It revealed that CPI [c(Ala-Tyr-Leu-Ala-Gly)] and CP4 [c(Pro-D-Tyr-Leu-D-Ala-Gly)] have the higher binding affinity with the duplex DNA among the five cyclic peptides.

  9. Interaction of zinc and cobalt with dipeptides and their DNA binding studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Rabindra Reddy; M Radhika; K Srinivas Rao

    2004-06-01

    Interactions of zinc and cobalt with peptides cysteinylglycine and histidylglycine have been studied. The binding modes were identified and geometry assigned. Stabilities of these complexes and their ability to bind DNA have been investigated. It is demonstrated that only zinc complexes bind DNA as compared to cobalt complexes.

  10. Modelling protein-DNA interactions: bend and twist until it fits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.

    2010-01-01

    DNA-interacting proteins fulfil a vital role in the living cell. They allow the cell to quickly respond to changes in its environment by tuning the level of transcription. Furthermore, sophisticated protein machineries guard the DNA against hazardous influences that may damage it. A disruption of th

  11. Multi-spectroscopic DNA interaction studies of sunset yellow food additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Heidary Zeidali, Sahar; Omidfar, Kobra; Shahabadi, Nahid

    2012-12-01

    The use of food dyes is at least controversial due to their essential role. Synthetic color food additives occupy an important place in the food industry. Moreover many of them have been related to health problems mainly in children that are considered the most vulnerable group. The purpose of this work is to present spectrophotometric methods to analyze the interaction of native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with sunset yellow (SY) at physiological pH. Considerable hyperchromism and no red shift with an intrinsic binding constant of 7 × 10(4 )M(-1) were observed in UV absorption band of SY. Binding constants of DNA with complex were calculated at different temperatures. Slow increase in specific viscosity of DNA, induced circular dichroism spectral changes, and no significant changes in the fluorescence of neutral red-DNA solutions in the presence of SY suggest that this molecule interacts with CT-DNA via groove binding mode. Furthermore, the enthalpy and entropy of the reaction between SY and CT-DNA showed that the reaction is exothermic and enthalpy favored (∆H = -58.19 kJ mol(-1); ΔS = -274.36 kJ mol(-1) ) which are other evidences to indicate that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding are the main running forces in the binding of the mentioned molecule and mode of interaction with DNA.

  12. Binding interaction between sorafenib and calf thymus DNA: Spectroscopic methodology, viscosity measurement and molecular docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Chen, Jun; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Ying-Yao

    2015-02-01

    The binding interaction of sorafenib with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was studied using UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence emission spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD), viscosity measurement and molecular docking methods. The experimental results revealed that there was obvious binding interaction between sorafenib and ct-DNA. The binding constant (Kb) of sorafenib with ct-DNA was 5.6 × 103 M-1 at 298 K. The enthalpy and entropy changes (ΔH0 and ΔS0) in the binding process of sorafenib with ct-DNA were -27.66 KJ mol-1 and -21.02 J mol-1 K-1, respectively, indicating that the main binding interaction forces were van der Waals force and hydrogen bonding. The docking results suggested that sorafenib preferred to bind on the minor groove of A-T rich DNA and the binding site of sorafenib was 4 base pairs long. The conformation change of sorafenib in the sorafenib-DNA complex was obviously observed and the change was close relation with the structure of DNA, implying that the flexibility of sorafenib molecule played an important role in the formation of the stable sorafenib-ct-DNA complex.

  13. Studies on the interaction of apigenin with calf thymus DNA by spectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shufang; Sun, Xuejun; Kong, Rongmei; Xu, Mingming

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between apigenin and calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) in a pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, DNA melting techniques, and viscosity measurements. It was found that apigenin molecules could intercalate into the base pairs of DNA, forming a apigenin-DNA complex with a binding constant of K310K = 6.4 × 104 L mol-1. The thermodynamic parameters enthalpy change (ΔH), entropy change (ΔS) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG) were calculated to be 7.36 × 104 J mol-1, 329 J K-1 mol-1 and -2.84 × 104 J mol-1 at 310 K, respectively. Hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular force in stabilizing the apigenin-DNA complex. Thermal denaturation study suggested that the stabilization of the ctDNA helix was increased when the apigenin binding to ctDNA as indicated by the increase in thermal denaturation temperature of ctDNA at around 5.0 °C in the presence of apigenin. Spectroscopic techniques together with melting techniques and viscosity determination provided evidences of intercalation mode of binding for the interaction between apigenin and ctDNA.

  14. Sequence-specific DNA interactions with calixarene-based langmuir monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullaud, Vanessa; Moridi, Negar; Shahgaldian, Patrick

    2014-07-29

    The interactions of an amphiphilic calixarene, namely p-guanidino-dodecyloxy-calix[4]arene, 1, self-assembled as Langmuir monolayers, with short double stranded DNA, were investigated by surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms, surface ellipsometry and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). Three DNA 30mers were used as models, poly(AT), poly(GC) and a random DNA sequence with 50% of G:C base pairs. The interactions of these model DNA duplexes with 1-based Langmuir monolayers were studied by measuring compression isotherms using increasing DNA concentrations (10(-6), 10(-5), 10(-4), and 5 × 10(-4) g L(-1)) in the aqueous subphase. The isotherms of 1 showed an expansion of the monolayer with, interestingly, significant differences depending on the duplex DNA sequence studied. Indeed, the interactions of 1-based monolayers with poly(AT) led to an expansion of the monolayer that was significantly more pronounced that for monolayers on subphases of poly(GC) and the random DNA sequence. The structure and thickness of 1-based Langmuir monolayers were investigated by BAM and surface ellipsometry that showed differences in thickness and structure between a monolayer formed on pure water or on a DNA subphase, with here again relevant dissimilarities depending on the DNA composition.

  15. Copper interactions with DNA of chromatin and its role in neurodegenerative disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Govindaraju; H.S. Shekar; S.B.Sateesha; P.Vasudeva Raju; K.R.Sambasiva Rao; K.S.J. Rao; A.J.Rajamma

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have demonstrated the conformational changes to DNA induced by abnormal interactions of copper using circular dichroism, in combination with UV-absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy. Results confirm that binding of copper to bases of DNA in chromatin is concentration dependent. Binding efficiency of Cu2+ions to DNA is increased in proportion to the degree of unwinding of the double helix induced by denaturation. Altered B-DNA conformation will alter the integrity of DNA which may affect the normal process of DNA replication and transcription. Copper induced DNA damage in the brain may cause neurotoxicity and the neuronal cell death and is implicated in Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders.

  16. Improved sustained release of antigen from immunostimulatory DNA hydrogel by electrostatic interaction with chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii-Mizuno, Yumiko; Umeki, Yuka; Onuki, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Nishikawa, Makiya

    2017-01-10

    Immunostimulatory DNA hydrogel (sDNA hydrogel) containing unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sequences has been demonstrated to be a useful antigen delivery system, which can effectively induce an antigen-specific immune response through stimulation of the innate immune system. However, relatively rapid release of antigens from the sDNA hydrogel limits its potential. To enhance the potency of the sDNA hydrogel via improvement of its sustained release property, we selected chitosan, a biocompatible cationic polymer which electrostatically interacts with DNA, and mixed it with the sDNA hydrogel. Compared to unmixed sDNA hydrogel, sDNA hydrogel mixed with chitosan (Chitosan-sDNA hydrogel) was more stable, tougher, had more bound water, released a model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) more slowly in vitro, and provided longer retention of OVA at the injection site after intradermal injection into mice. Intradermal immunization of mice with the OVA-loaded Chitosan-sDNA hydrogel resulted in the induction of a higher level of OVA-specific IgG in serum compared with OVA-loaded sDNA hydrogel with no chitosan. These results indicate that the Chitosan-sDNA hydrogel is an improved sustained release formulation for efficient induction of antigen-specific immune responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of troxerutin on 2-aminoanthracene and DNA interaction and its anti-mutagenic property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subastri, A; Harikrishna, K; Sureshkumar, M; Alshammari, Ghedeir M; Aristatile, B; Thirunavukkarasu, C

    2017-04-01

    One of the pivotal mechanisms projected for bioflavonoids in cancer chemoprevention is through their intervention against mutagen-DNA interaction. Recent literatures emphasize the role of troxerutin (TXER) as an emerging anticancer agent. However, there are no reports on its intervention in any carcinogen-DNA interaction. The present study investigates the possibility of TXER, in prevention of 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA) contact with DNA. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy results, highlight the direct contact of 2-AA with DNA, while presence of TXER prevented this interaction. Gel-electrophoresis study clearly revealed that, TXER inhibits 2-AA+UVA radiation induced DNA damage. Fluorescence microscopic studies elucidated that, TXER treatment obstructs the 2-AA interaction with cellular DNA, while molecular docking showed the energetically favourable structure of TXER/2-AA/TXER complex. Further anti-mutagenicity experiment revealed that, TXER prevents the mutation induced colony formation in mutant strain of S. typhymurium. Our in vitro and ex vivo experimental findings provide imperative evidence about the protective role of TXER against environmental carcinogens through the inhibition of carcinogen-DNA interaction, implicating its potential for therapeutic applications in cancer.

  18. Thermodynamics of HMGB1 interaction with duplex DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, S; Bianchi, M E; Knapp, S

    2001-08-28

    The high mobility group protein HMGB1 is a small, highly abundant protein that binds to DNA in a non-sequence-specific manner. HMGB1 consists of 2 DNA binding domains, the HMG boxes A and B, followed by a short basic region and a continuous stretch of 30 glutamate or aspartate residues. Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to characterize the binding of HMGB1 to the double-stranded model DNAs poly(dAdT).(dTdA) and poly(dGdC).(dCdG). To elucidate the contribution of the different structural motifs to DNA binding, calorimetric measurements were performed comparing the single boxes A and B, the two boxes plus or minus the basic sequence stretch (AB(bt) and AB), and the full-length HMGB1 protein. Thermodynamically, binding of HMGB1 and all truncated constructs to duplex DNA was characterized by a positive enthalpy change at 15 degrees C. From the slopes of the temperature dependence of the binding enthalpies, heat capacity changes of -0.129 +/- 0.02 and -0.105 +/- 0.05 kcal mol(-1) K(-1) were determined for box A and full-length HMGB1, respectively. Significant differences in the binding characteristics were observed using full-length HMGB1, suggesting an important role for the acid tail in modulating DNA binding. Moreover, full-length HMGB1 binds differently these two DNA templates: binding to poly(dAdT).(dTdA) was cooperative, had a larger apparent binding site size, and proceeded with a much larger unfavorable binding enthalpy than binding to poly(dGdC).(dCdG).

  19. Interaction of anthelmintic drug (thiabendazole with DNA: Spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Jalali

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between thiabendazole (TBZ and calf-thymus DNA (ct-DNA was studied by experimental and molecular modeling methods. The intrinsic fluorescence of TBZ was quenched in the presence of ct-DNA. In competition experiments, TBZ could displace Hoechst 33258 (a minor groove binder to DNA, whereas it was unable to replace ethidium bromide (an intercalator. Potassium iodide could quench the fluorescence of TBZ, which indicated the nonintercalative mode of binding of TBZ to ct-DNA. UV absorbance of TBZ shows hyperchromic effect on the addition of DNA to the solution with negligible shift in wavelength. Salt effect studies showed the non-electrostatic nature of binding of TBZ to DNA. The viscosity of ct-DNA solution was almost unchanged on addition of TBZ. Circular dichroism (CD spectra of DNA showed small changes in the presence of TBZ which is in agreement with groove binding mode of interaction. Moreover, from molecular modeling methods, a docked structure with minimum energy was obtained in which TBZ was located in minor grooves of ct-DNA.

  20. Interaction between cationic agents and small interfering RNA and DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unksov, I. N.; Slita, A. V.; Petrova, A. V.; Pereviazko, I.; Bakulev, V. M.; Rolich, V. I.; Bondarenko, A. B.; Kasyanenko, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    Azobenzene containing surfactant AzoTAB was used for investigation of binding in cationic- agent + nucleic acid in NaCl salt aqueous solutions. Two nucleic acids, macromolecular DNA and small interfering RNA, were examined upon the interaction with the surfactant. For DNA the interaction was studied using spectral methods and the methods of viscometry and flow birefringence measurement. For siRNA the possibility of surfactant-based delivery was checked in vitro.

  1. Structure and interactions of the Bacillus subtilis sporulation inhibitor of DNA replication, SirA, with domain I of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Katie H; Rostami, Nadia; Fogg, Mark J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Grahl, Anne; Murray, Heath; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2014-09-01

    Chromosome copy number in cells is controlled so that the frequency of initiation of DNA replication matches that of cell division. In bacteria, this is achieved through regulation of the interaction between the initiator protein DnaA and specific DNA elements arrayed at the origin of replication. DnaA assembles at the origin and promotes DNA unwinding and the assembly of a replication initiation complex. SirA is a DnaA-interacting protein that inhibits initiation of replication in diploid Bacillus subtilis cells committed to the developmental pathway leading to formation of a dormant spore. Here we present the crystal structure of SirA in complex with the N-terminal domain of DnaA revealing a heterodimeric complex. The interacting surfaces of both proteins are α-helical with predominantly apolar side-chains packing in a hydrophobic interface. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm the importance of this interface for the interaction of the two proteins in vitro and in vivo. Localization of GFP-SirA indicates that the protein accumulates at the replisome in sporulating cells, likely through a direct interaction with DnaA. The SirA interacting surface of DnaA corresponds closely to the HobA-interacting surface of DnaA from Helicobacter pylori even though HobA is an activator of DnaA and SirA is an inhibitor.

  2. Thermodynamics of the interaction between Alzheimer's disease related tau protein and DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Camero

    Full Text Available Tau hyperphosphorylation can be considered as one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease and other tauophaties. Besides its well-known role as a microtubule associated protein, Tau displays a key function as a protector of genomic integrity in stress situations. Phosphorylation has been proven to regulate multiple processes including nuclear translocation of Tau. In this contribution, we are addressing the physicochemical nature of DNA-Tau interaction including the plausible influence of phosphorylation. By means of surface plasmon resonance (SPR we measured the equilibrium constant and the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes associated to the Tau-DNA complex formation. Our results show that unphosphorylated Tau binding to DNA is reversible. This fact is in agreement with the protective role attributed to nuclear Tau, which stops binding to DNA once the insult is over. According to our thermodynamic data, oscillations in the concentration of dephosphorylated Tau available to DNA must be the variable determining the extent of Tau binding and DNA protection. In addition, thermodynamics of the interaction suggest that hydrophobicity must represent an important contribution to the stability of the Tau-DNA complex. SPR results together with those from Tau expression in HEK cells show that phosphorylation induces changes in Tau protein which prevent it from binding to DNA. The phosphorylation-dependent regulation of DNA binding is analogous to the Tau-microtubules binding inhibition induced by phosphorylation. Our results suggest that hydrophobicity may control Tau location and DNA interaction and that impairment of this Tau-DNA interaction, due to Tau hyperphosphorylation, could contribute to Alzheimer's pathogenesis.

  3. Ab initio determination of coarse-grained interactions in double-stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Fyta, Maria; Lakatos, Greg; Melchionna, Simone; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-09-01

    We derive the coarse-grained interactions between DNA nucleotides from ab initio total-energy calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). The interactions take into account base and sequence specificity, and are decomposed into physically distinct contributions that include hydrogen bonding, stacking interactions, backbone, and backbone-base interactions. The interaction energies of each contribution are calculated from DFT for a wide range of configurations and are fitted by simple analytical expressions for use in the coarse-grained model, which reduces each nucleotide into two sites. This model is not derived from experimental data, yet it successfully reproduces the stable B-DNA structure and gives good predictions for the persistence length. It may be used to realistically probe dynamics of DNA strands in various environments at the μs time scale and the μm length scale.

  4. Voltammetric interaction of vitamin B1 with DNA at multiwalled carbon nanotube paste electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar Brahman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between vitamin B1 and DNA was studied with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV at the bare and DNA modified MWCNTPE. The differential pulse voltammograms of vitamin B1 showed that peak potentials shifted to a more negative value and peak currents decreased with the addition of DNA, indicating the dominance of electrostatic interactions. The combining constant (β and combining number (m of DNA–mVB1 were determined too. The work has been supplemented by an UV spectral study.

  5. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of eugenol with salmon sperm DNA in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi Shuyun, E-mail: sy_bi@sina.com [College of Chemistry, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China); Yan Lili; Wang Yu; Pang Bong; Wang Tianjiao [College of Chemistry, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Fluorescence spectra, absorption spectra, melting temperature, ionic strength effect, and viscosity experiments were described that characterize the interaction of eugenol with salmon sperm DNA in vitro. Eugenol was found to bind but weakly to DNA, with binding constants of 4.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, 3.62 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} and 2.47 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} L mol{sup -1} at 18, 28 and 38 Degree-Sign C respectively. The Stern-Volmer plots at different temperatures suggested that the quenching type of fluorescence of eugenol by DNA was a static quenching. Both the relative viscosity and the melting temperature of DNA were increased by the addition of eugenol. The changes of ionic strength had no affect on the binding. In addition, the binding constant of eugenol with single stranded DNA (ssDNA) was larger than that of eugenol with double stranded DNA (dsDNA). These results revealed that the binding mode of eugenol to DNA was intercalative binding. The thermodynamic parameters {Delta}H, {Delta}G and {Delta}S were also obtained according to the Van't Hoff equations, which suggested that hydrogen bond or van der Waals force might play an important role in a binding of eugenol to DNA. Based on the theory of the Foerster energy transference, the binding distance between DNA and eugenol was determined as 4.40 nm, indicating that the static fluorescence quenching of eugenol by DNA was also a non-radiation energy transfer process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA quenched the fluorescence of eugenol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding constant, binding site and binding force were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding mode of eugenol to DNA was intercalative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy transfer occurred between eugenol and DNA.

  6. Polymorphism of DNA-anionic liposome complexes reveals hierarchy of ion-mediated interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hongjun; Harries, Daniel; Wong, Gerard C L

    2005-08-09

    Self-assembled DNA delivery systems based on anionic lipids (ALs) complexed with DNA mediated by divalent cations have been recently introduced as an alternative to cationic lipid-DNA complexes because of their low cytotoxicity. We investigate AL-DNA complexes induced by different cations by using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering and confocal microscopy to show how different ion-mediated interactions are expressed in the self-assembled structures and phase behavior of AL-DNA complexes. The governing interactions in AL-DNA systems are complex: divalent ions can mediate strong attractions between different combinations of the components (such as DNA-DNA and membrane-membrane). Moreover, divalent cations can coordinate non-electrostatically with lipids and modify the resultant membrane structure. We find that at low membrane charge densities AL-DNA complexes organize into a lamellar structure of alternating DNA and membrane layers crosslinked by ions. At high membrane charge densities, a new phase with no analog in cationic lipid-DNA systems is observed: DNA is expelled from the complex, and a lamellar stack of membranes and intercalated ions is formed. For a subset of the ionic species, high ion concentrations generate an inverted hexagonal phase comprised of DNA strands wrapped by ion-coated lipid tubes. A simple theoretical model that takes into account the electrostatic and membrane elastic contributions to the free energy shows that this transition is consistent with an ion-induced change in the membrane spontaneous curvature, c0. Moreover, the crossover between the lamellar and inverted hexagonal phases occurs at a critical c0 that agrees well with experimental values.

  7. Interaction of Bis-Zn(II) salphen complex with calf thymus-DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yussof, Aida Mastura Binti Mohd; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd

    2014-09-01

    Metal salphen family has been extensively studied over the past few years and has been reported to be good DNA stabilizers due to its high binding affinity. Binding studies of metal complex with DNA are useful for understanding the interaction mechanism and to provide an insight about the application and design of a novel effective drug target to DNA. In this study, a bis-zinc (II) salphen metal complex derived from 4-methyl-2,6-diformylphenol and 1,2-diaminobenzene (H2L) via condensation reactions has been synthesised. The zinc(II) macrocyclic complex is characterised using standard spectroscopic and structural techniques such as 1H NMR spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy. The binding interaction between the synthesised metal complex with calf thymus-DNA (ct-DNA) has been investigated by preliminary UV/Vis DNA study. From the preliminary UV/Vis DNA study, it shows that Bis-Zn(II) salphen complex has interaction with ct-DNA.

  8. Interaction of diethyl aniline methylphosphonate with DNA: Spectroscopic and isothermal titration calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Yan, E-mail: yanlu2001@sohu.co [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China); Xu Meihua; Wang Gongke; Zheng Yun [College of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Henan Normal University, Xinxiang, Henan 453007 (China)

    2011-05-15

    In this study the diethyl aniline methylphosphonate (DAM) was synthesized, the interaction of DAM with ct-DNA has been investigated by fluorescence spectra, UV spectra, molecular modeling and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The binding constant of DAM to ct-DNA calculated from both isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence spectra were found to be in the 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} range. According to the ethidium bromide displacement studies, UV spectra and isothermal titration calorimetry experimental results, it can be concluded that DAM is an intercalator that can slide into the G-C rich region of ct-DNA. Furthermore, the results obtained from molecular modeling corroborated the experimental results obtanied from spectroscopic and ITC investigations. At the same time, fluorescence spectra suggested that the mechanism of the interaction of DAM to ct-DNA was a static enhancing type. ITC data showed that ct-DNA/DAM binding is enthalpy controlled. - Research highlights: The interaction of DAM with ct-DNA is a static enhancing type. DAM can slide into the G-C rich region of ct-DNA. The binding of DAM to ct-DNA is enthalpy controlled. The hydrogen bonding forces play an essential role in the binding process.

  9. Electrochemical and calorimetric investigation of interaction of novel biscationic anticancer agents with DNA; Investigacao eletroquimica e calorimetrica da interacao de novos agentes antitumorais biscationicos com DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Lauris Lucia da; Donnici, Claudio Luis; Lopes, Julio Cesar Dias, E-mail: cdonnici@terra.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Quimica; Goulart, Marilia Oliveira Fonseca; Abreu, Fabiane Caxico de; Paula, Francine Santos de [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil). Campus A.C. Simoes. Inst. de Quimica e Biotecnologia; Bravo, Carlos E. Salas; Santoro, Marcelo Matos [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Denadai, Angelo Marcio Leite [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica, Timoteo, MG (Brazil). Campus VII; Santos, Alexandre Martins Costa [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Fisiologicas; Montanari, Carlos Alberto [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Biscationic amidines bind in the DNA minor groove and present biological activity against a range of infectious diseases. Two new biscationic compounds (bis-{alpha}-{omega}-S-thioureido, amino and sulfide analogues) were synthesized in good yields and fully characterized, and their interaction with DNA was also investigated. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to measure the thermodynamic properties of binding interactions between DNA and these ligands. A double stranded calf thymus DNA immobilized on an electrode surface was used to study the possible DNA-interacting abilities of these compounds towards dsDNA in situ. A remarkable interaction of these compounds with DNA was demonstrated and their potential application as anticancer agents was furthered. (author)

  10. SPECTROSCOPIC AND PHYSICOCHEMICAL METHODS FOR STUDYING THE INTERACTION OF METALLOPORPHYRIN WITH DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenari Inoue

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years studies on the interaction of porphyrin with DNA have received much attention because of the importance in DNA-probing and photodynamic therapy of cancer. A variety of spectroscopic methods, e.g. NMR, ESR, Mössbauer, UV-visible absorption, circular dichroism (CD, magnetic circular dichroism (MCD, IR and Raman spectroscopy, have been employed for studying interactions between porphyrin and DNA. Of these spectroscopic methods, only a few instrumental analytical techniques applicable to an aqueous buffer solution of DNA have been particularly developed to investigate porphyrin-DNA interactions. On the other hand, a number of physicochemical methods, e.g. gel electrophoresis, melting temperature measurements and hydrodynamic methods such as viscosity and sedimentation measurements, have been also used for determining the binding modes of porphyrin to DNA. The present lecture will focus on the application of visible absorption, CD and MCD spectroscopy as well as melting temperature and viscosity measurements to studies of porphyrin-DNA interactions.

  11. Interactions of cytotoxic amino acid derivatives of tert-butylquinone with DNA lysozyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilipić Jovana P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of nine amino acid derivatives of tert-butylquinone with biomacromolecules were studied. SDS electrophoresis and mass spectrometry confirmed the absence of modifications of lysozyme by any of the synthesized compounds. Spectrophotometric studies demonstrated hyperchromism, i.e. existence of interactions between the quinones and CT-DNA. Determination of binding constant by absorption titration indicates weak interactions between quinone derivatives and CT-DNA. The quenching of fluorescence of intercalator ethidium bromide from EB-CT-DNA system and of minor groove binder Hoechst 33258 from H-CT-DNA system by the synthesized derivatives indicates interactions of compounds and CT-DNA. CD spectra demonstrate non-intercalative binding mode of quinone derivaties to CT-DNA. Molecular docking results confirm binding to the minor groove. Electrophoretic pattern showed no cleavage of pUC19 plasmid in the presence of any of the synthesized compounds. The ability of the derivatives to scavenge radicals was confirmed by DPPH test. All the presented results suggest that the DNA minor groove binding is the principal mechanism of action of the examined amino acid derivatives. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172055

  12. Analysis of interaction between tamoxifen and ctDNA in vitro by multi-spectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Changqun; Chen, Xiaoming; Ge, Fei

    2010-07-01

    Multi-spectroscopic methods including resonance light scattering (RLS), ultraviolet spectra (UV), fluorescence spectra, 1H NMR spectroscopy, coupled with thermo-denaturation experiments were firstly used to study the interaction of antitumor drug tamoxifen (TMX) with calf thymus (ctDNA) in acetate buffer solutions (pH 4.55). The interaction of TMX with ctDNA could cause a significant enhancement of RLS intensity, the hyperchromic effect, red shift of absorption spectra and the fluorescence quenching of TMX, indicating that there is an inserting interaction between TMX and ctDNA. This inference was confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The chemical shift of the benzene proton changes significantly which indicates that TMX could insert into the base pairs of ctDNA. These studies are valuable for a better understanding the mode of TMX-ctDNA interaction further, which are important and useful for designing of new ctDNA targeted drug. And the antitumor drug TMX inserted directly into ctDNA in vitro, which can provide a lot of useful information to explore the development of new and highly effective anti-cancer drugs.

  13. Intrinsic histone-DNA interactions are not the major determinant of nucleosome positions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Moqtaderi, Zarmik; Rattner, Barbara P; Euskirchen, Ghia; Snyder, Michael; Kadonaga, James T; Liu, X Shirley; Struhl, Kevin

    2009-08-01

    We assess the role of intrinsic histone-DNA interactions by mapping nucleosomes assembled in vitro on genomic DNA. Nucleosomes strongly prefer yeast DNA over Escherichia coli DNA, indicating that the yeast genome evolved to favor nucleosome formation. Many yeast promoter and terminator regions intrinsically disfavor nucleosome formation, and nucleosomes assembled in vitro show strong rotational positioning. Nucleosome arrays generated by the ACF assembly factor have fewer nucleosome-free regions, reduced rotational positioning and less translational positioning than obtained by intrinsic histone-DNA interactions. Notably, nucleosomes assembled in vitro have only a limited preference for specific translational positions and do not show the pattern observed in vivo. Our results argue against a genomic code for nucleosome positioning, and they suggest that the nucleosomal pattern in coding regions arises primarily from statistical positioning from a barrier near the promoter that involves some aspect of transcriptional initiation by RNA polymerase II.

  14. Direct inference of protein-DNA interactions using compressed sensing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlQuraishi, Mohammed; McAdams, Harley H

    2011-09-06

    Compressed sensing has revolutionized signal acquisition, by enabling complex signals to be measured with remarkable fidelity using a small number of so-called incoherent sensors. We show that molecular interactions, e.g., protein-DNA interactions, can be analyzed in a directly analogous manner and with similarly remarkable results. Specifically, mesoscopic molecular interactions act as incoherent sensors that measure the energies of microscopic interactions between atoms. We combine concepts from compressed sensing and statistical mechanics to determine the interatomic interaction energies of a molecular system exclusively from experimental measurements, resulting in a "de novo" energy potential. In contrast, conventional methods for estimating energy potentials are based on theoretical models premised on a priori assumptions and extensive domain knowledge. We determine the de novo energy potential for pairwise interactions between protein and DNA atoms from (i) experimental measurements of the binding affinity of protein-DNA complexes and (ii) crystal structures of the complexes. We show that the de novo energy potential can be used to predict the binding specificity of proteins to DNA with approximately 90% accuracy, compared to approximately 60% for the best performing alternative computational methods applied to this fundamental problem. This de novo potential method is directly extendable to other biomolecule interaction domains (enzymes and signaling molecule interactions) and to other classes of molecular interactions.

  15. Interaction of coumarin with calf thymus DNA: deciphering the mode of binding by in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Tarique; Rehman, Sayeed Ur; Husain, Mohammed Amir; Ishqi, Hassan Mubarak; Tabish, Mohammad

    2015-02-01

    DNA is the major target for a wide range of therapeutic substances. Thus, there has been considerable interest in the binding studies of small molecules with DNA. Interaction between small molecules and DNA provides a structural guideline in rational drug designing and in the synthesis of new and improved drugs with enhanced selective activity and greater clinical efficacy. Plant derived polyphenolic compounds have a large number of biological and pharmacological properties. Coumarin is a polyphenolic compound which has been extensively studied for its diverse pharmacological properties. However, its mode of interaction with DNA has not been elucidated. In the present study, we have attempted to ascertain the mode of binding of coumarin with calf thymus DNA (Ct-DNA) through various biophysical techniques. Analysis of UV-visible absorbance spectra and fluorescence spectra indicates the formation of complex between coumarin and Ct-DNA. Several other experiments such as effect of ionic strength, iodide induced quenching, competitive binding assay with ethidium bromide, acridine orange and Hoechst 33258 reflected that coumarin possibly binds to the minor groove of the Ct-DNA. These observations were further supported by CD spectral analysis, viscosity measurements, DNA melting studies and in silico molecular docking.

  16. Specific and non-specific interactions of ParB with DNA: implications for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James A; Pastrana, Cesar L; Butterer, Annika; Pernstich, Christian; Gwynn, Emma J; Sobott, Frank; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Dillingham, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The segregation of many bacterial chromosomes is dependent on the interactions of ParB proteins with centromere-like DNA sequences called parS that are located close to the origin of replication. In this work, we have investigated the binding of Bacillus subtilis ParB to DNA in vitro using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques. We observe tight and specific binding of a ParB homodimer to the parS sequence. Binding of ParB to non-specific DNA is more complex and displays apparent positive co-operativity that is associated with the formation of larger, poorly defined, nucleoprotein complexes. Experiments with magnetic tweezers demonstrate that non-specific binding leads to DNA condensation that is reversible by protein unbinding or force. The condensed DNA structure is not well ordered and we infer that it is formed by many looping interactions between neighbouring DNA segments. Consistent with this view, ParB is also able to stabilize writhe in single supercoiled DNA molecules and to bridge segments from two different DNA molecules in trans. The experiments provide no evidence for the promotion of non-specific DNA binding and/or condensation events by the presence of parS sequences. The implications of these observations for chromosome segregation are discussed.

  17. Binding and interaction of di- and tri-substituted organometallic triptycene palladium complexes with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Rina; Bhowmick, Sourav; Das, Neeladri; Das, Prolay

    2014-10-01

    Two triptycene-based ligands with pendant bromophenyl units have been prepared. These triptycene derivatives have been used as synthons for the synthesis of di and tri nuclear palladium complexes. The organic molecules and their corresponding organometallic complexes have been fully characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The mode of binding and effect of the complexes on pUC19 plasmid, calf thymus DNA and oligomer duplex DNA have been investigated by a host of analytical methods. The complexes brought about unwinding of supercoiled plasmid and the unwinding angle was found to be related to the binding affinity of the complexes with DNA, where both these parameters were guided by the structure of the complexes. Concentration-dependent inhibition of endonuclease activity of SspI and BamHI by the complexes indicates preference for G/C sequence for binding to DNA. However, neither the complexes did not introduce any cleavage at abasic site in oligomer duplex DNA, nor they created linear form of the plasmid upon co-incubation with the DNA samples. The interactions of the complexes with DNA were found to be strongly guided by the structure of the complexes, where intercalation as well as groove binding was observed, without inflicting any damage to the DNA. The mode of interaction of the complexes with DNA was further confirmed by isothermal calorimetry.

  18. Analytical Ultracentrifugation as a Tool to Study Nonspecific Protein–DNA Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Teng-Chieh; Catalano, Carlos Enrique; Maluf, Nasib Karl

    2016-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is a powerful tool that can provide thermodynamic information on associating systems. Here, we discuss how to use the two fundamental AUC applications, sedimentation velocity (SV), and sedimentation equilibrium (SE), to study nonspecific protein–nucleic acid interactions, with a special emphasis on how to analyze the experimental data to extract thermodynamic information. We discuss three specific applications of this approach: (i) determination of nonspecific binding stoichiometry of E. coli integration host factor protein to dsDNA, (ii) characterization of nonspecific binding properties of Adenoviral IVa2 protein to dsDNA using SE-AUC, and (iii) analysis of the competition between specific and nonspecific DNA-binding interactions observed for E. coli integration host factor protein assembly on dsDNA. These approaches provide powerful tools that allow thermodynamic interrogation and thus a mechanistic understanding of how proteins bind nucleic acids by both specific and nonspecific interactions. PMID:26412658

  19. Voltammetry and fluorescence studies on the interaction between Eu (phen)33+ and DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The binding mode of Eu(phen) 33+ with DNA is studied by fluorescence and voltammetric methods. From theScatchard graph and the fluorescence quenching phenomenon, it is concluded that the mode of interaction betweenEu(phen) 33+ and DNA is intercalation bind by inserting the phen π-π conjugate surface between the base pairs of theDNA duplex. Voltammetry was used to confirm the results obtained from the fluorescence method, the result from bothmethods agrees with each other. The binding constant (K) and the binding site size (ns) were calculated from voltammetricdata such as the shifts in potential and limiting currents in the process of adding DNA, according to the positive shifts ofpeak potential. It was considered that the complex of the +2 ion interacted more favorably with the nucleotide bases thanthat of the +3 ion by hydrophobic interaction.

  20. Interaction of DNA and Proteins with Single Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasianowicz, J. J.

    2006-03-01

    The bacterial toxins Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin and Bacillus anthracis protective antigen kill cells in part by forming ion channels in target membranes. We are using electrophysiology, molecular biology/protein biochemistry and computer modeling to study how biopolymers (e.g., single-stranded DNA and proteins) bind to and transport through these nanometer-scale pores. The results provide insight into the mechanism by which these toxins work and are the basis for several potential nanobiotechnology applications including ultra-rapid DNA sequencing, the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes and high throughput screening of therapeutic agents against several anthrax toxins. In collaboration with V.M. Stanford, M. Misakian, B. Nablo, S.E. Henrickson, NIST, EEEL, Gaithersburg, MD; T. Nguyen, R. Gussio, NCI, Ft. Detrick, MD; and K.M. Halverson, S. Bavari, R.G. Panchal, USAMRIID, Ft. Detrick, MD.

  1. Investigation of DNA-cationic bolaform surfactants interaction with different spacer length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Beheshteh; Khani, Vahid; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar; Moradi, Parviz

    2013-10-01

    In this paper interaction of DNA with cationic bolaform surfactants is investigated. The structural formula for synthesized bolaforms is as follows: bolaform B1 with structural formula Br(-)(CH3)3N(+)(CH2)3N(+)(CH3)Br(-) and bolaform B2 with structural formula of Br(-)(CH3)3N(+)(CH2)12N(+)(CH3)Br(-). There are stronger electrostatic interactions in bolaform B1 due to shorter spacer length, while there are stronger hydrophobic interactions in bolaform B2 compared to bolaform B1 due to existence of 12 carbons in hydrocarbonic chain. The structure of bolaforms consists of two polar head groups which play important role in DNA compaction. Surface tension change in aqueous solution of bolaform surfactants is measured using tensiometer. Electrical conductivity of surfactants aqueous solution is examined with and without DNA. DNA compaction is tracked in the presence of bolaforms by dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique. Results of DLS indicate bolaforms with shorter spacer length (dominant electrostatic interactions) are more influential in compressing DNA compared to bolaforms with longer spacer length (stronger hydrophobic interactions). UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopies specify the binding mechanism of bolaform surfactants to DNA.

  2. Interaction of anthraquinone anti-cancer drugs with DNA:Experimental and computational quantum chemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Jamelah S.; Teesdale Spittle, Paul; El Gogary, Tarek M.

    2017-01-01

    Anthraquinones form the basis of several anticancer drugs. Anthraquinones anticancer drugs carry out their cytotoxic activities through their interaction with DNA, and inhibition of topoisomerase II activity. Anthraquinones (AQ4 and AQ4H) were synthesized and studied along with 1,4-DAAQ by computational and experimental tools. The purpose of this study is to shade more light on mechanism of interaction between anthraquinone DNA affinic agents and different types of DNA. This study will lead to gain of information useful for drug design and development. Molecular structures were optimized using DFT B3LYP/6-31 + G(d). Depending on intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions two conformers of AQ4 were detected and computed as 25.667 kcal/mol apart. Molecular reactivity of the anthraquinone compounds was explored using global and condensed descriptors (electrophilicity and Fukui functions). Molecular docking studies for the inhibition of CDK2 and DNA binding were carried out to explore the anti cancer potency of these drugs. NMR and UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra of anthraquinones/DNA were investigated at the physiological pH. The interaction of the three anthraquinones (AQ4, AQ4H and 1,4-DAAQ) were studied with three DNA (calf thymus DNA, (Poly[dA].Poly[dT]) and (Poly[dG].Poly[dC]). NMR study shows a qualitative pattern of drug/DNA interaction in terms of band shift and broadening. UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra were employed to measure the affinity constants of drug/DNA binding using Scatchard analysis.

  3. Nanostructured SERS-electrochemical biosensors for testing of anticancer drug interactions with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilkhani, Hoda; Hughes, Taylor; Li, Jing; Zhong, Chuan Jian; Hepel, Maria

    2016-06-15

    Widely used anti-cancer treatments involving chemotherapeutic drugs result in cancer cell damage due to their strong interaction with DNA. In this work, we have developed laboratory biosensors for screening chemotherapeutic drugs and to aid in the assessment of DNA modification/damage caused by these drugs. The sensors utilize surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy and electrochemical methods to monitor sensory film modification and observe the drug-DNA reactivity. The self-assembled monolayer protected gold-disk electrode (AuDE) was coated with a reduced graphene oxide (rGO), decorated with plasmonic gold-coated Fe2Ni@Au magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), a sequence of the breast cancer gene BRCA1. The nanobiosensors AuDE/SAM/rGO/Fe2Ni@Au/dsDNA were then subjected to the action of a model chemotherapeutic drug, doxorubicin (DOX), to assess the DNA modification and its dose dependence. The designed novel nanobiosensors offer SERS/electrochemical transduction, enabling chemically specific and highly sensitive analytical signals generation. The SERS measurements have corroborated the DOX intercalation into the DNA duplex whereas the electrochemical scans have indicated that the DNA modification by DOX proceeds in a concentration dependent manner, with limit of detection LOD=8 µg/mL (S/N=3), with semilog linearity over 3 orders of magnitude. These new biosensors are sensitive to agents that interact with DNA and facilitate the analysis of functional groups for determination of the binding mode. The proposed nanobiosensors can be applied in the first stage of the drug development for testing the interactions of new drugs with DNA before the drug efficacy can be assessed in more expensive testing in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Quantitative analysis of TALE-DNA interactions suggests polarity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckler, Joshua F; Bhakta, Mital S; Kim, Moon-Soo; Ovadia, Robert; Habrian, Chris H; Zykovich, Artem; Yu, Abigail; Lockwood, Sarah H; Morbitzer, Robert; Elsäesser, Janett; Lahaye, Thomas; Segal, David J; Baldwin, Enoch P

    2013-04-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) have revolutionized the field of genome engineering. We present here a systematic assessment of TALE DNA recognition, using quantitative electrophoretic mobility shift assays and reporter gene activation assays. Within TALE proteins, tandem 34-amino acid repeats recognize one base pair each and direct sequence-specific DNA binding through repeat variable di-residues (RVDs). We found that RVD choice can affect affinity by four orders of magnitude, with the relative RVD contribution in the order NG > HD ≈ NN > NI > NK. The NN repeat preferred the base G over A, whereas the NK repeat bound G with 10(3)-fold lower affinity. We compared AvrBs3, a naturally occurring TALE that recognizes its target using some atypical RVD-base combinations, with a designed TALE that precisely matches 'standard' RVDs with the target bases. This comparison revealed unexpected differences in sensitivity to substitutions of the invariant 5'-T. Another surprising observation was that base mismatches at the 5' end of the target site had more disruptive effects on affinity than those at the 3' end, particularly in designed TALEs. These results provide evidence that TALE-DNA recognition exhibits a hitherto un-described polarity effect, in which the N-terminal repeats contribute more to affinity than C-terminal ones.

  5. Small molecule inhibitors of PCNA/PIP-box interaction suppress translesion DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Marcelo; Inoue, Akira; Evison, Benjamin; Perry, Scott; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Fujii, Naoaki

    2013-04-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential component for DNA replication and DNA damage response. Numerous proteins interact with PCNA through their short sequence called the PIP-box to be promoted to their respective functions. PCNA supports translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) by interacting with TLS polymerases through PIP-box interaction. Previously, we found a novel small molecule inhibitor of the PCNA/PIP-box interaction, T2AA, which inhibits DNA replication in cells. In this study, we created T2AA analogues and characterized them extensively for TLS inhibition. Compounds that inhibited biochemical PCNA/PIP-box interaction at an IC50 <5 μM inhibited cellular DNA replication at 10 μM as measured by BrdU incorporation. In cells lacking nucleotide-excision repair activity, PCNA inhibitors inhibited reactivation of a reporter plasmid that was globally damaged by cisplatin, suggesting that the inhibitors blocked the TLS that allows replication of the plasmid. PCNA inhibitors increased γH2AX induction and cell viability reduction mediated by cisplatin. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibitors of PCNA/PIP-box interaction could chemosensitize cells to cisplatin by inhibiting TLS.

  6. A conserved physical and functional interaction between the cell cycle checkpoint clamp loader and DNA ligase I of eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Levin, David S; Varkey, Johnson; Post, Sean; Bermudez, Vladimir P; Hurwitz, Jerard; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2007-08-03

    DNA ligase I joins Okazaki fragments during DNA replication and completes certain excision repair pathways. The participation of DNA ligase I in these transactions is directed by physical and functional interactions with proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a DNA sliding clamp, and, replication factor C (RFC), the clamp loader. Here we show that DNA ligase I also interacts with the hRad17 subunit of the hRad17-RFC cell cycle checkpoint clamp loader, and with each of the subunits of its DNA sliding clamp, the heterotrimeric hRad9-hRad1-hHus1 complex. In contrast to the inhibitory effect of RFC, hRad17-RFC stimulates joining by DNA ligase I. Similar results were obtained with the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins indicating that the interaction between the replicative DNA ligase and checkpoint clamp is conserved in eukaryotes. Notably, we show that hRad17 preferentially interacts with and specifically stimulates dephosphorylated DNA ligase I. Moreover, there is an increased association between DNA ligase I and hRad17 in S phase following DNA damage and replication blockage that occurs concomitantly with DNA damage-induced dephosphorylation of chromatin-associated DNA ligase I. Thus, our results suggest that the in vivo interaction between DNA ligase I and the checkpoint clamp loader is regulated by post-translational modification of DNA ligase I.

  7. Fluorescence studies on the interaction of ethidium bromide with duplex, triplex and quadruplex DNA structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙雪光; 曹恩华; 何裕建; 秦静芬

    1999-01-01

    Under different conditions, oligonucleotides can form several alternative DNA structures such as duplex, triplex and quadruplex. All these structures can interact with ethidium bromide (EB) and make its fluorescence intensity change. The fluorescence spectra and other related parameters provided by static fluorescence techniques showed that the interaction mechanisms between EB and these structures were not always the same. Among them, B type duplex and triplex DNA adopt an intercalative mode when binding to the EB, which has a relatively high efficiency of energy transfer and the fluorescence of EB cannot be quenched easily. While for the parallel duplex DNA, the interaction mode is an outside binding in which energy transfer can hardly happen and its fluorescence intensity as well as Stern-Volmer constant is almost the same to the free EB. For the quadruplex, the binding mechanism to EB is more complex. Results from the energy transfer and quenching studies indicate that the two interaction modes note

  8. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Y., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Murakawa, T., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Shimamura, K., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Oishi, M., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Ohyama, T., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Kurita, N., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi, 441-8580 (Japan)

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions of Indolicidin with Model Membranes and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    The cell membrane is the first barrier and quite often the primary target that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have to destroy or penetrate to fulfill their mission. Upon penetrating through the membrane, the peptides can further attack intracellular targets, in particular DNA. Studying the interaction of an antimicrobial peptide with a cell membrane and DNA holds keys to understanding its killing mechanisms. Commonly, these interactions are studied by using optical or scanning electron microscopy and appropriately labeled peptides. However, labeling can significantly affect the hydrophobicity, conformation, and size of the peptide, hence altering the interaction significantly. Here, we describe the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for a label-free study of the interactions of peptides with model membranes under physiological conditions and DNA as a possible intracellular target.

  10. Structural insight into β-Clamp and its interaction with DNA Ligase in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Preeti; Tarique, Khaja Faisal; Mazumder, Mohit; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; Kumari, Nilima; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-08-08

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative and microaerophilic bacterium, is the major cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Owing to its central role, DNA replication machinery has emerged as a prime target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. Here, we report 2Å structure of β-clamp from H. pylori (Hpβ-clamp), which is one of the critical components of DNA polymerase III. Despite of similarity in the overall fold of eubacterial β-clamp structures, some distinct features in DNA interacting loops exists that have not been reported previously. The in silico prediction identified the potential binders of β-clamp such as alpha subunit of DNA pol III and DNA ligase with identification of β-clamp binding regions in them and validated by SPR studies. Hpβ-clamp interacts with DNA ligase in micromolar binding affinity. Moreover, we have successfully determined the co-crystal structure of β-clamp with peptide from DNA ligase (not reported earlier in prokaryotes) revealing the region from ligase that interacts with β-clamp.

  11. A revisit of the mode of interaction of small transcription inhibitors with genomic DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipak Dasgupta; Parijat Majumder; Amrita Banerjee

    2012-07-01

    One class of small molecules with therapeutic potential for treatment of cancer functions as transcription inhibitors via interaction with double-stranded DNA. Majority of the studies of the interaction with DNA have so far been reported under conditions nonexistent in vivo. Inside the cell, DNA is present in the nucleus as a complex with proteins known as chromatin. For the last few years we have been studying the interaction of these DNA-binding small molecules at the chromatin level with emphasis on the drug-induced structural alterations in chromatin. Our studies have shown that at the chromatin level these molecules could be classified in two broad categories: single-binding and dual-binding molecules. Single-binding molecules access only DNA in the chromatin, while the dual-binding molecules could bind to both DNA and the associated histone(s). Structural effects of the DNA-binding molecules upon chromatin in light of the above broad categories and the associated biological implications of the two types of binding are discussed.

  12. Electrochemistry of interaction of 2-(2-nitrophenyl)-benzimidazole derivatives with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalán, Mabel; Alvarez-Lueje, Alejandro; Bollo, Soledad

    2010-10-01

    In this study the interaction between new benzimidazole molecules, 2-(2-nitrophenyl)-1H-benzimidazole (NB) and N-benzoyl-2-(2-nitrophenyl)-benzimidazole (BNB), with dsDNA and ssDNA was assessed at pH 7.4. Using differential pulse voltammetry at glassy carbon electrode, both molecules were electrochemically reduced due to the presence of a nitro group in their structures. When DNA was added to the solution, the electrochemical signal of NB and BNB decreased and shifted to more negative potentials. The interaction mode was electrostatic when ionic strength was low. Under this condition DNA-nitro complexes were characterized and binding constant values of 8.22 x 10(4)M(-1) and 3.08 x 10(6)M(-1) for NB and BNB with dsDNA were determined. On the other hand, only NB was able to interact when a high concentration of NaCl was used. Finally, a glassy carbon electrode modified with carbon nanotubes and DNA was tested in order to determine the nitrocompound in solution. The electrochemical reduction of the nitrocompound adsorbed on GCE/CHIT-CNT/DNA was used as an analytical signal. Using 10 min as accumulation time, a linear dependence was observed between 20 and 80 microM nitrocompound concentrations and the electrode response. Detection and quantification limits in the range of microM were determined.

  13. [Investigation of the interaction between DNA and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles by FTIR spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershina, A G; Sazonov, A E; Ogorodova, L M

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of DNA with nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite powder prepared by the mechano-chemical method was studied. It was shown that CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles efficiently bind DNA in aqueous solutions (Tris-HCl), forming a bionanocomposite. The adsorption capacity of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles for DNA was evaluated to be 5.25 x 10(-3) mol/m(2). The desorption of DNA from the surface of the particles was analyzed while changing the pH, the ionic strength, and the chemical content of the medium. The DNA-CoFe(2)O(4) nanocomposite was investigated by FTIR spectroscopy. The block of the data allowed one to consider the mechanism of the interaction between a polynucleotide and CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles and to make the assumption that the binding occurred due to the coordination interaction of the phosphate groups and heterocyclic bases of DNA (oxygen atoms of thymine and guanine) with metal ions on the particle surface. The analysis of the IR spectra showed that binding can lead to the partial destabilization of the DNA structure, with the B conformation of a polynucleotide being preserved.

  14. Studies on interaction of norbixin with DNA: Multispectroscopic and in silico analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, Amrita; Priya, Rajendra Rao; Hemachandran, Hridya; Sivaramakrishna, Akella; Babu, Subramanian; Siva, Ramamoorthy

    2015-06-01

    The interaction of food colorant norbixin with calf thymus DNA (CTDNA) was investigated through UV-Visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Circular Dichroism (CD), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), DNA melting studies, electrophoretic analysis, histological staining technique and molecular docking studies. The results indicated that norbixin interacted with CTDNA by partial intercalation mode. The binding constant (K) of norbixin with CTDNA was calculated to be 5.08 × 105 Mol-1 L. FTIR and CD studies were coupled with 1H NMR spectra revealed that norbixin intercalates partially and binds to the groove's, phosphate group, deoxyribose sugar of DNA and also induces conformational transition of B-form to A-form DNA. Agarose gel electrophoretic and histological staining technique results further prove that, norbixin specifically binds to the DNA in the cell. Moreover, molecular docking studies on the specific binding of norbixin with CTDNA have exhibited lowest conformation energy score of -3.2. Therefore, this food colorant has the ability to interact with DNA and it could emerge as a promising class of natural DNA targeted therapeutic.

  15. DNA fluorescent labeling with naphtho[1,2,3-cd]indol-6(2H)-one for investigation of protein-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyeva, Svetlana V; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Kuznetsova, Anastasya S; Khalyavina, Juliya G; Tropina, Darya A; Lavrikova, Tatyana I; Kargina, Olga I; Gornostaev, Leonid M

    2017-06-01

    Fluorescently labeled DNA to study protein-DNA interactions was synthesized using the Cu(I)-catalysed cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. For this purpose, a new azido-containing fluorophore based on the naphtho[1,2,3-cd]indol-6(2H)-one derivative was obtained. The fluorescent properties of naphtho[1,2,3-cd]indol-6(2H)-one derivatives and labeled DNA were studied. The new fluorescent DNA conjugate was shown to be a useful tool to study complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Binding interaction of cationic phenazinium dyes with calf thymus DNA: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Deboleena; Das, Paramita; Basak, Soumen; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2008-07-31

    Absorption, steady-state fluorescence, steady-state fluorescence anisotropy, and intrinsic and induced circular dichroism (CD) have been exploited to explore the binding of calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) with three cationic phenazinium dyes, viz., phenosafranin (PSF), safranin-T (ST), and safranin-O (SO). The absorption and fluorescence spectra of all the three dyes reflect significant modifications upon interaction with the DNA. A comparative study of the dyes with respect to modification of fluorescence and fluorescence anisotropy upon binding, effect of urea, iodide-induced fluorescence quenching, and CD measurements reveal that the dyes bind to the ctDNA principally in an intercalative fashion. The effect of ionic strength indicates that electrostatic attraction between the cationic dyes and ctDNA is also an important component of the dye-DNA interaction. Intrinsic and induced CD studies help to assess the structural effects of dyes binding to DNA and confirm the intercalative mode of binding as suggested by fluorescence and other studies. Finally it is proposed that dyes with bulkier substitutions are intercalated into the DNA to a lesser extent.

  17. Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on the interaction of the drug olanzapine with calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Bagheri, Somayeh

    2015-02-01

    The present study investigated the binding interaction between olanzapine and calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) using emission, absorption, circular dichroism, viscosity measurements and molecular modeling. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH < 0 and ΔS < 0) indicated that hydrogen bond and van der Waals play main roles in the binding of the drug to ct-DNA. Spectrophotometric studies of the interaction of olanzapine with DNA have shown that it could bind to ct-DNA (Kb = 2 × 103 M-1). The binding constant is comparable to standard groove binding drugs. Competitive fluorimetric studies with Hoechst 33258 have shown that olanzapine exhibits the ability to displace the DNA-bound Hoechst 33258 indicating that binds strongly in minor groove of DNA helix. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in the CD spectrum of ct-DNA as well as changes in its viscosity. All of the experimental results prove that the groove binding must be predominant. The results obtained from experimental data were in good agreement with molecular modeling studies.

  18. Ku80 interaction with apurinic/apyrimidinic sites depends on the structure of DNA ends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosova A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The identification of a protein from human cell extract which specifically interacts with the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP site in the partial DNA duplex containing 5'and 3'-dangling ends (DDE-AP DNA and mimicking clustered DNA damage. Methods. The Schiff base-dependent cross-linking of a protein to AP DNA (borohydride trapping, MALDI-TOF-MS, chromatography, and gel electrophoresis. Results. A human cell extract protein which forms a major covalent adduct with the AP DNA duplex with dangling ends was identified as the Ku80 subunit of Ku antigen by peptide mass mapping based on MALDI-TOF-MS data. The Ku antigen purified from the HeLa cell extract was shown to form the covalent adducts with the same mobility as observed in cell extracts. Conclusions. The Ku80 subunit of Ku antigen can specifically interact with AP DNA forming the Schiff base-mediated adducts which electrophoretic mobility depends on the structure of DNA ends. The difference in electrophoretic mobility can be caused by the cross-linking of AP DNA to distinct target amino acids that appears to reflect unequal positioning of AP DNAs in the complex with Ku antigen.

  19. Study of Cytochrome c-DNA Interaction - Evaluation of Binding Sites on the Redox Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettstein, Christoph; Kyne, Ciara; M. Doolan, Aishling; Möhwald, Helmuth; Crowley, Peter B.; Lisdat, Fred

    2014-10-01

    Artificial assemblies consisting of the cationic cytochrome c (cyt c) and double-stranded DNA are interesting for the field of biohybrid systems because of the high electro-activity of the incorporated redox protein. However, little is known about the interactions between these two biomolecules. Here, the complex of reduced cyt c and a 41 base pair oligonucleotide was characterized in solution as a function of pH and ionic strength. Persistent cyt c-DNA agglomerates were observed by UV-vis and DLS (dynamic light scattering) at pH 5.0 and low ionic strength. The strength of the interaction was attenuated by raising the pH or the ionic strength. At pH 7.0 agglomerates were not formed, allowing interaction analysis by NMR spectroscopy. Using TROSY (transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy)-HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum coherence) experiments it was possible to identify the DNA binding site on the cyt c surface. Numerous residues surrounding the exposed heme edge of cyt c were involved in transient binding to DNA under these conditions. This result was supported by SEC (size exclusion chromatography) experiments at pH 7.0 showing that the interaction is sufficient for co-elution of cyt c and DNA.Artificial assemblies consisting of the cationic cytochrome c (cyt c) and double-stranded DNA are interesting for the field of biohybrid systems because of the high electro-activity of the incorporated redox protein. However, little is known about the interactions between these two biomolecules. Here, the complex of reduced cyt c and a 41 base pair oligonucleotide was characterized in solution as a function of pH and ionic strength. Persistent cyt c-DNA agglomerates were observed by UV-vis and DLS (dynamic light scattering) at pH 5.0 and low ionic strength. The strength of the interaction was attenuated by raising the pH or the ionic strength. At pH 7.0 agglomerates were not formed, allowing interaction analysis by NMR spectroscopy. Using TROSY (transverse relaxation

  20. Interaction of Antitumor Drug Aclacinomycin-A with DNA and Its Specific Sequence Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG,Gui-Fang; ZHANG,Fan; TAN,Xue-Lian; HE,Pin-Gang; FANG,Yu-Zhi

    2008-01-01

    Through UV and fluorescence spectrophotometries,the interaction of aclacinomycin-A (ACM-A) with DNA and its specific sequence have been investigated with the aid of circular dichroism spectrophotometry and differential pulse voltammetry method.The results demonstrated that ACM-A was capable of intercalating DNA double helix,the π-π electronic overlapping between π-electrons of ACM-A and base pair of DNA stabilized the ACM-A-DNA adduct,and through electrostatic interaction,the trisaccharide interacted with the minor groove of DNA owing to an amino group at C(3').Electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical studies revealed that the original form of ACM-A had higher affinity for DNA than the reduction form in which the trisaccharide group at C(7) was lost.According to the results obtained in this paper,ACM-A showed preference for AT base pairs of the deoxyribonucleic acid duplex,and it was apt to interact with cytosine and thymine rather than the adenine of oligonucleotide.

  1. Thermodynamic model of interaction of small ligands with DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Bregadze, Vasil G; Khutsishvili, Irene G; Sologashvili, Khatuna G; Tsakadze, Ketevan J

    2007-01-01

    We have managed to correlate the stability constants of complex formation, which can be registered in equilibrium state, to the dynamic characteristic of the complex lifetime. Thus, the principal concept of molecular biophysics regarding biomolecule, structure-dynamics-function can be reformatted as structure-stability-function. It should be specially noted that such an approach highly simplifies end widens the time interval of investigation of dynamic characteristics of macromolecules. Study of hydration energy and hydration number by kinetic curves of water desorption from Na-DNA humidified fibers by glow discharge atomic spectral analysis of hydrogen allowed us to reveal that after transition of DNA from B form to unordered state the activation energy of hydrated water desorption increases by 0.65kcal/Mole of water. This increase of energy is 0.1 kcal/Mole for transition from B to C form (from 20 to 10 water molecules per nucleotide) and 0.55 kcal/Mole for the one from C form to A unordered state (from 10 ...

  2. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H; Miller, Katherine H; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L

    2015-06-01

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome.

  3. Circular Dichroism for the Analysis of Protein-DNA Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Garry; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kneale, Geoffrey G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to provide information on the practical aspects of circular dichroism (CD) and synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) in protein-nucleic acids interaction solution studies. The chapter will describe the guidelines appropriate to designing experiments and conducting correct data interpretation, the use of both benchtop and synchrotron CD approaches is discussed and the advantages of SRCD outlined. Further information and a good general review of the field a can be found in Gray (Circular Dichroism of protein-nucleic acid interactions. In: Fasman GD (ed) Circular dichroism and the conformational analysis of biomolecules. Plenum Press, New York. pp 469-500, 1996).

  4. Studies on the Interaction Mechanism of 1,10-Phenanthroline Cobalt(II Complex with DNA and Preparation of Electrochemical DNA Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiying Wang

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence spectroscopy and ultraviolet (UV spectroscopy techniques coupled with cyclic voltammetry (CV were used to study the interaction between salmon sperm DNA and 1,10-Phenanthroline cobalt(II complex, [Co(phen2(Cl(H2O]Cl·H2O, where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline. The interaction between [Co(phen2(Cl(H2O]+ and double-strand DNA (dsDNA was identified to be intercalative mode. An electrochemical DNA biosensor was developed by covalent immobilization of probe single-strand DNA (ssDNA related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV on the activated glassy carbon electrode (GCE. With [Co(phen2(Cl(H2O]+ being the novel electrochemical hybridization indicator, the selectivity of ssDNA-modified electrode was investigated and selective detection of complementary ssDNA was achieved using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV.

  5. FANCM interacts with PCNA to promote replication traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohleder, Florian; Huang, Jing; Xue, Yutong; Kuper, Jochen; Round, Adam; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong; Kisker, Caroline

    2016-04-20

    FANCM is a highly conserved DNA remodeling enzyme that promotes the activation of the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway and facilitates replication traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks. However, how FANCM interacts with the replication machinery to promote traverse remains unclear. Here, we show that FANCM and its archaeal homolog Hef from Thermoplasma acidophilum interact with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), an essential co-factor for DNA polymerases in both replication and repair. The interaction is mediated through a conserved PIP-box; and in human FANCM, it is strongly stimulated by replication stress. A FANCM variant carrying a mutation in the PIP-box is defective in promoting replication traverse of interstrand crosslinks and is also inefficient in promoting FANCD2 monoubiquitination, a key step of the Fanconi anemia pathway. Our data reveal a conserved interaction mode between FANCM and PCNA during replication stress, and suggest that this interaction is essential for FANCM to aid replication machines to traverse DNA interstrand crosslinks prior to post-replication repair.

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy of dynamic protein DNA interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, van Simon Johannes Theodorus

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis a dedicated Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) setup is used for imaging biochemical reactions with molecular resolution. The basis for the high resolution of AFM is the combination of a small probe, close proximity to the sample and a short-range interaction between the probe and the samp

  7. Landscape of π-π and sugar-π contacts in DNA-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katie A; Wells, Rachael A; Abendong, Minette N; Anderson, Colin B; Kung, Ryan W; Wetmore, Stacey D

    2016-01-01

    There were 1765 contacts identified between DNA nucleobases or deoxyribose and cyclic (W, H, F, Y) or acyclic (R, E, D) amino acids in 672 X-ray structures of DNA-protein complexes. In this first study to compare π-interactions between the cyclic and acyclic amino acids, visual inspection was used to categorize amino acid interactions as nucleobase π-π (according to biological edge) or deoxyribose sugar-π (according to sugar edge). Overall, 54% of contacts are nucleobase π-π interactions, which involve all amino acids, but are more common for Y, F, and R, and involve all DNA nucleobases with similar frequencies. Among binding arrangements, cyclic amino acids prefer more planar (stacked) π-systems than the acyclic counterparts. Although sugar-π interactions were only previously identified with the cyclic amino acids and were found to be less common (38%) than nucleobase-cyclic amino acid contacts, sugar-π interactions are more common than nucleobase π-π contacts for the acyclic series (61% of contacts). Similar to DNA-protein π-π interactions, sugar-π contacts most frequently involve Y and R, although all amino acids adopt many binding orientations relative to deoxyribose. These DNA-protein π-interactions stabilize biological systems, by up to approximately -40 kJ mol(-1) for neutral nucleobase or sugar-amino acid interactions, but up to approximately -95 kJ mol(-1) for positively or negatively charged contacts. The high frequency and strength, despite variation in structure and composition, of these π-interactions point to an important function in biological systems.

  8. DNA builds and strengthens the extracellular matrix in Myxococcus xanthus biofilms by interacting with exopolysaccharides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available One intriguing discovery in modern microbiology is the extensive presence of extracellular DNA (eDNA within biofilms of various bacterial species. Although several biological functions have been suggested for eDNA, including involvement in biofilm formation, the detailed mechanism of eDNA integration into biofilm architecture is still poorly understood. In the biofilms formed by Myxococcus xanthus, a Gram-negative soil bacterium with complex morphogenesis and social behaviors, DNA was found within both extracted and native extracellular matrices (ECM. Further examination revealed that these eDNA molecules formed well organized structures that were similar in appearance to the organization of exopolysaccharides (EPS in ECM. Biochemical and image analyses confirmed that eDNA bound to and colocalized with EPS within the ECM of starvation biofilms and fruiting bodies. In addition, ECM containing eDNA exhibited greater physical strength and biological stress resistance compared to DNase I treated ECM. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that DNA interacts with EPS and strengthens biofilm structures in M. xanthus.

  9. Studies on the Recognition Interaction of Rhodamine B and DNA by Voltammetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Kui; LI Qing-jun; SUN Wei; WANG Zhen-yong

    2005-01-01

    The recognition interaction of Rhodamine B(RB) with DNA was studied in a Britton-Robinson (B-R)buffer solution with pH=7.5 at a glassy carbon electrode by electrochemical techniques. RB shows an irreversible oxidation peak at +0. 92 V(vs. SCE). After the addition of DNA inthe RB solution, the peak current of RB decreased apparently without the shift of the peak potential. The electrochemical parameters such as the charge transfer coefficient a and the electrode reaction rate constant k' of the interaction system were carefully studied. The parameters did not change before and after the addition of DNA, which indicated that an electrochemical non-active complex had been formed, so the concentration of RB in the solution decreased and the peak current decreased correspondingly. The binding ratio of RB to DNA was 2:1 with a binding constant of 2.66×109.

  10. Selective transformations between nanoparticle superlattices via the reprogramming of DNA-mediated interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yugang; Pal, Suchetan; Srinivasan, Babji; Vo, Thi; Kumar, Sanat; Gang, Oleg

    2015-08-01

    The rapid development of self-assembly approaches has enabled the creation of materials with desired organization of nanoscale components. However, achieving dynamic control, wherein the system can be transformed on demand into multiple entirely different states, is typically absent in atomic and molecular systems and has remained elusive in designed nanoparticle systems. Here, we demonstrate with in situ small-angle X-ray scattering that, by using DNA strands as inputs, the structure of a three-dimensional lattice of DNA-coated nanoparticles can be switched from an initial 'mother' phase into one of multiple 'daughter' phases. The introduction of different types of reprogramming DNA strands modifies the DNA shells of the nanoparticles within the superlattice, thereby shifting interparticle interactions to drive the transformation into a particular daughter phase. Moreover, we mapped quantitatively with free-energy calculations the selective reprogramming of interactions onto the observed daughter phases.

  11. Energetic studies on DNA-peptide interaction in relation to the enthalpy-entropy compensation paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Robin C K; Huang, Jonathan T B; Chien, Shih-Chuan; Huang, Roy; Jeng, Kee-Ching G; Chen, Yen-Chung; Liao, Mokai; Wu, Jia-Rong; Hung, Wei-Kang; Hung, Chia-Chun; Chen, Yu-Ling; Waring, Michael J; Sheh, Leung

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to interpret the energetic basis of complex DNA-peptide interactions according to a novel allosteric interaction network approach. In common with other designed peptides, five new conjugates incorporating the XPRK or XHypRK motif (Hyp = hydroxyproline) attached to a N-methylpyrrole (Py) tract with a basic tail have been found to display cooperative binding to DNA involving multiple monodentate as well as interstrand bidentate interactions. Using quantitative DNase I footprinting it appears that allosteric communication via cooperative binding to multiple sites on complementary DNA strands corresponds to two different types of DNA-peptide interaction network. Temperature variation experiments using a dodecapeptide RY-12 show that lower temperature (25 °C) favor a circuit type of allosteric interaction network, whereas higher temperatures (31 and 37 °C) afford only a partial-circuit type of network. Circular dichroism studies show that our five peptides induce significant local conformational changes in DNA via the minor groove, with apparently dimeric binding stoichiometry. Isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that these peptides, together with another seven for comparison, are strongly exothermic upon binding to a model 13-mer DNA duplex, characterized by ΔH ranging from -14.7 to -74.4 kcal mol(-1), and also high TΔS ranging from -6.5 to -65.9 kcal mol(-1). Multiple monodentate and bidentate interactions, as well as ionic forces that mediate positive cooperativity in sequence recognition, are consistent with a dramatic decrease in entropy and a 'tightening' effect of DNA conformation. Distinctive enthalpy-entropy compensation (EEC) relationships are demonstrated for the interaction of all twelve designed peptides with DNA, affording a straight line of slope close to unity when ΔH is plotted versus TΔS, with a y-axis intercept (average ΔG) corresponding to -8.5 kcal mol(-1), while the observed ΔG ranges from -8.2 to -9.1 kcal mol(-1) for

  12. Delineation of Methyl-DNA Binding Protein Interactions in the Prostate Cancer Genome (PC110091)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    DNA Binding Protein Interactions in the Prostate Cancer Genome (PC110091) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Roderick T Hori, PhD...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Prostate Cancer, Methylated DNA, Methyl- CpG Binding Domain, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation 14. ABSTRACT The purpose...of this study is to generate a genome-wide association profile of Methyl- CpG Domain-containing (MBD) proteins, such as MeCP2, MBD1, MBD2 and MBD4, in

  13. Observation of intracellular interactions between DNA origami and lysosomes by the fluorescence localization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Meifang; Dai, Luru; Jiang, Qiao; Tang, Yunqing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Ding, Baoquan; Li, Junbai

    2016-07-28

    We obtained the fluorescence localization images of tube DNA origami nanostructures in NIH 3T3 cells for the first time. The fluorescence localization images of tube DNA origami nanostructures and TIRF images of lysosomes were combined and they revealed the detailed interactions between the two structures. Quantitative analysis illustrated that the tube origami can be captured as well as degraded by lysosomes with time.

  14. Electrochemical, spectroscopic, and theoretical studies on the interaction between azathioprine and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Fahimeh; Rasaee, Gelareh

    2015-11-01

    Possible interaction between immunosuppressive drug, azathioprine, and calf thymus DNA was explored by cyclic voltammetry, spectrophotometry, competitive spectrofluorimetry, circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD), and viscosity measurements. Cyclic voltammetry showed negative shift in the reduction peak of azathioprine in the presence of DNA, and large decrease in peak current, referring to the predominance of electrostatic forces. The binding constant was calculated to be 1.22×10(3)M(-1). Absorption hyperchromism without shift in wavelength was observed when DNA was added to azathioprine solution. Competitive fluorescence experiments were conducted by using Hoechst 33258 and methylene blue as probes for minor groove and intercalation binding modes, respectively. The studies showed that azathioprine could release Hoechst 33258, while negligible effect was detected in the case of methylene blue. Stern-Volmer quenching constant (KSV) and complex formation constant (Kf) were obtained from the fluorescence measurements to be 7.6×10(3)M(-1) and 7.76×10(4)M(-1), respectively, at 298K. Enthalpy and entropy changes during the interaction between azathioprine and DNA were calculated from Van't Hoff plot (ΔH=-20.2kJmol(-1); ΔS=26.11Jmol(-1)K(-1) at 298K) which showed an exothermic spontaneous reaction, and involvement of electrostatic forces in the complex formation with DNA. Moreover, circular dichroism studies revealed that azathioprine induced detectable changes in the negative band of DNA spectrum. Viscosity of DNA solution decreased in the presence of azathioprine, showed a non-intercalative mode of interaction. Finally, molecular docking calculations showed that in the lowest energy level of drug-DNA complex, azathioprine approaches the minor grooves of DNA.

  15. Multi-spectroscopic methods investigation on the interaction of tenoxicam with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing-Mi; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Li-Ping; Ma, Ping; Wang, Xin; Liu, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) show chemopreventive and chemosuppressive effects on various cancer cell lines. They exert anticancer activities by inhibiting both at the protein level and/or at the transcription level. Thus, in this paper, the interaction between tenoxicam (TXM) and calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was investigated by UV-visible light, fluorescence, viscosity experiments and DNA melting studies. The results showed that TXM could bind to ct-DNA in the groove binding mode. The binding constants were 7.67 × 10(3) and 5.48 × 10(3) M(-1) at 293 and 300 K, respectively. Furthermore, the calculated thermodynamic parameters suggested that hydrogen bonds or van der Waals force might play an important role in the binding of TXM to ct-DNA. The obtained results should give new insight into the pharmacological activity of TXM.

  16. Polymerase/DNA interactions and enzymatic activity: multi-parameter analysis with electro-switchable biosurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Andreas; Schräml, Michael; Strasser, Ralf; Daub, Herwin; Myers, Thomas; Heindl, Dieter; Rant, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    The engineering of high-performance enzymes for future sequencing and PCR technologies as well as the development of many anticancer drugs requires a detailed analysis of DNA/RNA synthesis processes. However, due to the complex molecular interplay involved, real-time methodologies have not been available to obtain comprehensive information on both binding parameters and enzymatic activities. Here we introduce a chip-based method to investigate polymerases and their interactions with nucleic acids, which employs an electrical actuation of DNA templates on microelectrodes. Two measurement modes track both the dynamics of the induced switching process and the DNA extension simultaneously to quantitate binding kinetics, dissociation constants and thermodynamic energies. The high sensitivity of the method reveals previously unidentified tight binding states for Taq and Pol I (KF) DNA polymerases. Furthermore, the incorporation of label-free nucleotides can be followed in real-time and changes in the DNA polymerase conformation (finger closing) during enzymatic activity are observable.

  17. DNA display of glycoconjugates to emulate oligomeric interactions of glycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Novoa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Glycans (carbohydrate portion of glycoproteins and glycolipids frequently exert their function through oligomeric interactions involving multiple carbohydrate units. In efforts to recapitulate the diverse spatial arrangements of the carbohydrate units, assemblies based on hybridization of nucleic acid conjugates have been used to display simplified ligands with tailored interligand distances and valences. The programmability of the assemblies lends itself to a combinatorial display of multiple ligands. Recent efforts in the synthesis and applications of such conjugates are discussed.

  18. DNA Interaction Studies of a New Platinum(II) Complex Containing Different Aromatic Dinitrogen Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Mohammadi, Somaye; Alizadeh, Robabeh

    2011-01-01

    A new mononuclear Pt(II) complex, [Pt(DMP)(DIP)]Cl(2).H(2)O, in which DMP is 4,4-dimethyl-2,2-bipyridine and DIP is 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenantroline, has been synthesized and characterized by physicochemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding interaction of this complex with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated using fluorimetry, spectrophotometry, circular dichroism, viscosimetry and cyclic voltametry (CV). UV-VIS spectrum showed 4 nm bathochromic shift of the absorption band at 280 nm along with significant hypochromicity for the absorption band of the complex. The intrnisic binding constant (K(b) = 2 × 10(4) M(-1)) is more in keeping with intercalators and suggests this binding mode. The viscosity measurements showed that the complex-DNA interaction can be hydrophobic and confirm intercalation. Moreover, the complex induced detectable changes in the CD spectrum of CT-DNA. The fluorescence studies revealed that the probable quenching mechanism of fluorescence of the complex by CT-DNA is static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH > 0 and ΔS > 0) showed that main interaction with hydrogenic forces occurred that is intercalation mode. Also, CV results confirm this mode because, with increasing the CT-DNA concentration, shift to higher potential was observed.

  19. Molecular restructuring of water and lipids upon the interaction of DNA with lipid monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campen, R Kramer; Ngo, Thuy T M; Sovago, Maria; Ruysschaert, Jean-Marie; Bonn, Mischa

    2010-06-16

    Understanding the molecular mechanism of DNA/lipid interaction is critical in optimizing the use of lipid cofactors in gene therapy. Here, we address this question by employing label-free vibrational sum frequency (VSF) spectroscopy to study the interaction of DNA with lipid monolayers of the cationic lipids DPTAP(1,2-dipalmitoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) and diC14-amidine as well as the zwitterionic lipid DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) in the presence and absence of calcium. Our approach has the advantage both of allowing us to explicitly probe intermolecular interactions and of providing insight into the structure of water and lipids around DNA at the lipid interface. We find, by examination of the OD stretch of interfacial D(2)O, that water structure differs markedly between systems containing DNA adsorbed to cationic and those that contain DNA adsorbed to zwitterionic lipid monolayers (in the presence or absence of Ca(2+)). The spectral response of interfacial water in the cationic system is consistent with a highly structured, undercoordinated, structural 'type' of water. Further, by investigation of CH stretch modes of the diC14-amidine lipid tails, we demonstrate that the adsorption of DNA to this lipid leads to increased ordering of lipid tails.

  20. Influence of the amino substituents in the interaction of ethidium bromide with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Nichola C; Hammond, Nicholas B; Graves, David E

    2004-12-01

    A key step in the rational design of new DNA binding agents is to obtain a complete thermodynamic characterization of small molecule-DNA interactions. Ethidium bromide has served as a classic DNA intercalator for more than four decades. This work focuses on delineating the influence(s) of the 3- and 8-amino substituents of ethidium on the energetic contributions and concomitant fluorescent properties upon DNA complex formation. Binding affinities decrease by an order of magnitude upon the removal of either the 3- or 8-amino substituent, with a further order-of-magnitude decrease in the absence of both amino groups. The thermodynamic binding mechanism changes from enthalpy-driven for the parent ethidium to entropy-driven when both amino groups are removed. Upon DNA binding, fluorescence enhancement is observed in the presence of either or both of the amino groups, likely because of more efficient fluorescence quenching through solvent interactions of free amino groups than when buried within the intercalation site. The des-amino ethidium analog exhibits fluorescence quenching upon binding, consistent with less efficient quenching of the chromophore through interactions with solvent than within the intercalation site. Determination of the quantum efficiencies suggests distinct differences in the environments of the 3- and 8-amino substituents within the DNA binding site.

  1. Ab initio determination of coarse-grained interactions in double stranded DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Fyta, Maria; Lakatos, Greg; Melchionna, Simone; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2012-02-01

    We derive the coarse-grained interactions between DNA nucleotides from ab initio calculations using density functional theory (DFT). The interactions take into account the base and sequence specificity, and are decomposed into physically distinct contributions. The interactions energies calculated from DFT for a wide range of configurations are fitted to simple analytical expressions for use in the coarse-grained model, which reduces each nucleotide into two sites. This non-empirical model accurately yields structural properties of B-DNA even in extreme conditions, and predicts persistence length in excellent agreement with experiments. The model enables quantitative an efficient investigations of the dynamics of long DNA strands in various environments, making it possible to reach microsecond time scales and beyond.

  2. Nucleotide insertion initiated by van derWaals interaction during polymerase beta DNA replication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew Das Arulsamy

    2013-09-01

    We present here an unambiguous theoretical analyses and to show that the exclusive biochemical reaction involved in a single nucleotide insertion into the DNA primer can be efficiently tracked using the renormalized van derWaals (vdW) interaction of a stronger type, the Hermansson blue-shifting hydrogen bond effect, and the Arunan composite hydrogen-vdW bond. We find that there are two biochemical steps involved to complete the insertion of a single base (cytosine) into the 3' end of a DNA primer. First, the O3' (from a DNA primer) initiates the nucleophilic attack on P (from an incoming dCTP), in response, O3 (bonded to P) interacts with H' (bonded to O3'). These interactions are shown to be strongly interdependent and require the forming and breaking of P—O and H—O covalent bonds, which in turn imply that we do not need any external energy supply.

  3. [Study on the interaction of DNA and norfloxacin by FT-Raman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yi-Hua; Zhou, Guang-Ming; Wu, Jie; Yu, Dan-Ni

    2009-11-01

    FT-Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of norfloxacin and norfloxacin capsule on the silver colloidal substrate were recorded, and the vibrational and enhanced peaks were assigned; interactions of norfloxacin and DNA were researched. The experimental results proved that the characteristic vibrations of capsule's content and NFX standard, which is v(C-F), vs(O-C-O), v(C=C), did not change, while the changes in molecular skeleton's vibrations were substantial. Additives do not affect the Raman spectroscopy of norfloxacin substantively. An analytical method for detecting norfloxacin medcine can be established by FT-Raman. Without any ions, the interaction is mainly caused by the inserting-action mode between the ring of norfloxacin and the double helix structure of DNA, and norfloxacin could interact with DNA directly, providing reliable evidence for antibacterial mechanism of quinoxalone antibiotics.

  4. Microbial interactions chapter: binding and entry of DNA in bacterial transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    Genetic transformation of bacteria by DNA released from cells of a related strain is discussed. The mechanism by which the giant information-bearing molecules of DNA are transported into the bacterial cell was investigated. It was concluded that the overall process of DNA uptake consists of two main steps, binding of donor DNA to the outside of the cell and entry of the bound DNA into the cell. Each step is discussed in detail. Inasmuch as these phenomena occur at the cell surface, they are related to structures and functions of the cell wall and membrane. In addition, the development of competence, that is the formation of cell surface structures allowing DNA uptake, is examined from both a physiological and evolutionary point of view. Genetic transfer mediated by free DNA is an obvious and important form of cellular interaction. The development of competence involves another, quite distinct system of interaction between bacterial cells. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Bacillus subtilis, and Hemophilus influenzae were used as the test organisms. 259 references.

  5. Interaction study of ciprofloxacin with human telomeric DNA by spectroscopy and molecular docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huihui; Bu, Xiaoyang; Lu, Jia; Xu, Chongzheng; Wang, Xianlong; Yang, Xiaodi

    2013-04-01

    The interaction of ciprofloxacin (CIP) with human telomeric DNA was studied in vitro using multi-spectroscopy and molecular modeling methods. The hypochromic effect with a red shift in ultraviolet (UV) absorption indicated the occurrence of the interaction between CIP and DNA. The fluorescence quenching of CIP was observed with the addition of DNA and was proved to be the static quenching. The binding constant was found to be 9.62 × 104 L mol-1. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) result further confirmed the formation of 1:1 non-covalent complex between DNA and CIP. Combined with the UV melting results, circular dichroism (CD) results confirmed the existence of groove binding mode, as well as conformational changes of DNA. Molecular docking studies illustrated the visual display of the CIP binding to the GC region in the minor groove of DNA. Specific hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces were demonstrated as main acting forces between CIP and guanine bases of DNA.

  6. Learning protein-DNA interaction landscapes by integrating experimental data through computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianling; Wasson, Todd; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2014-10-15

    Transcriptional regulation is directly enacted by the interactions between DNA and many proteins, including transcription factors (TFs), nucleosomes and polymerases. A critical step in deciphering transcriptional regulation is to infer, and eventually predict, the precise locations of these interactions, along with their strength and frequency. While recent datasets yield great insight into these interactions, individual data sources often provide only partial information regarding one aspect of the complete interaction landscape. For example, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) reveals the binding positions of a protein, but only for one protein at a time. In contrast, nucleases like MNase and DNase can be used to reveal binding positions for many different proteins at once, but cannot easily determine the identities of those proteins. Currently, few statistical frameworks jointly model these different data sources to reveal an accurate, holistic view of the in vivo protein-DNA interaction landscape. Here, we develop a novel statistical framework that integrates different sources of experimental information within a thermodynamic model of competitive binding to jointly learn a holistic view of the in vivo protein-DNA interaction landscape. We show that our framework learns an interaction landscape with increased accuracy, explaining multiple sets of data in accordance with thermodynamic principles of competitive DNA binding. The resulting model of genomic occupancy provides a precise mechanistic vantage point from which to explore the role of protein-DNA interactions in transcriptional regulation. The C source code for compete and Python source code for MCMC-based inference are available at http://www.cs.duke.edu/∼amink. amink@cs.duke.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB) 22+) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 × 10 4 L mol -1. Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 μg mL -1 for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 μg mL -1 for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL -1 for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL -1 for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL -1 for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  8. Interaction of a copper (II) complex containing an artificial sweetener (aspartame) with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kashanian, Soheila; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh

    2014-01-01

    A copper (II) complex containing aspartame (APM) as ligand, Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O, was synthesized and characterized. In vitro binding interaction of this complex with native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied at physiological pH. The interaction was studied using different methods: spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, competition experiment, circular dichroism (CD) and viscosimetric techniques. Hyperchromicity was observed in UV absorption band of Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of DNA to Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O was observed and the binding constants (Kf) and corresponding numbers of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were calculated to be+89.3 kJ mol(-1) and+379.3 J mol(-1) K(-1) according to Van't Hoff equation which indicated that reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Experimental results from spectroscopic methods were comparable and further supported by viscosity measurements. We suggest that Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 8×10+4 M(-1). Binding of this copper complex to DNA was found to be stronger compared to aspartame which was studied recently.

  9. Electrochemical study of varenicline adsorptive behaviour and its interaction with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behaviour of novel nicotinic α4β2 subtype receptor partial agonist varenicline (VAR which is used for smoking cessation, was investigated in Britton-Robinson buffers (pH 2.0-12.0 by cyclic, differential pulse and square wave voltammetry at a hanging mercury drop elctrode. The influence of pH, scan rate, concentration, accumulation potential and time on peak current and potential suggested that in alkaline media the redox process was adsorption controlled. Also, the experimental value of surface coverage, G = 1.03´10-10 mol cm-2, was used to determine the conditions when VAR was fully adsorbed at the electrode surface. Having in mind potential high toxicity of VAR due to the presence of quinoxaline structure, its interaction with DNA was postulated, and studied when both compounds were in the adsorbed state at modified HMDE. Using adsorptive transfer technique, the changes in potential and decrease in normalized peak currents were observed. The estimated value of the ratio of surface-binding constants indicated that the reduced form of VAR interacted with dsDNA more strongly than the oxidized form. Subtle DNA damage under conditions of direct DNA-VAR interaction at room temperature was observed. The proposed type of interaction was an intercalation. This study used simple electroanalytical methodology and showed the potential of DNA/HMDE biosensor for investigation of genotoxic effects.

  10. Study of cytochrome c-DNA interaction--evaluation of binding sites on the redox protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettstein, Christoph; Kyne, Ciara; Doolan, Aishling M; Möhwald, Helmuth; Crowley, Peter B; Lisdat, Fred

    2014-11-21

    Artificial assemblies consisting of the cationic cytochrome c (cyt c) and double-stranded DNA are interesting for the field of biohybrid systems because of the high electro-activity of the incorporated redox protein. However, little is known about the interactions between these two biomolecules. Here, the complex of reduced cyt c and a 41 base pair oligonucleotide was characterized in solution as a function of pH and ionic strength. Persistent cyt c-DNA agglomerates were observed by UV-vis and DLS (dynamic light scattering) at pH 5.0 and low ionic strength. The strength of the interaction was attenuated by raising the pH or the ionic strength. At pH 7.0 agglomerates were not formed, allowing interaction analysis by NMR spectroscopy. Using TROSY (transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy)-HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum coherence) experiments it was possible to identify the DNA binding site on the cyt c surface. Numerous residues surrounding the exposed heme edge of cyt c were involved in transient binding to DNA under these conditions. This result was supported by SEC (size exclusion chromatography) experiments at pH 7.0 showing that the interaction is sufficient for co-elution of cyt c and DNA.

  11. Zinc-induced interaction of the metal-binding domain of amyloid-β peptide with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmeleva, Svetlana A; Mezentsev, Yuri V; Kozin, Sergey A; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Ivanov, Alexis S; Bodoev, Nikolay V; Makarov, Alexander A; Radko, Sergey P

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of the 16-mer synthetic peptide (Aβ16), which represents the metal-binding domain of the amyloid-β with DNA, was studied employing the surface plasmon resonance technique. It has been shown that Aβ16 binds to the duplex DNA in the presence of zinc ions and thus the metal-binding domain can serve as a zinc-dependent DNA-binding site of the amyloid-β. The interaction of Aβ16 with DNA most probably depends on oligomerization of the peptide and is dominated by interaction with phosphates of the DNA backbone.

  12. The Cold Shock Domain of YB-1 Segregates RNA from DNA by Non-Bonded Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Kljashtorny

    Full Text Available The human YB-1 protein plays multiple cellular roles, of which many are dictated by its binding to RNA and DNA through its Cold Shock Domain (CSD. Using molecular dynamics simulation approaches validated by experimental assays, the YB1 CSD was found to interact with nucleic acids in a sequence-dependent manner and with a higher affinity for RNA than DNA. The binding properties of the YB1 CSD were close to those observed for the related bacterial Cold Shock Proteins (CSP, albeit some differences in sequence specificity. The results provide insights in the molecular mechanisms whereby YB-1 interacts with nucleic acids.

  13. Investigation on interaction of DNA and several cationic surfactants with different head groups by spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and viscosity technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Zhang, Zhaohong; Song, Youtao; Liu, Shuo; Gao, Wei; Qiao, Heng; Guo, Lili; Wang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the interaction between DNA and several cationic surfactants with different head groups such as ethyl hexadecyl dimethyl ammonium bromide (EHDAB), hexadecyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (HDBAC), and cetyl pyridinium bromide (CPB) were investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and viscosity technologies. The results show that these cationic surfactants can interact with DNA and major binding modes are electrostatic and hydrophobic. Also, CPB and HDBAC molecules interact with DNA by partial intercalation, and CPB has slightly stronger intercalation than HDBAC, while EHDAB interacts with DNA by non-intercalation. The different head groups of the surfactant molecules can influence the interaction strength. CPB has the stronger interaction with DNA than the others. Moreover, surfactant concentration, the ratio of DNA and fluorescence probe, ionic strength can influence the interaction. The surfactants may interact with DNA by the competition reactions with BR for DNA-BR. The increase of ionic strength may favor the surface binding between DNA and surfactants to some extent. This work provides deep mechanistic insight on the toxicity of cationic surfactants with different head groups to DNA molecules.

  14. Direct measurement of interaction forces between a platinum dichloride complex and DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Shimada, Shogo; Okada, Tomoko

    2017-06-29

    The interaction forces between a platinum dichloride complex and DNA molecules have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The platinum dichloride complex, di-dimethylsulfoxide-dichloroplatinum (II) (Pt(DMSO)2Cl2), was immobilized on an AFM probe by coordinating the platinum to two amino groups to form a complex similar to Pt(en)Cl2, which is structurally similar to cisplatin. The retraction forces were measured between the platinum complex and DNA molecules immobilized on mica plates using force curve measurements. The histogram of the retraction force for λ-DNA showed several peaks; the unit retraction force was estimated to be 130 pN for a pulling rate of 60 nm/s. The retraction forces were also measured separately for four single-base DNA oligomers (adenine, guanine, thymine, and cytosine). Retraction forces were frequently observed in the force curves for the DNA oligomers of guanine and adenine. For the guanine DNA oligomer, the most frequent retraction force was slightly lower than but very similar to the retraction force for λ-DNA. A higher retraction force was obtained for the adenine DNA oligomer than for the guanine oligomer. This result is consistent with a higher retraction activation energy of adenine with the Pt complex being than that of guanine because the kinetic rate constant for retraction correlates to exp(FΔx - ΔE) where ΔE is an activation energy, F is an applied force, and Δx is a displacement of distance.

  15. Modes of Escherichia coli Dps Interaction with DNA as Revealed by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav V Melekhov

    Full Text Available Multifunctional protein Dps plays an important role in iron assimilation and a crucial role in bacterial genome packaging. Its monomers form dodecameric spherical particles accumulating ~400 molecules of oxidized iron ions within the protein cavity and applying a flexible N-terminal ends of each subunit for interaction with DNA. Deposition of iron is a well-studied process by which cells remove toxic Fe2+ ions from the genetic material and store them in an easily accessible form. However, the mode of interaction with linear DNA remained mysterious and binary complexes with Dps have not been characterized so far. It is widely believed that Dps binds DNA without any sequence or structural preferences but several lines of evidence have demonstrated its ability to differentiate gene expression, which assumes certain specificity. Here we show that Dps has a different affinity for the two DNA fragments taken from the dps gene regulatory region. We found by atomic force microscopy that Dps predominantly occupies thermodynamically unstable ends of linear double-stranded DNA fragments and has high affinity to the central part of the branched DNA molecule self-assembled from three single-stranded oligonucleotides. It was proposed that Dps prefers binding to those regions in DNA that provide more contact pads for the triad of its DNA-binding bundle associated with one vertex of the protein globule. To our knowledge, this is the first study revealed the nucleoid protein with an affinity to branched DNA typical for genomic regions with direct and inverted repeats. As a ubiquitous feature of bacterial and eukaryotic genomes, such structural elements should be of particular care, but the protein system evolutionarily adapted for this function is not yet known, and we suggest Dps as a putative component of this system.

  16. Effects of Tris and Hepes buffers on the interaction of palladium-diaminopropane complexes with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdi, Khalid; Vilaplana, Rosario A; Kamah, Sanae; González-Vílchez, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    The Pd(II) complexes, [PdCl(2)(1,2-pn)] and [PdCl(2)(1,3-pn)] (pn is diaminopropane), were synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectroscopic (FT-IR, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR) techniques. UV difference spectral study performed on Pd-pn/DNA systems, indicate a pronounced interaction of palladium complexes with DNA in cell-free media; comparison of lambda(max), Abs(max) and %H values observed for the two compounds might be attributed to structural differences of the chelated ligand rings. Results obtained from electrophoretic analysis of Pd complexes in presence of pBR322 plasmid DNA show a clear decreasing of the supercoiled (SC) DNA form mobility, that could be attributed to unwinding of the double helix; a parallel increasing of the open-circular (OC) DNA form mobility is also noted, this fact implying that the binding of complexes either shortens or condenses the DNA helix. Interaction studies of Pd complexes with plasmid DNA in different buffer systems indicate that DNA binding efficiency capable of modifying the tertiary structure of pBR322 decreased from NaClO(4) to Hepes 2, Hepes 1 [Hepes=4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid], and Tris [(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane] buffers, in this order. Moreover, the level of DNA modifications produced by palladium complexes in 10 mM NaClO(4) remains unchanged after transferring the samples into the medium required for subsequent biophysical or biochemical analyses.

  17. Drug-DNA interactions at single molecule level: A view with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramanathan, Thayaparan

    Studies of small molecule--DNA interactions are essential for developing new drugs for challenging diseases like cancer and HIV. The main idea behind developing these molecules is to target and inhibit the reproduction of the tumor cells and infected cells. We mechanically manipulate single DNA molecule using optical tweezers to investigate two molecules that have complex and multiple binding modes. Mononuclear ruthenium complexes have been extensively studied as a test for rational drug design. Potential drug candidates should have high affinity to DNA and slow dissociation kinetics. To achieve this, motifs of the ruthenium complexes are altered. Our collaborators designed a dumb-bell shaped binuclear ruthenium complex that can only intercalate DNA by threading through its bases. Studying the binding properties of this complex in bulk studies took hours. By mechanically manipulating a single DNA molecule held with optical tweezers, we lower the barrier to thread and make it fast compared to the bulk experiments. Stretching single DNA molecules with different concentration of drug molecules and holding it at a constant force allows the binding to reach equilibrium. By this we can obtain the equilibrium fractional ligand binding and length of DNA at saturated binding. Fitting these results yields quantitative measurements of the binding thermodynamics and kinetics of this complex process. The second complex discussed in this study is Actinomycin D (ActD), a well studied anti-cancer agent that is used as a prototype for developing new generations of drugs. However, the biophysical basis of its activity is still unclear. Because ActD is known to intercalate double stranded DNA (dsDNA), it was assumed to block replication by stabilizing dsDNA in front of the replication fork. However, recent studies have shown that ActD binds with even higher affinity to imperfect duplexes and some sequences of single stranded DNA (ssDNA). We directly measure the on and off rates by

  18. FT-Raman and QM/MM study of the interaction between histamine and DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Chica, A.J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Soriano, A. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica/IcMol, Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot Valencia (Spain); Tunon, I. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica/IcMol, Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot Valencia (Spain); Sanchez-Jimenez, F.M. [Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Silla, E. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica/IcMol, Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot Valencia (Spain); Ramirez, F.J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain)], E-mail: ramirez@uma.es

    2006-05-31

    The interaction between histamine and highly polymerized calf-thymus DNA has been investigated using FT-Raman spectroscopy and the hybrid QM/MM (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) methodology. Raman spectra of solutions containing histamine and calf-thymus DNA, at different molar ratios, were recorded. Solutions were prepared at physiological settings of pH and ionic strength, using both natural and heavy water as the solvent. The analysis of the spectral changes on the DNA Raman spectra when adding different concentrations of histamine allowed us to identify the reactive sites of DNA and histamine, which were used to built two minor groove and one intercalated binding models. They were further used as starting points of the QM/MM theoretical study. However, minimal energy points were only reached for the two minor groove models. For each optimized structure, we calculated analytical force constants of histamine molecule in order to perform the vibrational dynamics. Normal mode descriptions allowed us to compare calculated wavenumbers for DNA-interacting histamine to those measured in the Raman spectra of DNA-histamine solutions.

  19. FT-Raman and QM/MM study of the interaction between histamine and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Chica, A. J.; Soriano, A.; Tuñón, I.; Sánchez-Jiménez, F. M.; Silla, E.; Ramírez, F. J.

    2006-05-01

    The interaction between histamine and highly polymerized calf-thymus DNA has been investigated using FT-Raman spectroscopy and the hybrid QM/MM (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) methodology. Raman spectra of solutions containing histamine and calf-thymus DNA, at different molar ratios, were recorded. Solutions were prepared at physiological settings of pH and ionic strength, using both natural and heavy water as the solvent. The analysis of the spectral changes on the DNA Raman spectra when adding different concentrations of histamine allowed us to identify the reactive sites of DNA and histamine, which were used to built two minor groove and one intercalated binding models. They were further used as starting points of the QM/MM theoretical study. However, minimal energy points were only reached for the two minor groove models. For each optimized structure, we calculated analytical force constants of histamine molecule in order to perform the vibrational dynamics. Normal mode descriptions allowed us to compare calculated wavenumbers for DNA-interacting histamine to those measured in the Raman spectra of DNA-histamine solutions.

  20. In vitro study on the interaction of 4,4-dimethylcurcumin with calf thymus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bing-Mi, E-mail: liubingmi@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Bai, Chong-Liang [Centre for Molecular Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Zhang, Jun; Liu, Yang; Dong, Bo-Yang; Zhang, Yi-Tong [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Liu, Bin, E-mail: liubinzehao@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of 4,4-dimethylcurcumin (DMCU), a synthesized analog of curcumin, with calf-thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was investigated using fluorescence, absorption, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, coupled with viscosity measurements and molecular docking techniques. DMCU was found to bind to ct-DNA with moderate binding affinity through groove binding as evidenced by a decrease in the absorption intensity in combination with no obvious change in the relative specific viscosity of ct-DNA and the CD spectrum. Thermodynamic analysis of the fluorescence data obtained at different temperatures suggested that the binding process was spontaneous and was primarily driven by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. Furthermore, competitive binding experiments with ethidium bromide and 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole as probes showed that DMCU could preferentially bind in the minor groove of double-stranded DNA. The results obtained from the molecular docking studies were consistent with these experimental results. This study explored the potential applicability of the spectroscopic properties of DMCU for studying its interactions with relevant biological or biomimicking targets. - Highlights: • 4,4-dimethylcurcumin (DMCU) has strong fluorescence characteristics. • DMCU could bind to DNA through groove binding. • Docking studies revealed that DMCU bound to the A–T region in the minor groove.

  1. Electrochemical Study on the Interaction of Irinotecan with Calf Thymus Double Stranded DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hajian, Reza; Huat, Tan Guan

    2012-01-01

    Voltammetric behavior of Irinotecan (CPT-11) was studied in a phosphate buffer (0.002 mol.L^-1, pH 7.5) solution at the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) using cyclic voltammetry (CV). CPT-11 showed two irreversible cathodic peaks at - 1.01 V and - 1.09 V which involved two electrons and two protons in each reduction step. In addition, the interaction of Irinotecan with double-stranded calf thymus DNA (ds-DNA) was studied by CV at the HMDE employing an irreversible electrochemical equation. As a result of the reaction with ds-DNA, the reduc- tion peaks related to CPT-11 were shifted in a negative direction and the peak currents were decreased. The diffu- sion coefficients of CPT- 11 in the absence (Dr) and presence (Db) of ds-DNA were calculated as 2.8 ×10 5 cm2.s^- 1 and 1.6 × 10^-5 cm2·s^-1 respectively. The binding constant (K=1.0×10^4 L·mol^-1), and binding site size (s=0.60) of CPT-11 interacting with ds-DNA were obtained simultaneously by non-linear fit analysis. The results demon strate that the main interaction mode of CPT-11 with ds-DNA is electrostatic.

  2. Nucleotide insertion initiated by van der Waals interaction during polymerase beta DNA replication

    CERN Document Server

    Arulsamy, Andrew Das

    2011-01-01

    Immortality will remain a fantasy for as long as aging is determined by the erroneous biochemical reactions during a particular DNA replication. The replication and base excision repair mechanism, associated to eukaryotic DNA polymerase-beta enzyme are central to maintaining a healthy cell. Here, we give a series of unambiguous theoretical analyses and prove that the exclusive biochemical reaction involved in a single nucleotide insertion into the DNA primer can be efficiently tracked using the renormalized van der Waals interaction of the stronger type, and the Hermansson blue-shifting hydrogen bond effect. We found that there are two biochemical steps involved to complete the insertion of a single dCTP into the 3' end of a DNA primer. First, the O3' (from a DNA primer) initiates the nucleophilic attack on P_alpha?(from an incoming dCTP), in response, O3_alpha (bonded to P_alpha) retaliates by interacting with H' (bonded to O3'). These interactions are shown to be strongly interdependent and require the form...

  3. Alzheimer's disease amyloid peptides interact with DNA, as proved by surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrantes, Alejandro; Camero, Sergio; Garcia-Lucas, Angel; Navarro, Pedro J; Benitez, María J; Jiménez, Juan S

    2012-10-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, abnormal processing of the β-amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer's disease patients increases the production of β-amyloid toxic peptides, which, after forming highly aggregated fibrillar structures, lead to extracellular plaques formation, neuronal loss and dementia. However, a great deal of evidence has point to intracellular small oligomers of amyloid peptides, probably transient intermediates in the process of fibrillar structures formation, as the most toxic species. In order to study the amyloid-DNA interaction, we have selected here three different forms of the amyloid peptide: Aβ1-40, Aβ25-35 and a scrambled form of Aβ25-35. Surface Plasmon Resonance was used together with UV-visible spectroscopy, Electrophoresis and Electronic Microscopy to carry out this study. Our results prove that, similarly to the full length Aβ1-42, all conformations of toxic amyloid peptides, Aβ1-40 and Aβ25-35, may bind DNA. In contrast, the scrambled form of Aβ25-35, a non-aggregating and nontoxic form of this peptide, could not bind DNA. We conclude that although the amyloid-DNA interaction is closely related to the amyloid aggregation proneness, this cannot be the only factor which determines the interaction, since small oligomers of amyloid peptides may also bind DNA if their predominant negatively charged amino acid residues are previously neutralized.

  4. Real-time study of genomic DNA structural changes upon interaction with small molecules using dual-polarization interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Zhanxia; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xiurong

    2009-06-15

    The structural changes of genomic DNA upon interaction with small molecules have been studied in real time using dual-polarization interferometry (DPI). Native or thermally denatured DNA was immobilized on the silicon oxynitride surface via a preadsorbed poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) layer. The mass loading was similar for both types of DNA; however, native DNA formed a looser and thicker layer due to its rigidity, unlike the more flexible denatured DNA, which mixed with PEI to form a denser and thinner layer. Ethidium bromide (EtBr), a classical intercalator, induced the large thickness decrease and density increase of native DNA (double-stranded), but a slight increase in both the thickness and density of denatured DNA (partial single-stranded). Spermine that electrostatically binds DNA induced the increase in layer thickness and decrease in the density of both native and denatured DNA. However, the looser structure of native DNA made it more accessible to spermine, leading to a higher binding amount and larger thickness increase. For native DNA, EtBr induced a slow and less reversible contraction of DNA owing to intercalation, while spermine induced a fast and reversible expansion of DNA owing to electrostatic interaction. DPI offers an effective means for real-time study of DNA structural changes during the interactions.

  5. Interaction between DNA and Trimethyl-Ammonium Bromides with Different Alkyl Chain Lengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between λ—DNA and cationic surfactants with varying alkyl chain lengths was investigated. By dynamic light scattering method, the trimethyl-ammonium bromides-DNA complex formation was shown to be dependent on the length of the surfactant’s alkyl chain. For surfactants with sufficient long alkyl chain (CTAB, TTAB, DTAB, the compacted particles exist with a size of ~60–110 nm at low surfactant concentrations. In contrast, high concentration of surfactants leads to aggregates with increased sizes. Atomic force microscope scanning also supports the above observation. Zeta potential measurements show that the potential of the particles decreases with the increase of surfactant concentration (CTAB, TTAB, DTAB, which contributes much to the coagulation of the particles. For OTAB, the surfactant with the shortest chain in this study, it cannot fully neutralize the charges of DNA molecules; consequently, the complex is looser than other surfactant-DNA structures.

  6. Spectrophotometric analysis of flavonoid-DNA binding interactions at physiological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Naveed Kausar; Siddiqa, Asima; Yaqub, Azra; Sabahat, Sana; Qureshi, Rumana; Haque, Sayed ul

    2009-12-01

    Mode of interactions of three flavonoids [morin (M), quercetin (Q), and rutin (R)] with chicken blood ds.DNA (ck.DNA) has been investigated spectrophotometrically at different temperatures including body temperature (310 K) and at two physiological pH values, i.e. 7.4 (human blood pH) and 4.7 (stomach pH). The binding constants, Kf, evaluated using Benesi-Hildebrand equation showed that the flavonoids bind effectively through intercalation at both pH values and body temperature. Quercetin, somehow, showed greater binding capabilities with DNA. The free energies of flavonoid-DNA complexes indicated the spontaneity of their binding. The order of binding constants of three flavonoids at both pH values were found to be Kf(Q) > Kf(R) > Kf(M) and at 310 K.

  7. Studies on the Interaction of Dinitratobis(phen) Cadmium Complex with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN,Cai-Xia; WU,Yan-Bo; WEI,Yi-Bin; YANG,Pin; ZHU,Miao-Li

    2007-01-01

    DNA-binding properties of the dinitratobis(phen) cadmium complex [Cd(phen)2(NO3)2] (where phen =1,10-phenanthroline) have been investigated with absorption titration, fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosity measurement, molecular modeling and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results indictate DNA-binding mode of the complex to be weak groove binding rather than partial intercalative interaction expected of the extended planar aromatic phen ring. In addition, the DNA cleavage study was carried out by gel electrophoresis experiment. The results showed that the complex both hardly cleaves pBR322 DNA in the absence and present ascorbate. So it is suggested that the formation of cadmium complex can decrease cadmium toxicity to some extents.

  8. Synthesis of dihydromyricetin-manganese (II) complex and interaction with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingquan; Yuan, Juan; Zeng, Jinhua; He, Xiangzhu; Li, Daguang

    2012-11-01

    Dihydromyricetin has many physiological functions and its metal complex could have better effects. DNA is very important in biological body, but little attention has been devoted to the relationship between dihydromyricetin-metal complex and the DNA. In this paper, dihydromyricetin-Mn (II) complex has been prepared and characterized using UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TG-DTA Analysis). The interaction of dihydromyricetin-Mn (II) complex with DNA was investigated using UV-vis spectra, fluorescence measurements and viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the dihydromyricetin-manganese (II) complex can intercalate into the stacked base pairs of DNA with binding constant Kb = 5.64 × 104 M and compete with the strong intercalator ethidium bromide for the intercalative binding sites with Stern-Volmer quenching constant, Ksq = 1.16.

  9. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of

  10. Palladium polypyridyl complexes: synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction and biological activity on Leishmania (L.) mexicana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Maribel [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas (Venezuela). Centro de Quimica; Betancourt, Adelmo [Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia (Venezuela). Facultad Experimental de Ciencia y Tecnologia. Dept. de Quimica; Hernandez, Clara [Universidad de Carabobo Sede Aragua, Maracay (Venezuela). Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud. Dept. de Ciencias Basicas; Marchan, Edgar [Universidad de Oriente, Cumana (Venezuela). Inst. de Investigaciones en Biomedicina y Ciencias Aplicadas. Nucleo de Sucre

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the search for new potential chemotherapeutic agents based on transition metal complexes with planar ligands. In this study, palladium polypyridyl complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopies. The interaction of the complexes with DNA was also investigated by spectroscopic methods. All metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) bands of the palladium polypyridyl complexes exhibited hypochromism and red shift in the presence of DNA. The binding constant and viscosity data suggested that the complexes [PdCl{sub 2}(phen)] and [PdCl{sub 2}(phendiamine)] interact with DNA by electrostatic forces. Additionally, these complexes induced an important leishmanistatic effect on L. (L.) mexicana promastigotes at the final concentration of 10 {mu}mol L{sup -1} in 48 h. (author)

  11. [Study of aspirin and its interaction with DNA by Raman and UV spectroscopies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Qian-qian; Zhou, Guang-ming

    2012-03-01

    Normal Raman spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of aspirin and aspirin tablet were reported, and the vibrational and enhanced peaks were assigned; the interaction of aspirin with DNA was investigated by SERS and UV. The results showed that NRS and SERS of aspirin and aspirin tablet were consistent basically, which indicated that excipient hardly affected the detection of aspirin; in SERS, aspirin was absorbed perpendicularly on silver colloid through the carboxyl group and the benzene ring; The interaction was mainly caused by the inserting-action mode between aspirin and DNA, and the benzene ring and C=O of aspirin were inserted between the base pair of the double helix structure of DNA, which provided important information and useful reference for understanding deeply the mechanism of action of this kind of drug.

  12. Histidine-Based Lipopeptides Enhance Cleavage of Nucleic Acids: Interactions with DNA and Hydrolytic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélières, M; Déjugnat, C; Chouini-Lalanne, N

    2015-12-16

    Interaction studies and cleavage activity experiments were carried out between plasmid DNA and a series of histidine-based lipopeptides. Specific fluorescent probes (ethidium bromide, Hoechst 33342, and pyrene) were used to monitor intercalation, minor groove binding, and self-assembly of lipopeptides, respectively. Association between DNA and lipopeptides was thus evidenced, highlighting the importance of both histidine and hydrophobic tail in the interaction process. DNA cleavage in the presence of lipopeptides was then detected by gel electrophoresis and quantified, showing the importance of histidine and the involvement of its side-chain imidazole in the hydrolysis mechanism. These systems could then be developed as synthetic nucleases while raising concern of introducing histidine in the design of lipopeptide-based transfection vectors.

  13. Stacking interaction in metal complexes with compositions of DNA and heteroaromatic N-bases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The current development in the intramolecular aromatic-ring stacking i nteractions in the complexes with compositions of DNA and heteroaromatic N-bases has been reviewed to a great extent, especially the significant contributions i n several important systems about ternary mixed-ligand complexes, including nucl eotide-metal ion-po- lyaromatic amine, amino acid-metal ion-polyaromatic amine, nucleotide-metal ion-pyridine-like aromatic amine, nucleotide-metal ion-amino ac id, nucleotide-metal ion-nucleic acid base, nucleic acid base-metal ion, and the important factors affecting the intramolecular aromatic-ring stacking interacti ons in the complexes. Based on the study of stacking interaction in the complexe s, the mechanism of interaction between DNA molecules and complexes of heteroaro matic N-bases has been established, which is crucial for the design and synthesi s of the complexes acting as molecular devices of DNA.

  14. [Combined hopping-superexchange mechanism of charge transfer in DNA; a model with nearest interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, V D; Sultanov, V B

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of the earlier developed combined hopping-superexchange mechanism of charge transfer in DNA, a model with all nearest interactions between nucleobases is proposed. It is shown that the transfer rates for various types of nucleotide sequences calculated within this model are in a good agreement with experimental data.

  15. Highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence displacement method for the study of DNA/small molecule binding interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Rongfu; Wang Lirong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China); Guo Lianghong, E-mail: LHGuo@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2010-08-31

    Non-covalent binding interactions of small molecules with DNA play important roles in regulating gene expression and gene function. In this work, a highly sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) displacement method has been developed to investigate such interactions, particularly for weak DNA binders. This ECL method relies on a double-stranded DNA film deposited on an indium tin oxide electrode (ITO) surface by layer-by-layer self-assembly. A DNA intercalator, [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(dppz)]{sup 2+} (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2'3'-c]phenazine), is employed as the ECL signal indicator. If a test compound competes with the indicator for the same binding sites in DNA, it would displace the indicator from the film and reduce ECL signal. The new method was validated by measuring five well-known DNA-binding organic molecules including quinacrine, H33258, thiazole orange, ethidium bromide and 4,6-diamidine-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride. Due to high ECL sensitivity, only 0.4 {mu}mol L{sup -1} [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(dppz)]{sup 2+} was needed in the ECL displacement measurement, which is about 75-fold less than the concentration in the voltammetric measurement. The lowered concentration permitted direct measurement of IC{sub 50} values of eight hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in their ECL displacement curves and subsequent calculation of their binding constants with DNA. The ECL displacement method is particularly useful for investigating weak DNA binders with limited aqueous solubility.

  16. Interaction of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen With DNA at the Single Molecule Level

    KAUST Repository

    Raducanu, Vlad-Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a key factor involved in Eukaryotic DNA replication and repair, as well as other cellular pathways. Its importance comes mainly from two aspects: the large numbers of interacting partners and the mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA. The large numbers of interacting partners makes PCNA a necessary factor to consider when studying DNA replication, either in vitro or in vivo. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA, i.e. sliding along the duplex, reduces the six degrees of freedom of the molecule, three degrees of freedom of translation and three degrees of freedom of rotation, to only two, translation along the duplex and rotational tracking of the helix. Through this mechanism PCNA can recruit its partner proteins and localize them to the right spot on the DNA, maybe in the right spatial orientation, more effectively and in coordination with other proteins. Passive loading of the closed PCNA ring on the DNA without free ends is a topologically forbidden process. Replication factor C (RFC) uses energy of ATP hydrolysis to mechanically open the PCNA ring and load it on the dsDNA. The first half of the introduction gives overview of PCNA and RFC and the loading mechanism of PCNA on dsDNA. The second half is dedicated to a diffusion model and to an algorithm for analyzing PCNA sliding. PCNA and RFC were successfully purified, simulations and a mean squared displacement analysis algorithm were run and showed good stability and experimental PCNA sliding data was analyzed and led to parameters similar to the ones in literature.

  17. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction mechanisms of safranin T with herring sperm DNA using acridine orange as a fluorescence probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jun; Wang, Xing-ming; Xu, Dong-ling; Ding, Li-sheng

    2014-03-01

    Under the condition of physiological pH environment (pH = 7.40), the interactions of safranin T (ST) with herring sperm DNA were studied by means of spectral methods using acridine orange (AO) as a fluorescence probe. The spectroscopic characteristics of DNA-AO in the case of ST (along with the increase of concentration) were observed in an aqueous medium. The binding constants for ST stranded DNA and competitive bindings of ST interacting with DNA-AO systems were examined by fluorescence spectra, and the binding mechanism of ST with DNA was researched via viscosity measurements. All the testimony manifested that bonding modes between ST and DNA were evidenced to be intercalative binding and electrostatic binding, and the combining constant of ST with DNA was obtained. The binding of ST to DNA was driven by entropy and enthalpy through the calculated thermodynamic parameters (Δr Hm (Ө), Δr Sm and Δr Gm (Ө)).

  18. Antibacterial effect of cationic porphyrazines and anionic phthalocyanine and their interaction with plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Leila; Hakimian, Fatemeh; Safaei, Elham; Fazeli, Zahra

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is a public health issue and identification of new antibacterial agents is one of the most important goals of pharmacological research. Among the novel developed antibacterial agents, porphyrin complexes and their derivatives are ideal candidates for use in medical applications. Phthalocyanines differ from porphyrins by having nitrogen atoms link the individual pyrrol units. The aza analogues of the phthalocyanines (azaPcs) such as tetramethylmetalloporphyrazines are heterocyclic Pc analogues. In this investigation, interaction of an anionic phthalocyanine (Cu(PcTs)) and two cationic tetrapyridinoporphyrazines including [Cu(2,3-tmtppa)]4+ and [Cu(3,4-tmtppa)]4+ complexes with plasmid DNA was studied using spectroscopic and gel electrophoresis methods. In addition, antibacterial effect of the complexes against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria was investigated using dilution test method. The results indicated that both porphyrazines have significant antibacterial properties, but Cu(PcTs) has weak antibacterial effect. Compairing the binding of the phthalocyanine and the porphyrazines to DNA demonstrated that the interaction of cationic porphyrazines is stronger than the anionic phthalocyanine remarkably. The extent of hypochromicity and red shift of absorption spectra indicated preferential intercalation of the two porphyrazine into the base pairs of DNA helix. Gel electrophoresis result implied Cu(2,3-tmtppa) and Cu(3,4-tmtppa) are able to perform cleavage of the plasmid DNA. Consequently, DNA binding and cleavage might be one of the antibacterial mechanisms of the complexes.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and DNA Interaction Studies of Copper Complex Containing Food Additive Carmoisine Dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Akbari, Alireza; Jamshidbeigi, Mina; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-06-02

    A copper complex of carmoisine dye; [Cu(carmoisine)2(H2O)2]; was synthesized and characterized by using physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding of this complex with calf thymus (ct) DNA was investigated by circular dichroism, absorption studies, emission spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. UV-vis results confirmed that the Cu complex interacted with DNA to form a ground-state complex and the observed binding constant (2× 10(4) M(-1)) is more in keeping with the groove bindings with DNA. Furthermore, the viscosity measurement result showed that the addition of complex causes no significant change on DNA viscosity and it indicated that the intercalation mode is ruled out. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions played major roles in the reaction. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that the complex can change the conformation of DNA from B-like form toward A-like conformation. The cytotoxicity studies of the carmoisine dye and its copper complex indicated that both of them had anticancer effects on HT-29 (colon cancer) cell line and they may be new candidates for treatment of the colon cancer.

  20. DNA interaction with Al- N, N'-bis(salicylidene)2,2'-phenylendiamine complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, S.; Gholivand, M. B.; Ahmadi, F.; Taravati, A.; Colagar, A. Hosseinzadeh

    2007-06-01

    The Al(III) complex, [Al(salophen)2H 2O]NO 3, was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic (NMR and FT-IR) techniques. Then the binding of Schiff base complex of [Al(salophen)] + type, where salophen denotes N, N'-bis(salicylidene) 2,2-phenylendiamine to calf thymus DNA, has been investigated by spectrophotometric, circular dichroism, spectrofluorometric, melting temperature and viscosimetric techniques. This Al(III) complex showed absorption hyperchromism in the range of 310-390 nm, increase in melting temperature, some structural changes in specific viscosity, when bound to calf thymus DNA. The binding constant has been determined using absorption measurement and found to be 1.82 × 10 3 M -1 and 1.31 × 10 3 M -1 in HEPES and Tris-HCl buffers, respectively. Also the fluorescence spectral characteristics and interaction of Al-salophen complex with DNA have been studied. Al-salophen bound to DNA showed a marked increase in the fluorescence intensity along with a bathochromic shift (5 nm). The intersection point of the binding isotherm indicated a binding site size of 12 bp per bound complex molecule in both HEPES and Tris-HCl buffers. The experimental results showed that the Al-salophen complex bound to DNA by non-intercalative mode and major groove binding was the preferred mode of interaction

  1. A quantitative 14-3-3 interaction screen connects the nuclear exosome targeting complex to the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasius, Melanie; Wagner, Sebastian A; Choudhary, Chuna Ram

    2014-01-01

    RNA metabolism is altered following DNA damage, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Through a 14-3-3 interaction screen for DNA damage-induced protein interactions in human cells, we identified protein complexes connected to RNA biology. These include the nuclear exosome...

  2. Regularities in the E.coli promoters composition in connection with the DNA strands interaction and promoter activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BEREZHNOY Andrey Yu; SHCKORBATOV Yuriy G.; HISANORI Kiryu

    2006-01-01

    The energy of interaction between DNA strands in promoters is of great functional importance. Visualization of the energy of DNA strands distribution in promoter sequences was achieved. The separation of promoters in groups by their energetic properties enables evaluation of the dependence of promoter strength on the energetic properties. The analysis of groups (clusters)of promoters distributed by the energy of DNA strands interaction in -55, -35, -10 and +6 sequences indicates their connection with the transcriptional activity.

  3. Direct force measurement of single DNA-peptide interactions using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ji W; Shin, Dongjin; Kwak, June M; Seog, Joonil

    2013-06-01

    The selective interactions between DNA and miniature (39 residues) engineered peptide were directly measured at the single-molecule level by using atomic force microscopy. This peptide (p007) contains an α-helical recognition site similar to leucine zipper GCN4 and specifically recognizes the ATGAC sequence in the DNA with nanomolar affinity. The average rupture force was 42.1 pN, which is similar to the unbinding forces of the digoxigenin-antidigoxigenin complex, one of the strongest interactions in biological systems. The single linear fit of the rupture forces versus the logarithm of pulling rates showed a single energy barrier with a transition state located at 0.74 nm from the bound state. The smaller koff compared with that of other similar systems was presumably due to the increased stability of the helical structure by putative folding residues in p007. This strong sequence-specific DNA-peptide interaction has a potential to be utilized to prepare well-defined mechanically stable DNA-protein hybrid nanostructures.

  4. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of DNA with the copper complexes of NSAIDs lornoxicam and isoxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sathi; Ray, Suhita; Sarkar, Munna

    2016-12-01

    Non Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) form the most common class of anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents. They also show anticancer properties for which they exert their effects by interacting at the protein but not at the genomic level. This is because most NSAIDs are anions at physiological pH, which prohibit their approach to the polyanionic DNA backbone. Complexing NSAIDs with bioactive metal like copper obliterates this disadvantage. Here, copper complexes of two oxicam NSAIDs, Lornoxicam (Lx) and Isoxicam (Isx) have been chosen to study their interaction with calf thymus (ct) DNA and have been synthesized as per reported protocols. UV-vis absorption showed that DNA binding to Cu(II)-Lx complex alters the absorption spectra indicating changes in the electronic environment of the complex, whereas, for Cu(II)-Isx there was only small changes. Hence, UV-vis absorption was used to determine the binding constant, stoichiometry and thermodynamic parameters of Cu(II)-Lx. However, UV-melting studies and CD difference spectra showed that both Cu(II)-Lx and Cu(II)-Isx can interact with the DNA backbone albeit with different binding modes. The probable binding mode was determined by kinetics of EtBr displacement and viscosity measurements. Our results point to an intercalative mode of binding for Cu(II)-Lx and external groove binding for Cu(II)-Isx.

  5. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies of the interaction between oleuropein, the major bio-phenol in olives, and salmon sperm DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadi, Maryam; Afzali, Daryoush; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Mostafavi, Ali; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud

    2015-09-01

    Interaction of oleuropein, the major bio-phenol in olive leaf and fruit, with salmon sperm double-stranded DNA was investigated by employing electronic absorption titrations, fluorescence quenching spectroscopy, competitive fluorescence spectroscopy, thermal denaturation and voltammetric studies. Titration of oleuropein with the DNA caused a hypochromism accompanied with a red shift indicating an intercalative mode of interaction. Binding constant of 1.4 × 104 M-1 was obtained for this interaction. From the curves of fluorescence titration of oleuropein with the DNA, binding constant and binding sites were calculated to be 8.61 × 103 M-1 and 1.05, respectively. Competitive studies with ethidium bromide (a well-known DNA intercalator) showed that the bio-phenol could take the place of ethidium bromide in the DNA intercalation sites. The interaction of oleuropein with DNA was also studied electrochemically. In the presence of the DNA, the anodic and cathodic peak currents of oleuropein decreased accompanied with increases in peak-to-peak potential separation and formal potential, indicating the intercalation of oleuropein into the DNA double helix. Moreover, melting temperature of the DNA was found to increase in the presence of oleuropein, indicating the stabilization of the DNA double helix due to an intercalative interaction.

  6. First paraben substituted cyclotetraphosphazene compounds and DNA interaction analysis with a new automated biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiftçi, Gönül Yenilmez; Şenkuytu, Elif; İncir, Saadet Elif; Yuksel, Fatma; Ölçer, Zehra; Yıldırım, Tuba; Kılıç, Adem; Uludağ, Yıldız

    2016-06-15

    Cancer, as one of the leading causes of death in the world, is caused by malignant cell division and growth that depends on rapid DNA replication. To develop anti-cancer drugs this feature of cancer could be exploited by utilizing DNA-damaging molecules. To achieve this, the paraben substituted cyclotetraphosphazene compounds have been synthesized for the first time and their effect on DNA (genotoxicity) has been investigated. The conventional genotoxicity testing methods are laborious, take time and are expensive. Biosensor based assays provide an alternative to investigate this drug/compound DNA interactions. Here for the first time, a new, easy and rapid screening method has been used to investigate the DNA damage, which is based on an automated biosensor device that relies on the real-time electrochemical profiling (REP™) technology. Using both the biosensor based screening method and the in vitro biological assay, the compounds 9 and 11 (propyl and benzyl substituted cyclotetraphosphazene compounds, respectively), have resulted in higher DNA damage than the others with 65% and 80% activity reduction, respectively.

  7. Interaction studies between biosynthesized silver nanoparticle with calf thymus DNA and cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Swarup; Sadhukhan, Ratan; Ghosh, Utpal; Das, Tapan Kumar

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of calf thymus DNA (CTDNA) with silver nanoparticles (SNP) has been investigated following spectroscopic studies, analysis of melting temperature (Tm) curves and hydrodynamic measurement. In spectrophotometric titration and thermal denaturation studies of CTDNA it was found that SNP can form a complex with double-helical DNA and the increasing value of Tm also supported the same. The association constant of SNP with DNA from UV-Vis study was found to be 4.1 × 103 L/mol. The fluorescence emission spectra of intercalated ethidium bromide (EB) with increasing concentration of SNP represented a significant reduction of EB intensity and quenching of EB fluorescence. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that SNP can change the conformation of DNA. From spectroscopic, hydrodynamic, and DNA melting studies, SNP has been found to be a DNA groove binder possessing partial intercalating property. Cell cytotoxicity of SNP was compared with that of normal silver salt solution on HeLa cells. Our results show that SNP has less cytotoxicity compared to its normal salt solution and good cell staining property.

  8. Probing DNA-Protein Interactions on Surfaces Using Spectral Self-interference Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Mehmet; Droge, Peter; Swan, Anna K.; Unlu, Selim; Goldberg, Bennett B.

    2007-03-01

    We are probing the interactions between double-stranded DNA and integration host factor (IHF) proteins [1] on surfaces using Spectral Self-interference Fluorescence Microscopy (SSFM) [2].The probing technique utilizes the spectral fringes produced by interference of direct and reflected emission from fluorescent molecules. The modified spectrum provides a unique signature of the axial position of the fluorophores. Using the SSFM technique, we probe the average location of the fluorescent markers attached to the DNA molecules to study the conformational changes in double-stranded DNA tethered to SiO2 surfaces. In the presence of IHF, a DNA bending protein, we observe reduction in the vertical position of fluorescent molecules suggesting the formation of IHF-DNA complex and IHF-induced DNA bending. We also discuss the results with different IHF strains and different binding conditions. [1] Q. Bao et. al., Gene, Vol.343 pp.99-106 (2004) [2] L.A. Moiseev et. al., Journal of Applied Physics, Vol.96, pp. 5311-5315 (2004)

  9. Toxoplasma gondii: a bradyzoite-specific DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Akio; Dautu, George; Haga, Kaori; Munyaka, Biscah; Carmen, Gabriella; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Igarashi, Makoto

    2011-04-01

    The DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) gene (ToxoDB ID, TGME49_002020) is expressed predominantly at the bradyzoite stage. DnaK-TPR protein has a heat shock protein (DnaK) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains with amino acid sequence similarity to the counterparts of other organisms (40.2-43.7% to DnaK domain and 41.1-66.0% to TPR domain). These findings allowed us to infer that DnaK-TPR protein is important in the tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite development or maintenance of cyst structure although the function of this gene is still unknown. An immunofluorescence assay (IFA) revealed that DnaK-TPR protein was expressed in Toxoplasma gondii-encysted and in vitro-induced bradyzoites and distributed in the whole part of parasite cells. We conducted yeast two-hybrid screening to identify proteins interacting with DnaK-TPR protein, and demonstrated that DnaK-TPR protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein (Tgp23). It was expected that DnaK-TPR protein would have a function as a molecular chaperon in bradyzoite cells associated with Tgp23. Possible mechanisms for this gene are discussed.

  10. Interaction of Murine BiP/GRP78 with the DnaJ Homologue MTJ1*

    OpenAIRE

    Chevalier, Mathieu; Rhee, Hong; Elguindi, Ebrahim C.; Blond, Sylvie Y.

    2000-01-01

    The activity of Hsp70 proteins is regulated by accessory proteins, among which the most studied are the members of the DnaJ-like protein family. BiP/GRP78 chaperones the translocation and maturation of secreted and membrane proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. No DnaJ-like partner has been described so far to regulate the function of mammalian BiP/GRP78. We show here that murine BiP/GRP78 interacts with the lumenal J domain of the murine transmembrane protein MTJ1 (J-MTJ1). J-MTJ1 stimulate...

  11. Interactions of DNA with graphene and sensing applications of graphene field-effect transistor devices: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Nathaniel S; Norton, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    Graphene field-effect transistors (GFET) have emerged as powerful detection platforms enabled by the advent of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) production of the unique atomically thin 2D material on a large scale. DNA aptamers, short target-specific oligonucleotides, are excellent sensor moieties for GFETs due to their strong affinity to graphene, relatively short chain-length, selectivity, and a high degree of analyte variability. However, the interaction between DNA and graphene is not fully understood, leading to questions about the structure of surface-bound DNA, including the morphology of DNA nanostructures and the nature of the electronic response seen from analyte binding. This review critically evaluates recent insights into the nature of the DNA graphene interaction and its affect on sensor viability for DNA, small molecules, and proteins with respect to previously established sensing methods. We first discuss the sorption of DNA to graphene to introduce the interactions and forces acting in DNA based GFET devices and how these forces can potentially affect the performance of increasingly popular DNA aptamers and even future DNA nanostructures as sensor substrates. Next, we discuss the novel use of GFETs to detect DNA and the underlying electronic phenomena that are typically used as benchmarks for characterizing the analyte response of these devices. Finally, we address the use of DNA aptamers to increase the selectivity of GFET sensors for small molecules and proteins and compare them with other, state of the art, detection methods.

  12. Methods for Elucidation of DNA-Anticancer Drug Interactions and their Applications in the Development of New Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiak, Majus; Mantegazza, Francesco; Beretta, Giovanni L

    2016-01-01

    DNA damaging agents including anthracyclines, camptothecins and platinum drugs are among most frequently used drugs in the chemotherapeutic routine. Due to their relatively low selectivity for cancer cells, administration of these drugs is associated with adverse side effects, inherent genotoxicity with risk of developing secondary cancers. Development of new drugs, which could be spared of these drawbacks and characterize by improved antitumor efficacy, remains challenging yet vitally important task. These properties are in large part dictated by the selectivity of interaction between the drug and DNA and in this way the studies aimed at elucidating the complex interactions between ligand and DNA represent a key step in the drug development. Studies of the drug-DNA interactions encompass determination of DNA sequence specificity and mode of DNA binding as well as kinetic, dynamic and structural parameters of binding. Here, we consider the types of interactions between small molecule ligands and polynucleotides, how they are affected by DNA sequence and structure, and what is their significance for the antitumor activity. Based on this knowledge, we discuss the wide array of experimental techniques available to researchers for studying drug-DNA interactions, which include absorption and emission spectroscopies, NMR, magnetic and optical tweezers or atomic force microscopy. We show, using the clinical and experimental anticancer drugs as examples, how these methods provide various types of information and at the same time complement each other to provide full picture of drug- DNA interaction and aid in the development of new drugs.

  13. HyCCAPP as a tool to characterize promoter DNA-protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen-Ahlers, Hector; Rao, Prahlad K; Levenstein, Mark E; Kennedy-Darling, Julia; Perumalla, Danu S; Jadhav, Avinash Y L; Glenn, Jeremy P; Ludwig-Kubinski, Amy; Drigalenko, Eugene; Montoya, Maria J; Göring, Harald H; Anderson, Corianna D; Scalf, Mark; Gildersleeve, Heidi I S; Cole, Regina; Greene, Alexandra M; Oduro, Akua K; Lazarova, Katarina; Cesnik, Anthony J; Barfknecht, Jared; Cirillo, Lisa A; Gasch, Audrey P; Shortreed, Michael R; Smith, Lloyd M; Olivier, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Currently available methods for interrogating DNA-protein interactions at individual genomic loci have significant limitations, and make it difficult to work with unmodified cells or examine single-copy regions without specific antibodies. In this study, we describe a physiological application of the Hybridization Capture of Chromatin-Associated Proteins for Proteomics (HyCCAPP) methodology we have developed. Both novel and known locus-specific DNA-protein interactions were identified at the ENO2 and GAL1 promoter regions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and revealed subgroups of proteins present in significantly different levels at the loci in cells grown on glucose versus galactose as the carbon source. Results were validated using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Overall, our analysis demonstrates that HyCCAPP is an effective and flexible technology that does not require specific antibodies nor prior knowledge of locally occurring DNA-protein interactions and can now be used to identify changes in protein interactions at target regions in the genome in response to physiological challenges.

  14. Influence of packing interactions on the average conformation of B-DNA in crystalline structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshko, V; Subirana, J A

    1999-04-01

    The molecular interactions in crystals of oligonucleotides in the B form have been analysed and in particular the end-to-end interactions. Phosphate-phosphate interactions in dodecamers are also reviewed. A strong influence of packing constraints on the average conformation of the double helix is found. There is a strong relationship between the space group, the end-to-end interactions and the average conformation of DNA. Dodecamers must have a B-form average conformation with 10 +/- 0.1 base pairs per turn in order to crystallize in the P212121 and related space groups usually found. Decamers show a wider range of conformational variation, with 9.7-10. 6 base pairs per turn, depending on the terminal sequence and the space group. The influence of the space group in decamers is quite striking and remains unexplained. Only small variations are allowed in each case. Thus, crystal packing is strongly related to the average DNA conformation in the crystals and deviations from the average are rather limited. The constraints imposed by the crystal lattice explain why the average twist of the DNA in solution (10.6 base pairs per turn) is seldom found in oligonucleotides crystallized in the B form.

  15. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA-barcoded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M

    2014-11-27

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing, high-throughput protein analyses are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule protein detection using optical methods is limited by the number of spectrally non-overlapping chromophores. Here we introduce a single-molecular-interaction sequencing (SMI-seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling leveraging single-molecule advantages. DNA barcodes are attached to proteins collectively via ribosome display or individually via enzymatic conjugation. Barcoded proteins are assayed en masse in aqueous solution and subsequently immobilized in a polyacrylamide thin film to construct a random single-molecule array, where barcoding DNAs are amplified into in situ polymerase colonies (polonies) and analysed by DNA sequencing. This method allows precise quantification of various proteins with a theoretical maximum array density of over one million polonies per square millimetre. Furthermore, protein interactions can be measured on the basis of the statistics of colocalized polonies arising from barcoding DNAs of interacting proteins. Two demanding applications, G-protein coupled receptor and antibody-binding profiling, are demonstrated. SMI-seq enables 'library versus library' screening in a one-pot assay, simultaneously interrogating molecular binding affinity and specificity.

  16. Interaction of organophosphorus pesticides with DNA nucleotides on a Boron-doped diamond electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbellini, Gustavo S.; Uliana, Carolina V.; Yamanaka, Hideko, E-mail: gustgarb@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Bauru, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica

    2013-12-01

    Diamond electrode was used to evaluate the interaction of the nucleotides guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with the pesticides chlorpyrifos, methamidophos and monocrotophos. Changes were observed in the currents and peak potentials of the nucleotide voltammograms in the presence of the pesticides, with dependence on the pesticide concentration (from 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1}) and the interaction time (from 1 min to 4 h). This is probably due to binding of the pesticides to the nitrogenous bases present in the nucleotides, which could lead to problems in the DNA replication and biological functions of nucleotides. The pesticides showed stronger interaction with AMP than with GMP. Studies of the interaction of 50 Micro-Sign g mL{sup -1} DNA with the pesticides (from 30 min to 4 h and from 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 6.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1}) did not reveal any peaks relating to double helix opening or DNA unwinding. (author)

  17. DNA-Harmalol interaction: The effects of Harmalol on the solution structure of calf-thymus DNA studied by FTIR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadji Akhoondi A

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of hamalol with calf-thymus DNA was investigated at physiological pH with drug/DNA (phosphate molar ratio(r of 1/40. Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy were used to establish correlations between spectral changes and drug binding mode, sequence selectivity, DNA conformation and structural properties of harmalol-DNA complexes in aqueous solution. Spectroscopic results indicated that harmalol is a weak intercalator with affinity for A-T rich regions. At low drug concentration (r=1/40, the A-T region is the main target of drug intercalation.

  18. riDOM, a cell-penetrating peptide. Interaction with DNA and heparan sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Québatte, Gabriela; Kitas, Eric; Seelig, Joachim

    2013-09-19

    DNA condensation in the presence of polycationic molecules is a well-known phenomenon exploited in gene delivery. riDOM (retro-inverso dioleoylmelittin) is a cell-penetrating peptide with excellent transporter properties for DNA. It is a chimeric molecule where ri-melittin is fused to dioleoylphosphoethanolamine. The physical-chemical properties of riDOM in solution and in the presence of DNA and heparan sulfate were investigated with spectroscopic and thermodynamic methods. Dynamic light scattering shows that riDOM in solution aggregates to well-defined nanoparticles with a diameter of ∼13 nm and a ζ-potential of 22 mV, composed of about 220-270 molecules. Binding of riDOM to DNA was studied with dynamic light scattering, ζ-potential measurements, and isothermal titration calorimetry and was compared with authentic melittin-DNA interaction. riDOM binds tightly to DNA with a microscopic binding constant of 5 × 10(7) M(-1) and a stoichiometry of 12 riDOM per 10 DNA base pairs. In the complex the DNA double strand is completely shielded by the more hydrophobic riDOM molecules. Authentic melittin binds to DNA with a much lower binding constant of 5 × 10(6) M(-1) and lower stoichiometry of 5 melittin per 10 DNA base pairs. The binding enthalpies for riDOM and melittin are small and the binding reactions are entropy-driven. Sulfated glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate are also linear molecules with a negative charge. riDOM binding to heparan sulfate on cell surfaces can therefore interfere with DNA-riDOM binding. riDOM-heparan sulfate complex formation was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and spectroscopic methods. The binding constant of riDOM for heparan sulfate is K ≈ 2 × 10(6) M(-1). Authentic melittin has a similar binding constant but riDOM shows a 3-fold higher packing density on heparan sulfate than the distinctly smaller melittin.

  19. Electrochemical Studies of the Recognition Interaction of Rhodamine B with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kui JIAO; Qing Jun LI; Wei SUN; Zhen Yong WANG

    2005-01-01

    The recognition interaction of rhodamine B (RB) with DNA was studied in pH 7.5Britton-Robinson (B-R) buffer solution by electrochemical techniques. An irreversible oxidation peak at glassy carbon electrode was obtained at +0.92V (vs. SCE). After the addition of DNA into the RB solution, the peak current of RB decreased apparently without the shift of peak potential. The electrochemical parameters such as the charge transfer coefficient α and the electrode reaction standard rate constant ks of RB in the absence and presence of DNA were determined, which did not change, indicating that a non-electroactive complex was formed, so the concentration of RB in the solution decreased and the peak current decreased correspondingly.

  20. Synthesis and characterisation of platinum (II) salphen complex and its interaction with calf thymus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukri, Shahratul Ain Mohd; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43650 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    A platinum (II) salphen complex was synthesised by condensation reaction of 2,4-dihydroxylbenzaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine with potassium tetrachloroplatinate to obtain N,N′-Bis-4-(hydroxysalicylidene)-phenylenediamine-platinum (II). The structure of the complex was confirmed by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, CHN elemental analyses and ESI-MS spectrometry. The platinum (II) salphen complex with four donor atoms N{sub 2}O{sub 2} from its salphen ligand coordinated to platinum (II) metal centre were determined. The binding mode and interaction of this complex with calf thymus DNA was determined by UV/Vis DNA titration and emission titration. The intercalation between the DNA bases by π-π stacking due to its square planar geometry and aromatic rings structures was proposed.

  1. Synthesis and characterisation of platinum (II) salphen complex and its interaction with calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukri, Shahratul Ain Mohd; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd

    2014-09-01

    A platinum (II) salphen complex was synthesised by condensation reaction of 2,4-dihydroxylbenzaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine with potassium tetrachloroplatinate to obtain N,N'-Bis-4-(hydroxysalicylidene)-phenylenediamine-platinum (II). The structure of the complex was confirmed by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, CHN elemental analyses and ESI-MS spectrometry. The platinum (II) salphen complex with four donor atoms N2O2 from its salphen ligand coordinated to platinum (II) metal centre were determined. The binding mode and interaction of this complex with calf thymus DNA was determined by UV/Vis DNA titration and emission titration. The intercalation between the DNA bases by π-π stacking due to its square planar geometry and aromatic rings structures was proposed.

  2. Interaction of Chelerythrine Choloride in Acid Buffer with Calf-thymus DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Jing SU; Xiong Hui WEI

    2006-01-01

    The binding of chelerythrine (CHE) iminium to calf-thymus (CT) DNA is characterized by hypochromism and bathochromism in the absorption band, enhancement of fluorescence intensity, increase in fluorescence polarization, and the perturbation of the CD spectra of DNA.These changes are characteristic of intercalation. Scatchard plots constructed from fluorescence titration data gave a binding constant of 5.77×105 and a binding site size of 3,4 base pairs at 25℃.The intercalative interaction is exothermic with a Van't Hoff enthalpy of -33.7 kJ/mol. In addition, △G =-32.9 kJ/mol, and △S =-2.9 J/mol/K. The intercalation of CHE into the DNA helix is enthalpy-driven.

  3. Optimization of Cyanine Dye Stability and Analysis of FRET Interaction on DNA Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Haar, Marcel; Heuer, Christopher; Pähler, Martin; von der Haar, Kathrin; Lindner, Patrick; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-11-30

    The application of DNA microarrays for high throughput analysis of genetic regulation is often limited by the fluorophores used as markers. The implementation of multi-scan techniques is limited by the fluorophores' susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner laser light. This paper presents combined mechanical and chemical strategies which enhance the photostability of cyanine 3 and cyanine 5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays. These strategies are based on scanning the microarrays while the hybridized DNA is still in an aqueous solution with the presence of a reductive/oxidative system (ROXS). Furthermore, the experimental setup allows for the analysis and eventual normalization of Förster-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET) interaction of cyanine-3/cyanine-5 dye combinations on the microarray. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the comparability of microarray experiment results between labs.

  4. Optimization of Cyanine Dye Stability and Analysis of FRET Interaction on DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel von der Haar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The application of DNA microarrays for high throughput analysis of genetic regulation is often limited by the fluorophores used as markers. The implementation of multi-scan techniques is limited by the fluorophores’ susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner laser light. This paper presents combined mechanical and chemical strategies which enhance the photostability of cyanine 3 and cyanine 5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays. These strategies are based on scanning the microarrays while the hybridized DNA is still in an aqueous solution with the presence of a reductive/oxidative system (ROXS. Furthermore, the experimental setup allows for the analysis and eventual normalization of Förster-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET interaction of cyanine-3/cyanine-5 dye combinations on the microarray. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the comparability of microarray experiment results between labs.

  5. Effect of the head-group geometry of amino acid-based cationic surfactants on interaction with plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Vaibhav; Maiti, Souvik; Dasgupta, Antara; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Dias, Rita S; Miguel, Maria G; Lindman, Björn

    2008-07-01

    The interaction between DNA and different types of amino acid-based cationic surfactants was investigated. Particular attention was directed to determine the extent of influence of surfactant head-group geometry toward tuning the interaction behavior of these surfactants with DNA. An overview is obtained by gel retardation assay, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism at different mole ratios of surfactant/DNA; also, cell viability was assessed. The studies show that the surfactants with more complex/bulkier hydrophobic head group interact more strongly with DNA but exclude ethidium bromide less efficiently; thus, the accessibility of DNA to small molecules is preserved to a certain extent. The presence of more hydrophobic groups surrounding the positive amino charge also gave rise to a significantly lower cytotoxicity. The surfactant self-assembly pattern is quite different without and with DNA, illustrating the roles of electrostatic and steric effects in determining the effective shape of a surfactant molecule.

  6. Internal charge transfer based ratiometric interaction of anionic surfactant with calf thymus DNA bound cationic surfactant: Study I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhijit; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Moulik, Satya Priya; Banerjee, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) binds calf thymus (ct-) DNA like anionic biopolymers electrostatically and established equilibrium both in the ground as well as in excited state in aqueous medium at pH 7. Anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) does not show even hydrophobic interaction with ct-DNA at low concentration. On contrary, SDS can establish well defined equilibrium with DNA bound CTAB in ground state where the same CTAB-DNA isosbestic point reappears. First report of internal charge transfer (ICT) based binding of CTAB with ct-DNA as well as ICT based interaction of anionic SDS with DNA bound CTAB that shows dynamic quenching contribution also. The reappearance of anodic peak and slight increase in cathodic peak current with increasing concentration (at lower range) of anionic SDS, possibly reflect the release of CTAB from DNA bound CTAB by SDS.

  7. Internal charge transfer based ratiometric interaction of anionic surfactant with calf thymus DNA bound cationic surfactant: Study I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhijit; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Moulik, Satya Priya; Banerjee, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) binds calf thymus (ct-) DNA like anionic biopolymers electrostatically and established equilibrium both in the ground as well as in excited state in aqueous medium at pH 7. Anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) does not show even hydrophobic interaction with ct-DNA at low concentration. On contrary, SDS can establish well defined equilibrium with DNA bound CTAB in ground state where the same CTAB-DNA isosbestic point reappears. First report of internal charge transfer (ICT) based binding of CTAB with ct-DNA as well as ICT based interaction of anionic SDS with DNA bound CTAB that shows dynamic quenching contribution also. The reappearance of anodic peak and slight increase in cathodic peak current with increasing concentration (at lower range) of anionic SDS, possibly reflect the release of CTAB from DNA bound CTAB by SDS.

  8. Tropical plant-herbivore networks: reconstructing species interactions using DNA barcodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos García-Robledo

    Full Text Available Plants and their associated insect herbivores, represent more than 50% of all known species on earth. The first step in understanding the mechanisms generating and maintaining this important component of biodiversity is to identify plant-herbivore associations. In this study we determined insect-host plant associations for an entire guild of insect herbivores using plant DNA extracted from insect gut contents. Over two years, in a tropical rain forest in Costa Rica (La Selva Biological Station, we recorded the full diet breadth of rolled-leaf beetles, a group of herbivores that feed on plants in the order Zingiberales. Field observations were used to determine the accuracy of diet identifications using a three-locus DNA barcode (rbcL, trnH-psbA and ITS2. Using extraction techniques for ancient DNA, we obtained high-quality sequences for two of these loci from gut contents (rbcL and ITS2. Sequences were then compared to a comprehensive DNA barcode library of the Zingiberales. The rbcL locus identified host plants to family (success/sequence = 58.8% and genus (success/sequence = 47%. For all Zingiberales except Heliconiaceae, ITS2 successfully identified host plants to genus (success/sequence = 67.1% and species (success/sequence = 61.6%. Kindt's sampling estimates suggest that by collecting ca. four individuals representing each plant-herbivore interaction, 99% of all host associations included in this study can be identified to genus. For plants that amplified ITS2, 99% of the hosts can be identified to species after collecting at least four individuals representing each interaction. Our study demonstrates that host plant identifications at the species-level using DNA barcodes are feasible, cost-effective, and reliable, and that reconstructing plant-herbivore networks with these methods will become the standard for a detailed understanding of these interactions.

  9. DNA interaction studies of new nano metal based anticancer agent: validation by spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Chandra Sharma, Girish; Arjmand, Farukh [Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Azam, Ameer, E-mail: tsartaj62@yahoo.com [Center of Excellence in Materials Science (Nanomaterials), Department of Applied Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, UP (India)

    2010-05-14

    A new nano dimensional heterobimetallic Cu-Sn containing complex as a potential drug candidate was designed, synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral methods. The electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance parameters of the complex revealed that the Cu(II) ion exhibits a square pyramidal geometry with the two pyrazole nitrogen atoms, the amine nitrogen atom and the carboxylate oxygen of the phenyl glycine chloride ligand located at the equatorial sites and the coordinated chloride ion occupying an apical position. {sup 119}Sn NMR spectral data showed a hexa-coordinated environment around the Sn(IV) metal ion. TEM, AFM and XRD measurements illustrate that the complex could induce the condensation of CT-DNA to a particulate nanostructure. The interaction of the Cu-Sn complex with CT-DNA was investigated by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, as well as cyclic voltammetric measurements. The results indicated that the complex interacts with DNA through an electrostatic mode of binding with an intrinsic binding constant K{sub b} = 8.42 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}. The Cu-Sn complex exhibits effective cleavage of pBR322 plasmid DNA by an oxidative cleavage mechanism, monitored at different concentrations both in the absence and in the presence of reducing agents.

  10. Single-molecule observations of RNA-RNA kissing interactions in a DNA nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yosuke; Endo, Masayuki; Suzuki, Yuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Durand, Guillaume; Dausse, Eric; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules uniquely form a complex through specific hairpin loops, called a kissing complex. The kissing complex is widely investigated and used for the construction of RNA nanostructures. Molecular switches have also been created by combining a kissing loop and a ligand-binding aptamer to control the interactions of RNA molecules. In this study, we incorporated two kinds of RNA molecules into a DNA origami structure and used atomic force microscopy to observe their ligand-responsive interactions at the single-molecule level. We used a designed RNA aptamer called GTPswitch, which has a guanosine triphosphate (GTP) responsive domain and can bind to the target RNA hairpin named Aptakiss in the presence of GTP. We observed shape changes of the DNA/RNA strands in the DNA origami, which are induced by the GTPswitch, into two different shapes in the absence and presence of GTP, respectively. We also found that the switching function in the nanospace could be improved by using a cover strand over the kissing loop of the GTPswitch or by deleting one base from this kissing loop. These newly designed ligand-responsive aptamers can be used for the controlled assembly of the various DNA and RNA nanostructures.

  11. The interaction of DNA gyrase with the bacterial toxin CcdB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Howells, A J; Maxwell, A

    1999-01-01

    CcdB is a bacterial toxin that targets DNA gyrase. Analysis of the interaction of CcdB with gyrase reveals two distinct complexes. An initial complex (alpha) is formed by direct interaction between GyrA and CcdB; this complex can be detected by affinity column and gel-shift analysis, and has...... of this initial complex with ATP in the presence of GyrB and DNA slowly converts it to a second complex (beta), which has a lower rate of ATP hydrolysis and is unable to catalyse supercoiling. The efficiency of formation of this inactive complex is dependent on the concentrations of ATP and CcdB. We suggest...

  12. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, W.K.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of presentations and discussions which took place at the US Department of Energy/Commission of European Communities (DOE/CEC) workshop on ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection,'' held at San Diego, California, January 21-22, 1987, is provided. The Department has traditionally supported fundamental research on interactions of ionizing radiation with different biological systems and at all levels of biological organization. The aim of this workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection.

  13. DNA-protein interaction at erythroid important regulatory elements of MEL cells by in vivo footprinting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Using ligation-mediated PCR method to study the status of DNA-protein interaction at hypersensitive site 2 of locus control Region and β maj promoter of MEL cell line before and after induction, MEL cell has been cultured and induced to differentiation by Hemin and DMSO, then the live cells have been treated with dimethyl sulfate. Ligation mediated PCR has been carried out following the chemical cleavage. The results demonstrate that before and after induction, the status of DNA-protein interaction at both hypersensitive site 2 and β maj promoter change significantly, indicating that distal regulatory elements (locus control region, hypersensitive sites) as well as proximal regulatory elements (promoter, enhancer) of β -globin gene cluster participate in the regulation of developmental specificity.

  14. Interactions of metal ions with DNA, its constituents and derivatives, which may be relevant for anticancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turel, Iztok; Kljun, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    In this review several types of interactions between metal ions and DNA are given, starting from basic binding to the use of metal complexes in cancer treatment and diagnostics. Metal cations help to neutralize the negative charge of DNA and thus enable the normal functions of DNA but many other interactions are also possible and are discussed in this paper. Various consequences of such interactions can be reversible (e. g. conformational changes) or irreversible (e. g. cleavage). It is known that some metal ions can also damage DNA which can provoke mutations and in some cases leads to cancer. It is clear that we know a lot about metal-DNA interactions but much more information is needed to understand the role of metal ions completely and to use this knowledge successfully.

  15. Interaction of low energy electrons with DNA: Applications to cancer radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanche, Léon

    2016-11-01

    Presently, there exists considerable information on the mechanisms involved when low-energy electrons (LEEs) interact with biomolecules, including DNA. Since these electrons are produced in large quantities by ionizing radiation, knowing their mechanisms of action increases our understanding of radiobiological damage and modifications of this damage by morphological or chemical changes introduced in the DNA. In the present article, the results of experiments on LEE-induced damage to DNA modified by radiosensitizers, chemotherapeutic agents and gold nanoparticles are reviewed. DNA strand breaks and multiple lesions become more numerous with such modifications. They are usually due to an increase in the number and probability of forming transient anions of DNA constituents, and their decay into destructive channels, such as dissociative electron attachment. As shown in this review, by invoking the role of LEEs in the processes of radiosensitization, guidelines can be provided for the development of new radiosensitizers and improved protocols in the treatment of cancer patients with radiotherapy alone or in concomitance with chemotherapy.

  16. Tailored protein encapsulation into a DNA host using geometrically organized supramolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprengel, Andreas; Lill, Pascal; Stegemann, Pierre; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Schöneweiß, Elisa-C.; Merdanovic, Melisa; Gudnason, Daniel; Aznauryan, Mikayel; Gamrad, Lisa; Barcikowski, Stephan; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Birkedal, Victoria; Gatsogiannis, Christos; Ehrmann, Michael; Saccà, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    The self-organizational properties of DNA have been used to realize synthetic hosts for protein encapsulation. However, current strategies of DNA-protein conjugation still limit true emulation of natural host-guest systems, whose formation relies on non-covalent bonds between geometrically matching interfaces. Here we report one of the largest DNA-protein complexes of semisynthetic origin held in place exclusively by spatially defined supramolecular interactions. Our approach is based on the decoration of the inner surface of a DNA origami hollow structure with multiple ligands converging to their corresponding binding sites on the protein surface with programmable symmetry and range-of-action. Our results demonstrate specific host-guest recognition in a 1:1 stoichiometry and selectivity for the guest whose size guarantees sufficient molecular diffusion preserving short intermolecular distances. DNA nanocontainers can be thus rationally designed to trap single guest molecules in their native form, mimicking natural strategies of molecular recognition and anticipating a new method of protein caging.

  17. Interatomic Coulombic Decay Effects in Theoretical DNA Recombination Systems Involving Protein Interaction Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, E. L.; Rivas, D. A.; Duot, A. C.; Hovey, R. T.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication is the basis for all biological reproduction. A strand of DNA will ``unzip'' and bind with a complimentary strand, creating two identical strands. In this study, we are considering how this process is affected by Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD), specifically how ICD affects the individual coding proteins' ability to hold together. ICD mainly deals with how the electron returns to its original state after excitation and how this affects its immediate atomic environment, sometimes affecting the connectivity between interaction sites on proteins involved in the DNA coding process. Biological heredity is fundamentally controlled by DNA and its replication therefore it affects every living thing. The small nature of the proteins (within the range of nanometers) makes it a good candidate for research of this scale. Understanding how ICD affects DNA molecules can give us invaluable insight into the human genetic code and the processes behind cell mutations that can lead to cancer. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  18. Isothermal titration calorimetric analysis of the interaction between cationic lipids and plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, B A; Davis, A; Koe, G; Smith, J G; Middaugh, C R

    2001-02-01

    The effects of buffer and ionic strength upon the enthalpy of binding between plasmid DNA and a variety of cationic lipids used to enhance cellular transfection were studied using isothermal titration calorimetry at 25.0 degrees C and pH 7.4. The cationic lipids DOTAP (1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethyl ammonium propane), DDAB (dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide), DOTAP:cholesterol (1:1), and DDAB:cholesterol (1:1) bound endothermally to plasmid DNA with a negligible proton exchange with buffer. In contrast, DOTAP: DOPE (L-alpha-dioleoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine) (1:1) and DDAB:DOPE (1:1) liposomes displayed a negative enthalpy and a significant uptake of protons upon binding to plasmid DNA at neutral pH. These findings are most easily explained by a change in the apparent pKa of the amino group of DOPE upon binding. Complexes formed by reverse addition methods (DNA into lipid) produced different thermograms, sizes, zeta potentials, and aggregation behavior, suggesting that structurally different complexes were formed in each titration direction. Titrations performed in both directions in the presence of increasing ionic strength revealed a progressive decrease in the heat of binding and an increase in the lipid to DNA charge ratio at which aggregation occurred. The unfavorable binding enthalpy for the cationic lipids alone and with cholesterol implies an entropy-driven interaction, while the negative enthalpies observed with DOPE-containing lipid mixtures suggest an additional contribution from changes in protonation of DOPE.

  19. Tailored protein encapsulation into a DNA host using geometrically organized supramolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprengel, Andreas; Lill, Pascal; Stegemann, Pierre; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Schöneweiß, Elisa-C; Merdanovic, Melisa; Gudnason, Daniel; Aznauryan, Mikayel; Gamrad, Lisa; Barcikowski, Stephan; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Birkedal, Victoria; Gatsogiannis, Christos; Ehrmann, Michael; Saccà, Barbara

    2017-02-16

    The self-organizational properties of DNA have been used to realize synthetic hosts for protein encapsulation. However, current strategies of DNA-protein conjugation still limit true emulation of natural host-guest systems, whose formation relies on non-covalent bonds between geometrically matching interfaces. Here we report one of the largest DNA-protein complexes of semisynthetic origin held in place exclusively by spatially defined supramolecular interactions. Our approach is based on the decoration of the inner surface of a DNA origami hollow structure with multiple ligands converging to their corresponding binding sites on the protein surface with programmable symmetry and range-of-action. Our results demonstrate specific host-guest recognition in a 1:1 stoichiometry and selectivity for the guest whose size guarantees sufficient molecular diffusion preserving short intermolecular distances. DNA nanocontainers can be thus rationally designed to trap single guest molecules in their native form, mimicking natural strategies of molecular recognition and anticipating a new method of protein caging.

  20. The adsorption-desorption transition of double-stranded DNA interacting with an oppositely charged dendrimer induced by multivalent anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yangwei; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Yaoyang; Deng, Zhenyu; Zhang, Linxi

    2014-05-28

    The adsorption-desorption transition of DNA in DNA-dendrimer solutions is observed when high-valence anions, such as hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions. In the DNA-dendrimer solutions with low-valence anions, dendrimers bind tightly with the V-shaped double-stranded DNA. When high-valence anions, such as pentavalent or hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions, the double-stranded DNA chains can be stretched straightly and the dendrimers are released from the double-stranded DNA chains. In fact, adding high-valence anions to the solutions can change the charge spatial distribution in the DNA-dendrimer solutions, and weaken the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged dendrimers and the oppositely charged DNA chains. Adsorption-desorption transition of DNA is induced by the overcharging of dendrimers. This investigation is capable of helping us understand how to control effectively the release of DNA in gene/drug delivery because an effective gene delivery for dendrimers includes non-covalent DNA-dendrimer binding and the effective release of DNA in gene therapy.

  1. Cytogenetic evaluation and DNA interaction studies of the food colorants amaranth, erythrosine and tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpountoukas, Panagiotis; Pantazaki, Anastasia; Kostareli, Efterpi; Christodoulou, Pantelitsa; Kareli, Dimitra; Poliliou, Stamatia; Mourelatos, Costas; Lambropoulou, Vasso; Lialiaris, Theodore

    2010-10-01

    Food coloring agents, amaranth, erythrosine and tartrazine have been tested at 0.02-8mM in human peripheral blood cells in vitro, in order to investigate their genotoxic, cytotoxic and cytostatic potential. Amaranth at the highest concentration (8mM) demonstrates high genotoxicity, cytostaticity and cytotoxicity. The frequency of SCEs/cell was increased 1.7 times over the control level. Additionally, erythrosine at 8, 4 and 2mM shows a high cytotoxicity and cytostaticity. Finally, tartrazine seems to be toxic at 8 and 4mM. No signs of genotoxicity were observed. Reversely, tartrazine showed cytotoxicity at 1 and 2mM. Furthermore, spectroscopic titration studies for the interaction of these food additives with DNA showed that these dyes bind to calf thymus DNA and distinct isosbestic points are observed clearly suggesting binding of the dyes to DNA. Additionally DNA electrophoretic mobility experiments showed that these colorants are obviously capable for strong binding to linear dsDNA causing its degradation. PCR amplification of all DNA fragments (which previously were pre-treated with three different concentrations of the colorants, extracted from agarose gel after separation and then purified), seems to be attenuated with a manner dye concentration-dependent reflecting in a delayed electrophoretic mobility due to the possible binding of some molecules of the dyes. Evaluation of the data and curves were obtained after quantitative and qualitative analysis of the lanes of the gel by an analyzer computer program. Our results indicate that these food colorants had a toxic potential to human lymphocytes in vitro and it seems that they bind directly to DNA.

  2. 53BP1 mediates productive and mutagenic DNA repair through distinct phosphoprotein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, E.; Wong, N.; Chen, H.-T.;

    2013-01-01

    deficiency by restoring genome stability in BRCA1-deficient cells yet behaves like wild-type 53BP1 with respect to immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR). 53BP1 recruits RIF1 but fails to recruit the DDR protein PTIP to DSBs, and disruption of PTIP phenocopies 53BP1. We conclude that 53BP1 promotes...... productive CSR and suppresses mutagenic DNA repair through distinct phosphodependent interactions with RIF1 and PTIP. © 2013 Elsevier Inc....

  3. Design of artificial nucleases and studies of their interaction with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JingJing; SHAO Ying; WEI Li; LI Ying; SHENG Xin; LIU Fang; LU GuoYuan

    2009-01-01

    The design of artificial nucleases and nuclease mimics has attracted extensive attention and made great progress due to their significant scientific meanings and potential application in the field of gene medicine and molecular biology. This paper reviews recent progress in the investigation of artificial nuclease, including "bifunctional cooperative catalysis", "dinuclear synergistic catalysis", "metal-free catalysis", and especially, the studies of aza-crown ethers as artificial nucleases and their interaction with DNA.

  4. Probing and quantifying DNA-protein interactions with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Jonathan; Schachermeyer, Samantha; Duan, Yaokai; Jimenez, Luis A; Zhong, Wenwan

    2014-09-05

    Tools capable of measuring binding affinities as well as amenable to downstream sequencing analysis are needed for study of DNA-protein interaction, particularly in discovery of new DNA sequences with affinity to diverse targets. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) is an open-channel separation technique that eliminates interference from column packing to the non-covalently bound complex and could potentially be applied for study of macromolecular interaction. The recovery and elution behaviors of the poly(dA)n strand and aptamers in AF4 were investigated. Good recovery of ssDNAs was achieved by judicious selection of the channel membrane with consideration of the membrane pore diameter and the radius of gyration (Rg) of the ssDNA, which was obtained with the aid of a Molecular Dynamics tool. The Rg values were also used to assess the folding situation of aptamers based on their migration times in AF4. The interactions between two ssDNA aptamers and their respective protein components were investigated. Using AF4, near-baseline resolution between the free and protein-bound aptamer fractions could be obtained. With this information, dissociation constants of ∼16nM and ∼57nM were obtained for an IgE aptamer and a streptavidin aptamer, respectively. In addition, free and protein-bound IgE aptamer was extracted from the AF4 eluate and amplified, illustrating the potential of AF4 in screening ssDNAs with high affinity to targets. Our results demonstrate that AF4 is an effective tool holding several advantages over the existing techniques and should be useful for study of diverse macromolecular interaction systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Design of artificial nucleases and studies of their interaction with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The design of artificial nucleases and nuclease mimics has attracted extensive attention and made great progress due to their significant scientific meanings and potential application in the field of gene medicine and molecular biology. This paper reviews recent progress in the investigation of artificial nuclease,including "bifunctional cooperative catalysis","dinuclear synergistic catalysis","metal-free catalysis" ,and especially,the studies of aza-crown ethers as artificial nucleases and their interaction with DNA.

  6. Study on the Interaction of Colloidal Gold with Taq DNA Polymerase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU,Hong-Ping; MI,Li-Juan; CHEN,Shi-Mou; WANG,Wen-Feng; YAO,Si-De

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of colloidal gold with Taq DNA polymerase (Taq) was investigated in this study. Taq-gold conjugate was formed by adding the enzyme to the colloidal gold solution, as evidenced by UV-Vis spectroscopy,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and photon cross correlation spectroscopy measurements. The conjugate was further characterized by transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the Taq-gold conjugate particles were still spherical and well-dispersed. The influence of gold nanoparticles on the bioactivity of Taq was studied by analyzing the yield of the polymerase chain reaction amplification. Results indicated that the enzymatic activity of Taq decreased after interaction with the colloidal gold.

  7. Inducible DNA - protein interactions of the murine kappa immunoglobulin enhancer in intact cells: comparison with in vitro interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hromas, R.; Pauli, U.; Marcuzzi, A.; Lafrenz, D.; Nick, H.; Stein, J.; Stein, G.; Ness, B.V.

    1988-02-11

    The large intron of the kappa immunoglobulin gene contains a cis-acting enhancer element, which is important in the tissue-specific expressions of the gene. The authors have confirmed the binding activity of a sequence-specific factor present in lymphoid extracts derived from cell lines expressing, or induced to express, the kappa gene. They have extended these studies to show the binding activity is present in normal activated splenic B cells as well as lambda producing cells, and have demonstrated by DNAse footprint analysis full, protection of a sequence containing the 11 bp homology to the SV-40 core enhancer. They have compared these in vitro binding studies with an analysis of protein-DNA interactions in intact murine cell lines using genomic sequencing techniques. They demonstrate significant alterations in DMS reactivity of DNA in the murine 70Z/3 cell line after it is induced to kappa expression. These alterations occur at guanine residues which are part of the 11 bp core sequence, and are identical to those observed in cells constitutively expressing kappa. This provides direct evidence for the induced binding of the tissue specific factor to intact chromatin. In intact chromatin they also observed significant alteration in the reactivity of a guanine, 3' of the core sequence, which is part of a potential secondary DNA structure, and protection of four residues that are part of a region homologous to the heavy chain enhancer.

  8. Inducible DNA-protein interactions of the murine kappa immunoglobulin enhancer in intact cells: comparison with in vitro interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hromas, R; Pauli, U; Marcuzzi, A; Lafrenz, D; Nick, H; Stein, J; Stein, G; Van Ness, B

    1988-01-01

    The large intron of the kappa immunoglobulin gene contains a cis-acting enhancer element, which is important in the tissue-specific expression of the gene. We have confirmed the binding activity of a sequence-specific factor present in lymphoid extracts derived from cell lines expressing, or induced to express, the kappa gene. We have extended these studies to show the binding activity is present in normal activated splenic B cells as well as lambda producing cells, and have demonstrated by DNAse footprint analysis full protection of a sequence containing the 11 bp homology to the SV-40 core enhancer. We have compared these in vitro binding studies with an analysis of protein-DNA interactions in intact murine cell lines using genomic sequencing techniques. We demonstrate significant alterations in DMS reactivity of DNA in the murine 70Z/3 cell line after it is induced to kappa expression. These alterations occur at guanine residues which are part of the the 11 bp core sequence, and are identical to those observed in cells constitutively expressing kappa. This provides direct evidence for the induced binding of the tissue specific factor to intact chromatin. In intact chromatin we also observed significant alteration in the reactivity of a guanine, 3' of the core sequence, which is part of a potential secondary DNA structure, and protection of four residues that are part of a region homologous to the heavy chain enhancer. Images PMID:2830597

  9. Guidelines to develop interactive tutorials on 3D biomolecules: the case of DNA repair by photolyase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Assis Barony Valadares Fonseca

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This work presents the following guidelines for developing interactive learning objects on the 3D biomolecules: i- identify a relevant educational need; ii-select an appropriate subject; iii- employ interactive 3D molecular structures; iv- simultaneously display animation with related textual information or 2D diagrams; v- integrating different modes of representation of chemical phenomena. Based on these, was constructed the "Photolyase Tutorial". Photolyase is an enzyme that repairs DNA. It recognizes the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesion (CPD caused by exposure to ultraviolet light. Understanding the repair mechanism requires understanding the structure-activity relationships of the molecules involved. Therefore, this topic is a convenient subject for teaching key aspects of the structure of protein and nucleic acids. There are few interactive 3D DNA repair tutorials available and most of these are in english, therefore not acessible for students that do not domain this language. Besides, these tutorials generally focus only on displaying structural features without make foster correlations between the structure and chemical aspects of repair mechanisms. OBJECTIVES: In order to construct a interactive tutorial that fills these gaps, the 3D structures of a DNA molecule, a DNA with CPD lesion and the photolyase enzyme were manipulated focusing on structural and chemical explanation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: These structures were obtained from PDB (http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/home/home.do and manipulated to show biochemical and chemical concepts by using the resources from the LABIQ Platform (http://labiq.is.usp.br. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: Several concepts are covered, i.e., H-bonding, active site, co-factors etc. The tutorial is organized in small conceptual blocks presenting, in a stepwise fashion, how the enzyme recognizes the DNA lesion and proceeds to repair. Each block comprises a trigger button that controls the interactive

  10. The influence of β-cyclodextrin on the interaction of hesperetin and its bismuth (III) complex with calf thymus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sameena, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Karunya University, Coimbatore 641 114 (India); Enoch, Israel V.M.V., E-mail: israelenoch@karunya.edu [Department of Chemistry, Karunya University, Coimbatore 641 114 (India)

    2013-06-15

    The interaction between hesperetin (Hes)/hesperetin–Bi (III) complex (Bhes) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was analyzed in the solid and the solution phase. The interaction of hesperetin [5,7,3′-trihydroxyl-4′-methoxyl-flavanone] and its bismuth complex with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) in the absence and the presence of β-CD was studied by absorption and fluorescence techniques. Docking of Hes with β-CD/DNA was carried out to study the binding theoretically. Hyperchromic and fluorescence enhancement was observed for the interaction between Hes/Bhes and β-CD. Hes interact with β-CD to form 1:2 complexes whereas Bhes shows 1:1 complexation. The effect of β-CD on the binding strength of Hes/Bhes with ctDNA was observed. Hyperchromic effect and fluorescence quenching were observed for the binding of Hes/Bhes and ctDNA in the absence and the presence of β-CD. Significant enhancement in the fluorescence intensity of Hes–ctDNA and Bhes–ctDNA was noticed in the β-CD solution. The fluorescence study showed that the quenching of Hes–ctDNA interaction was of static type, whereas Bhes–ctDNA is of dynamic type. Low Stern–Volmer quenching constant of β-CD-bound-Hes, in comparison with Hes was observed which might be due to cleavage of Hes from DNA by inclusion complexation between Hes and β-CD. The similar order of magnitude of Stern–Volmer quenching of Bhes in the aqueous and the β-CD solutions might be due to electrostatic interaction between the Bi and DNA predominantly. The study on the interaction of Hes/Bhes with ctDNA in competition with methylene blue (MB) supported the existence of electrostatic interaction. -- Highlights: ► Hesperetin forms a 1:2 complex and hesperetin–Bi (III) forms a 1:1 with β-CD. ► The effect of β-CD on ctDNA interacted hesperetin/hesperetin–Bi (III) is reported. ► Hesperetin and its β-CD complex bind more strongly with ctDNA than Hes–Bi (III) complex. ► 1:1 stoichiometry is observed for Hes/Bhes with ctDNA in

  11. Real-Time Analysis of Specific Protein-DNA Interactions with Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Ritzefeld

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several proteins, like transcription factors, bind to certain DNA sequences, thereby regulating biochemical pathways that determine the fate of the corresponding cell. Due to these key positions, it is indispensable to analyze protein-DNA interactions and to identify their mode of action. Surface plasmon resonance is a label-free method that facilitates the elucidation of real-time kinetics of biomolecular interactions. In this article, we focus on this biosensor-based method and provide a detailed guide how SPR can be utilized to study binding of proteins to oligonucleotides. After a description of the physical phenomenon and the instrumental realization including fiber-optic-based SPR and SPR imaging, we will continue with a survey of immobilization methods. Subsequently, we will focus on the optimization of the experiment, expose pitfalls, and introduce how data should be analyzed and published. Finally, we summarize several interesting publications of the last decades dealing with protein-DNA and RNA interaction analysis by SPR.

  12. De novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3b interacts with NEDD8-modified proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamay, Meir; Greenway, Melanie; Liao, Gangling; Ambinder, Richard F; Hayward, S Diane

    2010-11-19

    DNA methylation and histone modifications play an important role in transcription regulation. In cancer cells, many promoters become aberrantly methylated through the activity of the de novo DNA methyltransferases DNMT3a and DNMT3b and acquire repressive chromatin marks. NEDD8 is a ubiquitin-like protein modifier that is conjugated to target proteins, such as cullins, to regulate their activity, and cullin 4A (CUL4A) in its NEDD8-modified form is essential for repressive chromatin formation. We found that DNMT3b associates with NEDD8-modified proteins. Whereas DNMT3b interacts directly in vitro with NEDD8, conjugation of NEDD8 to target proteins enhances this interaction in vivo. DNMT3b immunoprecipitated two major bands of endogenously NEDDylated proteins at the size of NEDDylated cullins, and indeed DNMT3b interacted with CUL1, CUL2, CUL3, CUL4A, and CUL5. Moreover, DNMT3b preferentially immunoprecipitated the NEDDylated form of endogenous CUL4A. NEDD8 enhanced DNMT3b-dependent DNA methylation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggest that DNMT3b recruits CUL4A and NEDD8 to chromatin, whereas deletion of Dnmt3b reduces the association of CUL4A and NEDD8 at a repressed promoter in a cancer cell line.

  13. Genome-wide mapping of in vivo protein-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David S; Mortazavi, Ali; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara

    2007-06-08

    In vivo protein-DNA interactions connect each transcription factor with its direct targets to form a gene network scaffold. To map these protein-DNA interactions comprehensively across entire mammalian genomes, we developed a large-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation assay (ChIPSeq) based on direct ultrahigh-throughput DNA sequencing. This sequence census method was then used to map in vivo binding of the neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF; also known as REST, for repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor) to 1946 locations in the human genome. The data display sharp resolution of binding position [+/-50 base pairs (bp)], which facilitated our finding motifs and allowed us to identify noncanonical NRSF-binding motifs. These ChIPSeq data also have high sensitivity and specificity [ROC (receiver operator characteristic) area >/= 0.96] and statistical confidence (P <10(-4)), properties that were important for inferring new candidate interactions. These include key transcription factors in the gene network that regulates pancreatic islet cell development.

  14. Experimental and Computational Evidence on the Interaction of Cycloalkyl α-Aminobisphosphonates with Calf Thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher; Peyman, Hossein; Gholivand, Khodayar; Roshanfekr, Hamideh; Taherpour, Avat Arman; Yaghoubi, Rouhollah

    2017-07-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy, viscometry, cyclic voltammetry, and differential pulse voltammetry were applied to investigate the competitive interaction of DNA with the three new cycloalkyl α-aminobisphosphonates (D1-D3) and spectroscopic probe, neutral red dye, and Hoechst (HO), in a Tris-hydrogen chloride buffer (pH 7.4). The spectroscopic and voltammetric studies showed that the groove binding mode of interaction is predominant in the solution containing DNA and α-aminobisphosphonates. Furthermore, the results indicated that α-aminobisphosphonate with the lengthy N alkyl chains and larger heterocyclic ring size had a stronger interaction. The principal component analysis and theoretical quantum mechanical and molecular mechanics (QM-DFT B3LYP/6-31+G* and MM-SYBYL) methods were also applied to determine the number of chemical components presented in complexation equilibrium and identify the structure complexes of DNA with the three new cycloalkyl α-aminobisphosphonates (D1-D3), respectively.

  15. Structure/Function Analysis of DNA-glycosylases That Repair Oxidized Purines and Pyrimidines and the Influence of Surrounding DNA Sequence on Their Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Susan S.

    2005-08-22

    The overall goal of this project was to elucidate the structure/function relationships between oxidized DNA bases and the DNA repair enzymes that recognize and remove them. The NMR solution structure of formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg) that recognizes oxidized DNA purines was to be determined. Furthermore, the solution structures of DNA molecules containing specific lesions recognized by Fpg was to be determined in sequence contexts that either facilitate or hinder this recognition. These objectives were in keeping with the long-term goals of the Principal Investigator's laboratory, that is, to understand the basic mechanisms that underpin base excision repair processing of oxidative DNA lesions and to elucidate the interactions of unrepaired lesions with DNA polymerases. The results of these two DNA transactions can ultimately determine the fate of the cell. These objectives were also in keeping with the goals of our collaborator, Dr. Michael Kennedy, who is studying the repair and recognition of damaged DNA. Overall the goals of this project were congruent with those of the Department of Energy's Health Effects and Life Sciences Research Program, especially to the Structural Biology, the Human Genome and the Health Effects Programs. The mission of the latter Program includes understanding the biological effects and consequences of DNA damages produced by toxic agents in the many DOE waste sites so that cleanup can be accomplished in a safe, effective and timely manner.

  16. Interaction of calf thymus dsDNA with anti-tumor drug tamoxifen studied by zero current potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-xia; Song, Zhang-jun; Sun, Jie-juan; Song, Jun-feng

    2011-06-15

    Since the electrochemical oxidation peaks of both DNA and anti-tumor drug tamoxifen (TAM) overlapped with each other, the known electrochemical methods were limited in the study of the interactions between DNA and TAM. In this paper, zero current potentiometry, a new electrochemical method, was used to study the interaction of calf thymus dsDNA with TAM. The dsDNA was immobilized on the surface of carbon paste (dsDNA/CP). The dsDNA/CP connected in series between the clips of working and counter electrodes of a potentiostat and a reference electrode were immersed in aqueous solution containing TAM, the interaction of dsDNA with TAM produced a change in interfacial potential at the dsDNA/CP/solution interface. When linear sweep potential was applied to the dsDNA/CP and the corresponding I-E curve was recorded, interfacial potential offset applied potential partially, making the I-E curve displace along potential axis. Zero current potential where circuit current I was equal to zero in the I-E curve was measured to check the displacement of the I-E curve. Based on the displacement, the thermodynamic constants of the interaction between dsDNA and TAM were determined. The binding ratio of dsDNA with TAM was found to be 1:1 and the apparent binding constant was (6.85±0.20)×10(6) M(-1). As zero current potentiometry was independent of the changes in redox potential or current of both dsDNA and TAM themselves, the interaction was studied in their natural forms without damage. Moreover, TAM can be determined. The detection limit was 1.1×10(-7) M.

  17. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations.

  18. Determining plant-leaf miner-parasitoid interactions: a DNA barcoding approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derocles, Stéphane A P; Evans, Darren M; Nichols, Paul C; Evans, S Aifionn; Lunt, David H

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in network ecology is to describe the full-range of species interactions in a community to create highly-resolved food-webs. We developed a molecular approach based on DNA full barcoding and mini-barcoding to describe difficult to observe plant-leaf miner-parasitoid interactions, consisting of animals commonly regarded as agricultural pests and their natural enemies. We tested the ability of universal primers to amplify the remaining DNA inside leaf miner mines after the emergence of the insect. We compared the results of a) morphological identification of adult specimens; b) identification based on the shape of the mines; c) the COI Mini-barcode (130 bp) and d) the COI full barcode (658 bp) fragments to accurately identify the leaf-miner species. We used the molecular approach to build and analyse a tri-partite ecological network of plant-leaf miner-parasitoid interactions. We were able to detect the DNA of leaf-mining insects within their feeding mines on a range of host plants using mini-barcoding primers: 6% for the leaves collected empty and 33% success after we observed the emergence of the leaf miner. We suggest that the low amplification success of leaf mines collected empty was mainly due to the time since the adult emerged and discuss methodological improvements. Nevertheless our approach provided new species-interaction data for the ecological network. We found that the 130 bp fragment is variable enough to identify all the species included in this study. Both COI fragments reveal that some leaf miner species could be composed of cryptic species. The network built using the molecular approach was more accurate in describing tri-partite interactions compared with traditional approaches based on morphological criteria.

  19. Determining plant-leaf miner-parasitoid interactions: a DNA barcoding approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane A P Derocles

    Full Text Available A major challenge in network ecology is to describe the full-range of species interactions in a community to create highly-resolved food-webs. We developed a molecular approach based on DNA full barcoding and mini-barcoding to describe difficult to observe plant-leaf miner-parasitoid interactions, consisting of animals commonly regarded as agricultural pests and their natural enemies. We tested the ability of universal primers to amplify the remaining DNA inside leaf miner mines after the emergence of the insect. We compared the results of a morphological identification of adult specimens; b identification based on the shape of the mines; c the COI Mini-barcode (130 bp and d the COI full barcode (658 bp fragments to accurately identify the leaf-miner species. We used the molecular approach to build and analyse a tri-partite ecological network of plant-leaf miner-parasitoid interactions. We were able to detect the DNA of leaf-mining insects within their feeding mines on a range of host plants using mini-barcoding primers: 6% for the leaves collected empty and 33% success after we observed the emergence of the leaf miner. We suggest that the low amplification success of leaf mines collected empty was mainly due to the time since the adult emerged and discuss methodological improvements. Nevertheless our approach provided new species-interaction data for the ecological network. We found that the 130 bp fragment is variable enough to identify all the species included in this study. Both COI fragments reveal that some leaf miner species could be composed of cryptic species. The network built using the molecular approach was more accurate in describing tri-partite interactions compared with traditional approaches based on morphological criteria.

  20. Interaction of bacteriophage T4 and T7 single-stranded DNA-binding proteins with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Leila; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.

    2009-06-01

    Bacteriophages T4 and T7 are well-studied model replication systems, which have allowed researchers to determine the roles of many proteins central to DNA replication, recombination and repair. Here we summarize and discuss the results from two recently developed single-molecule methods to determine the salt-dependent DNA-binding kinetics and thermodynamics of the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins (SSBs) from these systems. We use these methods to characterize both the equilibrium double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and ssDNA binding of the SSBs T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) and T7 gene 2.5 protein (gp2.5). Despite the overall two-orders-of-magnitude weaker binding of gp2.5 to both forms of DNA, we find that both proteins exhibit four-orders-of-magnitude preferential binding to ssDNA relative to dsDNA. This strong preferential ssDNA binding as well as the weak dsDNA binding is essential for the ability of both proteins to search dsDNA in one dimension to find available ssDNA-binding sites at the replication fork.

  1. Discovering approximate-associated sequence patterns for protein-DNA interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Tak Ming

    2010-12-30

    Motivation: The bindings between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are fundamental protein-DNA interactions in transcriptional regulation. Extensive efforts have been made to better understand the protein-DNA interactions. Recent mining on exact TF-TFBS-associated sequence patterns (rules) has shown great potentials and achieved very promising results. However, exact rules cannot handle variations in real data, resulting in limited informative rules. In this article, we generalize the exact rules to approximate ones for both TFs and TFBSs, which are essential for biological variations. Results: A progressive approach is proposed to address the approximation to alleviate the computational requirements. Firstly, similar TFBSs are grouped from the available TF-TFBS data (TRANSFAC database). Secondly, approximate and highly conserved binding cores are discovered from TF sequences corresponding to each TFBS group. A customized algorithm is developed for the specific objective. We discover the approximate TF-TFBS rules by associating the grouped TFBS consensuses and TF cores. The rules discovered are evaluated by matching (verifying with) the actual protein-DNA binding pairs from Protein Data Bank (PDB) 3D structures. The approximate results exhibit many more verified rules and up to 300% better verification ratios than the exact ones. The customized algorithm achieves over 73% better verification ratios than traditional methods. Approximate rules (64-79%) are shown statistically significant. Detailed variation analysis and conservation verification on NCBI records demonstrate that the approximate rules reveal both the flexible and specific protein-DNA interactions accurately. The approximate TF-TFBS rules discovered show great generalized capability of exploring more informative binding rules. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  2. Study on the toxic interactions of Ni{sup 2+} with DNA using neutral red dye as a fluorescence probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Li [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China); CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu Rutao, E-mail: rutaoliu@sdu.edu.c [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China); CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Teng Yue [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China); CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2011-04-15

    The interaction between Ni{sup 2+} and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was investigated in simulated physiological buffer (pH 7.4) using the Neutral Red (NR) dye as a spectral probe by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as CD spectra. The experimental results showed that the conformational changes in DNA helix induced by Ni{sup 2+} are the reason for the fluorescence quenching of the DNA-NR system. From the experimental results, conclusion can be drawn that Ni{sup 2+} can cause structural changes of ctDNA and bind with DNA by electrostatic interaction. At the same time, the paper proved that conformation changes of DNA can also lead to the fluorescence decrease of DNA-probe systems. - Research Highlights: The formation of new non-fluorescence complex or competing binding sites between small molecules and probe are usually the reason of fluorescence quenching in DNA-probe systems. This study proved that conformation changes of DNA induced by Ni{sup 2+} can also lead to the fluorescence decrease of DNA-probe systems.

  3. Multispectroscopic studies on the interaction of a copper(ii) complex of ibuprofen drug with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Shiri, Farshad

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of copper(II)-ibuprofenato complex with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) has been explored following, UV-visible spectrophotometry, fluorescence measurement, dynamic viscosity measurements, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. In spectrophotometric studies of ct-DNA it was found that [Cu(ibp)2]2 can form a complex with double-helical DNA. The association constant of [Cu(ibp)2]2 with DNA from UV-Vis study was found to be 6.19 × 10(4) L mol(-1). The values of Kf from fluorescence measurement clearly underscore the high affinity of [Cu(ibp)2]2 to DNA. The experimental results showed that the conformational changes in DNA helix induced by [Cu(ibp)2]2 are the reason for the fluorescence quenching of the DNA-Hoechst system. In addition, the fluorescence emission spectra of intercalated methylene blue (MB) with increasing concentrations of [Cu(ibp)2]2 represented a significant increase of MB intensity as to release MB from MB-DNA system. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that copper(II)-ibuprofenato complex can change the conformation of DNA. In addition, the results of viscosity measurements suggest that copper(II)-ibuprofenato complex may bind with non-classical intercalative mode. From spectroscopic and hydrodynamic studies, it has been found that [Cu(ibp)2]2 interacts with DNA by partial intercalation mode which contains intercalation and groove properties.

  4. Spectroscopic studies on the interactions between novel bisnaphthalimide derivatives and calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dongye; Wang, Lili; Wang, Liping; Li, Xiaoyu; Xu, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    The types of interactions between six novel bisnaphthalimide derivatives (AITHN, BITHN, PITHN, PyITHN, DN6 and DNT6) and calf thymus DNA in a physiological buffer (Tris-HCl buffer solutions, pH=7.4) were investigated using UV-vis spectrophotometry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and a competition experiment, in order to explore the relationships between the linkers of bisnaphthalimide derivatives and their activity. The absorption spectra of the six bisnaphthalimide derivatives with DNA showed a slight red shift and hypochromic effect. DNA quenched the compounds (AITHN, PITHN, PyITHN and DN6) by a static quenching process. Using acridine orange (AO) dye as a fluorescence probe, fluorescence quenching of the emission peak was observed in the AO-DNA system with the addition of PITHN, but the maximum emission intensity was elevated for AITHN and DN6 while the other three compounds showed no obvious change. The calculated binding constants of AITHN, PITHN, PyITHN and DN6 with DNA were 2.09×10(5)Lmol(-1), 1.14×10(5)Lmol(-1), 0.95×10(5)Lmol(-1) and 2.39×10(5)Lmol(-1) respectively, and the number of binding sites were 0.618, 0.323, 0.297 and 0.769. Intercalative and electrostatic binding were the two major modes between the six bisnaphthalimide derivatives and calf thymus DNA. The strength of the intercalation was related to the type of linker. Moreover, DN6 and AITHN had the greatest intercalative ability. The electrostatic binding ability of the six compounds was independent of the type of linker present.

  5. Structural Basis of DNA Ligase IV-Artemis Interaction in Nonhomologous End-Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo De Ioannes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA ligase IV (LigIV and Artemis are central components of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ machinery that is required for V(DJ recombination and the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells. We report here crystal structures of the LigIV DNA binding domain (DBD in both its apo form and in complex with a peptide derived from the Artemis C-terminal region. We show that LigIV interacts with Artemis through an extended hydrophobic surface. In particular, we find that the helix α2 in LigIV-DBD is longer than in other mammalian ligases and presents residues that specifically interact with the Artemis peptide, which adopts a partially helical conformation on binding. Mutations of key residues on the LigIV-DBD hydrophobic surface abolish the interaction. Together, our results provide structural insights into the specificity of the LigIV-Artemis interaction and how the enzymatic activities of the two proteins may be coordinated during NHEJ.

  6. Improved Modeling of Side-Chain–Base Interactions and Plasticity in Protein–DNA Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyme, Summer B.; Baker, David; Bradley, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Combinatorial sequence optimization for protein design requires libraries of discrete side-chain conformations. The discreteness of these libraries is problematic, particularly for long, polar side chains, since favorable interactions can be missed. Previously, an approach to loop remodeling where protein backbone movement is directed by side-chain rotamers predicted to form interactions previously observed in native complexes (termed “motifs”) was described. Here, we show how such motif libraries can be incorporated into combinatorial sequence optimization protocols and improve native complex recapitulation. Guided by the motif rotamer searches, we made improvements to the underlying energy function, increasing recapitulation of native interactions. To further test the methods, we carried out a comprehensive experimental scan of amino acid preferences in the I-AniI protein–DNA interface and found that many positions tolerated multiple amino acids. This sequence plasticity is not observed in the computational results because of the fixed-backbone approximation of the model. We improved modeling of this diversity by introducing DNA flexibility and reducing the convergence of the simulated annealing algorithm that drives the design process. In addition to serving as a benchmark, this extensive experimental data set provides insight into the types of interactions essential to maintain the function of this potential gene therapy reagent. PMID:22426128

  7. Investigation of hyperfine interactions in DNA nitrogenous bases using perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Andreia dos Santos; Carbonari, Artur Wilson; Lapolli, Andre Luis; Saxena, Rajendra Narain [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Saitovitch, Henrique, E-mail: asilva@usp.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Perturbed γγ angular correlations (PAC) spectroscopy has been used to study the DNA nitrogenous bases (adenine, cytosine, guanine, thymine), using {sup 111}In→{sup 111}Cd and {sup 111m}Cd→{sup 111}Cd probe nuclei. One of the advantages of applying PAC technique to biological molecules is that the experiments can be carried out on molecules in aqueous solution [1], approaching the function of molecules under conditions that are close to in vivo conditions. The measurements were carried out for DNA nitrogenous bases molecules at 295 K and 77 K in order to investigate dynamic and static hyperfine interactions, respectively. The interpretation of the results was based on the measurements of dynamic interaction characterized by the decay constant from which valuable information on the macroscopic behavior of the molecules was obtained [2; 3]. On the other hand, PAC measurements at low temperature showed interaction frequency (ν{sub Q}), asymmetry parameter (η) and the distribution of the quadrupole frequency (δ). These parameters provide a local microscopic description of the chemical environment in the neighborhood of the probe nuclei. Results showed differences in the hyperfine interactions of probe nuclei bound to the studied biomolecules. Such differences were observed by variations in the hyperfine parameters, which depended on the type of biomolecule and the results also showed that the probe nuclei bounded at the molecules in some cases and at others did not. (author)

  8. Structural basis of DNA ligase IV-Artemis interaction in nonhomologous end-joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Malu, Shruti; Cortes, Patricia; Aggarwal, Aneel K

    2012-12-27

    DNA ligase IV (LigIV) and Artemis are central components of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) machinery that is required for V(D)J recombination and the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells. We report here crystal structures of the LigIV DNA binding domain (DBD) in both its apo form and in complex with a peptide derived from the Artemis C-terminal region. We show that LigIV interacts with Artemis through an extended hydrophobic surface. In particular, we find that the helix α2 in LigIV-DBD is longer than in other mammalian ligases and presents residues that specifically interact with the Artemis peptide, which adopts a partially helical conformation on binding. Mutations of key residues on the LigIV-DBD hydrophobic surface abolish the interaction. Together, our results provide structural insights into the specificity of the LigIV-Artemis interaction and how the enzymatic activities of the two proteins may be coordinated during NHEJ. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis class II apurinic/apyrimidinic-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III exhibits DNA regulated modes of interaction with the sliding DNA β-clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, Taran; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-10-01

    The class-II AP-endonuclease (XthA) acts on abasic sites of damaged DNA in bacterial base excision repair. We identified that the sliding DNA β-clamp forms in vivo and in vitro complexes with XthA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel 239 QLRFPKK245 motif in the DNA-binding domain of XthA was found to be important for the interactions. Likewise, the peptide binding-groove (PBG) and the C-terminal of β-clamp located on different domains interact with XthA. The β-clamp-XthA complex can be disrupted by clamp binding peptides and also by a specific bacterial clamp inhibitor that binds at the PBG. We also identified that β-clamp stimulates the activities of XthA primarily by increasing its affinity for the substrate and its processivity. Additionally, loading of the β-clamp onto DNA is required for activity stimulation. A reduction in XthA activity stimulation was observed in the presence of β-clamp binding peptides supporting that direct interactions between the proteins are necessary to cause stimulation. Finally, we found that in the absence of DNA, the PBG located on the second domain of the β-clamp is important for interactions with XthA, while the C-terminal domain predominantly mediates functional interactions in the substrate's presence.

  10. The intervening domain from MeCP2 enhances the DNA affinity of the methyl binding domain and provides an independent DNA interaction site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claveria-Gimeno, Rafael; Lanuza, Pilar M.; Morales-Chueca, Ignacio; Jorge-Torres, Olga C.; Vega, Sonia; Abian, Olga; Esteller, Manel; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) preferentially interacts with methylated DNA and it is involved in epigenetic regulation and chromatin remodelling. Mutations in MeCP2 are linked to Rett syndrome, the leading cause of intellectual retardation in girls and causing mental, motor and growth impairment. Unstructured regions in MeCP2 provide the plasticity for establishing interactions with multiple binding partners. We present a biophysical characterization of the methyl binding domain (MBD) from MeCP2 reporting the contribution of flanking domains to its structural stability and dsDNA interaction. The flanking disordered intervening domain (ID) increased the structural stability of MBD, modified its dsDNA binding profile from an entropically-driven moderate-affinity binding to an overwhelmingly enthalpically-driven high-affinity binding. Additionally, ID provided an additional site for simultaneously and autonomously binding an independent dsDNA molecule, which is a key feature linked to the chromatin remodelling and looping activity of MeCP2, as well as its ability to interact with nucleosomes replacing histone H1. The dsDNA interaction is characterized by an unusually large heat capacity linked to a cluster of water molecules trapped within the binding interface. The dynamics of disordered regions together with extrinsic factors are key determinants of MeCP2 global structural properties and functional capabilities. PMID:28139759

  11. Study of Interaction between Red-tide Toxin, Domoic Acid and Double -stranded DNA by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da Zhi LI; Xin Ya HE; Hui WANG; Li SUN; Bing Cheng LIN

    2004-01-01

    The interactions between amnesic red-tide toxin, domoic acid (DA) and 14mer double-stranded DNA (dsDNA with three kinds of sequences) were studied by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). For the dsDNA with a sequence of 5'-CCCCCTATACCCGC-3', the amount of free dsDNA decreases with the increase of added DA; and the signal of DA-dsDNA complex was observed. Meanwhile, the other two dsDNAs, 5'-(C)12GC-3' and 5'-(AT)7-3', the existence of DA could not lead to the change of dsDNA signal and indicated that there is no interaction between DA and these two dsDNAs.

  12. Interactions between low energy electrons and DNA: a perspective from first-principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohanoff, Jorge; McAllister, Maeve; Tribello, Gareth A.; Gu, Bin

    2017-09-01

    DNA damage caused by irradiation has been studied for many decades. Such studies allow us to better assess the dangers posed by radiation, and to increase the efficiency of the radiotherapies that are used to combat cancer. A full description of the irradiation process involves multiple size and time scales. It starts with the interaction of radiation—either photons or swift ions—and the biological medium, which causes electronic excitation and ionisation. The two main products of ionising radiation are thus electrons and radicals. Both of these species can cause damage to biological molecules, in particular DNA. In the long run, this molecular level damage can prevent cells from replicating and can hence lead to cell death. For a long time it was assumed that the main actors in the damage process were the radicals. However, experiments in a seminal paper by the group of Leon Sanche in 2000 showed that low-energy electrons (LEE), such as those generated when ionising biological targets, can also cause bond breaks in biomolecules, and strand breaks in plasmid DNA in particular (Boudaiffa et al 2000 Science 287 1658-60). These results prompted a significant amount of experimental and theoretical work aimed at elucidating the role played by LEE in DNA damage. In this Topical Review we provide a general overview of the problem. We discuss experimental findings and theoretical results hand in hand with the aim of describing the physics and chemistry that occurs during the process of radiation damage, from the initial stages of electronic excitation, through the inelastic propagation of electrons in the medium, the interaction of electrons with DNA, and the chemical end-point effects on DNA. A very important aspect of this discussion is the consideration of a realistic, physiological environment. The role played by the aqueous solution and the amino acids from the histones in chromatin must be considered. Moreover, thermal fluctuations must be incorporated when

  13. Give-and-take: interactions between DNA transposons and their host plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooner, Hugo K; Weil, Clifford F

    2007-12-01

    Recent genome sequencing efforts have revealed how extensively transposable elements (TEs) have contributed to the shaping of present day plant genomes. DNA transposons associate preferentially with the euchromatic or genic component of plant genomes and have had the opportunity to interact intimately with the genes of the plant host. These interactions have resulted in TEs acquiring host sequences, forming chimeric genes through exon shuffling, replacing regulatory sequences, mobilizing genes around the genome, and contributing genes to the host. The close interaction of transposons with genes has also led to the evolution of intricate cellular mechanisms for silencing transposon activity. Transposons have thus become important subjects of study in understanding epigenetic regulation and, in cases where transposons have amplified to high numbers, how to escape that regulation.

  14. 13915*G DNA polymorphism associated with lactase persistence in Africa interacts with Oct-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Lynne C; Ahn, Jong Kun; Sibley, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Lactase gene expression declines with aging (lactase non-persistence) in the majority of humans worldwide. Lactase persistence is a heritable autosomal dominant condition and has been strongly correlated with several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located ~14-kb upstream (-13907, -13910 and -13915) of the lactase gene in different ethnic populations. In contrast to the -13907*G and -13910*T SNPs, the -13915*G SNP was previously believed not to interact with Oct-1. In the present study, however, Oct-1 is shown to interact with the -13915*G SNP region DNA sequence by EMSAs and gel supershift. In addition, Oct-1 is capable of enhancing promoter activity of a lactase promoter-reporter construct harboring the 13915*G SNP sequence in cell culture. Oct-1 binding to the -13907 to -13915 SNP region therefore remains a candidate interaction involved in lactase persistence.

  15. Effective interaction studies for inhibition of DNA ligase protein from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayalakshmi, Periyasamy; Daisy, Pitchai

    2015-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has been recognized as an important human pathogen for more than 100 years. It is among the most important causative agent of human infections in the twenty-first century. DNA ligase is the main protein responsible for the replication of S. aureus. In order to control the replication mechanism, DNA ligase is a successive drug target, hence we have chosen this protein for this study. We performed virtual screening using ZINC database for identification of potent inhibitor against DNA ligase. Based on the scoring methods, we have selected best five compounds from the ZINC database. In order to improve the accuracy, selected compounds were subjected into Quantum Polarized Ligand Docking (QPLD) docking, for which the results showed high docking score, compared to glide docking score. QPLD is more accurate as it includes charges in the scoring function, which was not available in the glide docking. Binding energy calculation results also indicated that selected compounds have good binding capacity with the target protein. In addition, these compounds on screening have good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity property. In this study, we identified few compounds that particularly work against DNA ligase protein, having better interaction phenomenon and it would help further the experimental analysis.

  16. DNA interactions and biocidal activity of metal complexes of benzothiazole Schiff bases: synthesis, characterization and validation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NARENDRULA VAMSIKRISHNA; MARRI PRADEEP KUMAR; GALI RAMESH; NIRMALA GANJI; SREENU DARAVATH; SHIVARAJ

    2017-05-01

    Binary complexes of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) were synthesized using two novel Schiff bases L₁ = 2-(-(benzothiazol-6-ylimino)methyl)-4-chlorophenol (BTEMCP), L₂= 2-(-(benzothiazol-6-ylimino) methyl)-4-nitrophenol. The Schiff bases and metal complexes were characterized by analytical and spectral methods like elemental analysis, Mass, ¹H-NMR, ¹³ C-NMR, UV-Vis, IR, ESR, SEM, EDX, XRD and magnetic susceptibility measurements. From the analytical data, square planar geometry has been proposed for all themetal complexes. The binding interaction between the metal complexes and DNA was investigated by means of electronic absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. The DNA cleavage ability ofthe metal complexes was also evaluated by agarose gel electrophoresis method. These studies revealed that the complexes showed an intercalative mode of binding to CT DNA and also effectively cleaved the supercoiledpBR DNA. The synthesised compounds were evaluated for in vitro antibacterial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria, and found that the metal complexes showed more potent biocidal activity than theSchiff bases.

  17. The ChIP-exo Method: Identifying Protein-DNA Interactions with Near Base Pair Precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Andrea A; Venters, Bryan J

    2016-12-23

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is an indispensable tool in the fields of epigenetics and gene regulation that isolates specific protein-DNA interactions. ChIP coupled to high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) is commonly used to determine the genomic location of proteins that interact with chromatin. However, ChIP-seq is hampered by relatively low mapping resolution of several hundred base pairs and high background signal. The ChIP-exo method is a refined version of ChIP-seq that substantially improves upon both resolution and noise. The key distinction of the ChIP-exo methodology is the incorporation of lambda exonuclease digestion in the library preparation workflow to effectively footprint the left and right 5' DNA borders of the protein-DNA crosslink site. The ChIP-exo libraries are then subjected to high throughput sequencing. The resulting data can be leveraged to provide unique and ultra-high resolution insights into the functional organization of the genome. Here, we describe the ChIP-exo method that we have optimized and streamlined for mammalian systems and next-generation sequencing-by-synthesis platform.

  18. Gli1/DNA interaction is a druggable target for Hedgehog-dependent tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Paola; Mori, Mattia; Alfonsi, Romina; Ghirga, Francesca; Aiello, Federica; Toscano, Sara; Ingallina, Cinzia; Siler, Mariangela; Cucchi, Danilo; Po, Agnese; Miele, Evelina; D'Amico, Davide; Canettieri, Gianluca; De Smaele, Enrico; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Screpanti, Isabella; Uccello Barretta, Gloria; Botta, Maurizio; Botta, Bruno; Gulino, Alberto; Di Marcotullio, Lucia

    2015-01-13

    Hedgehog signaling is essential for tissue development and stemness, and its deregulation has been observed in many tumors. Aberrant activation of Hedgehog signaling is the result of genetic mutations of pathway components or other Smo-dependent or independent mechanisms, all triggering the downstream effector Gli1. For this reason, understanding the poorly elucidated mechanism of Gli1-mediated transcription allows to identify novel molecules blocking the pathway at a downstream level, representing a critical goal in tumor biology. Here, we clarify the structural requirements of the pathway effector Gli1 for binding to DNA and identify Glabrescione B as the first small molecule binding to Gli1 zinc finger and impairing Gli1 activity by interfering with its interaction with DNA. Remarkably, as a consequence of its robust inhibitory effect on Gli1 activity, Glabrescione B inhibited the growth of Hedgehog-dependent tumor cells in vitro and in vivo as well as the self-renewal ability and clonogenicity of tumor-derived stem cells. The identification of the structural requirements of Gli1/DNA interaction highlights their relevance for pharmacologic interference of Gli signaling.

  19. Study of neutral red interaction with DNA by resolution of rank deficient multi-way fluorescence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghaddam, Fatemeh Ghasemi; Kompany Zare, Mohsen; Gholami, Somayeh

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of neutral red (NR) as an efficient anticancer drug with DNA was studied under physiological pH condition. Three-way data array were recorded by measuring excitation-emission fluorescence during the titration of neutral red with DNA at constant pH. The acid-base equilibrium constant...

  20. Identification of coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human K562 cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-09-27

    Motivation: The protein-DNA interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, also known as DNA motifs) are critical activities in gene transcription. The identification of the DNA motifs is a vital task for downstream analysis. Unfortunately, the long-range coupling information between different DNA motifs is still lacking. To fill the void, as the first-of-its-kind study, we have identified the coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human. Results: The coupling DNA motif pairs exhibit substantially higher DNase accessibility than the background sequences. Half of the DNA motifs involved are matched to the existing motif databases, although nearly all of them are enriched with at least one gene ontology term. Their motif instances are also found statistically enriched on the promoter and enhancer regions. Especially, we introduce a novel measurement called motif pairing multiplicity which is defined as the number of motifs that are paired with a given motif on chromatin interactions. Interestingly, we observe that motif pairing multiplicity is linked to several characteristics such as regulatory region type, motif sequence degeneracy, DNase accessibility and pairing genomic distance. Taken into account together, we believe the coupling DNA motif pairs identified in this study can shed lights on the gene transcription mechanism under long-range chromatin interactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Design, synthesis and DNA interactions of a chimera between a platinum complex and an IHF mimicking peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harita; Damian, Mariana S; Alshiekh, Alak; Elmroth, Sofi K C; Diederichsen, Ulf

    2015-12-28

    Conjugation of metal complexes with peptide scaffolds possessing high DNA binding affinity has shown to modulate their biological activities and to enhance their interaction with DNA. In this work, a platinum complex/peptide chimera was synthesized based on a model of the Integration Host Factor (IHF), an architectural protein possessing sequence specific DNA binding and bending abilities through its interaction with a minor groove. The model peptide consists of a cyclic unit resembling the minor grove binding subdomain of IHF, a positively charged lysine dendrimer for electrostatic interactions with the DNA phosphate backbone and a flexible glycine linker tethering the two units. A norvaline derived artificial amino acid was designed to contain a dimethylethylenediamine as a bidentate platinum chelating unit, and introduced into the IHF mimicking peptides. The interaction of the chimeric peptides with various DNA sequences was studied by utilizing the following experiments: thermal melting studies, agarose gel electrophoresis for plasmid DNA unwinding experiments, and native and denaturing gel electrophoresis to visualize non-covalent and covalent peptide-DNA adducts, respectively. By incorporation of the platinum metal center within the model peptide mimicking IHF we have attempted to improve its specificity and DNA targeting ability, particularly towards those sequences containing adjacent guanine residues.

  2. Toward a Code for the Interactions of Zinc Fingers with DNA: Selection of Randomized Fingers Displayed on Phage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Yen; Klug, Aaron

    1994-11-01

    We have used two selection techniques to study sequence-specific DNA recognition by the zinc finger, a small, modular DNA-binding minidomain. We have chosen zinc fingers because they bind as independent modules and so can be linked together in a peptide designed to bind a predetermined DNA site. In this paper, we describe how a library of zinc fingers displayed on the surface of bacteriophage enables selection of fingers capable of binding to given DNA triplets. The amino acid sequences of selected fingers which bind the same triplet are compared to examine how sequence-specific DNA recognition occurs. Our results can be rationalized in terms of coded interactions between zinc fingers and DNA, involving base contacts from a few α-helical positions. In the paper following this one, we describe a complementary technique which confirms the identity of amino acids capable of DNA sequence discrimination from these positions.

  3. DNA-controlled dynamic colloidal nanoparticle systems for mediating cellular interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Seiichi; Glancy, Dylan; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-02-01

    Precise control of biosystems requires development of materials that can dynamically change physicochemical properties. Inspired by the ability of proteins to alter their conformation to mediate function, we explored the use of DNA as molecular keys to assemble and transform colloidal nanoparticle systems. The systems consist of a core nanoparticle surrounded by small satellites, the conformation of which can be transformed in response to DNA via a toe-hold displacement mechanism. The conformational changes can alter the optical properties and biological interactions of the assembled nanosystem. Photoluminescent signal is altered by changes in fluorophore-modified particle distance, whereas cellular targeting efficiency is increased 2.5 times by changing the surface display of targeting ligands. These concepts provide strategies for engineering dynamic nanotechnology systems for navigating complex biological environments.

  4. Theoretical investigation of nuclear quadrupole interactions in DNA at first-principles level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahato, Dip N. [State University of New York at Albany, Department of Physics (United States); Dubey, Archana [University of Central Florida, Department of Physics (United States); Pink, R. H. [State University of New York at Albany, Department of Physics (United States); Scheicher, R. H. [Uppsala University, Condensed Matter Theory Group, Department of Physics and Materials Science (Sweden); Badu, S. R. [State University of New York at Albany, Department of Physics (United States); Nagamine, K. [University of California at Riverside, Department of Physics (United States); Torikai, E. [Yamanashi University, Department of Electrical Engineering (Japan); Saha, H. P.; Chow, Lee [University of Central Florida, Department of Physics (United States); Huang, M. B. [State University of New York at Albany, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (United States); Das, T. P., E-mail: tpd56@albany.edu [State University of New York at Albany, Department of Physics (United States)

    2008-01-15

    We have studied the nuclear quadrupole interactions (NQI) of the {sup 14}N, {sup 17}O and {sup 2}H nuclei in the nucleobases cytosine, adenine, guanine and thymine in the free state as well as when they are bonded to the sugar ring in DNA, simulated through a CH{sub 3} group attached to the nucleobases. The nucleobase uracil, which replaces thymine in RNA, has also been studied. Our results show that there are substantial indirect effects of the bonding with the sugar group in the nucleic acids on the NQI parameters e{sup 2}qQ/h and {eta}. It is hoped that measurements of these NQI parameters in DNA will be available in the future to compare with our predictions. Our results provide the conclusion that for any property dependent on the electronic structures of the nucleic acids, the effects of the bonding between the nucleobases and the nucleic acid backbones have to be included.

  5. Phosphorylation-dependent interactions between Crb2 and Chk1 are essential for DNA damage checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Qu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In response to DNA damage, the eukaryotic genome surveillance system activates a checkpoint kinase cascade. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, checkpoint protein Crb2 is essential for DNA damage-induced activation of downstream effector kinase Chk1. The mechanism by which Crb2 mediates Chk1 activation is unknown. Here, we show that Crb2 recruits Chk1 to double-strand breaks (DSBs through a direct physical interaction. A pair of conserved SQ/TQ motifs in Crb2, which are consensus phosphorylation sites of upstream kinase Rad3, is required for Chk1 recruitment and activation. Mutating both of these motifs renders Crb2 defective in activating Chk1. Tethering Crb2 and Chk1 together can rescue the SQ/TQ mutations, suggesting that the main function of these phosphorylation sites is promoting interactions between Crb2 and Chk1. A 19-amino-acid peptide containing these SQ/TQ motifs is sufficient for Chk1 binding in vitro when one of the motifs is phosphorylated. Remarkably, the same peptide, when tethered to DSBs by fusing with either recombination protein Rad22/Rad52 or multi-functional scaffolding protein Rad4/Cut5, can rescue the checkpoint defect of crb2Δ. The Rad22 fusion can even bypass the need for Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1 complex in checkpoint activation. These results suggest that the main role of Crb2 and 9-1-1 in DNA damage checkpoint signaling is recruiting Chk1 to sites of DNA lesions.

  6. Cyanotryptophans as Novel Fluorescent Probes for Studying Protein Conformational Changes and DNA-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Poulami; Chen, Shengxi; Roy, Basab; Yakovchuk, Petro; Spiering, Michelle M; Alam, Mohammad P; Madathil, Manikandadas M; Bhattacharya, Chandrabali; Benkovic, Stephen J; Hecht, Sidney M

    2015-12-29

    Described herein are the syntheses and photophysical characterization of three novel cyanotryptophans, and their efficient incorporation into proteins as fluorescent probes. Photophysical characteristics indicated that each was significantly brighter and red-shifted in fluorescence emission relative to tryptophan. Each analogue was used to activate a suppressor tRNA transcript and was incorporated with good efficiency into two different positions (Trp22 and Trp74) of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR). The Trp analogues could be monitored selectively in the presence of multiple native Trp residues in DHFR. 6-CNTrp (A) formed an efficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair with l-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine (HCO, D) at position 17. Further, 6-CNTrp (A) was incorporated into two DNA binding proteins, including the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I and an RNA recognition motif (RRM2) of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L-like (hnRNP LL). Using these proteins, we demonstrated the use of FRET involving A as a fluorescence donor and benzo[g]quinazoline-2,4-(1H,3H)-dione 2'-deoxyriboside (Tf) or 4-aminobenzo[g]quinazoline-2-one 2'-deoxyriboside (Cf) as fluorescent acceptors to study the binding interaction of the Klenow fragment with duplex DNA oligomers (labeled with Tf), or the domain-specific association between hnRNP LL and the BCL2 i-motif DNA (labeled with Cf). Thus, the non-natural amino acid could be used as a FRET partner for studying protein-nucleic acid interactions. Together, these findings demonstrate the potential utility of 6-CNTrp (A) as a fluorescence donor for the study of protein conformational events.

  7. Spectroscopic Study of The Interaction between Camptothecin and DNA%喜树碱与DNA相互作用的光谱学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于岚岚; 杨冉; 白希希; 陈晓英; 李建军; 屈凌波

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of an anti-cancer drug camptothecin with salmon sperm DNA was studied by spec-troscopic techniques. DNA induced slight hypochromic and bathochromic effects on the UV-Vis absorption spectra of camptothecin, but strong fluorescence quenching of camptothecin, which suggest the formation of ground-state camptothecin-DNA complex. The binding constant and number of binding site were calculated and the main interaction force was determined. The effect of salt, phosphate and negatively charged quencher KI on camptothecin-DNA interaction was investigated and the interaction of camptothecin with double-stranded DNA and single-stranded DNA was compared. The melting temperature of camptothecin-DNA complex was 60 ℃ , which is 18℃ lower than that of pure DNA. All the results indicate that groove binding mode is the main interaction mode between camptothecin and DNA.

  8. Host protein Snapin interacts with human cytomegalovirus pUL130 and affects viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanpin; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The interplay between the host and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) plays a pivotal role in the outcome of an infection. HCMV growth in endothelial and epithelial cells requires expression of viral proteins UL128, UL130, and UL131 proteins (UL128-131), of which UL130 is the largest gene and the only one that is not interrupted by introns.Mutation of the C terminus of the UL130 protein causes reduced tropism of endothelial cells (EC). However, very few host factors have been identified that interact with the UL130 protein. In this study, HCMV UL130 protein was shown to directly interact with the human protein Snapin in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells by Yeast two-hybrid screening, in vitro glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, heterologous expression of protein UL130 revealed co-localization with Snapin in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of HEK293 cells using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Furthermore, decreasing the level of Snapin via specific small interfering RNAs decreased the number of viral DNA copies and titer inHCMV-infected U373-S cells. Taken together, these results suggest that Snapin, the pUL130 interacting protein, has a role in modulating HCMV DNA synthesis.

  9. Host protein Snapin interacts with human cytomegalovirus pUL130 and affects viral DNA replication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guili Wang; Gaowei Ren; Xin Cui; Yanpin Ma; Ying Qi; Yujing Huang; Zhongyang Liu; Zhengrong Sun; Qiang Ruan

    2016-06-01

    The interplay between the host and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) plays a pivotal role in the outcome of an infection. HCMV growth in endothelial and epithelial cells requires expression of viral proteins UL128, UL130, and UL131 proteins (UL128-131), of which UL130 is the largest gene and the only one that is not interrupted by introns. Mutation of the C terminus of the UL130 protein causes reduced tropism of endothelial cells (EC). However, very few host factors have been identified that interact with the UL130 protein. In this study, HCMV UL130 protein was shown to directly interact with the human protein Snapin in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells by Yeast two-hybrid screening, in vitro glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, and co-immunoprecipitation. Additionally, heterologous expression of protein UL130 revealed co-localization with Snapin in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of HEK293 cells using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Furthermore, decreasing the level of Snapin via specific small interfering RNAs decreased the number of viral DNA copies and titer in HCMV-infected U373-S cells. Taken together, these results suggest that Snapin, the pUL130 interacting protein, has a role in modulating HCMV DNA synthesis.

  10. The crystal structure of sulfamethoxazole, interaction with DNA, DFT calculation, and molecular docking studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipankar; Sahu, Nilima; Roy, Suman; Dutta, Paramita; Mondal, Sudipa; Torres, Elena L.; Sinha, Chittaranjan

    2015-02-01

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) [4-amino-N-(5-methyl-1,2-oxazol-3-yl)benzenesulfonamide] is structurally established by single crystal X-ray diffraction measurement. The crystal packing shows H-bonded 2D polymer through N(7)sbnd H(7A)---O(2), N(7)sbnd H(7B)---O(3), N(1)sbnd H(1)---N(2), C(5)sbnd H(5)---O(3)sbnd S(1) and N(7)sbnd (H7A)---O(2)sbnd S(1). Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time Dependent-DFT (TD-DFT) computations of optimized structure of SMX determine the electronic structure and has explained the electronic spectral transitions. The interaction of SMX with CT-DNA has been studied by absorption spectroscopy and the binding constant (Kb) is 4.37 × 104 M-1. The in silico test of SMX with DHPS from Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae helps to understand drug metabolism and accounts the drug-molecule interactions. The molecular docking of SMX-DNA also helps to predict the interaction feature.

  11. The crystal structure of sulfamethoxazole, interaction with DNA, DFT calculation, and molecular docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipankar; Sahu, Nilima; Roy, Suman; Dutta, Paramita; Mondal, Sudipa; Torres, Elena L; Sinha, Chittaranjan

    2015-02-25

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) [4-amino-N-(5-methyl-1,2-oxazol-3-yl)benzenesulfonamide] is structurally established by single crystal X-ray diffraction measurement. The crystal packing shows H-bonded 2D polymer through N(7)-H(7A)-O(2), N(7)-H(7B)-O(3), N(1)-H(1)-N(2), C(5)-H(5)-O(3)-S(1) and N(7)-(H7A)-O(2)-S(1). Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time Dependent-DFT (TD-DFT) computations of optimized structure of SMX determine the electronic structure and has explained the electronic spectral transitions. The interaction of SMX with CT-DNA has been studied by absorption spectroscopy and the binding constant (Kb) is 4.37×10(4)M(-1). The in silico test of SMX with DHPS from Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae helps to understand drug metabolism and accounts the drug-molecule interactions. The molecular docking of SMX-DNA also helps to predict the interaction feature.

  12. Hydrodynamic characterisation of chitosan and its interaction with two polyanions: DNA and xanthan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Fahad M; Erten, Tayyibe; Adams, Gary G; Hayes, Maria; McLoughlin, Pádraig; Kök, M Şamil; Mackie, Alan R; Rowe, Arthur J; Harding, Stephen E

    2015-05-20

    Chitosan, a soluble polycationic derivative of insoluble chitin, has been widely considered for use in the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Commercial ("C") and in-house laboratory ("L") prepared chitosan samples extracted from crustaceous shells with different molecular weight and degrees of acetylation (25% and 15%) were compared with regards to (i) weight-average molecular weight (Mw); (ii) sedimentation coefficient (s(o)(20,w)) distribution, and (iii) intrinsic viscosity ([η]). These parameters were estimated using a combination of analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), size exclusion chromatography coupled to multi-angle laser light scattering (SEC-MALS) and differential pressure viscometry. Polydisperse distributions were seen from sedimentation coefficient distributions and elution profiles from SEC-MALS. Mw values obtained for each sample by sedimentation equilibrium measurements were in excellent agreement with those obtained from SEC-MALS. Mark-Houwink-Kuhn-Sakurada (MHKS) and Wales van Holde analyses of the data all suggest a semi-flexible conformation. The principle of co-sedimentation was then used to monitor the interactions of the two different molecular weights of L chitosans with two polyanions, DNA and xanthan (another double helical high molecular weight molecule). Interactions were clearly observed and then quantified from the changes in the sedimentation coefficient distribution of the mixture compared to unmixed controls using sedimentation velocity. The interactions appeared to show a strong dependence on molecular weight. The relevance of this for DNA condensation applications is indicated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The C-Terminal Domain of Yeast PCNA Is Required for Physical And Functional Interactions With Cdc9 DNA Ligase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayakumar, S.; Chapados, B.R.; Schmidt, K.H.; Kolodner, R.D.; Tainer, J.A.; Tomkinson, A.E.

    2007-07-13

    There is compelling evidence that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a DNA sliding clamp, co-ordinates the processing and joining of Okazaki fragments during eukaryotic DNA replication. However, a detailed mechanistic understanding of functional PCNA:ligase I interactions has been incomplete. Here we present the co-crystal structure of yeast PCNA with a peptide encompassing the conserved PCNA interaction motif of Cdc9, yeast DNA ligase I. The Cdc9 peptide contacts both the inter-domain connector loop (IDCL) and residues near the C-terminus of PCNA. Complementary mutational and biochemical results demonstrate that these two interaction interfaces are required for complex formation both in the absence of DNA and when PCNA is topologically linked to DNA. Similar to the functionally homologous human proteins, yeast RFC interacts with and inhibits Cdc9 DNA ligase whereas the addition of PCNA alleviates inhibition by RFC. Here we show that the ability of PCNA to overcome RFC-mediated inhibition of Cdc9 is dependent upon both the IDCL and the C-terminal interaction interfaces of PCNA. Together these results demonstrate the functional significance of the {beta}-zipper structure formed between the C-terminal domain of PCNA and Cdc9 and reveal differences in the interactions of FEN-1 and Cdc9 with the two PCNA interfaces that may contribute to the coordinated, sequential action of these enzymes.

  14. In and out of the minor groove: interaction of an AT-rich DNA with the drug CD27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta-Reyes, Francisco J. [Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dardonville, Christophe [Instituto de Química Médica, IQM–CSIC, Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Koning, Harry P. de; Natto, Manal [University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Subirana, Juan A.; Campos, J. Lourdes, E-mail: lourdes.campos@upc.edu [Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    New features of an antiprotozoal DNA minor-groove binding drug, which acts as a cross-linking agent, are presented. It also fills the minor groove of DNA completely and prevents the access of proteins. These features are also expected for other minor-groove binding drugs when associated with suitable DNA targets. The DNA of several pathogens is very rich in AT base pairs. Typical examples include the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and the causative agents of trichomoniasis and trypanosomiases. This fact has prompted studies of drugs which interact with the minor groove of DNA, some of which are used in medical practice. Previous studies have been performed almost exclusively with the AATT sequence. New features should be uncovered through the study of different DNA sequences. In this paper, the crystal structure of the complex of the DNA duplex d(AAAATTTT){sub 2} with the dicationic drug 4, 4′-bis(imidazolinylamino)diphenylamine (CD27) is presented. The drug binds to the minor groove of DNA as expected, but it shows two new features that have not previously been described: (i) the drugs protrude from the DNA and interact with neighbouring molecules, so that they may act as cross-linking agents, and (ii) the drugs completely cover the whole minor groove of DNA and displace bound water. Thus, they may prevent the access to DNA of proteins such as AT-hook proteins. These features are also expected for other minor-groove binding drugs when associated with all-AT DNA. These findings allow a better understanding of this family of compounds and will help in the development of new, more effective drugs. New data on the biological interaction of CD27 with the causative agent of trichomoniasis, Trichomonas vaginalis, are also reported.

  15. Developmental and organ-specific changes in promoter DNA-protein interactions in the tomato rbcS gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzara, T; Carrasco, P; Gruissem, W

    1991-12-01

    The five genes encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcS) from tomato are differentially expressed. Transcription of the genes is organ specific and developmentally regulated in fruit and light regulated in cotyledons and leaves. DNase I footprinting assays were used to map multiple sites of DNA-protein interaction in the promoter regions of all five genes and to determine whether the differential transcriptional activity of each gene correlated with developmental or organ-specific changes in DNA-protein interactions. We show organ-specific differences in DNase I protection patterns, suggesting that differential transcription of rbcS genes is controlled at least in part at the level of DNA-protein interactions. In contrast, no changes were detected in the DNase I footprint pattern generated with nuclear extracts from dark-grown cotyledons versus cotyledons exposed to light, implying that light-dependent regulation of rbcS transcription is controlled by protein-protein interactions or modification of DNA binding proteins. During development of tomato fruit, most DNA-protein interactions in the rbcS promoter regions disappear, coincident with the transcriptional inactivation of the rbcS genes. In nuclear extracts from nonphotosynthetic roots and red fruit, the only detectable DNase I protection corresponds to a G-box binding activity. Detection of other DNA binding proteins in extracts from these organs and expression of nonphotosynthetic genes exclude the possibility that roots and red fruit are transcriptionally inactive. The absence of complex promoter protection patterns in these organs suggests either that cooperative interactions between different DNA binding proteins are necessary to form functional transcription complexes or that there is developmental and organ-specific regulation of several rbcS-specific transcription factors in these organs. The DNase I-protected DNA sequences defined in this study are discussed in the context of conserved DNA

  16. Comparative interactomics for virus-human protein-protein interactions: DNA viruses versus RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmuş, Saliha; Ülgen, Kutlu Ö

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory intracellular pathogens and completely depend on their hosts for survival and reproduction. The strategies adopted by viruses to exploit host cell processes and to evade host immune systems during infections may differ largely with the type of the viral genetic material. An improved understanding of these viral infection mechanisms is only possible through a better understanding of the pathogen-host interactions (PHIs) that enable viruses to enter into the host cells and manipulate the cellular mechanisms to their own advantage. Experimentally-verified protein-protein interaction (PPI) data of pathogen-host systems only became available at large scale within the last decade. In this study, we comparatively analyzed the current PHI networks belonging to DNA and RNA viruses and their human host, to get insights into the infection strategies used by these viral groups. We investigated the functional properties of human proteins in the PHI networks, to observe and compare the attack strategies of DNA and RNA viruses. We observed that DNA viruses are able to attack both human cellular and metabolic processes simultaneously during infections. On the other hand, RNA viruses preferentially interact with human proteins functioning in specific cellular processes as well as in intracellular transport and localization within the cell. Observing virus-targeted human proteins, we propose heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins and transporter proteins as potential antiviral therapeutic targets. The observed common and specific infection mechanisms in terms of viral strategies to attack human proteins may provide crucial information for further design of broad and specific next-generation antiviral therapeutics.

  17. Cytotoxicity and DNA interactions of some platinum(II) complexes with substituted benzimidazole ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, Azime Berna; Utku, Semra; Gümüş, Fatma; Keskin, Ayten Çelebi; Açık, Leyla; Yılmaz, Sükran; Ozgüngör, Adeviye

    2012-06-01

    In the present study, four Pt(II) complexes with 2-ethyl (1)/or benzyl (2)/or p-chlorobenzyl (3)/or 2-phenoxymethyl (4) benzimidazole carrier ligands were evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxic activities against the human HeLa cervix, oestrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 breast, and oestrogen receptor-negative MDA-MB 231 breast cancer cell lines. The plasmid DNA interactions and inhibition of the BamHI restriction enzyme activities of the complexes were also studied. Complex 3 was found to be more active than carboplatin for all examined cell lines and comparable with cisplatin, except for the HeLa cell line.

  18. DNA interaction, antimicrobial, antioxidant and anticancer studies on Cu(II) complexes of Luotonin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavan, M P; Vinoth Kumar, G G; Dhaveethu Raja, J; Anitha, K; Karthikeyan, S; Rajesh, J

    2017-02-01

    Luotonin A (L), a novel natural cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory alkaloid, chelated with copper(II) to improve its cytotoxic effect against the cancer cells. The complexes [Cu(L)H2OCl]Cl (1) and [Cu(L)2]Cl2 (2) are prepared by using copper(II) chloride and L with ligand/metal molar ratio of 1:1 and 2:1 respectively. A solution of complexes 1 &2 are characterized by physical spectroscopic methods using Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer, Fourier Transform-Infra red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Electron Para magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (EPR) and by electrochemical methods. The interaction of these complexes 1 &2 with calf thymus (CT-DNA) have been investigated by physical methods to propose the modes of DNA binding with the complexes 1 &2. Absorption spectral titration studies of complex 1 with CT-DNA shows a red-shift of 5nm with the DNA binding affinity of Kb, 8.65×10(3)M(-1), but complex 2does not show any red-shift with binding constant Kb, 7.32×10(3)M(-1) reveals that the complex 1 binding with DNA strongly than complex 2 and the binding occurs in between the base pairs of DNA as intercalation. Strong interactions of the two complexes 1 & 2 with CT-DNA have also been confirmed by fluorescence spectral titration studies. The evaluated values of KSV and Kass shows that, the complexes 1 &2 interact with DNA through the intercalation, coincide with other partial intercalators strongly than the free ligand L. Complex 1 exhibits potent antioxidant activity with SC50 value of 23.9±0.69μM is evaluated by DPPH radical scavenging assay and which has potent antimicrobial activity against pathogens than 2 and L. The anticancer activity of L, complexes 1 &2 against human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) and cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) has also been studied by using fluorescence staining method. The IC50 values of L, complexes 1&2 against MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines with the incubation time intervals of 24hrs are 1 (5.0±0.25, 12.0±0.30μM)<2 (6.5±0.27, 15.0

  19. Specific interaction of IP6 with human Ku70/80, the DNA-binding subunit of DNA-PK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakahi, Les A; West, Stephen C

    2002-04-15

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA double-strand breaks can be repaired by non-homologous end-joining, a process dependent upon Ku70/80, XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV. In mammals, this process also requires DNA-PK(cs), the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase DNA-PK. Previously, inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) was shown to be bound by DNA-PK and to stimulate DNA-PK-dependent end-joining in vitro. Here, we localize IP6 binding to the Ku70/80 subunits of DNA- PK, and show that DNA-PK(cs) alone exhibits no detectable affinity for IP6. Moreover, proteolysis mapping of Ku70/80 in the presence and absence of IP6 indicates that binding alters the conformation of the Ku70/80 heterodimer. The yeast homologue of Ku70/80, yKu70/80, fails to bind IP6, indicating that the function of IP6 in non-homologous end-joining, like that of DNA-PK(cs), is unique to the mammalian end-joining process.

  20. Interaction of Dialkyltin(Ⅳ) Bishydroxamates with 5'-AMP or DNA: the Impact of Carbon Chain Length to Coordination Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Xian-Mei; WU Ji-Zhou; LI Qing-Shan

    2008-01-01

    Two diorganotin(Ⅳ) complexes, [Me2Sn(4-FC6H4C(O)NHO)2] (1) and [Bu2Sn(4-FC6H4C(O)NHO)2] (2), were synthesized. The action mode of the diorganotin(Ⅳ) complexes with adenosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-AMP) or DNA under different conditions and different time was investigated by high-solution 1H NMR and 31P NMR technology and UV spectroscopy. The complexes 1 and 2 which have different carbon chain lengths exhibited different action modes with mononucleotide or DNA. The interaction of 2 with 5'-AMP resulted in significant chemical shift of H(8), H(2) and 31P. A hyperchromic effect of DNA could be observed due to the interaction of 2 with DNA, while interaction of 1 with 5'-AMP or DNA could only cause obvious change of chemical shift of 31P. The results indicate that the complex 2 is the first case which could selectively bind to both the N(1) atom of the base and the phosphate oxygen atom of 5'-AMP near a physiological condition, and may further destroy the helical structure of DNA, while 1 may merely bind to the phosphate oxygen atom of 5'-AMP and cause the contraction of the DNA helical structure.The results first reveal that the organic group R may not only help the membrane transference of the diorganotin compounds but also play an important role in the action mode with DNA.

  1. Interaction between DNA and Drugs Having Protonable Basic Groups: Characterization through Affinity Constants, Drug Release Kinetics, and Conformational Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Liliana P; Baena, Yolima; Manzo, Rubén H

    2017-01-04

    This paper reports the in vitro characterization of the interaction between the phosphate groups of DNA and the protonated species of drugs with basic groups through the determination of the affinity constants, the reversibility of the interaction, and the effect on the secondary structure of the macromolecule. Affinity constants of the counterionic condensation DNA-drug were in the order of 10⁶. The negative electrokinetic potential of DNA decreased with the increase of the proportion of loading drugs. The drugs were slowly released from the DNA-drug complexes and had release kinetics consistent with the high degree of counterionic condensation. The circular dichroism profile of DNA was not modified by complexation with atenolol, lidocaine, or timolol, but was significantly altered by the more lipophilic drugs benzydamine and propranolol, revealing modifications in the secondary structure of the DNA. The in vitro characterization of such interactions provides a physicochemical basis that would contribute to identify the effects of this kind of drugs in cellular cultures, as well as side effects observed under their clinical use. Moreover, this methodology could also be projected to the fields of intracellular DNA transfection and the use of DNA as a carrier of active drugs.

  2. Fluorescent probes based on side-chain chlorinated benzo[a]phenoxazinium chlorides: Studies of interaction with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, B. Rama; Gonçalves, M. Sameiro T.; Coutinho, Paulo J. G.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of DNA with six water soluble benzo[a]phenoxazinium chlorides mono- or di-substituted with 3-chloropropyl groups at the O and N of 2- and 9-positions, along with methyl, hydroxyl and amine terminal groups at 5-positions, was investigated by photophysical techniques. The results indicated that almost all compounds intercalated in DNA base pairs at phosphate to dye ratio higher than 5. At lower values of this ratio, electrostatic binding mode with DNA was observed. Groove binding was detected mainly for the benzo[a]phenoxazinium dye with NH2·HBr terminal. The set of six benzo[a]phenoxazinium chlorides proved successful to label the migrating DNA in agarose gel electrophoresis assays. These finding proves the ability of these benzo[a]phenoxazinium dyes to strongly interact with DNA.

  3. Deciphering the interactions between chlorambucil and calf thymus DNA: a multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Sayeed Ur; Sarwar, Tarique; Ishqi, Hassan Mubarak; Husain, Mohammed Amir; Hasan, Ziaul; Tabish, Mohammad

    2015-01-15

    Non-covalent interactions of chlorambucil with calf thymus DNA was investigated using multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular docking study. Binding constant calculated was found to be 1.54×10(4)M(-1) at 290K, significantly lower than various known intercalators. Quenching process was found to be static as evident by biomolecular quenching constant. Thermodynamic parameters revealed the involvement of hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds in the binding. Chlorambucil was found to interact via external binding mode and follow groove binding as it replaces Hoechst (a typical groove binder) from the groove of DNA but does not replace intercalating dyes including ethidium bromide and acridine orange from the DNA helix. These results were further supported by KI quenching experiments, DNA melting studies, CD spectroscopy and molecular docking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Extracting physical chemistry from mechanics: a new approach to investigate DNA interactions with drugs and proteins in single molecule experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Rocha, M S

    2015-01-01

    In this review we focus on the idea of establishing connections between the mechanical properties of DNAligand complexes and the physical chemistry of DNA-ligand interactions. This type of connection is interesting because it opens the possibility of performing a robust characterization of such interactions by using only one experimental technique: single molecule stretching. Furthermore, it also opens new possibilities in comparing results obtained by very different approaches, in special when comparing single molecule techniques to ensemble-averaging techniques. We start the manuscript reviewing important concepts of the DNA mechanics, from the basic mechanical properties to the Worm-Like Chain model. Next we review the basic concepts of the physical chemistry of DNA-ligand interactions, revisiting the most important models used to analyze the binding data and discussing their binding isotherms. Then, we discuss the basic features of the single molecule techniques most used to stretch the DNA-ligand complex...

  5. Preparation of a new nanobiosensor for the determination of some biogenic polyamines and investigation of their interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheryan, Zahra; Noori, Abolhassan; Zahra Bathaie, S; Yousef-Elahi, Mozhdeh; Mousavi, Mir F

    2016-03-15

    Biogenic polyamines are small organic polycations involving in a variety of biological processes. They form high affinity complexes with DNA. Here, we have followed two different novel approaches, either fabrication of an electrochemical nanobiosensor for determination of three of the most important biogenic polyamines; spermine (SPM), spermidine (SPD) and putrescine (PUT), or electrochemical investigation of their interaction with DNA. Strong binding of polyamines to DNA makes the DNA a suitable recognition element for construction of a sensitive biosensor. The fabricated biosensor responded to SPM, SPD and PUT over an extended dynamic range of 0.04-100 μM, 0.01-24 μM, and 0.08-100 μM respectively, with low detection limits of a few nM. We also studied the interaction of polyamines with three different DNA sequences with base composition of 100% AT, 80% AT and 100% GC in the presence of [Ru(NH3)6]3(+) as a redox probe. The highest kb values were obtained in the interaction of polyamines with 80% AT (mixed) DNA sequence. The kb values were 5.24 × 10(5), 4.17 × 10(5) and 1.46 × 10(5)M(-1) for SPM, SPD and PUT, respectively, which correlated well with their increasing number of amino groups. In addition, competition study showed the impotence of SPD to replace with histone H1 in histone H1-DNA complex, which indicates the more potent interaction of histone H1 with DNA. In this proof-of-principle study, we have proposed an approach for simple, cost-effective, miniaturizable, and direct-readout detection of polyamines, as well as the understanding of the modes of interaction between polyamines and DNA.

  6. Tailored protein encapsulation into a DNA host using geometrically organized supramolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprengel, Andreas; Lill, Pascal; Stegemann, Pierre; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Schöneweiß, Elisa-C.; Merdanovic, Melisa; Gudnason, Daniel; Aznauryan, Mikayel; Gamrad, Lisa; Barcikowski, Stephan; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Birkedal, Victoria; Gatsogiannis, Christos; Ehrmann, Michael; Saccà, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The self-organizational properties of DNA have been used to realize synthetic hosts for protein encapsulation. However, current strategies of DNA–protein conjugation still limit true emulation of natural host–guest systems, whose formation relies on non-covalent bonds between geometrically matching interfaces. Here we report one of the largest DNA–protein complexes of semisynthetic origin held in place exclusively by spatially defined supramolecular interactions. Our approach is based on the decoration of the inner surface of a DNA origami hollow structure with multiple ligands converging to their corresponding binding sites on the protein surface with programmable symmetry and range-of-action. Our results demonstrate specific host–guest recognition in a 1:1 stoichiometry and selectivity for the guest whose size guarantees sufficient molecular diffusion preserving short intermolecular distances. DNA nanocontainers can be thus rationally designed to trap single guest molecules in their native form, mimicking natural strategies of molecular recognition and anticipating a new method of protein caging. PMID:28205515

  7. Interaction of Catechu Dye with DNA: Spectroscopic and In Silico Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemachandran, Hridya; Anantharaman, Amrita; Priya, Rajendra Rao; Doss, George Priya; Siva, Ramamoorthy

    2016-01-01

    Catechin, a yellow colored molecule obtained from the wood of Acacia catechu was analyzed for its interaction with synthetic DNA duplexes using spectroscopic analysis. UV-Visible spectroscopic analysis revealed the non-intercalative binding mode. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis expose chemical shift indicated by various vibrational stretches and an increase in the intensity of base stacking was observed by Circular Dichroism (CD), respectively. This inference was further confirmed through nuclear staining technique and also in electrophoretic technique; the dye quenches the fluorescent intensity of ethidium bromide. The result of fluorescence spectroscopy was in concordance with the electrophoretic technique. In addition, the spectroscopic results were in accordance with the molecular docking studies of specific catechin compound from the catechu dye with CT-DNA. This kind of site specificity is a gain in the medicinal field as the drug can be DNA targeted for cancer therapeutics. The present work reveals that catechu dye has a noteworthy application in the field of medical bioscience.

  8. 53BP1 mediates productive and mutagenic DNA repair through distinct phosphoprotein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Elsa; Di Virgilio, Michela; Kruhlak, Michael J; Nieto-Soler, Maria; Wong, Nancy; Chen, Hua-Tang; Faryabi, Robert B; Polato, Federica; Santos, Margarida; Starnes, Linda M; Wesemann, Duane R; Lee, Ji-Eun; Tubbs, Anthony; Sleckman, Barry P; Daniel, Jeremy A; Ge, Kai; Alt, Frederick W; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Nussenzweig, André

    2013-06-06

    The DNA damage response (DDR) protein 53BP1 protects DNA ends from excessive resection in G1, and thereby favors repair by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) as opposed to homologous recombination (HR). During S phase, BRCA1 antagonizes 53BP1 to promote HR. The pro-NHEJ and antirecombinase functions of 53BP1 are mediated in part by RIF1, the only known factor that requires 53BP1 phosphorylation for its recruitment to double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we show that a 53BP1 phosphomutant, 53BP18A, comprising alanine substitutions of the eight most N-terminal S/TQ phosphorylation sites, mimics 53BP1 deficiency by restoring genome stability in BRCA1-deficient cells yet behaves like wild-type 53BP1 with respect to immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR). 53BP18A recruits RIF1 but fails to recruit the DDR protein PTIP to DSBs, and disruption of PTIP phenocopies 53BP18A. We conclude that 53BP1 promotes productive CSR and suppresses mutagenic DNA repair through distinct phosphodependent interactions with RIF1 and PTIP.

  9. Fluorescence formation from the interaction of DNA with lipid oxidation degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, E N; Neff, W E; Brooks, D D; Fujimoto, K

    1987-06-23

    To clarify the mechanism of fluorescence formation between DNA and lipid degradation products in the presence of ferric chloride and ascorbic acid, a number of carbonyl compounds and decomposition products of pure methyl linolenate hydroperoxides were examined. Keto derivatives of methyl ricinoleate, linoleate, and oleate, alkanals and 2-alkenals produced little or no fluorescence with DNA in the presence of ferric chloride-ascorbic acid. 2,4-Alkadienals were more active and 2,4,7-decatrienal was the most active. Mixtures of volatile aldehydes prepared from linolenate hydroperoxide decomposed either thermally or with iron and ascorbate had the same activity as 2,4,7-decatrienal. Higher molecular-weight products from the decomposition of methyl linolenate hydroperoxides showed relatively low activity. beta-Carotene, alpha-tocopherol and other antioxidants effectively reduced the amount of fluorescence formed by linolenate hydroperoxides. The results suggest that, in addition to hydroperoxide decomposition products, singlet oxygen and/or free radical species contribute significantly to the fluorescence formed from the interaction of methyl linolenate hydroperoxides with DNA in the presence of ferric chloride and ascorbic acid.

  10. Nickel (II) Ions Interaction with Polynucleotides and DNA of Different GC Composition

    CERN Document Server

    Bregadze, Vasil G; Melikishvili, Sophie Z; Melikishvili, Zaza G

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the work was to study the role of GC alternative dimmers in the binding of DNA with Ni (II) ions. The method of ultraviolet difference spectroscopy has been applied to investigate Ni (II) ions interactions with DNA extracted from Clostridium perfringens, Mice liver (C3HA line), Calf thymus, Salmon sperm, Herring sperm, E.coli, Micrococcus luteus and polynucleotides Poly (dA-dT)xPoly (dA-dT), Poly (dG)x Poly (dC), Poly (dG-dC)xPoly (dG-dC). It is shown that Ni (II) ions at outer-spherical binding with DNA double helix from the side of the major groove choose more stable dimmers 3^'-C-G-5^' . . 5^'-G-C-3^' and get bound with N7 atoms of both guanines in dimmer forming G-G interstrand crosslink. It directly correlates to the process of forming point defects of Watson-Crick wrong pair type (creation of rare keto-enolic and amino-imino tautomeric forms) and depurinization.

  11. Probing the dynamic differential stiffness of dsDNA interacting with RecA in the enthalpic regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Chia-Hui; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Tseng, Te-Yu; Lee, Chien-Der; Wang, Chung; Wang, Ting-Fang; Ou-Yang, H Daniel; Chiou, Arthur

    2009-10-26

    RecA plays a central role in homologous recombination of DNA. When RecA combines with dsDNA to form RecA-dsDNA nucleofilament, it unwinds dsDNA and changes its structure. The unwinding length extension of a DNA segment interacting with RecA has been studied by various techniques, but the dynamic differential stiffness of dsDNA conjugating with RecA has not been well characterized. We applied oscillatory optical tweezers to measure the differential stiffness of dsDNA molecules, interacting with RecA, as a function of time at a constant stretching force of 33.6pN. The values of the differential stiffness of DNA (for stretching force in the range of 20.0pN to 33.6pN) measured by oscillatory optical tweezers, both before and after its interaction with RecA, are consistent with those measured by stationary optical tweezers. In the dynamic measurement, we have shown that the association (or binding) rate increases with higher concentration of RecA; besides, we have also monitored in real-time the dissociation of RecA from the stretched RecA-dsDNA filament as ATPgammaS was washed off from the sample chamber. Finally, we verified that RecA (I26C), a form of RecA mutant, does not affect the differential stiffness of the stretched DNA sample. It implies that mutant RecA (I26C) does not bind to the DNA, which is consistent with the result obtained by conventional biochemical approach.

  12. Interaction of Individual Structural Domains of hnRNP LL with the BCL2 Promoter i-Motif DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Basab; Talukder, Poulami; Kang, Hyun-Jin; Tsuen, Shujian S; Alam, Mohammad P; Hurley, Laurence H; Hecht, Sidney M

    2016-08-31

    The recently discovered role of the BCL2 (B-cell lymphoma 2 gene) promoter i-motif DNA in modulation of gene expression via interaction with the ribonucleoprotein hnRNP L-like (hnRNP LL) has prompted a more detailed study of the nature of this protein-DNA interaction. The RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) of hnRNP LL were expressed individually, and both RRM1 and RRM2 were found to bind efficiently to the BCL2 i-motif DNA, as well as being critical for transcriptional activation, whereas RRM3-4 bound only weakly to this DNA. Binding was followed by unfolding of the DNA as monitored by changes in the CD spectrum. Mutational analysis of the i-motif DNA revealed that binding involved primarily the lateral loops of the i-motif. The kinetics of binding of the DNA with RRM1 was explored by recording CD spectra at predetermined times following admixture of the protein and DNA. The change in molar ellipticity was readily apparent after 30 s and largely complete within 1 min. A more detailed view of protein-DNA interaction was obtained by introducing the fluorescence donor 6-CNTrp in RRM1 at position 137, and the acceptor 4-aminobenzo[g]quinazoline-2-one (Cf) in lieu of cytidine22 in the i-motif DNA. The course of binding of the two species was monitored by FRET, which reflected a steady increase in energy transfer over a period of several minutes. The FRET signal could be diminished by the further addition of (unlabeled) RRM2, no doubt reflecting competition for binding to the i-motif DNA. These experiments using the individual RRM domains from hnRNP LL confirm the role of this transcription factor in activation of BCL2 transcription via the i-motif in the promoter element.

  13. Extracting physical chemistry from mechanics: a new approach to investigate DNA interactions with drugs and proteins in single molecule experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, M S

    2015-09-01

    In this review we focus on the idea of establishing connections between the mechanical properties of DNA-ligand complexes and the physical chemistry of DNA-ligand interactions. This type of connection is interesting because it opens the possibility of performing a robust characterization of such interactions by using only one experimental technique: single molecule stretching. Furthermore, it also opens new possibilities in comparing results obtained by very different approaches, in particular when comparing single molecule techniques to ensemble-averaging techniques. We start the manuscript reviewing important concepts of DNA mechanics, from the basic mechanical properties to the Worm-Like Chain model. Next we review the basic concepts of the physical chemistry of DNA-ligand interactions, revisiting the most important models used to analyze the binding data and discussing their binding isotherms. Then, we discuss the basic features of the single molecule techniques most used to stretch DNA-ligand complexes and to obtain "force × extension" data, from which the mechanical properties of the complexes can be determined. We also discuss the characteristics of the main types of interactions that can occur between DNA and ligands, from covalent binding to simple electrostatic driven interactions. Finally, we present a historical survey of the attempts to connect mechanics to physical chemistry for DNA-ligand systems, emphasizing a recently developed fitting approach useful to connect the persistence length of DNA-ligand complexes to the physicochemical properties of the interaction. Such an approach in principle can be used for any type of ligand, from drugs to proteins, even if multiple binding modes are present.

  14. Electronic structure of an anticancer drug DC81 and its interaction with DNA base pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Gargi, E-mail: gargi.tiwari@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Dipendra, E-mail: d-11sharma@rediffmail.com; Dwivedi, K. K., E-mail: dwivedikarunesh4@gmail.com [Department of Physics, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur (India); Dwivedi, M. K., E-mail: dwivedi-ji@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India)

    2016-05-06

    The drug, 8-Hydroxy-7-methoxy-pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4] benzodiazepine-5-one, commonly christened as DC81 belongs to the pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBDs) family. It is a member of the group of naturally occurring antitumour antibiotics produced by various Streptomyces species. The antitumour activity of DC81 is attributed to its sequence specific interaction with G-C rich DNA region in particular, for Pu-G-Pu motifs. In the present paper, physico-chemical properties DC81 have been carried out using an ab-initio method, HF/6-31G(d,p) with GAMESS program. MEP, HOMO and LUMO surfaces have been scanned. Ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, global hardness and softness of the drug have been calculated. Further, drug-DNA interactions have been examined using modified second order perturbation theory along with multicentred-multipole expansion technique. Results have been discussed in the light of other theoretical and experimental observations. Efforts have been made to elucidate the binding patterns and thereby biological properties of the drug.

  15. DNA interaction with DAPI fluorescent dye: Force spectroscopy decouples two different binding modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, L A; Rocha, M S

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we use force spectroscopy to investigate the interaction between the DAPI fluorescent dye and the λ-DNA molecule under high (174 mM) and low (34 mM) ionic strengths. Firstly, we have measured the changes on the mechanical properties (persistence and contour lengths) of the DNA-DAPI complexes as a function of the dye concentration in the sample. Then, we use recently developed models in order to connect the behavior of both mechanical properties to the physical chemistry of the interaction. Such analysis has allowed us to identify and to decouple two main binding modes, determining the relevant physicochemical (binding) parameters for each of these modes: minor groove binding, which saturates at very low DAPI concentrations ( CT ∼ 0.50 μM) and presents equilibrium binding constants of the order of ∼10(7) M(-1) for the two ionic strengths studied; and intercalation, which starts to play a significant role only after the saturation of the first mode, presenting much smaller equilibrium binding constants (∼10(5) M(-1) ).

  16. A feature-based approach to modeling protein-DNA interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilon Sharon

    Full Text Available Transcription factor (TF binding to its DNA target site is a fundamental regulatory interaction. The most common model used to represent TF binding specificities is a position specific scoring matrix (PSSM, which assumes independence between binding positions. However, in many cases, this simplifying assumption does not hold. Here, we present feature motif models (FMMs, a novel probabilistic method for modeling TF-DNA interactions, based on log-linear models. Our approach uses sequence features to represent TF binding specificities, where each feature may span multiple positions. We develop the mathematical formulation of our model and devise an algorithm for learning its structural features from binding site data. We also developed a discriminative motif finder, which discovers de novo FMMs that are enriched in target sets of sequences compared to background sets. We evaluate our approach on synthetic data and on the widely used TF chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP dataset of Harbison et al. We then apply our algorithm to high-throughput TF ChIP data from mouse and human, reveal sequence features that are present in the binding specificities of mouse and human TFs, and show that FMMs explain TF binding significantly better than PSSMs. Our FMM learning and motif finder software are available at http://genie.weizmann.ac.il/.

  17. Ni(II) complexes of arginine Schiff-bases and its interaction with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallam, S.A., E-mail: shehabsallam@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Isamilia (Egypt); Abbas, A.M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Isamilia (Egypt)

    2013-04-15

    Ni(II) complexes with Schiff-bases obtained by condensation of arginine with salicylaldehyde; 2,3-; 2,4-; 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde have been synthesized using the template method in ethanol or ammonia media. They were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, magnetic moment, UV, IR and {sup 1}H NMR spectra as well as thermal analysis (TG, DTG and DTA). The Schiff-bases are dibasic tridentate donors and the complexes have diamagnetic square planar and octahedral structures. The complexes decompose in three steps where kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition steps were computed. The interactions of the formed complexes with FM-DNA were monitored by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy. -- Highlights: ► Arginine Schiff-bases and their nickel(II) complexes have been synthesized. ► Magnetic and spectral data show diamagnetic square planar and octahedral complexes. ► The complexes thermally decompose in three stages. Interaction with FM-DNA shows hyperchromism with blue shift.

  18. Electronic structure of an anticancer drug DC81 and its interaction with DNA base pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Gargi; Sharma, Dipendra; Dwivedi, K. K.; Dwivedi, M. K.

    2016-05-01

    The drug, 8-Hydroxy-7-methoxy-pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4] benzodiazepine-5-one, commonly christened as DC81 belongs to the pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBDs) family. It is a member of the group of naturally occurring antitumour antibiotics produced by various Streptomyces species. The antitumour activity of DC81 is attributed to its sequence specific interaction with G-C rich DNA region in particular, for Pu-G-Pu motifs. In the present paper, physico-chemical properties DC81 have been carried out using an ab-initio method, HF/6-31G(d,p) with GAMESS program. MEP, HOMO and LUMO surfaces have been scanned. Ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, global hardness and softness of the drug have been calculated. Further, drug-DNA interactions have been examined using modified second order perturbation theory along with multicentred-multipole expansion technique. Results have been discussed in the light of other theoretical and experimental observations. Efforts have been made to elucidate the binding patterns and thereby biological properties of the drug.

  19. Identification of the first small-molecule inhibitor of the REV7 DNA repair protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Marcelo L; Ambaye, Nigus D; Evison, Benjamin J; Shao, Youming; Vanarotti, Murugendra; Inoue, Akira; McDonald, Ezelle T; Kikuchi, Sotaro; Heath, Richard; Hara, Kodai; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Fujii, Naoaki

    2016-09-15

    DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair (ICLR) has been implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to ICL-inducing chemotherapeutic agents. Despite the clinical significance of ICL-inducing chemotherapy, few studies have focused on developing small-molecule inhibitors for ICLR. The mammalian DNA polymerase ζ, which comprises the catalytic subunit REV3L and the non-catalytic subunit REV7, is essential for ICLR. To identify small-molecule compounds that are mechanistically capable of inhibiting ICLR by targeting REV7, high-throughput screening and structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis were performed. Compound 1 was identified as an inhibitor of the interaction of REV7 with the REV7-binding sequence of REV3L. Compound 7 (an optimized analog of compound 1) bound directly to REV7 in nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, and inhibited the reactivation of a reporter plasmid containing an ICL in between the promoter and reporter regions. The normalized clonogenic survival of HeLa cells treated with cisplatin and compound 7 was lower than that for cells treated with cisplatin only. These findings indicate that a small-molecule inhibitor of the REV7/REV3L interaction can chemosensitize cells by inhibiting ICLR.

  20. Differential interaction kinetics of a bipolar structure-specific endonuclease with DNA flaps revealed by single-molecule imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Rezgui

    Full Text Available As DNA repair enzymes are essential for preserving genome integrity, understanding their substrate interaction dynamics and the regulation of their catalytic mechanisms is crucial. Using single-molecule imaging, we investigated the association and dissociation kinetics of the bipolar endonuclease NucS from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab on 5' and 3'-flap structures under various experimental conditions. We show that association of the PabNucS with ssDNA flaps is largely controlled by diffusion in the NucS-DNA energy landscape and does not require a free 5' or 3' extremity. On the other hand, NucS dissociation is independent of the flap length and thus independent of sliding on the single-stranded portion of the flapped DNA substrates. Our kinetic measurements have revealed previously unnoticed asymmetry in dissociation kinetics from these substrates that is markedly modulated by the replication clamp PCNA. We propose that the replication clamp PCNA enhances the cleavage specificity of NucS proteins by accelerating NucS loading at the ssDNA/dsDNA junctions and by minimizing the nuclease interaction time with its DNA substrate. Our data are also consistent with marked reorganization of ssDNA and nuclease domains occurring during NucS catalysis, and indicate that NucS binds its substrate directly at the ssDNA-dsDNA junction and then threads the ssDNA extremity into the catalytic site. The powerful techniques used here for probing the dynamics of DNA-enzyme binding at the single-molecule have provided new insight regarding substrate specificity of NucS nucleases.

  1. A Penalty Method to Model Particle Interactions in DNA-laden Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebotich, D; Miller, G H; Bybee, M D

    2006-10-06

    We present a hybrid fluid-particle algorithm to simulate flow and transport of DNA-laden fluids in microdevices. Relevant length scales in microfluidic systems range from characteristic channel sizes of millimeters to micron scale geometric variation (e.g., post arrays) to 10 nanometers for the length of a single rod in a bead-rod polymer representation of a biological material such as DNA. The method is based on a previous fluid-particle algorithm in which long molecules are represented as a chain of connected rods, but in which the physically unrealistic behavior of rod crossing occurred. We have extended this algorithm to include screened Coulombic forces between particles by implementing a Debye-Hueckel potential acting between rods. In the method an unsteady incompressible Newtonian fluid is discretized with a second-order finite difference method in the interior of the Cartesian grid domain; an embedded boundary volume-of-fluid formulation is used near boundaries. The bead-rod polymer model is fully coupled to the solvent through body forces representing hydrodynamic drag and stochastic thermal fluctuations. While intrapolymer interactions are modeled by a soft potential, polymer-structure interactions are treated as perfectly elastic collisions. We demonstrate this method on flow and transport of a polymer through a post array microchannel in 2D where the polymer incorporates more realistic physical parameters of DNA, and compare to previous simulations where rods are allowed to cross. We also show that the method is capable of simulating 3D flow in a packed bed micro-column.

  2. Characterisation of the interactions between substrate, copper(II) complex and DNA and their role in rate acceleration in DNA-based asymmetric catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Boersma, Arnold J; Browne, Wesley R; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of the azachalcone derived substrate Aza with copper(II) complexes in the presence and absence of st-DNA were studied in detail by UV/Vis absorption, EPR and Raman and (UV and vis) resonance Raman spectroscopies. The binding of Aza to the Lewis acidic copper(II) complexes, which results

  3. Characterisation of the interactions between substrate, copper(II) complex and DNA and their role in rate acceleration in DNA-based asymmetric catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Boersma, Arnold J; Browne, Wesley R; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of the azachalcone derived substrate Aza with copper(II) complexes in the presence and absence of st-DNA were studied in detail by UV/Vis absorption, EPR and Raman and (UV and vis) resonance Raman spectroscopies. The binding of Aza to the Lewis acidic copper(II) complexes, which results

  4. Study on the interaction of the antiviral drug, zidovudine with DNA using neutral red (NR) and methylene blue (MB) dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabadi, Nahid, E-mail: nahidshahabadi@yahoo.com [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghadam, Neda Hossein pour [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The interaction between the drug, zidovudine and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) was investigated using neutral red (NR) and methylene blue (MB) dyes as a spectral probes by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the conformational changes in DNA helix induced by zidovudine are the reason for the fluorescence quenching of the DNA-NR system. In addition, by increasing zidovudine to DNA-MB solution, the fluorescence has no change. From the experimental results, it was found that zidovudine can cause structural changes on CT-DNA and bind with DNA via groove binding mode. At the same time, the paper proved that conformational changes of DNA can also lead to the fluorescence decrease of DNA-probe systems. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Search for new molecular structures which exhibit effective antitumor activities among popular drugs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DRUG can bind to DNA via groove binding mode. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several spectroscopic techniques have been used in this research.

  5. Affinity of molecular interactions in the bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark A; Wood, Jonathan P A; Capaldi, Stephanie A; Baron, Andrew J; Gell, Christopher; Smith, D Alastair; Stonehouse, Nicola J

    2006-01-01

    DNA packaging in the bacteriophage phi29 involves a molecular motor with protein and RNA components, including interactions between the viral connector protein and molecules of pRNA, both of which form multimeric complexes. Data are presented to demonstrate the higher order assembly of pRNA together with the affinity of pRNA:pRNA and pRNA:connector interactions, which are used to propose a model for motor function. In solution, pRNA can form dimeric and trimeric multimers in a magnesium-dependent manner, with dissociation constants for multimerization in the micromolar range. pRNA:connector binding is also facilitated by the presence of magnesium ions, with a nanomolar apparent dissociation constant for the interaction. From studies with a mutant pRNA, it appears that multimerization of pRNA is not essential for connector binding and it is likely that connector protein is involved in the stabilization of higher order RNA multimers. It is proposed that magnesium ions may promote conformational change that facilitate pRNA:connector interactions, essential for motor function.

  6. Affinity of molecular interactions in the bacteriophage φ29 DNA packaging motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark A.; Wood, Jonathan P.A.; Capaldi, Stephanie A.; Baron, Andrew J.; Gell, Christopher; Smith, D. Alastair; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2006-01-01

    DNA packaging in the bacteriophage φ29 involves a molecular motor with protein and RNA components, including interactions between the viral connector protein and molecules of pRNA, both of which form multimeric complexes. Data are presented to demonstrate the higher order assembly of pRNA together with the affinity of pRNA:pRNA and pRNA:connector interactions, which are used to propose a model for motor function. In solution, pRNA can form dimeric and trimeric multimers in a magnesium-dependent manner, with dissociation constants for multimerization in the micromolar range. pRNA:connector binding is also facilitated by the presence of magnesium ions, with a nanomolar apparent dissociation constant for the interaction. From studies with a mutant pRNA, it appears that multimerization of pRNA is not essential for connector binding and it is likely that connector protein is involved in the stabilization of higher order RNA multimers. It is proposed that magnesium ions may promote conformational change that facilitate pRNA:connector interactions, essential for motor function. PMID:16714447

  7. [Research on potential interaction between mitochondrial DNA copy number and related factors on risk of hypertension in coal miners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J Y; Lei, L J; Qiao, N; Fan, G Q; Sun, C M; Huang, J J; Wang, T

    2017-01-10

    Objective: To investigate the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number in peripheral blood and related factors on the risk of hypertension in coal miners. Methods: A case-control study was conducted in 378 coal miners with hypertension and 325 healthy coal miners recruited from Datong Coal Mine Group. A standard questionnaire was used to collect their general information, such as demographic characteristics, habits and occupational history. Fluorescence quantitative PCR was performed to detect the copy number of mtDNA. Logistic regression model was applied for identifying the related risk factors of hypertension and analyzing the interaction between mtDNA copy number and risk factors. Results: The prevalence of hypertension of high mtDNA copy number was lower than mtDNA copy numberin 0-5.67 group, but the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.414). Alcohol drinking (OR=1.80, 95% CI: 1.26-2.56), family history of hypertension (OR=1.74, 95% CI: 1.20- 2.50), work shifts (OR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.48-0.99), education level (P=0.012) and family monthly income level (P=0.001) were related to the prevalence of hypertension. There were potential interactions between mtDNA copy number and alcohol drinking, family monthly income level, family history of hypertension, respectively. Alcohol drinking was a risk factor for hypertension [1.77 (1.25-2.50)]. Potential interactions between mtDNA copy number and alcohol drinking reduced the risk of hypertension (OR=1.20, 95% CI: 1.07-1.35). Family history of hypertension was a risk factor for hypertension [1.81(1.26-2.59)]. Potential interactions between mtDNA copy number and family history of hypertension reduced the risk of hypertension (OR=1.24, 95%CI: 1.09-1.41). Family monthly income level was a protect factor for hypertension [0.55(0.46-0.66)]. Potential interactions between mtDNA copy number and family monthly income level increased the protection role of hypertension (OR=0.90, 95% CI: 0.86-0.94). Conclusion: mtDNA

  8. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazan Haddad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated, MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated, MAN158 (phosphate-coated, and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated. All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of −0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration. A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  9. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-04-20

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  10. The impact of the C-terminal domain on the interaction of human DNA topoisomerase II α and β with DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn L Gilroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type II DNA topoisomerases are essential, ubiquitous enzymes that act to relieve topological problems arising in DNA from normal cellular activity. Their mechanism of action involves the ATP-dependent transport of one DNA duplex through a transient break in a second DNA duplex; metal ions are essential for strand passage. Humans have two isoforms, topoisomerase IIα and topoisomerase IIβ, that have distinct roles in the cell. The C-terminal domain has been linked to isoform specific differences in activity and DNA interaction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the role of the C-terminal domain in the binding of human topoisomerase IIα and topoisomerase IIβ to DNA in fluorescence anisotropy assays using full length and C-terminally truncated enzymes. We find that the C-terminal domain of topoisomerase IIβ but not topoisomerase IIα affects the binding of the enzyme to the DNA. The presence of metal ions has no effect on DNA binding. Additionally, we have examined strand passage of the full length and truncated enzymes in the presence of a number of supporting metal ions and find that there is no difference in relative decatenation between isoforms. We find that calcium and manganese, in addition to magnesium, can support strand passage by the human topoisomerase II enzymes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The C-terminal domain of topoisomerase IIβ, but not that of topoisomerase IIα, alters the enzyme's K(D for DNA binding. This is consistent with previous data and may be related to the differential modes of action of the two isoforms in vivo. We also show strand passage with different supporting metal ions for human topoisomerase IIα or topoisomerase IIβ, either full length or C-terminally truncated. They all show the same preferences, whereby Mg > Ca > Mn.

  11. M. tuberculosis sliding β-clamp does not interact directly with the NAD+-dependent DNA ligase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandna Kukshal

    Full Text Available The sliding β-clamp, an important component of the DNA replication and repair machinery, is drawing increasing attention as a therapeutic target. We report the crystal structure of the M. tuberculosis β-clamp (Mtbβ-clamp to 3.0 Å resolution. The protein crystallized in the space group C222(1 with cell-dimensions a = 72.7, b = 234.9 & c = 125.1 Å respectively. Mtbβ-clamp is a dimer, and exhibits head-to-tail association similar to other bacterial clamps. Each monomer folds into three domains with similar structures respectively and associates with its dimeric partner through 6 salt-bridges and about 21 polar interactions. Affinity experiments involving a blunt DNA duplex, primed-DNA and nicked DNA respectively show that Mtbβ-clamp binds specifically to primed DNA about 1.8 times stronger compared to the other two substrates and with an apparent K(d of 300 nM. In bacteria like E. coli, the β-clamp is known to interact with subunits of the clamp loader, NAD(+-dependent DNA ligase (LigA and other partners. We tested the interactions of the Mtbβ-clamp with MtbLigA and the γ-clamp loader subunit through radioactive gel shift assays, size exclusion chromatography, yeast-two hybrid experiments and also functionally. Intriguingly while Mtbβ-clamp interacts in vitro with the γ-clamp loader, it does not interact with MtbLigA unlike in bacteria like E. coli where it does. Modeling studies involving earlier peptide complexes reveal that the peptide-binding site is largely conserved despite lower sequence identity between bacterial clamps. Overall the results suggest that other as-yet-unidentified factors may mediate interactions between the clamp, LigA and DNA in mycobacteria.

  12. The impact of α-hydrazino acids embedded in short fluorescent peptides on peptide interactions with DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suć, Josipa; Tumir, Lidija-Marija; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica; Jukić, Marijana; Piantanida, Ivo; Jerić, Ivanka

    2016-06-01

    A series of novel hydrazino-based peptidomimetics and analogues comprising N-terminal lysine and C-terminal phenanthridinyl-l-alanine were prepared. The presented results demonstrate the up to now unknown possibility to finely modulate peptide interactions with DNA/RNA by α-hydrazino group insertion and how the different positioning of two α-hydrazino groups in peptides controls binding to various double stranded and single stranded DNA and RNA. All peptidomimetics bind with 1-10 micromolar affinity to ds-DNA/RNA, whereby the binding mode is a combination of electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic interactions within DNA/RNA grooves. Insertion of the α-hydrazino group into the peptide systematically decreased its fluorimetric response to DNA/RNA binding in the order: mono-hydrazino peptide sequence. Particularly interesting was the interaction of two sequential α-hydrazino acids-peptidomimetic with poly rG, characterised by a specific strong increase of CD bands, while all other peptide/ssRNA combinations gave only a CD-band decrease. All mentioned interactions could also be reversibly controlled by adjusting the pH, due to the protonation of the fluorophore.

  13. Interaction of human mitochondrial transcription factor A in mitochondria: its involvement in the dynamics of mitochondrial DNA nucleoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasashima, Katsumi; Endo, Hitoshi

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is a key regulator of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). TFAM interacts with itself and forms dimers; however, the precise interaction domain in vivo has not yet been determined. We herein showed that human TFAM formed oligomers in mitochondria by in situ chemical cross-linking. We used the separated fluorescent protein, monomeric Kusabira-Green, as a reporter to monitor their self-association in mitochondria. This reporter successfully detected the TFAM-TFAM interaction in cells as fluorescent signals on mitochondria. We also found that the N-terminal high-mobility group box domain was sufficient for this interaction. The expression of the dimer-defective mutant induced enlarged mtDNA nucleoids, suggesting the importance of dimerization in the distribution of mtDNA. The reporter system also supported the association and mixture between independent nucleoids through TFAM by a cell fusion assay using hemagglutinating virus of Japan. We here, for the first time, visualized the interaction of TFAM molecules in mitochondria and proposed its implications for the dynamics of mtDNA nucleoids.

  14. Cd hyperfine interactions in DNA bases and DNA of mouse strains infected with Trypanosoma cruzi investigated by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Philippe A D; Silva, Andreia S; Gonçalves, Marcos B; Lapolli, André L; Ferreira, Ana Maria C; Carbonari, Artur W; Petrilli, Helena M

    2014-06-01

    In this work, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy is used to study differences in the nuclear quadrupole interactions of Cd probes in DNA molecules of mice infected with the Y-strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. The possibility of investigating the local genetic alterations in DNA, which occur along generations of mice infected with T. cruzi, using hyperfine interactions obtained from PAC measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations in DNA bases is discussed. A comparison of DFT calculations with PAC measurements could determine the type of Cd coordination in the studied molecules. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to use DFT calculations and PAC measurements to investigate the local environment of Cd ions bound to DNA bases in mice infected with Chagas disease. The obtained results also allowed the detection of local changes occurring in the DNA molecules of different generations of mice infected with T. cruzi, opening the possibility of using this technique as a complementary tool in the characterization of complicated biological systems.

  15. DNA interaction studies of a novel Cu(II) complex as an intercalator containing curcumin and bathophenanthroline ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh; Moghadam, Neda Hosseinpour

    2013-05-05

    A new copper(II) complex; [Cu(Cur)(DIP)](+2) in which Cur=curcumin and DIP=4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, was synthesized and characterized using different physico-chemical methods. Binding interaction of this complex with calf thymus (CT-DNA) has been investigated by emission, absorption, circular dichroism, viscosity, and differential pulse voltammetry and fluorescence techniques. The complex displays significant binding properties to the CT-DNA. In fluorimeteric studies, the binding mode of the complex with CT-DNA was investigated using methylene blue as a fluorescence probe. Fluorescence of methylene blue-DNA solution increased in the presence of increasing amounts of the complex. It was found that the complex is able to displace the methylene blue completely. This indicate intercalation of the complex between base pairs of DNA. The cleavage of plasmid DNA by the complex was also studied. We found that the copper(II) complex can cleave puC18 DNA. Furthermore, mentioned complex induces detectable changes in the CD spectrum of CT-DNA, a decrease in absorption spectrum, and an increase in its viscosity. All of the experimental results showed that the Cu(II) complex bound to DNA by an intercalative mode of binding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Triazolopyridyl ketones as a novel class of antileishmanial agents. DNA binding and BSA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Rosa; Bilbao-Ramos, Pablo; López-Molina, Sonia; Abarca, Belén; Ballesteros, Rafael; González-Rosende, M Eugenia; Dea-Ayuela, M Auxiliadora; Alzuet-Piña, Gloria

    2014-08-01

    A new series of triazolopyridyl pyridyl ketones has been synthetized by regioselective lithiation of the corresponding [1,2,3]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridine at 7 position followed by reaction with different electrophiles. The in vitro antileishmanial activity of these compounds was evaluated against Leishmaniainfantum, Leishmaniabraziliensis, Leishmaniaguyanensis and Leishmaniaamazonensis. Compounds 6 and 7 were found to be the most active leishmanicidal agents. Both of them showed activities at micromolar concentration against cultured promastigotes of Leishmania spp. (IC₅₀=99.8-26.8 μM), without cytotoxicity on J774 macrophage cells. These two compounds were also tested in vivo in a murine model of acute infection by L. infantum. The triazolopyridine derivative 6 was effective against both spleen and liver parasites forms, while 7 was inactive against liver parasites. Mechanistic aspects of the antileishmanial activity were investigated by means of DNA binding studies (UV-titration and viscosimetry). Results have revealed that these active ligands are able to interact strongly with DNA [Kb=1.14 × 10(5)M(-1) (6) and 3.26 × 10(5)M(-1) (7)]. Moreover, a DNA groove binding has been proposed for both 6 and 7. To provide more insight on the mode of action of compounds 6 and 7 under biological conditions, their interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was monitored by fluorescence titrations and UV-visible spectroscopy. The quenching constants and binding parameters were determined. Triazolopyridine ketones 6 and 7 have exhibited significant affinity towards BSA [Kb=2.5 × 10(4)M(-1) (6) and 1.9 × 10(4)M(-1) (7)]. Finally, to identify the binding location of compounds 6 and 7 on the BSA, competitive binding experiments were carried out, using warfarin, a characteristic marker for site I, and ibuprofen as one for site II. Results derived from these studies have indicated that both compounds interact at BSA site I and, to a lesser extent, at site II.

  17. Analysis of In Vitro DNA Interactions of Brassinosteroid-Controlled Transcription Factors Using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterholzner, Simon J; Rozhon, Wilfried; Poppenberger, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Most signaling cascades ultimately lead to changes in gene expression by modulating the activity of transcription factors (TFs). The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) is a simple but powerful in vitro method for investigation of specific protein-DNA interactions. It makes use of the fact that protein-DNA complexes have a lower electrophoretic mobility in gels than free DNA has. The application of labeled probes in combination with unlabeled competitors allows investigation of DNA-binding specificity and identification of binding motifs with single base-pair resolution. Here we describe the application of EMSAs for the study of interactions of the brassinosteroid-regulated TFs, BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1, (BZR1), BRI1-ETHYL METHANESULFONATE-SUPPRESSOR1 (BES1)/BZR2, and CESTA with putative binding sites. The classical approach using radiolabeled probes, as well as the more recent application of fluorescent probes, is described and the advantages and disadvantages of both methods are discussed.

  18. A PALB2-interacting domain in RNF168 couples homologous recombination to DNA break-induced chromatin ubiquitylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Typas, Dimitris; Caron, Marie-Christine

    2017-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) elicit a ubiquitylation cascade that controls DNA repair pathway choice. This cascade involves the ubiquitylation of histone H2A by the RNF168 ligase and the subsequent recruitment of RIF1, which suppresses homologous recombination (HR) in G1 cells. The RIF1-dependent...... recognizes histone ubiquitylation by physically associating with ubiquitin-bound RNF168. This direct interaction is mediated by the newly identified PALB2-interacting domain (PID) in RNF168 and the WD40 domain in PALB2, and drives DNA repair by facilitating the assembly of PALB2-containing HR complexes...... at DSBs. Our findings demonstrate that RNF168 couples PALB2-dependent HR to H2A ubiquitylation to promote DNA repair and preserve genome integrity....

  19. Advances in the analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry data for ligand-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buurma, Niklaas J; Haq, Ihtshamul

    2007-06-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a well established technique for the study of biological interactions. The strength of ITC is that it directly measures enthalpy changes associated with interactions. Experiments can also yield binding isotherms allowing quantification of equilibrium binding constants, hence an almost complete thermodynamic profile can be established. Principles and application of ITC have been well documented over recent years, experimentally the technique is simple to use and in ideal scenarios data analysis is trivial. However, ITC experiments can be designed such that previously inaccessible parameters can be evaluated. We outline some of these advances, including (1) exploiting different experimental conditions; (2) low affinity systems; (3) high affinity systems and displacement assays. In addition we ask the question: What if data cannot be fit using the fitting functions incorporated in the data-analysis software that came with your ITC? Examples where such data might be generated include systems following non 1:n binding patterns and systems where binding is coupled to other events such as ligand dissociation. Models dealing with such data are now appearing in literature and we summarise examples relevant for the study of ligand-DNA interactions.

  20. Use of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study binding interactions between a replication terminator protein and DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Kapur, Amit; Beck, Jennifer L.; Brown, Susan E.; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Sheil, Margaret M.

    2002-01-01

    Tus protein binds tightly to specific DNA sequences (Ter) on the Escherichia coli chromosome halting replication. We report here conditions for detecting the 1 : 1 Tus–Ter complex by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). ESI mass spectra of a mixture of Tus and nonspecific DNA showed ions predominantly from uncomplexed Tus protein, indicating that the Tus–Ter complex observed in the gas phase was the result of a specific interaction rather than nonspecific associations in the io...

  1. Interaction of Hypocrellin B or Mono-cysteine Substituted Hypocrellin B with CT-DNA by Spectral Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Hong ZHOU; Sheng Qin XIA; Xue Song WANG; Bao Wen ZHANG; Yi CAO

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of the anticancer drag hypocrellin B (HB) or the mono-cysteinesubstituted hypocrellin B (MCHB) and calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (CT-DNA) has beeninvestigated using spectral methods. The results of UV-visible spectra show that the HB andMCHB could intercalate into the base-stacking domain of the CT-DNA double helix. The studiesof fluorescence spectra and circular dichroism(CD) spectra also support the interacalationmechanism.

  2. Plasticity of BRCA2 function in homologous recombination: genetic interactions of the PALB2 and DNA binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Siaud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells through its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR. Human BRCA2 is 3,418 amino acids and is comprised of multiple domains that interact with the RAD51 recombinase and other proteins as well as with DNA. To gain insight into the cellular function of BRCA2 in HR, we created fusions consisting of various BRCA2 domains and also introduced mutations into these domains to disrupt specific protein and DNA interactions. We find that a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the DNA binding domain and active in HR is completely dependent on interaction with the PALB2 tumor suppressor for activity. Conversely, a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the PALB2 binding domain is dependent on an intact DNA binding domain, providing a role for this conserved domain in vivo; mutagenesis suggests that both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA binding activities in the DNA binding domain are required for its activity. Given that PALB2 itself binds DNA, these results suggest alternative mechanisms to deliver RAD51 to DNA. In addition, the BRCA2 C terminus contains both RAD51-dependent and -independent activities which are essential to HR in some contexts. Finally, binding the small peptide DSS1 is essential for activity when its binding domain is present, but not when it is absent. Our results reveal functional redundancy within the BRCA2 protein and emphasize the plasticity of this large protein built for optimal HR function in mammalian cells. The occurrence of disease-causing mutations throughout BRCA2 suggests sub-optimal HR from a variety of domain modulations.

  3. Investigation of the interaction of carbofuran and DNA by voltammetry and fluorescence with the aid of chemometrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Xia Wang; Yong Nian Ni; Serge Kokot

    2010-01-01

    The interactions of carbofuran and DNA were studied using voltammetry and fluorescence spectroscopy.The formation of carbofuran-DNA makes the current peak of DNA decreased by voltammetry method.The binding number(n)and constant(Ka)for complex carbofuran-DNA were calculated to be 1.06 ±0.04 and 0.11 ±0.03 mol-1 L,respectively by fluorescence measurement.Chemometrics approach,such as singular value decomposition(SVD)was used to evaluate the number of spectral species in the drug-DNA binding process.And the pure spectra and concentration profiles in the kinetic system were clearly deduced by multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares(MCR-ALS)with the initial estimates by evolving factor analysis(EFA).

  4. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of ct-DNA with manganese Salen complex containing triphenyl phosphonium groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkordi, Maryam Nejat; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Lincoln, Per; Mirkhani, Valiollah

    2012-05-01

    The DNA binding properties of a bulky and hydrophobic Schiff base complex of manganese(III) [N,N'-bis(5-(triphenyl phosphonium methyl)salicylidene)-1,2-ethylene diamine chloride Mn(III) acetate] was examined by spectroscopic techniques. UV-vis titration data indicate both hypo and hyperchromic effect with addition of DNA to complex. A competitive binding study showed that the enhanced emission intensity of ethidium bromide (EB) in the presence of DNA was quenched by adding Mn Salen complex. This finding indicates that Mn Salen complex displaces EB from its binding site in DNA. Helix melting studies indicate improvement in the helix stability, and an increase in the melting temperature. The analysis of CD spectra represents the structural changes in DNA due to the binding of Mn Salen complex. The binding constant has been calculated using absorbance and fluorescence data. The results also represent that the binding process proceeds by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

  5. A spectroscopic investigation of the interaction between c-MYC DNA and tetrapyridinoporphyrazinatozinc(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Leila; Fazeli, Zahra; Safaei, Elham; Rastegar, Hossein; Akbari, Minoo

    2014-06-01

    The c-MYC gene plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and growth and it is overexpressed in a wide variety of human cancers. Around 90% of c-MYC transcription is controlled by the nuclease-hypersensitive element III1 (NHE III1), whose 27-nt purine-rich strand has the ability to form a G-quadruplex structure under physiological conditions. Therefore, c-MYC DNA is an attractive target for drug design, especially for cancer chemotherapy. Here, the interaction of water-soluble tetrapyridinoporphyrazinatozinc(II) with 27-nt G-rich strand (G/c-MYC), its equimolar mixture with the complementary sequence (GC/c-MYC) and related C-rich oligonucleotide (C/c-MYC) is investigated. Circular dichroism (CD) measurements of the G-rich 27-mer oligonucleotide in 150 mM KCl, pH 7 demonstrate a spectral signature consistent with parallel G-quadruplex DNA. Furthermore, the CD spectrum of the GC rich oligonucleotide shows characteristics of both duplex and quadruplex structures. Absorption spectroscopy implies that the complex binding of G/c-MYC and GC/c-MYC is a two-step process; in the first step, a very small red shift and hypochromicity and in the second step, a large red shift and hyperchromicity are observed in the Q band. Emission spectra of zinc porphyrazine are quenched upon addition of three types of DNA. According to the results of spectroscopy, it can be concluded the dominant binding mode is probably, outside binding and end stacking.

  6. The experimental and theoretical QM/MM study of interaction of chloridazon herbicide with ds-DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, F.; Jamali, N.; Jahangard-Yekta, S.; Jafari, B.; Nouri, S.; Najafi, F.; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, M.

    2011-09-01

    We report a multispectroscopic, voltammetric and theoretical hybrid of QM/MM study of the interaction between double-stranded DNA containing both adenine-thymine and guanine-cytosine alternating sequences and chloridazon (CHL) herbicide. The electrochemical behavior of CHL was studied by cyclic voltammetry on HMDE, and the interaction of ds-DNA with CHL was investigated by both cathodic differential pulse voltammetry (CDPV) at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) and anodic differential pulse voltammetry (ADPV) at a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The constant bonding of CHL-DNA complex that was obtained by UV/vis, CDPV and ADPV was 2.1 × 10 4, 5.1 × 10 4 and 2.6 × 10 4, respectively. The competition fluorescence studies revealed that the CHL quenches the fluorescence of DNA-ethidium bromide complex significantly and the apparent Stern-Volmer quenching constant has been estimated to be 1.71 × 10 4. Thermal denaturation study of DNA with CHL revealed the Δ Tm of 8.0 ± 0.2 °C. Thermodynamic parameters, i.e., enthalpy (Δ H), entropy (Δ S°), and Gibbs free energy (Δ G) were 98.45 kJ mol -1, 406.3 J mol -1 and -22.627 kJ mol -1, respectively. The ONIOM, based on the hybridization of QM/MM (DFT, 6.31++G(d,p)/UFF) methodology, was also performed using Gaussian 2003 package. The results revealed that the interaction is base sequence dependent, and the CHL has more interaction with ds-DNA via the GC base sequence. The results revealed that CHL may have an interaction with ds-DNA via the intercalation mode.

  7. The experimental and theoretical QM/MM study of interaction of chloridazon herbicide with ds-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, F; Jamali, N; Jahangard-Yekta, S; Jafari, B; Nouri, S; Najafi, F; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, M

    2011-09-01

    We report a multispectroscopic, voltammetric and theoretical hybrid of QM/MM study of the interaction between double-stranded DNA containing both adenine-thymine and guanine-cytosine alternating sequences and chloridazon (CHL) herbicide. The electrochemical behavior of CHL was studied by cyclic voltammetry on HMDE, and the interaction of ds-DNA with CHL was investigated by both cathodic differential pulse voltammetry (CDPV) at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) and anodic differential pulse voltammetry (ADPV) at a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The constant bonding of CHL-DNA complex that was obtained by UV/vis, CDPV and ADPV was 2.1×10(4), 5.1×10(4) and 2.6×10(4), respectively. The competition fluorescence studies revealed that the CHL quenches the fluorescence of DNA-ethidium bromide complex significantly and the apparent Stern-Volmer quenching constant has been estimated to be 1.71×10(4). Thermal denaturation study of DNA with CHL revealed the ΔTm of 8.0±0.2°C. Thermodynamic parameters, i.e., enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS°), and Gibbs free energy (ΔG) were 98.45 kJ mol(-1), 406.3 J mol(-1) and -22.627 kJ mol(-1), respectively. The ONIOM, based on the hybridization of QM/MM (DFT, 6.31++G(d,p)/UFF) methodology, was also performed using Gaussian 2003 package. The results revealed that the interaction is base sequence dependent, and the CHL has more interaction with ds-DNA via the GC base sequence. The results revealed that CHL may have an interaction with ds-DNA via the intercalation mode. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Interaction of an Fe derivative of TMAP (Fe(TMAP)OAc) with DNA in comparison with free-base TMAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Bathaie, S Zahra; Saboury, Ali-Akbar; Sharghi, Hashem; Tangestaninejad, Shahram

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the interaction of meso-tetrakis (N-para-methylanilium) porphyrin (TMAP) in its free base and Fe(II) form (Fe(TMAP)OAc) as a new derivative, with high molecular weight DNA at different ionic strengths, using various spectroscopic methods and microcalorimetry. The data obtained by spectrophotometery, circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence quenching and resonance light scattering (RLS) have demonstrated that TMAP association with DNA is via outside binding with self-stacking manner, which is accompanied with the "end-on" type complex formation in low ionic strength. However, in the case of Fe(TMAP)OAc, predominant mode of interaction is groove binding and after increasing in DNA concentration, unstable stacking-type aggregates are formed. In addition, isothermal titration calorimetric measurements have indicated the exothermic process of porphyrins binding to DNA, but the exothermisity in metal derivative of porphyrin is less than the free base. It confirmed the formation of a more organized aggregate of TMAP on DNA surface. Interactions of both porphyrins with DNA show high sensitivity to ionic strength. By addition of salt, the downfield CD signal of TMAP aggregates is shifted to a higher wavelength, which indicates some changes in the aggregates position. In the case of Fe(TMAP)OAc, addition of salt leads to changes in the mode of binding from groove binding to outside binding with self-stacking, which is accompanied with major changes in CD spectra, possibly indicating the formation of "face-on" type complex.

  9. Experimental and molecular docking studies on DNA binding interaction of adefovir dipivoxil: Advances toward treatment of hepatitis B virus infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh

    The toxic interaction of adefovir dipivoxil with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated drug interacted with CT-DNA in a groove binding mode. The binding constant of UV-visible and the number of binding sites were 3.33 ± 0.2 × 104 L mol-1and 0.99, respectively. The fluorimetric studies showed that the reaction between the drug and CT-DNA is exothermic (ΔH = 34.4 kJ mol-1; ΔS = 184.32 J mol-1 K-1). Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) was employed to measure the conformational change of CT-DNA in the presence of adefovir dipivoxil, which verified the groove binding mode. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in its viscosity. The molecular modeling results illustrated that adefovir strongly binds to groove of DNA by relative binding energy of docked structure -16.83 kJ mol-1. This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the toxic interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with bio macromolecules, which contributes to clarify the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo.

  10. Interaction between DNA and Drugs Having Protonable Basic Groups: Characterization through Affinity Constants, Drug Release Kinetics, and Conformational Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana P. Alarcón

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the in vitro characterization of the interaction between the phosphate groups of DNA and the protonated species of drugs with basic groups through the determination of the affinity constants, the reversibility of the interaction, and the effect on the secondary structure of the macromolecule. Affinity constants of the counterionic condensation DNA–drug were in the order of 106. The negative electrokinetic potential of DNA decreased with the increase of the proportion of loading drugs. The drugs were slowly released from the DNA–drug complexes and had release kinetics consistent with the high degree of counterionic condensation. The circular dichroism profile of DNA was not modified by complexation with atenolol, lidocaine, or timolol, but was significantly altered by the more lipophilic drugs benzydamine and propranolol, revealing modifications in the secondary structure of the DNA. The in vitro characterization of such interactions provides a physicochemical basis that would contribute to identify the effects of this kind of drugs in cellular cultures, as well as side effects observed under their clinical use. Moreover, this methodology could also be projected to the fields of intracellular DNA transfection and the use of DNA as a carrier of active drugs.

  11. Inferring coarse-grain histone-DNA interaction potentials from high-resolution structures of the nucleosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sam; Everaers, Ralf

    2015-02-01

    The histone-DNA interaction in the nucleosome is a fundamental mechanism of genomic compaction and regulation, which remains largely unknown despite increasing structural knowledge of the complex. In this paper, we propose a framework for the extraction of a nanoscale histone-DNA force-field from a collection of high-resolution structures, which may be adapted to a larger class of protein-DNA complexes. We applied the procedure to a large crystallographic database extended by snapshots from molecular dynamics simulations. The comparison of the structural models first shows that, at histone-DNA contact sites, the DNA base-pairs are shifted outwards locally, consistent with locally repulsive forces exerted by the histones. The second step shows that the various force profiles of the structures under analysis derive locally from a unique, sequence-independent, quadratic repulsive force-field, while the sequence preferences are entirely due to internal DNA mechanics. We have thus obtained the first knowledge-derived nanoscale interaction potential for histone-DNA in the nucleosome. The conformations obtained by relaxation of nucleosomal DNA with high-affinity sequences in this potential accurately reproduce the experimental values of binding preferences. Finally we address the more generic binding mechanisms relevant to the 80% genomic sequences incorporated in nucleosomes, by computing the conformation of nucleosomal DNA with sequence-averaged properties. This conformation differs from those found in crystals, and the analysis suggests that repulsive histone forces are related to local stretch tension in nucleosomal DNA, mostly between adjacent contact points. This tension could play a role in the stability of the complex.

  12. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  13. Synthesis of Novel Metal Ion Sensors Based on DNA-Metal Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Ono; Shiqi Cao; Humika Togashi; Yoko Miyake

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction The interactions of metal ions with nucleic acids, nucleosides, and nucleo-bases have been extensively investigated[1,2]. We have reported that thymine-thymine (T-T) and cytosine-cytosine (C- C) miss base pairs in DNA duplexes highly selectively capture HgⅡ ion and Ag Ⅰ ion, which result in formations of metal-mediated base pairs, T-HgⅡ -T and C-AgⅠ -C, in duplexes[3]. The phenomenon is expected to be useful for a variety of studies such as synthesis of nano-wires containing metal ions, developing metal-ion sensing methods, etc.Here, we report novel oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ODN)-based sensors that detect HgⅡ ions and AgⅠ ions in aqueous solutions.

  14. Novel fluorescent amphiphilic block copolymers: photophysics behavior and interactions with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, novel amphiphilic fluorescent copolymers poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone-b-poly(N-methacryloyl-N'-(α-naphthylthiourea (PVP-b-PNT were synthesized via ATRP with poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone-Cl as macroinitiator and N-methacryloyl-N'-α-naphthylthiourea (NT as hydrophobic segment. PVP-b-PNT copolymers were characterized by 1H NMR, GPC-MALLS and fluorescence measurements. The aggregation behavior of PVP-b-PNT in water was investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS measurement. The photophysics behavior of PVP-b-PNT showed that block copolymer formed strong excimer. The interaction of DNA with the block copolymer made the excimer of block copolymer quench. The cytotoxicity result of PVP-b-PNT in cell culture in vitro indicated that this copolymer PVP-b-PNT had good biocompatibility.

  15. Cell interactions in concanavalin A activated cation flux and DNA synthesis of mouse lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Kaplan, J G

    1980-01-01

    Co-culture at constant cell density of nude mouse spleen cells (by themselves unresponsive to the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A (Con A)), with congenic T-enriched lymphocyte suspensions and Con A caused anomalously high activation of K+ transport (measured by 86Rb uptake) and of incorporation...... of thymidine into DNA; the expected dilution of these two responses by nude spleen cells did not occur. However, if the nude splenocytes were added immediately prior to assay to the enriched T cells that had been precultured in presence of Con A, the expected dilution of the activated T-cell responses occurred......; both 86Rb uptake and thymidine incorporation were reduced proportionally to the degree of dilution of the T cells by the nonresponding cells. These data indicate that during co-culture in presence of Con A there is interaction between the T cells, capable of responding to mitogens, and the nude spleen...

  16. Triazole-linked phenyl derivatives: redox mechanisms and in situ electrochemical evaluation of interaction with dsDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontinha, A Dora R; Lombardo, Caterina M; Neidle, Stephen; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2015-02-01

    The redox mechanism of two trisubstituted triazole-linked phenyl derivatives (CL41 and CL42) and a disubstituted triazole-linked phenyl derivative (CL2r50) were studied using cyclic, differential pulse and square wave voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. The CL41, CL42 and CL2r50 oxidation is a complex, pH-dependent irreversible process involving the formation of electroactive products that undergo two consecutive reversible oxidation reactions. The DNA interaction with CL41, CL42 and CL2r50 was investigated by differential pulse voltammetry using the dsDNA-electrochemical biosensor and in DNA/trisubstituted triazole incubated solutions. All three trisubstituted triazole-linked phenyl derivatives interacted with dsDNA causing morphological and oxidative damage to the dsDNA structure in a time-dependent manner. The DNA-electrochemical biosensor enabled the detection of oxidative damage to DNA following the occurrence of the 8-oxoGua and/or 2,8-oxoAde oxidation peaks.

  17. Resonance light scattering spectroscopy study of interaction between norfloxacin and calf thymus DNA and its analytical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanguang; Zhang, Taiyu; Han, Yali; Zhu, Li

    2006-11-01

    The interaction between norfloxacin and calf thymus double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) has been studied by a resonance light scattering (RLS) technique with a common spectrofluorometer. The characteristics of RLS spectra, the effective factors and optimum conditions of the reaction have been investigated. In Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer (pH 5.87), norfloxacin has a maximum peak 405.5 nm and the RLS intensity is remarkably enhanced by trace amount of calf thymus dsDNA due to the interaction between norfloxacin and dsDNA. The binding of norfloxacin to DNA forms large particles, which were characterized by RLS spectrum, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum, and fluorescence spectrum. Based on the enhanced RLS intensity, a novel method for sensitive determination of calf thymus dsDNA concentration ranging from 0.02 to 2.3 μg ml -1 was developed. The determination limit (3 σ) was 1.2 ng ml -1. The method is simple, rapid, practical and relatively free from interference generated by coexisting substance, as well as much more sensitive than most of the reported methods. Three synthetic samples of ctDNA were determined with satisfactory results.

  18. Interplay of nonlinearity and geometry in a DNA-related, Klein-Gordon model with long-range dipole-dipole interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archilla, J. F.R.; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich

    2002-01-01

    Most of the studies on mathematical models of DNA are limited to next neighbor interaction. However, the coupling between base pairs is thought to be caused by dipole interaction, and, when the DNA strand is bent, the distances between base pairs become shorter, therefore the interactions with di...

  19. DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  20. Specificity of interactions among the DNA-packaging machine components of T4-related bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Rao, Venigalla B

    2011-02-04

    Tailed bacteriophages use powerful molecular motors to package the viral genome into a preformed capsid. Packaging at a rate of up to ∼2000 bp/s and generating a power density twice that of an automobile engine, the phage T4 motor is the fastest and most powerful reported to date. Central to DNA packaging are dynamic interactions among the packaging components, capsid (gp23), portal (gp20), motor (gp17, large "terminase"), and regulator (gp16, small terminase), leading to precise orchestration of the packaging process, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we analyzed the interactions between small and large terminases of T4-related phages. Our results show that the gp17 packaging ATPase is maximally stimulated by homologous, but not heterologous, gp16. Multiple interaction sites are identified in both gp16 and gp17. The specificity determinants in gp16 are clustered in the diverged N- and C-terminal domains (regions I-III). Swapping of diverged region(s), such as replacing C-terminal RB49 region III with that of T4, switched ATPase stimulation specificity. Two specificity regions, amino acids 37-52 and 290-315, are identified in or near the gp17-ATPase "transmission" subdomain II. gp16 binding at these sites might cause a conformational change positioning the ATPase-coupling residues into the catalytic pocket, triggering ATP hydrolysis. These results lead to a model in which multiple weak interactions between motor and regulator allow dynamic assembly and disassembly of various packaging complexes, depending on the functional state of the packaging machine. This might be a general mechanism for regulation of the phage packaging machine and other complex molecular machines.

  1. Digital Frequency Domain Fluorometry and the Study of Hoechst 33258 Dye-Dna Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddersen, Brett Andrew

    Fluorescence is a powerful tool for the study of chemical and biological processes. The typical decay times of fluorescence are ideal to study events in the pico to nanosecond range. On these time scales, the motions of many biological processes can be studied. The use of frequency domain fluorometry to measure the lifetime of the excited state has been used for many years. However, the development of an acquisition system based on modern digital techniques, presented in this thesis, has opened the door to different types of experiments that previously were either too time consuming or could not be done. The use of digital techniques and the development of a method to modulate an image intensifier have made it possible to incorporate linear and matrix detectors in frequency domain fluorometry. The extension of time -resolved fluorescence measurements to linear arrays has made it possible to follow the time evolution of the emission spectra while the use of matrix detectors has permitted the measurement of the lifetime at every "pixel" of an image. The dye Hoechst 33258 has been used for many years in the study of DNA and DNA binding. However, the fluorescent properties of Hoechst 33258 are not well understood. The dye is highly quenched in aqueous solutions and becomes brightly fluorescent when bound to Acdot T rich sequences of DNA or placed in non-aqueous solutions. The fluorescence of Hoechst 33258 seems to arise from two different solvation states of the molecule. When Hoechst 33258 binds to calf thymus DNA or poly(d(A cdotT)), the molecule becomes highly fluorescent, yet the two states can still be distinguished. The two states are attributed to different binding modes of the dye. The loose binding allows access of water molecules which results in different emission properties. On the other hand, when Hoechst binds onto d(CGCGAATTCGCG) only one lifetime is observed. The single lifetime has been attributed to strong binding of the Hoechst molecule onto the AATT

  2. The synthesis of new amphiphilic p-tert-butylthiacalix[4]arenes containing peptide fragments and their interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padnya, Pavel L; Andreyko, Elena A; Mostovaya, Olga A; Rizvanov, Ildar Kh; Stoikov, Ivan I

    2015-06-01

    New water-soluble p-tert-butylthiacalix[4]arenes containing peptide and quaternary ammonium fragments in cone and 1,3-alternate conformations were synthesized and characterized. The interaction of the macrocycles with DNA was studied by UV-spectroscopy, DLS and TEM. It was shown that the interaction of the self-associates based on p-tert-butylthiacalix[4]arenes tetrasubstituted at the lower rim with glycine and quaternary ammonium fragments in cone and 1,3-alternate conformations with DNA led to the formation of particles of about 99-192 nm in size.

  3. The resonance Rayleigh scattering of the interaction of copper(Ⅱ)-bleomycinA2 with DNA and its analytical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The forming of bleomycinA2-Cu(Ⅱ) cationic chelate and the interaction of the chelate with DNA have been investigated by using resonance Rayleigh scattering(RRS),molecular absorption and fluorescence spectra.The result shows that in aqueous solution,bleomycinA2(BLMA2) can react with Cu(Ⅱ) to form 1:1 cationic chelate which contributes to the changes of the absorption spectra and the quenched fluorescence of BLMA2.When the cationic chelate further bound with DNA to form ternary ion-association complexes,the remarkable enhancement of the RRS intensity was observed.In this work,the optimum conditions for the coordination reaction of BLMA2 with Cu(Ⅱ) and some influencing factors have been investigated.The reaction mechanism of BLMA2-Cu(Ⅱ) binding with DNA was suggested and a binding model was proposed.In addition,the fluorescence quenching type of BLMA2 was investigated.A highly sensitive,simple and rapid new method for the determination of DNA by using BLMA2-Cu(Ⅱ) as RRS probe has been developed.The detection limits(3σ) are 7.2 ng/mL for ctDNA,7.1 ng/mL for sDNA and 18 ng/mL for hsDNA.The method can be applied to the determination of trace amounts of DNA.

  4. Electrochemical and Spectroscopic Studies on Interaction between Complex of Copper(Ⅱ) with Schiff Base Ligand and DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Shu-yan; JIE Gui-fen; ZHANG Shu-sheng; LI Ying; YANG Fan

    2005-01-01

    The crystal structure of ( [CuL (H2O) 2 ] (ClO4) 2 · 2H2O, CuL) (L = N- (5-sulfosalicylidene)-4' -bromoaniline) was determined by means of X-ray crystallography. The interaction between CuL and salmon sperm DNA in a 0. 1 mol/L HOAc-NaOAc buffer solution (pH 5.10) was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy. A couple of redox peaks of CuL in the cyclic voltammograms(CV) can be seen at the glassy carbon electrode. It was found that the peak current of CuL decreased significantly with a negative shift of the peak potential in the presence of DNA compared with that in the absence of DNA. In addition,the decreased absorbance of CuL was observed with increasing the concentration of DNA; the absorption spectrum of an ethidium bromide(EB)-DNA system inthe presence of CuL confirms that the binding mode of CuL to DNA is different from the intercalation of EB with DNA. All the experimental results indicate that CuL can bind to DNA by electrostatic binding and form a 1:1 association complex with a binding constant of 2.72×104 L/mol.

  5. The Inner Membrane Protein PilG Interacts with DNA and the Secretin PilQ in Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Stephan A; Lång, Emma; Beyene, Getachew Tesfaye; Balasingham, Seetha V; Homberset, Håvard; Rowe, Alexander D; Ambur, Ole Herman; Tønjum, Tone

    2015-01-01

    Expression of type IV pili (Tfp), filamentous appendages emanating from the bacterial surface, is indispensable for efficient neisserial transformation. Tfp pass through the secretin pore consisting of the membrane protein PilQ. PilG is a polytopic membrane protein, conserved in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, that is required for the biogenesis of neisserial Tfp. PilG null mutants are devoid of pili and non-competent for transformation. Here, recombinant full-length, truncated and mutated variants of meningococcal PilG were overexpressed, purified and characterized. We report that meningococcal PilG directly binds DNA in vitro, detected by both an electromobility shift analysis and a solid phase overlay assay. PilG DNA binding activity was independent of the presence of the consensus DNA uptake sequence. PilG-mediated DNA binding affinity was mapped to the N-terminus and was inactivated by mutation of residues 43 to 45. Notably, reduced meningococcal transformation of DNA in vivo was observed when PilG residues 43 to 45 were substituted by alanine in situ, defining a biologically significant DNA binding domain. N-terminal PilG also interacted with the N-terminal region of PilQ, which previously was shown to bind DNA. Collectively, these data suggest that PilG and PilQ in concert bind DNA during Tfp-mediated transformation.

  6. The Inner Membrane Protein PilG Interacts with DNA and the Secretin PilQ in Transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan A Frye

    Full Text Available Expression of type IV pili (Tfp, filamentous appendages emanating from the bacterial surface, is indispensable for efficient neisserial transformation. Tfp pass through the secretin pore consisting of the membrane protein PilQ. PilG is a polytopic membrane protein, conserved in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, that is required for the biogenesis of neisserial Tfp. PilG null mutants are devoid of pili and non-competent for transformation. Here, recombinant full-length, truncated and mutated variants of meningococcal PilG were overexpressed, purified and characterized. We report that meningococcal PilG directly binds DNA in vitro, detected by both an electromobility shift analysis and a solid phase overlay assay. PilG DNA binding activity was independent of the presence of the consensus DNA uptake sequence. PilG-mediated DNA binding affinity was mapped to the N-terminus and was inactivated by mutation of residues 43 to 45. Notably, reduced meningococcal transformation of DNA in vivo was observed when PilG residues 43 to 45 were substituted by alanine in situ, defining a biologically significant DNA binding domain. N-terminal PilG also interacted with the N-terminal region of PilQ, which previously was shown to bind DNA. Collectively, these data suggest that PilG and PilQ in concert bind DNA during Tfp-mediated transformation.

  7. Gene-diet interactions in exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines and bulky DNA adduct levels in blood leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Vikki; Peacock, Sarah; Massey, Thomas E; Godschalk, Roger W L; van Schooten, Frederik J; Chen, Jian; King, Will D

    2015-08-01

    Heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs), carcinogens produced in meat when cooked at high temperatures, are an emerging biologic explanation for the meat-colorectal cancer relationship. HAAs form DNA adducts; left unrepaired, adducts can induce mutations, which may initiate/promote carcinogenesis. The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between dietary HAAs, genetic susceptibility and bulky DNA adduct levels. Least squares regression was used to examine the relationship between dietary HAA exposure and bulky DNA adduct levels in blood measured using (32)P-postlabeling among 99 healthy volunteers. Gene-diet interactions between dietary HAAs and genetic factors relevant to the biotransformation of HAAs and DNA repair were also examined. No main effects of dietary HAAs on bulky DNA adduct levels was found. However, those with the putative NAT1 rapid acetylator phenotype had lower adduct levels than those with the slow acetylator phenotype (P = 0.02). Furthermore, having five or more 'at-risk' genotypes was associated with higher bulky DNA adduct levels (P = 0.03). Gene-diet interactions were observed between NAT1 polymorphisms and dietary HAAs (P adduct levels compared to lower intakes. This study provides evidence of a biologic relationship between dietary HAAs, genetic susceptibility and bulky DNA adduct formation. However, the lack of a strong main effect of HAAs suggests that dietary HAAs are not a large contributor to bulky DNA adducts in this population; future studies should consider relevant gene-diet interactions to clarify the role of HAAs in carcinogenesis.

  8. Cooperative recruitment of HMGB1 during V(D)J recombination through interactions with RAG1 and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Alicia J; Corbett, Elizabeth; Ortega, Fabian; Schatz, David G

    2013-03-01

    During V(D)J recombination, recombination activating gene (RAG)1 and RAG2 bind and cleave recombination signal sequences (RSSs), aided by the ubiquitous DNA-binding/-bending proteins high-mobility group box protein (HMGB)1 or HMGB2. HMGB1/2 play a critical, although poorly understood, role in vitro in the assembly of functional RAG-RSS complexes, into which HMGB1/2 stably incorporate. The mechanism of HMGB1/2 recruitment is unknown, although an interaction with RAG1 has been suggested. Here, we report data demonstrating only a weak HMGB1-RAG1 interaction in the absence of DNA in several assays, including fluorescence anisotropy experiments using a novel Alexa488-labeled HMGB1 protein. Addition of DNA to RAG1 and HMGB1 in fluorescence anisotropy experiments, however, results in a substantial increase in complex formation, indicating a synergistic binding effect. Pulldown experiments confirmed these results, as HMGB1 was recruited to a RAG1-DNA complex in a RAG1 concentration-dependent manner and, interestingly, without strict RSS sequence specificity. Our finding that HMGB1 binds more tightly to a RAG1-DNA complex over RAG1 or DNA alone provides an explanation for the stable integration of this typically transient architectural protein in the V(D)J recombinase complex throughout recombination. These findings also have implications for the order of events during RAG-DNA complex assembly and for the stabilization of sequence-specific and non-specific RAG1-DNA interactions.

  9. Two modes of interaction of the single-stranded DNA-binding protein of bacteriophage T7 with the DNA polymerase-thioredoxin complex

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sharmistha

    2010-04-06

    The DNA polymerase encoded by bacteriophage T7 has low processivity. Escherichia coli thioredoxin binds to a segment of 76 residues in the thumb subdomain of the polymerase and increases the processivity. The binding of thioredoxin leads to the formation of two basic loops, loops A and B, located within the thioredoxin-binding domain (TBD). Both loops interact with the acidic C terminus of the T7 helicase. A relatively weak electrostatic mode involves the C-terminal tail of the helicase and the TBD, whereas a high affinity interaction that does not involve the C-terminal tail occurs when the polymerase is in a polymerization mode. T7 gene 2.5 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (gp2.5) also has an acidic C-terminal tail. gp2.5 also has two modes of interaction with the polymerase, but both involve the C-terminal tail of gp2.5. An electrostatic interaction requires the basic residues in loops A and B, and gp2.5 binds to both loops with similar affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance. When the polymerase is in a polymerization mode, the C terminus of gene 2.5 protein interacts with the polymerase in regions outside the TBD.gp2.5 increases the processivity of the polymerase-helicase complex during leading strand synthesis. When loop B of the TBD is altered, abortive DNA products are observed during leading strand synthesis. Loop B appears to play an important role in communication with the helicase and gp2.5, whereas loop A plays a stabilizing role in these interactions. © 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. DNA homologous recombination factor SFR1 physically and functionally interacts with estrogen receptor alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Feng

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα, a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates the expression of its target genes by interacting with corepressors and coactivators. Since the first cloning of SRC1, more than 280 nuclear receptor cofactors have been identified, which orchestrate target gene transcription. Aberrant activity of ER or its accessory proteins results in a number of diseases including breast cancer. Here we identified SFR1, a protein involved in DNA homologous recombination, as a novel binding partner of ERα. Initially isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen, the interaction of SFR1 and ERα was confirmed in vivo by immunoprecipitation and mammalian one-hybrid assays. SFR1 co-localized with ERα in the nucleus, potentiated ER's ligand-dependent and ligand-independent transcriptional activity, and occupied the ER binding sites of its target gene promoters. Knockdown of SFR1 diminished ER's transcriptional activity. Manipulating SFR1 expression by knockdown and overexpression revealed a role for SFR1 in ER-dependent and -independent cancer cell proliferation. SFR1 differs from SRC1 by the lack of an intrinsic activation function. Taken together, we propose that SFR1 is a novel transcriptional modulator for ERα and a potential target in breast cancer therapy.

  11. Model membrane interaction and DNA-binding of antimicrobial peptide Lasioglossin II derived from bee venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Lee, Meryl; Sivaraman, J; Chatterjee, Chiradip

    2013-01-01

    Lasioglossins, a new family of antimicrobial peptide, have been shown to have strong antimicrobial activity with low haemo-lytic and mast cell degranulation activity, and exhibit cytotoxic activity against various cancer cells in vitro. In order to understand the active conformation of these pentadecapeptides in membranes, we have studied the interaction of Lasioglossin II (LL-II), one of the members of Lasioglossins family with membrane mimetic micelle Dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) by fluorescence, Circular Dichroism (CD) and two dimensional (2D) (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Fluorescence experiments provide evidence of interaction of the N-terminal tryptophan residue of LL-II with the hydrophobic core of DPC micelle. CD results show an extended chain conformation of LL-II in water which is converted to a partial helical conformation in the presence of DPC micelle. Moreover we have determined the first three-dimensional NMR structure of LL-II bound to DPC micelle with rmsd of 0.36Å. The solution structure of LL-II shows hydrophobic and hydrophilic core formation in peptide pointing towards different direction in the presence of DPC. This amphipathic structure may allow this peptide to penetrate deeply into the interfacial region of negatively charged membranes and leading to local membrane destabilization. Further we have elucidated the DNA binding ability of LL-II by agarose gel retardation and fluorescence quenching experiments.

  12. Influence of perylenediimide–pyrene supramolecular interactions on the stability of DNA-based hybrids: Importance of electrostatic complementarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian B. Winiger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic π–π stacking interactions are ubiquitous in nature, medicinal chemistry and materials sciences. They play a crucial role in the stacking of nucleobases, thus stabilising the DNA double helix. The following paper describes a series of chimeric DNA–polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH hybrids. The PAH building blocks are electron-rich pyrene and electron-poor perylenediimide (PDI, and were incorporated into complementary DNA strands. The hybrids contain different numbers of pyrene–PDI interactions that were found to directly influence duplex stability. As the pyrene–PDI ratio approaches 1:1, the stability of the duplexes increases with an average value of 7.5 °C per pyrene–PDI supramolecular interaction indicating the importance of electrostatic complementarity for aromatic π–π stacking interactions.

  13. Three-dimensional structure of N-terminal domain of DnaB helicase and helicase-primase interactions in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Kashav

    Full Text Available Replication initiation is a crucial step in genome duplication and homohexameric DnaB helicase plays a central role in the replication initiation process by unwinding the duplex DNA and interacting with several other proteins during the process of replication. N-terminal domain of DnaB is critical for helicase activity and for DnaG primase interactions. We present here the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD of H. pylori DnaB (HpDnaB helicase at 2.2 A resolution and compare the structural differences among helicases and correlate with the functional differences. The structural details of NTD suggest that the linker region between NTD and C-terminal helicase domain plays a vital role in accurate assembly of NTD dimers. The sequence analysis of the linker regions from several helicases reveals that they should form four helix bundles. We also report the characterization of H. pylori DnaG primase and study the helicase-primase interactions, where HpDnaG primase stimulates DNA unwinding activity of HpDnaB suggesting presence of helicase-primase cohort at the replication fork. The protein-protein interaction study of C-terminal domain of primase and different deletion constructs of helicase suggests that linker is essential for proper conformation of NTD to interact strongly with HpDnaG. The surface charge distribution on the primase binding surface of NTDs of various helicases suggests that DnaB-DnaG interaction and stability of the complex is most probably charge dependent. Structure of the linker and helicase-primase interactions indicate that HpDnaB differs greatly from E.coli DnaB despite both belong to gram negative bacteria.

  14. Molecular sled is an eleven-amino acid vehicle facilitating biochemical interactions via sliding components along DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangel, Walter F; McGrath, William J; Xiong, Kan; Graziano, Vito; Blainey, Paul C

    2016-02-02

    Recently, we showed the adenovirus proteinase interacts productively with its protein substrates in vitro and in vivo in nascent virus particles via one-dimensional diffusion along the viral DNA. The mechanism by which this occurs has heretofore been unknown. We show sliding of these proteins along DNA occurs on a new vehicle in molecular biology, a 'molecular sled' named pVIc. This 11-amino acid viral peptide binds to DNA independent of sequence. pVIc slides on DNA, exhibiting the fastest one-dimensional diffusion constant, 26±1.8 × 10(6) (bp)(2) s(-1). pVIc is a 'molecular sled,' because it can slide heterologous cargos along DNA, for example, a streptavidin tetramer. Similar peptides, for example, from the C terminus of β-actin or NLSIII of the p53 protein, slide along DNA. Characteristics of the 'molecular sled' in its milieu (virion, nucleus) have implications for how proteins in the nucleus of cells interact and imply a new form of biochemistry, one-dimensional biochemistry.

  15. Specific interactions between lactose repressor protein and DNA affected by ligand binding: ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Masato; Nishikawa, Shin; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2011-06-01

    Transcription mechanisms of gene information from DNA to mRNA are essentially controlled by regulatory proteins such as a lactose repressor (LacR) protein and ligand molecules. Biochemical experiments elucidated that a ligand binding to LacR drastically changes the mechanism controlled by LacR, although the effect of ligand binding has not been clarified at atomic and electronic levels. We here investigated the effect of ligand binding on the specific interactions between LacR and operator DNA by the molecular simulations combined with classical molecular mechanics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results indicate that the binding of anti-inducer ligand strengthens the interaction between LacR and DNA, which is consistent with the fact that the binding of anti-inducer enhances the repression of gene transcription by LacR. It was also elucidated that hydrating water molecules existing between LacR and DNA contribute to the specific interactions between LacR and DNA. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Spectroscopic investigation on the interaction of copper porphyrazines and phthalocyanine with human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Leila; Hakimian, Fatemeh; Safaei, Elham

    2014-01-01

    The G-quadruplex DNA is a novel target for anticancer drug discovery and many scientific groups are investigating interaction of small molecules with G-quadruplex DNA to discover therapeutic agents for cancer. Here, interaction of a phthalocyanine (Cu(PcTs)) and two tetrapyridinoporphyrazines ([Cu(2,3-tmtppa)](4+) and [Cu(3,4-tmtppa)](4+)) with Na(+) and K(+) forms of human telomeric G-quadruplex DNA has been investigated by spectroscopic techniques. The results indicated that interaction of the cationic porphyrazines is remarkably stronger than the anionic phthalocyanine and they presumably bind to the G-quadruplex DNA through end-stacking. Fluorescent intercalator displacement assay implied the displacement ability of the complexes with thiazole orange. In addition, circular dichroism spectra of both quadruplex forms converge to the Na(+) isoform after binding to the porphyrazines. In conclusion, the porphyrazines as the complexes that bind to the G-quadruplex DNA, could be suitable candidates for further investigations about inhibition of telomerase enzyme. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuangying; Tang, Song; Mayer, Gregory D; Cobb, George P; Maul, Jonathan D

    2015-02-01

    Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides increased transcript abundance of CSA and MUTL. In addition, mRNA abundance of HSP70 and GADD45α were increased by endosulfan and mRNA abundance of XPG was increased by α-cypermethrin. XPC, HR23B, XPG, and GADD45α exhibited elevated mRNA concentrations whereas there was a reduction in MUTL transcript concentrations in UVB-alone treatments. It appeared that even

  18. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shuangying, E-mail: shuangying.yu@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Tang, Song, E-mail: song.tang@usask.ca [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Mayer, Gregory D., E-mail: greg.mayer@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Cobb, George P., E-mail: george_cobb@baylor.edu [Department of Environmental Science, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97266, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Maul, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonathan.maul@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Interactive effects of UVB radiation-pesticide co-exposures were examined in frogs. • Responses included induction of DNA photo-adducts and DNA damage and repair genes. • Elevated DNA adduct levels occurred for co-exposures compared to UVB alone. • One mechanism is that pesticides may alter nuclear excision repair gene expression. - Abstract: Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides

  19. Synthesis of 5,10,15,20-Tetra[4-(N-ethylpiperazinyl)phenyl]-porphyrin and Its Interaction with DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭灿城; 李和平; 张晓兵

    2005-01-01

    Piperazinyl-porphyrin, 5,10,15,20-tetra[4-(N-ethylpiperazinyl)phenyl]porphyrin (TEPPH2), was synthesized based on the special affinity of porphyrin to cancer cells and the antitumor activity of piperazine compounds. Its structure was characterized by UV-vis and 1H NMR spectra and elemental analysis. A model for the interaction between TEPPH2 and calf thymus DNA was built, and the binding mechanism was investigated by W-vis and fluorescence spectra. The results indicated that TEPPH2 could intercalate into the base pairs of DNA strongly. One calf thymus DNA molecule could bind 88 TEPPH2 molecules, and the binding constant K is 8.4×106 L-mol-1. The binding number and binding constant of TEPPH2 with DNA are higher than those of the known anti-tumor drugs,tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridyl)porphine and the Schiff bases Ca/sal-his and Ni/sal-aln.

  20. Study on the interaction of the drug mesalamine with calf thymus DNA using molecular docking and spectroscopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Fili, Soraya Moradi; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh

    2013-11-05

    The interaction of CT-DNA with the drug mesalamine (5-ASA) at physiological pH has been investigated by absorption, emission, circular dichroism (CD), cyclic voltammetry (CV), viscosity studies and molecular modeling. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH>0 and ΔS<0) indicated that hydrogen bond and van der Waals play main roles in the binding of 5-ASA to CT-DNA. Ethidium bromide (EB) displacement studies revealed that 5-ASA did not have any effect on ethidium bromide (EB) bound DNA which is indicative of groove binding. The results obtained from experimental and molecular modeling showed that 5-ASA is a minor groove binder of DNA and preferentially binds to GC rich regions.

  1. Interaction of hnRNP A1 with telomere DNA G-quadruplex structures studied at the single molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Asger Christian; Raarup, Merete Krog; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig;

    2010-01-01

    G-rich telomeric DNA sequences can form G-quadruplex structures. The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) and a shortened derivative (UP1) are active in telomere length regulation, and it has been reported that UP1 can unwind G-quadruplex structures. Here, we investigate...... the interaction of hnRNP A1 with G-quadruplex DNA structures containing the human telomere repeat (TTAGGG) by gel retardation assays, ensemble fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy, and single molecule FRET microscopy. Our biochemical experiments show that hnRNP A1 binds well to the G......-quadruplex telomeric DNA. Ensemble and single molecule FRET measurements provide further insight into molecular conformation: the telomeric DNA overhang is found to be in a folded state in the absence of hnRNP A1 and to remain predominantly in a compact state when complexed with hnRNP A1. This finding is in contrast...

  2. FurA from Anabaena PCC 7120: New insights on its regulation and the interaction with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, J. A.; López-Gomollón, S.; Pellicer, S.; Martín, B.; Sevilla, E.; Bes, M. T.; Peleato, M. L.; Fillat, M. F.

    2006-08-01

    Fur (ferric uptake regulator) proteins are global regulatory proteins involved in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. They recognize specific DNA sequences denoted iron boxes. It is assumed that Fur proteins act as classical repressors. Under iron-rich conditions, Fur dimers complexed with ferrous ions bind to iron boxes, preventing transcription. In addition to iron homeostasis, Fur proteins control the concerted response to oxidative and acidic stresses in heterotrophic prokaryotes. Our group studies the interaction between Fur proteins and target DNA sequences. Moreover, the regulation of FurA in the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, whose genome codes for three fur homologues has been investigated. We present an overview about the different factors involved in the regulation of FurA and analyze the parameters that influence FurA-DNA interaction in the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120.

  3. Interaction studies of resistomycin from Streptomyces aurantiacus AAA5 with calf thymus DNA and bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayabharathi, R.; Sathyadevi, P.; Krishnamoorthy, P.; Senthilraja, D.; Brunthadevi, P.; Sathyabama, S.; Priyadarisini, V. Brindha

    2012-04-01

    Resistomycin, a secondary metabolite produced by Streptomyces aurantiacus AAA5. The binding interaction of resistomycin with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, circular dichroism (CD) and synchronous fluorescence techniques under physiological conditions in vitro. Absorption spectral studies along with the fluorescence competition with ethidium bromide measurements and circular dichroism clearly suggest that the resistomycin bind with CT DNA relatively strong via groove binding. BSA interaction results revealed that the drug was found to quench the fluorescence intensity of the protein through a static quenching mechanism. The number of binding sites 'n' and apparent binding constant 'K' calculated according to the Scatchard equation exhibit a good binding property to bovine serum albumin protein. In addition, the results observed from synchronous fluorescence measurements clearly demonstrate the occurrence of conformational changes of BSA upon addition of the test compound.

  4. Optical Methods to Study Protein-DNA Interactions in Vitro and in Living Cells at the Single-Molecule Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gionata Belcastro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of intact genetic information, as well as the deployment of transcription for specific sets of genes, critically rely on a family of proteins interacting with DNA and recognizing specific sequences or features. The mechanisms by which these proteins search for target DNA are the subject of intense investigations employing a variety of methods in biology. A large interest in these processes stems from the faster-than-diffusion association rates, explained in current models by a combination of 3D and 1D diffusion. Here, we present a review of the single-molecule approaches at the forefront of the study of protein-DNA interaction dynamics and target search in vitro and in vivo. Flow stretch, optical and magnetic manipulation, single fluorophore detection and localization as well as combinations of different methods are described and the results obtained with these techniques are discussed in the framework of the current facilitated diffusion model.

  5. Sequence-specific purification of DNA oligomers in hydrophobic interaction chromatography using peptide nucleic acid amphiphiles: extended dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, Jeffrey M; Schneider, James W

    2007-06-01

    We present improvements on a previously reported method (Vernille JP, Schneider JW. 2004. Biotechnol Prog 20(6):1776-1782) to purify DNA oligomers by attachment of peptide nucleic acid amphiphiles (PNAA) to particular sequences on the oligomers, followed by their separation from unbound oligomers using hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). Use of alkyl-modified HIC media (butyl and octyl sepharose) over phenyl-modified media (phenyl sepharose) reduced the elution time of unbound DNA while not affecting the elution time of the PNAA/DNA complex. Modifying the alkane tail length for PNAA from C(12) to C(18) increased slightly the retention of PNAA/DNA duplexes. By combining these two refinements, we show that sequence-specific purifications of DNA oligomers 60 bases in length or more can be achieved with high resolution, even when the PNAA alkane is attached to the center of the target strand. The insensitivity of the PNAA/DNA duplex binding to choice of HIC media appears to be due to a surface-induced aggregation phenomenon that does not occur in the case of untagged DNA. We also report on the use of batch HIC as an adequate predictor of elution profiles in linear gradient HIC, and its potential to considerably reduce purification times by applying step gradients. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A novel type of DNA-binding protein interacts with a conserved sequence in an early nodulin ENOD12 promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, H; Hansen, A C; Vijn, I

    1996-01-01

    in the nodule parenchyma and meristem. The presence of three small overlapping ORFs in the 5'-untranslated region of the ENBP1 cDNA indicates that ENBP1 expression might be regulated at the translational level. The interaction of ENBP1 with a conserved AT-rich element within the ENOD12 promoter and the presence...

  7. Structure-function studies of DNA binding domain of response regulator KdpE reveals equal affinity interactions at DNA half-sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Narayanan

    Full Text Available Expression of KdpFABC, a K(+ pump that restores osmotic balance, is controlled by binding of the response regulator KdpE to a specific DNA sequence (kdpFABC(BS via the winged helix-turn-helix type DNA binding domain (KdpE(DBD. Exploration of E. coli KdpE(DBD and kdpFABC(BS interaction resulted in the identification of two conserved, AT-rich 6 bp direct repeats that form half-sites. Despite binding to these half-sites, KdpE(DBD was incapable of promoting gene expression in vivo. Structure-function studies guided by our 2.5 Å X-ray structure of KdpE(DBD revealed the importance of residues R193 and R200 in the α-8 DNA recognition helix and T215 in the wing region for DNA binding. Mutation of these residues renders KdpE incapable of inducing expression of the kdpFABC operon. Detailed biophysical analysis of interactions using analytical ultracentrifugation revealed a 2∶1 stoichiometry of protein to DNA with dissociation constants of 200±100 and 350±100 nM at half-sites. Inactivation of one half-site does not influence binding at the other, indicating that KdpE(DBD binds independently to the half-sites with approximately equal affinity and no discernable cooperativity. To our knowledge, these data are the first to describe in quantitative terms the binding at half-sites under equilibrium conditions for a member of the ubiquitous OmpR/PhoB family of proteins.

  8. Functional interaction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-α basic region mutants with E2F transcription factors and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowenz-Leutz, Elisabeth; Schuetz, Anja; Liu, Qingbin; Knoblich, Maria; Heinemann, Udo; Leutz, Achim

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) regulates cell cycle arrest and terminal differentiation of neutrophils and adipocytes. Mutations in the basic leucine zipper domain (bZip) of C/EBPα are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. A widely used murine transforming C/EBPα basic region mutant (BRM2) entails two bZip point mutations (I294A/R297A). BRM2 has been discordantly described as defective for DNA binding or defective for interaction with E2F. We have separated the two BRM2 mutations to shed light on the intertwined reciprocity between C/EBPα-E2F-DNA interactions. Both, C/EBPα I294A and R297A retain transactivation capacity and interaction with E2F-DP. The C/EBPα R297A mutation destabilized DNA binding, whereas the C/EBPα I294A mutation enhanced binding to DNA. The C/EBPα R297A mutant, like BRM2, displayed enhanced interaction with E2F-DP but failed to repress E2F-dependent transactivation although both mutants were readily suppressed by E2F1 for transcription through C/EBP cis-regulatory sites. In contrast, the DNA binding enhanced C/EBPα I294A mutant displayed increased repression of E2F-DP mediated transactivation and resisted E2F-DP mediated repression. Thus, the efficient repression of E2F dependent S-phase genes and the activation of differentiation genes reside in the balanced DNA binding capacity of C/EBPα.

  9. DNA methyltransferase and alcohol dehydrogenase: gene-nutrient interactions in relation to risk of colorectal polyps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, A.Y.; Poole, E.M.; Bigler, J.; Whitton, J.; Potter, J.D.; Ulrich, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances in DNA methylation are a characteristic of colorectal carcinogenesis. Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism is essential for providing one-carbon groups for DNA methylation via DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). Alcohol, a folate antagonist, could adversely affect one-carbon metabolism. In

  10. DNA methyltransferase and alcohol dehydrogenase: gene-nutrient interactions in relation to risk of colorectal polyps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, A.Y.; Poole, E.M.; Bigler, J.; Whitton, J.; Potter, J.D.; Ulrich, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances in DNA methylation are a characteristic of colorectal carcinogenesis. Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism is essential for providing one-carbon groups for DNA methylation via DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). Alcohol, a folate antagonist, could adversely affect one-carbon metabolism. In

  11. Photoinduced interactions of supramolecular ruthenium(II) complexes with plasmid DNA: synthesis and spectroscopic, electrochemical, and DNA photocleavage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swavey, Shawn; DeBeer, Madeleine; Li, Kaiyu

    2015-04-06

    Two new bridging ligands have been synthesized by combining substituted benzaldehydes with phenanthrolinopyrrole (php), resulting in new polyazine bridging ligands. The ligands have been characterized by (1)H NMR, mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. These new ligands display π-π* transitions above 500 nm with modest molar absorptivities. Upon excitation at the ligand-centered charge-transfer transition, weak emission with a maximum wavelength of 612 nm is observed. When coordinated to two ruthenium(II) bis(bipyridyl) groups, the new bimetallic complexes generated give an overall 4+ charge. The electronic transitions of the bimetallic ruthenium(II) complexes display traditional π-π* transitions at 287 nm and metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions at 452 nm with molar absorptivities greater than 30000 M(-1) cm(-1). Oxidation of the ruthenium(II) metal centers to ruthenium(III) occurs at potentials above 1.4 V versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements indicate that the ruthenium(II) moieties behave independently. Both complexes are water-soluble and show the ability to photonick plasmid DNA when irradiated with low-energy light above 550 nm. In addition, one of the complexes, [Ru(bpy)2php]2Van(4+), shows the ability to linearize plasmid DNA and gives evidence, by gel electrophoresis, of photoinduced binding to plasmid DNA.

  12. Specific interaction of terminase, the DNA packaging enzyme of bacteriophage lambda, with the portal protein of the prohead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, A; Feiss, M

    1995-01-13

    Terminase, the bacteriophage lambda DNA packaging protein, is a heteromultimer of two subunits, gpNu1 and gpA, the products of genes Nu1 and A, resp. Phage 21 is a lambdoid phage that produces a terminase similar to that of lambda terminase, the subunits of 21 terminase, gp1 and gp2, have the same domain structures of their lambda analog, gpNu1 and gpA, respectively. The lambda and 21 terminases have different DNA binding and prohead binding specificities. When the C-terminal 32 amino residues of gpA replace the C-terminal 32 residues of gp2, the resulting chimeric terminase specifically uses lambda proheads, indicating that the C-terminal 32 residues of gpA are a specificity domain for prohead binding. A second chimeric terminase, in which the C-terminal six residues of gpA are replaced by the C-terminal six residues of gp2, is unable to utilize lambda proheads, and a lambda phage producing this terminase, lambda Are636, is unable to form plaques. In the present work, a pseudorevertant of lambda Are636 was isolated that contained a mutation Bms8, affecting the prohead. The B gene encodes the portal protein of lambda proheads, which forms the special vertex that is thought to serve as (1) the site of DNA entry into the prohead during packaging, (2) the site for DNA exit during DNA injection, and (3) the site of tail attachment during virion assembly. Bms8 is predicted to change residue 331 of gpB from proline to serine. Burst size measurements and in vitro DNA packaging experiments demonstrated allele-specific interactions between the Are636 terminase and Bms8 proheads. That is, wild-type terminase interacted more efficiently with wild-type proheads than with Bms8 proheads, and Are636 terminase interacted with Bms8 proheads more efficiently than with wild-type proheads. Prohead binding by lambda terminase is stimulated by an assembly catalyst, gpFI. In vitro packaging extracts lacking gpFI were used under conditions in which packaging was gpFI-independent. In the

  13. Conformational dynamics of abasic DNA upon interactions with AP endonuclease 1 revealed by stopped-flow fluorescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu; Koval, Vladimir V; Vorobjev, Yury N; Fedorova, Olga S

    2012-02-14

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are abundant DNA lesions arising from exposure to UV light, ionizing radiation, alkylating agents, and oxygen radicals. In human cells, AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) recognizes this mutagenic lesion and initiates its repair via a specific incision of the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the AP site. We have investigated a detailed mechanism of APE1 functioning using fluorescently labeled DNA substrates. A fluorescent adenine analogue, 2-aminopurine, was introduced into DNA substrates adjacent to the abasic site to serve as an on-site reporter of conformational transitions in DNA during the catalytic cycle. Application of a pre-steady-state stopped-flow technique allows us to observe changes in the fluorescence intensity corresponding to different stages of the process in real time. We also detected an intrinsic Trp fluorescence of the enzyme during interactions with 2-aPu-containing substrates. Our data have revealed a conformational flexibility of the abasic DNA being processed by APE1. Quantitative analysis of fluorescent traces has yielded a minimal kinetic scheme and appropriate rate constants consisting of four steps. The results obtained from stopped-flow data have shown a substantial influence of the 2-aPu base location on completion of certain reaction steps. Using detailed molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA substrates, we have attributed structural distortions of AP-DNA to realization of specific binding, effective locking, and incision of the damaged DNA. The findings allowed us to accurately discern the step that corresponds to insertion of specific APE1 amino acid residues into the abasic DNA void in the course of stabilization of the precatalytic complex.

  14. Use of Capillary Electrophoresis in the Study of Interaction between dsDNA and Drug Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Two 17-mer dsDNA with different sequence characteristics were designed to investigate the binding characteristics of berberine, an anticancer drug with uncertain binding mode, and Hoechst 33258, a model DNA minor groove binder, with dsDNA, respectively by the capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). Kenndler model analysis revealed that Hoechst 33258 exhibited intermediate affinity with dsDNA, while there was only low affinity and some weak binding preference for AATT-containing to GGCC-containing dsDNA for berberine.

  15. Joining mutants of RAG1 and RAG2 that demonstrate impaired interactions with the coding-end DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagawa, Fumikiyo; Hirose, Satoshi; Nishizumi, Hirofumi; Nishihara, Tadashi; Sakano, Hitoshi

    2004-09-10

    In V(D)J joining of antigen receptor genes, two recombination signal sequences (RSSs), 12- and 23-RSSs, form a complex with the protein products of recombination activating genes, RAG1 and RAG2. DNaseI footprinting demonstrates that the interaction of RAG proteins with substrate RSS DNA is not just limited to the signal region but involves the coding sequence as well. Joining mutants of RAG1 and RAG2 demonstrate impaired interactions with the coding region in both pre- and postcleavage type complexes. A possible role of this RAG coding region interaction is discussed in the context of V(D)J recombination.

  16. Characterisation of the interactions between substrate, copper(II) complex and DNA and their role in rate acceleration in DNA-based asymmetric catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Boersma, Arnold J; Browne, Wesley R; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-02-28

    Interactions of the azachalcone derived substrate Aza with copper(II) complexes in the presence and absence of st-DNA were studied in detail by UV/Vis absorption, EPR and Raman and (UV and vis) resonance Raman spectroscopies. The binding of Aza to the Lewis acidic copper(II) complexes, which results in activation of the substrate, was established spectroscopically. It was shown that the binding of Aza differs between Cu(II)dmbpy and Cu(II)terpy, consistent with the observed differences in catalytic asymmetric Diels-Alder reactions with regard to both the rate and enantiomeric preference. Finally, it was shown that DNA has a major beneficial effect on the binding of Aza to the copper(II) complex due to the fact that both bind to the DNA. The result is a high effective molarity of both the copper complexes and the Aza substrate, which leads to a significant increase in binding of Aza to the copper(II) complex. This effect is a key reason for the observed rate acceleration in the catalyzed reactions brought about by the presence of DNA.

  17. Role of minor groove width and hydration pattern on amsacrine interaction with DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak K Jangir

    Full Text Available Amsacrine is an anilinoacridine derivative anticancer drug, used to treat a wide variety of malignancies. In cells, amsacrine poisons topoisomerase 2 by stabilizing DNA-drug-enzyme ternary complex. Presence of amsacrine increases the steady-state concentration of these ternary complexes which in turn hampers DNA replication and results in subsequent cell death. Due to reversible binding and rapid slip-out of amsacrine from DNA duplex, structural data is not available on amsacrine-DNA complexes. In the present work, we designed five oligonucleotide duplexes, differing in their minor groove widths and hydration pattern, and examined their binding with amsacrine using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Complexes of amsacrine with calf thymus DNA were also evaluated for a comparison. Our results demonstrate for the first time that amsacrine is not a simple intercalator; rather mixed type of DNA binding (intercalation and minor groove takes place between amsacrine and DNA. Further, this binding is highly sensitive towards the geometries and hydration patterns of different minor grooves present in the DNA. This study shows that ligand binding to DNA could be very sensitive to DNA base composition and DNA groove structures. Results demonstrated here could have implication for understanding cytotoxic mechanism of aminoacridine based anticancer drugs and provide directions to modify these drugs for better efficacy and few side-effects.

  18. The Stat3/GR interaction code: predictive value of direct/indirect DNA recruitment for transcription outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlais, David; Couture, Catherine; Balsalobre, Aurélio; Drouin, Jacques

    2012-07-13

    Transcription factor recruitment to genomic sites of action is primarily due to direct protein:DNA interactions. The subsequent recruitment of coregulatory complexes leads to either transcriptional activation or repression. In contrast to this canonical scheme, some transcription factors, such as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), behave as transcriptional repressors when recruited to target genes through protein tethering. We have investigated the genome-wide prevalence of tethering between GR and Stat3 and found nonreciprocal interactions, namely that GR tethering to DNA-bound Stat3 results in transcriptional repression, whereas Stat3 tethering to GR results in synergism. Further, other schemes of GR and Stat3 corecruitment to regulatory modules result in transcriptional synergism, including neighboring and composite binding sites. The results indicate extensive transcriptional interactions between Stat3 and GR; further, they provide a genome-wide assessment of transcriptional regulation by tethering and a molecular basis for integration of signals mediated by GR and Stats in health and disease.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA mapping of social-biological interactions in Brazilian Amazonian African-descendant populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Maia Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the Brazilian Amazonian population has historically involved three main ethnic groups, Amerindian, African and European. This has resulted in genetic investigations having been carried out using classical polymorphisms and molecular markers. To better understand the genetic variability and the micro-evolutionary processes acting in human groups in the Brazilian Amazon region we used mitochondrial DNA to investigate 159 maternally unrelated individuals from five Amazonian African-descendant communities. The mitochondrial lineage distribution indicated a contribution of 50.2% from Africans (L0, L1, L2, and L3, 46.6% from Amerindians (haplogroups A, B, C and D and a small European contribution of 1.3%. These results indicated high genetic diversity in the Amerindian and African lineage groups, suggesting that the Brazilian Amazonian African-descendant populations reflect a possible population amalgamation of Amerindian women from different Amazonian indigenous tribes and African women from different geographic regions of Africa who had been brought to Brazil as slaves. The present study partially mapped the historical biological and social interactions that had occurred during the formation and expansion of Amazonian African-descendant communities.

  20. Distance-dependent interactions between gold nanoparticles and fluorescent molecules with DNA as tunable spacers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, Rahul; Sharma, Jaswinder; Lin Su; Yan Hao; Lindsay, Stuart; Liu Yan [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Wang Haining; Zou Shengli, E-mail: stuart.lindsay@asu.ed, E-mail: yan_liu@asu.ed [Department of Chemistry, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2009-12-02

    Using stoichiometrically controlled 1:1 functionalization of gold nanoparticles with fluorescent dye molecules in which the dye molecule is held away from the particle surface by a rigid DNA spacer allows precise determination of the distance-dependent effect of the metal nanoparticles on fluorescence intensity. Two dyes were studied, Cy3 and Cy5, with two sizes of nanoparticles, 5 and 10 nm. The larger the particle, the more quenching of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity, due to increased overlap of the dye's emission spectrum with the Au surface plasmon resonance. Fluorescence is quenched significantly for distances somewhat larger than the particle diameter, in good agreement with the predictions of an electrodynamics model based on interacting dipoles. The distance dependence of surface energy transfer behavior, i.e. quenching efficiency, is proportional to 1/d{sup 4}, which involves no consideration of the size of the particle and the spectral overlap of the dye and AuNp. This surface energy transfer model is found qualitatively and agrees with the electrodynamic model, though the exponent is greater than 4 for the smaller nanoparticles (5 nm), and smaller than 4 for the larger nanoparticles (10 nm).

  1. Different modes of interaction by TIAR and HuR with target RNA and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Henry S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Yoga, Yano M K; Pendini, Nicole R; Gunzburg, Menachem J; Cowieson, Nathan P; Wilson, Gerald M; Williams, Bryan R G; Gorospe, Myriam; Wilce, Jacqueline A

    2011-02-01

    TIAR and HuR are mRNA-binding proteins that play important roles in the regulation of translation. They both possess three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and bind to AU-rich elements (AREs), with seemingly overlapping specificity. Here we show using SPR that TIAR and HuR bind to both U-rich and AU-rich RNA in the nanomolar range, with higher overall affinity for U-rich RNA. However, the higher affinity for U-rich sequences is mainly due to faster association with U-rich RNA, which we propose is a reflection of the higher probability of association. Differences between TIAR and HuR are observed in their modes of binding to RNA. TIAR is able to bind deoxy-oligonucleotides with nanomolar affinity, whereas HuR affinity is reduced to a micromolar level. Studies with U-rich DNA reveal that TIAR binding depends less on the 2'-hydroxyl group of RNA than HuR binding. Finally we show that SAXS data, recorded for the first two domains of TIAR in complex with RNA, are more consistent with a flexible, elongated shape and not the compact shape that the first two domains of Hu proteins adopt upon binding to RNA. We thus propose that these triple-RRM proteins, which compete for the same binding sites in cells, interact with their targets in fundamentally different ways.

  2. Thermodynamic and structural study of phenanthroline derivative ruthenium complex/DNA interactions: probing partial intercalation and binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueso, E; López-Pérez, G; Castellano, M; Prado-Gotor, R

    2012-01-01

    The binding of [Ru(PDTA-H(2))(phen)]Cl (PDTA = propylene-1,2-diaminetetra-acetic acid; phen = 1,10 phenanthroline) with ctDNA (=calf thymus DNA) has been investigated through intrinsic and induced circular dichroism, UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies, steady-state fluorescence, thermal denaturation technique, viscosity and electrochemical measurements. The latter indicate that the cathodic and anodic peak potentials of the ruthenium complex shift to more positive values on increasing the DNA concentration, this behavior being a direct consequence of the interaction of both the reduced and oxidized form with DNA binding. From spectrophotometric titration experiments, the equilibrium binding constant and the number of monomer units of the polymer involved in the binding of one ruthenium molecule (site size) have been quantified. The intrinsic circular dichroism (CD) spectra show an unwinding and a conformational change of the DNA helix upon interaction of the ruthenium complex. Quenching process, thermal denaturation experiments and induced circular dichroism (ICD) are consistent with a partial intercalative binding mode. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and multi-spectroscopic DNA interaction studies of a new platinum complex containing the drug metformin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Heidari, Leila

    2014-07-01

    A new platinum(II) complex; [Pt(Met)(DMSO)Cl]Cl in which Met = metformin and DMSO: dimethylsulfoxide, was synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, IR, UV-Vis spectra, molar conductivity and computational methods. Binding interaction of this complex with calf thymus (CT) DNA has been investigated by using absorption, emission, circular dichroism, viscosity measurements, differential pulse voltammetry and cleavage studies by agarose gel electrophoresis. UV-Vis absorption studies showed hyperchromism. CD studies showed less perturbation on the base stacking and helicity bands in the CD spectrum of CT-DNA (B → C structural transition). In fluorimeteric studies, the Pt(II) complex can bind with DNA-NR complex and forms a new non-fluorescence adduct. The anodic peak current in the differential pulse voltammogram of the Pt(II) complex decreased gradually with the addition of DNA. Cleavage experiments showed that the Pt(II) complex does not induce any cleavage under the experimental setup. Finally all results indicated that Pt(II) complex interact with DNA via groove binding mode.

  4. Role of the LEXE Motif of Protein-primed DNA Polymerases in the Interaction with the Incoming Nucleotide*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Eugenia; Lázaro, José M.; Pérez-Arnaiz, Patricia; Salas, Margarita; de Vega, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The LEXE motif, conserved in eukaryotic type DNA polymerases, is placed close to the polymerization active site. Previous studies suggested that the second Glu was involved in binding a third noncatalytic ion in bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase. In the protein-primed DNA polymerase subgroup, the LEXE motif lacks the first Glu in most cases, but it has a conserved Phe/Trp and a Gly preceding that position. To ascertain the role of those residues, we have analyzed the behavior of mutants at the corresponding φ29 DNA polymerase residues Gly-481, Trp-483, Ala-484, and Glu-486. We show that mutations at Gly-481 and Trp-483 hamper insertion of the incoming dNTP in the presence of Mg2+ ions, a reaction highly improved when Mn2+ was used as metal activator. These results, together with previous crystallographic resolution of φ29 DNA polymerase ternary complex, allow us to infer that Gly-481 and Trp-483 could form a pocket that orients Val-250 to interact with the dNTP. Mutants at Glu-486 are also defective in polymerization and, as mutants at Gly-481 and Trp-483, in the pyrophosphorolytic activity with Mg2+. Recovery of both reactions with Mn2+ supports a role for Glu-486 in the interaction with the pyrophosphate moiety of the dNTP. PMID:24324256

  5. Synthesis, characterization and multi-spectroscopic DNA interaction studies of a new platinum complex containing the drug metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Heidari, Leila

    2014-07-15

    A new platinum(II) complex; [Pt(Met)(DMSO)Cl]Cl in which Met = metformin and DMSO: dimethylsulfoxide, was synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, IR, UV-Vis spectra, molar conductivity and computational methods. Binding interaction of this complex with calf thymus (CT) DNA has been investigated by using absorption, emission, circular dichroism, viscosity measurements, differential pulse voltammetry and cleavage studies by agarose gel electrophoresis. UV-Vis absorption studies showed hyperchromism. CD studies showed less perturbation on the base stacking and helicity bands in the CD spectrum of CT-DNA (B→C structural transition). In fluorimeteric studies, the Pt(II) complex can bind with DNA-NR complex and forms a new non-fluorescence adduct. The anodic peak current in the differential pulse voltammogram of the Pt(II) complex decreased gradually with the addition of DNA. Cleavage experiments showed that the Pt(II) complex does not induce any cleavage under the experimental setup. Finally all results indicated that Pt(II) complex interact with DNA via groove binding mode.

  6. Subunit interaction and regulation of activity through terminal domains of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y; Tang, X-F; Matsui, E; Matsui, I

    2004-04-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) has recently been found in the Euryarchaeota subdomain of Archaea. Its genes are adjacent to several other genes related to DNA replication, repair and recombination in the genome, suggesting that this enzyme may be the major DNA replicase in Euryarchaeota. We successfully cloned, expressed, and purified the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PolDPho). By site-directed mutagenesis, we identified amino acid residues Asp-1122 and Asp-1124 of a large subunit as the essential residues responsible for DNA-polymerizing activity. We analysed the domain structure using proteins truncated at the N- and C-termini of both small and large subunits (DP1Pho and DP2Pho), and identified putative regions responsible for subunit interaction, oligomerization and regulation of the 3'-5' exonuclease activity in PolDPho. It was also found that the internal region of the putative zinc finger motif (cysteine cluster II) at the C-terminal of DP2Pho is involved in the 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Using gel filtration analysis, we determined the molecular masses of the recombinant PolDPho and the N-terminal putative dimerization domain of the large subunit, and proposed that PolD from P. horikoshii probably forms a heterotetrameric structure in solution. Based on these results, a model regarding the subunit interaction and regulation of activity of PolDPho is proposed.

  7. DMPD: Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14751759 Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withTo...;16(1):17-22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of... CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. PubmedID 14751759 Title Signal transduction pa

  8. An interaction between teh DNA repair factor XPA and replication protein A appears essential for nucleotide excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lei; Lu, Xiaoyan; Peterson, C.A.; Legerski, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is required for simian virus 40-directed DNA replication in vitro and for nucleotide excision repair (NER). Here we report that RPA and the human repair protein XPA specifically interact both in vitro and in vivo. Mapping of the RPA-interactive domains in XPA revealed that both of the largest subunits of RPA, RPA-70 and RPA-34, interact with XPA at distinct sites. A domain involved in mediating the interaction with RPA-70 was located between XPA residues 153 and 176. Deletion of highly conserved motifs within this region identified two mutants that were deficient in binding RPA in vitro and highly defective in NER both in vitro and in vivo. The second domain mediating the interaction with RPA-34 was identified within the first 58 residues in XPA. Deletion of this region, however, only moderately affects the complementing activity of XPA in vivo. Finally, the XPA-RPA complex is shown to have a greater affinity for damaged DNA than XPA alone. Taken together, these results indicate that the interaction between XPA and RPA is required for NER but that only the interaction with RPA-70 is essential. 52 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Potential bioactive Schiff base compounds: Synthesis, characterization, X-ray structures, biological screenings and interaction with Salmon sperm DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirajuddin, Muhammad; Uddin, Noor; Ali, Saqib; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz

    2013-12-01

    Three Schiff base compounds ofN‧-substituted benzohydrazide and sulfonohydrazide derivatives: N‧-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-4-tert-butyl- benzohydrazide (1), N‧-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene)-4-tert-butylbenzohydrazide (2) and N‧-(2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylidene)-4-methylbenzenesulfonohydrazide (3) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H, 13C NMR spectroscopy and single crystal analysis. The title compounds have been screened for their biological activities including, antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant, cytotoxic, enzymatic activities as well as interaction with SS-DNA which showed remarkable activities in each area of research. The DNA binding of the compounds 1-3 with SS-DNA has been carried out with absorption spectroscopy, which reveals the binding propensity towards SS-DNA via intercalation mode of interaction. The intercalative mode of interaction is also supported by viscometric results. The synthesized compounds were also found to be effective against alkaline phosphatase enzyme. They also show significant to good antimicrobial activity against six bacterial and five fungal strains. The MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) for antibacterial activity ranges from 1.95-500 μg/mL. Compounds 1-3 show cytotoxic activity comparable to the control. At higher conc. (100 μg/L) compound 3 shows 100% activity means that it has killed all brine shrimps. They were also found to be effective antioxidant of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and show almost comparable antioxidant activity to that of the standard and known antioxidant, ascorbic acid.

  10. INO80 and gamma-H2AX interaction links ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling to DNA damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ashby J; Highland, Jessica; Krogan, Nevan J; Arbel-Eden, Ayelet; Greenblatt, Jack F; Haber, James E; Shen, Xuetong

    2004-12-17

    While the role of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in transcription is well established, a link between chromatin remodeling and DNA repair has remained elusive. We have found that the evolutionarily conserved INO80 chromatin remodeling complex directly participates in the repair of a double-strand break (DSB) in yeast. The INO80 complex is recruited to a HO endonuclease-induced DSB through a specific interaction with the DNA damage-induced phosphorylated histone H2A (gamma-H2AX). This interaction requires Nhp10, an HMG-like subunit of the INO80 complex. The loss of Nhp10 or gamma-H2AX results in reduced INO80 recruitment to the DSB. Finally, components of the INO80 complex show synthetic genetic interactions with the RAD52 DNA repair pathway, the main pathway for DSB repair in yeast. Our findings reveal a new role of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling in nuclear processes and suggest that an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex can read a DNA repair histone code.

  11. Theoretical and Instrumental Studies of the Competitive Interaction Between Aromatic α-Aminobisphosphonates with DNA Using Binding Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholivand, M B; Peyman, H; Gholivand, Kh; Roshanfekr, H; Taherpour, A A; Yaghobi, R

    2017-07-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, viscometry, cyclic voltammetry (CV), and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were applied to investigate the competitive interaction of DNA with two aromatic α-aminobisphosphonates and neutral red dye (NR, intercalator) and Hoechst (Ho, groove binder) as spectroscopic probes, in a Tris-hydrogen chloride buffer solution (pH 7.4). The principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to determine the number of chemical components presented in complexation equilibrium of DNA with the aromatic α-aminobisphosphonates (B1 and B2). The spectroscopic and voltammetric studies showed that the groove binding mode of interaction is predominant in the solution containing DNA and α-aminobisphosphonates. Furthermore, the results indicated that α-aminobisphosphonate with the lengthy N-alkyl chains had a stronger interaction. The PCA and theoretical quantum mechanical and molecular mechanic methods were also utilized to determine the structure of DNA with the two α-aminobisphosphonates (B1 and B2).

  12. Effect of the interaction between M-CSF and MCM7 on DNA replication in HeLa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Meng-xia; WU Hai-yan; TU Jian; ZHANG Xiao-hong; LE Xiao-yong; TANG Sheng-song

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of the interaction between microphage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and minichromosome maintenance protein-7(Mcm7) on DNA replication in HeLa cells. Methods pCMV/nuc/mye, pCMV/nuc/GFP and pCMV/nuc/M-CSF vector were stably transfected into HeLa cells by Lipofectarnine, respectively. After screening with G418, the expression and localization of M-CSF in HeLa cells were verified by RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluoreseence staining. The statue and interaction between intracellular M-CSF and Mcm7 in HeLa cells was analyzed by co-immunoprecipitation. The effect of the interaction between M-CSF and Mcm7 on DNA replication was analyzed by a mammalian cell or cell-free DNA replication system in vitro. Results The results indicated that the M-CSF-transfected HeLa cells stably express both M-CSF mRNA and protein, and that M-CSF protein is located to the nuclei of HeLa cells mentioned above. To further analyze the status and interaction between intracellular M-CSF and Mcm7, the Mcm7 from HeLa cells was precipitated with anti-Mcm7 antibody and followed by Protein A/G PLUS agarose. The precipitation was blotted with anti-M-CSF monoclonal antibody. The results show that M-CSF was coprecipitated with Mcm7, so intracellular M-CSF existed in Mcm7-bound state. The DNA replication experiments reveal that a higher percentage of the replicating nuclei is present either in unsyn-chronized or in both synchronized G1 and S phase M-CSF-transfected HeLa cells, compared with both pCMV/nuc-transfeeted and un-transfected HeLa cells, which suggests that interaction between M-CSF and Mcm7 promote both the initiation and elongation of DNA replication. Conclusions M-CSF directly interacts with McmT. The interaction between M-CSF and Mcm7 promotes both the initiation and elongation of DNA replication.

  13. Human RECQ1 interacts with Ku70/80 and modulates DNA end-joining of double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swetha Parvathaneni

    Full Text Available Genomic instability is a known precursor to cancer and aging. The RecQ helicases are a highly conserved family of DNA-unwinding enzymes that play key roles in maintaining genome stability in all living organisms. Human RecQ homologs include RECQ1, BLM, WRN, RECQ4, and RECQ5β, three of which have been linked to diseases with elevated risk of cancer and growth defects (Bloom Syndrome and Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome or premature aging (Werner Syndrome. RECQ1, the first RecQ helicase discovered and the most abundant in human cells, is the least well understood of the five human RecQ homologs. We have previously described that knockout of RECQ1 in mice or knockdown of its expression in human cells results in elevated frequency of spontaneous sister chromatid exchanges, chromosomal instability, increased load of DNA damage and heightened sensitivity to ionizing radiation. We have now obtained evidence implicating RECQ1 in the nonhomologous end-joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. We show that RECQ1 interacts directly with the Ku70/80 subunit of the DNA-PK complex, and depletion of RECQ1 results in reduced end-joining in cell free extracts. In vitro, RECQ1 binds and unwinds the Ku70/80-bound partial duplex DNA substrate efficiently. Linear DNA is co-bound by RECQ1 and Ku70/80, and DNA binding by Ku70/80 is modulated by RECQ1. Collectively, these results provide the first evidence for an interaction of RECQ1 with Ku70/80 and a role of the human RecQ helicase in double-strand break repair through nonhomologous end-joining.

  14. Anticancer drug mithramycin interacts with core histones: An additional mode of action of the DNA groove binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mithramycin (MTR is a clinically approved DNA-binding antitumor antibiotic currently in Phase 2 clinical trials at National Institutes of Health for treatment of osteosarcoma. In view of the resurgence in the studies of this generic antibiotic as a human medicine, we have examined the binding properties of MTR with the integral component of chromatin – histone proteins – as a part of our broad objective to classify DNA-binding molecules in terms of their ability to bind chromosomal DNA alone (single binding mode or both histones and chromosomal DNA (dual binding mode. The present report shows that besides DNA, MTR also binds to core histones present in chromatin and thus possesses the property of dual binding in the chromatin context. In contrast to the MTR–DNA interaction, association of MTR with histones does not require obligatory presence of bivalent metal ion like Mg2+. As a consequence of its ability to interact with core histones, MTR inhibits histone H3 acetylation at lysine 18, an important signature of active chromatin, in vitro and ex vivo. Reanalysis of microarray data of Ewing sarcoma cell lines shows that upon MTR treatment there is a significant down regulation of genes, possibly implicating a repression of H3K18Ac-enriched genes apart from DNA-binding transcription factors. Association of MTR with core histones and its ability to alter post-translational modification of histone H3 clearly indicates an additional mode of action of this anticancer drug that could be implicated in novel therapeutic strategies.

  15. Interactions between the R2R3-MYB transcription factor, AtMYB61, and target DNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Prouse

    Full Text Available Despite the prominent roles played by R2R3-MYB transcription factors in the regulation of plant gene expression, little is known about the details of how these proteins interact with their DNA targets. For example, while Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB protein AtMYB61 is known to alter transcript abundance of a specific set of target genes, little is known about the specific DNA sequences to which AtMYB61 binds. To address this gap in knowledge, DNA sequences bound by AtMYB61 were identified using cyclic amplification and selection of targets (CASTing. The DNA targets identified using this approach corresponded to AC elements, sequences enriched in adenosine and cytosine nucleotides. The preferred target sequence that bound with the greatest affinity to AtMYB61 recombinant protein was ACCTAC, the AC-I element. Mutational analyses based on the AC-I element showed that ACC nucleotides in the AC-I element served as the core recognition motif, critical for AtMYB61 binding. Molecular modelling predicted interactions between AtMYB61 amino acid residues and corresponding nucleotides in the DNA targets. The affinity between AtMYB61 and specif