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Sample records for denervated outer molecular

  1. Molecular identity of human outer radial glia during cortical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollen, Alex A; Nowakowski, Tomasz J; Chen, Jiadong; Retallack, Hanna; Sandoval-Espinosa, Carmen; Nicholas, Cory R; Shuga, Joe; Liu, Siyuan John; Oldham, Michael C; Diaz, Aaron; Lim, Daniel A; Leyrat, Anne A; West, Jay A; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2015-09-24

    Radial glia, the neural stem cells of the neocortex, are located in two niches: the ventricular zone and outer subventricular zone. Although outer subventricular zone radial glia may generate the majority of human cortical neurons, their molecular features remain elusive. By analyzing gene expression across single cells, we find that outer radial glia preferentially express genes related to extracellular matrix formation, migration, and stemness, including TNC, PTPRZ1, FAM107A, HOPX, and LIFR. Using dynamic imaging, immunostaining, and clonal analysis, we relate these molecular features to distinctive behaviors of outer radial glia, demonstrate the necessity of STAT3 signaling for their cell cycle progression, and establish their extensive proliferative potential. These results suggest that outer radial glia directly support the subventricular niche through local production of growth factors, potentiation of growth factor signals by extracellular matrix proteins, and activation of self-renewal pathways, thereby enabling the developmental and evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex.

  2. The Equilibrium State of Molecular Regions in the Outer Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Heyer, M H; Snell, R L

    2001-01-01

    A summary of global properties and an evaluation of the equilibrium state of molecular regions in the outer Galaxy are presented from the decomposition of the FCRAO Outer Galaxy Survey and targeted 12CO and 13CO observations of four giant molecular cloud complexes. The ensemble of identified objects includes both small, isolated clouds and clumps within larger cloud complexes. 12CO velocity dispersions show little variation with cloud sizes for radii less than 10 pc. It is demonstrated that the internal motions of regions with molecular masses greater than 10**4 msuns are bound by self gravity, yet, the constituent clumps of cloud complexes and isolated molecular clouds with M < 10**3 msuns are not in self gravitational equilibrium. The required external pressures to maintain the equilibrium of this population are (1-2)x10**4 cm-3-K.

  3. Survey of Outer Galaxy Molecular Lines Associated with Water Masers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, N.; Hachisuka, K.; Umemoto, T.

    2009-08-01

    H_2O masers in Young stellar objects (YSOs) in our Galaxy are one of the targets of the VSOP-2 science. The advantage of VSOP-2 observation is the highest angular resolution which can detect a proper motion of H_2O masers for distant objects over short time intervals. To find candidate sources, we observed H2O maser sources in the outer Galaxy using the VLA, and we surveyed the molecular lines toward these sources to understand the environment of YSOs. Higher H2 column densities of YSOs were found for objects with active H2O masers.

  4. Eligibility for renal denervation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persu, Alexandre; Jin, Yu; Baelen, Marie;

    2014-01-01

    -resistant hypertension (ENCOReD). The analysis included 731 patients. Age averaged 61.6 years, office blood pressure at screening was 177/96 mm Hg, and the number of blood pressure-lowering drugs taken was 4.1. Specialists referred 75.6% of patients. The proportion of patients eligible for renal denervation according......Based on the SYMPLICITY studies and CE (Conformité Européenne) certification, renal denervation is currently applied as a novel treatment of resistant hypertension in Europe. However, information on the proportion of patients with resistant hypertension qualifying for renal denervation after...... undetected secondary causes of hypertension (11.1%). In conclusion, after careful screening and treatment adjustment at hypertension expert centers, only ≈40% of patients referred for renal denervation, mostly by specialists, were eligible for the procedure. The most frequent cause of ineligibility...

  5. MRI appearance of muscle denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, S. [University Hospital of Wales, Department of Radiology, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Venkatanarasimha, N.; Walsh, M.A.; Hughes, P.M. [Derriford Hospital, Department of Radiology, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Muscle denervation results from a variety of causes including trauma, neoplasia, neuropathies, infections, autoimmune processes and vasculitis. Traditionally, the diagnosis of muscle denervation was based on clinical examination and electromyography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a distinct advantage over electromyography, not only in diagnosing muscle denervation, but also in determining its aetiology. MRI demonstrates characteristic signal intensity patterns depending on the stage of muscle denervation. The acute and subacutely denervated muscle shows a high signal intensity pattern on fluid sensitive sequences and normal signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI images. In chronic denervation, muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration demonstrate high signal changes on T1-weighted sequences in association with volume loss. The purpose of this review is to summarise the MRI appearance of denervated muscle, with special emphasis on the signal intensity patterns in acute and subacute muscle denervation. (orig.)

  6. Nandrolone reduces activation of Notch signaling in denervated muscle associated with increased Numb expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin-Hua [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Yao, Shen; Qiao, Rui-Fang; Levine, Alice C. [Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Kirschenbaum, Alexander [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Qin, Weiping [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Bauman, William A. [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Rehabilitation Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Cardozo, Christopher P., E-mail: chris.cardozo@mssm.edu [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Rehabilitation Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Nerve transection increased Notch signaling in paralyzed muscle. {yields} Nandrolone prevented denervation-induced Notch signaling. {yields} Nandrolone induced the expression of an inhibitor of the Notch signaling, Numb. {yields} Reduction of denervation-induced Notch signaling by nandrolone is likely through upregulation of Numb. -- Abstract: Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, slows denervation-atrophy in rat muscle. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are not well understood. Androgens and anabolic steroids activate Notch signaling in animal models of aging and thereby mitigate sarcopenia. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which nandrolone prevents denervation-atrophy, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on Notch signaling in denervated rat gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation significantly increased Notch activity reflected by elevated levels of nuclear Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and expression of Hey1 (a Notch target gene). Activation was greatest at 7 and 35 days after denervation but remained present at 56 days after denervation. Activation of Notch in denervated muscle was prevented by nandrolone associated with upregulated expression of Numb mRNA and protein. These data demonstrate that denervation activates Notch signaling, and that nandrolone abrogates this response associated with increased expression of Numb, suggesting a potential mechanism by which nandrolone reduces denervation-atrophy.

  7. Renal denervation and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaich, Markus P; Krum, Henry; Sobotka, Paul A; Esler, Murray D

    2011-06-01

    Essential hypertension remains one of the biggest challenges in medicine with an enormous impact on both individual and society levels. With the exception of relatively rare monogenetic forms of hypertension, there is now general agreement that the condition is multifactorial in nature and hence requires therapeutic approaches targeting several aspects of the underlying pathophysiology. Accordingly, all major guidelines promote a combination of lifestyle interventions and combination pharmacotherapy to reach target blood pressure (BP) levels in order to reduce overall cardiovascular risk in affected patients. Although this approach works for many, it fails in a considerable number of patients for various reasons including drug-intolerance, noncompliance, physician inertia, and others, leaving them at unacceptably high cardiovascular risk. The quest for additional therapeutic approaches to safely and effectively manage hypertension continues and expands to the reappraisal of older concepts such as renal denervation. Based on the robust preclinical and clinical data surrounding the role of renal sympathetic nerves in various aspects of BP control very recent efforts have led to the development of a novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency (RF) energy to selectively target and disrupt the renal nerves. The available evidence from the limited number of uncontrolled hypertensive patients in whom renal denervation has been performed are auspicious and indicate that the procedure has a favorable safety profile and is associated with a substantial and presumably sustained BP reduction. Although promising, a myriad of questions are far from being conclusively answered and require our concerted research efforts to explore the full potential and possible risks of this approach. Here we briefly review the science surrounding renal denervation, summarize the current data on safety and efficacy of renal nerve ablation, and discuss some of the open questions that need

  8. Molecular gas and a new young stellar cluster in the far outer Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, Joao L; Palmeirim, Pedro M; Gomes, Joana I; Martins, Andre M

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the star-formation ocurring in the region towards IRAS07527-3446 in the molecular cloud [MAB97]250.63-3.63, in the far outer Galaxy. We report the discovery of a new young stellar cluster, and describe its properties and those of its parent molecular cloud. Near-infrared JHKS images were obtained with VLT/ISAAC, and millimetre line CO spectra were obtained with the SEST telescope. VLA archive date were also used. The cloud and cluster are located at a distance of 10.3 kpc and a Galactocentric distance of 15.4 kpc, in the far outer Galaxy. Morphologically, IRAS 07527-3446 appears as a young embedded cluster of a few hundred stars seen towards the position of the IRAS source, extending for about 2-4 pc and exhibiting sub-clustering. The cluster contains low and intermediate-mass young reddened stars, a large fraction having cleared the inner regions of their circumstellar discs responsible for (H-Ks) colour excess. The observations are compatible with a < 5 Myr cluster with variable spatial ex...

  9. Molecular gas and a new young stellar cluster in the far outer Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, J. L.; Elia, D.; Palmeirim, P. M.; Gomes, J. I.; Martins, A. M.

    2009-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the star-formation ocurring in the region towards IRAS 07527-3446 in the molecular cloud [MAB97]250.63-3.63, in the far outer Galaxy. We report the discovery of a new young stellar cluster, and describe its properties and those of its parent molecular cloud. Methods: Near-infrared JHKS images were obtained with VLT/ISAAC, and millimetre line CO spectra were obtained with the SEST telescope. VLA archive date were also used. Results: The cloud and cluster are located at a distance of 10.3 kpc and a Galactocentric distance of 15.4 kpc, in the far outer Galaxy. Morphologically, IRAS 07527-3446 appears as a young embedded cluster of a few hundred stars seen towards the position of the IRAS source, extending for about 2-4 pc and exhibiting sub-clustering. The cluster contains low and intermediate-mass young reddened stars, a large fraction having cleared the inner regions of their circumstellar discs responsible for (H-K_S) colour excess. The observations are compatible with a ≤5 Myr cluster with variable spatial extinction of between A_V=5 and A_V=11. Decomposition of CO emission in clumps, reveals a clump clearly associated with the cluster position, of mass 3.3 × 103 M_⊙. Estimates of the slopes of the K_S-band luminosity function and of the star-formation efficiency yield values similar to those seen in nearby star-formation sites. These findings reinforce previous results that the distant outer Galaxy continues to be active in the production of new and rich stellar clusters, with the physical conditions required for the formation of rich clusters continuing to be met in the very distant environment of the outer Galactic disc. Based on observations collected at the ESO 8.2-m VLT-UT1 Antu telescope (program 66.C-0015A). Table 2 is only available in electonic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Molecular and virulence characteristics of an outer membrane-associated RTX exoprotein in Pasteurella pneumotropica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawamoto Eiichi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pasteurella pneumotropica is a ubiquitous bacterium that is frequently isolated from laboratory rodents and causes various clinical symptoms in immunodeficient animals. Currently two RTX toxins, PnxIA and PnxIIA, which are similar to hemolysin-like high-molecular-weight exoproteins are known in this species. In this study, we identified and analyzed a further RTX toxin named PnxIIIA and the corresponding type I secretion system. Results The RTX exoprotein, PnxIIIA, contains only a few copies of the RTX repeat-like sequence and 3 large repeat sequences that are partially similar to the outer membrane protein found in several prokaryotes. Recombinant PnxIIIA protein (rPnxIIIA was cytotoxic toward J774A.1 mouse macrophage cells, whereas cytotoxicity was attenuated by the addition of anti-CD11a monoclonal antibody. rPnxIIIA could bind to extracellular matrices (ECMs and cause hemagglutination of sheep erythrocytes. Binding was dependent on the 3 large repeat sequences in PnxIIIA. Protein interaction analyses indicated that PnxIIIA is mainly localized in the outer membrane of P. pneumotropica ATCC 35149 in a self-assembled oligomeric form. PnxIIIA is less cytotoxic to J774A.1 cells than PnxIA and PnxIIA. Conclusions The results implicate that PnxIIIA is located on the cell surface and participates in adhesion to ECMs and enhanced hemagglutination in the rodent pathogen P. pneumotropica.

  11. Outer membrane cytochromes/flavin interactions in Shewanella spp.-A molecular perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babanova, Sofia; Matanovic, Ivana; Cornejo, Jose; Bretschger, Orianna; Nealson, Kenneth; Atanassov, Plamen

    2017-05-31

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is intrinsically associated with the core phenomena of energy harvesting/energy conversion in natural ecosystems and biotechnology applications. However, the mechanisms associated with EET are complex and involve molecular interactions that take place at the "bionano interface" where biotic/abiotic interactions are usually explored. This work provides molecular perspective on the electron transfer mechanism(s) employed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Molecular docking simulations were used to explain the interfacial relationships between two outer-membrane cytochromes (OMC) OmcA and MtrC and riboflavin (RF) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN), respectively. OMC-flavin interactions were analyzed by studying the electrostatic potential, the hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface properties, and the van der Waals surface of the OMC proteins. As a result, it was proposed that the interactions between flavins and OMCs are based on geometrical recognition event. The possible docking positions of RF and FMN to OmcA and MtrC were also shown.

  12. The missing link: tracing molecular gas in the outer filament of Centaurus A

    CERN Document Server

    Morganti, Raffaella; Oonk, J B Raymond; Santoro, Francesco; Tadhunter, Clive

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection, using observations of the CO(2-1) line performed with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, of molecular gas in the region of the outer filament of Centaurus A, a complex region known to show various signatures of an interaction between the radio jet, an HI cloud and ionised gas filaments. We detect CO(2-1) at all observed locations, which were selected to represent regions with very different physical conditions. The H_2 masses of the detections range between 0.2 x 10^6 and 1.1 x 10^6 msun, for conservative choices of the CO-to-H_2 conversion factor. Surprisingly, the stronger detections are not coincident with the HI cloud, but instead are in the region of the ionised filaments. We also find variations in the widths of the CO(2-1) lines throughout the region, with broader lines in the region of the ionised gas, i.e. where the jet-cloud interaction is strongest, and narrow profiles in the HI cloud. This may indicate that the molecular gas in the region of the ionised gas has the momentu...

  13. Molecular recognition in myxobacterial outer membrane exchange: Functional, social and evolutionary implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Through cooperative interactions, bacteria can build multicellular communities. To ensure that productive interactions occur, bacteria must recognize their neighbors and respond accordingly. Molecular recognition between cells is thus a fundamental behavior, and in bacteria important discoveries have been made. This MicroReview focuses on a recently described recognition system in myxobacteria that is governed by a polymorphic cell surface receptor called TraA. TraA regulates outer membrane exchange (OME), whereby myxobacterial cells transiently fuse their OMs to efficiently transfer proteins and lipids between cells. Unlike other transport systems, OME is rather indiscriminate in what OM goods are transferred. In contrast, the recognition of partnering cells is discriminatory and only occurs between cells that bear identical or closely related TraA proteins. Therefore TraA functions in kin recognition and, in turn, OME helps regulate social interactions between myxobacteria. Here, I discuss and speculate on the social and evolutionary implications of OME and suggest it helps to guide their transition from free-living cells into coherent and functional populations. PMID:24261719

  14. Denervation alters protein-lipid interactions in membrane fractions from electrocytes of Electrophorus electricus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriviera, M L; Louro, S R; Wajnberg, E; Hasson-Voloch, A

    2001-06-15

    Protein-lipid interactions are studied in normal and denervated electrocytes from Electrophorus electricus (L.). Structural modifications of the lipid micro-environment encircling integral membrane proteins in membrane fractions presenting Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity are investigated using ESR spectroscopy of stearic acid spin labeled at the 14th carbon (14-SASL). The microsomal fraction derived from the innervated electric organ exhibits, on a discontinuous sucrose gradient, a bimodal distribution of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, bands a and b. Band b is almost absent in microsomes from the denervated organ, and band a', with the same density as band a has lower Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. Band a' presents a larger ratio of protein-interacting lipids than band a. Analysis of the lipid stoichiometry at the protein interface indicates that denervation causes at least a twofold average decrease on protein oligomerization. Physical inactivity and denervation have similar effects on protein-lipid interactions. Denervation also influences the selectivity of proteins for fatty acids. Experiments in decreasing pH conditions performed to verify the influence of stearic acid negative charge on protein interaction revealed that denervation produces loss of charge selectivity. The observed modifications on molecular interactions induced by denervation may have importance to explain modulation of enzyme activity.

  15. Increase in norepinephrine-induced formation of phosphatidic acid in rat vas deferens after denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenawa, T; Masaki, T; Goto, K

    1983-01-01

    Surgical denervation of rat vas deferens causes supersensitivity in that the tissue sensitivity and the maximum response to a variety of agonists increase. To understand the molecular mechanism of supersensitivity in smooth muscle, norepinephrine(NE)-induced alteration in phospholipid metabolism was studied using control and denervated vasa deferentia. When the tissue was stimulated by NE, only [32P]Pi incorporation into phosphatidic acid(PA) was increased in proportion to the increase in NE concentration without any significant effect on that into other phospholipids. This PA labeling was significantly accelerated by denervation. In the denervated tissue, PA labeling was stimulated by lower concentrations of NE and the maximum response to NE was increased compared to the control. The breakdown of phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate(DPI) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate (TPI) was also accelerated by NE. But the influence of denervation on this NE-induced DPI and TPI was not marked. Therefore, it is likely that denervation clearly enhanced NE-induced PA labeling without an appreciable effect on that of the other phospholipids. Furthermore, the absolute amount of PA was also increased by NE, and this increase was exaggerated by denervation. Considering that PA can behave as a Ca2+ ionophore in the plasma membrane, these results suggest that the stimulated accumulation of PA plays an important role in receptor-linked supersensitivity in smooth muscle.

  16. Renal denervation for resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Manuel de Sousa; Gonçalves, Pedro de Araújo; Oliveira, Eduardo Infante de; Carvalho, Henrique Cyrne de

    2015-02-01

    There is a marked contrast between the high prevalence of hypertension and the low rates of adequate control. A subset of patients with suboptimal blood pressure control have drug-resistant hypertension, in the pathophysiology of which chronic sympathetic hyperactivation is significantly involved. Sympathetic renal denervation has recently emerged as a device-based treatment for resistant hypertension. In this review, the pathophysiological mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous system and cardiovascular disease are reviewed, focusing on resistant hypertension and the role of sympathetic renal denervation. An update on experimental and clinical results is provided, along with potential future indications for this device-based technique in other cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Reversible bladder denervation in acute polyradiculitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Andersen, J T

    1982-01-01

    A case of reversible bladder denervation in acute polyradiculitis is presented, in which both motor and sensory bladder involvement could be demonstrated using cystometry and denervation-hypersensitivity testing. Attention is drawn to the differential diagnosis to cauda equina syndromes of other ...

  18. Molecular Chaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 Prepares the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Translocon Receptor Tom71 for Preprotein Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jingzhi; Qian, Xinguo; Hu, Junbin; Sha, Bingdong; (UAB)

    2010-11-03

    The preproteins targeted to the mitochondria are transported through the translocase of the outer membrane complex. Tom70/Tom71 is a major surface receptor of the translocase of the outer membrane complex for mitochondrial preproteins. The preproteins are escorted to Tom70/Tom71 by molecular chaperones Hsp70 and Hsp90. Here we present the high resolution crystal structures of Tom71 and the protein complexes between Tom71 and the Hsp70/Hsp90 C terminus. The crystal structures indicate that Tom70/Tom71 may exhibit two distinct states. In the closed state, the N-terminal domain of Tom70/Tom71 partially blocks the preprotein-binding pocket. In the open state, the N-terminal domain moves away, and the preprotein-binding pocket is fully exposed. The complex formation between the C-terminal EEVD motif of Hsp70/Hsp90 and Tom71 could lock Tom71 in the open state where the preprotein-binding pocket of Tom71 is ready to receive preproteins. The interactions between Hsp70/Hsp90 and Tom71 N-terminal domain generate conformational changes that may increase the volume of the preprotein-binding pocket. The complex formation of Hsp70/Hsp90 and Tom71 also generates significant domain rearrangement within Tom71, which may position the preprotein-binding pocket closer to Hsp70/Hsp90 to facilitate the preprotein transfer from the molecular chaperone to Tom71. Therefore, molecular chaperone Hsp70/Hsp90 may function to prepare the mitochondrial outer membrane receptor Tom71 for preprotein loading.

  19. Inner/Outer nuclear membrane fusion in nuclear pore assembly: biochemical demonstration and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtman, Boris; Ramos, Corinne; Rasala, Beth; Harel, Amnon; Forbes, Douglass J

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large proteinaceous channels embedded in double nuclear membranes, which carry out nucleocytoplasmic exchange. The mechanism of nuclear pore assembly involves a unique challenge, as it requires creation of a long-lived membrane-lined channel connecting the inner and outer nuclear membranes. This stabilized membrane channel has little evolutionary precedent. Here we mapped inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion in NPC assembly biochemically by using novel assembly intermediates and membrane fusion inhibitors. Incubation of a Xenopus in vitro nuclear assembly system at 14°C revealed an early pore intermediate where nucleoporin subunits POM121 and the Nup107-160 complex were organized in a punctate pattern on the inner nuclear membrane. With time, this intermediate progressed to diffusion channel formation and finally to complete nuclear pore assembly. Correct channel formation was blocked by the hemifusion inhibitor lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), but not if a complementary-shaped lipid, oleic acid (OA), was simultaneously added, as determined with a novel fluorescent dextran-quenching assay. Importantly, recruitment of the bulk of FG nucleoporins, characteristic of mature nuclear pores, was not observed before diffusion channel formation and was prevented by LPC or OA, but not by LPC+OA. These results map the crucial inner/outer nuclear membrane fusion event of NPC assembly downstream of POM121/Nup107-160 complex interaction and upstream or at the time of FG nucleoporin recruitment.

  20. Quantitative ultrasound of denervated hand muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Neil G; Ralph, Jeffrey W; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Poncelet, Ann N; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C; Kliot, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Presentations to the neuromuscular clinic commonly involve hand muscle denervation, but few studies have evaluated hand muscle ultrasound. Ultrasound studies of abductor pollicis brevis, first dorsal interosseous, and abductor digit minimi were prospectively performed in a cohort of 34 patients (77 muscles) with electromyography (EMG)-confirmed denervation, compared with 58 healthy control subjects. In control subjects, muscle thickness was highly reproducible [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.88-0.98], and echogenicity was moderately reproducible (ICC = 0.542-0.686). Age, gender, and body mass index influenced muscle thickness and echogenicity. Ultrasound changes in denervated muscles correlated with the severity of EMG abnormalities. A z-score cutoff of 0 identified denervated muscles with a sensitivity of 100% and 89% for echogenicity and muscle thickness, respectively. Hand muscle ultrasound provides a noninvasive method to quantify muscle denervation and may be useful as a screening tool before EMG studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Renal denervation for resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppolino, Giuseppe; Pisano, Anna; Rivoli, Laura; Bolignano, Davide

    2017-02-21

    Resistant hypertension is highly prevalent among the general hypertensive population and the clinical management of this condition remains problematic. Different approaches, including a more intensified antihypertensive therapy, lifestyle modifications, or both, have largely failed to improve patients' outcomes and to reduce cardiovascular and renal risk. As renal sympathetic hyperactivity is a major driver of resistant hypertension, renal sympathetic ablation (renal denervation) has been recently proposed as a possible therapeutic alternative to treat this condition. We sought to evaluate the short- and long-term effects of renal denervation in individuals with resistant hypertension on clinical end points, including fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality, hospital admissions, quality of life, blood pressure control, left ventricular hypertrophy, cardiovascular and metabolic profile, and kidney function, as well as the potential adverse events related to the procedure. We searched the following databases to 17 February 2016 using relevant search terms: the Cochrane Hypertension Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and ClinicalTrials.gov SELECTION CRITERIA: We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared renal denervation to standard therapy or sham procedure to treat resistant hypertension, without language restriction. Two authors independently extracted data and assessed study risks of bias. We summarised treatment effects on available clinical outcomes and adverse events using random-effects meta-analyses. We assessed heterogeneity in estimated treatment effects using Chi² and I² statistics. We calculated summary treatment estimates as a mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) for continuous outcomes, and a risk ratio (RR) for dichotomous outcomes, together with their 95% confidence intervals (CI). We found 12 eligible studies (1149

  2. Inner and Outer Coordination Shells of Mg(2+) in CorA Selectivity Filter from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Wapeesittipan, Pattama; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2016-01-28

    Structural data of CorA Mg(2+) channels show that the five Gly-Met-Asn (GMN) motifs at the periplasmic loop of the pentamer structure form a molecular scaffold serving as a selectivity filter. Unfortunately, knowledge about the cation selectivity of Mg(2+) channels remains limited. Since Mg(2+) in aqueous solution has a strong first hydration shell and apparent second hydration sphere, the coordination structure of Mg(2+) in a CorA selectivity filter is expected to be different from that in bulk water. Hence, this study investigated the hydration structure and ligand coordination of Mg(2+) in a selectivity filter of CorA using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The simulations reveal that the inner-shell structure of Mg(2+) in the filter is not significantly different from that in aqueous solution. The major difference is the characteristic structural features of the outer shell. The GMN residues engage indirectly in the interactions with the metal ion as ligands in the second shell of Mg(2+). Loss of hydrogen bonds between inner- and outer-shell waters observed from Mg(2+) in bulk water is mostly compensated by interactions between waters in the first solvation shell and the GMN motif. Some water molecules in the second shell remain in the selectivity filter and become less mobile to support the metal binding. Removal of Mg(2+) from the divalent cation sensor sites of the protein had an impact on the structure and metal binding of the filter. From the results, it can be concluded that the GMN motif enhances the affinity of the metal binding site in the CorA selectivity filter by acting as an outer coordination ligand.

  3. Effects of electrical stimulation and stretching on the adaptation of denervated skeletal muscle: implications for physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvini, Tania F; Durigan, João L Q; Peviani, Sabrina M; Russo, Thiago L

    2012-06-01

    This review will describe the main cellular mechanisms involved in the reduction and increase of myoproteins synthesis commonly associated with muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, respectively. We analyzed the effects of electrical stimulation (ES) and stretching exercise on the molecular pathways involved in muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. We also described the main effects and limits of these resources in the skeletal muscle, particularly on the denervated muscle. Recently, our studies showed that the ES applied in a similar manner as performed in clinical practice is able to attenuate the increase of genes expression involved in muscle atrophy. However, ES was not effective to prevent the loss of muscle mass caused by denervation. Regarding to stretching exercises, their mechanisms of action on the denervated muscle are not fully understood and studies on this area are scarce. Studies from our laboratory have found that stretching exercise increased the extracellular matrix remodeling and decreased genes expression related to atrophy in denervated muscle. Nevertheless, it was not enough to prevent muscle atrophy after denervation. In spite of the use of stretching exercise and ES in clinical practice in order to minimize the atrophy of denervated muscle, there is still lack of scientific evidence to justify the effectiveness of these resources to prevent muscle atrophy in denervated muscle.

  4. Chemical Renal Denervation in the Rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consigny, Paul M., E-mail: paul.consigny@av.abbott.com; Davalian, Dariush, E-mail: dariush.davalian@av.abbott.com [Abbott Vascular, Innovation Incubator (United States); Donn, Rosy, E-mail: rosy.donn@av.abbott.com; Hu, Jie, E-mail: jie.hu@av.abbott.com [Abbott Vascular, Bioanalytical and Material Characterization (United States); Rieser, Matthew, E-mail: matthew.j.rieser@abbvie.com; Stolarik, DeAnne, E-mail: deanne.f.stolarik@abbvie.com [Abbvie, Analytical Pharmacology (United States)

    2013-12-03

    Introduction: The recent success of renal denervation in lowering blood pressure in drug-resistant hypertensive patients has stimulated interest in developing novel approaches to renal denervation including local drug/chemical delivery. The purpose of this study was to develop a rat model in which depletion of renal norepinephrine (NE) could be used to determine the efficacy of renal denervation after the delivery of a chemical to the periadventitial space of the renal artery. Methods: Renal denervation was performed on a single renal artery of 90 rats (n = 6 rats/group). The first study determined the time course of renal denervation after surgical stripping of a renal artery plus the topical application of phenol in alcohol. The second study determined the efficacy of periadventitial delivery of hypertonic saline, guanethidine, and salicylic acid. The final study determined the dose–response relationship for paclitaxel. In all studies, renal NE content was determined by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. Results: Renal NE was depleted 3 and 7 days after surgical denervation. Renal NE was also depleted by periadventitial delivery of all agents tested (hypertonic saline, salicylic acid, guanethidine, and paclitaxel). A dose response was observed after the application of 150 μL of 10{sup −5} M through 10{sup −2} M paclitaxel. Conclusion: We developed a rat model in which depletion of renal NE was used to determine the efficacy of renal denervation after perivascular renal artery drug/chemical delivery. We validated this model by demonstrating the efficacy of the neurotoxic agents hypertonic saline, salicylic acid, and guanethidine and increasing doses of paclitaxel.

  5. Differential synaptic integration of interneurons in the outer and inner molecular layers of the developing dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittajallu, Ramesh; Kunze, Albrecht; Mangin, Jean-Marie; Gallo, Vittorio

    2007-08-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) undergoes continued reorganization and lamination during early postnatal development. Interneurons with anatomically identified synaptic contacts migrate from the outer to the inner regions of the molecular layer (ML) of the DG. By using the 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP)-enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse, we were able to target and physiologically characterize Dlx2(+) developing ML interneurons. We investigated whether synapses on migrating ML interneurons were functional and defined properties of synaptic inputs onto interneurons that were located in the outer ML (OML) or inner ML (IML). Consistent with ongoing maturation, IML interneurons displayed lower input resistances and more hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials than OML interneurons. Both OML and IML interneurons received a direct excitatory monosynaptic input from the entorhinal cortex via the perforant paths, but this input was differentially sensitive to activation of presynaptic group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors. Furthermore, only IML interneurons also received significant synaptic input from the CA3/hilar region, especially under conditions of experimentally induced disinhibition. These changes are attributed to a significant reorganization of dendritic fields. GABA(A) receptor-mediated innervation of OML and IML interneurons also displayed significant differences in miniature IPSC amplitude, frequency, and decay kinetics. Finally, cell-attached recordings indicated that GABA(A) receptor activation was depolarizing in OML interneurons but predominantly shunting in IML interneurons. Our data provide evidence that developing ML interneurons receive functional glutamatergic and GABAergic inputs and undergo significant changes in synaptic integration during migration from the OML to the IML.

  6. Imaging of denervation in the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093 Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com

    2010-05-15

    Denervation changes maybe the first sign of a cranial nerve injury. Recognition of denervation patterns can be used to determine the site and extent of a lesion and to tailor imaging studies according to the most likely location of an insult along the course of the affected cranial nerve(s). In addition, the extent of denervation can be used to predict functional recovery after treatment. On imaging, signs of denervation can be misleading as they often mimic recurrent neoplasm or inflammatory conditions. Imaging can both depict denervation related changes and establish its cause. This article briefly reviews the anatomy of the extracranial course of motor cranial nerves with particular emphasis on the muscles supplied by each nerve, the imaging features of the various stages of denervation, the different patterns of denervation that maybe helpful in the topographic diagnosis of nerve lesions and the most common causes of cranial nerve injuries leading to denervation.

  7. Photosynthesis of Carbon Dioxide from Carbon Surfaces Coated with Oxygen: Implications for Interstellar Molecular Clouds and the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulvio, D.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2012-06-01

    We investigate via infrared spectroscopy the synthesis of CO2 by ultraviolet irradiation (6.41 eV) of amorphous carbon covered with solid O2 at 21 K. Oxidation occurs at the O2-carbon interface promoted by photon excitation or dissociation of O2 molecules. The CO2 production is linear with photon fluence with a yield of 3.3 ± 0.3 × 10-5 CO2 photon-1 the yield does not decrease at high fluences (at least up to 2 × 1019 photons cm-2) since CO2 is not photodissociated at this photon energy. Replacing oxygen with water ice did not produce CO2 since H2O does not dissociate at this photon energy. The CO2 synthesis process discussed in this Letter does not require H2O or CO and may be important in cold astrophysical environments where O2 could be locally segregated on carbonaceous grains, such as in molecular clouds and icy objects in the outer solar system.

  8. Multiple conformational states and gate opening of outer membrane protein TolC revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beibei; Weng, Jingwei; Wang, Wenning

    2014-09-01

    Outer membrane protein TolC serves as an exit duct for exporting substances out of cell. The occluded periplasmic entrance of TolC is required to open for substrate transport, although the opening mechanism remains elusive. In this study, systematic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for wild type TolC and six mutants were performed to explore the conformational dynamics of TolC. The periplasmic gate was shown to sample multiple conformational states with various degrees of gating opening. The gate opening was facilitated by all mutations except Y362F, which adopts an even more closed state than wild type TolC. The interprotomer salt-bridge R367-D153 is turned out to be crucial for periplasmic gate opening. The mutations that disrupt the interactions at the periplasmic tip may affect the stability of the trimeric assembly of TolC. Structural asymmetry of the periplasmic gate was observed to be opening size dependent. Asymmetric conformations are found in moderately opening states, while the most and the least opening states are often more symmetric. Finally, it is shown that lowering pH can remarkably stabilize the closed state of the periplasmic gate.

  9. Changes following denervation to the masseter muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Masseter muscle nerve is often injured in mandible osteotomy. What changes in food intake and masseter muscle will be brought after masseter muscle nerve injury?OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to selectively establish animal models of denervated masseter muscle and investigate the effects of severing masseter muscular nerve on masseter muscle and animal's food intake. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized controlled animal experiment was performed at the Laboratory Animal Center, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University from September to November 2005. MATERIALS: A total of 50 healthy, adult, SPF-grade, New Zealand rabbits, of both genders, were used to develop an animal model of selectively denervated masseter muscle.METHODS: Five rabbits were randomly selected as normal controls. According to various mutilation methods, the remaining animals were randomly divided into 3 experimental groups, with 15 rabbits in each group: masseter muscular neural stem denervated, masseter muscular neural superior branch-denervated, and masseter muscular neural inferior branch-denervated groups. Self-control comparison was performed on each animal. The right masseter muscle served as the experimental side, and the left masseter muscle served as the control side. In each group, 3 time points (2, 8, and 24 weeks post-surgery) were allotted for observation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: At the pre-set time points, masseter muscular thickness was measured with a Logic 500 color Doppler ultrasonic diagnostic apparatus. Masseter muscle tissue was resected for hematoxylin eosin staining. Masseter muscular fiber diameter and area were measured with an optical microscope. Masseter muscle tissue was sectioned and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide tetrazolium oxidoreductase (NADH-TR) and adenosine triphosphatase staining were performed. Following staining, the sections were quantitatively analyzed using an IBAS200 image analyzer.RESULTS: Post-surgery food intake: No abnormal

  10. Cytokine responses during chronic denervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsson Tomas

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to examine inflammatory responses during Wallerian degeneration in rat peripheral nerve when the regrowth of axons was prevented by suturing. Methods Transected rat sciatic nerve was sutured and ligated to prevent reinnervation. The samples were collected from the left sciatic nerve distally and proximally from the point of transection. The endoneurium was separated from the surrounding epi- and perineurium to examine the expression of cytokines in both of these compartments. Macrophage invasion into endoneurium was investigated and Schwann cell proliferation was followed as well as the expression of cytokines IL-1β, IL-10, IFN-γ and TNF-α mRNA. The samples were collected from 1 day up to 5 weeks after the primary operation. Results At days 1 to 3 after injury in the epi-/perineurium of the proximal and distal stump, a marked expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β and of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was observed. Concurrently, numerous macrophages started to gather into the epineurium of both proximal and distal stumps. At day 7 the number of macrophages decreased in the perineurium and increased markedly in the endoneurium of both stumps. At this time point marked expression of TNF-α and IFN-γ mRNA was observed in the endo- and epi-/perineurium of the proximal stump. At day 14 a marked increase in the expression of IL-1β could be noted in the proximal stump epi-/perineurium and in the distal stump endoneurium. At that time point many macrophages were observed in the longitudinally sectioned epineurium of the proximal 2 area as well as in the cross-section slides from the distal stump. At day 35 TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-10 mRNA appeared abundantly in the proximal epi-/perineurium together with macrophages. Conclusion The present studies show that even during chronic denervation there is a cyclic expression pattern for the studied cytokines. Contrary to the

  11. Renal Sympathetic Denervation: Hibernation or Resurrection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papademetriou, Vasilios; Doumas, Michael; Tsioufis, Costas

    2016-01-01

    The most current versions of renal sympathetic denervation have been invented as minimally invasive approaches for the management of drug-resistant hypertension. The anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of renal sympathetic innervation provide a strong background supporting an important role of the renal nerves in the regulation of blood pressure (BP) and volume. In addition, historical data with surgical sympathectomy and experimental data with surgical renal denervation indicate a beneficial effect on BP levels. Early clinical studies with transcatheter radiofrequency ablation demonstrated impressive BP reduction, accompanied by beneficial effects in target organ damage and other disease conditions characterized by sympathetic overactivity. However, the failure of the SYMPLICITY 3 trial to meet its primary efficacy end point raised a lot of concerns and put the field of renal denervation into hibernation. This review aims to translate basic research into clinical practice by presenting the anatomical and physiological basis for renal sympathetic denervation, critically discussing the past and present knowledge in this field, where we stand now, and also speculating about the future of the intervention and potential directions for research. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Renal Denervation: Past, Present, and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negiin Pourafshar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, percutaneous renal denervation has been vigorously investigated as a treatment for resistant hypertension. The SYMPLICITY radiofrequency catheter system (Medtronic CardioVascular Inc., Santa Rosa, CA, USA is the most tested device in clinical trials. After the positive results of small phase I and II clinical trials, SYMPLICITY HTN-3 (a phase III, multi-center, blinded, sham-controlled randomized clinical trial was completed in 2014, but did not show significant blood pressure lowering effect with renal denervation compared to medical therapy and caused the investigators and industry to revisit both the basic science elements of renal denervation as well as the design of related clinical trials. This review summarizes the SYMPLICITY trials, analyzes the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 data, and provides insights gained from this trial in the design of the most recent clinical trial, the SPYRAL HTN Global clinical trial. Other than hypertension, the role of renal denervation in the management of other disease processes such as systolic and diastolic heart failure, metabolic syndrome, arrhythmia, and obstructive sleep apnea with the common pathophysiologic pathway of sympathetic overactivity is also discussed.

  13. Persistent muscle fiber regeneration in long term denervation. Past, present, future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Carraro

    2015-03-01

    that the MHCemb positive muscle fibers we observe result from the activation, proliferation and fusion of satellite cells, the myogenic precursors present under the basal lamina of the muscle fibers. Using morphological features and molecular biomarkers, we show that severely atrophic muscle fibers, with a peculiar cluster reorganization of myonuclei, are present in rodent muscle seven-months after neurectomy and in human muscles 30-months after complete Conus-Cauda Equina Syndrome and that these are structurally distinct from early myotubes. Beyond reviewing evidence from rodent and human studies, we add some ultrastructural evidence of muscle fiber regeneration in long-term denervated human muscles and discuss the options to substantially increase the regenerative potential of severely denervated human muscles not having been treated with h-bFES. Some of the mandatory procedures, are ready to be translated from animal experiments to clinical studies to meet the needs of persons with longterm irreversible muscle denervation. An European Project, the trial Rise4EU (Rise for You, a personalized treatment for recovery of function of denervated muscle in long-term stable SCI will hopefully follow.

  14. Neurohumoral indicators of efficacy radiofrequency cardiac denervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evtushenko, A. V.; Evtushenko, V. V.; Saushkina, Yu. V.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.; Pokushalov, E. A.; Sergeevichev, D. S.; Gusakova, A. M.; Suslova, T. E.; Dymbrylova, O. N.; Bykov, A. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Lotkov, A. I.; Kurlov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we compared pre- and postoperative parameters of the cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to examine the approaches to evaluating the quality of radiofrequency (RF)-induced cardiac denervation by using non-invasive and laboratory methods. The study included 32 people with long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the objectives of the study: group 1 (main) - 21 patients with mitral valve diseases, which simultaneously with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) AF carried out on the effects of the paraganglionic nervous plexuses by C. Pappone (2004) and N. Doll (2008) schemes. The second group (control) contained 11 patients with heart diseases in sinus rhythm (the RF denervation not been performed). All patients, who underwent surgical treatment, were received examination of cardiac sympathetic tone by using 123I-MIBG. All of them made blood analysis from ascending aorta and coronary sinus to determine the level of norepinephrine and its metabolites before and after cardiac denervation. Data of radionuclide examination are correlating with laboratory data.

  15. Neurohumoral indicators of efficacy radiofrequency cardiac denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evtushenko, A. V., E-mail: ave@cardio-tomsk.ru; Evtushenko, V. V. [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution “Research Institute for Cardiology”, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Saushkina, Yu. V.; Gusakova, A. M.; Suslova, T. E.; Dymbrylova, O. N.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Kurlov, I. O. [Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution “Research Institute for Cardiology”, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Lishmanov, Yu. B.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution “Research Institute for Cardiology”, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Sergeevichev, D. S. [Academician E.N. Meshalkin State Research Institute of Circulation Pathology, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bykov, A. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V. [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Lotkov, A. I. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science of the Siberian Branch of the RAS, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Pokushalov, E. A.

    2015-11-17

    In this study, we compared pre- and postoperative parameters of the cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to examine the approaches to evaluating the quality of radiofrequency (RF)-induced cardiac denervation by using non-invasive and laboratory methods. The study included 32 people with long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the objectives of the study: group 1 (main) - 21 patients with mitral valve diseases, which simultaneously with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) AF carried out on the effects of the paraganglionic nervous plexuses by C. Pappone (2004) and N. Doll (2008) schemes. The second group (control) contained 11 patients with heart diseases in sinus rhythm (the RF denervation not been performed). All patients, who underwent surgical treatment, were received examination of cardiac sympathetic tone by using {sup 123}I-MIBG. All of them made blood analysis from ascending aorta and coronary sinus to determine the level of norepinephrine and its metabolites before and after cardiac denervation. Data of radionuclide examination are correlating with laboratory data.

  16. The rise, fall, and possible resurrection of renal denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Rajiv; Raphael, Claire E; Negoita, Manuela; Pocock, Stuart J; Gersh, Bernard J

    2016-04-01

    Renal denervation has a chequered history. Dramatic reductions in blood pressure after denervation of the renal arteries were observed in early trials, but later trials in which denervation was tested against a sham procedure produced neutral results. Although a sound pathophysiological basis exists for interruption of the renal sympathetic nervous system as a treatment for hypertension, trial data to date are insufficient to support renal denervation as an established clinical therapy. In this Perspectives article, we summarize the currently available trial data, device development, and trials in progress, and provide recommendations for future trial design.

  17. MOLECULAR MODELING STUDY OF THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF SIDE AMINO ACID RESIDUES OF POLYMYXIN B3 TO ITS BINDING WITH E.COLI OUTER MEMBRANE LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak Yu. V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Last decades, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are the subject of intense investigations aimed to develop effective drugs against extremely resistant nosocomial bacterial pathogens (especially Gram-negative bacteria. In particular, there has been greatly renewed interest to polymyxins, the representatives of AMPs which are specific and highly potent against Gram-negative bacteria, but have potential nephrotoxic side effect. A prerequisite of purposeful enhancement of therapeutic properties of polymyxins is a detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of their interactions with cell targets. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the main component of the outer leaflet of outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, is a primary cell target of polymyxins. The aim of the paper was to study the peculiarities of molecular interactions of polymyxin В3 with lipopolysaccharide of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacterium. Materials and methods The complexes of polymyxin В3 (PmВ3 and its alaninederivatives with E. coli outer membrane lipopolysaccharide were built and studied by molecular modeling methods (minimization, simulated annealing, docking. Atom coordinates of polymyxin В3 and LPS structures were taken from nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography experiments, respectively. The AMBER03 force field was used with a 1.05 nm force cutoff. Longrange electrostatic interactions were treated by the Particle Mesh Ewald method. Results and discussion Alanine scanning of PmВ3 molecule has been carried out and the role of its side amino acid residues in the formation of complex with lipopolysaccharide has been investigated. It has been shown that substitutions of polymyxin’s Dab residues in positions 1, 3, 5, 8 and 9 for alanine markedly reduce the binding energy of PmB3-LPS complex, where as the similar substitutions of residues in positions 2, 6, 7 and 10 leave the binding energy virtually unchanged. Structural aspects of antimicrobial action of

  18. Selective peripheral denervation : comparison with pallidal stimulation and literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Bosch, D. Andries; Schuurman, P. Richard; Speelman, Johannes D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cervical dystonia who are non-responders to Botulinum toxin qualify for surgery. Selective peripheral denervation (Bertrand's procedure, SPD) and deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus (GPi-DBS) are available surgical options. Although peripheral denervation has potential advant

  19. Radiological diagnosis of abductor denervation after hip surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, B.R.; Binns, M.S. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, Pontefract General Infirmary (United Kingdom); Horsfall, H. [Dept. of Radiology, Pontefract General Infirmary (United Kingdom)

    2001-02-01

    A case of total hip arthroplasty through a direct lateral approach is described. The patient had a markedly positive Trendelenburg test at follow-up. Radiographs showed features consistent with the denervation of the gluteus medius. This was confirmed on CT scan. The standard post-operative radiograph following a total hip replacement may suggest denervation of the gluteus medius. (orig.)

  20. Renal sympathetic denervation: MDCT evaluation of the renal arteries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hutchinson, Barry D

    2013-08-01

    Percutaneous transluminal renal sympathetic denervation is a new treatment of refractory systemic hypertension. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical utility of MDCT to evaluate the anatomic configuration of the renal arteries in the context of renal sympathetic denervation.

  1. Renal Denervation for Chronic Heart Failure: Background and Pathophysiological Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Michael; Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix

    2017-01-01

    The activation of the sympathetic nervous system is associated with cardiovascular hospitalizations and death in heart failure. Renal denervation has been shown to effectively reduce sympathetic overdrive in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Pilot trials investigating renal denervation as a potential treatment approach for heart failure were initiated. Heart failure comorbidities like obstructive sleep apnea, metabolic syndrome and arrhythmias could also be targets for renal denervation, because these occurrences are also mediated by the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, renal denervation in heart failure is worthy of further investigation, although its effectiveness still has to be proven. Herein, we describe the pathophysiological rationale and the effect of renal denervation on surrogates of the heart failure syndrome.

  2. Perlecan and synaptophysin changes in denervated skeletal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Ma; Zhifeng Huang; Jianfeng Ma; Longquan Shao; Huiming Wang; Yanliang Wang

    2012-01-01

    The present study observed sciatic nerve and gastrocnemius muscle changes in denervated rats using morphology methods, and assessed expression of perlecan, an extracellular matrix com-ponent, which is located at the skeletal muscle cell surface as acetylcholine esterase, as well as synaptophysin, a synaptic marker. Results showed degeneration and inflammation following transection of the sciatic nerve. In addition, the sciatic nerve-dominated skeletal muscle degen-erated with mild inflammation, indicating that skeletal muscle atrophy primarily contributed to denervation-induced nutritional disturbances. With prolonged injury time (1-4 weeks post-injury), perlecan expression gradually decreased and reached the lowest level at 4 weeks, but synap-tophysin expression remained unchanged after denervation. Results suggested that perlecan expression was more sensitive to denervation and reflected regional extracellular matrix changes following denervation.

  3. Denervation of the painful temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellon, Lee; Maloney, Christopher T

    2006-09-01

    The successful management of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain remains elusive. Often the initial relief of pain is complicated by recurrence of the symptoms. This time frame suggests that the pain may be related to neuromas of the nerves that innervate the TMJ. In 2003, an anatomic description of the innervation of the TMJ suggested that denervation of this joint might be the appropriate treatment for pain resistant to traditional forms of therapy. In January, 2005, this approach was used to treat recalcitrant left TMJ pain in a 21-year-old woman with congenital hearing loss who had recurrent dislocations of her TMJ articular disc. She previously had two arthroscopic surgeries and one open attempt to treat her TMJ pain. The last failed TMJ surgery created a painful neuroma that prevented her from wearing her hearing aid. A medial and lateral denervation of the TMJ joint was done. The successful results of this surgery are presented at one-year follow-up. The technical considerations of this approach and risk to the facial nerve are discussed.

  4. Protective Effects of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on Denervated Skeletal Muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄仕龙; 王发斌; 洪光祥; 万圣祥; 康皓

    2002-01-01

    Summary: To study the effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on denervated skeletal muscle atrophy and to find a new approach to ameliorate atrophy of denervated muscle, a model was estab lished by cutting the right sciatic nerve in 36 Wistar mice, with the left side serving as control. Then they were divided into two groups randomly. CNTF (1 U/ml) 0. 1 ml was injected into the right tib-ial muscle every day in experimental group, and saline was used into another group for comparison.The muscle wet weight, muscle total protein, Ca2+, physiological response and morphology were an alyzed on the 7th, 14th and 28th day after operation. Our results showed that compared to control group, there was a significant increase in muscle wet weight, total protein, Ca2+ , muscle fiber cross section area in CNTF group (P< 0. 05). CNTF could ameliorate the decrease of tetanic tension (PO), post-tetanic twitch potentiation (PTP), and the prolonged muscle relaxation time (RT)caused by denervation (P<0. 05). The motor end-plate areas 7 days and 14 days after denervation was similar (P>0. 05), but significantly larger 28 days after the denervation (P<0.05). Our re-sults suggest that CNTF exerts myotrophic effects by attenuating the morphological and functional changes associated with denervation of rat muscles and has protective effects on denervated muscle and motor end plate.

  5. Renal denervation: a new therapeutic approach for resistant hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Longxing; Fu Qiang; Wang Binghui; Li Zhiliang

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the advances in studies on renal denervation.Data sources References concerning renal denervation and resistant hypertension cited in this review were collected from PubMed published in English and those of renal denervation devices from official websites of device manufacturers up to January 2014.Study selection Articles with keywords "renal denervation" and "resistant hypertension" were selected.Results Renal and systemic sympathetic overactivity plays an important role in pathology of hypertension as well as other diseases characterized by sympathetic overactivity.Renal denervation is a new,catheter based procedure to reduce renal and systemic sympathetic overactivity by disruption of renal sympathetic efferent and afferent nerves through radiofrequency or ultrasound energy delivered to the endoluminal surface of both renal arteries.Although several studies have shown the efficacy and safety of renal denervation in the treatment of resistant hypertension and the potential benefit of the procedure in other diseases,Symplicity HTN 3 study,the most rigorous clinical trial of renal denervation to date,failed to meet its primary endpoint.The procedure also has other limitations such as the lack of long term,efficacy and safety data and the lack of the predictors for the blood pressure lowering response and nonresponse to the procedure.An overview of current renal denervation devices holding Conformité Européenne mark is also included in this review.Conclusions Renal denervation is a promising therapeutic approach in the management of resistant hypertension and other diseases characterized by sympathetic overactivity.In its early stage of clinical application,the efficacy of the procedure is still controversial.Large scale,blind,randomized,controlled clinical trials are still necessary to address the limitations of the procedure.

  6. Excitation-contraction coupling and mechano-sensitivity in denervated skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Francini

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy can be defined as a wasting or decrease in muscle mass and muscle force generation owing lack of use, ageing, injury or disease. Thus, the etiology of atrophy can be different. Atrophy in denervated muscle is a consequence of two factors: 1 the complete lack of motoneuron activity inducing the deficiency of neurotransmitter release and 2 the muscles disuse. The balance of the muscular functions depends on extra- and intra-muscular signals. In the balance are involved the excitation-contraction coupling (ECC, local growth factors, Ca2+-dependent and independent intracellular signals, mechano-sensitivity and mechano-transduction that activate Ca2+-dependent signaling proteins and cytoskeleton- nucleus pathways to the nucleus, that regulate the gene expression. Moreover, retrograde signal from intracellular compartments and cytoskeleton to the sarcolemma are additional factors that regulate the muscle function. Proteolytic systems that operate in atrophic muscles progressively reduce the muscle protein content and so the sarcolemma, ECC and the force generation. In this review we will focus on the more relevant changes of the sarcolemma, excitation-contraction coupling, ECC and mechano-transduction evaluated by electrophysiological methods and observed from early- to long-term denervated skeletal muscles. This review put in particular evidence that long-term denervated muscle maintain a sub-population of fibers with ECC and contractile machinery able to be activated, albeit in lesser amounts, by electrical and mechanical stimulation. Accordingly, this provides a potential molecular explanation of the muscle recovery that occurs in response to rehabilitation strategy as transcutaneous electrical stimulation and passive stretching of denervated muscles, which wre developed as a result of empirical clinical observations.

  7. Renal denervation: Results of a single-center cohort study; Renale Denervation. Ergebnisse einer Single-Center Kohortenstudie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetkens, J.A.; Thomas, D.; Doerner, J.; Schild, H.H.; Naehle, C.P. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Wilhelm, K. [Johanniter Hospital, Bonn (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Duesing, R. [Hypertension Center, Bonn (Germany); Woitas, R.P.; Hundt, F. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine I

    2015-01-15

    To investigate the effect of renal denervation on office-based and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements (ABPM) in a highly selective patient population with drug-resistant hypertension. Patients with drug resistant hypertension eligible for renal denervation were included in the study population. Office blood pressure and ABPM were assessed prior to and after renal denervation. To detect procedure related renal or renal artery damage, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography (MRA) were performed pre-interventional, one day post-interventional, and one month after renal denervation. Mean follow-up time between renal denervation and blood pressure re-assessment was 9.5 ± 3.9 months. Between August 2011 and March 2013, 17 patients prospectively underwent renal denervation. Pre-interventional mean office blood pressure and ABPM were 177.3 ± 20.3/103.8 ± 20.4 mmHg and 155.2 ± 20.5/93.7 ± 14.5 mmHg, respectively. Post-interventional, office blood pressure was significantly reduced to 144.7 ± 14.9/89.5 ± 12.1 (p < 0.05). ABPM values remained unchanged (147.9 ± 20.3/90.3 ± 15.6, p > 0.05). The number of prescribed antihypertensive drugs was unchanged after renal denervation (4.7 ± 2.0 vs. 4.2 ± 1.2, p = 0.18). No renovascular complications were detected in follow-up MRI. After renal denervation, no significant decrease in ABPM was observed. These results may indicate a limited impact of renal denervation for drug resistant hypertension.

  8. Opioid neuronal denervation in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandyk, R

    1987-07-01

    Increased striatal dopaminergic functions with heightened postsynaptic receptor sensitivity has been proposed to underlie the major clinical symptoms of Tourette's syndrome (TS). The beneficial response of the majority of TS patients to haloperidol supports the hyperdopaminergic pathophysiological concept of TS. However, in 5 recently encountered TS patients, haloperidol failed to ameliorate self-injurious behavior (SIB) while the opiate antagonist, naloxone, attenuated SIB, implicating deranged endorphinergic mechanisms in the pathophysiology of this disorder. Brain damage is commonly associated with partial neuronal denervation, denervation supersensitivity and neuronal habituation (Cannon's Law). While the motor tics of TS possibly reflect neuronal denervation of striatal dopaminergic neurons. SIB may represent opioid denervation with alterations in opioid receptor sensitivity possibly involving striato-limbic-hypothalamic circuits. The effect of naloxone on SIB in TS could thus be explained on the basis of a modulatory effect of this drug on opioid receptor sensitivity.

  9. Effect of salbutamol on innervated and denervated rat soleus muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ?oic-Vranic T.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation was to perform a 14-day time-course study of treatment with salbutamol, a ß2 adrenoceptor agonist, on rat soleus muscle in order to assess fiber type selectivity in the hypertrophic response and fiber type composition. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control (N = 10, treated with salbutamol (N = 30, denervated (N = 30, and treated with salbutamol after denervation (N = 30. Salbutamol was injected intraperitoneally in the rats of the 2nd and 4th groups at a concentration of 0.3 mg/kg twice a day for 2 weeks. The muscles were denervated using the crush method with pean. The animals were sacrificed 3, 6, 9, 12, and 14 days after treatment. Frozen cross-sections of soleus muscle were stained for myosin ATPase, pH 9.4. Cross-sectional area and percent of muscle fibers were analyzed morphometrically by computerized image analysis. Treatment with salbutamol induced hypertrophy of all fiber types and a higher percentage of type II fibers (21% in the healthy rat soleus muscle. Denervation caused marked atrophy of all fibers and conversion from type I to type II muscle fibers. Denervated muscles treated with salbutamol showed a significantly larger cross-sectional area of type I muscle fibers, 28.2% compared to the denervated untreated muscle. Moreover, the number of type I fibers was increased. These results indicate that administration of salbutamol is able to induce changes in cross-sectional area and fiber type distribution in the early phase of treatment. Since denervation-induced atrophy and conversion from type I to type II fibers were improved by salbutamol treatment we propose that salbutamol, like other ß2 adrenoceptor agonists, may have a therapeutic potential in improving the condition of skeletal muscle after denervation.

  10. Respiratory neuroplasticity following carotid body denervation Central and peripheral adaptations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew R. Hodges; Hubert V. Forster

    2012-01-01

    Historically, the role of the carotid bodies in ventilatory control has been understated, but the current view suggests that the carotid bodies (1) provide a tonic, facilitory input to the respiratory network, (2) serve as the major site of peripheral O2 chemoreception and minor contributor to CO2/H+ chemoreception, and (3) are required for ventilatory adaptation to high altitude. Each of these roles has been demonstrated in studies of ventilation in mammals after carotid body denervation. Following carotid body denervation, many of the compromised ventilatory "functions" show a time-dependent recovery plasticity that varies in the degree of recovery and time required for recovery. Respiratory plasticity following carotid body denervation is also dependent on species, with contributions from peripheral and central sites/mechanisms driving the respiratory plasticity. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of the data pointing to peripheral and central mechanisms of plasticity following carotid body denervation. We speculate that after carotid body denervation there are altered excitatory and/or inhibitory neuromodulator mechanisms that contribute to the initial respiratory depression and the subsequent respiratory plasticity, and further suggest that the continued exploration of central effects of carotid body denervation might provide useful information regarding the capacity of the respiratory network for plasticity following neurologic injury in humans.

  11. Intrapericardial Denervation: Responses to Water Immersion in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeever, Kenneth H.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1995-01-01

    Eleven anesthetized rhesus monkeys were used to study cardiovascular, renal, and endocrine alterations associated with 120 min of head-out water immersion. Five animals underwent complete intrapericardial denervation using the Randall technique, while the remaining six monkeys served as intact controls. Each animal was chronically instrumented with an electromagnetic flow probe on the ascending aorta, a strain gauge pressure transducer implanted in the apex of the left ventricle (LV), and electrocardiogram leads anchored to the chest wall and LV. During immersion, LV end-diastolic pressure, urine flow, glomerular filtration rate, sodium excretion, and circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) each increased (P less than 0.05) for intact and denervated monkeys. There were no alterations in free water clearance in either group during immersion, yet fractional excretion of free water increased (P less than 0.05) in the intact monkeys. Plasma renin activity (PRA) decreased (P less than 0.05) during immersion in intact monkeys but not the denervated animals. Plasma vasopressin (PVP) concentration decreased (P less than 0.05) during the first 30 min of immersion in both groups but was not distinguishable from control by 60 min of immersion in denervated monkeys. These data demonstrate that complete cardiac denervation does not block the rise in plasma ANP or prevent the natriuresis associated with head-out water immersion. The suppression of PVP during the first minutes of immersion after complete cardiac denervation suggests that extracardiac sensing mechanisms associated with the induced fluid shifts may be responsible for the findings.

  12. Functional Echomyography of the human denervated muscle: first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Zanato

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we followed with ultrasound three patients with permanent denervation to evaluate changes in morphology, thickness, contraction and vascularisation of muscles undergoing the home-based electrical stimulation program of the Rise2-Italy project. During a period of 1 year for the first subject, 6 months for the second subject and 3 months for the third subject we studied with ultrasound the denervated muscle comparing it (if possible to the contralateral normal muscle. We evaluated: 1. Changes in morphology and sonographic structure of the pathologic muscle; 2. Muscular thickness in response to the electrical stimulation therapy; 3. Short-term modifications in muscle perfusion and arterial flow patterns after stimulation; 4. Contraction-relaxation kinetic induced by volitional activity or electrical stimulation. Morphology and ultrasonographic structure of the denervated muscles changed during the period of stimulation from a pattern typical of complete muscular atrophy to a pattern which might be considered “normal” when detected in an old patient. Thickness improved significantly more in the middle third than in the proximal and distal third of the denervated muscle, reaching in the last measurements of the first subject approximately the same thickness as the contralateral normal muscle. In all the measurements done within this study, arterial flow of the denervated muscle showed at rest a low-resistance pattern with Doppler Ultra Sound (US, and a pulsed pattern after electrical stimulation. The stimulation- induced pattern is similar to the trifasic high-resistance pattern of the normal muscle. Contraction- relaxation kinetic, measured by recording the muscular movements during electrical stimulation, showed an abnormal behaviour of the denervated muscle during the relaxation phase, which resulted to be significantly longer than in normal muscle (880 msec in the denervated muscle vs 240 msec in the contralateral normal one

  13. Permanent LMN denervation of human skeletal muscle and recovery by h-b FES: management and monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Kern

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Denervation of a defined skeletal muscle is due to lower motor neuron (LMN or peripheral nerve lesions that have major consequences on the muscle tissue. After early atrophy, the mid- and late-phases presents two very contrasting myofibers populations: beside those severely atrophic with internalized groups of myonuclei, large fast-type muscle fibers continue to be present 4 to 6 years after Spinal Cord Injury (SCI. Recent results of rat experiments provides the rational basis for understanding the residual functional characteristics of the long-term denervated muscle and the molecular explanation of its ability to respond to home-base functional electrical stimulation (h-b FES using custom-designed electrodes and stimulators. Further outcomes of the Vienna-Padova ten-year collaboration are: 1. a world-unique Myo- Bank of muscle biopsies and 2. improved imaging procedures (Color Computer Tomography (CT scan and Functional Echomyography, all demonstrating that h-b FES induces improvements in muscle contractility, tissue composition and mass, despite permanent LMN denervation. The benefits of h-b FES could be extended from patents suffering with complete Conus-Cauda Syndrome to the numerous patients with incomplete LMN denervation of skeletal muscles to determine whether h-b FES reduces secondary complications related to disuse and impaired blood perfusion (reduction in bone density, risk of bone fracture, decubitus ulcers, and pulmonary thromboembolism. We are confident that translation of the results of a clinical experiment, the EU Project RISE, to the larger cohort of incomplete LMN denervated muscles will provide the wanted results.

  14. Treating resistant hypertension: role of renal denervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urban D

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Urban, Sebastian Ewen, Christian Ukena, Dominik Linz, Michael Böhm, Felix Mahfoud Department of Internal Medicine III, Cardiology, Angiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Saarland, Homburg, Saarland, Germany Abstract: Arterial hypertension is the most prevalent risk factor associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although pharmacological treatment is generally well tolerated, 5%–20% of patients with hypertension are resistant to medical therapy, which is defined as blood pressure above goal (>140/90 mmHg in general; >130–139/80–85 mmHg in patients with diabetes mellitus; >130/80 mmHg in patients with chronic kidney disease despite treatment with ≥3 antihypertensive drugs of different classes, including a diuretic, at optimal doses. These patients are at significantly higher risk for cardiovascular events, in particular stroke, myocardial infarction, and heart failure, as compared with patients with nonresistant hypertension. The etiology of resistant hypertension is multifactorial and a number of risk factors have been identified. In addition, resistant hypertension might be due to secondary causes such as primary aldosteronism, chronic kidney disease, renal artery stenosis, or obstructive sleep apnea. To identify patients with resistant hypertension, the following must be excluded: pseudo-resistance, which might be due to nonadherence to medical treatment; white-coat effect; and inaccurate measurement technique. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system contributes to the development and maintenance of hypertension by increasing renal renin release, decreasing renal blood flow, and enhancing tubular sodium retention. Catheter-based renal denervation (RDN is a novel technique specifically targeting renal sympathetic nerves. Clinical trials have demonstrated that RDN significantly reduces blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension. Experimental studies and small

  15. Effects of Renal Denervation Documented in the Austrian National Multicentre Renal Denervation Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Thomas; Steinwender, Clemens; Weber, Thomas; Suppan, Markus; Brussee, Helmut; Koppelstätter, Christian; Kerschbaum, Julia; Watschinger, Bruno; Hohenstein-Scheibenecker, Katharina; Reindl-Schwaighofer, Roman; Sturmberger, Thomas; Kindslehner, Claudia; Weiss, Thomas Werner; Rohla, Miklos; Gruener, Peter; Maister, Petra; Auer, Johann; Dechant, Cornelia; Sykora, Josef; Krismer, Christoph; Glaser, Stefan; Zweiker, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Renal denervation (RDN) is a new procedure for treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. In order to monitor all procedures undergone in Austria, the Austrian Society of Hypertension established the investigator-initiated Austrian Transcatheter Renal Denervation (TREND) Registry. From April 2011 to September 2014, 407 procedures in 14 Austrian centres were recorded. At baseline, office and mean 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) were 171/94 and 151/89 mmHg, respectively, and patients were taking a median of 4 antihypertensive medications. Mean 24-h ABP changes after 2–6 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months were -11/-6, -8/-4, -8/-5 and -10/-6 mmHg (p<0.05 at all measurements), respectively. The periprocedural complication rate was 2.5%. Incidence of long-term complications during follow-up (median 1 year) was 0.5%. Office BP and ABP responses showed only a weak correlation (Pearson coefficient 0.303). Based on the data from the TREND registry, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in addition to office BP should be used for patient selection as well as for monitoring response to RDN. Furthermore, criteria for optimal patient selection are suggested. PMID:27529426

  16. A study of the damage tolerance enhancement of carbon/epoxy laminates by utilizing an outer lamina of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettles, Alan T.; Lance, David G.

    1991-01-01

    The damage tolerance of carbon/epoxy was examined when an outer layer of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (Spectra) material was utilized on the specimen. Four types of 16 ply quasi-isotropic panels, (0,+45,90,-45)s2 were tested. The first contained no Spectra, while the others had one lamina of Spectra placed on either the top (impacted side), bottom or both surfaces of the composite plate. A range of impact energies up to approximately 8.5 Joules (6.3 ft-lbs) was used to inflict damage upon these specimens. Glass/Phenolic honeycomb beams with a core density of 314 N/m3 (2.0 lb/ft3) and 8 ply quasi-isotropic facesheets were also tested for compression-after-impact strength with and without Spectra at impact energies of 1,2,3 and 4 Joules (.74, 1.47, 2.21 and 2.95 ft-lbs). It was observed that the composite plates had little change in damage tolerance due to the Spectra, while the honeycomb panels demonstrated a slight increase in damage tolerance when Spectra was added, the damage tolerance level being more improved at higher impact energies.

  17. Neurotrophin-3 mRNA expression in rat intrafusal muscle fibres after denervation and reinnervation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copray, JCVM; Brouwer, N

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the regulation of the expression of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) mRNA in neonatal and adult rat muscle spindles after denervation and after denervation followed by reinnervation. Denervation of the intrafusal fibres did not result in an upregulation of the NT-3 mRNA expression but decreased

  18. Evaluation of the endogenous glucocorticoid hypothesis of denervation atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konagaya, Masaaki; Konagaya, Yoko; Max, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    The effects are studied of the oral administration of RU38486, a potent selective glucocorticoid antagonist, on muscle weight, non-collagen protein content, and selected enzyme activities (choline acetyltransferase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glutamine synthetase) following denervation of rat skeletal muscle. Neither decreases in muscle weight, protein content, and choline acetyltransferase activity, nor increases in the activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogernase and glutamine synthetase were affected by RU38486. These data do not support the hypothesis that denervation atrophy results from enhanced sensitivity of muscle to endogenous glucocorticoids.

  19. Modification of motoneuron size after partial denervation in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, F; Vrbová, G

    2007-11-01

    Our previous studies have shown that partial denervation of extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) in the rat at 3 days of age causes an increase in the activity of the intact motoneurons. The originally phasic pattern of activity of EDL became tonic after partial denervation. These modifications of motoneuron activity were associated with the change in the phenotype of the muscle from fast to slow contracting and with a conversion of the muscle fibres from a fast to a slow type. The present study investigates whether the size of the cell body of the active EDL motoneurons change in parallel with the altered muscular activity. The study involved partial denervation of rat EDL muscle by section of the L4 spinal nerve at 3 days of age. Then the remaining motoneurons from L5 spinal nerve supplying the EDL muscle were retrogradly labelled with horseradish peroxidase two months later. The results show a reduction in motoneuron size in parallel with an increase in activity of the motoneurons after partial denervation of EDL muscle.

  20. Axonal sprouting regulates myelin basic protein gene expression in denervated mouse hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B; Poulsen, F R; Finsen, B

    2000-01-01

    radiatum of CA3 and the dentate hilus, which display axonal sprouting but no degenerative changes or microglial activation, and (2) the outer part of the molecular layer of the fascia dentata, and in stratum moleculare of CA3 and stratum lacunosum-moleculare of CA1, areas that display dense anterograde...

  1. Axonal sprouting regulates myelin basic protein gene expression in denervated mouse hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M B; Poulsen, F R; Finsen, B

    2000-01-01

    radiatum of CA3 and the dentate hilus, which display axonal sprouting but no degenerative changes or microglial activation, and (2) the outer part of the molecular layer of the fascia dentata, and in stratum moleculare of CA3 and stratum lacunosum-moleculare of CA1, areas that display dense anterograde...

  2. Glucose metabolism in rats submitted to skeletal muscle denervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilton Marlindo Santana Nunes

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the local and systemic effects of immobilization by denervation of the skeletal muscle on glucose metabolism. The rats were submitted to section of the right paw sciatic nerve. A reduction was observed in glucose uptake by the isolated soleus muscle of the denervated paw after 3 and 7 days, but not after 28 days in relation to the control animals. There was no difference after 3 and 7 days in glucose uptake by the soleus muscle of the opposite intact paw in relation to the control. There was increased glucose uptake in the same paw 28 days after denervation. The rate of glucose removal in response to exogenous insulin after 28 days of denervation was significantly higher than in control animals and those observed after 3 and 7 days of denervation. These results suggest that immobilization by denervation interfered not only in glucose metabolism in the skeletal muscle involved but also in other tissues.O estudo analisou os efeitos locais e sistêmicos da imobilização por desnervação do músculo esquelético sobre o metabolismo glicidico. Ratos foram submetidos à secção do nervo ciático da pata direita. Observou-se redução da captação de glicose pelo músculo sóleo isolado da pata desnervada após 3 e 7 mas não após 28 dias em relação a animais controle. Não houve diferença após 3 e 7 dias na captação de glicose pelo músculo sóleo da pata contralateral intacta em relação ao controle. Houve aumento da captação de glicose nesta mesma pata 28 dias após a desnervação. A taxa de remoção da glicose em resposta à insulina exógena após 28 dias de desnervação foi significantemente superior à do controle e àquelas observadas após 3 e 7 dias da desnervação. Esses resultados sugerem que a imobilização por desnervação interfere não só no metabolismo da glicose no músculo esquelético envolvido como também em outros tecidos.

  3. Implications of Renal Denervation Therapy in Patients with Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Jaén-Águila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA syndrome is a prevalent condition characterized by repeated episodes of obstruction of the upper airway, leading to intermittent hypoxemia and important endothelial and anatomical dysfunctions that cause cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. The finding of the relationship between OSA and hypertension, especially resistant hypertension (RHT, has increased the interest in therapeutic strategies that affect renal sympathetic activity in these patients. The observational studies published until now demonstrated that renal denervation therapy can reduce the severity of OSA syndrome. Renal sympathetic denervation (RDN could be a future therapeutic possibility for conditions other than RHT, such as atrial fibrillation, heart failure, obesity, and OSA syndrome, where renal sympathetic system plays an important physiological role. The aim of this review was to elucidate the implications of renal sympathetic activity in OSA syndrome.

  4. Adrenergic receptors are a fallible index of adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Liggett, S B; Christensen, N J

    1991-01-01

    by measuring these in a group of subjects with well-documented adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity, patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Mononuclear leukocyte beta 2-adrenergic receptor densities (and binding affinities), measured with 125I-labelled pindolol, and isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP...... accumulation, in samples from patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (n = 8), were no different from those in samples from patients with IDDM without neuropathy (n = 8), or from non-diabetic subjects (n = 8). In addition, platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptor...... to diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Regardless of the mechanism of adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity in such patients, these data provide further evidence that measurements of cellular adrenergic receptors (and adenylate cyclase) in vitro are a fallible index of sensitivity to catecholamines in vivo....

  5. Adrenergic receptors are a fallible index of adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Liggett, S B; Christensen, N J

    1991-01-01

    by measuring these in a group of subjects with well-documented adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity, patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Mononuclear leukocyte beta 2-adrenergic receptor densities (and binding affinities), measured with 125I-labelled pindolol, and isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP...... accumulation, in samples from patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (n = 8), were no different from those in samples from patients with IDDM without neuropathy (n = 8), or from non-diabetic subjects (n = 8). In addition, platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptor...... to diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Regardless of the mechanism of adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity in such patients, these data provide further evidence that measurements of cellular adrenergic receptors (and adenylate cyclase) in vitro are a fallible index of sensitivity to catecholamines in vivo....

  6. Efficacy of the "baby-sitter" procedure after prolonged denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mersa, B; Tiangco, D A; Terzis, J K

    2000-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate whether 40 percent of the hypoglossal nerve, which showed optimal efficacy in restoring orbicularis oculi muscle (OOM) function after different percentages of partial neurectomy in a previous study would be effective after prolonged denervation time. Twenty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. In first-stage surgery the left facial nerve of all animals was transected at the level of the stylomastoid foramen and main zygomatic branch. Group A (controls) consisted of animals with only left facial nerves transected (no repair). In Groups B, C, and D the facial nerve was transected and the facial musculature was denervated for a period of 4, 8, and 12 weeks respectively. During a second-stage procedure, a 40 percent neurectomy was performed on the hypoglossal nerve. Subsequently, a nerve transfer was performed by coaptations of a saphenous nerve graft to the neurectomized hypoglossal nerve and the main zygomatic branch of the facial nerve that innervated the OOM. Behavioral analysis of blink reflex, electrophysiology, and axon and motor end-plate counts in Groups B, C, and D showed superior results compared to Group A. There was no statistically significant difference observed among Groups B, C, and D (p > 0.05). Despite the diminished number of axons in the zygomatic branch and motor end-plates in the orbicularis oculi muscle after 12 weeks of denervation, there was still sufficient muscle target recovery to effect some eye closure in all groups except the controls. This study demonstrated in this model that the 40 percent partial neurectomy of the XII to VII component of the "baby-sitter" procedure was effective even after prolonged denervation.

  7. Renal artery sympathetic denervation: observations from the UK experience

    OpenAIRE

    Sharp, Andrew S. P.; Davies, Justin E.; Lobo, Melvin D.; Bent, Clare L.; Mark, Patrick B.; Burchell, Amy E; Thackray, Simon D.; Martin, Una; McKane, William S.; Gerber, Robert T.; Wilkinson, James R.; Antonios, Tarek F.; Doulton, Timothy W.; Patterson, Tiffany; Clifford, Piers C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal denervation (RDN) may lower blood pressure (BP); however, it is unclear whether medication changes may be confounding results. Furthermore, limited data exist on pattern of ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) response—particularly in those prescribed aldosterone antagonists at the time of RDN. Methods We examined all patients treated with RDN for treatment-resistant hypertension in 18 UK centres. Results Results from 253 patients treated with five technologies are shown. Pre-proc...

  8. CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency denervation of the sacroiliac joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevargez, A.; Schirp, S.; Braun, M. [Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, University of Witten/Herdecke, Bochum (Germany); Groenemeyer, D. [Department of Radiology and Microtherapy, University of Witten/Herdecke, Bochum (Germany); EFMT Development and Research Center for Microtherapy, Bochum (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    Defining the origin of low back pain is a challenging task. Among a variety of factors the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a possible pain generator, although precise diagnosis is difficult. Joint blocks may reduce pain, but are, in cases, of only temporary effect. This study was conducted to evaluate CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency denervation of the sacroiliac joint in patients with low back pain. The procedure was performed on 38 patients who only temporarily responded to CT-guided SIJ blocks. The denervation was carried out in the posterior interosseous sacroiliac ligaments and on the dorsal rami of the fifth spinal nerve. All interventions were carried out under CT guidance as out-patient therapies. Three months after the therapy, 13 patients (34.2%) were completely free of pain. Twelve patients (31.6%) reported on a substantial pain reduction, 7 patients (18.4%) had obtained a slight and 3 patients (7.9%) no pain reduction. The data of 3 patients (7.9%) was missing. There were no intra- or postoperative complications. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous radiofrequency denervation of the sacroiliac joint appears safe and effective. The procedure may be a useful therapeutic modality, especially in patients with chronic low back pain, who only temporarily respond to therapeutic blocks. (orig.)

  9. Effect of denervation on the glycolytic metabolism of the main electric organ of Electrophorus electricus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-da Matta, J; Silva, C B; da Matta, A N; Hassón-Voloch, A

    1985-01-01

    Biochemical modifications of the glycolytic metabolism of the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus (L.) have been studied as a function of denervation. The activities of LDH, MDH and the concentrations of ATP, lactic and pyruvic acids were measured at intervals of zero, 15, 30 and 60 days following denervation. In parallel, CPK activity was also measured. All of these biochemical characteristics were substantially altered by denervation. The results obtained point to a change, after 15 days of denervation, from the normal anaerobic to an aerobic metabolism which remains after 30 days and reverts to anaerobic at 60 days.

  10. Twenty-Four-Hour Blood Pressure Monitoring to Predict and Assess Impact of Renal Denervation: The DENERHTN Study (Renal Denervation for Hypertension).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosse, Philippe; Cremer, Antoine; Pereira, Helena; Bobrie, Guillaume; Chatellier, Gilles; Chamontin, Bernard; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Delsart, Pascal; Denolle, Thierry; Dourmap, Caroline; Ferrari, Emile; Girerd, Xavier; Michel Halimi, Jean; Herpin, Daniel; Lantelme, Pierre; Monge, Matthieu; Mounier-Vehier, Claire; Mourad, Jean-Jacques; Ormezzano, Olivier; Ribstein, Jean; Rossignol, Patrick; Sapoval, Marc; Vaïsse, Bernard; Zannad, Faiez; Azizi, Michel

    2017-03-01

    The DENERHTN trial (Renal Denervation for Hypertension) confirmed the blood pressure (BP) lowering efficacy of renal denervation added to a standardized stepped-care antihypertensive treatment for resistant hypertension at 6 months. We report here the effect of denervation on 24-hour BP and its variability and look for parameters that predicted the BP response. Patients with resistant hypertension were randomly assigned to denervation plus stepped-care treatment or treatment alone (control). Average and standard deviation of 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime BP and the smoothness index were calculated on recordings performed at randomization and 6 months. Responders were defined as a 6-month 24-hour systolic BP reduction ≥20 mm Hg. Analyses were performed on the per-protocol population. The significantly greater BP reduction in the denervation group was associated with a higher smoothness index (P=0.02). Variability of 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime BP did not change significantly from baseline to 6 months in both groups. The number of responders was greater in the denervation (20/44, 44.5%) than in the control group (11/53, 20.8%; P=0.01). In the discriminant analysis, baseline average nighttime systolic BP and standard deviation were significant predictors of the systolic BP response in the denervation group only, allowing adequate responder classification of 70% of the patients. Our results show that denervation lowers ambulatory BP homogeneously over 24 hours in patients with resistant hypertension and suggest that nighttime systolic BP and variability are predictors of the BP response to denervation. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01570777. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Next generation renal denervation: chemical “perivascular” renal denervation with alcohol using a novel drug infusion catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischell, Tim A. [Borgess Heart Institute, 1521 Gull Road, Kalamazoo, MI, 49008 (United States); Ablative Solutions, 801 Hermosa Way, Menlo Park, CA, 94025 (United States); Fischell, David R.; Ghazarossian, Vartan E. [Ablative Solutions, 801 Hermosa Way, Menlo Park, CA, 94025 (United States); Vega, Félix [Preclinical Consultation, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ebner, Adrian [Clinics, Ascension (Paraguay)

    2015-06-15

    Background/Purpose: We update the pre-clinical and early clinical results using a novel endovascular approach, to perform chemical renal denervation, via peri-adventitial injection of micro-doses of dehydrated alcohol (ethanol–EtOH). Methods/Materials: A novel, three-needle delivery device (Peregrine™) was used to denervate the renal arteries of adult swine (n = 17) and in a first-in-man feasibility study (n = 18). In the pre-clinical testing EtOH was infused bilaterally with one infusion per renal artery into to the perivascular space, using EtOH doses of 0.3 ml/artery (n = 8), and 0.6 ml/artery (n = 9), and with saline sham control (0.4 ml/artery n = 3). Renal parenchymal norepinephrine (NE) concentration (performed blindly), and safety were the primary endpoints. Data from the first-in-man study (n = 18) to evaluate device performance, safety and peri-procedural pain are reported. Results: In the pre-clinical testing renal function was unchanged at 3-month follow-up. Angiography at 90 days (n = 34 arteries) demonstrated normal appearing renal arteries, unchanged from baseline, and without stenosis or other abnormalities. The reductions in mean renal parenchymal NE reductions at 3 months were 68% and 88% at doses of 0.3 and 0.6 ml, respectively (p < 0.001 vs. controls). In the first-in-man study, there was 100% device success, no complications, a mean treatment time of 4.3 ± 3 minutes/artery, and minimal or no patient discomfort during treatment. Angiography at 6-months showed no evidence of renal artery stenosis, and evidence of a reduction of blood pressure from baseline. Conclusion: Perivascular RDN using micro-doses of alcohol is a promising alternative to energy-based systems to achieve dose-dependent, predictable, safe and essentially painless renal denervation. Further clinical evaluation is warranted. Summary: (For annotated table of contents) This paper describes the preclinical results, in a porcine model, and the early first-in-man results, using

  12. Effects of myenteric denervation on extracellular matrix fibers and mast cell distribution in normal stomach and gastric lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estofolete Cássia F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study the effect of myenteric denervation induced by benzalconium chloride (BAC on distribution of fibrillar components of extracellular matrix (ECM and inflammatory cells was investigated in gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG. Rats were divided in four experimental groups: non-denervated (I and denervated stomach (II without MNNG treatment; non-denervated (III and denervated stomachs (IV treated with MNNG. For histopathological, histochemical and stereological analysis, sections of gastric fragments were stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin, Picrosirius-Hematoxylin, Gomori reticulin, Weigert's Resorcin-Fuchsin, Toluidine Blue and Alcian-Blue/Safranin (AB-SAF. Results BAC denervation causes an increase in the frequency of reticular and elastic fibers in the denervated (group II compared to the non-denervated stomachs (group I. The treatment of the animals with MNNG induced the development of adenocarcinomas in non-denervated and denervated stomachs (groups III and IV, respectively with a notable increase in the relative volume of the stroma, the frequency of reticular fibers and the inflammatory infiltrate that was more intense in group IV. An increase in the frequency of elastic fibers was observed in adenocarcinomas of denervated (group IV compared to the non-denervated stomachs (group III that showed degradation of these fibers. The development of lesions (groups III and IV was also associated with an increase in the mast cell population, especially AB and AB-SAF positives, the latter mainly in the denervated group IV. Conclusions The results show a strong association in the morphological alteration of the ECM fibrillar components, the increased density of mast cells and the development of tumors induced by MNNG in the non-denervated rat stomach or denervated by BAC. This suggests that the study of extracellular and intracellular components of tumor microenvironment contributes

  13. The effect of acute denervation on the microcirculation of skeletal muscle: rat cremaster model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L E; Seaber, A V; Bossen, E; Urbaniak, J R

    1991-03-01

    Although tissue is denervated during replantation of a severed part, tissue transfer, or muscle transplantation, there are few studies concerning the effects of acute denervation on muscle microcirculation. We have described a surgical procedure that totally denervates the rat cremaster muscle. Histological examination of the denervated tissue has given convincing evidence of nerve degeneration and skeletal muscle atrophy, accompanied by electrophysiological evidence of total denervation. The diameters of each component of the microcirculation were measured before and after denervation. Arterioles and arteries ranging in size from 10 to 70 microns in diameter were found to increase significantly in size immediately after acute denervation. Larger arteries and veins did not undergo significant diametrical increases. These findings suggest that total acute denervation significantly increases the diameter of small arteries and arterioles, thereby decreasing the resistance in the arterial bed and increasing blood flow. Since this phenomenon is of limited duration (20 min), it would appear to be ineffective in enhancing reperfusion and oxygenation at the time of reattachment of amputated parts or during vascularized tissue transfers, until methods of prolonging it for several hours or more are found.

  14. Effect of denervation of the myenteric plexus on gastroduodenal motility in turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, S B; Duke, G E

    1990-09-01

    The effect of denervation of portions of the myenteric plexus on initiation and coordination of gastric and duodenal contractions was examined in domestic turkeys. Three areas of the muscular stomach (MS), the isthmus between the glandular stomach (GS) and MS, and the pylorus were denervated by application of 1% benzalkonium chloride. Motor activity of the gastroduodenal organs was monitored for 1 h every other day for 13 days using strain gauge transducers implanted at selected sites. Denervation of the isthmus reduced the frequency of MS and duodenal contractions by 50% and abolished GS contractions. Pyloric denervation did not affect the frequency of GS or MS contractions but abolished duodenal contractions. These results suggest that 1) a driving pacemaker for the gastroduodenal cycle is located in the isthmus, and 2) the myenteric plexus is essential for conduction from the pacemaker to the GS and to the duodenum. Denervation of the medial commissure of the myenteric plexus of the MS significantly impaired the function of the ventral half of the MS. It caused atrophy of the underlying medial thick muscle and significantly decreased contraction amplitude. Denervation at this site also caused an enlargement and impaction of the adjacent caudal thin muscle with food and a significant decrease in contraction amplitude. In contrast, denervation of the lateral commissure enlarged the underlying lateral thick muscle and significantly increased its contraction amplitude. Denervation of the cranial thin muscle delayed contractions of that muscle, causing an asynchronization of thin muscle pair.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. [Expert consensus statement on interventional renal sympathetic denervation for hypertension treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoud, F; Vonend, O; Bruck, H; Clasen, W; Eckert, S; Frye, B; Haller, H; Hausberg, M; Hoppe, U C; Hoyer, J; Hahn, K; Keller, T; Krämer, B K; Kreutz, R; Potthoff, S A; Reinecke, H; Schmieder, R; Schwenger, V; Kintscher, U; Böhm, M; Rump, L C

    2011-11-01

    This commentary summarizes the expert consensus and recommendations of the working group 'Herz und Niere' of the German Society of Cardiology (DGK), the German Society of Nephrology (DGfN) and the German Hypertension League (DHL) on renal denervation for antihypertensive treatment. Renal denervation is a new, interventional approach to selectively denervate renal afferent and efferent sympathetic fibers. Renal denervation has been demonstrated to reduce office systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension, defined as systolic office blood pressure ≥ 160 mm Hg and ≥ 150 mm Hg in patients with diabetes type 2, which should currently be used as blood pressure thresholds for undergoing the procedure. Exclusion of secondary hypertension causes and optimized antihypertensive drug treatment is mandatory in every patient with resistant hypertension. In order to exclude pseudoresistance, 24-hour blood pressure measurements should be performed. Preserved renal function was an inclusion criterion in the Symplicity studies, therefore, renal denervation should be only considered in patients with a glomerular filtration rate > 45 ml/min. Adequate centre qualification in both, treatment of hypertension and interventional expertise are essential to ensure correct patient selection and procedural safety. Long-term follow-up after renal denervation and participation in the German Renal Denervation (GREAT) Registry are recommended to assess safety and efficacy after renal denervation over time.

  16. [Denervation of mimic muscles during endoscopic lifting of the upper part of face].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, V D; Tkach, O S

    2013-08-01

    Endoscopic lifting of the upper part of face carry out in 28 patients Chemical or surgical denervation had been done for decreasing of mimic muscles activity. Medical glue with folic acid had been used for tissues fixation. Use of medical glue in conjunction with preliminary chemical denervation of mimic muscles with botulin toxin application decreases surgery duration, prevents complications and increases satisfaction of patients.

  17. The time course of denervation-induced changes is similar in soleus muscles of adult and old rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degens, H.; Kosar, S.N.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Haan, A. de

    2008-01-01

    Muscle denervation is accompanied by atrophy and a decline in oxidative capacity. We investigated whether the time course of adaptations following denervation of the soleus muscle differs in adult (5 months old) and older adult (25 months old) rats. We denervated the soleus muscle of the left leg, w

  18. Direct optical activation of skeletal muscle fibres efficiently controls muscle contraction and attenuates denervation atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magown, Philippe; Shettar, Basavaraj; Zhang, Ying; Rafuse, Victor F

    2015-10-13

    Neural prostheses can restore meaningful function to paralysed muscles by electrically stimulating innervating motor axons, but fail when muscles are completely denervated, as seen in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or after a peripheral nerve or spinal cord injury. Here we show that channelrhodopsin-2 is expressed within the sarcolemma and T-tubules of skeletal muscle fibres in transgenic mice. This expression pattern allows for optical control of muscle contraction with comparable forces to nerve stimulation. Force can be controlled by varying light pulse intensity, duration or frequency. Light-stimulated muscle fibres depolarize proportionally to light intensity and duration. Denervated triceps surae muscles transcutaneously stimulated optically on a daily basis for 10 days show a significant attenuation in atrophy resulting in significantly greater contractile forces compared with chronically denervated muscles. Together, this study shows that channelrhodopsin-2/H134R can be used to restore function to permanently denervated muscles and reduce pathophysiological changes associated with denervation pathologies.

  19. Immunogenicity of iron-regulated outer membrane proteins of Pasteurella multocida A:3 in cattle: molecular characterization of the immunodominant heme acquisition system receptor (HasR) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M E; Dabo, S M; Confer, A W

    2005-02-25

    The iron-regulated outer membrane proteins (IROMPs) of Pasteurella multocida A:3 strain 232 (Pm232), a bovine isolate, were investigated as potential immunogens in cattle. We addressed the ability of P. multocida IROMP-enriched fractions to induce antibody responses in cattle by different vaccination strategies and the protective efficacy of these antibodies using a P. multocida-induced pneumonia challenge model. Vaccination of cattle with outer membrane-enriched fractions derived from Pm232 grown on either iron-depleted (IROMPs) or iron-sufficient (OMPs) conditions induced significant antibody responses; however, the correlation with lung lesion scores was not significant (P = 0.01 and P multocida (strain Pm70) and was confirmed by DNA sequence analysis of the cloned Pm232 hasR gene. Further analyses indicated that Pm232 HasR is a surface-exposed OMP and conserved among most P. multocida isolates investigated. In addition, cattle vaccinated with live Pm232 or IROMPs had significantly higher antibody responses to the 96 kDa protein band and the correlation with lung lesion scores approached significance (P = 0.056). These results indicate that antibody responses in cattle are induced by P. multocida IROMPs, and that the 96 kDa HasR protein is an immunodominant IROMP.

  20. Imaging of muscular denervation secondary to motor cranial nerve dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, S.E.J. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: sejconnor@tiscali.co.uk; Chaudhary, N. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Fareedi, S. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Woo, E.K. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    The effects of motor cranial nerve dysfunction on the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of head and neck muscles are reviewed. Patterns of denervation changes are described and illustrated for V, VII, X, XI and XII cranial nerves. Recognition of the range of imaging manifestations, including the temporal changes in muscular appearances and associated muscular grafting or compensatory hypertrophy, will avoid misinterpretation as local disease. It will also prompt the radiologist to search for underlying cranial nerve pathology, which may be clinically occult. The relevant cranial nerve motor division anatomy will be described to enable a focussed search for such a structural abnormality.

  1. Connexin hemichannels explain the ionic imbalance and lead to atrophy in denervated skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisterna, Bruno A; Vargas, Aníbal A; Puebla, Carlos; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-11-01

    Denervated fast skeletal muscles undergo atrophy, which is associated with an increase in sarcolemma permeability and protein imbalance. However, the mechanisms responsible for these alterations remain largely unknown. Recently, a close association between de novo expression of hemichannels formed by connexins 43 and 45 and increase in sarcolemma permeability of denervated fast skeletal myofibers was demonstrated. However, it remains unknown whether these connexins cause the ionic imbalance of denervates fast myofibers. To elucidate the latter and the role of hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx HCs) in denervation-induced atrophy, skeletal myofibers deficient in Cx43 and Cx45 expression (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice) and control (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice) were denervated and several muscle features were systematically analyzed at different post-denervation (PD) times (1, 3, 5, 7 and 14days). The following sequence of events was found in denervated myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice: 1) from day 3 PD, increase in sarcolemmal permeability, 2) from day 5 PD, increases of intracellular Ca(2+) and Na(+) signals as well as a significant increase in protein synthesis and degradation, yielding a negative protein balance and 3) from day 7 PD, a fall in myofibers cross-section area. All the above alterations were either absent or drastically reduced in denervated myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice. Thus, the denervation-induced Cx HCs expression is an early event that precedes the electrochemical gradient dysregulation across the sarcolemma and critically contributes to the progression of skeletal muscle atrophy. Consequently, Cx HCs could be a therapeutic target to drastically prevent the denervation-induced atrophy of fast skeletal muscles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative decline of the protein profiles of nebulin in response to denervation in skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Jih-Hua [Department of Internal Medicine, Min-Sheng General Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Nen-Chung [Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Sy-Ping [Department of Nursing, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Geraldine, Pitchairaj [Department of Animal Science, School of Life Sciences, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, Tamil Nadu (India); Jayakumar, Thanasekaran, E-mail: tjaya_2002@yahoo.co.in [Department of Pharmacology and Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Fong, Tsorng-Harn, E-mail: thfong@tmu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-09

    The sliding filament model of the sarcomere was developed more than half a century ago. This model, consisting only of thin and thick filaments, has been efficacious in elucidating many, but not all, features of skeletal muscle. Work during the 1980s revealed the existence of two additional filaments: the giant filamentous proteins titin and nebulin. Nebulin, a giant myofibrillar protein, acts as a protein ruler to maintain the lattice arrays of thin filaments and plays a role in signal transduction and contractile regulation. However, the change of nebulin and its effect on thin filaments in denervation-induced atrophic muscle remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to examine the content and pattern of nebulin, myosin heavy chain (MHC), actin, and titin in innervated and denervated tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of rats using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), densitometry and electron microscopic (EM) analyses. The results revealed that denervation induced muscle atrophy is accompanied by decreased nebulin content in a time-dependent manner. For instant, the levels of nebulin in denervated muscles were markedly (P < 0.05) decreased, about 24.6% and 40.2% in comparison with innervated muscle after denervation of 28 and 56 days, respectively. The nebulin/MHC, nebulin/actin, and nebulin/titin ratios were decreased, suggesting a concomitant reduction of nebulin in denervated muscle. Moreover, a western blotting assay proved that nebulin declined faster than titin on 28 and 56 days of denervated muscle. In addition, EM study revealed that the disturbed arrangements of myofilaments and a disorganized contractile apparatus were also observed in denervated muscle. Overall, the present study provides evidence that nebulin is more sensitive to the effect of denervation than MHC, actin, and titin. Nebulin decline indeed resulted in disintegrate of thin filaments and shortening of sarcomeres. - Highlights: • We successfully

  3. AB298. SPR-25 NLRP3/IL-1β mediates denervation during bladder outlet obstruction in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutolf, Robin; Hughes, Francis M.; Purves, J. Todd

    2016-01-01

    Objective Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) is a common condition resulting from benign prostatic hyperplasia, neurologic pathology, organ prolapse, etc. Long-term, obstruction is well-established to evoke denervation in the bladder which causes the detrusor to become hypocontractile, resulting in inefficient bladder emptying and consequent infections, continence issues or even renal failure. Recently, considerable attention has been paid to a role for inflammation in bladder deterioration during BOO and we have shown a central role for the NLRP3 inflammasome in triggering this inflammation. In the present study we explore a possible connection between this NLRP3-induced inflammation and bladder denervation. Methods Rats were divided into five groups: (I) control; (II) sham operated; (III) BOO + vehicle (1 mL, 40% ethanol in PBS, p.o.); (IV) BOO + glyburide (Gly, NLRP3 inhibitor; 10 mg/kg, p.o.); (V) BOO + anakinra (Ana, IL-1 receptor antagonist; 25 mg/kg, i.p.). BOO is constructed in female rats by inserting a 1 mm outer diameter transurethral catheter, tying a silk ligature around the urethra and removing the catheter. Medications were administered prior to surgery and once daily. At 12 days animals were sacrificed and the bladders processed for histological analysis. Transverse sections (5 µm) were stained for PGP9.5 expression (a pan-neuronal marker) using standard immunohistochemistry techniques. Entire sections were scanned, using a 10× objective, into TIFF files using Zen software (Zeiss Inc.). Images were imported into Elements software (Nikon Inc.) and the area of individual neurons designated as well as total bladder area (exclusive of the urothelium and lumen). The number of neurons and respective areas were used to calculate nerve density. Results Denervation in the bladder wall during BOO was significant, as measured by nerve density. This effect was attenuated by either preventing NLRP3 activation with Gly or blocking IL-1β’s action at its

  4. RENAL DENERVATION IN THE TREATMENT OF RESISTANT HYPERTENSION: RESULTS OF A ONE-YEAR OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sulimov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of renal denervation on blood pressure (BP, myocardium function and vegetative status in patients with resistant hypertension (HT.Material and methods. Patients with a provisional resistant HT diagnosis (n=62; 41.3% male were included into the study. 17 patients were selected for renal denervation after correction of previous antihypertensive therapy and examination to exclude symptomatic HT. Two patients refused the procedure, 1 patient hadn’t undergone renal denervation due to anatomical features (renal artery diameter <4 mm. Renal denervation was performed in 14 patients. Office and average daily BP, kidney function, the severity of left ventricular hypertrophy and heart rate variability were assessed initially and after the intervention.Results. Office systolic BP (SBP decreased from 165 to 150 mm Hg (p=0.016, diastolic BP (DBP - from 110 to 95 mm Hg (p=0.019 12 months after the renal denervation. Average daily SBP decreased from 148 to 137 mm Hg (p=0.092, average daily DBP - from 90 to 80 mm Hg (p=0.401. Plasma creatinine level and glomerular filtration rate remained within the reference range at a baseline and in 12 months. Left ventricular hypertrophy measured by echocardiography has not changed significantly. No significant heart rate variability dynamics has been found.Conclusion. Renal denervation is a promising treatment for resistant HT. The effect of renal denervation on the dynamics of left ventricular hypertrophy and heart rate variability requires updating.

  5. RENAL DENERVATION IN THE TREATMENT OF RESISTANT HYPERTENSION: RESULTS OF A ONE-YEAR OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sulimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the effect of renal denervation on blood pressure (BP, myocardium function and vegetative status in patients with resistant hypertension (HT.Material and methods. Patients with a provisional resistant HT diagnosis (n=62; 41.3% male were included into the study. 17 patients were selected for renal denervation after correction of previous antihypertensive therapy and examination to exclude symptomatic HT. Two patients refused the procedure, 1 patient hadn’t undergone renal denervation due to anatomical features (renal artery diameter <4 mm. Renal denervation was performed in 14 patients. Office and average daily BP, kidney function, the severity of left ventricular hypertrophy and heart rate variability were assessed initially and after the intervention.Results. Office systolic BP (SBP decreased from 165 to 150 mm Hg (p=0.016, diastolic BP (DBP - from 110 to 95 mm Hg (p=0.019 12 months after the renal denervation. Average daily SBP decreased from 148 to 137 mm Hg (p=0.092, average daily DBP - from 90 to 80 mm Hg (p=0.401. Plasma creatinine level and glomerular filtration rate remained within the reference range at a baseline and in 12 months. Left ventricular hypertrophy measured by echocardiography has not changed significantly. No significant heart rate variability dynamics has been found.Conclusion. Renal denervation is a promising treatment for resistant HT. The effect of renal denervation on the dynamics of left ventricular hypertrophy and heart rate variability requires updating.

  6. Severe neuromuscular denervation of clinically relevant muscles in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Karen K Y; Gibbs, Rebecca M; Feng, Zhihua; Ko, Chien-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a motoneuron disease caused by a deficiency of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, is characterized by motoneuron loss and muscle weakness. It remains unclear whether widespread loss of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) is involved in SMA pathogenesis. We undertook a systematic examination of NMJ innervation patterns in >20 muscles in the SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. We found that severe denervation (<50% fully innervated endplates) occurs selectively in many vulnerable axial muscles and several appendicular muscles at the disease end stage. Since these vulnerable muscles were located throughout the body and were comprised of varying muscle fiber types, it is unlikely that muscle location or fiber type determines susceptibility to denervation. Furthermore, we found a similar extent of neurofilament accumulation at NMJs in both vulnerable and resistant muscles before the onset of denervation, suggesting that neurofilament accumulation does not predict subsequent NMJ denervation. Since vulnerable muscles were initially innervated, but later denervated, loss of innervation in SMA may be attributed to defects in synapse maintenance. Finally, we found that denervation was amendable by trichostatin A (TSA) treatment, which increased innervation in clinically relevant muscles in TSA-treated SMNΔ7 mice. Our findings suggest that neuromuscular denervation in vulnerable muscles is a widespread pathology in SMA, and can serve as a preparation for elucidating the biological basis of synapse loss, and for evaluating therapeutic efficacy.

  7. Acupuncture plus low-frequency electrical stimulation (Acu-LFES) attenuates denervation-induced muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhen; Hu, Li; Cheng, Jinzhong; Klein, Janet D; Hassounah, Faten; Cai, Hui; Li, Min; Wang, Haidong; Wang, Xiaonan H

    2016-02-15

    Muscle wasting occurs in a variety of clinical situations, including denervation. There is no effective pharmacological treatment for muscle wasting. In this study, we used a tibial nerve denervation model to test acupuncture plus low-frequency electric stimulation (Acu-LFES) as a therapeutic strategy for muscle atrophy. Acupuncture needles were connected to an SDZ-II electronic acupuncture device delivering pulses at 20 Hz and 1 mA; the treatment was 15 min daily for 2 wk. Acu-LFES prevented soleus and plantaris muscle weight loss and increased muscle cross-sectional area in denervated mice. The abundances of Pax7, MyoD, myogenin, and embryonic myosin heavy chain were significantly increased by Acu-LFES in both normal and denervated muscle. The number of central nuclei was increased in Acu-LFES-treated muscle fibers. Phosphorylation of Akt was downregulated by denervation leading to a decline in muscle mass; however, Acu-LFES prevented the denervation-induced decline largely by upregulation of the IGF-1 signaling pathway. Acu-LFES reduced the abundance of muscle catabolic proteins forkhead O transcription factor and myostatin, contributing to the attenuated muscle atrophy. Acu-LFES stimulated the expression of macrophage markers (F4/80, IL-1b, and arginase-1) and inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IFNγ, and TNFα) in normal and denervated muscle. Acu-LFES also stimulated production of the muscle-specific microRNAs miR-1 and miR-206. We conclude that Acu-LFES is effective in counteracting denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy and increasing muscle regeneration. Upregulation of IGF-1, downregulation of myostatin, and alteration of microRNAs contribute to the attenuation of muscle atrophy in denervated mice. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. [Effect of denervation on macromolecular metabolism in electric tissue of Electrophorus electricus (L)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcato Ribeiro, A F; Chagas, C

    1975-11-10

    Unilateral denervation of the principal electric organ of the Electrophorus electricus produces in the denervated an increase of its content of RNA. This increase results, as shown by radioactive incorporation, from an increase in RNA synthesis and is followed by an increase in aminoacid incorporation by proteins. Protein concentration does not change significantly, implying that a change of the proteic pattern occurs. The increase in the RNA content follows denervation rather rapidly but comes down to approximately 10% of the initial value sixty days afterwards.

  9. Susceptibility of Skeletal Muscle to Coxsackie A2 Virus Infection: Effects of Botulinum Toxin and Denervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Clifford G.; Drachman, Daniel B.; Pestronk, Alan; Narayan, Opendra

    1984-02-01

    Coxsackie A viruses can infect denervated but not innervated mature skeletal muscles. The role of synaptic transmission in preventing susceptibility to Coxsackievirus infection was studied by surgically denervating leg muscles of mice or injecting the muscles with botulinum toxin to block quantal release of acetylcholine. Control muscles were injected with heat-inactivated toxin. Subsequent injection of Coxsackie A2 virus resulted in extensive virus replication and tissue destruction in the denervated and botulinum toxin-treated muscles, while the control muscles showed only minimal changes. This suggests that the susceptibility of skeletal muscle to Coxsackievirus infection is regulated by synaptic transmission.

  10. Exercise-induced increase in dog adipose tissue blood flow before and after denervation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, J; Madsen, J

    1986-01-01

    Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow was examined during rest and exercise in the inguinal fat pads of four female dogs using the Xe wash-out technique. The experiments were performed before and after denervation of one of the pads. No difference between the resting flows in the two pads could...... be demonstrated either before or after denervation. The flow increased about two-fold on average from rest to exercise. This response was similar before and after denervation. It is concluded that direct sympathetic innervation is not involved in the regulation of adipose tissue blood flow during exercise....

  11. Increase in ubiquitin-protein conjugates concomitant with the increase in proteolysis in rat skeletal muscle during starvation and atrophy denervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, S. S.; Haas, A. L.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid loss of skeletal-muscle protein during starvation and after denervation occurs primarily through increased rates of protein breakdown and activation of a non-lysosomal ATP-dependent proteolytic process. To investigate whether protein flux through the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway is enhanced, as was suggested by related studies, we measured, using specific polyclonal antibodies, the levels of Ub-conjugated proteins in normal and atrophying muscles. The content of these critical intermediates had increased 50-250% after food deprivation in the extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles 2 days after denervation. Like rates of proteolysis, the amount of Ub-protein conjugates and the fraction of Ub conjugated to proteins increased progressively during food deprivation and returned to normal within 1 day of refeeding. During starvation, muscles of adrenalectomized rats failed to increase protein breakdown, and they showed 50% lower levels of Ub-protein conjugates than those of starved control animals. The changes in the pools of Ub-conjugated proteins (the substrates for the 26S proteasome) thus coincided with and can account for the alterations in overall proteolysis. In this pathway, large multiubiquitinated proteins are preferentially degraded, and the Ub-protein conjugates that accumulated in atrophying muscles were of high molecular mass (> 100 kDa). When innervated and denervated gastrocnemius muscles were fractionated, a significant increase in ubiquitinated proteins was found in the myofibrillar fraction, the proteins of which are preferentially degraded on denervation, but not in the soluble fraction. Thus activation of this proteolytic pathway in atrophying muscles probably occurs initially by increasing Ub conjugation to cell proteins. The resulting accumulation of Ub-protein conjugates suggests that their degradation by the 26S proteasome complex subsequently becomes rate-limiting in these catabolic states.

  12. Regional sympathetic denervation after myocardial infarction: a follow-up study using [123I]MIBG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podio, V; Spinnler, M T; Spandonari, T; Moretti, C; Castellano, G; Bessone, M; Brusca, A

    1995-12-01

    Previous studies in dogs have shown that experimental infarction produces myocardial sympathetic denervation not only in the infarcted area, but also in a region apical to the infarction. In these dogs MIBG myocardial scintigraphy detected denervation but returned to normal in a few months at which time reinnervation was shown to have occurred. Myocardial sympathetic denervation was studied with MIBG scintigraphy in ten patients after their first acute transmural myocardial infarction; scans were repeated at 4 months, one year and 30 months to follow the time course of possible reinnervation. Except during the first 48 hours following the infarction, no therapy except for antiaggregants was administered to the patients; during this follow-up period no cardiac events were seen. One week after infarction, comparison of MIBG images with perfusion scans revealed that the denervated area was larger than the infarcted area; no difference in MIBG uptake by the infarcted myocardium was found during the 30 months follow-up.

  13. Intrapericardial denervation - Radial artery blood flow and heart rate responses to LBNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrapericardial denervation on the radial artery blood flow velocity (RABFV) and heart rate (HR) responses to LBNP in rhesus monkeys were investigated by measuring the RABFV transcutaneously by a continuous-wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter in order to derive an index of forearm blood flow response to low (0 to -20 mm Hg) and high (0 to -60 mm Hg) ramp exposures during supine LBNP. Four of the eight subjects were subjected to efferent and afferent cardiac denervation. It was found that, during low levels of LBNP, monkeys with cardiac denervation exhibited no cardiopulmonary baroreceptor-mediated change in the RABFV or HR, unlike the intact animals, which showed steady decreases in RABFV during both high- and low-pressure protocols. It is suggested that forearm blood flow and HR responses to low-level LBNP, along with pharmacological challenge, are viable physiological tests for verifying the completeness of atrial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor denervation.

  14. Severely atrophic human muscle fibers with nuclear misplacement survive many years of permanent denervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Carraro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Likewise in rodents, after complete spinal cord injury (SCI the lower motor neuron (LMN denervated human muscle fibers lose completely the myofibrillar apparatus and the coil distribution of myonuclei that are relocated in groups (nuclear clumps in the center of severely atrophic muscle fibers. Up to two years of LMN denervation the muscle fibers with nuclear clumps are very seldom, but in this cohort of patients the severely atrophic muscle fibers are frequent in muscle biopsies harvested three to six years after SCI. Indeed, the percentage increased to 27 ± 9% (p< 0.001, and then abruptly decreased from the 6th year onward, when fibrosis takes over to neurogenic muscle atrophy. Immunohistochemical analyses shown that nuclear misplacements occurred in both fast and slow muscle fibers. In conclusion, human muscle fibers survive permanent denervation much longer than generally accepted and relocation of nuclei is a general behavior in long term denervated muscle fibers.

  15. MRI diagnosis of muscle denervation from herpes zoster with discordant distribution of the skin rash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Amit; Sundaram, Murali [Cleveland Clinic, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Imaging Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Winalski, Carl S. [Cleveland Clinic, Section of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Imaging Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States); Cleveland Clinic, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Herpes zoster is a common disorder characterized by a painful rash along a dermatome caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus (VZV). Muscle denervation injury from motor involvement is an uncommon phenomenon. Discordant distribution of the skin rash and motor nerve involvement, presenting as a skin rash in one body part and muscle weakness or pain from nerve involvement in another body part is an even more uncommonly reported finding. We present an unusual case of muscle denervation injury resulting from motor involvement of a peripheral nerve by VZV diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging with cutaneous manifestations in a different dermatomal distribution. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no similar case reported in the English radiology literature. We suggest that whenever a radiologist notices MRI findings suggesting denervation injury and a cause not readily identified, VZV-related denervation injury should be included in the differential diagnosis, especially in an older immunocompromised patient. (orig.)

  16. Effect of thoracoscopic splanchnic denervation on pain processing in chronic pancreatitis patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buscher, H.C.J.L.; Goor, H. van; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Central sensitisation due to visceral pancreatic nociceptive input may play an important role in chronic pancreatitis pain. Using quantitative sensory testing (QST), this first study investigates whether thoracoscopic splanchnic denervation (TSD), performed to reduce nociceptive visceral

  17. Partial sympathetic denervation of the rat epididymis permits fertilization but inhibits embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, D D; Crone, J K; Chamness, S L; Klinefelter, G R; Chang, T S

    1997-01-01

    The rat cauda epididymidis receives sympathetic innervation from the inferior mesenteric ganglion (IMG). We have previously demonstrated that surgical removal of the IMG and proximal hypogastric nerves (IMG denervation) results in significant and cauda-specific changes in epididymal sperm transport, sperm motility, luminal fluid protein composition, and tissue histology. In the present study we used natural mating trials and intrauterine insemination (IUI) techniques to determine whether or not IMG denervation affects male fertility and reproductive capacity. For the initial studies, adult male Sprague Dawley rats were mated with estrous females 1 and 4 weeks following IMG denervation. Nine days after mating, uterine implantation sites and corpora lutea (CL) were counted. In females mated with sham-operated control males, 85.8% of ovulated oocytes were fertilized and subsequently implanted. In contrast, females mated with IMG-denervated males 1 or 4 weeks following surgery had 0% and 3.5%, respectively, of ovulated oocytes fertilized and implanted. For rats maintained 21 days after mating, an average of 13 +/- 1 pups were delivered by each of nine females mated with sham-operated control male rats; whereas, only seven morphologically normal pups were delivered by one of 14 females mated with IMG-denervated male rats. Additional experiments demonstrated that the decrement in offspring was, in part, due to a significant decrease in the number of spermatozoa in the female uterus following mating with IMG-denervated males. To determine whether IMG denervation exerted an additional effect directly on the fertilizing ability of spermatozoa, IUI experiments were performed. Six million cauda epididymal spermatozoa from 1- or 4-week IMG-denervated males were inseminated into the uterine horns of luteinzing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH)-synchronized females and 9 days later implantation sites and CL were counted. Implantations were observed for 78%, 28%, and 25% of

  18. The outer solar system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encrenaz T.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The outer solar system extends beyond a heliocentric distance of 5 AU. It contains the giant planets and their systems (rings and satellites, the Kuiper belt, the comets (except those which approach episodically the inner solar system and, at its outer edge, the Oort cloud. The outer solar system physically corresponds to the region located outside the « snow line » which corresponded to the distance of ice condensation in the protodolar disk, and thus made the frontier between the terrestrial and the giant planets at the time of the planets’ formation. The outer solar system is charaterized by a very large variety of ob jects, even within a given class of ob jects. Each of the giant planet has its own properties, as well as each of the outer satellites and the ring systems ; all are the products of specific conditions which determined their formation and evolution processes. The existence of the Kuiper belt, suspected on theoretical bases since the 1940s, has been confirmed since 1992 with the observation of over 1200 trans-neptunian ob jects. Thanks to the the developments of more and more performing groundbased instrumentation and the use of large telescopes, these ob jects are now studies in a statistical way, both dynamically and physically, and these studies are precious for constraining the early formation models of the solar system.

  19. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor inhibition prevents denervation-induced dendritic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Laurent M; Zahn, Nadine; Ferreirós, Nerea; Scholich, Klaus; Maggio, Nicola; Deller, Thomas; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-03-31

    A hallmark of several major neurological diseases is neuronal cell death. In addition to this primary pathology, secondary injury is seen in connected brain regions in which neurons not directly affected by the disease are denervated. These transneuronal effects on the network contribute considerably to the clinical symptoms. Since denervated neurons are viable, they are attractive targets for intervention. Therefore, we studied the role of Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-receptor signaling, the target of Fingolimod (FTY720), in denervation-induced dendritic atrophy. The entorhinal denervation in vitro model was used to assess dendritic changes of denervated mouse dentate granule cells. Live-cell microscopy of GFP-expressing granule cells in organotypic entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures was employed to follow individual dendritic segments for up to 6 weeks after deafferentation. A set of slice cultures was treated with FTY720 or the S1P-receptor (S1PR) antagonist VPC23019. Lesion-induced changes in S1P (mass spectrometry) and S1PR-mRNA levels (laser microdissection and qPCR) were determined. Denervation caused profound changes in dendritic stability. Dendritic elongation and retraction events were markedly increased, resulting in a net reduction of total dendritic length (TDL) during the first 2 weeks after denervation, followed by a gradual recovery in TDL. These changes were accompanied by an increase in S1P and S1PR1- and S1PR3-mRNA levels, and were not observed in slice cultures treated with FTY720 or VPC23019. We conclude that inhibition of S1PR signaling prevents dendritic destabilization and denervation-induced dendrite loss. These results suggest a novel neuroprotective effect for pharmaceuticals targeting neural S1PR pathways.

  20. Renal sympathetic nervous system and the effects of denervation on renal arteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arun; Kannan; Raul; Ivan; Medina; Nagapradeep; Nagajothi; Saravanan; Balamuthusamy

    2014-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is associated with chronic activation of the sympathetic nervous system resulting in various comorbidities. The prevalence of resistant hypertension is often under estimated due to various reasons. Activation of sympathetic nervous system at the renal-as well as systemic-level contributes to the increased level of catecholamines and resulting increase in the blood pressure. This increased activity was demonstrated by increased muscle sympathetic nerve activity and renal and total body noradrenaline spillover. Apart from the hypertension, it is hypothesized to be associated with insulin resistance, congestive heart failure and obstructive sleep apnea. Renal denervation is a novel procedure where the sympathetic afferent and efferent activity is reduced by various techniques and has been used successfully to treat drug-resistant hypertension improvement of various metabolic derangements.Renal denervation has the unique advantage of offering the denervation at the renal level, thus mitigating the systemic side effects. Renal denervation can be done by various techniques including radiofrequency ablation, ultrasound guided ablation and chemical ablation. Various trials evaluated the role of renal denervation in the management of resistant hypertension and have found promising results. More studies are underway to evaluate the role of renal denervation in patients presenting with resistant hypertension in different scenarios. Appropriate patient selection might be the key in determining the effectiveness of the procedure.

  1. Diagnostic signs of motor neuropathy in MR neurography: Nerve lesions and muscle denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Daniel; Pham, Mirko; Bendszus, Martin; Baeumer, Philipp [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Weiler, Markus [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Neurooncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heiland, Sabine [Heidelberg University Hospital, Section of Experimental Radiology, Department of Neuroradiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the diagnostic contribution of T2-w nerve lesions and of muscle denervation in peripheral motor neuropathies by magnetic resonance neurography (MRN). Fifty-one patients with peripheral motor neuropathies underwent high-resolution MRN by large coverage axial T2-w sequences of the upper arm, elbow, and forearm. Images were evaluated by two blinded readers for T2-w signal alterations of median, ulnar, and radial nerves, and for denervation in respective target muscle groups. All 51 patients displayed nerve lesions in at least one of three nerves, and 43 out of 51 patients showed denervation in at least one target muscle group of these nerves. In 21 out of 51 patients, the number of affected nerves matched the number of affected target muscle groups. In the remaining 30 patients, T2-w lesions were encountered more frequently than target muscle group denervation. In 153 nerve-muscle pairs, 72 showed denervation, but only one had increased muscle signal without a lesion in the corresponding nerve. MRN-based diagnosis of peripheral motor neuropathies is more likely by visualization of peripheral nerve lesions than by denervation in corresponding target muscles. Increased muscular T2-w signal without concomitant nerve lesions should raise suspicion of an etiology other than peripheral neuropathy. (orig.)

  2. Regional sympathetic denervation after myocardial infarction in humans detected noninvasively using I-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanton, M.S.; Tuli, M.M.; Radtke, N.L.; Heger, J.J.; Miles, W.M.; Mock, B.H.; Burt, R.W.; Wellman, H.N.; Zipes, D.P. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, IN (USA))

    1989-11-15

    Transmural myocardial infarction in dogs produces denervation of sympathetic nerves in viable myocardium apical to the infarct that may be arrhythmogenic. It is unknown whether sympathetic denervation occurs in humans. The purpose of this study was to use iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiolabeled guanethidine analog that is actively taken up by sympathetic nerve terminals, to image noninvasively the cardiac sympathetic nerves in patients with and without ventricular arrhythmias after myocardial infarction. Results showed that 10 of 12 patients with spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias after myocardial infarction exhibited regions of thallium-201 uptake indicating viable perfused myocardium, with no MIBG uptake. Such a finding is consistent with sympathetic denervation. One patient had frequent episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia induced at exercise testing that was eliminated by beta-adrenoceptor blockade. Eleven of the 12 patients had ventricular tachycardia induced at electrophysiologic study and metoprolol never prevented induction. Sympathetic denervation was also detected in two of seven postinfarction patients without ventricular arrhythmias. Normal control subjects had no regions lacking MIBG uptake. This study provides evidence that regional sympathetic denervation occurs in humans after myocardial infarction and can be detected noninvasively by comparing MIBG and thallium-201 images. Although the presence of sympathetic denervation may be related to the onset of spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias in some patients, it does not appear to be related to sustained ventricular tachycardia induced at electrophysiologic study.

  3. Improved functional recovery of denervated skeletal muscle after temporary sensory nerve innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, J R; Veltri, K L; Chamberlain, D; Fahnestock, M

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged muscle denervation results in poor functional recovery after nerve repair. The possible protective effect of temporary sensory innervation of denervated muscle, prior to motor nerve repair, has been examined in the rat. Soleus and gastrocnemius muscles were denervated by cutting the tibial nerve, and the peroneal nerve was then sutured to the transected distal tibial nerve stump either immediately or after two, four or six months. In half of the animals with delayed repair, the saphenous (sensory) nerve was temporarily attached to the distal nerve stump. Muscles were evaluated three months after the peroneal-to-tibial union, and were compared with each other, with unoperated control muscles and with untreated denervated muscles. After four to six months of sensory "protection", gastrocnemius muscles weighed significantly more than unprotected muscles, and both gastrocnemius and soleus muscles exhibited better preservation of their structure, with less fiber atrophy and connective tissue hyperplasia. The maximum compound action potentials were significantly larger in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles following sensory protection, irrespective of the delay in motor nerve union. Isometric force, although less than in control animals and in those with immediate nerve repair, remained reasonably constant after sensory protection, while in unprotected muscles there was a progressive and significant decline as the period of denervation lengthened. We interpret these results as showing that, although incapable of forming excitable neuromuscular junctions, sensory nerves can nevertheless exert powerful trophic effects on denervated muscle fibers. We propose that these findings indicate a useful strategy for improving the outcome of peripheral nerve surgery.

  4. Dynamics of electron impact ionization of the outer and inner valence (1t{sub 2} and 2a{sub 1}) molecular orbitals of CH{sub 4} at intermediate and large ion recoil momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahmam-Bennani, A; Naja, A; Staicu Casagrande, E M; Okumus, N [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires (LCAM), Universite Paris-Sud 11, Bat. 351, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Dal Cappello, C [Laboratoire de Physique Moleculaire et des Collisions, Institut de Physique, ICPMB (FR 2843), Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, 1 rue Arago, 57078 Metz Cedex 3 (France); Charpentier, I [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux (UMR 7554), Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex 1 (France); Houamer, S [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systemes Dynamiques, Universite Ferhat Abbas, Setif (Algeria)

    2009-08-28

    The triply differential cross section has been measured for electron-impact ionization of the outer valence 1t{sub 2} and the inner valence 2a{sub 1} orbitals of methane using the (e,2e) technique with coplanar asymmetric kinematics. The measurements are performed at scattered electron energy of 500 eV, ejected electron energy of 12, 37 and 74 eV and for scattering angle of the fast outgoing electron of 6 deg. This kinematics is characterized by a target ion recoil momentum ranging from moderate (0.25 au) to very large (3.2 au) values. The results are compared with theoretical cross sections calculated using the 1CW and the BBK models recently extended to molecules. The experimental cross sections exhibit a very large recoil scattering, especially for the inner 2a{sub 1} molecular orbital, which is not predicted by the theory. The differences between experiment and theory are attributed to the very strong scattering from the ion, not properly accounted for by theory. This indicates the need for further theoretical developments as well as experimental investigations in order to correctly model the process of molecular ionization.

  5. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYROTAXANES MADE FROM α-CDs THREADED ONTO TRIBLOCK COPOLYMERS WITH PEG AS A CENTRAL AXLE AND FLANKED BY TWO LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT POLYSTYRENES AS OUTER STOPPERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ming Tong; Dan-dan Hou; Xiao-wen Zhang; Lin Ye; Ai-ying Zhang; Zeng-guo Feng

    2008-01-01

    A study has been conducted on the synthesis and characterization of a kind of novel polyrotaxanes comprising α cyclodextrins (α-CDs) threaded on triblock copolymers with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as a central axle and flanked by two low molecular weight polystyrenes as outer stoppers.Styrene was allowed to telomerize with polypseudorotaxanes as chain transfer agents made from the self-assembly of a distal thiol-capped PEG with a varying amount of α-CDs in the presence of a redox initiation system at 40℃ in aqueous solutions.The resulting polyrotaxanes were characterized in detail by 1H-NMR,FTIR,XRD,TG and DSC analyses.The findings from the study demonstrated that the low molecular weight polystyrenes were successfully attached to two axle terminals of polypseudorotaxanes,and the number of α-CDs threaded onto the PEG backbone was tunable by varying its molar feeding ratio to some extent,while the polymerization degree of PS nearly remained constant in this radical telomerization process.

  6. Denervation causes fiber atrophy and myosin heavy chain co-expression in senescent skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L Rowan

    Full Text Available Although denervation has long been implicated in aging muscle, the degree to which it is causes the fiber atrophy seen in aging muscle is unknown. To address this question, we quantified motoneuron soma counts in the lumbar spinal cord using choline acetyl transferase immunhistochemistry and quantified the size of denervated versus innervated muscle fibers in the gastrocnemius muscle using the in situ expression of the denervation-specific sodium channel, Nav₁.₅, in young adult (YA and senescent (SEN rats. To gain insights into the mechanisms driving myofiber atrophy, we also examined the myofiber expression of the two primary ubiquitin ligases necessary for muscle atrophy (MAFbx, MuRF1. MN soma number in lumbar spinal cord declined 27% between YA (638±34 MNs×mm⁻¹ and SEN (469±13 MNs×mm⁻¹. Nav₁.₅ positive fibers (1548±70 μm² were 35% smaller than Nav₁.₅ negative fibers (2367±78 μm²; P<0.05 in SEN muscle, whereas Nav₁.₅ negative fibers in SEN were only 7% smaller than fibers in YA (2553±33 μm²; P<0.05 where no Nav₁.₅ labeling was seen, suggesting denervation is the primary cause of aging myofiber atrophy. Nav₁.₅ positive fibers had higher levels of MAFbx and MuRF1 (P<0.05, consistent with involvement of the proteasome proteolytic pathway in the atrophy of denervated muscle fibers in aging muscle. In summary, our study provides the first quantitative assessment of the contribution of denervation to myofiber atrophy in aging muscle, suggesting it explains the majority of the atrophy we observed. This striking result suggests a renewed focus should be placed on denervation in seeking understanding of the causes of and treatments for aging muscle atrophy.

  7. Arachidonic acid incorporation and turnover is decreased in sympathetically denervated rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Casey B; McHowat, Jane; Rosenberger, Thad A; Rapoport, Stanley I; Murphy, Eric J

    2005-06-01

    Heart sympathetic denervation can accompany Parkinson's disease, but the effect of this denervation on cardiac lipid-mediated signaling is unknown. To address this issue, rats were sympathetically denervated with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 50 mg/kg ip) and infused with 170 muCi/kg of either [1-(14)C]palmitic acid ([1-(14)C]16:0) or [1-(14)C]arachidonic acid ([1-(14)C]20:4 n-6), and kinetic parameters were assessed using a steady-state radiotracer model. Heart norepinephrine and epinephrine levels were decreased 82 and 85%, respectively, in denervated rats, and this correlated with a 34% reduction in weight gain in treated rats. Fatty acid tracer uptake was not significantly different between groups for either tracer, although the dilution coefficient lambda was increased in [1-(14)C]20:4 n-6-infused rats, which indicates that less 20:4 n-6 was recycled in denervated rats. In [1-(14)C]16:0-infused rats, incorporation rate and turnover values of 16:0 in stable lipid compartments were unchanged, which is indicative of preservation of beta-oxidation. In [1-(14)C]20:4 n-6-infused rats, there were dramatic reductions in incorporation rate (60-84%) and turnover value (56-85%) in denervated rats that were dependent upon the lipid compartment. In addition, phospholipase A(2) activity was reduced 40% in treated rats, which is consistent with the reduction observed in 20:4 n-6 turnover. These results demonstrate marked reductions in 20:4 n-6 incorporation rate and turnover in sympathetic denervated rats and thereby suggest an effect on lipid-mediated signal transduction mediated by a reduction in phospholipase A(2) activity.

  8. Renal denervation attenuates NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress and hypertension in rats with hydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleli, Maria; Al-Mashhadi, Ammar; Yang, Ting; Larsson, Erik; Wåhlin, Nils; Jensen, Boye L; G Persson, A Erik; Carlström, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Hydronephrosis is associated with the development of salt-sensitive hypertension. Studies have suggested that increased sympathetic nerve activity and oxidative stress play important roles in hypertension and the modulation of salt sensitivity. The present study primarily aimed to examine the role of renal sympathetic nerve activity in the development of hypertension in rats with hydronephrosis. In addition, we aimed to investigate if NADPH oxidase (NOX) function could be affected by renal denervation. Partial unilateral ureteral obstruction (PUUO) was created in 3-wk-old rats to induce hydronephrosis. Sham surgery or renal denervation was performed at the same time. Blood pressure was measured during normal, high-, and low-salt diets. The renal excretion pattern, NOX activity, and expression as well as components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system were characterized after treatment with the normal salt diet. On the normal salt diet, rats in the PUUO group had elevated blood pressure compared with control rats (115 ± 3 vs. 87 ± 1 mmHg, P Renal denervation in PUUO rats attenuated both hypertension (97 ± 3 mmHg) and salt sensitivity (5 ± 1 mmHg, P renal excretion pattern, whereas the degree of renal fibrosis and inflammation was not changed. NOX activity and expression as well as renin and ANG II type 1A receptor expression were increased in the renal cortex from PUUO rats and normalized by denervation. Plasma Na(+) and K(+) levels were elevated in PUUO rats and normalized after renal denervation. Finally, denervation in PUUO rats was also associated with reduced NOX expression, superoxide production, and fibrosis in the heart. In conclusion, renal denervation attenuates hypertension and restores the renal excretion pattern, which is associated with reduced renal NOX and components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. This study emphasizes a link between renal nerves, the development of hypertension, and modulation of NOX function.

  9. Functional recovery of completely denervated muscle: implications for innervation of tissue-engineered muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Bum; Olson, Jennifer L; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2012-09-01

    Tissue-engineered muscle has been proposed as a solution to repair volumetric muscle defects and to restore muscle function. To achieve functional recovery, engineered muscle tissue requires integration of the host nerve. In this study, we investigated whether denervated muscle, which is analogous to tissue-engineered muscle tissue, can be reinnervated and can recover muscle function using an in vivo model of denervation followed by neurotization. The outcomes of this investigation may provide insights on the ability of tissue-engineered muscle to integrate with the host nerve and acquire normal muscle function. Eighty Lewis rats were classified into three groups: a normal control group (n=16); a denervated group in which sciatic innervations to the gastrocnemius muscle were disrupted (n=32); and a transplantation group in which the denervated gastrocnemius was repaired with a common peroneal nerve graft into the muscle (n=32). Neurofunctional behavior, including extensor postural thrust (EPT), withdrawal reflex latency (WRL), and compound muscle action potential (CMAP), as well as histological evaluations using alpha-bungarotoxin and anti-NF-200 were performed at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks (n=8) after surgery. We found that EPT was improved by transplantation of the nerve grafts, but the EPT values in the transplanted animals at 12 weeks postsurgery were still significantly lower than those measured for the normal control group at 4 weeks (EPT, 155.0±38.9 vs. 26.3±13.8 g, ptissue is able to regenerate neuromuscular junctions within denervated muscle, and thus the muscle can recover partial function. However, the function of the denervated muscle remains in the subnormal range even at 12 weeks after direct nerve transplantation. These results suggest that tissue-engineered muscle, which is similarly denervated, could be innervated and become functional in vivo if it is properly integrated with the host nerve.

  10. Experimental study on aortic remodeling in sinoaortic denervated rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Chao-yu; TAO Xia; GUAN Yun-feng; YANG You-cai; CHU Zheng-xu; SU Ding-feng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the aortic remodeling produced by chronic sinoaortic denervation (SAD) and its time course, and to study the role of humoral factor in the SAD-induced aortic remodeling. Methods: In rats with chronic SAD or sham operation, the aortic structure was measured by computer-assisted image analysis, the aortic function by isolated artery preparation, and angiotensin Ⅱ concentration by radioimmunoassay. Results and Conclusion: The aortic structural remodeling developed progressively at 4, 8, 16 and 32 weeks after SAD. Aortic structural remodeling after SAD expressed mainly as aortic hypertrophy due to SMC growth and collagen accumulation. The aortic contraction elicited by norepinephrine (NE) was progressively increased 8, 16 and 32 weeks after SAD. The aortic relaxation elicited by acetylcholine (ACh) was depressed 8, 16 and 32 weeks after SAD. In addition, in 32-week SAD rats the NE-induced contraction was not increased by endothelial denudation. These indicated that the increased contraction and depressed relaxation after SAD were related to the change of endothelium and/or the change of interaction between endothelium and SMC. In 10-week SAD rats, plasma angiotensin Ⅱ concentration remained unchanged, whereas aortic angiotensin Ⅱ concentration was significantly increased, suggesting that activation of tissue renin-angiotensin system may be involved in SAD-induced aortic remodeling.

  11. Forkhead box O1 and muscle RING finger 1 protein expression in atrophic and hypertrophic denervated mouse skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors and E3 ubiquitin ligases such as Muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) are believed to participate in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass. The function of FoxO transcription factors is regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation. In the present study FoxO1 protein expression, phosphorylation and acetylation as well as MuRF1 protein expression, were examined in atrophic and hypertrophic denervated skeletal muscle. Methods Protein expression, phosphorylation and acetylation were studied semi-quantitatively using Western blots. Muscles studied were 6-days denervated mouse hind-limb muscles (anterior tibial as well as pooled gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, all atrophic), 6-days denervated mouse hemidiaphragm muscles (hypertrophic) and innervated control muscles. Total muscle homogenates were used as well as separated nuclear and cytosolic fractions of innervated and 6-days denervated anterior tibial and hemidiaphragm muscles. Results Expression of FoxO1 and MuRF1 proteins increased 0.3-3.7-fold in all 6-days denervated muscles studied, atrophic as well as hypertrophic. Phosphorylation of FoxO1 at S256 increased about 0.8-1-fold after denervation in pooled gastrocnemius and soleus muscles and in hemidiaphragm but not in unfractionated anterior tibial muscle. A small (0.2-fold) but statistically significant increase in FoxO1 phosphorylation was, however, observed in cytosolic fractions of denervated anterior tibial muscle. A statistically significant increase in FoxO1 acetylation (0.8-fold) was observed only in denervated anterior tibial muscle. Increases in total FoxO1 and in phosphorylated FoxO1 were only seen in cytosolic fractions of denervated atrophic anterior tibial muscle whereas in denervated hypertrophic hemidiaphragm both total FoxO1 and phosphorylated FoxO1 increased in cytosolic as well as in nuclear fractions. MuRF1 protein expression increased in cytosolic as well

  12. Diffusion-weighted MRI of denervated muscle: a clinical and experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holl, Nathalie; Bierry, Guillaume; Moser, Thomas; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Kremer, Stephane [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie 2, Strasbourg (France); Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Departement de Neurologie, BP 426, Strasbourg (France); Mohr, Michel [Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Departement d' Anatomie Pathologique, Strasbourg (France); Loeffler, Jean-Philippe [INSERM U692, Laboratoire de Signalisations Moleculaires et Neurodegenerescence, Faculte de Medecine, Strasbourg (France)

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate skeletal muscle denervation using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI). Sciatic nerve axotomy was performed in a group of nine New Zealand White rabbits, and electromyographic (EMG), pathological, and DWMRI studies were conducted on ipsilateral hamstring muscles 1 and 8 days after axotomy. In addition, DWMRI studies were carried out on leg muscles of ten patients with acute and subacute lumbosacral radiculopathy. High intensity signals on short tau inversion recovery (STIR) magnetic resonance imaging and an increased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were observed in denervated muscles of the animals 1 and 8 days after axotomy as well as in denervated muscles of the patients with radiculopathy. In the clinical study, ADC was 1.26{+-}0.18 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s in normal muscle and increased to 1.56{+-}0.23 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s in denervated muscles (p =0.0016). In animals, EMG and muscle pathological studies were normal 1 day after axotomy, and the muscles demonstrated spontaneous activity on EMG and neurogenic atrophy on histological studies 7 days later. This DWMRI study demonstrates that enlargement of extracellular fluid space in muscle denervation is an early phenomenon occurring several days before the appearance of EMG and histological abnormalities. (orig.)

  13. Interaction of thyroid state and denervation on skeletal myosin heavy chain expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, F.; Arnold, C.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of altered thyroid state and denervation (Den) on skeletal myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the plantaris and soleus muscles. Rats were subjected to unilateral denervation (Den) and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) euthyroid; (2) hyperthyroid; (3) and hypothyroid. Denervation caused severe muscle atrophy and muscle-type specific MHC transformation. Denervation transformed the soleus to a faster muscle, and its effects required the presence of circulating thyroid hormone. In contrast, denervation transformed the plantaris to a slower muscle independently of thyroid state. Furthermore, thyroid hormone effects did not depend upon innervation status in the soleus, while they required the presence of the nerve in the plantaris. Collectively, these findings suggest that both thyroid hormone and intact nerve (a) differentially affect MHC transformations in fast and slow muscle; and (b) are important factors in regulating the optimal expression of both type I and IIB MHC genes. This research suggests that for patients with nerve damage and/or paralysis, both muscle mass and biochemical properties can also be affected by the thyroid state.

  14. Morphological alterations in small intestine of rats with myenteric plexus denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, M; Kilinç, M; Hatipoğlu, E S

    2004-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of myenteric denervation by benzalkonium chloride (BAC) on small intestine morphology in the rat, and whether segmental myenteric denervation alters morphology elsewhere in the small intestine. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into 4 groups: control (0.9% NaCl); denervation (0.062% BAC); chemical inflammation (5% acetic acid), and intraluminal stasis produced by partial obstruction. 28 days after operation tissue samples were taken from the treated segment, 10 cm distal to the treated segment, and 20 cm proximal to the treated segment. Morphological changes and the number of ganglion cells were examined under the light microscope. BAC application reduced the number of myenteric neurons by 85% in the treated segment. Denervation increased villus height and crypt depth in the treated and proximal segments. But changes in muscle thickness were seen throughout the intestine. As a result, although myenteric plexus denervation caused mucosa morphology in the treated and proximal segments, it caused smooth muscle changes throughout the small intestine.

  15. Myenteric denervation in gastric carcinogenesis: differential modulation of nitric oxide and annexin-A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polli-Lopes, Ana Cláudia; Estofolete, Cássia F; Oliani, Sonia M; Zucoloto, Sérgio; Cunha, Fernando Q; Gil, Cristiane D

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the properties of endogenous nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and annexin-A1 (ANXA1) and determined how they can be exploited in the N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced gastric carcinogenesis and myenteric denervation model. Male Wistar rats were treated with MNNG and/or aminoguanidine (AG) for 20 weeks. In another set of experiments, rats with nondenervated and denervated stomachs were treated with MNNG or water for 28 weeks. Fragments of the pyloric region were processed for histopathology, NOS activity, and immunohistochemistry to explore the activity and expression of constitutive (cNOS) and inducible (iNOS) NO synthase and their relationship with annexin-A1 (ANXA1) expression. NO inhibition by AG increased the percentage of animals with adenocarcinomas (~29%) compared with the untreated MNNG group (~4%). Myenteric denervation did not alter NOS activity. cNOS activity was significantly greater in nondernervated and denervated stomachs with or without lesions (Pactivity (Pactivity in normal stomachs and outside the lesion area was considerably higher than inside it (Pmyenteric denervation. In conclusion, NO protects against the development of gastric adenocarcinomas. The pattern of ANXA1 expression was not associated with NOS activity or expression, suggesting that NO and ANXA1 act in gastric tumors in disparate pathways.

  16. AMP-activated kinase α2 deficiency protects mice from denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuting; Meng, Jin; Tang, Yinglong; Wang, Ting; Wei, Bin; Feng, Run; Gong, Bing; Wang, Huiwen; Ji, Guangju; Lu, Zhongbing

    2016-06-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of skeletal muscle metabolic pathways. Recently, AMPK activation by AICAR has been shown to increase myofibrillar protein degradation in C2C12 myotubes via stimulating autophagy and ubiquitin proteasome system. However, the impact of AMPKα on denervation induced muscle atrophy has not been tested. In this study, we performed sciatic denervation on hind limb muscles in both wild type (WT) and AMPKα2(-/-) mice. We found that AMPKα was phosphorylated in atrophic muscles following denervation. In addition, deletion of AMPKα2 significantly attenuated denervation induced skeletal muscle wasting and protein degradation, as evidenced by preserved muscle mass and myofiber area, as well as lower levels of ubiquitinated protein, Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expression, and LC3-II/I ratio in tibial anterior (TA) muscles. Interestingly, the phosphorylated FoxO3a at Ser253 was significantly decreased in atrophic TA muscles, which was preserved in AMPKα2(-/-) mice. Collectively, our data support the notion that the activation of AMPKα2 contributes to the atrophic effects of denervation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of renal denervation on atrial tachyarrhythmia recurrence in patients with resistant hypertension and atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Д. А. Заманов

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this prospective randomized study was to assess the impact of renal artery denervation on patients with refractory AF and drug resistant hypertension, for whom pulmonary vein isolation (PVI was recommended.Methods. Patients with symptomatic paroxysmal or persistent AF refractory to ≥2 antiarrhythmic drugs and drug-resistant hypertension (systolic blood pressure >160 mm Hg despite triple drug therapy were eligible for enrolment. 50 consenting patients were randomized to PVI only (n = 25 or PVI with renal artery denervation (n = 25. All patients were followed during 18 months to assess sinus rhythm stability and to monitor blood pressure changes.Results. Out of 25, 16 (64% patients treated with PVI and renal denervation versus 6 (24% of the 25 patients in the PVI-only group (p=0.004, log-rank test were AF-free at 18-month post ablation follow-up. At the end of follow-up, significant reductions in systolic (–27±4 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure (–11±2 mm Hg were observed in patients treated with PVI with renal denervation, with no significant changes in the PVI only group. Conclusion. Renal artery denervation combined with PVI reduces AF recurrence and systolic/diastolic blood pressure, as compared with conventional AF ablation, in patients with drug-resistant hypertension and AF.

  18. Interaction of thyroid state and denervation on skeletal myosin heavy chain expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, F.; Arnold, C.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of altered thyroid state and denervation (Den) on skeletal myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the plantaris and soleus muscles. Rats were subjected to unilateral denervation (Den) and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) euthyroid; (2) hyperthyroid; (3) and hypothyroid. Denervation caused severe muscle atrophy and muscle-type specific MHC transformation. Denervation transformed the soleus to a faster muscle, and its effects required the presence of circulating thyroid hormone. In contrast, denervation transformed the plantaris to a slower muscle independently of thyroid state. Furthermore, thyroid hormone effects did not depend upon innervation status in the soleus, while they required the presence of the nerve in the plantaris. Collectively, these findings suggest that both thyroid hormone and intact nerve (a) differentially affect MHC transformations in fast and slow muscle; and (b) are important factors in regulating the optimal expression of both type I and IIB MHC genes. This research suggests that for patients with nerve damage and/or paralysis, both muscle mass and biochemical properties can also be affected by the thyroid state.

  19. Functional Echomyography: thickness, ecogenicity, contraction and perfusion of the LMN denervated human muscle before and during h-bFES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Zanato

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Permanent denervated muscles were evaluated by ultrasound to monitor changes in morphology, thickness, contraction-relaxation kinetics and perfusion due to the electrical stimulation program of the Rise2-Italy project. In a case of monolateral lesion, morphology and ultrasonographic structure of the denervated muscles changed during the period of stimulation from a pattern typical of complete denervation-induced muscle atrophy to a pattern which might be considered “normal” when detected in an old patient. Thickness improved significantly more in the middle third of the denervated muscle, reaching the same value as the contralateral innervated muscle. Contraction-relaxation kinetics, measured by recording the muscle movements during electrical stimulation, showed an abnormal behavior of the chronically denervated muscle during the relaxation phase, which resulted to be significantly longer than in normal muscle. The long-term denervated muscles analyzed with Echo Doppler showed at rest a low resistance arterial flow that became pulsed during and after electrical stimulation. As expected, the ultra sound measured electrical stimulation-induced hyperemia lasted longer than the stimulation period. The higher than normal energy of the delivered electrical stimuli of the Vienna home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation strategy (h-b FES demonstrate that the explored muscles were still almost completely denervated during the one-year of training. In conclusion, this pilot study confirms the usefulness of Functional Echomyography in the follow-up and the positive effects of h-b FES of denervated muscles.

  20. Multimodality intra-Arterial imaging assessment of the vascular trauma induced by balloon-based and nonballoon-based renal denervation systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Karanasos (Antonios); N.M. van Mieghem (Nicolas); M.W. Bergmann (Martin W.); E.M.J. Hartman (Eline); J.M.R. Ligthart (Jürgen); E. van der Heide (Elco); C.-H. Heeger (Christian-H.); M. Ouhlous (Mohamed); F. Zijlstra (Felix); E.S. Regar (Eveline); J. Daemen (Joost)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground-Renal denervation is a new treatment considered for several possible indications. As new systems are introduced, the incidence of acute renal artery wall injury with relation to the denervation method is unknown. We investigated the acute repercussion of renal denervation on

  1. Cardiac denervation in the calf using cryoablation: functional evidence and regional tissue catecholamine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaer, J A; Wharton, J; Gordon, L; Swift, R I; Munsch, C; Inglis, G C; Polak, J M; Taylor, K M

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-six calves were subjected to a technique of cryoablation in order to establish an animal model of complete cardiac denervation. All 26 survived the procedure, and 20 were alive to be re-evaluated 2-4 weeks later. Mean heart rate in the denervated animals rose from 77 +/- 7.8 beats/min to 102 +/- 16.4 (P less than 0.01). Cryoablation abolished the heart rate responses to electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve and thoracic sympathetic trunk. The reduction in myocardial noradrenaline concentrations averaged 99% in the right atrium, 90% in the left atrium, 85% in the right ventricle and 90% in the left ventricle, when compared with tissue obtained from control animals. Cryoablation is a relatively simple means of accomplishing complete functional cardiac denervation in the calf. On the basis of the observed change in heart rate, the calf model appears to be more comparable with human heart transplant recipients than the dog.

  2. High incidence of secondary hypertension in patients referred for renal denervation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjær; Kamper, Anne-Lise; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2014-01-01

    extracted from letters and documents from referring clinics and from our physical examination. Of the 100 patients included, 68 were men and the mean age was 60 (± 12) years. Office blood pressure was 176 (± 28)/99 (± 19) mmHg and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure 156 (± 20)/88 (± 13) mmHg. The mean number......Percutaneous renal denervation is a new treatment option for patients with resistant hypertension and little is known about the eligibility of patients referred. 100 consecutive patients were referred for renal denervation from March 2011 through September 2012. Clinical data were prospectively...... of antihypertensive agents was 4.0 (± 1.6). Nearly four-fifths (82%) of the patients were categorized as having resistant hypertension based on the criteria stated by The American Heart Association's stated criteria. Nine patients declined interest in renal denervation before completing the clinical workup program...

  3. Mechanisms of accelerated proteolysis in rat soleus muscle atrophy induced by unweighting or denervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Kirby, Christopher; Rosenberg, Sara; Tome, Margaret; Chase, Peter

    1991-01-01

    A hypothesis proposed by Tischler and coworkers (Henriksen et al., 1986; Tischler et al., 1990) concerning the mechanisms of atrophy induced by unweighting or denervation was tested using rat soleus muscle from animals subjected to hindlimb suspension and denervation of muscles. The procedure included (1) measuring protein degradation in isolated muscles and testing the effects of lysosome inhibitors, (2) analyzing the lysosome permeability and autophagocytosis, (3) testing the effects of altering calcium-dependent proteolysis, and (4) evaluating in vivo the effects of various agents to determine the physiological significance of the hypothesis. The results obtained suggest that there are major differences between the mechanisms of atrophies caused by unweighting and denervation, though slower protein synthesis is an important feature common for both.

  4. Percutaneous lumbar sympathectomy: A comparison of radiofrequency denervation versus phenol neurolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynsworth, R.F. Jr.; Noe, C.E. (Baylor Univ. Medical Center, Dallas, TX (USA))

    1991-03-01

    A new percutaneous approach to sympathectomy using radiofrequency denervation has seemed to offer longer duration and less incidence of postsympathetic neuralgia as compared to phenol sympathetic blocks. To compare these techniques, 17 patients underwent either phenol lumbar sympathetic blocks (n = 9) or radiofrequency denervation (n = 8). Duration of sympathetic block was followed by a sweat test and temperature measurements. Results indicate that 89% of patients in the phenol group showed signs of sympathetic blockade after 8 weeks, as compared to 12% in the radiofrequency group (P less than 0.05). Although the incidence of post sympathetic neuralgia appears to be less with radiofrequency denervation, further refinement of needle placement to ensure complete lesioning of the sympathetic chain will be required before the technique can offer advantages over current phenol techniques.

  5. Successful accessory renal artery denervation in a patient with resistant hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Atas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal sympathetic denervation is safe and effective in patients with resistant hypertension. In all of the studies of renal artery denervation, patients with accessory renal arteries are excluded. So there is not any data regarding renal sympathetic denervation applied to the accessory renal arteries. We present a young female patient with resistant hypertension despite use of five different antihypertensive drugs. The patient had a well developed (diameter >4 mm left renal accessory. We believe that if we omitted the well developed accessory renal artery, we would not have maintained adequate blood pressure control. Thus, we applied radiofrequency ablation to both renal arteries and left accessory artery. Immediately after the procedure, the patient′s blood pressure was reduced to 110/60 mmHg and this effect was continued during the first month of follow-up.

  6. Partial cardiac sympathetic denervation after bilateral thoracic sympathectomy in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moak, Jeffrey P; Eldadah, Basil; Holmes, Courtney; Pechnik, Sandra; Goldstein, David S

    2005-06-01

    Upper thoracic sympathectomy is used to treat several disorders. Sympathetic nerve fibers emanating from thoracic ganglia innervate the heart. Whether unilateral or bilateral upper thoracic sympathectomy affects cardiac sympathetic innervation in humans in vivo has been unclear. The purpose of this study was to assess whether thoracic sympathectomy decreases cardiac sympathetic innervation, as indicated by positron emission tomographic scanning after intravenous injection of the sympathoneural imaging agent 6-[18F]fluorodopamine. Nine patients with previous upper thoracic sympathectomies (four right-sided, one left-sided, four bilateral) underwent thoracic 6-[18F]fluorodopamine scanning between 1 and 2 hours after injection of the imaging agent. In each case, a low rate of entry of norepinephrine into the arm venous drainage (norepinephrine spillover) verified upper limb sympathectomy. Data were compared with those from the interventricular septum of patients with cardiac sympathetic denervation associated with pure autonomic failure and from normal volunteers. All four patients with bilateral sympathectomy had low septal myocardial 6-[18F]fluorodopamine-derived radioactivity (2,673 +/- 92 nCi-kg/cc-mCi at an average of 89 minutes after injection) compared with normal volunteers (3,634 +/- 311 nCi-kg/cc-mCi at 83 minutes, N = 22, P = .007) and higher radioactivity than in patients with pure autonomic failure (1,320 +/- 300 nCi-kg/cc-mCi at 83 minutes, N = 7, P = .003). Patients with unilateral sympathectomy had normal 6-[18F]fluorodopamine-derived radioactivity (3,971 +/- 337 nCi-kg/cc-mCi at 87 minutes). Bilateral upper thoracic sympathectomy partly decreases cardiac sympathetic innervation density.

  7. Does Renal Artery Supply Indicate Treatment Success of Renal Denervation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Axel, E-mail: axel.schmid@uk-erlangen.de [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Ditting, Tilmann, E-mail: tilmann.ditting@uk-erlangen.de [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension (Germany); Sobotka, Paul A., E-mail: sobotka@alumni.stanford.edu [Ohio State University (United States); Veelken, Roland, E-mail: roland.veelken@uk-erlangen.de; Schmieder, Roland E., E-mail: roland.schmieder@uk-erlangen.de [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension (Germany); Uder, Michael, E-mail: michael.uder@uk-erlangen.de [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Ott, Christian, E-mail: christian.ott@uk-erlangen.de [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeRenal denervation (RDN) emerged as an innovative interventional antihypertensive therapy. With the exception of pretreatment blood pressure (BP) level, no other clear predictor for treatment efficacy is yet known. We analyzed whether the presence of multiple renal arteries has an impact on BP reduction after RDN.MethodsFifty-three patients with treatment-resistant hypertension (office BP {>=} 140/90 mmHg and 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring ({>=}130/80 mmHg) underwent bilateral catheter-based RDN. Patients were stratified into one-vessel (OV) (both sides) and at least multivessel (MV) supply at one side. Both groups were treated on one vessel at each side; in case of multiple arteries, only the dominant artery was treated on each side.ResultsBaseline clinical characteristics (including BP, age, and estimated glomerular filtration rate) did not differ between patients with OV (n = 32) and MV (n = 21). Office BP was significantly reduced in both groups at 3 months (systolic: OV -15 {+-} 23 vs. MV -16 {+-} 20 mmHg; diastolic: OV -10 {+-} 12 vs. MV -8 {+-} 11 mmHg, both p = NS) as well as 6 months (systolic: OV -18 {+-} 18 vs. MV -17 {+-} 22 mmHg; diastolic: OV -10 {+-} 10 vs. -10 {+-} 12 mmHg, both p = NS) after RDN. There was no difference in responder rate (rate of patients with office systolic BP reduction of at least 10 mmHg after 6 months) between the groups.ConclusionIn patients with multiple renal arteries, RDN of one renal artery-namely, the dominant one-is sufficient to induce BP reduction in treatment-resistant hypertension.

  8. OuterJacket

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    女子训练OuterJacket系列在面料选择方面,注入了CLIMA系列科技,保障运动过程中的舒适性。其中,个别款式更融入杜邦Tefione科技的面料,不仅防水还提供防油、防尘等多种功能,为喜欢室外运动的女生们带来全方位的保护。

  9. Adherence to Antihypertensive Treatment and the Blood Pressure-Lowering Effects of Renal Denervation in the Renal Denervation for Hypertension (DENERHTN) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Michel; Pereira, Helena; Hamdidouche, Idir; Gosse, Philippe; Monge, Matthieu; Bobrie, Guillaume; Delsart, Pascal; Mounier-Véhier, Claire; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Lantelme, Pierre; Denolle, Thierry; Dourmap-Collas, Caroline; Girerd, Xavier; Michel Halimi, Jean; Zannad, Faiez; Ormezzano, Olivier; Vaïsse, Bernard; Herpin, Daniel; Ribstein, Jean; Chamontin, Bernard; Mourad, Jean-Jacques; Ferrari, Emile; Plouin, Pierre-François; Jullien, Vincent; Sapoval, Marc; Chatellier, Gilles

    2016-09-20

    The DENERHTN trial (Renal Denervation for Hypertension) confirmed the blood pressure-lowering efficacy of renal denervation added to a standardized stepped-care antihypertensive treatment for resistant hypertension at 6 months. We report the influence of adherence to antihypertensive treatment on blood pressure control. One hundred six patients with hypertension resistant to 4 weeks of treatment with indapamide 1.5 mg/d, ramipril 10 mg/d (or irbesartan 300 mg/d), and amlodipine 10 mg/d were randomly assigned to renal denervation plus standardized stepped-care antihypertensive treatment, or the same antihypertensive treatment alone. For standardized stepped-care antihypertensive treatment, spironolactone 25 mg/d, bisoprolol 10 mg/d, prazosin 5 mg/d, and rilmenidine 1 mg/d were sequentially added at monthly visits if home blood pressure was ≥135/85 mm Hg after randomization. We assessed adherence to antihypertensive treatment at 6 months by drug screening in urine/plasma samples from 85 patients. The numbers of fully adherent (20/40 versus 21/45), partially nonadherent (13/40 versus 20/45), or completely nonadherent patients (7/40 versus 4/45) to antihypertensive treatment were not different in the renal denervation and the control groups, respectively (P=0.3605). The difference in the change in daytime ambulatory systolic blood pressure from baseline to 6 months between the 2 groups was -6.7 mm Hg (P=0.0461) in fully adherent and -7.8 mm Hg (P=0.0996) in nonadherent (partially nonadherent plus completely nonadherent) patients. The between-patient variability of daytime ambulatory systolic blood pressure was greater for nonadherent than for fully adherent patients. In the DENERHTN trial, the prevalence of nonadherence to antihypertensive drugs at 6 months was high (≈50%) but not different in the renal denervation and control groups. Regardless of adherence to treatment, renal denervation plus standardized stepped-care antihypertensive treatment resulted in

  10. Chronic bilateral renal denervation attenuates renal injury in a transgenic rat model of diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yimin; Fomison-Nurse, Ingrid C; Harrison, Joanne C; Walker, Robert J; Davis, Gerard; Sammut, Ivan A

    2014-08-01

    Bilateral renal denervation (BRD) has been shown to reduce hypertension and improve renal function in both human and experimental studies. We hypothesized that chronic intervention with BRD may also attenuate renal injury and fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy. This hypothesis was examined in a female streptozotocin-induced diabetic (mRen-2)27 rat (TGR) shown to capture the cardinal features of human diabetic nephropathy. Following diabetic induction, BRD/sham surgeries were conducted repeatedly (at the week 3, 6, and 9 following induction) in both diabetic and normoglycemic animals. Renal denervation resulted in a progressive decrease in systolic blood pressure from first denervation to termination (at 12 wk post-diabetic induction) in both normoglycemic and diabetic rats. Renal norepinephrine content was significantly raised following diabetic induction and ablated in denervated normoglycemic and diabetic groups. A significant increase in glomerular basement membrane thickening and mesangial expansion was seen in the diabetic kidneys; this morphological appearance was markedly reduced by BRD. Immunohistochemistry and protein densitometric analysis of diabetic innervated kidneys confirmed the presence of significantly increased levels of collagens I and IV, α-smooth muscle actin, the ANG II type 1 receptor, and transforming growth factor-β. Renal denervation significantly reduced protein expression of these fibrotic markers. Furthermore, BRD attenuated albuminuria and prevented the loss of glomerular podocin expression in these diabetic animals. In conclusion, BRD decreases systolic blood pressure and reduces the development of renal fibrosis, glomerulosclerosis, and albuminuria in this model of diabetic nephropathy. The evidence presented strongly suggests that renal denervation may serve as a therapeutic intervention to attenuate the progression of renal injury in diabetic nephropathy.

  11. Myenteric denervation in gastric carcinogenesis: differential modulation of nitric oxide and annexin-A1

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the properties of endogenous nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and annexin-A1 (ANXA1) and determined how they can be exploited in the N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced gastric carcinogenesis and myenteric denervation model. Male Wistar rats were treated with MNNG and/or aminoguanidine (AG) for 20 weeks. In another set of experiments, rats with nondenervated and denervated stomachs were treated with MNNG or water for 28 weeks. Fragments of the pyloric region we...

  12. Effect of denervation or unweighting on GLUT-4 protein in rat soleus muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Rodnick, Kenneth J.; Mondon, Carl E.; James, David E.; Holloszy, John O.

    1991-01-01

    The study is intended to test the hypothesis that the decreased capacity for glucose transport in the denervated rat soleus and the increased capacity for glucose transport in the unweighted rat soleus are related to changes in the expression of the regulatable glucose transporter protein in skeletal muscle (GLUT-4). Results obtained indicate that altered GLUT-4 expression may be a major contributor to the changes in insulin-stimulated glucose transport that are observed with denervation and unweighting. It is concluded that muscle activity is an important factor in the regulation of the GLUT-4 expression in skeletal muscle.

  13. Adherence to Antihypertensive Medication in Treatment-Resistant Hypertension Undergoing Renal Denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, Roland E; Ott, Christian; Schmid, Axel; Friedrich, Stefanie; Kistner, Iris; Ditting, Tilmann; Veelken, Roland; Uder, Michael; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-02-12

    Adherence to medication has been repeatedly proposed to represent a major cause of treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH); however, treatment decisions such as treating TRH with renal denervation depend on accurate judgment of adherence. We carefully analyzed adherence rates to medication before and after renal denervation and its effect on blood pressure (BP) control. Eighty patients with TRH were included in 2 prospective observational studies that assessed the difference of potential antihypertensive and nephroprotective effects of renal denervation. To compare prescribed with actual medication intake (representing a measure of adherence), we analyzed urine samples collected at baseline and at 6 months after renal denervation for antihypertensive compounds or metabolites (by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry). In addition to office BP, 24-hour ambulatory BP and central hemodynamics (central systolic pressure, central pulse pressure) were assessed. Informed consent for analyses of urine metabolites was obtained from 79 of 80 patients. Actual intake of all antihypertensive drugs was detected at baseline and at 6 months after renal denervation in 44 (56%) and 52 (66%) patients, respectively; 1 drug was missing in 22 (28%) and 17 (22%) patients, respectively, and ≥2 drugs were missing in 13 (16%) and 10 (13%) patients, respectively. At baseline, 24-hour ambulatory BP (P=0.049) and central systolic BP (P=0.012) were higher in nonadherent patients. Adherence did not significantly change overall (McNemar-Bowker test, P=0.362). An increase in adherence was observed in 21 patients, and a decrease was observed in 11 patients. The decrease in 24-hour ambulatory BP was not different in those with stable adherence 6 months after renal denervation (n=41, -7±13 mm Hg) compared with those with increased adherence (n=21, -10±13 mm Hg) and decreased adherence (n=11, -7±14 mm Hg) (P>0.20). Our study is limited by the relatively small sample size and potentially by the

  14. Macrophage populations and cardiac sympathetic denervation during L-NAME-induced hypertension in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neves, S R S; Machado, C R S; Pinto, A M T;

    2006-01-01

    The rat model of hypertension induced by prolonged treatment with Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) has been extensively used. However, the effects on cardiac autonomic innervation are unknown. Here, the cardiac sympathetic innervation is analyzed in parallel with myocardial lesions...... and macrophage infiltration at day 7. No denervation was detectable at day 14 of double treatment, using subcutaneous AG. Our findings favor a role for ED1+ macrophages and iNOS in the hypertension-induced denervation process....

  15. Persistent Thalamic Sound Processing Despite Profound Cochlear Denervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Anna R.; Salazar, Juan J.; Polley, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons at higher stages of sensory processing can partially compensate for a sudden drop in peripheral input through a homeostatic plasticity process that increases the gain on weak afferent inputs. Even after a profound unilateral auditory neuropathy where >95% of afferent synapses between auditory nerve fibers and inner hair cells have been eliminated with ouabain, central gain can restore cortical processing and perceptual detection of basic sounds delivered to the denervated ear. In this model of profound auditory neuropathy, auditory cortex (ACtx) processing and perception recover despite the absence of an auditory brainstem response (ABR) or brainstem acoustic reflexes, and only a partial recovery of sound processing at the level of the inferior colliculus (IC), an auditory midbrain nucleus. In this study, we induced a profound cochlear neuropathy with ouabain and asked whether central gain enabled a compensatory plasticity in the auditory thalamus comparable to the full recovery of function previously observed in the ACtx, the partial recovery observed in the IC, or something different entirely. Unilateral ouabain treatment in adult mice effectively eliminated the ABR, yet robust sound-evoked activity persisted in a minority of units recorded from the contralateral medial geniculate body (MGB) of awake mice. Sound driven MGB units could decode moderate and high-intensity sounds with accuracies comparable to sham-treated control mice, but low-intensity classification was near chance. Pure tone receptive fields and synchronization to broadband pulse trains also persisted, albeit with significantly reduced quality and precision, respectively. MGB decoding of temporally modulated pulse trains and speech tokens were both greatly impaired in ouabain-treated mice. Taken together, the absence of an ABR belied a persistent auditory processing at the level of the MGB that was likely enabled through increased central gain. Compensatory plasticity at the level of the

  16. Feasibility of catheter ablation renal denervation in "mild" resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaojie; Kiuchi, Marcio Galindo; Acou, Willem-Jan; Derndorfer, Michael; Wang, Jiazhi; Li, Ruotian; Kollias, Georgios; Martinek, Martin; Kiuchi, Tetsuaki; Pürerfellner, Helmut; Liu, Shaowen

    2017-04-01

    Renal denervation (RDN) has been proposed as a novel interventional antihypertensive technique. However, existing evidence was mainly from patients with severe resistant hypertension. The authors aimed to evaluate the efficacy of RDN in patients with resistant hypertension with mildly elevated blood pressure (BP). Studies of RDN in patients with mild resistant hypertension (systolic office BP 140-160 mm Hg despite treatment with three antihypertensive drugs including one diuretic, or mean systolic BP by 24-hour ambulatory BP measurement [ABPM] 135-150 mm Hg) were included. Two observational and one randomized cohort were identified (109 patients in the RDN group and 36 patients in the control group). Overall, the mean age of patients was 62±10 years, and 69.7% were male. Before-after comparison showed that RDN significantly reduced ABPM as compared with the baseline systolic ABPM, from 146.3±13 mm Hg at baseline to 134.6±14.7 mm Hg at 6-month follow-up and diastolic ABPM from 80.8±9.4 mm Hg at baseline to 75.5±9.8 mm Hg at 6-month follow up (both Pchange in ABPM in the RDN group as compared with that in the control group (change in systolic ABPM: -11.7±9.9 mm Hg in RDN vs -3.5±9.6 mm Hg in controls [Pchange in diastolic ABPM: -5.3±6.3 mm Hg in RDN vs -2.1±5.5 mm Hg in control [P=.007]). RDN was also associated with a significantly decreased office systolic/diastolic BP and reduced number of antihypertensive medications. No severe adverse events were found during follow-up. RDN seems feasible to treat patients with mild resistant hypertension. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Persistent Thalamic Sound Processing Despite Profound Cochlear Denervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna R. Chambers

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurons at higher stages of sensory processing can partially compensate for a sudden drop in input from the periphery through a homeostatic plasticity process that increases the gain on weak afferent inputs. Even after a profound unilateral auditory neuropathy where > 95% of synapses between auditory nerve fibers and inner hair cells have been eliminated with ouabain, central gain can restore the cortical processing and perceptual detection of basic sounds delivered to the denervated ear. In this model of profound auditory neuropathy, cortical processing and perception recover despite the absence of an auditory brainstem response (ABR or brainstem acoustic reflexes, and only a partial recovery of sound processing at the level of the inferior colliculus (IC, an auditory midbrain nucleus. In this study, we induced a profound cochlear neuropathy with ouabain and asked whether central gain enabled a compensatory plasticity in the auditory thalamus comparable to the full recovery of function previously observed in the auditory cortex (ACtx, the partial recovery observed in the IC, or something different entirely. Unilateral ouabain treatment in adult mice effectively eliminated the ABR, yet robust sound-evoked activity persisted in a minority of units recorded from the contralateral medial geniculate body (MGB of awake mice. Sound-driven MGB units could decode moderate and high-intensity sounds with accuracies comparable to sham-treated control mice, but low-intensity classification was near chance. Pure tone receptive fields and synchronization to broadband pulse trains also persisted, albeit with significantly reduced quality and precision, respectively. MGB decoding of temporally modulated pulse trains and speech tokens were both greatly impaired in ouabain-treated mice. Taken together, the absence of an ABR belied a persistent auditory processing at the level of the MGB that was likely enabled through increased central gain. Compensatory

  18. miRNA targeted signaling pathway in the early stage of denervated fast and slow muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Denervation often results in skeletal muscle atrophy. Different mechanisms seem to be involved in the determination between denervated slow and fast skeletal muscle atrophy. At the epigenetic level, miRNAs are thought to be highly involved in the pathophysiological progress of denervated muscles. We used miRNA microarrays to determine miRNA expression profiles from a typical slow muscle (soleus muscle and a typical fast muscle (tibialis anterior muscle at an early denervation stage in a rat model. Results showed that miR-206, miR-195, miR-23a, and miR-30e might be key factors in the transformation process from slow to fast muscle in denervated slow muscles. Additionally, certain miRNA molecules (miR-214, miR-221, miR-222, miR-152, miR-320, and Let-7e could be key regulatory factors in the denervated atrophy process involved in fast muscle. Analysis of signaling pathway networks revealed the miRNA molecules that were responsible for regulating certain signaling pathways, which were the final targets (e.g., p38 MAPK pathway; Pax3/Pax7 regulates Utrophin and follistatin by HDAC4; IGF1/PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway regulates atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression via FoxO phosphorylation. Our results provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of denervated skeletal muscle pathophysiology.

  19. Expression of TGF-β1 and CTGF Is Associated with Fibrosis of Denervated Sternocleidomastoid Muscles in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Tang, Weifang; Chen, Donghui; Li, Meng; Gao, Yinna; Zheng, Hongliang; Chen, Shicai

    2016-01-01

    Injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve often leads to permanent vocal cord paralysis, which has a significant negative impact on the quality of life. Long-term denervation can induce laryngeal muscle fibrosis, which obstructs the muscle recovery after laryngeal reinnervation. However, the mechanisms of fibrosis remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to analyze the changes in the expression of fibrosis-related factors, including transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in denervated skeletal muscles using a mouse model of accessory nerve transection. Because of the small size, we used sternocleidomastoid muscles instead of laryngeal muscles for denervation experiments. Masson's trichrome staining showed that the grade of atrophy and fibrosis of muscles became more severe with time, but showed a plateau at 4 weeks after denervation, followed by a slow decrease. Quantitative assessment and immunohistochemistry showed that TGF-β1 expression peaked at 1 week after denervation (p muscle cells were detected at 1 week after denervation, peaked at 2 weeks (p muscle fibrosis. They may induce the differentiation of myoblasts into myofibroblasts, as characterized by the activation of α-SMA. These findings may provide insights on key pathological processes in denervated skeletal muscle fibrosis and develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  20. Effects of renal sympathetic denervation on exercise blood pressure, heart rate, and capacity in patients with resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix; Linz, Dominik; Pöss, Janine; Cremers, Bodo; Kindermann, Ingrid; Laufs, Ulrich; Ukena, Christian; Böhm, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Renal denervation reduces office blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension. This study investigated the effects of renal denervation on blood pressure, heart rate, and chronotropic index at rest, during exercise, and at recovery in 60 patients (renal denervation group=50, control group=10) with resistant hypertension using a standardized bicycle exercise test protocol performed 6 and 12 months after renal denervation. After renal denervation, exercise blood pressure at rest was reduced from 158±3/90±2 to 141±3/84±4 mm Hg (PExercise blood pressure tended to be lower at all stages of exercise at 6- and 12-month follow-up in patients undergoing renal denervation, although reaching statistical significance only at mild-to-moderate exercise levels (75-100 W). At recovery after 1 minute, blood pressure decreased from 201±4/95±2 to 177±4/88±2 (PHeart rate was reduced after renal denervation from 71±3 bpm at rest, 128±5 bpm at maximum workload, and 96±5 bpm at recovery after 1 minute to 66±2 (Pexercise time increased from 6.59±0.33 to 8.4±0.32 (Pheart rate during exercise, improved mean workload, and increased exercise time without impairing chronotropic competence.

  1. Innervation of the elbow joint: Is total denervation possible? A cadaveric anatomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kesel, Renata; Van Glabbeek, Francis; Mugenzi, Dominique; De Vos, Joris; Vermeulen, Katrien; Van Renterghem, Debbie; Bortier, Hilde; Schuind, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this anatomical study was to find out if total denervation of the elbow joint is technically feasible. The endbranches of the brachial plexus of eight fresh-frozen upper arm cadavers were dissected with optical loupe magnification. All major nerves of the upper limb (except the axillary and the medial brachial cutaneous nerve) give some terminal articular endbranches to the elbow. The articular endbranches arise from muscular endbranches, cutaneous endbranches, or arise straight from the main nerves of the brachial plexus. A topographic diagram was made of the different nerves innervating the elbow joint. The ulno-posterior part of the elbow is innervated by the ulnar nerve and some branches of medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. The radial-posterior part of the elbow is innervated exclusively by the radial nerve. The ulno-anterior part of the elbow is innervated by the median nerve and the musculocutaneous nerve. The radio-anterior part of the elbow is innervated by the radial nerve and the musculocutaneous nerve. These elbow innervation findings are relevant to both anatomical and clinical field as they provide evidence that the total denervation of the elbow joint is impossible. Nevertheless, partial denervation, like denervation of the lateral epicondyle or the ulnar part of elbow, is technically possible.

  2. Joint UK societies’ 2014 consensus statement on renal denervation for resistant hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Melvin D; de Belder, Mark A; Cleveland, Trevor; Collier, David; Dasgupta, Indranil; Deanfield, John; Kapil, Vikas; Knight, Charles; Matson, Matthew; Moss, Jonathan; Paton, Julian F R; Poulter, Neil; Simpson, Iain; Williams, Bryan; Caulfield, Mark J

    2015-01-01

    Resistant hypertension continues to pose a major challenge to clinicians worldwide and has serious implications for patients who are at increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with this diagnosis. Pharmacological therapy for resistant hypertension follows guidelines-based regimens although there is surprisingly scant evidence for beneficial outcomes using additional drug treatment after three antihypertensives have failed to achieve target blood pressure. Recently there has been considerable interest in the use of endoluminal renal denervation as an interventional technique to achieve renal nerve ablation and lower blood pressure. Although initial clinical trials of renal denervation in patients with resistant hypertension demonstrated encouraging office blood pressure reduction, a large randomised control trial (Symplicity HTN-3) with a sham-control limb, failed to meet its primary efficacy end point. The trial however was subject to a number of flaws which must be taken into consideration in interpreting the final results. Moreover a substantial body of evidence from non-randomised smaller trials does suggest that renal denervation may have an important role in the management of hypertension and other disease states characterised by overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system. The Joint UK Societies does not recommend the use of renal denervation for treatment of resistant hypertension in routine clinical practice but remains committed to supporting research activity in this field. A number of research strategies are identified and much that can be improved upon to ensure better design and conduct of future randomised studies. PMID:25431461

  3. Cost-effectiveness of renal denervation therapy for the treatment of resistant hypertension in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henry, Thea L.; de Brouwer, Bonnie F.E.; van Keep, Marjolein M.L.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Bots, Michiel L.; Koffijberg, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Safety and efficacy data for catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) in the treatment of resistant hypertension have been used to estimate the cost-effectiveness of this approach. However, there are no Dutch-specific analyses. This study examined the cost-effectiveness of RDN from the

  4. Cost-effectiveness of renal denervation therapy for the treatment of resistant hypertension in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henry, Thea L.; De Brouwer, Bonnie F E; Van Keep, Marjolijn M L; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Bots, Michiel L.; Koffijberg, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Safety and efficacy data for catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) in the treatment of resistant hypertension have been used to estimate the cost-effectiveness of this approach. However, there are no Dutch-specific analyses. This study examined the cost-effectiveness of RDN from the

  5. Renal sympathetic denervation for treatment of patients with heart failure: summary of the available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammas, Wail; Koistinen, Juhani; Paana, Tuomas; Karjalainen, Pasi P

    2017-02-10

    Heart failure syndrome results from compensatory mechanisms that operate to restore - back to normal - the systemic perfusion pressure. Sympathetic overactivity plays a pivotal role in heart failure; norepinephrine contributes to maintenance of the systemic blood pressure and increasing preload. Cardiac norepinephrine spillover increases in patients with heart failure; norepinephrine exerts direct toxicity on cardiac myocytes resulting in a decrease of synthetic activity and/or viability. Importantly, cardiac norepinephrine spillover is a powerful predictor of mortality in patients with moderate to severe HF. This provided the rationale for trials that demonstrated survival benefit associated with the use of beta adrenergic blockers in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Nevertheless, the MOXCON trial demonstrated that rapid uptitration of moxonidine (inhibitor of central sympathetic outflow) in patients with heart failure was associated with excess mortality and morbidity, despite reduction of plasma norepinephrine. Interestingly, renal norepinephrine spillover was the only independent predictor of adverse outcome in patients with heart failure, in multivariable analysis. Recently, renal sympathetic denervation has emerged as a novel approach for control of blood pressure in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. This article summarizes the available evidence for the effect of renal sympathetic denervation in the setting of heart failure. Key messages Experimental studies supported a beneficial effect of renal sympathetic denervation in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Clinical studies demonstrated improvement of symptoms, and left ventricular function. In heart failure and preserved ejection fraction, renal sympathetic denervation is associated with improvement of surrogate endpoints.

  6. Denervation syndromes of the shoulder girdle: MR imaging with electrophysiologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredella, M.A.; Wischer, T.K.; Stork, A.; Genant, H.K. [Dept. of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco (United States); Tirman, P.F.J. [San Francisco Magnetic Resonance Center, CA (United States); Fritz, R.C. [National Orthopaedic Imaging Associates, Greenbrae, CA (United States)

    1999-10-01

    Objective. To investigate the use of MR imaging in the characterization of denervated muscle of the shoulder correlated with electrophysiologic studies.Design and patients. We studied with MR imaging five patients who presented with shoulder weakness and pain and who underwent electrophysiologic studies. On MR imaging the distribution of muscle edema and fatty infiltration was recorded, as was the presence of masses impinging on a regional nerve.Results. Acute/subacute denervation was best seen on T2-weighted fast spin-echo images with fat saturation, showing increased SI related to neurogenic edema. Chronic denervation was best seen on T1-weighted spin-echo images, demonstrating loss of muscle bulk and diffuse areas of increased signal intensity within the muscle. Three patients showed MR imaging and electrophysiologic findings of Parsonage Turner syndrome. One patient demonstrated an arteriovenous malformation within the spinoglenoid notch, impinging on the suprascapular nerve with associated atrophy of the infraspinatus muscle. The fifth patient demonstrated fatty atrophy of the teres minor muscle caused by compression by a cyst of the axillary nerve and electrophysiologic findings of an incomplete axillary nerve block.Conclusion. MR imaging is useful in detecting and characterizing denervation atrophy and neurogenic edema in shoulder muscles. MR imaging can provide additional information to electrophysiologic studies by estimating the age (acute/chronic) and identifying morphologic causes for shoulder pain and atrophy. (orig.)

  7. Cost-effectiveness of renal denervation therapy for the treatment of resistant hypertension in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henry, Thea L.; Brouwer, de Bonnie F.E.; Keep, van Marjolein M.L.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Bots, Michiel L.; Koffijberg, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Safety and efficacy data for catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) in the treatment of resistant hypertension have been used to estimate the cost-effectiveness of this approach. However, there are no Dutch-specific analyses. This study examined the cost-effectiveness of RDN from the per

  8. Renal denervation attenuates NADPH oxidase-mediated oxidative stress and hypertension in rats with hydronephrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peleli, Maria; Al-Mashhadi, Ammar; Yang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    ) regulation in the development of hypertension in rats with hydronephrosis. Hydronephrosis was induced by partial unilateral ureteral obstruction (PUUO) in young rats. Sham surgery or renal denervation was performed at the same time. Blood pressure was measured during normal, high and low salt diets. Renal...

  9. Clinical Results of Carotid Denervation by Adventitial Stripping in Carotid Sinus Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toorop, R. J.; Scheltinga, M. R.; Huige, M. C.; Moll, F. L.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Older patients with spells of syncope may suffer from a carotid sinus syndrome (CSS). Patients with invalidating CSS routinely receive pacemaker treatment. This study evaluated the safety and early outcome of a surgical technique termed carotid denervation by adventitial stripping for CSS trea

  10. Denervated hippocampus provides a favorable microenvironment for neuronal differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Zhang; Xiao Han; Xiang Cheng; Xue-feng Tan; He-yan Zhao; Xin-hua Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Fimbria-fornix transection induces both exogenous and endogenous neural stem cells to differentiate into neurons in the hippocampus. This indicates that the denervated hippocampus provides an environment for neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells. However, the pathways and mechanisms in this process are still unclear. Seven days after ifmbria fornix transection, our reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blot assay, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay results show a signiifcant increase in ciliary neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein expression in the denervated hippocampus. Moreover, neural stem cells derived from hippocampi of fetal (em-bryonic day 17) Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with ciliary neurotrophic factor for 7 days, with an increased number of microtubule associated protein-2-positive cells and decreased number of glial ifbrillary acidic protein-positive cells detected. Our results show that cili-ary neurotrophic factor expression is up-regulated in the denervated hippocampus, which may promote neuronal differentiation of neural stem cells in the denervated hippocampus.

  11. EFFECT OF LIVER DENERVATION ON GLUCOSE-PRODUCTION DURING RUNNING IN GUINEA-PIGS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIERSMA, MML; VISSING, J; MIKINES, KJ; STEFFENS, AB; GALBO, H

    1995-01-01

    Activity in sympathetic liver nerves has been proposed to be important for glucose production in exercising humans. However, liver denervation does not influence the exercise-induced increase in glucose production in the rat and dog. These species have a poor sympathetic liver innervation in contras

  12. PPM1B and P-IKKβ expression levels correlated inversely with rat gastrocnemius atrophy after denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Jian; Liang, Bing-Sheng [Department of Orthopedics, the Second Hospital, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan (China)

    2012-05-18

    Activated inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB kinase β (IKKβ) is necessary and sufficient for denervated skeletal muscle atrophy. Although several studies have shown that Mg{sup 2+}/Mn{sup 2+}-dependent protein phosphatase 1B (PPM1B) inactivated IKKβ, few studies have investigated the role of PPM1B in denervated skeletal muscle. In this study, we aim to explore the expression and significance of PPM1B and phosphorylated IKKβ (P-IKKβ) during atrophy of the denervated gastrocnemius. Thirty young adult female Wistar rats were subjected to right sciatic nerve transection and were sacrificed at 0 (control), 2, 7, 14, and 28 days after denervation surgery. The gastrocnemius was removed from both the denervated and the contralateral limb. The muscle wet weight ratio was calculated as the ratio of the wet weight of the denervated gastrocnemius to that of the contralateral gastrocnemius. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that mRNA and protein levels of PPM1B were significantly lower than those of the control group at different times after the initiation of denervation, while P-IKKβ showed the opposite trends. PPM1B protein expression persistently decreased while P-IKKβ expression persistently increased for 28 days after denervation. PPM1B expression correlated negatively with P-IKKβ expression by the Spearman test, whereas decreasing PPM1B expression correlated positively with the muscle wet weight ratio. The expression levels of PPM1B and P-IKKβ were closely associated with atrophy in skeletal denervated muscle. These results suggest that PPM1B and P-IKKβ could be markers in skeletal muscle atrophy.

  13. Generation of a genetically encoded marker of rod photoreceptor outer segment growth and renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Willoughby

    2011-10-01

    Vertebrate photoreceptors are specialized light sensing neurons. The photoreceptor outer segment is a highly modified cilium where photons of light are transduced into a chemical and electrical signal. The outer segment has the typical cilary axoneme but, in addition, it has a large number of densely packed, stacked, intramembranous discs. The molecular and cellular mechanisms that contribute to vertebrate photoreceptor outer segment morphogenesis are still largely unknown. Unlike typical cilia, the outer segment is continuously regenerated or renewed throughout the life of the animal through the combined process of distal outer segment shedding and proximal outer segment growth. The process of outer segment renewal was discovered over forty years ago, but we still lack an understanding of how photoreceptors renew their outer segments and few, if any, molecular mechanisms that regulate outer segment growth or shedding have been described. Our lack of progress in understanding how photoreceptors renew their outer segments has been hampered by the difficulty in measuring rates of renewal. We have created a new method that uses heat-shock induction of a fluorescent protein that can be used to rapidly measure outer segment growth rates. We describe this method, the stable transgenic line we created, and the growth rates observed in larval and adult rod photoreceptors using this new method. This new method will allow us to begin to define the genetic and molecular mechanisms that regulate rod outer segment renewal, a crucial aspect of photoreceptor function and, possibly, viability.

  14. Vacuum Outer-Gap Structure in Pulsar Outer Magnetospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Gui-Fang; ZHANG Li

    2009-01-01

    We study the vacuum outer-gap structure in the outer magnetosphere of rotation-powered pulsars by considering the limit of trans-field height through a pair production process. In this case, the trans-field height is limited by the photon-photon pair production process and the outer boundary of the outer gap can be extended outside the light cylinder. By solving self-consistently the Poisson equation for electrical potential and the Boltzmann equations of electrons/positrons and γ-rays in a vacuum outer gap for the parameters of Vela pulsar, we obtain an approximate geometry of the outer gap, i.e. the trans-field height is limited by the pair-production process and increases with the radial distance to the star and the width of the outer gap starts at the inner boundary (near the null charge surface) and ends at the outer boundary which locates inside or outside the light cylinder depending on the inclination angle.

  15. Effect of renal denervation on the compensatory renal growth following nephrectomy in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, T; Matsukawa, K; Murata, J; Matsumoto, M; Nakashima, K

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of denervation on the mass of the remaining kidney with or without unilateral nephrectomy using adult cats. The animals were divided into 4 groups: (1) control group, the weights of the right and left kidneys were measured intact in 5 cats; (2) nephrectomy group (Nx, n = 5 cats), the right kidney was removed and the left kidney was weighed 3-5 d after nephrectomy; (3) nephrectomy and denervation group (Nx+Dx, n = 7 cats), the left kidney was weighed on the 7th day after surgery in which the left kidney was denervated and the right kidney was removed; and (4) denervation group (Dx+Dx, n = 5 cats), both kidneys were weighed on the 7th day after denervation of the kidneys. In the control group, the left and right kidney weights per body weight (LKW and RKW) were the same (LKW, 0.74 +/- 0.06%; RKW, 0. 74 +/- 0.07%). In the Nx group, LKW increased to 0.90 +/- 0.03% 3-5 d after nephrectomy, although RKW of the removed kidney was 0.66 +/- 0.01%. In the Nx+Dx group, LKW increased to 0.97 +/- 0.15%, which was similar to that of the Nx group. In the Dx+Dx group, LKW (0.56 +/- 0.05%) and RKW (0.54 +/- 0.05%) were significantly less than those in the control group. We conclude that the renal nerves may contribute to maintaining the renal mass and that the neural effect on compensatory growth following nephrectomy may be covered by other growth factors.

  16. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Accumulation and beta-Adrenergic Binding in Unweighted and Denervated Rat Soleus Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Woolridge, Dale; Tischler, Marc E.

    1992-01-01

    Unweighting, but not denervation, of muscle reportedly "spares" insulin receptors, increasing insulin sensitivity. Unweighting also increases beta-adrenergic responses of carbohydrate metabolism. These differential characteristics were studied further by comparing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and beta-adrenergic binding in normal and 3-day unweighted or denervated soleus muscle. Submaximal amounts of isoproterenol, a p-agonist, increased cAMP accumulation in vitro and in vivo (by intramuscular (IM) injection) to a greater degree (P less than .05) in unweighted muscles. Forskolin or maximal isoproterenol had similar in vitro effects in all muscles, suggesting increased beta-adrenergic sensitivity following unweighting. Increased sensitivity was confirmed by a greater receptor density (B(sub max)) for iodo-125(-)-pindolol in particulate preparations of unweighted (420 x 10(exp -18) mol/mg muscle) than of control or denervated muscles (285 x 10(exp-18) mol/mg muscle). The three dissociation constant (Kd) values were similar (20.3 to 25.8 pmol/L). Total binding capacity (11.4 fmol/muscle) did not change during 3 days of unweighting, but diminished by 30% with denervation. This result illustrates the "sparing" and loss of receptors, respectively, in these two atrophy models. In diabetic animals, IM injection of insulin diminished CAMP accumulation in the presence of theophylline in unweighted muscle (-66% +/- 2%) more than in controls (-42% +'- 6%, P less than .001). These results show that insulin affects CAMP formation in muscle, and support a greater in vivo insulin response following unweighting atrophy. These various data support a role for lysosomal proteolysis in denervation, but not in unweighting, atrophy.

  17. Ultra structure of the denervated vocal muscle mechanically in hogs (sus scrofa domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leão, Henrique Zaquia

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The literature is not clear in the ultra-structural manifestations of the vocal wrinkles after neural wound. Objective: To verify the alterations that occur in a vocal fold mechanically denervated. Method: In this prospective study, it were utilized 15 hogs of commercial race (Sus scrofa domesticates, with age of 4 to 12 weeks. The animals were distributed in three groups, chosen at random. Everybody was submitted to the denervation of the right vocal fold, with surgical removal of a segment with three centimeters of the recurring right laryngeal nerve. After 45, 90 and 180 days of the operations, it was proceeded the biopsy of the vocal muscles, it was prosecuted the samples for transmission electron microscopy and, for the ultra-structural study, utilized the transmission electron microscopy Philips, model EM208S. Results: The biopsied groups with 45 and 90 days after operation of mechanical denervation, presented disorganization miofibrilar, only vestigial lines Z in many samples, as well like altered mithochondrions presenting limited sizes, and matrix mithocondrial rarefied with rare mithocondrial cristae present. The biopsied group with 180 days after operation of denervation, presented regular sarcomeres, mithocondrions with sizes and regular number with correct positioning between the sarcomerical units. Conclusion: The finds in the ultra-structure of the vocal muscles suggest to re enervation of the muscle being that the muscular mithochondrions were the most sensible structures to the denervated condition, successions by the cytoarchiteture of the miofibrilas; the finds in the ultra-structure of the vocal muscles suggests to reinervation of the muscle in the period of approximately six months.

  18. Cooled radiofrequency denervation for treatment of sacroiliac joint pain: two-year results from 20 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho KY

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Kok-Yuen Ho,1 Mohamed Abdul Hadi,2 Koravee Pasutharnchat,2 Kian-Hian Tan21Pain Management Centre, Raffles Hospital, 2Pain Management Centre, Singapore General Hospital, SingaporeBackground: Sacroiliac joint pain is a common cause of chronic low back pain. Different techniques for radiofrequency denervation of the sacroiliac joint have been used to treat this condition. However, results have been inconsistent because the variable sensory supply to the sacroiliac joint is difficult to disrupt completely using conventional radiofrequency. Cooled radiofrequency is a novel technique that uses internally cooled radiofrequency probes to enlarge lesion size, thereby increasing the chance of completely denervating the sacroiliac joint. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cooled radiofrequency denervation using the SInergyTM cooled radiofrequency system for sacroiliac joint pain.Methods: The charts of 20 patients with chronic sacroiliac joint pain who had undergone denervation using the SInergyTM cooled radiofrequency system were reviewed at two years following the procedure. Outcome measures included the Numeric Rating Scale for pain intensity, Patient Global Impression of Change, and Global Perceived Effect for patient satisfaction.Results: Fifteen of 20 patients showed a significant reduction in pain (a decrease of at least three points on the Numeric Rating Scale. Mean Numeric Rating Scale for pain decreased from 7.4 ± 1.4 to 3.1 ± 2.5, mean Patient Global Impression of Change was "improved" (1.4 ± 1.5, and Global Perceived Effect was reported to be positive in 16 patients at two years following the procedure.Conclusion: Cooled radiofrequency denervation showed long-term efficacy for up to two years in the treatment of sacroiliac joint pain.Keywords: ablation, chronic low back pain, intervention, neurotomy, sacroiliitis

  19. Side-To-Side Nerve Bridges Support Donor Axon Regeneration Into Chronically Denervated Nerves and Are Associated With Characteristic Changes in Schwann Cell Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, J Michael; Alvarez-Veronesi, M Cecilia; Snyder-Warwick, Alison; Gordon, Tessa; Borschel, Gregory H

    2015-11-01

    Chronic denervation resulting from long nerve regeneration times and distances contributes greatly to suboptimal outcomes following nerve injuries. Recent studies showed that multiple nerve grafts inserted between an intact donor nerve and a denervated distal recipient nerve stump (termed "side-to-side nerve bridges") enhanced regeneration after delayed nerve repair. To examine the cellular aspects of axon growth across these bridges to explore the "protective" mechanism of donor axons on chronically denervated Schwann cells. In Sprague Dawley rats, 3 side-to-side nerve bridges were placed over a 10-mm distance between an intact donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) distal nerve stump. Green fluorescent protein-expressing TIB axons grew across the bridges and were counted in cross section after 4 weeks. Immunofluorescent axons and Schwann cells were imaged over a 4-month period. Denervated Schwann cells dedifferentiated to a proliferative, nonmyelinating phenotype within the bridges and the recipient denervated CP nerve stump. As donor TIB axons grew across the 3 side-to-side nerve bridges and into the denervated CP nerve, the Schwann cells redifferentiated to the myelinating phenotype. Bridge placement led to an increased mass of hind limb anterior compartment muscles after 4 months of denervation compared with muscles whose CP nerve was not "protected" by bridges. This study describes patterns of donor axon regeneration and myelination in the denervated recipient nerve stump and supports a mechanism where these donor axons sustain a proregenerative state to prevent deterioration in the face of chronic denervation.

  20. Local Sympathetic Denervation of Femoral Artery in a Rabbit Model by Using 6-Hydroxydopamine In Situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both artery bundle and sympathetic nerve were involved with the metabolism of bone tissues. Whether the enhancing effects of artery bundle result from its accompanying sympathetic nerve or blood supply is still unknown. There is no ideal sympathetic nerve-inhibited method for the in situ denervation of artery bundle. Therefore, we dipped the femoral artery in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA locally and observed its effect. Compared with control group, the in situ treatment of 6-OHDA did not damage the normal structure of vascular bundle indicated by hematoxylin-eosin (HE staining. However, the functions of sympathetic nerve was completely inhibited for more than 2 weeks, and only a few function of sympathetic nerve resumed 4 weeks later, evidenced by glyoxylic acid staining and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and nerve peptide Y (NPY. Thus, 6-OHDA is promising as an ideal reagent for the local denervation of sympathetic nerve from artery system.

  1. Does sensory stimulation threshold affect lumbar facet radiofrequency denervation outcomes? A prospective clinical correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Steven P; Strassels, Scott A; Kurihara, Connie; Lesnick, Ivan K; Hanling, Steven R; Griffith, Scott R; Buckenmaier, Chester C; Nguyen, Conner

    2011-11-01

    Radiofrequency facet denervation is one of the most frequently performed procedures for chronic low back pain. Although sensory stimulation is generally used as a surrogate measure to denote sufficient proximity of the electrode to the nerve, no study has examined whether stimulation threshold influences outcome. We prospectively recorded data in 61 consecutive patients undergoing lumbar facet radiofrequency denervation who experienced significant pain relief after medial branch blocks. For each nerve lesioned, multiple attempts were made to maximize sensory stimulation threshold (SST). Mean SST was calculated on the basis of the lowest stimulation perceived at 0.1-V increments for each medial branch. A positive outcome was defined as a ≥50% reduction in back pain coupled with a positive satisfaction score lasting ≥3 months. The relationship between mean SST and denervation outcomes was evaluated via a receiver's operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and stratifying outcomes on the basis of various cutoff values. No correlation was noted between mean SST and pain relief at rest (Pearson's r=-0.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.24 to 0.23, P=0.97), with activity (r=-0.17, 95% CI: -0.40 to 0.07, P=0.20), or a successful outcome. No optimal SST could be identified. There is no significant relationship between mean SST during lumbar facet radiofrequency denervation and treatment outcome, which may be due to differences in general sensory perception. Because stimulation threshold was optimized for each patient, these data cannot be interpreted to suggest that sensory testing should not be performed, or that high sensory stimulation thresholds obtained on the first attempt should be deemed acceptable.

  2. Muscle, tendons, and bone: structural changes during denervation and FES treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, Paolo; Reynisson, Páll Jens; Helgason, Benedikt; Kern, Helmut; Mayr, Winfried; Ingvarsson, Páll; Helgason, Thordur; Carraro, Ugo

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a novel approach to determine structural changes in bone, muscle, and tendons using medical imaging, finite element models, and processing techniques to evaluate and quantify: (1) progression of atrophy in permanently lower motor neuron (LMN) denervated human muscles, and tendons; (2) their recovery as induced by functional electrical stimulation (FES); and (3) changes in bone mineral density and bone strength as effect of FES treatment. Briefly, we used three-dimensional reconstruction of muscle belly, tendons, and bone images to study the structural changes occurring in these tissues in paralysed subjects after complete lumbar-ischiadic spinal cord injury (SCI). These subjects were recruited through the European project RISE, an endeavour designed to establish a novel clinical rehabilitation method for patients who have permanent and non-recoverable muscle LMN denervation in the lower extremities. This paper describes the use of segmentation techniques to study muscles, tendons, and bone in several states: healthy, LMN denervated-degenerated but not stimulated, and LMN denervated-stimulated. Here, we have used medical images to develop three-dimensional models and advanced imaging, including computational tools to display tissue density. Different tissues are visualized associating proper Hounsfield intervals defined experimentally to fat, connective tissue, and muscle. Finite element techniques are used to calculate Young's modulus on the patella bone and to analyse correlation between muscle contraction and bone strength changes. These analyses show restoration of muscular structures, tendons, and bone after FES as well as decline of the same tissues when treatment is not performed. This study suggests also a correlation between muscle growth due to FES treatment and increase in density and strength in patella bone. Segmentation techniques and finite element analysis allow the study of the structural changes of human skeletal muscle

  3. Catheter-Based Renal Denervation for Resistant Hypertension: Will It Ever Be Ready for "Prime Time"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffin, Luke J; Bakris, George L

    2016-11-12

    The year 2014 was a turning point for the field of renal denervation (RDN) and its potential use to treat resistant hypertension. Tremendous enthusiasm shifted to sober reflection on the efficacy of a technology once touted as the cure to resistant hypertension. The following review highlights 2 major questions: First, does catheter-based RDN lower blood pressure and, second, will RDN using catheter-directed therapy for the treatment of resistant hypertension ever become more than an investigational technology.

  4. Renal Denervation Using an Irrigated Catheter in Patients with Resistant Hypertension: A Promising Strategy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armaganijan, Luciana, E-mail: luciana-va@hotmail.com; Staico, Rodolfo; Moraes, Aline; Abizaid, Alexandre; Moreira, Dalmo; Amodeo, Celso; Sousa, Márcio; Borelli, Flávio; Armaganijan, Dikran; Sousa, J. Eduardo; Sousa, Amanda [Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    Systemic hypertension is an important public health problem and a significant cause of cardiovascular mortality. Its high prevalence and the low rates of blood pressure control have resulted in the search for alternative therapeutic strategies. Percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation emerged as a perspective in the treatment of patients with resistant hypertension. To evaluate the feasibility and safety of renal denervation using an irrigated catheter. Ten patients with resistant hypertension underwent the procedure. The primary endpoint was safety, as assessed by periprocedural adverse events, renal function and renal vascular abnormalities at 6 months. The secondary endpoints were changes in blood pressure levels (office and ambulatory monitoring) and in the number of antihypertensive drugs at 6 months. The mean age was 47.3 (± 12) years, and 90% of patients were women. In the first case, renal artery dissection occurred as a result of trauma due to the long sheath; no further cases were observed after technical adjustments, thus showing an effect of the learning curve. No cases of thrombosis/renal infarction or death were reported. Elevation of serum creatinine levels was not observed during follow-up. At 6 months, one case of significant renal artery stenosis with no clinical consequences was diagnosed. Renal denervation reduced office blood pressure levels by 14.6/6.6 mmHg, on average (p = 0.4 both for systolic and diastolic blood pressure). Blood pressure levels on ambulatory monitoring decreased by 28/17.6 mmHg (p = 0.02 and p = 0.07 for systolic and diastolic blood pressure, respectively). A mean reduction of 2.1 antihypertensive drugs was observed. Renal denervation is feasible and safe in the treatment of resistant systemic arterial hypertension. Larger studies are required to confirm our findings.

  5. Electrical stimulation attenuates morphological alterations and prevents atrophy of the denervated cranial tibial muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Cleuber Rodrigo de Souza; Pereira, Mizael; Favaretto, Idvaldo Aparecido; Bortoluci, Carlos Henrique Fachin; Santos, Thais Caroline Pereira Dos; Dias, Daniel Ventura; Daré, Letícia Rossi; Rosa, Geraldo Marco

    2017-01-01

    To investigate if electrical stimulation through Russian current is able to maintain morphology of the cranial tibial muscle of experimentally denervated rats. Thirty-six Wistar rats were divided into four groups: the Initial Control Group, Final Control Group, Experimental Denervated and Treated Group, Experimental Denervated Group. The electrostimulation was performed with a protocol of Russian current applied three times per week, for 45 days. At the end, the animals were euthanized and histological and morphometric analyses were performed. Data were submitted to statistical analysis with a significance level of pmorfologia do músculo tibial cranial de ratos desnervados experimentalmente. Foram utilizados 36 ratos Wistar, distribuídos em quatro grupos: Grupo Controle Inicial, Grupo Controle Final, Grupo Experimental Desnervado Tratado, Grupo Experimental Desnervado. A eletroestimulação foi realizada com um protocolo de corrente russa aplicada três vezes por semanas, durante 45 dias. Ao final, os animais foram eutanasiados e, em seguida, foram realizadas as análises histológica e morfométrica. Os dados foram submetidos à análise estatística, com nível de significância de pmorfologia do músculo tibial cranial desnervado experimentalmente, minimizando a atrofia muscular.

  6. New treatment for old disease: management of resistant hypertension by percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Takashi; Krum, Henry

    2013-09-01

    Hypertension is a major contributor to cardiovascular events, such as stroke and myocardial infarction, with accelerated sympathetic nerve activity implicated in its pathogenesis. However, hypertension in many patients is not adequately controlled, despite the availability of numerous medication classes. Novel procedure-as well as device-based strategies, such as percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve denervation therapy-have been developed to improve blood pressure in these refractory patients. Renal sympathetic denervation delivers not only a decrease in blood pressure levels but also renal as well as systemic sympathetic nerve activity. The reduction in blood pressure appears to be sustained over 3 years after the procedure, which implies no counterregulatory mechanism or re-innervation of afferent renal sympathetic nerve so far. Renal sympathetic denervation is expected to be a promising treatment for patients with hypertension, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and metabolic syndrome implicated in the pathogenesis of potentiated sympathetic nerve activity. This review will focus on the current devices and procedures, their outcomes and prospects in the treatment of hypertension.

  7. Renal denervation in the treatment of resistant hypertension: Dead, alive or surviving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fakhouri, Ahmad; Efeovbokhan, Nephertiti; Nakhla, Rami; Khouzam, Rami N

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension is one of the most common chronic clinical problems encountered by physicians. The prevalence of resistant hypertension is estimated at 9% in the US. Patients with resistant hypertension have been shown to be at higher risk for adverse cardiovascular events, hence the need for greater efforts in improving the treatment of hypertension. The renal sympathetic nerves play an important role in the development of hypertension, mediated via sodium and water retention, increased renin release and alterations in renal blood flow. The proximity of the afferent and efferent renal sympathetic nerves to the adventitia of the renal arteries suggested the feasibility of an endovascular, selective, minimally invasive approach to renal denervation; a potential treatment option for resistant hypertension. While the RAPID, Reduce-HTN, EnligHTN, DENERHTN and Symplicity HTN-1 and -2 studies showed significant benefit of renal denervation in the treatment of resistant hypertension, the results of Oslo RDN, Prague-15 and Symplicity HTN-3 were not so favorable. Future well-designed clinical trials are needed to ascertain the benefits or otherwise of renal denervation in treatment-resistant hypertension.

  8. Is Tadpole Pupil in an Adolescent Girl Caused by Denervation Hypersensitivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jonas Kjeldbjerg; Møller, Hans Ulrik

    2017-01-04

    Tadpole pupil is a rarely encountered phenomenon caused by episodic, segmental iris dilator muscle spasm of short duration (2-15 minutes), occurring in clusters without a known precipitating factor. It has most commonly been described in women aged 28 to 48 years. A few hypotheses on pathogenesis have been discussed but none has been proved. Here, we present an adolescent girl with bilateral tadpole pupil that appeared during physical exercise. This is the first pediatric case of tadpole pupil, not caused by preceding surgery, to be published. Based on (1) this case in which tadpole pupil developed when the norepinephrine level rose during exercise, (2) the high ratio of patients with tadpole pupil who concurrently have or later develop Horner syndrome, in which denervation hypersensitivity is well described, (3) a previous report of a patient with both tadpole pupil and Horner syndrome who had denervation hypersensitivity on pharmacological testing, (4) a 29-year-old man with unilateral tadpole pupil induced by exercise, and (5) a 19-year-old man with bilateral tadpole pupil and possible autonomic neuropathy, we suggest denervation hypersensitivity as a probable pathogenic mechanism causing tadpole pupil. In addition, a suggestion for investigations to be performed in future pediatric cases is provided.

  9. Ulnar nerve injuries of the hand producing intrinsic muscle denervation of magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barberie, J.E.; Connell, D.G.; Munk, P.L.; Janzen, D.L. [Vancouver General Hospital and University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, (Canada). Department of Radiology

    1999-08-01

    Muscle and nerve injuries in the hand may be difficult to detect and diagnose clinically. Two cases are reported in which magnetic resonance imaging showed ulnar nerve injury and intrinsic hand muscle denervation. The clinical, anatomical and radiological features of injury to the deep motor branch of the ulnar nerve and associated muscle denervation are discussed and illustrated. Compression of the deep motor branch of the ulnar nerve is a rare cause of hand dysfunction. This condition produces a clinical syndrome characterized by weakness of the muscles innervated by the deep branch of the ulnar nerve, with normal sensation in the hand. Denervation of the intrinsic hand muscles is variable, depending on the site and severity of the nerve injury. The anatomy of the ulnar nerve is complex and ulnar nerve compression syndrome is difficult to detect and localize clinically. Multiple causes exist, including ganglions; repeated trauma, typically occupationally related; calcification adjacent to the pisiform and the pisotriquetral joint; anomalous muscle bellies; fractures or dislocations affecting the ulnar side of the wrist; vascular anomalies of the ulnar artery; and oedema of the hand, requiring differing surgical treatments. We report two patients who presented with ulnar nerve compression syndrome secondary to post-traumatic neuromas as a result of blunt trauma to the palm. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 12 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Diffusion-weighted MRI, dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI and ultrasound perfusion quantification of denervated muscle in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyault, G.; Beregi, J.P. [University Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular imaging, Cardiologic Hospital, Lille (France); Bierry, G.; Holl, N.; Dietemann, J.L.; Kremer, S. [University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Strasbourg (France); Lhermitte, B. [University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Strasbourg (France)

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess denervated muscle perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSCMRI) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), and to measure denervated muscle apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on b1000 diffusion-weighted MRI (DWMRI) at 3 T in order to clarify whether muscle denervation leads to an increase in the extracellular extravascular space, or an increase in blood flow - or both. Axotomy of the right sciatic nerve of six white rabbits was performed at day 0. At day 9, hind limb muscles MRI and CEUS were performed to assess the consequences of denervation and both semimembranosus muscles of each rabbit were explanted for histological studies. Signal intensity on T2- and T1-weighted MRI, ADC on DWMRI, maximum signal drop (MSD) on DSCMRI and the area under the curve (AUC) on CEUS were measured over circular regions of interest (ROI), in both semimembranosus muscles. Non-parametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests were used to assess the mean differences between denervated and normal muscles. T2 fat-saturated (FS) MRI studies showed a strong signal in the right semimembranosus muscles compared with the left side, and gadolinium enhancement was observed on T1 FS MRI. Denervated muscles show a significant increase in ADC on DWMRI (p < 0.01) and a significant signal enhancement on DSCMR imaging (p < 0.05) and on first-pass CEUS (p < 0.05). The results of this study - based on perfusion- and diffusion-weighted images - suggest that, after denervation, both increased blood flow through muscle tissue and expansion of the extracellular water volume are present. (orig.)

  11. Renal denervation using focused infrared fiber lasers: a potential treatment for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Vinay V; Shi, Zhennan; Iftekher, Fariha; Welsh, Michael J; Gurm, Hitinder S; Rising, Gail; Yanovich, Amber; Walacavage, Kim; Islam, Mohammed N

    2014-11-01

    Renal denervation has recently become of great interest as a potential treatment for resistant hypertension. Denervation techniques using radio frequency (RF) or ultrasound energy sources have already been explored in literature. In this study, we investigate the use of lasers as a potential energy source for renal denervation. In vitro studies are performed in porcine/ovine renal arteries with focused laser beams at 980 nm, 1210 nm, and 1700 nm to study the ability to damage renal nerves without causing injury to non-target tissue structures like the endothelium. Then, a 980 nm laser catheter prototype is built and used to demonstrate in vivo renal denervation in ovine renal arteries. This study utilizes fiber coupled infrared lasers at 980 nm, 1210 nm, and 1700 nm. In vitro laser denervation studies at 980 nm are performed in both porcine and ovine renal arteries to study the ability of focused laser beams to damage renal nerves without injuring the endothelium. In vitro studies using lasers close to the lipid absorption lines at 1210 nm and 1700 nm are also performed in porcine renal arteries to study the possibility of selectively damaging the renal nerves by targeting the lipid myelin sheaths surrounding the nerves. Then, a laser catheter prototype is designed and built for in vivo renal denervation in ovine renal arteries using the 980 nm laser (powers ranging from 2 to 4 W, 5 seconds per exposure). Histochemical evaluations of the frozen sections are performed using methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Histochemical analysis of in vitro laser treatments at 980 nm in porcine and ovine renal arteries show clear evidence of laser-induced renal nerve damage without injury to the endothelium and part of the media. No evidence of selective nerve damage is observed using the 1210 nm and 1700 nm lasers with the current treatment parameters. Histochemical analysis of in vivo laser treatments in ovine renal arteries

  12. The CMS Outer Hadron Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Bannaje Sripathi; Banerjee, Sunanda; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhandari, Virender; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chendvankar, Sanjay; Deshpande, Pandurang Vishnu; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguli, Som N; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kalmani, Suresh Devendrappa; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Krishnaswamy, Marthi Ramaswamy; Kumar, Arun; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Nagaraj, P; Narasimham, Vemuri Syamala; Patil, Mandakini Ravindra; Reddy, L V; Satyanarayana, B; Sharma, Seema; Singh, B; Singh, Jas Bir; Sudhakar, Katta; Tonwar, Suresh C; Verma, Piyush

    2006-01-01

    The CMS hadron calorimeter is a sampling calorimeter with brass absorber and plastic scintillator tiles with wavelength shifting fibres for carrying the light to the readout device. The barrel hadron calorimeter is complemented with a outer calorimeter to ensure high energy shower containment in CMS and thus working as a tail catcher. Fabrication, testing and calibrations of the outer hadron calorimeter are carried out keeping in mind its importance in the energy measurement of jets in view of linearity and resolution. It will provide a net improvement in missing $\\et$ measurements at LHC energies. The outer hadron calorimeter has a very good signal to background ratio even for a minimum ionising particle and can hence be used in coincidence with the Resistive Plate Chambers of the CMS detector for the muon trigger.

  13. Basal and hyperaemic myocardial blood flow in regionally denervated canine hearts: an in vivo study with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimoldi, Ornella E.; Camici, Paolo G. [Hammersmith Hospital, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College, National Heart and Lung Institute, London (United Kingdom); Drake-Holland, Angela J. [Robert Gordon University, School of Pharmacy, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Noble, Mark I.M. [University of Aberdeen, Department of Cardiology, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2007-02-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN) have demonstrated the impact of this disease on cardiac sympathetic innervation and myocardial blood flow (MBF). To investigate the effects of selective partial sympathetic denervation of the left ventricle (LV) on baseline and hyperaemic MBF, we measured myocardial presynaptic catecholamine re-uptake (uptake-1), {beta}-adrenoceptor ({beta}-AR) density and MBF non-invasively by means of PET in a canine model of regional sympathetic denervation. In 11 anaesthetised dogs, the sympathetic nerves of the free wall and septum of the LV were removed by means of dissection and phenol painting. Three weeks later, the animals were studied with PET. MBF was measured at baseline and following i.v. adenosine (140 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1}) and dobutamine (20 {mu}g kg{sup -1} min{sup -1}) using{sup 15}O-labelled water. Sympathetic denervation was confirmed by an 80{+-}12% decrease in the volume of distribution (V{sub d}) of [{sup 11}C]hydroxyephedrine (HED) compared with innervated regions. Myocardial {beta}-AR density was measured using [{sup 11}C]CGP12177. Innervated and denervated regions showed no differences in MBF at baseline and during adenosine or dobutamine. [{sup 11}C]HED V{sub d}was inversely correlated with MBF in both regions at baseline, and the correlation was lost during hyperaemia in denervated regions. However, for any given value of MBF, [{sup 11}C]HED V{sub d}was significantly lower in the denervated regions. {beta}-AR density was comparable in denervated and innervated regions (17.9{+-}4.2 vs 18.4{+-}3.3 pmol g{sup -1};p=NS). In this experimental model, selective, regional sympathetic denervation of the LV, which results in a profound reduction in [{sup 11}C]HED V{sub d}, did not affect baseline or hyperaemic MBF. In addition, we demonstrated that, under baseline conditions, there was a significant inverse correlation between [{sup 11}C]HED V{sub d}and MBF in

  14. Nuclear fuel grid outer strap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, R.; Craver, J.E.

    1989-10-10

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor fuel assembly grid. It comprises a first outer grip strap segment end. The first end having a first tab arranged in substantially the same plane as the plane defined by the first end; a second outer grip strap end. The second end having a second slot arranged in substantially the same plane as the plane defined by the second end, with the tab being substantially disposed in the slot, defining a socket therebetween; and a fort tine interposed substantially perpendicularly in the socket.

  15. The DC06 Outer Tracker Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Amoraal, J

    2008-01-01

    This note gives an overview of the Outer Tracker simulation for the 2006 Data Challenge (DC06). It covers the Outer Tracker detector description used in Gauss/Geant to simulate hits in the Outer Tracker and the digitisation of the hits in Boole. It concludes with the expected performance of the Outer Tracker.

  16. Dissecting Escherichia coli outer membrane biogenesis using differential proteomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M Martorana

    Full Text Available The cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria is a complex multi-layered structure comprising an inner cytoplasmic membrane and an additional asymmetric lipid bilayer, the outer membrane, which functions as a selective permeability barrier and is essential for viability. Lipopolysaccharide, an essential glycolipid located in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane, greatly contributes to the peculiar properties exhibited by the outer membrane. This complex molecule is transported to the cell surface by a molecular machine composed of seven essential proteins LptABCDEFG that form a transenvelope complex and function as a single device. While advances in understanding the mechanisms that govern the biogenesis of the cell envelope have been recently made, only few studies are available on how bacterial cells respond to severe envelope biogenesis defects on a global scale. Here we report the use of differential proteomics based on Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT to investigate how Escherichia coli cells respond to a block of lipopolysaccharide transport to the outer membrane. We analysed the envelope proteome of a lptC conditional mutant grown under permissive and non permissive conditions and identified 123 proteins whose level is modulated upon LptC depletion. Most such proteins belong to pathways implicated in cell envelope biogenesis, peptidoglycan remodelling, cell division and protein folding. Overall these data contribute to our understanding on how E. coli cells respond to LPS transport defects to restore outer membrane functionality.

  17. Renal denervation in an animal model of diabetes and hypertension: Impact on the autonomic nervous system and nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Ubiratan F

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of renal denervation on cardiovascular reflexes and markers of nephropathy in diabetic-hypertensive rats have not yet been explored. Methods Aim: To evaluate the effects of renal denervation on nephropathy development mechanisms (blood pressure, cardiovascular autonomic changes, renal GLUT2 in diabetic-hypertensive rats. Forty-one male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR ~250 g were injected with STZ or not; 30 days later, surgical renal denervation (RD or sham procedure was performed; 15 days later, glycemia and albuminuria (ELISA were evaluated. Catheters were implanted into the femoral artery to evaluate arterial pressure (AP and heart rate variability (spectral analysis one day later in conscious animals. Animals were killed, kidneys removed, and cortical renal GLUT2 quantified (Western blotting. Results Higher glycemia (p vs. nondiabetics (p vs. SHR. Conclusions Renal denervation in diabetic-hypertensive rats improved previously reduced heart rate variability. The GLUT2 equally overexpressed by diabetes and renal denervation may represent a maximal derangement effect of each condition.

  18. Effects of skin-derived precursors on wound healing of denervated skin in a nude mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Bin; Xie, Ju-Lin; Xu, Ying-Bin; Lai, Wen; Huang, Yong; Mao, Ren-Xiang; Liu, Xu-Sheng; Qi, Shao-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Denervated skin could result in impaired healing of wounds, such as decubitus ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers. Other studies indicated that cutaneous fiber density is reduced after inner nerve transection and that neuropeptide level depletes after denervation, leading to reduced cell proliferation around the wound and thus wound healing problems. Recent studies have revealed that skin-derived precursors (SKPs), which form a neural crest-related stem cell population in the dermis of skin, participate in cutaneous nerve regeneration. We hypothesized that injecting SKPs into denervated wound promotes healing. A bilateral denervation wound model was established followed by SKP transplantation. The wound healing rate was determined at 7, 14, and 21 d after injury. Cell proliferation activity during wound healing was analyzed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry (IHC). Nerve fiber density was measured by S-100 IHC. The contents of nerve growth factor, substance P, and calcitonin gene-related peptide were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The rate of epithelization in the SKP-treated group was faster than that in the control group. Wound cell proliferation and nerve fiber density were obviously higher in the SKP-treated group than in the control group. In addition, the content of neuropeptides was higher in the SKP-treated group than in the control group during wound healing. In conclusion, SKPs can promote denervated wound healing through cell proliferation and nerve fiber regeneration, and can facilitate the release of neuropeptides.

  19. Denervation atrophy is independent from Akt and mTOR activation and is not rescued by myostatin inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Elizabeth M.; Andres-Mateos, Eva; Mejias, Rebeca; Simmers, Jessica L.; Mi, Ruifa; Park, Jae-Sung; Ying, Stephanie; Hoke, Ahmet; Lee, Se-Jin; Cohn, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare two acquired muscle atrophies and the use of myostatin inhibition for their treatment. Myostatin naturally inhibits skeletal muscle growth by binding to ActRIIB, a receptor on the cell surface of myofibers. Because blocking myostatin in an adult wild-type mouse induces profound muscle hypertrophy, we applied a soluble ActRIIB receptor to models of disuse (limb immobilization) and denervation (sciatic nerve resection) atrophy. We found that treatment of immobilized mice with ActRIIB prevented the loss of muscle mass observed in placebo-treated mice. Our results suggest that this protection from disuse atrophy is regulated by serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase (SGK) rather than by Akt. Denervation atrophy, however, was not protected by ActRIIB treatment, yet resulted in an upregulation of the pro-growth factors Akt, SGK and components of the mTOR pathway. We then treated the denervated mice with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and found that, despite a reduction in mTOR activation, there is no alteration of the atrophy phenotype. Additionally, rapamycin prevented the denervation-induced upregulation of the mTORC2 substrates Akt and SGK. Thus, our studies show that denervation atrophy is not only independent from Akt, SGK and mTOR activation but also has a different underlying pathophysiological mechanism than disuse atrophy. PMID:24504412

  20. Muscular hypertrophy and atrophy in normal rats provoked by the administration of normal and denervated muscle extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, Eduardo; Castilla, Salvador; Luque, Evelio; Jimena, Ignacio; Leiva-Cepas, Fernando; Ruz-Caracuel, Ignacio; Peña, José

    2016-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of extracts obtained from both normal and denervated muscles on different muscle types. Wistar rats were used and were divided into a control group and four experimental groups. Each experimental group was treated intraperitoneally during 10 consecutive days with a different extract. These extracts were obtained from normal soleus muscle, denervated soleus, normal extensor digitorum longus, and denervated extensor digitorum longus. Following treatment, the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles were obtained for study under optic and transmission electron microscope; morphometric parameters and myogenic responses were also analyzed. The results demonstrated that the treatment with normal soleus muscle and denervated soleus muscle extracts provoked hypertrophy and increased myogenic activity. In contrast, treatment with extracts from the normal and denervated EDL had a different effect depending on the muscle analyzed. In the soleus muscle it provoked hypertrophy of type I fibers and increased myogenic activity, while in the extensor digitorum longus atrophy of the type II fibers was observed without changes in myogenic activity. This suggests that the muscular responses of atrophy and hypertrophy may depend on different factors related to the muscle type which could be related to innervation.

  1. Outer Synchronization of Complex Networks by Impulse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙文; 燕子宗; 陈士华; 吕金虎

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates outer synchronization of complex networks, especially, outer complete synchronization and outer anti-synchronization between the driving network and the response network. Employing the impulsive control method which is uncontinuous, simple, efficient, low-cost and easy to implement in practical applications, we obtain some sufficient conditions of outer complete synchronization and outer anti-synchronization between two complex networks. Numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed impulsive control scheme.

  2. Molecular Aspects of Muscle Damage and Denervation with Public Access Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Hyperresponsiveness LUNG 776 52 PGA Murine Calories Restriction LUNG 689 36 WSilk Macular Degeneration EYE 657 80 DMD temporal profiling MUSCLE 563 15 PGA... rehabilitation medicine. This is a core facility to provide DNA, mRNA, proteomics, and database services to grantees of the NICHD Medical Rehabilitation

  3. Dynamics of the Outer Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    views on food, basketball , and life in general; Barbara Spiegel for the most amazing meals at the Spiegels; Steve Meacham for helping me out during my... tapered outer edge. So long as this disk is balanced, though, it remains stable (always looking like the first frame of figure 2) indefinitely. [In this

  4. Intrinsic innervation and dopaminergic markers after experimental denervation in rat thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignini, F; Sabbatini, M; D'Andrea, V; Cavallotti, C

    2010-04-15

    The aim of this study was to examine rat thymus innervation using denervation techniques and to explore the related micro-anatomical localization of dopamine, D1, D2 receptors and dopamine membrane transporter (DAT). In the thymus subcapsular region, the parenchymal cholinergic fibers belong exclusively to phrenic nerve branching. No somatic phrenic nerve branching was detected in any other analysed thymus lobule regions. In rats subjected to sympathetic or parasympathetic ablation, it was observed that catecholaminergic and cholinergic nerve fibers respectively contributed to forming plexuses along vessel walls. In the subcapsular and septal region, no parenchymal nerve branching, belonging to sympathetic or parasympathetic nervous system was noted. Instead, in the deep cortical region, cortico-medullary junction (CM-j) and medulla, catecholaminergic and cholinergic nerve fibers were detected along the vessels and parenchyma. Dopamine and dopamine receptors were widely diffused in the lobular cortico-medullary junction region and in the medulla, where the final steps of thymocyte maturation and their trafficking take place. No variation in dopamine and DAT immune reaction was observed following total or partial parasympathectomy or phrenic nerve cutting. After chemical or surgical sympathectomy however, neither dopamine nor DAT immune reaction was noted again. Instead, D1 and D2 dopamine receptor expression was not affected by thymus denervation. In rats subjected to specific denervation, it was observed the direct intraparenchymal branching of the phrenic nerve and sympathetic and parasympathetic fibers into thymus parenchyma along vessels. These findings on the dopaminergic system highlight the importance of neurotransmitter receptor expression in the homeostasis of neuroimmune modulation.

  5. Effects of renal sympathetic denervation on post-myocardial infarction cardiac remodeling in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialu Hu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the therapeutic effects of renal denervation (RD on post- myocardial infarction (MI cardiac remodeling in rats, the most optimal time for intervention and the sustainability of these effects. METHODS: One hundred SPF male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to N group (Normal, n=10, MI group(MI, n=20,RD group (RD, n=10, RD3+MI (MI three days after RD, n=20, MI1+RD (RD one day after MI, n=20, MI7+RD (RD seven days after MI, n=20. MI was produced through thoracotomic ligation of the anterior descending artery. RD was performed through laparotomic stripping of the renal arteriovenous adventitial sympathetic nerve. Left ventricular function, hemodynamics, plasma BNP, urine volume, urine sodium excretion and other indicators were measured four weeks after MI. RESULTS: (1 The left ventricular function of the MI group significantly declined (EF<40%, plasma BNP was elevated, urine output was significantly reduced, and 24-hour urine sodium excretion was significantly reduced. (2 Denervation can be achieved by surgically stripping the arteriovenous adventitia, approximately 3 mm from the abdominal aorta. (3 In rats with RD3+MI, MI1+RD and MI7+RD, compared with MI rats respectively, the LVEF was significantly improved (75 ± 8.4%,69 ± 3.8%,73 ± 5.5%, hemodynamic indicators were significantly improved, plasma BNP was significantly decreased, and the urine output was significantly increased (21.3 ± 5 ml,23.8 ± 5.4 ml,25.2 ± 8.7 ml. However, the urinary sodium excretion also increased but without significant difference. CONCLUSIONS: RD has preventive and therapeutic effects on post-MI cardiac remodeling.These effects can be sustained for at least four weeks, but there were no significant differences between denervation procedures performed at different times in the course of illness. Cardiac function, hemodynamics, urine volume and urine sodium excretion in normal rats were not affected by RD.

  6. Reduced effect of percutaneous renal denervation on blood pressure in patients with isolated systolic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Sebastian; Ukena, Christian; Linz, Dominik; Kindermann, Ingrid; Cremers, Bodo; Laufs, Ulrich; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Schmieder, Roland E; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Renal denervation can reduce blood pressure in certain patients with resistant hypertension. The effect in patients with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH, ≥140/hypertension (CH, ≥140/≥90 mm Hg) defined as baseline office systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥140 mm Hg despite treatment with ≥3 antihypertensive agents. Renal denervation significantly reduced office SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at 3, 6, and 12 months by 17/18/17 and 5/4/4 mm Hg in ISH and by 28/27/30 and 13/16/18 mm Hg in CH, respectively. The reduction in SBP and DBP in ISH was lower compared with patients with CH at all observed time points (P<0.05 for SBP/DBP intergroup comparison). The nonresponder rate (change in office SBP <10 mm Hg) after 6 months was 37% in ISH and 21% in CH (P<0.001). Mean 24-hour ambulatory SBP and DBP after 3, 6, and 12 months were significantly reduced by 10/13/15 and 6/6/9 mm Hg in CH, respectively. In patients with ISH the reduction in systolic ambulatory blood pressure was 4/8/7 mm Hg (P=0.032/P<0.001/P=0.009) and 3/4/2 mm Hg (P=0.08/P<0.001/P=0.130) in diastolic ambulatory blood pressure after 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. The ambulatory blood pressure reduction was significantly lower after 3 and 12 months in SBP and after 12 months in ambulatory DBP, respectively. In conclusion, renal denervation reduces office and ambulatory blood pressure in patients with ISH. However, this reduction is less pronounced compared with patients with CH.

  7. Intrinsic innervation and dopaminergic markers after experimental denervation in rat thymus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mignini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine rat thymus innervation using denervation techniques and to explore the related micro-anatomical localization of dopamine, D1, D2 receptors and dopamine membrane transporter (DAT. In the thymus subcapsular region, the parenchymal cholinergic fibers belong exclusively to phrenic nerve branching. No somatic phrenic nerve branching was detected in any other analysed thymus lobule regions. In rats subjected to sympathetic or parasympathetic ablation, it was observed that catecholaminergic and cholinergic nerve fibers respectively contributed to forming plexuses along vessel walls. In the subcapsular and septal region, no parenchymal nerve branching, belonging to sympathetic or parasympathetic nervous system was noted. Instead, in the deep cortical region, cortico-medullary junction (CM-j and medulla, catecholaminergic and cholinergic nerve fibers were detected along the vessels and parenchyma. Dopamine and dopamine receptors were widely diffused in the lobular cortico-medullary junction region and in the medulla, where the final steps of thymocyte maturation and their trafficking take place. No variation in dopamine and DAT immune reaction was observed following total or partial parasympathectomy or phrenic nerve cutting. After chemical or surgical sympathectomy however, neither dopamine nor DAT immune reaction was noted again. Instead, D1 and D2 dopamine receptor expression was not affected by thymus denervation. In rats subjected to specific denervation, it was observed the direct intraparenchymal branching of the phrenic nerve and sympathetic and parasympathetic fibers into thymus parenchyma along vessels. These findings on the dopaminergic system highlight the importance of neurotransmitter receptor expression in the homeostasis of neuroimmune modulation.

  8. Impaired growth of denervated muscle contributes to contracture formation following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Peterson, Elizabeth; Kim, Annie; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2011-03-02

    The etiology of shoulder and elbow contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury is incompletely understood. With use of a mouse model, the current study tests the novel hypothesis that reduced growth of denervated muscle contributes to contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury. Unilateral brachial plexus injuries were created in neonatal mice by supraclavicular C5-C6 nerve root excision. Shoulder and elbow range of motion was measured four weeks after injury. Fibrosis, cross-sectional area, and functional length of the biceps, brachialis, and subscapularis muscles were measured over four weeks following injury. Muscle satellite cells were cultured from denervated and control biceps muscles to assess myogenic capability. In a comparison group, shoulder motion and subscapularis length were assessed following surgical excision of external rotator muscles. Shoulder internal rotation and elbow flexion contractures developed on the involved side within four weeks following brachial plexus injury. Excision of the biceps and brachialis muscles relieved the elbow flexion contractures. The biceps muscles were histologically fibrotic, whereas fatty infiltration predominated in the brachialis and rotator cuff muscles. The biceps and brachialis muscles displayed reduced cross-sectional and longitudinal growth compared with the contralateral muscles. The upper subscapularis muscle similarly displayed reduced longitudinal growth, with the subscapularis shortening correlating with internal rotation contracture. However, excision of the external rotators without brachial plexus injury caused no contractures or subscapularis shortening. Myogenically capable satellite cells were present in denervated biceps muscles despite impaired muscle growth in vivo. Injury of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus leads to impaired growth of the biceps and brachialis muscles, which are responsible for elbow flexion contractures, and impaired growth of the subscapularis

  9. Outer Arm in the Second Galactic Quadrant: Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Xinyu; Yang, Ji; Sun, Yan; Li, Facheng; Zhang, Shaobo; Zhou, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The lack of arm tracers, especially the remote tracers, is one of the most difficult problems that prevent us studying the Milky Way structure. Fortunately, with its high sensitivity CO survey, the Milky Way Imaging Scroll Painting (MWISP) project offers such an opportunity. As the project has completed about one third of its plan, the area of l=[100,150] deg, b=[-3,5] deg has been nearly covered. And the Outer arm of the Milky Way first clearly revealed its shape in the second galactic quadrant with the form of molecular gas --- this is the first time that the Outer arm is reported in such the large scale mapping of molecular gas. Using the 115 GHz 12CO(1-0) data of MWISP in the LSR velocity ~= [-100,-60] km s^-1 and in the area mentioned above, we have detected 481 molecular clouds in total, among them 332 (about 69\\%) are newly detected, and 457 probably belong to the Outer arm. The total mass of the detected Outer arm clouds is ~ 3.1*10^6 M_sun. Assuming the spiral arm is logarithmic spiral, the pitch ang...

  10. A perspective on sympathetic renal denervation in chronic congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanieh, Raef; El-Hunjul, Mohammed; Alkhawam, Hassan; Kosmas, Constantine E; Madanieh, Abed; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Medical therapy has indisputably been the mainstay of management for chronic congestive heart failure. However, a significant percentage of patients continue to experience worsening heart failure (HF) symptoms despite treatment with multiple therapeutic agents. Recently, catheter-based interventional strategies that interrupt the renal sympathetic nervous system have shown promising results in providing better symptom control in patients with HF. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of HF for better understanding of the interplay between the cardiovascular system and the kidney. Subsequently, we will briefly discuss pivotal renal denervation (RDN) therapy trials in patients with resistant hypertension and then present the available evidence on the role of RDN in HF therapy.

  11. Revisiting renovascular imaging for renal sympathetic denervation: current techniques and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pua, Uei; Tan, Cher Heng [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore (Singapore); Ho, Hee Hwa; Tan, Julian Ko Beng; Ong, Paul Jau Leong [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-08-28

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) is an emerging technique in the treatment of resistant hypertension, most commonly performed using an endovascular approach. Clinical and anatomical criteria for RDN are well established and imaging plays an integral role in selecting patients with suitable anatomy, procedural planning and device selection. Nevertheless, the current body of literature surrounding imaging related to RDN remains limited. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the expectations and limitations of various imaging techniques, including Doppler ultrasound, CT angiography, MR angiography and newer techniques such as non-contrast MR angiography, in the context of RDN. (orig.)

  12. Model of mouth-to-mouth transfer of bacterial lipoproteins through inner membrane LolC, periplasmic LolA, and outer membrane LolB

    OpenAIRE

    Okuda, Suguru; Tokuda, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in Escherichia coli are released from the inner membrane by an ATP-binding cassette transporter, the LolCDE complex, which causes the formation of a soluble complex with a periplasmic molecular chaperone, LolA. LolA then transports lipoproteins to the outer membrane where an outer membrane receptor, LolB, incorporates lipoproteins into the outer membrane. The molecular mechanisms underlying the Lol-dependent lipoprotein sorting have been clarified in detai...

  13. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  14. 76 FR 54787 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY... revised North American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram,...

  15. 76 FR 2919 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and...

  16. Meningococcal outer membrane vesicle composition-dependent activation of the innate immune response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zariri, Afshin; Beskers, Joep; van de Waterbeemd, Bas; Hamstra, Hendrik Jan; Bindels, Tim H E; van Riet, Elly; van Putten, Jos P M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069916527; van der Ley, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Meningococcal outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have been extensively investigated and successfully implemented as vaccines. They contain pathogen associated molecular patterns including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), capable of triggering innate immunity. However, Neisseria meningitidis contains an

  17. Polymorphic Regulation of Outer Membrane Lipid A Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell E. Bishop

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the polymorphic-phase behavior of lipid A structural variations in determining their endotoxic activities has been recognized previously, but any potential role for lipid A polymorphism in controlling outer membrane structure and function has been largely ignored until now. In a recent article in mBio [7(5:e01532-16, https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01532-16], Katherine E. Bonnington and Meta J. Kuehn of Duke University’s Department of Biochemistry make a compelling case for considering how the molecular shapes of the various lipid A structural subtypes found in the outer membrane contribute to the process of outer membrane vesicle (OMV formation.

  18. Viscosity of Earth's Outer Core

    CERN Document Server

    Smylie, D E

    2007-01-01

    A viscosity profile across the entire fluid outer core is found by interpolating between measured boundary values, using a differential form of the Arrhenius law governing pressure and temperature dependence. The discovery that both the retrograde and prograde free core nutations are in free decay (Palmer and Smylie, 2005) allows direct measures of viscosity at the top of the outer core, while the reduction in the rotational splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of the inner core allows it to be measured at the bottom. We find 2,371 plus/minus 1,530 Pa.s at the top and 1.247 plus/minus 0.035 x 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom. Following Brazhkin (1998) and Brazhkin and Lyapin (2000) who get 10^2 Pa.s at the top, 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom, by an Arrhenius extrapolation of laboratory experiments, we use a differential form of the Arrhenius law to interpolate along the melting temperature curve to find a viscosity profile across the outer core. We find the variation to be closely log-linear between the meas...

  19. Outer Space Traffic Safety Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Paul B.

    2013-09-01

    Management of traffic in outer space is a major safety problem. Traffic is increasing. Most satellites are navigable but they have to co-exist with space debris which is not navigable. We need minimum safety rules for outer space traffic. We have the possible beginnings of international safety standards in the form of national space object tracking; Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) standardization through ICAO and the International Committee on GNSS (ICG); the IADC space debris guidelines; and the proposed Code of Conduct. However, safety could be improved by standards for such activities as licensing launches of satellites into outer space; standards for accident investigation and search and rescue: operational safety zones around space objects such as the International Space Station. This paper describes legal authority for minimum safety standards. It considers safety standards established by private agreements among commercial operators. Finally it examines a number of options for an international forum to establish safety standards, including self-regulation, COPUOS, ICAO, ITU, a space code of conduct, and a new space organization.

  20. E. coli outer membrane and interactions with OmpLA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Emilia L; Fleming, Patrick J; Yeom, Min Sun; Widmalm, Göran; Klauda, Jeffery B; Fleming, Karen G; Im, Wonpil

    2014-06-03

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is a unique asymmetric lipid bilayer composed of phospholipids (PLs) in the inner leaflet and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) in the outer leaflet. Its function as a selective barrier is crucial for the survival of bacteria in many distinct environments, and it also renders Gram-negative bacteria more resistant to antibiotics than their Gram-positive counterparts. Here, we report the structural properties of a model of the Escherichia coli outer membrane and its interaction with outer membrane phospholipase A (OmpLA) utilizing molecular dynamics simulations. Our results reveal that given the lipid composition used here, the hydrophobic thickness of the outer membrane is ∼3 Å thinner than the corresponding PL bilayer, mainly because of the thinner LPS leaflet. Further thinning in the vicinity of OmpLA is observed due to hydrophobic matching. The particular shape of the OmpLA barrel induces various interactions between LPS and PL leaflets, resulting in asymmetric thinning around the protein. The interaction between OmpLA extracellular loops and LPS (headgroups and core oligosaccharides) stabilizes the loop conformation with reduced dynamics, which leads to secondary structure variation and loop displacement compared to that in a DLPC bilayer. In addition, we demonstrate that the LPS/PL ratios in asymmetric bilayers can be reliably estimated by the per-lipid surface area of each lipid type, and there is no statistical difference in the overall membrane structure for the outer membranes with one more or less LPS in the outer leaflet, although individual lipid properties vary slightly.

  1. Capsaicin-mediated denervation of sensory neurons promotes mammary tumor metastasis to lung and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin, Nuray; Boyer, Philip J; Bonneau, Robert H; Clawson, Gary A; Welch, Danny R

    2004-01-01

    Capsaicin specifically activates or destroys small diameter nociceptive sensory neurons that contain the capsaicin receptor, also called vanilloid receptor 1. Neurons sensitive to capsaicin mediate inflammatory pain and are important targets for management of chronic pain. These neurons also regulate local tissue homeostasis, inflammation, healing and development, especially under conditions of psychological stress. Stress contributes to increased cancer recurrence and metastasis through as yet undefined mechanisms. Likewise, activity of capsaicin-sensitive neurons is altered by pathological conditions that may lead to metastatic growth (e.g. stress). Therefore, we examined effects of a treatment that induces sensory nerve denervation on breast cancer metastases. Systemic denervation of sensory neurons caused by treatment with 125 mg/kg capsaicin resulted in significantly more lung and cardiac metastases in adult mice injected orthotopically with syngeneic 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells than was observed in vehicle-treated controls. Heart metastases, normally very rare, occurred as pericardial nodules, intra-myocardial nodules, or combined pericardial-myocardial lesions. Since the rate of primary tumor growth was unaffected, effects on metastases appear to be host tissue-specific. Although preliminary, these observations provide one possible explanation for resistance of cardiac tissue to tumor involvement and highlight contributions of host tissue, including sensory neurons, in the efficiency of cancer metastasis.

  2. Renal Sympathetic Denervation by CT-scan-Guided Periarterial Ethanol Injection in Sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firouznia, Kavous, E-mail: k-firouznia@yahoo.com; Hosseininasab, Sayed jaber, E-mail: dr.hosseininasab@gmail.com [Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TMUS), Advanced Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Research Center (ADIR), Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amanpour, Saeid, E-mail: saeidamanpour@yahoo.com [Tehran University of Medical Science, Cancer Models Research Center, Cancer Institute of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haj-Mirzaian, Arya, E-mail: arya.mirzaian@gmail.com [Tehran University of Medical Science, Department of Radiology and Imaging, MIC, Imam Khomeini Hospital (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Miri, Roza, E-mail: rosa.miri@yahoo.com [Tehran University of Medical Science, Department of Pathology, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Muhammadnejad, Ahad, E-mail: mohamadnejad@yahoo.com [Tehran University of Medical Science, Cancer Research Center, Cancer Institute of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Muhammadnejad, Samad, E-mail: s-muhammadnejad@sina.tums.ac.ir [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jalali, Amir H., E-mail: amirjalali51@yahoo.com [Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TMUS), Advanced Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Research Center (ADIR), Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Farrokhlagha, E-mail: ahmadi@tums.ac.ir [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Nephrology Research Center, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rokni-Yazdi, Hadi, E-mail: rokniyaz@tums.ac.ir [Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TMUS), Advanced Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Research Center (ADIR), Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    BackgroundRenal nerves are a recent target in the treatment of hypertension. Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) is currently performed using catheter-based radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and because this method has limitations, percutaneous magnetic resonance (MR)-guided periarterial ethanol injection is a suggested alternative. However, few studies have been conducted on the effectiveness of percutaneous ethanol injection for RSD.AimTo evaluate the feasibility, efficacy, and complications of computed tomography (CT)-guided periarterial ethanol injection.MethodsEthanol (10 ml, 99.6 %) was injected around the right renal artery in six sheep under CT guidance with the left kidney serving as a control. Before and after the intervention, the sheep underwent MR imaging studies and the serum creatinine level was measured. One month after the intervention, the sheep were euthanized and norepinephrine (NE) concentration in the renal parenchyma was measured to evaluate the efficacy of the procedure. The treated tissues were also examined histopathologically to evaluate vascular, parenchymal, and neural injury.ResultsThe right kidney parenchymal NE concentration decreased significantly compared with the left kidney after intervention (average reduction: 40 %, P = 0.0016). Histologic examination revealed apparent denervation with no other vascular or parenchymal injuries observed in the histological and imaging studies.ConclusionEffective and feasible RSD was achieved using CT-guided periarterial ethanol injection. This technique may be a potential alternative to catheter-based RFA in the treatment of hypertension.

  3. MR-guided Periarterial Ethanol Injection for Renal Sympathetic Denervation: A Feasibility Study in Pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitparth, F., E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de; Walter, A.; Stolzenburg, N.; Heckmann, L.; Breinl, J. [Charite, Humboldt University, Department of Radiology (Germany); Rinnenthal, J. L. [Charite, Humboldt University, Department of Neuropathology (Germany); Beck, A.; De Bucourt, M.; Schnorr, J. [Charite, Humboldt University, Department of Radiology (Germany); Bernhardt, U. [InnoRa GmbH (Germany); Gebauer, B.; Hamm, B.; Guenther, R. W. [Charite, Humboldt University, Department of Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of image-guided periarterial ethanol injection as an alternative to transluminal radiofrequency ablation. Methods. Unilateral renal periarterial ethanol injection was performed under general anesthesia in 6 pigs with the contralateral kidney serving as control. All interventions were performed in an open 1.0 T MRI system under real-time multiplanar guidance. The injected volume was 5 ml (95 % ethanol labelled marked MR contrast medium) in 2 pigs and 10 ml in 4 pigs. Four weeks after treatment, the pigs underwent MRI including MRA and were killed. Norepinephrine (NE) concentration in the renal parenchyma served as a surrogate parameter to analyze the efficacy of sympathetic denervation. In addition, the renal artery and sympathetic nerves were examined histologically to identify evidence of vascular and neural injury. Results. In pigs treated with 10 ml ethanol, treatment resulted in neural degeneration. We found a significant reduction of NE concentration in the kidney parenchyma of 53 % (p < 0.02) compared with the untreated contralateral kidney. In pigs treated with 5 ml ethanol, no significant changes in histology or NE were observed. There was no evidence of renal arterial stenosis in MRI, macroscopy or histology in any pig. Conclusion. MR-guided periarterial ethanol injection was feasible and efficient for renal sympathetic denervation in a swine model. This technique may be a promising alternative to the catheter-based approach in the treatment of resistant arterial hypertension.

  4. Cardiorenal axis and arrhythmias: Will renal sympathetic denervation provide additive value to the therapeutic arsenal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Brussel, Peter M; Lieve, Krystien V V; de Winter, Robbert J; Wilde, Arthur A M

    2015-05-01

    Disruption of sympathetic tone may result in the occurrence or maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias. Multiple arrhythmic therapies that intervene by influencing cardiac sympathetic tone are common in clinical practice. These vary from pharmaceutical (β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and calcium antagonists) to percutaneous/surgical (cardiac sympathetic denervation) interventions. In some patients, however, these therapies have insufficient prophylactic and therapeutic capabilities. A safe and effective additional therapy wherein sympathetic drive is further attenuated would be expedient. Recently, renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) has been subject of research for various sympathetic nervous system-related diseases. By its presumed afferent and efferent sympatholytic effects, RSD might indirectly attenuate sympathetic outflow via the brain to the heart but might also reduce systemic catecholamine excretion and might therefore reduce catecholamine-sensitive arrhythmias. RSD is subject of research for various sympathetically driven arrhythmias, both supraventricular and ventricular. In this review, we give an overview of the rationale behind RSD as potential therapy in mediating arrhythmias that are triggered by a disrupted sympathetic nervous system and discuss the presently available results from animal and human studies.

  5. Arthroscopic Patelloplasty and Circumpatellar Denervation for the Treatment of Patellofemoral Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patellofemoral osteoarthritis commonly occurs in older people, often resulting in anterior knee pain and severely reduced quality of life. The aim was to examine the effectiveness of arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation for the treatment of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA. Methods: A total of 156 PFOA patients (62 males, 94 females; ages 45-81 years, mean 66 years treated in our department between September 2012 and March 2013 were involved in this study. Clinical manifestations included recurrent swelling and pain in the knee joint and aggravated pain upon ascending/descending stairs, squatting down, or standing up. PFOA was treated with arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation. The therapeutic effects before and after surgery were statistically evaluated using Lysholm and Kujala scores. The therapeutic effects were graded by classification of the degree of cartilage defect. Results: A total of 149 cases were successfully followed up for 14.8 months, on average. The incisions healed well, and no complications occurred. After surgery, the average Lysholm score improved from 73.29 to 80.93, and the average Kujala score improved from 68.34 to 76.48. This procedure was highly effective for patients with cartilage defects I-III but not for patients with cartilage defect IV. Conclusions: For PFOA patients, this procedure is effective for significantly relieving anterior knee pain, improving knee joint function and quality of life, and deferring arthritic progression.

  6. Chronic refractory myofascial pain and denervation supersensitivity as global public health disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J; Bruyninckx, F; Neuhauser, D V

    2016-01-13

    Chronic pain with a 30.3% global prevalence significantly impacts universal health. Low back pain has a 9.4% prevalence worldwide causing the most widespread disability. Neck pain ranks 4th highest regarding years lived with disability with a 4.9% prevalence worldwide. The principal cause of pain in 85% of patients visiting a tertiary pain clinic has a myofascial origin. The root cause is multifocal neuromuscular ischaemia at myofascial trigger points from muscle tightening and shortening following spondylotic radiculopathy induced partial denervation. Chronic refractory myofascial pain (CRMP) is a neuromusculoskeletal disease needing management innovations. Using electrical twitch-obtaining intramuscular stimulation (eToims), we provide objective evidence of denervation supersensitivity in multiple myotomes as cause, aggravation and maintenance of CRMP. This study underscores our previous findings that eToims is safe and efficacious for long-term use in CRMP. eToims aids potential prevention (pre-rehabilitation), simultaneous diagnosis, treatment (rehabilitation) and prognosis in real time for acute and CRMP management.

  7. Outer-2-independent domination in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Marcin Krzywkowski; Doost Ali Mojdeh; Maryem Raoofi

    2016-02-01

    We initiate the study of outer-2-independent domination in graphs. An outer-2-independent dominating set of a graph is a set of vertices of such that every vertex of ()\\ has a neighbor in and the maximum vertex degree of the subgraph induced by ()\\ is at most one. The outer-2-independent domination number of a graph is the minimum cardinality of an outer-2-independent dominating set of . We show that if a graph has minimum degree at least two, then its outer-2-independent domination number equals the number of vertices minus the 2-independence number. Then we investigate the outer-2-independent domination in graphs with minimum degree one. We also prove the Vizing-type conjecture for outer-2-independent domination and disprove the Vizing-type conjecture for outer-connected domination.

  8. Choline acetyltransferase detection in normal and denervated electrocyte from Electrophorus electricus (L. using a Confocal Scanning Optical Microscopy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NILSON NUNES-TAVARES

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is the neurotransmitter responsible for the transmission of impulses from cholinergic neurons to cells of innervated tissues. Its biosynthesis is catalyzed by the enzyme Choline acetyltransferase that is considered to be a phenotypically specific marker for cholinergic system. It is well known that the regulation of Choline acetyltransferase activity under physiological and pathological conditions is important for development and neuronal activities of cholinergic functions. We observed the distribution of Choline acetyltransferase in sections from the normal and denervated main electric organ sections of Electrophorus electricus (L. by immunofluorescence using a anti-Choline acetyltransferase antibody. The animals were submitted to a surgical procedure to remove about 20 nerves and after 30 and 60 days, they were sacrificed. After 30 days, the results from immunohistochemistry demonstrated an increase on the Choline acetyltransferase distribution at denervated tissue sections when compared with the sections from the normal contralateral organ. A very similar labeling was observed between normal and denervated tissue sections of the animals after 60 days. However, Choline acetyltransferase activity (nmolesACh/ min/ mg of protein in extracts obtained from electrocyte microsomal preparation, estimated by Fonnun's method (Fonnun 1975, was 70% lower in the denervated extracts.

  9. Choline acetyltransferase detection in normal and denervated electrocyte from Electrophorus electricus (L.) using a confocal scanning optical microscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes-Tavares, N; Cunha-E-Silva, N L; Hassón-Voloch, A

    2000-09-01

    Acetylcholine is the neurotransmitter responsible for the transmission of impulses from cholinergic neurons to cells of innervated tissues. Its biosynthesis is catalyzed by the enzyme Choline acetyltransferase that is considered to be a phenotypically specific marker for cholinergic system. It is well known that the regulation of Choline acetyltransferase activity under physiological and pathological conditions is important for development and neuronal activities of cholinergic functions. We observed the distribution of Choline acetyltransferase in sections from the normal and denervated main electric organ sections of Electrophorus electricus (L.) by immunofluorescence using a anti-Choline acetyltransferase antibody. The animals were submitted to a surgical procedure to remove about 20 nerves and after 30 and 60 days, they were sacrificed. After 30 days, the results from immunohistochemistry demonstrated an increase on the Choline acetyltransferase distribution at denervated tissue sections when compared with the sections from the normal contralateral organ. A very similar labeling was observed between normal and denervated tissue sections of the animals after 60 days. However, Choline acetyltransferase activity (nmolesACh/ min/ mg of protein) in extracts obtained from electrocyte microsomal preparation, estimated by Fonnun's method (Fonnun 1975), was 70% lower in the denervated extracts.

  10. Lipids associated with the (Na+ - K+)ATPase of normal and denervated electric organs of Electrophorus electricus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriviera, M L; Hasson-Voloch, A

    1996-01-01

    The effect of denervation on the lipid metabolism and on the activity of (Na+ - K+)ATPase isoforms from the membrane fraction P3, which corresponds to the innervated electrocyte membrane, was evaluated. On a discontinuous sucrose gradient, normal P3 membranes exhibit a bimodal ("a" and "b bands) distribution of the (Na+ - K+)ATPase activity, which upon denervation changes to an unimodal ("c" band) distribution. Using these fractions, which have a higher (Na+ - K+)ATPase activity, we characterized the lipids at the hydrophobic protein surface boundary, (i.e., the bulk lipids that surround the protein). The results confirm that these lipids consist of phospholipids and cholesterol. The quantitative composition of the phospholipids is similar for both isoform fractions obtained from the discontinuous gradient of normal membranes, with phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine representing about 90% of the total phospholipids. Sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidic acid were in the minority. However, in the single band obtained after denervation, the three major phospholipid components decreased to 70% of the total, and a significant increase in the other phospholipids and in cholesterol was observed. The high cholesterol content of the denervated fraction may confer membrane stabilization, as it is likely to cause a decrease in the membrane fluidity and consequently in the enzyme activity.

  11. The morphological substrate for Renal Denervation : Nerve distribution patterns and parasympathetic nerves. A post-mortem histological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amsterdam, Wouter A C; Blankestijn, Peter J; Goldschmeding, Roel; Bleys, Ronald L A W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Renal Denervation as a possible treatment for hypertension has been studied extensively, but knowledge on the distribution of nerves surrounding the renal artery is still incomplete. While sympathetic and sensory nerves have been demonstrated, there is no mention of the presence of paras

  12. Electrical Stimulation of Denervated Rat Skeletal Muscle Retards Capillary and Muscle Loss in Early Stages of Disuse Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki Nakagawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of low-frequency electrical muscle stimulation (ES on the decrease in muscle mass, fiber size, capillary supply, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP immunoreactivity in the early stages of denervation-induced limb disuse. Direct ES was performed on the tibialis anterior muscle following denervation in seven-week-old male rats. The rats were divided into the following groups: control (CON, denervation (DN, and denervation with direct ES (DN + ES. Direct ES was performed at an intensity of 16 mA and a frequency of 10 Hz for 30 min per day, six days a week, for one week. We performed immunohistochemical staining to determine the expression of dystrophin, CD34, and MMP-2 in transverse sections of TA muscles. The weight, myofiber cross-sectional area (FCSA, and capillary-to-fiber (C/F ratio of the tibialis anterior (TA muscle were significantly reduced in the DN group compared to the control and DN + ES groups. The MMP-2 positive area was significantly greater in DN and DN + ES groups compared to the control group. These findings suggest beneficial effects of direct ES in reducing muscle atrophy and capillary regression without increasing MMP-2 immunoreactivity in the early stages of DN-induced muscle disuse in rat hind limbs.

  13. Evaluation of follistatin as a therapeutic in models of skeletal muscle atrophy associated with denervation and tenotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Patricio V; Lamon, Séverine; Hagg, Adam; Thomson, Rachel E; Winbanks, Catherine E; Qian, Hongwei; Bruce, Clinton R; Russell, Aaron P; Gregorevic, Paul

    2015-12-11

    Follistatin is an inhibitor of TGF-β superfamily ligands that repress skeletal muscle growth and promote muscle wasting. Accordingly, follistatin has emerged as a potential therapeutic to ameliorate the deleterious effects of muscle atrophy. However, it remains unclear whether the anabolic effects of follistatin are conserved across different modes of non-degenerative muscle wasting. In this study, the delivery of a recombinant adeno-associated viral vector expressing follistatin (rAAV:Fst) to the hind-limb musculature of mice two weeks prior to denervation or tenotomy promoted muscle hypertrophy that was sufficient to preserve muscle mass comparable to that of untreated sham-operated muscles. However, administration of rAAV:Fst to muscles at the time of denervation or tenotomy did not prevent subsequent muscle wasting. Administration of rAAV:Fst to innervated or denervated muscles increased protein synthesis, but markedly reduced protein degradation only in innervated muscles. Phosphorylation of the signalling proteins mTOR and S6RP, which are associated with protein synthesis, was increased in innervated muscles administered rAAV:Fst, but not in treated denervated muscles. These results demonstrate that the anabolic effects of follistatin are influenced by the interaction between muscle fibres and motor nerves. These findings have important implications for understanding the potential efficacy of follistatin-based therapies for non-degenerative muscle wasting.

  14. The morphological substrate for Renal Denervation : Nerve distribution patterns and parasympathetic nerves. A post-mortem histological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amsterdam, Wouter A C; Blankestijn, Peter J; Goldschmeding, Roel; Bleys, Ronald L A W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Renal Denervation as a possible treatment for hypertension has been studied extensively, but knowledge on the distribution of nerves surrounding the renal artery is still incomplete. While sympathetic and sensory nerves have been demonstrated, there is no mention of the presence of

  15. Surgical cardiac denervation therapy for treatment of congenital ion channelopathies in pediatric patients: a contemporary, single institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, John P; Wilson, Jennifer K; Louis, Clauden; Peer, Syed M; Zurakowski, David; Nadler, Evan P; Qureshi, Faisal G; Jonas, Richard A; Greene, E Anne; Berul, Charles I; Moak, Jeffrey P; Nath, Dilip S

    2015-01-01

    Congenital ion channel disorders, including congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS), cause significant morbidity in pediatric patients. When medication therapy does not control symptoms or arrhythmias, more invasive treatment strategies may be necessary. This study examines our institution's clinical experience with surgical cardiac denervation therapy for management of these arrhythmogenic disorders in children. An institutional review board-approved retrospective review identified ten pediatric patients with congenital ion channelopathies who underwent surgical cardiac denervation therapy at a single institution between May 2011 and April 2014. Eight patients had a diagnosis of congenital LQTS, two patients were diagnosed with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). All patients underwent sympathectomy and partial stellate ganglionectomy via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Six of the ten patients had documented ventricular arrhythmias preoperatively, and 70% of the patients had preoperative syncope. The corrected QT interval decreased in 75% of patients with LQTS following sympathectomy. Postoperative arrhythmogenic symptoms were absent in 88% of congenital LQTS patients, but both patients with CPVT continued to have symptoms throughout the duration of follow-up. All patients were alive after a median follow-up period of 10 months. Surgical cardiac denervation therapy via VATS is a useful treatment strategy for congenital LQTS patients who fail medical management, and its potential benefit in the management of CPVT is unclear. A prospective comparison of the efficacy of surgical cardiac denervation therapy and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator use in congenital ion channelopathies is timely and crucial. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Differential alterations in gene expression profiles contribute to time-dependent effects of nandrolone to prevent denervation atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauman William A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anabolic steroids, such as nandrolone, slow muscle atrophy, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect are largely unknown. Their effects on muscle size and gene expression depend upon time, and the cause of muscle atrophy. Administration of nandrolone for 7 days beginning either concomitantly with sciatic nerve transection (7 days or 29 days later (35 days attenuated denervation atrophy at 35 but not 7 days. We reasoned that this model could be used to identify genes that are regulated by nandrolone and slow denervation atrophy, as well as genes that might explain the time-dependence of nandrolone effects on such atrophy. Affymetrix microarrays were used to profile gene expression changes due to nandrolone at 7 and 35 days and to identify major gene expression changes in denervated muscle between 7 and 35 days. Results Nandrolone selectively altered expression of 124 genes at 7 days and 122 genes at 35 days, with only 20 genes being regulated at both time points. Marked differences in biological function of genes regulated by nandrolone at 7 and 35 days were observed. At 35, but not 7 days, nandrolone reduced mRNA and protein levels for FOXO1, the mTOR inhibitor REDD2, and the calcineurin inhibitor RCAN2 and increased those for ApoD. At 35 days, correlations between mRNA levels and the size of denervated muscle were negative for RCAN2, and positive for ApoD. Nandrolone also regulated genes for Wnt signaling molecules. Comparison of gene expression at 7 and 35 days after denervation revealed marked alterations in the expression of 9 transcriptional coregulators, including Ankrd1 and 2, and many transcription factors and kinases. Conclusions Genes regulated in denervated muscle after 7 days administration of nandrolone are almost entirely different at 7 versus 35 days. Alterations in levels of FOXO1, and of genes involved in signaling through calcineurin, mTOR and Wnt may be linked to the favorable action of nandrolone on

  17. Tectogenesis of the outer Carpathians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozikowski, H.

    1980-01-01

    The modern structure and history of development of the outer Carpathians are examined. The nature of sedimentation of the sedimentary rocks developed here is discussed in relation to the conditions of oil and gas formation and oil and gas accumulation. The conclusion is drawn that hydrocarbon formation began back in the period of sedimentation of the flysch deposits, and hydrocarbon accumulations in favorable traps could be preserved all the way to the present time. The northern part of the region where the formations of oil, gas and condensate could be found at great depths is considered highly promising.

  18. Hemodynamic and ventilatory response to different levels of hypoxia and hypercapnia in carotid body-denervated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo J. Sabino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chemoreceptors play an important role in the autonomic modulation of circulatory and ventilatory responses to changes in arterial O2 and/or CO2. However, studies evaluating hemodynamic responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia in rats have shown inconsistent results. Our aim was to evaluate hemodynamic and respiratory responses to different levels of hypoxia and hypercapnia in conscious intact or carotid body-denervated rats. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were submitted to bilateral ligature of carotid body arteries (or sham-operation and received catheters into the left femoral artery and vein. After two days, each animal was placed into a plethysmographic chamber and, after baseline measurements of respiratory parameters and arterial pressure, each animal was subjected to three levels of hypoxia (15, 10 and 6% O2 and hypercapnia (10% CO2. RESULTS: The results indicated that 15% O2 decreased the mean arterial pressure and increased the heart rate (HR in both intact (n = 8 and carotid body-denervated (n = 7 rats. In contrast, 10% O2did not change the mean arterial pressure but still increased the HR in intact rats, and it decreased the mean arterial pressure and increased the heart rate in carotid body-denervated rats. Furthermore, 6% O2 increased the mean arterial pressure and decreased the HR in intact rats, but it decreased the mean arterial pressure and did not change the HR in carotid body-denervated rats. The 3 levels of hypoxia increased pulmonary ventilation in both groups, with attenuated responses in carotid body-denervated rats. Hypercapnia with 10% CO2 increased the mean arterial pressure and decreased HR similarly in both groups. Hypercapnia also increased pulmonary ventilation in both groups to the same extent. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that the hemodynamic and ventilatory responses varied according to the level of hypoxia. Nevertheless, the hemodynamic and ventilatory responses to hypercapnia did not depend on the

  19. [Endovascular radiofrequency denervation of renal arteries as an innovation method of treatment of refractory arterial hypertension. First experience in Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, N M; Matchin, Iu G; Chazova, I E

    2012-01-01

    Excessive activation of the sympathetic nervous system forms the basis of pathogenesis of essential arterial hypertension (AH). The present work was aimed at evaluating efficacy and safety of endovascular radiofrequency denervation of renal arteries in patients with AH refractory AH based on the initial first experience in with using this methodology in the Russian Federation. The interventions were carried out on December 14-15th, 2011 in the first five patients presenting with AH refractory to antihypertensive therapy consisting of three and more drugs in therapeutic doses, one of which was a diuretic. The selection criteria were systolic arterial pressure (SAP) ≥160 mm Hg or ≥150 mm Hg in the presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The obligatory conditions for selection were the preserved renal function [glomerular filtration rate (GFR) ≥45 ml/min] and the absence of the secondary form of AH. The procedure of denervation was performed in the conditions of roentgen-operating room using special Medtronic Ardian Simplicity Catheter System™. In all cases we managed to perform bilateral denervation of renal arteries with the radiofrequency effect in not less than 4 zones of each of vessels. Efficacy of each of the effect was registered with due regard for reaching certain temperature and values of impedance. The interventions were not accompanied by the development of any complications either in the area of manipulations or the site of puncture. Neither were there any complications from the side of the cardiovascular or excretory systems of the body. Diurnal monitoring of AP (DMAP) registered a significant decrease in SAP averagely from 174±12 to 145±10 mm Hg three days after the intervention. A persistent antihypertensive effect was confirmed by the DMAP findings one month after denervation - the SAP level averagely amounted to 131±6 mm Hg. Endovascular radiofrequency denervation of renal arteries is a safe and efficient method of treatment of AH resistant

  20. Expression of atrophy-related transcription factors in the process of intrinsic laryngeal muscle atrophy after denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sei, Hirofumi; Taguchi, Aki; Nishida, Naoya; Hato, Naohito; Gyo, Kiyofumi

    2015-01-01

    We examined changes in the expressions of three atrophy-related transcription factors (FOXO3a, P-FOXO3a, and PGC-1α) in the process of intrinsic laryngeal muscle atrophy after denervation. In total, 51 Wistar rats were used. After transection of the unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve, the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle and the posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscle were excised and subjected to histological and Western blot studies. Relationships between the expressions of transcription factors during atrophy of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles were investigated by comparing the results of the treated side (T) with those of the untreated side (U), and sequential changes in the T/U ratio after denervation were assessed. Loss of wet muscle weight, together with a decrease in muscle fiber cross-sectional area and increase in the number of muscle fibers/mm(2), occurred more quickly in TA muscle than in PCA muscle. Muscle atrophy progressed rapidly between 7 and 28 days after denervation, while expression of FOXO3a was maximal on day 7, in both TA and PCA muscles. By contrast, P-FOXO3a expression decreased gradually after denervation. Expression of PGC-1α increased slowly until day 7, and then it declined. Denervation-induced atrophy of the intrinsic laryngeal muscles was closely linked with the expression of FOXO3a and PGC-1α, suggesting that atrophy of these muscles may involve the actions of these transcription factors. In addition, muscle atrophy progressed faster in TA muscle than in PCA muscle, due mainly to differences in muscle fiber composition.

  1. The Effect of Patellar Denervation by Circumpatellar Electrocautery on Anterior Knee Pain Following Total Knee Replacement – An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Zacharia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVES Anterior knee pain is a common problem in patients who have undergone TKR which causes dissatisfaction among them. There are Various methods for prevention of anterior knee pain following TKR .The  objective of this study is to determine the  effect of circumpatellar electrocautery on anterior knee pain following TKR and to compare the results with that of those patients who have undergone TKR without circumpatellar denervation. METHODS This is a cohort study conducted in Dept. of Orthopedics, Govt. Medical College, Kozhikode,kerala, 2014. Total sample size was 90.out of which 2 patients died during the study period. We lost follow up of 7 patients.  Among the remaining 81 patients 42 had undergone TKR with circumpatellar denervation using electocautery and 39 without circumpatellar denervation. They were kept under follow up. Patients were followed up postoperatively at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months and at one year. At all postoperative visits, a clinical score was determined using the Knee Society score and the clinical anterior knee pain rating system described by Waters and Bentley RESULTS There is no statistically significant difference in AKP score between both groups.There is a statistically significant difference in the knee society score at 1st month(p value <.001.  But there is no difference on further follow up visits . CONCLUSION There is no statistically significant difference between final outcome of patients who underwent patella denervation using circumpatellar electrocauterisation and those without denervation  with respect to anterior knee pain among patients who have undergone TKR.

  2. Implantation of muscle satellite cells overexpressing myogenin improves denervated muscle atrophy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of muscle satellite cells (MSCs overexpressing myogenin (MyoG on denervated muscle atrophy. Rat MSCs were isolated and transfected with the MyoG-EGFP plasmid vector GV143. MyoG-transfected MSCs (MTMs were transplanted into rat gastrocnemius muscles at 1 week after surgical denervation. Controls included injections of untransfected MSCs or the vehicle only. Muscles were harvested and analyzed at 2, 4, and 24 weeks post-transplantation. Immunofluorescence confirmed MyoG overexpression in MTMs. The muscle wet weight ratio was significantly reduced at 2 weeks after MTM injection (67.17±6.79 compared with muscles injected with MSCs (58.83±5.31 or the vehicle (53.00±7.67; t=2.37, P=0.04 and t=3.39, P=0.007, respectively. The muscle fiber cross-sectional area was also larger at 2 weeks after MTM injection (2.63×103±0.39×103 compared with MSC injection (1.99×103±0.58×103 or the vehicle only (1.57×103±0.47×103; t=2.24, P=0.049 and t=4.22, P=0.002, respectively. At 4 and 24 weeks post-injection, the muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area were similar across all three experimental groups. Immunohistochemistry showed that the MTM group had larger MyoG-positive fibers. The MTM group (3.18±1.13 also had higher expression of MyoG mRNA than other groups (1.41±0.65 and 1.03±0.19 at 2 weeks after injection (t=2.72, P=0.04. Transplanted MTMs delayed short-term atrophy of denervated muscles. This approach can be optimized as a novel stand-alone therapy or as a bridge to surgical re-innervation of damaged muscles.

  3. A Case Report of Renal Sympathetic Denervation for the Treatment of Polymorphic Ventricular Premature Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Márcio Galindo; Vitorio, Frederico Puppim; da Silva, Gustavo Ramalho; Paz, Luis Marcelo Rodrigues; Souto, Gladyston Luiz Lima

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Premature ventricular complexes are very common, appearing most frequently in patients with hypertension, obesity, sleep apnea, and structural heart disease. Sympathetic hyperactivity plays a critical role in the development, maintenance, and aggravation of ventricular arrhythmias. Recently, Armaganijan et al reported the relevance of sympathetic activation in patients with ventricular arrhythmias and suggested a potential role for catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation in reducing the arrhythmic burden. In this report, we describe a 32-year-old hypertensive male patient presenting with a high incidence of polymorphic premature ventricular complexes on a 24 hour Holter monitor. Beginning 1 year prior, the patient experienced episodes of presyncope, syncope, and tachycardia palpitations. The patient was taking losartan 100 mg/day, which kept his blood pressure (BP) under control, and sotalol 160 mg twice daily. Bisoprolol 10 mg/day was used previously but was not successful for controlling the episodes. The 24 hour Holter performed after the onset of sotalol 160 mg twice daily showed a heart rate ranging between 48 (minimum)–78 (average)–119 (maximum) bpm; 14,286 polymorphic premature ventricular complexes; 3 episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, the largest composed of 4 beats at a rate of 197 bpm; and 14 isolated atrial ectopic beats. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium perfusion performed at rest and under pharmacological stress with dipyridamole showed increased left atrial internal volume, preserved systolic global biventricular function, and an absence of infarcted or ischemic areas. The patient underwent bilateral renal sympathetic denervation. The only drug used postprocedure was losartan 25 mg/day. Three months after the patient underwent renal sympathetic denervation, the mean BP value dropped to 132/86 mmHg, the mean systolic/diastolic 24 hour ambulatory BP measurement was reduced to 128/83

  4. Muscle Degeneration Associated With Rotator Cuff Tendon Release and/or Denervation in Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Christian; Meyer, Dominik C; Flück, Martin; Valdivieso, Paola; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Benn, Mario C; Wieser, Karl

    2017-03-01

    The effect of an additional neurological injury (suprascapular nerve traction injury) to a chronically retracted rotator cuff muscle is incompletely understood and warrants clarification. To investigate the microscopic and macroscopic muscle degeneration patterns caused by tendon release and/or muscle denervation in a sheep rotator cuff model. Controlled laboratory study. Infraspinatus muscle biopsy specimens (for histological analysis) were obtained from 18 Swiss alpine sheep before and 16 weeks after release of the infraspinatus tendon (tenotomy [T] group; n = 6), transection of the suprascapular nerve (neurectomy [N] group; n = 6), or tendon release plus nerve transection (tenotomy + neurectomy [T&N] group; n = 6). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were used to assess retraction (CT), muscle density (CT), volume (MRI T2), and fat fraction (MRI Dixon). Stiffness of the infraspinatus was measured with a spring scale. At 16 weeks postoperatively, the mean infraspinatus muscle volume had decreased significantly more after neurectomy (to 47% ± 7% of the original volume; P = .001) and tenotomy plus neurectomy (48% ± 13%; P = .005) than after tenotomy alone (78% ± 11%). Conversely, the mean amount of intramuscular fat (CT/MRI Dixon) was not significantly different in the 3 groups (T group: 50% ± 9%; N group: 40% ± 11%; T&N group: 46% ± 10%) after 16 weeks. The mean myotendinous retraction (CT) was not significantly different in the T and T&N groups (5.8 ± 1.0 cm and 6.4 ± 0.4 cm, respectively; P = .26). Stiffness was, however, most increased after additional neurectomy. In contrast to muscle changes after tendon release, denervation of the muscle led to a decrease in the pennation angle of lengthened muscle fibers, with a reduced mean cross-sectional area of pooled muscle fibers, a slow- to fast-type transformation, and an increase in the area percentage of hybrid fibers, leading to overall significantly greater atrophy of the

  5. Effect of renal sympathetic denervation on atrial substrate remodeling in ambulatory canines with prolonged atrial pacing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xule Wang

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RSD could suppress atrial fibrillation (AF in canines with short-time rapid right atrial pacing (RAP. However, the role of renal denervation on atrial remodeling is unclear. The aim of the present study was to explore the long-term effect of RSD on the atrial remodeling during prolonged RAP. Twenty mongrel dogs were implanted with a high-frequency cardiac pacemaker with a transvenous lead inserted into the right atrial appendage. The dogs were divided into three groups: a sham-operated group (n = 6, the chronic RAP (CRAP group (n = 7, and the CRAP+RSD group (n = 7. In the CRAP+RSD group, a pacemaker was implanted 6 weeks after RSD was performed bilaterally for recovery. RAP was maintained for 5 weeks in CRAP group and CRAP+RSD group. The plasma levels of Angiotensin II and aldosterone were significantly increased in CRAP group compared with sham-operated group, but the increasing trend was inhibited in CRAP+RSD group compared with CRAP group (P<0.05. Similarly, RSD suppressed the increasing trend that prolonged RAP produced in the left atrial levels of ANP, TNF-α and IL-6. Compared with the sham-operated group, the CRAP group had significantly increased levels of caspase-3, bax and Cx40 whereas the level of Bcl-2 decreased (P<0.05. RSD markedly reduced the upregulation of caspase-3, bax and Cx40 and the downregulation of Bcl-2 expression compared with the CRAP group (P<0.05. Picric acid-sirius red staining study suggested that RSD could markedly alleviate the lesion degree of cardic fibrosis induced by CRAP (P<0.05. Immunohistochemistry results showed that the densities of TH- and GAP43- positive nerves were significantly elevated in the CRAP group compared with the sham-operated group, while RSD operation signicantly inhibited the these changes produced by CRAP. These findings suggest that renal denervation could suppress the atrial remodeling after

  6. Implantation of muscle satellite cells overexpressing myogenin improves denervated muscle atrophy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H; Lv, Y; Shen, X Q; Xu, J H; Lu, H; Fu, L C; Duan, T

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of muscle satellite cells (MSCs) overexpressing myogenin (MyoG) on denervated muscle atrophy. Rat MSCs were isolated and transfected with the MyoG-EGFP plasmid vector GV143. MyoG-transfected MSCs (MTMs) were transplanted into rat gastrocnemius muscles at 1 week after surgical denervation. Controls included injections of untransfected MSCs or the vehicle only. Muscles were harvested and analyzed at 2, 4, and 24 weeks post-transplantation. Immunofluorescence confirmed MyoG overexpression in MTMs. The muscle wet weight ratio was significantly reduced at 2 weeks after MTM injection (67.17±6.79) compared with muscles injected with MSCs (58.83±5.31) or the vehicle (53.00±7.67; t=2.37, P=0.04 and t=3.39, P=0.007, respectively). The muscle fiber cross-sectional area was also larger at 2 weeks after MTM injection (2.63×10³±0.39×10³) compared with MSC injection (1.99×10³±0.58×10³) or the vehicle only (1.57×10³±0.47×10³; t=2.24, P=0.049 and t=4.22, P=0.002, respectively). At 4 and 24 weeks post-injection, the muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area were similar across all three experimental groups. Immunohistochemistry showed that the MTM group had larger MyoG-positive fibers. The MTM group (3.18±1.13) also had higher expression of MyoG mRNA than other groups (1.41±0.65 and 1.03±0.19) at 2 weeks after injection (t=2.72, P=0.04). Transplanted MTMs delayed short-term atrophy of denervated muscles. This approach can be optimized as a novel stand-alone therapy or as a bridge to surgical re-innervation of damaged muscles.

  7. Renal denervation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lene Kjær; Kamper, Anne-Lise; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup;

    2015-01-01

    demonstrated that RDN in patients with resistant hypertension was both feasible and safe and indicated that RDN may lead to impressive reductions in BP. However, recent controlled studies question the BP lowering effect of RDN treatment. Large-scale registry data still supports the favorable BP reducing effect...

  8. Sepsis progression to multiple organ dysfunction in carotid chemo/baro-denervated rats treated with lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardocci, Gino; Martin, Aldo; Abarzúa, Sebastián; Rodríguez, Jorge; Simon, Felipe; Reyes, Edison P; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Navarro, Cristina; Cortes, Paula P; Fernández, Ricardo

    2015-01-15

    Sepsis progresses to multiple organ dysfunction (MOD) due to the uncontrolled release of inflammatory mediators. Carotid chemo/baro-receptors could play a protective role during sepsis. In anesthetized male rats, we measured cardiorespiratory variables and plasma TNF-α, glucocorticoids, epinephrine, and MOD marker levels 90min after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration in control (SHAM surgery) and bilateral carotid chemo/baro-denervated (BCN) rats. BCN prior to LPS blunted the tachypneic response and enhanced tachycardia and hypotension. BCN-LPS rats also showed blunted plasma glucocorticoid responses, boosted epinephrine and TNF-α responses, and earlier MOD onset with a lower survival time compared with SHAM-LPS rats. Consequently, the complete absence of carotid chemo/baro-sensory function modified the neural, endocrine and inflammatory responses to sepsis. Thus, carotid chemo/baro-receptors play a protective role in sepsis.

  9. Artificial facial nerve reflex restores eyelid closure following orbicularis oculi muscle denervation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yujuan Wang; Keyong Li; Jingquan Liu; Dongyue Xu; Yuefeng Rui; Chunsheng Yang

    2010-01-01

    To date, treatment of peripheral facial paralysis has focused on preservation of facial nerve integrity. However, with seriously damaged facial nerve cases, it is difficult to recover anatomical and functional integrity using present therapies. Therefore, the present study utilized artificial facial nerve reflex to obtain orbicularis oculi muscle (OOM) electromyography signals on the uninjured side through the use of implanted recording electrodes. The implanted electrical chips analyzed facial muscle motion on the uninjured side and triggered an electrical stimulator to emit current pulses, which resulted in stimulation of injured OOM contraction and maintained bilateral symmetry and consistency. Following signal recognition, extraction, and computer analysis, electromyography signals in the uninjured OOM resulted in complete eyelid closure, which was consistent with the voltage threshold for eye closure. These findings suggested that artificial facial nerve reflex through the use of implanted microelectronics in unilateral peripheral facial paralysis could restore eyelid closure following orbicularis oculi muscle denervation.

  10. Evaluation of the effects of sensory denervation on osteoblasts by 3H-proline autoradiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiego, D J; Singh, I J

    1981-01-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve was unilaterally resected in 30-day-old mice; other animals were unilaterally sham-operated. At 15, 30, 60, 90, or 150 days after surgery, the mice wee injected with 2 muCi of 3H-proline (sp. act. 1.0Ci/mM) per g of body weight and killed 15, 30, or 60 min later. Autoradiographs were prepared from 5 micron decalcified sagittal sections of mandibles and grain counts made over periosteal osteoblasts mesial to the first molar. In denervated mandibles, osteoblasts incorporated less isotope compared to controls with differences being maximal at the early intervals. These differences became attenuated with time, possibly due to an intrinsic compensatory mechanism, secondary to neurotrophic regulation.

  11. Microtransplantation of acetylcholine receptors from normal or denervated rat skeletal muscles to frog oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernareggi, Annalisa; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Lorenzon, Paola; Ruzzier, Fabio; Miledi, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Cell membranes, carrying neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels, can be ‘microtransplanted’ into frog oocytes. This technique allows a direct functional characterization of the original membrane proteins, together with any associated molecules they may have, still embedded in their natural lipid environment. This approach has been previously demonstrated to be very useful to study neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels contained in cell membranes isolated from human brains. Here, we examined the possibility of using the microtransplantation method to study acetylcholine receptors from normal and denervated rat skeletal muscles. We found that the muscle membranes, carrying their fetal or adult acetylcholine receptor isoforms, could be efficiently microtransplanted to the oocyte membrane, making the oocytes become sensitive to acetylcholine. These results show that oocytes injected with skeletal muscle membranes efficiently incorporate functional acetylcholine receptors, thus making the microtransplantation approach a valuable tool to further investigate receptors and ion channels of human muscle diseases. PMID:21224230

  12. Renal sympathetic denervation prevents the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension and cardiac dysfunction in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Yu, Sheng-Bo; Chen, Liao; Guo, Rui-Qiang; Zhao, Qing-Yan

    2015-08-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is activated in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients, and this activation may have long-term negative effects on the progression of PAH. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of transcatheter renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) on the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension and cardiac dysfunction in dogs using two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging. Twenty-two dogs were randomly divided into three groups: control group (n = 7), PAH group (n = 8), and PAH + RSD group (n = 7). All dogs were assessed using two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging. The ventricular strain, ventricular synchrony, left ventricular (LV) twist, and torsion rate were analyzed to evaluate cardiac function. After 8 weeks, the right ventricular lateral longitudinal strain and the septum longitudinal strain were reduced in the PAH group compared with the control group (p dogs.

  13. Sensory denervation of the plantar lumbrical muscle spindles in pyridoxine neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinke, G; Heid, J; Bittiger, H; Hess, R

    1978-09-15

    Male albino rats treated with excessive amounts of pyridoxine developed an impairment of neuromuscular function. The equatorial region of the plantar lumbrical intrafusal muscle fibres was studied in the electron microscope and the calibre of the nerve fibres was determined in semi-thin sections of the posterior tibial nerves. Degeneration of the primary sensory endings coincided with the onset of ataxia, and in more advanced stages of the neuropathy as well as after a 2-month treatment-free period the equatorial region was denervated. There was a corresponding decrease in the number of large nerve fibres. It is considered essential that primary sensory endings of lumbrical muscle spindles should be included in studies of distally accentuated sensory neuropathies.

  14. Peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites on striated muscles of the rat: Properties and effect of denervation

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    Mueller, W.E.; Ickstadt, A. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Pharmakologisches Inst.); Hopf, H.Ch. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1985-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites mediate some direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles, the properties of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding to rat biceps and rat diaphragm homogenates were investigated. In both tissues a single population of sites was found with a Ksub(D) value of 3 nmol/l. The density of these sites in both muscles was higher than the density in rat brain, but was considerably lower than in rat kidney. Competition experiments indicate a substrate specificity of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding similar to the properties already demonstrated for the specific binding of this ligand to peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites in many other tissues. The properties of these sites in the rat diaphragm are not changed after motoric denervation by phrenicectomy. It is concluded that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites are not involved in direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles.

  15. Association Between Rectus Abdominis Denervation and Ventilation Dysfunction in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Gang Zhang; Shuo Zhang; Ying-Sheng Xu; Nan Zhang; Dong-Sheng Fan

    2016-01-01

    Background:Spontaneous potentials in electromyography (EMG) ofparaspinal muscles are associated with diaphragm denervation and,therefore,poor respiratory function in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is understandable.EMG changes in the rectus abdominis (RA)display an effect similar to those in paraspinal muscles with respect to the function of lower motor neurons in the thoracic spinal cord.The RA denervation was examined to determine its association with ventilation dysfunction in ALS.Methods:We collected the clinical data of 128 patients with sporadic ALS in Department of Neurology of Peking University Third Hospital from 2009 to 2013.EMG,Revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were performed in all patients and the differences in the EMG changes in RA between those with and without FVC ≥ 80% were analysed.Results:The mean FVC value was 83.4% ± 17.1% (range:45%-131%) of the predicted value.A total of 79 patients displayed FVC ≥80%,and 49 patients displayed FVC <80%.Compared with the patients displaying a normal FVC (60/79,75.9%),spontaneous activity in RA was significantly different among those patients displaying an FVC <80% (47/49,95.9%).In addition,spontaneous potentials in RA were more frequently detected in patients exhibiting dyspnea (32/33,97.0%) than in patients without dyspnea (75/95,78.9%).Conclusion:Spontaneous potentials in RA are associated with ventilation dysfunction and dyspnea in ALS patients.

  16. Effects of Scopolamine on Blood Vessels in Rabbit Ear after Sympathetic and Sensory Denervation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘书勤; 臧伟进; 成亮; 李增利; 于晓江; 李宝平

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects and involved mechanisms of scopolamine (Scop) on rabbit ear blood vessels. Methods Rabbit ear blood vessels were desympathetic and desensory innervation with surgical operation. Diameters of dorsal auricular arterial trunks in vivo were measured with a pair of compasses and the ruler in a dissecting microscope, and effluents from isolated ear under constant perfusion pressure were recorded with a digital drop-recorder. Results Intramuscular injection of Scop 0.1 mg/kg made the diameter of denerved dorsal auricular arterial trunks, as well as that of innerved ones, significantly increased. Scop by itself, at the maximal concentration (Cmax) of 3 μM, 30 μM and 300 μM, did not alter the effluent flow from the isolated denervated rabbit ear, but chlorpromazine (CPZ), at Cmax of 1 μM, acetylcholine (ACh), 0.25μM, all significantly increased the effluent flow, and norepinephrine (NE), 0.1μM, significantly decreased the effluent. Scop, 3 μM, did not affect ACh (0.25μM)-induced the increase of effluent flow, but Scop,30μM, alleviated the increase. Scop, 3μM, did not affect NE (0.1 μM)-induced the decrease of effluent flow, but Scop, 10, 30 and 100 μM, significantly alleviated the decrease. Conclusions The study suggests that Scop has no direct vasodilator effect. The vasodilator effect of Scop is not due to the blockade of muscarinic receptor. However, Scop can dilate blood vessels contracted by α1-adrenoceptor activation.

  17. Degree of skin denervation and its correlation to objective thermal sensory test in leprosy patients.

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    Ismael Alves Rodrigues Júnior

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leprosy is an infectious disease affecting skin and peripheral nerves resulting in increased morbidity and physical deformities. Early diagnosis provides opportune treatment and reduces its complications, relying fundamentally on the demonstration of impaired sensation in suggestive cutaneous lesions. The loss of tactile sensitivity in the lesions is preceded by the loss of thermal sensitivity, stressing the importance of the thermal test in the suspicious lesions approach. The gold-standard method for the assessment of thermal sensitivity is the quantitative sensory test (QST. Morphological study may be an alternative approach to access the thin nerve fibers responsible for thermal sensitivity transduction. The few studies reported in leprosy patients pointed out a rarefaction of thin dermo-epidermal fibers in lesions, but used semi-quantitative evaluation methods. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This work aimed to study the correlation between the degree of thermal sensitivity impairment measured by QST and the degree of denervation in leprosy skin lesions, evaluated by immunohistochemistry anti-PGP 9.5 and morphometry. Twenty-two patients were included. There were significant differences in skin thermal thresholds among lesions and contralateral skin (cold, warm, cold induced pain and heat induced pain. The mean reduction in the density of intraepidermal and subepidermal fibers in lesions was 79.5% (SD = 19.6 and 80.8% (SD = 24.9, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We observed a good correlation between intraepidermal and subepidermal fibers deficit, but no correlation between these variables and those accounting for the degree of impairment in thermal thresholds, since the thin fibers rarefaction was homogeneously intense in all patients, regardless of the degree of sensory deficit. We believe that the homogeneously intense denervation in leprosy lesions should be objective of further investigations focused on its

  18. Vagal denervation inhibits the increase in pulmonary blood flow during partial lung aeration at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Justin A R; Pearson, James T; Binder-Heschl, Corinna; Wallace, Megan J; Siew, Melissa L; Kitchen, Marcus J; Te Pas, Arjan B; Lewis, Robert A; Polglase, Graeme R; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Hooper, Stuart B

    2017-03-01

    Lung aeration at birth significantly increases pulmonary blood flow, which is unrelated to increased oxygenation or other spatial relationships that match ventilation to perfusion. Using simultaneous X-ray imaging and angiography in near-term rabbits, we investigated the relative contributions of the vagus nerve and oxygenation to the increase in pulmonary blood flow at birth. Vagal denervation inhibited the global increase in pulmonary blood flow induced by partial lung aeration, although high inspired oxygen concentrations can partially mitigate this effect. The results of the present study indicate that a vagal reflex may mediate a rapid global increase in pulmonary blood flow in response to partial lung aeration. Air entry into the lungs at birth triggers major cardiovascular changes, including a large increase in pulmonary blood flow (PBF) that is not spatially related to regional lung aeration. To investigate the possible underlying role of a vagally-mediated stimulus, we used simultaneous phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography in near-term (30 days of gestation) vagotomized (n = 15) or sham-operated (n = 15) rabbit kittens. Rabbits were imaged before ventilation, when one lung was ventilated (unilateral) with 100% nitrogen (N2 ), air or 100% oxygen (O2 ), and after all kittens were switched to unilateral ventilation in air and then ventilation of both lungs using air. Compared to control kittens, vagotomized kittens had little or no increase in PBF in both lungs following unilateral ventilation when ventilation occurred with 100% N2 or with air. However, relative PBF did increase in vagotomized animals ventilated with 100% O2 , indicating the independent stimulatory effects of local oxygen concentration and autonomic innervation on the changes in PBF at birth. These findings demonstrate that vagal denervation inhibits the previously observed increase in PBF with partial lung aeration, although high inspired oxygen concentrations can partially

  19. Spleen vagal denervation inhibits the production of antibodies to circulating antigens.

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    Ruud M Buijs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently the vagal output of the central nervous system has been shown to suppress the innate immune defense to pathogens. Here we investigated by anatomical and physiological techniques the communication of the brain with the spleen and provided evidence that the brain has the capacity to stimulate the production of antigen specific antibodies by its parasympathetic autonomic output. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This conclusion was reached by successively demonstrating that: 1. The spleen receives not only sympathetic input but also parasympathetic input. 2. Intravenous trinitrophenyl-ovalbumin (TNP-OVA does not activate the brain and does not induce an immune response. 3. Intravenous TNP-OVA with an inducer of inflammation; lipopolysaccharide (LPS, activates the brain and induces TNP-specific IgM. 4. LPS activated neurons are in the same areas of the brain as those that provide parasympathetic autonomic information to the spleen, suggesting a feed back circuit between brain and immune system. Consequently we investigated the interaction of the brain with the spleen and observed that specific parasympathetic denervation but not sympathetic denervation of the spleen eliminates the LPS-induced antibody response to TNP-OVA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings not only show that the brain can stimulate antibody production by its autonomic output, it also suggests that the power of LPS as adjuvant to stimulate antibody production may also depend on its capacity to activate the brain. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the stimulation of the adaptive immune response may explain why mood and sleep have an influence on antibody production.

  20. Arthroscopic Patelloplasty and Circumpatellar Denervation for the Treatment of Patellofemoral Osteoarthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Zhao; Yujie Liu; Bangtuo Yuan; Xuezhen Shen; Feng Qu; Jiangtao Wang; Wei Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background:Patellofemoral osteoarthritis commonly occurs in older people,often resulting in anterior knee pain and severely reduced quality of life.The aim was to examine the effectiveness of arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation for the treatment of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA).Methods:A total of 156 PFOA patients (62 males,94 females; ages 45-81 years,mean 66 years) treated in our department between September 2012 and March 2013 were involved in this study.Clinical manifestations included recurrent swelling and pain in the knee joint and aggravated pain upon ascending/descending stairs,squatting down,or standing up.PFOA was treated with arthroscopic patelloplasty and circumpatellar denervation.The therapeutic effects before and after surgery were statistically evaluated using Lysholm and Kujala scores.The therapeutic effects were graded by classification of the degree of cartilage defect.Results:A total of 149 cases were successfully followed up for 14.8 months,on average.The incisions healed well,and no complications occurred.After surgery,the average Lysholm score improved from 73.29 to 80.93,and the average Kujala score improved from 68.34 to 76.48.This procedure was highly effective for patients with cartilage defects Ⅰ-Ⅲ but not for patients with cartilage defect Ⅳ.Conclusions:For PFOA patients,this procedure is effective for significantly relieving anterior knee pain,improving knee joint function and quality of life,and deferring arthritic progression.

  1. The effect of terbutaline on exocrine function in the denervated canine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, P J; Niehoff, M; Burton, F

    1988-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of the beta adrenergic agonist, terbutaline, on pancreatic exocrine secretion in the denervated canine pancreas. In vitro assessment was performed by evaluating the effect of terbutaline on 10(-8) OP-CCK stimulated amylase release of pancreatic tissue slices incubated at 37 degrees C in Krebs-bicarbonate media. In vivo assessment was accomplished in animals with pancreatic autografts and functioning pancreaticocystostomies, by evaluating the effect of intravenous terbutaline (0.075 mg/kg over 15 min) on the basal, and OP-CCK (125 ng/kg/hr)--stimulated, rate of secretion of urinary (autograft) amylase and bicarbonate. Incubation of tissue slices with terbutaline had no significant effect on OP-CCK-stimulated amylase release. The intravenous terbutaline infusion resulted in a decrease in the basal rate of amylase (U/min) and bicarbonate (mmol/min) secretion, with the bicarbonate inhibition being significantly decreased, when compared with controls (0.073 +/- .04 vs. 000 +/- .00; P less than 0.05). Following the terbutaline infusion, there was also a significant decrease in OP-CCK-stimulated amylase (140.3 +/- 23.3 vs. 24.6 +/- 11.9; P less than 0.005) and bicarbonate release (.069 +/- .03 vs. .003 +/- .001; P less than 0.05). This inhibition persisted until the study was terminated 3 hr after the terbutaline infusion. These studies demonstrate that terbutaline causes a significant and prolonged decrease in autograft exocrine secretion--and, as a result, may have a therapeutic role in reducing the exocrine complications associated with pancreatic transplantation. The mechanism of action of this agent in the denervated pancreas requires further elucidation.

  2. Time-Dependent Changes in the Structure of Calcified Fibrocartilage in the Rat Achilles Tendon-Bone Interface With Sciatic Denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hideaki; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Oyama, Mineo; Yamamoto, Noriaki; Onishi, Hideaki

    2017-09-13

    The enthesis transmits a physiological load from soft to hard tissue via fibrocartilage. The histological alterations induced by this physiological loading remain unclear. This study was performed to examine the histomorphological alterations in the collagen fiber bundle alignment and depth of collagen interdigitation between the calcified fibrocartilage and the bone. We examined the Achilles enthesis of rats with sciatic denervation to explore the mechanical effects of structural changes in the enthesis. The parallelism of the collagen fiber bundles was significantly reduced 8 weeks after denervation. However, the depth of collagen interdigitation significantly increased at 2 and 4 weeks after denervation and then significantly decreased 8 weeks after denervation. In conclusion, a lack of muscle loading induced structural alterations in the distal calcified fibrocartilage. These findings suggest that while structural changes in the enthesis are necessary for the development of physiological loading, structural deformities are required in the long term. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Exploring bacterial outer membrane barrier to combat bad bugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghai I

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ishan Ghai,1 Shashank Ghai2 1School of Engineering and Life Sciences, Jacobs University, Bremen, 2Leibniz University, Hannover, Germany Abstract: One of the main fundamental mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria comprises an effective change in the membrane permeability to antibiotics. The Gram-negative bacterial complex cell envelope comprises an outer membrane that delimits the periplasm from the exterior environment. The outer membrane contains numerous protein channels, termed as porins or nanopores, which are mainly involved in the influx of hydrophilic compounds, including antibiotics. Bacterial adaptation to reduce influx through these outer membrane proteins (Omps is one of the crucial mechanisms behind antibiotic resistance. Thus to interpret the molecular basis of the outer membrane permeability is the current challenge. This review attempts to develop a state of knowledge pertinent to Omps and their effective role in antibiotic influx. Further, it aims to study the bacterial response to antibiotic membrane permeability and hopefully provoke a discussion toward understanding and further exploration of prospects to improve our knowledge on physicochemical parameters that direct the translocation of antibiotics through the bacterial membrane protein channels. Keywords: antibiotics, Gram-negative bacteria, cell envelope, protein channels, nanopores, influx, antibiotic resistance

  4. Effect of Radiofrequency Denervation on Pain Intensity Among Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain: The Mint Randomized Clinical Trials.

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    Juch, Johan N S; Maas, Esther T; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Groeneweg, J George; Kallewaard, Jan-Willem; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P; van Dongen, Johanna M; Huygen, Frank J P M; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2017-07-04

    Radiofrequency denervation is a commonly used treatment for chronic low back pain, but high-quality evidence for its effectiveness is lacking. To evaluate the effectiveness of radiofrequency denervation added to a standardized exercise program for patients with chronic low back pain. Three pragmatic multicenter, nonblinded randomized clinical trials on the effectiveness of minimal interventional treatments for participants with chronic low back pain (Mint study) were conducted in 16 multidisciplinary pain clinics in the Netherlands. Eligible participants were included between January 1, 2013, and October 24, 2014, and had chronic low back pain, a positive diagnostic block at the facet joints (facet joint trial, 251 participants), sacroiliac joints (sacroiliac joint trial, 228 participants), or a combination of facet joints, sacroiliac joints, or intervertebral disks (combination trial, 202 participants) and were unresponsive to conservative care. All participants received a 3-month standardized exercise program and psychological support if needed. Participants in the intervention group received radiofrequency denervation as well. This is usually a 1-time procedure, but the maximum number of treatments in the trial was 3. The primary outcome was pain intensity (numeric rating scale, 0-10; whereby 0 indicated no pain and 10 indicated worst pain imaginable) measured 3 months after the intervention. The prespecified minimal clinically important difference was defined as 2 points or more. Final follow-up was at 12 months, ending October 2015. Among 681 participants who were randomized (mean age, 52.2 years; 421 women [61.8%], mean baseline pain intensity, 7.1), 599 (88%) completed the 3-month follow-up, and 521 (77%) completed the 12-month follow-up. The mean difference in pain intensity between the radiofrequency denervation and control groups at 3 months was -0.18 (95% CI, -0.76 to 0.40) in the facet joint trial; -0.71 (95% CI, -1.35 to -0.06) in the sacroiliac joint

  5. [Renal denervation in refractory hypertension: joint statement of the German hypertension league DHL eV and the German societies of cardiology, angiology, nephrology and radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonend, Oliver; Böhm, Michael; Eckert, Siegfried; Hausberg, Martin; Rittger, Harald; Rump, Lars-Christian; Schmieder, Roland; Schulte, Karl-Ludwig; Schunkert, Heribert; Uder, Michael; Veelken, Roland; Vorwerk, Dierk; Weil, Joachim; Wenzel, Ulrich; Mahfoud, Felix

    2015-03-01

    Arterial hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and remains insufficiently controlled in Germany. The sham controlled Symplicity HTN-3 trial did meet its primary safety endpoint but failed to meet its primary efficacy endpoint. Renal denervation can not replace established, well-proven therapies. It can only be used in selected truly resistant hypertensive patients as an additive approach and should be performed by specialized centers only. Randomized controlled trials are needed to further evaluate renal denervation.

  6. Adult skin-derived precursor Schwann cells exhibit superior myelination and regeneration supportive properties compared to chronically denervated nerve-derived Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ranjan; Sinha, Sarthak; Hagner, Andrew; Stykel, Morgan; Raharjo, Eko; Singh, Karun K; Midha, Rajiv; Biernaskie, Jeff

    2016-04-01

    Functional outcomes following delayed peripheral nerve repair are poor. Schwann cells (SCs) play key roles in supporting axonal regeneration and remyelination following nerve injury, thus understanding the impact of chronic denervation on SC function is critical toward developing therapies to enhance regeneration. To improve our understanding of SC function following acute versus chronic-denervation, we performed functional assays of SCs from adult rodent sciatic nerve with acute- (Day 5 post) or chronic-denervation (Day 56 post), versus embryonic nerves. We also compared Schwann cells derived from adult skin-derived precursors (aSKP-SCs) as an accessible, autologous alternative to supplement the distal (denervated) nerve. We found that acutely-injured SCs and aSKP-SCs exhibited superior proliferative capacity, promotion of neurite outgrowth and myelination of axons, both in vitro and following transplant into a sciatic nerve crush injury model, while chronically-denervated SCs were severely impaired. Acute injury caused re-activation of transcription factors associated with an immature and pro-myelinating SC state (Oct-6, cJun, Sox2, AP2α, cadherin-19), but was diminished with prolonged denervation in vivo and could not be rescued following expansion in vitro suggesting that this is a permanent deficiency. Interestingly, aSKP-SCs closely resembled acutely injured and embryonic SCs, exhibiting elevated expression of these same transcription factors. In summary, prolonged denervation resulted in SC deficiency in several functional parameters that may contribute to impaired regeneration. In contrast, aSKP-SCs closely resemble the regenerative attributes ascribed to acutely-denervated or embryonic SCs emphasizing their potential as an accessible and autologous source of glia cells to enhance nerve regeneration, particularly following delays to surgical repair. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The Power of Asymmetry: Architecture and Assembly of the Gram-Negative Outer Membrane Lipid Bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Jeremy C; Zimmerman, Shawn M; Crofts, Alexander A; Boll, Joseph M; Kuhns, Lisa G; Herrera, Carmen M; Trent, M Stephen

    2016-09-08

    Determining the chemical composition of biological materials is paramount to the study of natural phenomena. Here, we describe the composition of model gram-negative outer membranes, focusing on the predominant assembly, an asymmetrical bilayer of lipid molecules. We also give an overview of lipid biosynthetic pathways and molecular mechanisms that organize this material into the outer membrane bilayer. An emphasis is placed on the potential of these pathways as targets for antibiotic development. We discuss deviations in composition, through bacterial cell surface remodeling, and alternative modalities to the asymmetric lipid bilayer. Outer membrane lipid alterations of current microbiological interest, such as lipid structures found in commensal bacteria, are emphasized. Additionally, outer membrane components could potentially be engineered to develop vaccine platforms. Observations related to composition and assembly of gram-negative outer membranes will continue to generate novel discoveries, broaden biotechnologies, and reveal profound mysteries to compel future research.

  8. The effects of denervation, reinnervation, and muscle imbalance on functional muscle length and elbow flexion contracture following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekley, Holly; Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Eismann, Emily; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2012-08-01

    The pathophysiology of paradoxical elbow flexion contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) is incompletely understood. The current study tests the hypothesis that this contracture occurs by denervation-induced impairment of elbow flexor muscle growth. Unilateral forelimb paralysis was created in mice in four neonatal (5-day-old) BPI groups (C5-6 excision, C5-6 neurotomy, C5-6 neurotomy/repair, and C5-T1 global excision), one non-neonatal BPI group (28-day-old C5-6 excision), and two neonatal muscle imbalance groups (triceps tenotomy ± C5-6 excision). Four weeks post-operatively, motor function, elbow range of motion, and biceps/brachialis functional lengths were assessed. Musculocutaneous nerve (MCN) denervation and reinnervation were assessed immunohistochemically. Elbow flexion motor recovery and elbow flexion contractures varied inversely among the neonatal BPI groups. Contracture severity correlated with biceps/brachialis shortening and MCN denervation (relative axon loss), with no contractures occurring in mice with MCN reinnervation (presence of growth cones). No contractures or biceps/brachialis shortening occurred following non-neonatal BPI, regardless of denervation or reinnervation. Neonatal triceps tenotomy did not cause contractures or biceps/brachialis shortening, nor did it worsen those following neonatal C5-6 excision. Denervation-induced functional shortening of elbow flexor muscles leads to variable elbow flexion contractures depending on the degree, permanence, and timing of denervation, independent of muscle imbalance. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  9. Muscle fiber regeneration in human permanent lower motoneuron denervation: relevance to safety and effectiveness of FES-training, which induces muscle recovery in SCI subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, Ugo; Rossini, Katia; Mayr, Winfried; Kern, Helmut

    2005-03-01

    Morphologic characteristics of the long-term denervated muscle in animals suggest that some original fibers are lost and some of those seen are the result of repeated cycles of fiber regeneration. Muscle biopsies from lower motoneuron denervated patients enrolled in the EU Project RISE show the characteristics of long-term denervation. They present a few atrophic or severely atrophic myofibers dispersed among adipocytes and connective tissue (denervated degenerated muscle, DDM). Monoclonal antibody for embryonic myosin shows that regenerative events are present from 1- to 37-years postspinal cord injury (SCI). After 2- to 10-years FES-training the muscle cryosections present mainly large round myofibers. In the FES-trained muscles the regenerative events are present, but at a lower rate than long-term denervated muscles (myofiber per mm2 of cryosection area: 0.8 +/- 1.3 in FES vs. 2.3 +/- 2.3 in DDM, mean +/- SD, P = 0.011). In our opinion this is a sound additional evidence of effectiveness of the Kern's electrical stimulation protocol for FES of DDM. In any case, the overall results demonstrate that the FES-training is safe: at least it does not induce more myofiber damage/regeneration than denervation per se.

  10. Administration of Recombinant Heat Shock Protein 70 Delays Peripheral Muscle Denervation in the SOD1G93A Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Gifondorwa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A prominent clinical feature of ALS is muscle weakness due to dysfunction, denervation and degeneration of motoneurons (MNs. While MN degeneration is a late stage event in the ALS mouse model, muscle denervation occurs significantly earlier in the disease. Strategies to prevent this early denervation may improve quality of life by maintaining muscle control and slowing disease progression. The precise cause of MN dysfunction and denervation is not known, but several mechanisms have been proposed that involve potentially toxic intra- and extracellular changes. Many cells confront these changes by mounting a stress response that includes increased expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70. MNs do not upregulate Hsp70, and this may result in a potentially increased vulnerability. We previously reported that recombinant human hsp70 (rhHsp70 injections delayed symptom onset and increased lifespan in SOD1G93A mice. The exogenous rhHsp70 was localized to the muscle and not to spinal cord or brain suggesting it modulates peripheral pathophysiology. In the current study, we focused on earlier administration of Hsp70 and its effect on initial muscle denervation. Injections of the protein appeared to arrest denervation with preserved large myelinated peripheral axons, and reduced glial activation.

  11. Mitochondrial dysfunction underlying outer retinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevere, Evy; Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Vohra, Rupali

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) or both contribute to the initiation and progression of several outer retinal disorders. Disrupted Müller glia function might additionally subsidize to these diseases. Mitochondrial malfunctioning is importantly associated with outer...... retina pathologies, which can be classified as primary and secondary mitochondrial disorders. This review highlights the importance of oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA damage, underlying outer retinal disorders. Indeed, the metabolically active photoreceptors/RPE are highly prone to these hallmarks...... of mitochondrial dysfunction, indicating that mitochondria represent a weak link in the antioxidant defenses of outer retinal cells....

  12. Renal denervation in heart failure with normal left ventricular ejection fraction. Rationale and design of the DIASTOLE (DenervatIon of the renAl Sympathetic nerves in hearT failure with nOrmal Lv Ejection fraction) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloop, Willemien L; Beeftink, Martine M A; Nap, Alex; Bots, Michiel L; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Appelman, Yolande E; Cramer, Maarten-Jan; Agema, Willem R P; Scholtens, Asbjorn M; Doevendans, Pieter A; Allaart, Cor P; Voskuil, Michiel

    2013-12-01

    Aim Increasing evidence suggests an important role for hyperactivation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in the clinical phenomena of heart failure with normal LVEF (HFNEF) and hypertension. Moreover, the level of renal sympathetic activation is directly related to the severity of heart failure. Since percutaneous renal denervation (pRDN) has been shown to be effective in modulating elevated SNS activity in patients with hypertension, it can be hypothesized that pRDN has a positive effect on HFNEF. The DIASTOLE trial will investigate whether renal sympathetic denervation influences parameters of HFNEF. Methods DIASTOLE is a multicentre, randomized controlled trial. Sixty patients, diagnosed with HFNEF and treated for hypertension, will be randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to undergo renal denervation on top of medical treatment (n = 30) or to maintain medical treatment alone (n = 30). The primary objective is to investigate the efficacy of pRDN by means of pulsed wave Doppler echocardiographic parameters. Secondary objectives include safety of pRDN and a comparison of changes in the following parameters after pRDN: LV mass, LV volume, LVEF, and left atrial volume as determined by magnetic resonance imaging. Also, MIBG (metaiodobenzylguanidine) uptake and washout, BNP levels, blood pressure, heart rate variability, exercise capacity, and quality of life will be assessed. Perspective DIASTOLE is a randomized controlled trial evaluating renal denervation as a treatment option for HFNEF. The results of the current trial will provide important information regarding the treatment of HFNEF, and therefore may have major impact on future therapeutic strategies. Trail registration NCT01583881.

  13. Simulations of outer membrane channels and their permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothula, Karunakar R; Solano, Carlos J F; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    Channels in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria provide essential pathways for the controlled and unidirectional transport of ions, nutrients and metabolites into the cell. At the same time the outer membrane serves as a physical barrier for the penetration of noxious substances such as antibiotics into the bacteria. Most antibiotics have to pass through these membrane channels to either reach cytoplasmic bound targets or to further cross the hydrophobic inner membrane. Considering the pharmaceutical significance of antibiotics, understanding the functional role and mechanism of these channels is of fundamental importance in developing strategies to design new drugs with enhanced permeation abilities. Due to the biological complexity of membrane channels and experimental limitations, computer simulations have proven to be a powerful tool to investigate the structure, dynamics and interactions of membrane channels. Considerable progress has been made in computer simulations of membrane channels during the last decade. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the computational techniques and their roles in modeling the transport across outer membrane channels. A special emphasis is put on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations employed to better understand the transport of molecules. Moreover, recent molecular simulations of ion, substrate and antibiotics translocation through membrane pores are briefly summarized. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov.

  14. How does renal denervation lower blood pressure and when should this technique be considered for the treatment of hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Kui Toh Gerard; Krum, Henry

    2013-11-01

    Resistant hypertension poses significant health concerns. There are strong demands for new safe therapeutics to control resistant hypertension, while addressing its common causes, specifically poor compliance to lifelong polypharmacy, lifestyle modification and physician inertia. The sympathetic nervous system plays a significant pathophysiological role in hypertension. Surgical sympathectomy for blood pressure reduction is an old but extremely efficacious therapeutic concept, since abandoned, with the dawn of safer contemporary pharmacology era. Recently, clinical studies have revealed promising results for safe and sustained blood pressure reduction with percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation. This is a novel, minimally-invasive, device-based therapy, specifically targeting and ablating the renal artery nerves with radiofrequency waves, without permanent implantation. There are also reported additional benefits in related comorbidities, such as impaired glucose metabolism, renal impairment, left ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, and others. This review will focus on how selective renal sympathetic denervation works, as well as its present and potential therapeutic indications.

  15. Denervation and high-fat diet reduce insulin signaling in T-tubules in skeletal muscle of living mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hans P M; Ploug, Thorkil; Ai, Hua

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin stimulates muscle glucose transport by translocation of GLUT4 to sarcolemma and T-tubules. Despite muscle glucose uptake playing a major role in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, the temporal and spatial changes in insulin signaling and GLUT4 translocation during...... these conditions are not well described. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We used time-lapse confocal imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP) ADP-ribosylation factor nucleotide-binding site opener (ARNO) (evaluation of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase activation) and GLUT4-GFP-transfected quadriceps muscle in living...... receptors. RESULTS: Denervation and high-fat diet reduced insulin-mediated glucose transport. In denervated muscle, insulin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5 P(3) (PIP3) production was abolished in T-tubules, while PIP3 production at sarcolemma was increased 2.6-fold. Correspondingly, GLUT4-GFP...

  16. Effects of electrical stimulation and stretching on the adaptation of denervated skeletal muscle: implications for physical therapy Efeitos da eletroestimulação e do alongamento muscular sobre a adaptação do músculo desnervado: implicações para a fisioterapia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania F. Salvini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This review will describe the main cellular mechanisms involved in the reduction and increase of myoproteins synthesis commonly associated with muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, respectively. OBJECTIVE: We analyzed the effects of electrical stimulation (ES and stretching exercise on the molecular pathways involved in muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. We also described the main effects and limits of these resources in the skeletal muscle, particularly on the denervated muscle. DISCUSSION: Recently, our studies showed that the ES applied in a similar manner as performed in clinical practice is able to attenuate the increase of genes expression involved in muscle atrophy. However, ES was not effective to prevent the loss of muscle mass caused by denervation. Regarding to stretching exercises, their mechanisms of action on the denervated muscle are not fully understood and studies on this area are scarce. Studies from our laboratory have found that stretching exercise increased the extracellular matrix remodeling and decreased genes expression related to atrophy in denervated muscle. Nevertheless, it was not enough to prevent muscle atrophy after denervation. CONCLUSIONS: In spite of the use of stretching exercise and ES in clinical practice in order to minimize the atrophy of denervated muscle, there is still lack of scientific evidence to justify the effectiveness of these resources to prevent muscle atrophy in denervated muscle.CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Esta revisão abordará os principais mecanismos celulares envolvidos na redução e aumento da síntese de mioproteínas comumente associadas às situações de atrofia e hipertrofia muscular, respectivamente. OBJETIVO: Analisaremos os efeitos da estimulação elétrica (EE e do exercício de alongamento sobre as vias moleculares envolvidas na atrofia e hipertrofia muscular. Serão descritos os principais efeitos e os limites desses recursos no músculo esquelético, particularmente sobre o m

  17. Cutaneous collateral axonal sprouting re-innervates the skin component and restores sensation of denervated Swine osteomyocutaneous alloflaps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhaib Ibrahim

    Full Text Available Reconstructive transplantation such as extremity and face transplantation is a viable treatment option for select patients with devastating tissue loss. Sensorimotor recovery is a critical determinant of overall success of such transplants. Although motor function recovery has been extensively studied, mechanisms of sensory re-innervation are not well established. Recent clinical reports of face transplants confirm progressive sensory improvement even in cases where optimal repair of sensory nerves was not achieved. Two forms of sensory nerve regeneration are known. In regenerative sprouting, axonal outgrowth occurs from the transected nerve stump while in collateral sprouting, reinnervation of denervated tissue occurs through growth of uninjured axons into the denervated tissue. The latter mechanism may be more important in settings where transected sensory nerves cannot be re-apposed. In this study, denervated osteomyocutaneous alloflaps (hind- limb transplants from Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC-defined MGH miniature swine were performed to specifically evaluate collateral axonal sprouting for cutaneous sensory re-innervation. The skin component of the flap was externalized and serial skin sections extending from native skin to the grafted flap were biopsied. In order to visualize regenerating axonal structures in the dermis and epidermis, 50 um frozen sections were immunostained against axonal and Schwann cell markers. In all alloflaps, collateral axonal sprouts from adjacent recipient skin extended into the denervated skin component along the dermal-epidermal junction from the periphery towards the center. On day 100 post-transplant, regenerating sprouts reached 0.5 cm into the flap centripetally. Eight months following transplant, epidermal fibers were visualized 1.5 cm from the margin (rate of regeneration 0.06 mm per day. All animals had pinprick sensation in the periphery of the transplanted skin within 3 months post

  18. Denervation produces different single fiber phenotypes in fast- and slow-twitch hindlimb muscles of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, M F; Stephenson, G M M; Stephenson, D G

    2006-09-01

    Using a single, mechanically skinned fiber approach, we tested the hypothesis that denervation (0 to 50 days) of skeletal muscles that do not overlap in fiber type composition [extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles of Long-Evans hooded rats] leads to development of different fiber phenotypes. Denervation (50 day) was accompanied by 1) a marked increase in the proportion of hybrid IIB/D fibers (EDL) and I/IIA fibers (SOL) from 30% to >75% in both muscles, and a corresponding decrease in the proportion of pure fibers expressing only one myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform; 2) complex muscle- and fiber-type specific changes in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-loading level at physiological pCa approximately 7.1, with EDL fibers displaying more consistent changes than SOL fibers; 3) decrease by approximately 50% in specific force of all fiber types; 4) decrease in sensitivity to Ca(2+), particularly for SOL fibers (by approximately 40%); 5) decrease in the maximum steepness of the force-pCa curves, particularly for the hybrid I/IIA SOL fibers (by approximately 35%); and 6) increased occurrence of biphasic behavior with respect to Sr(2+) activation in SOL fibers, indicating the presence of both slow and fast troponin C isoforms. No fiber types common to the two muscles were detected at any time points (day 7, 21, and 50) after denervation. The results provide strong evidence that not only neural factors, but also the intrinsic properties of a muscle fiber, influence the structural and functional properties of a particular muscle cell and explain important functional changes induced by denervation at both whole muscle and single cell levels.

  19. Differences in the interaction of acetylcholine receptor antibodies with receptor from normal, denervated and myasthenic human muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Lefvert, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction of acetylcholine receptor antibodies with different kinds of human skeletal muscle receptor was investigated. The reaction of most receptor antibodies was strongest with receptor from a patient with myasthenia gravis and with receptor from denervated muscle. Results obtained with these receptors were well correlated. The binding of most receptor antibodies to receptor from functionally normal muscle was much weaker and also qualitatively different. In a few patients with moder...

  20. NIF Double Shell outer-shell experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, E. C.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Daughton, W. S.; Wilson, D. C.; Dodd, E. S.; Renner, D. B.; Cardenas, T.; Batha, S. H.

    2016-10-01

    At the core of the Double Shell concept is the kinetic energy transfer from the outer shell to the inner shell via collision. This collision sets both the implosion shape of the inner shell, from imprinting of the shape of the outer shell, as well as the maximum energy available to compress the DT fuel. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to control the time-dependent shape of the outer shell, such that the outer shell is nominally round at the collision time. We present the experiment results from our sub-scale ( 1 MJ) NIF outer-shell only shape tuning campaign, where we vary shape by changing a turn-on time delay between the same pulse shape on the inner and outer cone beams. This type of shape tuning is unique to this platform and only possible since the Double Shell design uses a single-shock drive (4.5 ns reverse ramp pulse). The outer-shell only targets used a 5.75 mm diameter standard near-vacuum NIF hohlraum with 0.032 mg/cc He gas fill, and a Be capsule with 0.4% uniform Cu dopant, with 242 um thick ablator. We also present results from a third outer-shell only shot used to measure shell trajectory, which is critical in determining the shell impact time. This work conducted under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  1. 76 FR 63654 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Doc No: 2011-26503] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block... American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Official Protraction Diagram (OPD),...

  2. Increased salt sensitivity induced by sensory denervation:role of superoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-zhong SONG; Alex F CHEN; Donna H WANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To test the hypothesis that production of superoxide in mesenteric resistance arteries is increased and contributes to the development of hypertension induced by sensory denervation plus high salt intake. METHODS:Newborn Wistar rats were given capsaicin 50mg/kg sc on the 1st and 2nd d of life. After weaning, male rats were grouped as follows and treated for 3 weeks with: capsaicin pretreatment plus normal sodium diet (0.5%, CAP-NS),CAP plus high sodium diet (4%, CAP-HS), control plus NS (CON-NS), or CON-HS. Both tail-cuff systolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured in each of the groups. Western blot analysis was used for measurement of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the mesenteric resistance arteries. Lucigenin chemiluminescence assay was used for superoxide production in the mesenteric resistance arteries. The Griess method was used for measurement of nitrite/nitrate levels in plasma.RESULTS: Both tail-cuff pressure and MAP were higher in CAP-HS compared with CAP-NS, CON-HS, and CONNS rats (P<0.05). Both MnSOD and eNOS in the mesenteric resistance arteries were increased in CAP-HS compared with CAP-NS, CON-HS, and CON-NS (P<0.05). However, nitrite/nitrate levels in plasma were not different among 4 groups. Acute iv administration of tempol, a membrane-permeable superoxide scavenger, decreased MAP in both CAP-HS and CON-HS when compared with their respective controls. However, the decreases of MAP between these two groups were not different. Chronic treatment with tempol failed to prevent the development of hypertension in CAP-HS rats. Superoxide production in the mesenteric resistance arteries was increased in CAP-HS compared with CAP-NS, CON-HS, and CON-NS (P<0.05). However, chronic treatment with tempol did not prevent the increase of mesenteric superoxide production in CAP-HS rats. CONCLUSIONS:Regardless of increased vascular MnSOD levels, salt sensitive hypertension

  3. Astroparticles: Messengers from Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desiati, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    Since Galileo pointed a spyglass toward the sky, 400 years ago, observations empowered by man-made instrumentation have provided us with an enormous leap in the knowledge of how the Universe functions. More and more powerful optical telescopes made it possible for us to reach the farthest corners of space. At the same time, the advances in microphysics and the discovery of the electromagnetic spectrum, made it possible to directly look at the Universe in a way that our eyes cannot see. The discoveries of the intimate structure of matter, of subatomic particles and of how they interact with each other, have led astronomers to use the smallest objects in Nature to observe the farthest reaches of the otherwise invisible Universe. Not unlike Galileo, today we observe Outer Space with visible light and beyond, across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, from long wavelength radio waves to short wavelength gamma rays. But also with instruments detecting cosmic rays (the atomic nuclei we know on Earth) neutrinos (neutral subatomic particles that interact very weakly with matter) and gravitational waves (perturbations of spacetime predicted by General Relativity). Each cosmic messenger provides us with a unique piece of information about their source and the history of their journey to us. Modern astrophysics has the challenging goal to collect as much information as possible from all those messengers, to reconstruct the story of the Universe and how it became what it is today. This journey started with the unsettling discovery that we are only one minuscule dot in the immensity of the Universe and yet we are able to observe objects that are far in space and time. This journey is yet to complete its course, and the more we advance our knowledge, the more we need to understand. This interdisciplinary talk provides an overview of this journey and the future perspectives.

  4. Prevention of disuse muscle atrophy by dietary ingestion of 8-prenylnaringenin in denervated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Mukai

    Full Text Available Flavonoids have attracted considerable attention in relation to their effects upon health. 8-Prenylnaringenin (8-PN is found in the common hop (Humulus lupulus and assumed to be responsible for the health impact of beer consumption. We wanted to clarify the effects of prenylation on the physiological functions of dietary flavonoids by comparing the effects of 8-PN with that of intact naringenin in the prevention of disuse muscle atrophy using a model of denervation in mice. Consumption of 8-PN (but not naringenin prevented loss of weight in the gastrocnemius muscle further supported by the lack of induction of the protein content of a key ubiquitin ligase involved in muscle atrophy, atrogin-1, and by the activation of Akt phosphorylation. 8-PN content in the gastrocnemius muscle was tenfold higher than that of naringenin. These results suggested that, compared with naringenin, 8-PN was effectively concentrated into skeletal muscle to exert its preventive effects upon disuse muscle atrophy. It is likely that prenylation generates novel functions for 8-PN by enhancing its accumulation into muscle tissue through dietary intake.

  5. The response of denervated muscle to long-term stimulation (1985, revisited here in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terje Lomo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1985, at a meeting in Abano, I presented results showing that direct stimulation of skeletal muscles with appropriate stimulus patterns prevents the effects of denervation on non-junctional properties of muscle fibers. Hence, it appeared unnecessary to postulate that unknown nerve-derived trophic factors control such properties, as posited by the (anterograde neurotrophic hypothesis. Here I discuss this conclusion in the light of what we know today, particularly with respect to the many lines of evidence that were then taken to support the trophic hypothesis, but which today have alternative interpretations consistent with control by evoked impulse activity. Despite much effort, no one has yet identified any nerve-derived factor consistent with the neurotrophic hypothesis. Reports favoring the existence of neurotrophic factors were numerous before 2000. Now they have essentially disappeared from the literature, including original research papers, textbooks and handbooks, suggesting that the hypothesis is no longer arguable. Thus, the results that I presented in our paper in 1985 seem to have held up rather well.

  6. Electrical storm: Role of stellate ganglion blockade and anesthetic implications of left cardiac sympathetic denervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrinivas Gadhinglajkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An electrical storm is usually associated with catecholaminergic surge following myocardial ischaemia and manifest as recurrent ventricular arrhythmias, requiring frequent DC shocks. Delivering repeated DC shocks induces myocardial damage and further worsens the arrhythmias, which are resistant to the antiarrhythmic drugs. Cardiac sympathetic blockade abates the excessive catecholaminergic drive and help pacifying the malignant ventricular arrhythmias. We treated the electrical storm in a 52-year-old male with ultrasound-guided left sympathetic ganglion block followed by surgical left cardiac sympathetic denervation. The patient remained symptom-free without any incident of ventricular arrhythmias for 8 months after the surgery. The ultrasonography during blockade of the stellate ganglion enhances the success rate of the technique, reduces the quantity of local anaesthetic required to produce desired effects and prevents technical complications. Supraclavicular surgical access to the upper thoracic sympathetic chain obviates the necessity for one lung ventilation and lateral decubitus during surgery, when the patient is in hemodynamically unstable condition. Sympathectomy can be performed under general anaesthesia taking cautions to avoid sympathetic stimulation in intraoperative period.

  7. Sustained sympathetic and blood pressure reduction 1 year after renal denervation in patients with resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Dagmara; Marusic, Petra; Walton, Antony S; Lambert, Elisabeth A; Krum, Henry; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Lambert, Gavin W; Esler, Murray D; Schlaich, Markus P

    2014-07-01

    Renal denervation (RDN) reduces muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP) in resistant hypertension. Although a persistent BP-lowering effect has been demonstrated, the long-term effect on MSNA remains elusive. We investigated whether RDN influences MSNA over time. Office BP and MSNA were obtained at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months after RDN in 35 patients with resistant hypertension. Office BP averaged 166±22/88±19 mm Hg, despite the use of an average of 4.8±2.1 antihypertensive drugs. Baseline MSNA was 51±11 bursts/min ≈2- to 3-fold higher than the level observed in healthy controls. Mean office systolic and diastolic BP significantly decreased by -12.6±18.3/-6.5±9.2, -16.1±25.6/-8.6±12.9, and -21.2±29.1/-11.1±12.9 mm Hg (Phypertension and high baseline MSNA. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis of a substantial contribution of afferent renal nerve signaling to increased BP in resistant hypertension and argue against a relevant reinnervation at 1 year after procedure.

  8. Effect of electroacupuncture at Sibai on the gastric myoelectric acitivities of denervated rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Rong Chang; Jie Yan; Yan-Ling Zhao; Jiang-Shang Li; Jian-Hua Liu; Jun-Feng He

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore the mechanism of the exciting effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) at Sibai on the gastric myoelectric activities.METHODS: A total of 32 rats were randomly divided into four groups. Through intraperitoneal injection with atropine (the anti-cholinergic agent by blockade of muscarinic receptors), hexamethonium (automatic nerve ganglion-blocking agent) and reserpine (anti-adrenergic agent by depleting the adrenergic nerve terminal of its norepinephrine store), effects of EA at Sibai on the gastric myoelectric activities of the denervated rats were observed.RESULTS: After intraperitoneal injection of atropine and hexamethonium, the average amplitude and ratio of period to time in the phase of high activity of gastric myoelectric slow wave, and the average numbers of the peaks of gastric myoelectric fast wave were significantly decreased (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, P < 0.01), while after intraperitoneal injection of reserpine, the aforementioned three parameters were increased (P < 0.01, P < 0.05, P< 0.01). EA at Sibai point partially relieved the inhibitory effect of atropine and hexamethonium on the gastric myoelectric activities in the rats (P < 0.05 or P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: Cholinergic and adrenergic nervous systems and autonomic nerve ganglion participate in the peripheral passage of the controlling effects of EA at Foot Yangming Channel on gastrointestinal tract.

  9. Role of left cardiac sympathetic denervation in the management of congenital long QT syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang L

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS is a rare but life-threatening disorder affecting cardiac electrophysiology. It occurs due to mutation in genes encoding for the ion channels in ventricular cell membrane. Syncopal attacks and cardiac arrest are the main symptoms of the disease. Anti-adrenergic therapy with oral beta-blockers has been the mainstay of treatment for LQTS. However, up to 30% of patients fail to respond to medical therapy and remain symptomatic. An alarming 10% of patients still experience cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death during the course of therapy. Left cardiac sympathetic denervation (LCSD has been used as an alternative therapy in patients who are resistant to beta-blockers. Although LCSD appears effective in reducing the frequency of syncopal attacks and improving the survival rate in both the short and long-term, its use has not gained popularity. The recent advent of minimally invasive thoracoscopic sympathectomy may improve the acceptance of LCSD by physicians and patients in the future. The primary objective of this article was to review the current evidence of the clinical efficacy and safety of LCSD in the management of LQTS. The review was based on Medline search of articles published between 1966 and 2002.

  10. Effects of denervation on 3H-fucose incorporation by odontoblasts in the mouse incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiego, D J; Fisher, M A; Avery, J K; Klein, R M

    1983-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effects of denervation on glycoprotein synthesis in the predentinal matrix of the mouse incisor. The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), superior cervical ganglion (SCG) or both (IAN + SCG) were unilaterally resected in adult mice with the contralateral side remaining intact as a control. Fourteen days after surgery and 4 h prior to killing, 0.2 mCi of 3H-fucose was injected intravenously and mandibles were processed for standard histological and autoradiographic techniques. Silver halide grains were counted over the predentin matrix for 2000 micrometers per tooth. The results showed that the IAN and SCG resection affected 3H-fucose incorporation into the predentinal matrix; however, the highest absolute mean grain counts occurred after IAN + SCG resection. SCG resection increased the amount of 3H-fucose incorporated into the predentinal matrix by 48%, that of IAN by 24% and that of IAN + SCG by 14% as compared to contralateral controls. These data indicate a regulatory role for the nervous system and a possible interaction of neural components in the control of glycoprotein synthesis by odontoblasts in the mouse incisor.

  11. Analysis of normal and denerved laryngeal vocalization in guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arch-Tirado, Emilio; Verduzco-Mendoza, Antonio; Taboada-Picazo, Verónica; Mota-Rojas, Daniel; Alonso-Spilsbury, Maria de Lourdes; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Paralysis of the left vocal chord is frequent in human clinical practice; because of its anatomic similarity with human, the guinea pig might be a suitable biological model to analyze the phoniatric behavior in denerved animals. Forty newborn guinea pigs were used (20 control and 20 experimental); an incision was made in the ventricular region with the animals under general anesthesia over the middle line of the neck, until the lower left laryngeal nerve was found, the same was secured with alligator clips so that afterward a two-part dissection could be performed and the middle section could be removed (1cm) from the nerve endings (distal and proximal) before they were separated from the laryngeal structure. After recovery from surgery, vocal emissions were recorded in solitary for 6 minutes. The animals that had nerves removed showed an increase in fundamental vocalization frequency compared with the controls. F test was carried out (P=0.05) and no significant difference was found. When analyzing functional recovery, we found that the guinea pigs compensated vocal emissions at 20 days. With regard to the unilateral paralysis, the motility was frequently compensated by the healthy vocal chord, improving voice emission, and loss of air inhalation.

  12. Effect of chemoreceptor denervation on the pulmonary vascular response to atelectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzky, M G; Newell, J C; Dutton, R E

    1978-10-01

    Six dogs anesthetized with 30 mg/kg pentobarbital were ventilated after differential cannulation of the main stem bronchi. Following sternotomy, blood flow was monitored by electromagnetic flow probes on the left pulmonary artery (QL) and on the pulmonary trunk or aorta (QT). Following 10 min of bilateral 100% O2, QL was 37.4 +/- 5.8% of QT. When left lung atelectasis was induced while the right lung remained on 100% O2, PaO2 remained above 75 mm Hg and QL fell to 26.1 +/- 5.0% of QT. However, when the right lung was ventilated with room air while the left lung remained atelectatic, PaO2 fell to 50.0 +/- 2.6 mm Hg and QL rose to 36.7 +/- 6.2% of QT. Six dogs which had undergone peripheral chemoreceptor denervation prior to these experiments showed a similar decrease in perfusion of the atelectatic left lung when the right lung was ventilated with 100% O2, but did not increase blood flow to the atelectatic lung during systemic hypoxemia. Thus, the increased blood flow to the atelectatic lung which occurs during systemic hypoxemia appears to be mediated by the arterial chemoreceptors.

  13. EFFECTIVENESS OF RADIOFREQUENCY DENERVATION FOR PAIN RELIEF IN HIP DEGENERATIVE DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Nazarenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective - to compare the effectiveness of radiofrequency denervation (RFD and conservative treatment of patients with hip degenerative diseases. Material and methods. 66 patients with various stages of hip degeneration were followed up for 12 months, including 36 patients who underwent RFD and 30 patients of control group with conservative treatment. Treatment results were assessed using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Harris Hip Score before treatment, during the first day, 2 days later, as well as at 1, 6 and 12 months. Results: RFD patients demonstrated significantly better results compared with conservative group. Patients with coxarthrosis stage I and II, besides higher efficiency had prolonged period of remission, while patients with coxarthrosis stage III returned to the near-baseline level of pain only in 3-6 months. Conclusions: RFD is an effective treatment modality for patients with initial coxarthrosis stages, which helps to reduce significantly the disability period compared with conservative therapy. RFD is the only method of effective hip pain relieve in patients with severe comorbidities allowing to reduce analgesic consumption. This method is minimally invasive, has low cost, permits repeated procedures, making it attractive for both physicians and patients.

  14. Targeted inhibition of RAGE in substantia nigra of rats blocks 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparotto, Juciano; Ribeiro, Camila Tiefensee; Bortolin, Rafael Calixto; Somensi, Nauana; Rabelo, Thallita Kelly; Kunzler, Alice; Souza, Natália Cabral; Pasquali, Matheus Augusto de Bittencourt; Moreira, José Claudio Fonseca; Gelain, Daniel Pens

    2017-08-18

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a pattern-recognition receptor associated with inflammation in most cell types. RAGE up-regulates the expression of proinflammatory mediators and its own expression via activation of NF-kB. Recent works have proposed a role for RAGE in Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we used the multimodal blocker of RAGE FPS-ZM1, which has become available recently, to selectively inhibit RAGE in the substantia nigra (SN) of rats intracranially injected with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). FPS-ZM1 (40 μg per rat), injected concomitantly with 6-OHDA (10 μg per rat) into the SN, inhibited the increase in RAGE, activation of ERK1/2, Src and nuclear translocation of NF-kB p65 subunit in the SN. RAGE inhibition blocked glial fibrillary acidic protein and Iba-1 upregulation as well as associated astrocyte and microglia activation. Circulating cytokines in serum and CSF were also decreased by FPS-ZM1 injection. The loss of tyrosine hydroxylase and NeuN-positive neurons was significantly inhibited by RAGE blocking. Finally, FPS-ZM1 attenuated locomotory and exploratory deficits induced by 6-OHDA. Our results demonstrate that RAGE is an essential component in the neuroinflammation and dopaminergic denervation induced by 6-OHDA in the SN. Selective inhibition of RAGE may offer perspectives for therapeutic approaches.

  15. Neuromuscular junctions are pathological but not denervated in two mouse models of spinal bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poort, Jessica E; Rheuben, Mary B; Breedlove, S Marc; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2016-09-01

    Spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive, late onset neuromuscular disease causing motor dysfunction in men. While the morphology of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is typically affected by neuromuscular disease, whether NMJs in SBMA are similarly affected by disease is not known. Such information will shed light on whether defective NMJs might contribute to the loss of motor function and represent a potential therapeutic target for treating symptoms of SBMA. To address this gap in information, the morphology of NMJs was examined in two mouse models of SBMA, a myogenic model that overexpresses wildtype androgen receptor (AR) exclusively in muscle fibres and a knockin (KI) model expressing a humanized mutant AR gene. The tripartite motor synapse consisting of motor nerve terminal, terminal Schwann cells (tSCs) and postsynaptic specialization were visualized and analysed using confocal microscopy. Counter to expectation, we found no evidence of denervation in either model, but junctions in both models show pathological fragmentation and an abnormal synaptophysin distribution consistent with functionally weak synapses. Neurofilament accumulations were observed only in the myogenic model, even though axonal transport dysfunction is characteristic of both models. The ultrastructure of NMJs revealed additional pathology, including deficits in docked vesicles presynaptically, wider synaptic clefts, and simpler secondary folds postsynaptically. The observed pathology of NMJs in diseased SBMA mice is likely the morphological correlates of defects in synaptic function which may underlie motor impairments associated with SBMA.

  16. Subclinical nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation in the cerebellar subtype of multiple system atrophy (MSA-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Esteban; Iranzo, Alex; Rauek, Sebastian; Lomeña, Francisco; Gallego, Judith; Ros, Doménec; Santamaría, Joan; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    Nigrostriatal involvement is considered an additional feature in the new consensus criteria for the diagnosis of the cerebellar variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-C). However, so far, only a few studies, which include a relative small number of patients, give support to this criterion. Our objective was to assess nigrostriatal dopaminergic innervation in patients with MSA-C without parkinsonism by use of dopamine transporter single photon emission computed tomography (DAT SPECT). Thirteen patients that fulfilled criteria for possible or probable MSA-C and presented no parkinsonian signs, and 12 age-matched healthy controls underwent ((123)I-2-β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl) nortropane ([(123)I]FP-CIT) SPECT. Patients were also evaluated through the Unified Multiple System Atrophy Rating Scale (UMSARS) and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The mean duration of the cerebellar syndrome was 3.8 ± 1.7 years. DAT SPECT showed a significant decrease of striatal [(123)I]FP-CIT uptake ratios in patients (p MSA-C patients without parkinsonism have subclinical nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation which is not related to disease duration, cerebellar dysfunction, or pontine atrophy.

  17. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kieselbach

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT and leukotoxin (LtxA into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease.

  18. Small RNAs controlling outer membrane porins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Johansen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Anders A

    2007-01-01

    Gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs has been recognized as an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism for several years. In Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella, these RNAs control stress response and translation of outer membrane proteins and therefore...... are key regulators of environmental stress. Recent work has revealed an intimate interplay between small RNA regulation of outer membrane proteins and the stress-induced sigmaE-signalling system, which has an essential role in the maintenance of the integrity of the outer membrane....

  19. Outer boundary conditions for evolving cool white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Rohrmann, R D; García-Berro, E; Córsico, A H; Bertolami, M M Miller

    2012-01-01

    White dwarf evolution is essentially a gravothermal cooling process, which,for cool white dwarfs, sensitively depends on the treatment of the outer boundary conditions. We provide detailed outer boundary conditions appropriate for computing the evolution of cool white dwarfs employing detailed non-gray model atmospheres for pure H composition. We also explore the impact on the white dwarf cooling times of different assumptions for energy transfer in the atmosphere of cool white dwarfs. Detailed non-gray model atmospheres are computed taken into account non-ideal effects in the gas equation of state and chemical equilibrium, collision-induced absorption from molecules, and the Lyman alpha quasi-molecular opacity. Our results show that the use of detailed outer boundary conditions becomes relevant for effective temperatures lower than 5800 and 6100K for sequences with 0.60 and 0.90 M_sun, respectively. Detailed model atmospheres predict ages that are up to approx 10% shorter at log L/L_sun=-4 when compared with...

  20. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granstrom, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and

  1. The Outer Thames Estuary Regional Environmental Characterisation

    OpenAIRE

    Sturt, Fraser; Dix, Justin K.; EMU Ltd.; University of Southampton

    2009-01-01

    The Outer Thames Estuary Regional Environmental Characterisation (REC) provides an environmental reference statement defining marine and seabed conditions within the study area. Prior to this study, regional environmental assessment of the Outer Thames Estuary was based upon dispersed data acquired over several decades. The Marine Aggregate Levy Sustainability Fund (MALSF) has provided the opportunity to acquire and interpret an integrated physical and biological dataset for the first time in...

  2. Consequences of nigrostriatal denervation on the functioning of the basal ganglia in human and nonhuman primates: an in situ hybridization study of cytochrome oxidase subunit I mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, M; Levy, R; Herrero, M T; Ruberg, M; Faucheux, B; Obeso, J A; Agid, Y; Hirsch, E C

    1997-01-15

    To examine the consequences of nigrostriatal denervation and chronic levodopa (L-DOPA) treatment on functional activity of the basal ganglia, we analyzed, using in situ hybridization, the cellular expression of the mRNA encoding for cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI mRNA), a molecular marker for functional neuronal activity, in the basal ganglia. This analysis was performed in monkeys rendered parkinsonian by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) Intoxication, some of which had been receiving L-DOPA, and in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In MPTP-intoxicated monkeys compared with control animals, COI mRNA expression was increased in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and in the output nuclei of the basal ganglia, i.e., the internal segment of the globus pallidus and the substantia nigra pars reticulata. This increase was partially reversed by L-DOPA treatment. COI mRNA expression remained unchanged in the external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe). In PD patients, all of whom had been treated chronically by L-DOPA, COI mRNA expression in the analyzed basal ganglia structures was similar to that in control subjects. These results are in agreement with the accepted model of basal ganglia organization, to the extent that the output nuclei of the basal ganglia are considered to be overactive after nigrostriatal denervation, partly because of increased activity of excitatory afferents from the STN. Yet, our results would also seem to contradict this model, because the overactivity of the STN does not seem to be attributable to a hypoactivation of the GPe.

  3. Cooperative binding of the outer arm-docking complex underlies the regular arrangement of outer arm dynein in the axoneme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owa, Mikito; Furuta, Akane; Usukura, Jiro; Arisaka, Fumio; King, Stephen M.; Witman, George B.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Outer arm dynein (OAD) in cilia and flagella is bound to the outer doublet microtubules every 24 nm. Periodic binding of OADs at specific sites is important for efficient cilia/flagella beating; however, the molecular mechanism that specifies OAD arrangement remains elusive. Studies using the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have shown that the OAD-docking complex (ODA-DC), a heterotrimeric complex present at the OAD base, functions as the OAD docking site on the doublet. We find that the ODA–DC has an ellipsoidal shape ∼24 nm in length. In mutant axonemes that lack OAD but retain the ODA-DC, ODA-DC molecules are aligned in an end-to-end manner along the outer doublets. When flagella of a mutant lacking ODA-DCs are supplied with ODA-DCs upon gamete fusion, ODA-DC molecules first bind to the mutant axonemes in the proximal region, and the occupied region gradually extends toward the tip, followed by binding of OADs. This and other results indicate that a cooperative association of the ODA-DC underlies its function as the OAD-docking site and is the determinant of the 24-nm periodicity. PMID:24979786

  4. Salmonellae PhoPQ regulation of the outer membrane to resist innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalebroux, Zachary D; Miller, Samuel I

    2014-02-01

    Salmonellae sense host cues to regulate properties important for bacterial survival and replication within host tissues. The PhoPQ two-component regulatory system senses phagosome acidification and cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMP) to regulate the protein and lipid contents of the bacterial envelope that comprises an inner and outer membrane. PhoPQ-regulated lipid components of the outer membrane include lipopolysaccharides and glycerophospholipids. Envelope proteins regulated by PhoPQ, include: components of virulence associated secretion systems, the flagellar apparatus, membrane transport systems, and proteins that are likely structural components of the outer membrane. PhoPQ alteration of the bacterial surface results in increased bacterial resistance to CAMP and decreased detection by the innate immune system. This review details the molecular complexity of the bacterial cell envelope and highlights the outer membrane lipid bilayer as an environmentally regulated bacterial organelle.

  5. ROLE OF OUTER MEMBRANE PROTEINS IN IMIPENEM DIFFUSION IN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The present study identified the properties of porins in the outer membrane in Pseudomonas aeruginosa,and showed the role of outer membrane in determining imipenem diffusion in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The molecular weight of the major outer membrane protein was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The purification of the porins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa was achieved by DEAE ion - exchange HPLC. The purified outer membrane proteins were reconstituted with phosphatidylcholine and dicetylphosphate into membrane vesicles, and were tested by the liposomes swelling method for the diffusion of imipenem. The permeability assay showed that OprC (70 kD), OprD2 (46kD), and OprE(43 kD) were the channel- forming proteins. But only OprD2 was thought to be the likely route of imipenem diffusion.

  6. 75 FR 61512 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official... Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams (OPDs) located within Atlantic Ocean areas, with... informational purposes only. Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams in the North Atlantic,...

  7. An outer bound for 2-receiver discrete memoryless broadcast channels

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Chandra

    2008-01-01

    An outer bound to the two-receiver discrete memoryless broadcast channel is presented. We compare it to the known outer bounds and show that the outer bound presented is at least as tight as the existing bounds.

  8. Quantitative studies on the localization of the cholinergic receptor protein in the normal and denervated electroplaque from Electrophorus electricus

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Electroplaques dissected from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus are labeled by tritiated alpha1-isotoxin from Naja nigricollis, a highly selective reagent of the cholinergic (nicotinic) receptor site. Preincubation of the cell with an excess of unlabeled alpha-toxin and with a covalent affinity reagent or labeling in the presence of 10(-4) M decamethonium reduces the binding of [3H]alpha- toxin by at least 75%. Absolute surface densities of alpha-toxin sites are estimated by high-resolution autoradiography on the basis of silver grain distribution and taking into account the complex geopmetry of the cell surface. Binding of [3H]alpha-toxin on the noninnervated face does not differ from background. Labeled sites are observed on the innervated membrane both between the synapses and under the nerve terminals but the density of sites is approx. 100 times higher at the level of the synapses than in between. Analysis of the distance of silver grains from the innervated membrane shows a symmetrical distribution centered on the postsynaptic plasma membrane under the nerve terminal. In extrasynaptic areas, the barycenter of the distribution lies approximately 0.5 micrometer inside the cell, indicating that alpha-toxin sites are present on the membrane of microinvaginations, or caveolae, abundant in the extrajunctional areas. An absolute density of 49,600 +/- 16,000 sites/micrometer2 of postsynaptic membrane is calculated; it is in the range of that found at the crest of the folds at the neuromuscular junction and expected from a close packing of receptor molecules. Electric organs were denervated for periods up to 142 days. Nerve transmission fails after 2 days, and within a week all the nerve terminals disappear and are subsequently replaced by Schwann cell processes, whereas the morphology of the electroplaque remains unaffected. The denervated electroplaque develops some of the electrophysiological changes found with denervated muscles (increases of membrane

  9. Effect of inhibition of nitric oxide synthase on blood pressure and renal sodium handling in renal denervated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xavier

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of sympathetic nerve activity in the changes in arterial blood pressure and renal function caused by the chronic administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO synthesis, was examined in sham and bilaterally renal denervated rats. Several studies have demonstrated that sympathetic nerve activity is elevated acutely after L-NAME administration. To evaluate the role of renal nerve activity in L-NAME-induced hypertension, we compared the blood pressure response in four groups (N = 10 each of male Wistar-Hannover rats weighing 200 to 250 g: 1 sham-operated vehicle-treated, 2 sham-operated L-NAME-treated, 3 denervated vehicle-treated, and 4 denervated L-NAME-treated rats. After renal denervation or sham surgery, one control week was followed by three weeks of oral administration of L-NAME by gavage. Arterial pressure was measured weekly in conscious rats by a tail-cuff method and renal function tests were performed in individual metabolic cages 0, 7, 14 and 21 days after the beginning of L-NAME administration. L-NAME (60 mg kg-1 day-1 progressively increased arterial pressure from 108 ± 6.0 to 149 ± 12 mmHg (P<0.05 in the sham-operated group by the third week of treatment which was accompanied by a fall in creatinine clearance from 336 ± 18 to 222 ± 59 µl min-1 100 g body weight-1 (P<0.05 and a rise in fractional urinary sodium excretion from 0.2 ± 0.04 to 1.62 ± 0.35% (P<0.05 and in sodium post-proximal fractional excretion from 0.54 ± 0.09 to 4.7 ± 0.86% (P<0.05. The development of hypertension was significantly delayed and attenuated in denervated L-NAME-treated rats. This was accompanied by a striking additional increase in fractional renal sodium and potassium excretion from 0.2 ± 0.04 to 4.5 ± 1.6% and from 0.1 ± 0.015 to 1.21 ± 0.37%, respectively, and an enhanced post-proximal sodium excretion compared to the sham-operated group. These differences occurred despite an

  10. Non-motor dopamine withdrawal syndrome after surgery for Parkinson's disease: predictors and underlying mesolimbic denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thobois, Stéphane; Ardouin, Claire; Lhommée, Eugénie; Klinger, Hélène; Lagrange, Christelle; Xie, Jing; Fraix, Valérie; Coelho Braga, Maria Clara; Hassani, Rachid; Kistner, Andrea; Juphard, Alexandra; Seigneuret, Eric; Chabardes, Stephan; Mertens, Patrick; Polo, Gustavo; Reilhac, Anthonin; Costes, Nicolas; LeBars, Didier; Savasta, Marc; Tremblay, Léon; Quesada, Jean-Louis; Bosson, Jean-Luc; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Pollak, Pierre; Krack, Paul

    2010-04-01

    postoperative apathy. Without methylphenidate, [11C]-raclopride binding potential values were greater in apathetic patients bilaterally in the orbitofrontal, dorsolateral prefrontal, posterior cingulate and temporal cortices, left striatum and right amygdala, reflecting greater dopamine D2/D3 receptor density and/or reduced synaptic dopamine level in these areas. The variations of [11C]-raclopride binding potential values induced by methylphenidate were greater in non-apathetic patients in the left orbitofrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, thalamus and internal globus pallidus and bilaterally in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, consistent with a more important capacity to release dopamine. Non-motor fluctuations are related to mesolimbic dopaminergic denervation. Apathy, depression and anxiety can occur after surgery as a delayed dopamine withdrawal syndrome. A varying extent of mesolimbic dopaminergic denervation and differences in dopaminergic treatment largely determine mood, anxiety and motivation in patients with Parkinson's disease, contributing to different non-motor phenotypes.

  11. Cardiac impairment evaluated by transesophageal echocardiography and invasive measurements in rats undergoing sinoaortic denervation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel A Sirvente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sympathetic hyperactivity may be related to left ventricular (LV dysfunction and baro- and chemoreflex impairment in hypertension. However, cardiac function, regarding the association of hypertension and baroreflex dysfunction, has not been previously evaluated by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE using intracardiac echocardiographic catheter. METHODS AND RESULTS: We evaluated exercise tests, baroreflex sensitivity and cardiovascular autonomic control, cardiac function, and biventricular invasive pressures in rats 10 weeks after sinoaortic denervation (SAD. The rats (n = 32 were divided into 4 groups: 16 Wistar (W with (n = 8 or without SAD (n = 8 and 16 spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR with (n = 8 or without SAD (SHRSAD (n = 8. Blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR did not change between the groups with or without SAD; however, compared to W, SHR groups had higher BP levels and BP variability was increased. Exercise testing showed that SHR had better functional capacity compared to SAD and SHRSAD. Echocardiography showed left ventricular (LV concentric hypertrophy; segmental systolic and diastolic biventricular dysfunction; indirect signals of pulmonary arterial hypertension, mostly evident in SHRSAD. The end-diastolic right ventricular (RV pressure increased in all groups compared to W, and the end-diastolic LV pressure increased in SHR and SHRSAD groups compared to W, and in SHRSAD compared to SAD. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that baroreflex dysfunction impairs cardiac function, and increases pulmonary artery pressure, supporting a role for baroreflex dysfunction in the pathogenesis of hypertensive cardiac disease. Moreover, TEE is a useful and feasible noninvasive technique that allows the assessment of cardiac function, particularly RV indices in this model of cardiac disease.

  12. Renal sympathetic denervation prevents the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension and cardiac dysfunction in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system is activated in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH patients, and this activation may have long-term negative effects on the progression of PAH. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of transcatheter renal sympathetic denervation (RSD on the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension and cardiac dysfunction in dogs using two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging. Twenty-two dogs were randomly divided into three groups: control group (n = 7, PAH group (n = 8, and PAH + RSD group (n = 7. All dogs were assessed using two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging. The ventricular strain, ventricular synchrony, left ventricular (LV twist, and torsion rate were analyzed to evaluate cardiac function. After 8 weeks, the right ventricular lateral longitudinal strain and the septum longitudinal strain were reduced in the PAH group compared with the control group (p < 0.001. However, these values were significantly restored in the PAH + RSD group compared with the PAH group (p < 0.01. The degree of LV and RV dyssynchrony was significantly higher in the PAH group compared with the control group (p < 0.001, but the degree of LV and RV dyssynchrony was significantly lower in the PAH + RSD group compared to the PAH group (p < 0.01. The LV twist was significantly restored in the PAH + RSD group compared to the PAH group (p < 0.01. Similarly, the rotation rate was markedly decreased in the PAH group, and strikingly improved in the PAH + RSD group (p < 0.01. These results indicate that RSD prevents the development of PAH and cardiac dysfunction in dogs.

  13. Renal Denervation Findings on Cardiac and Renal Fibrosis in Rats with Isoproterenol Induced Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Kai; Wang, Shengchan; Lu, Dasheng; Li, Zhenzhen; Geng, Jie; Fang, Ping; Wang, Ying; Shan, Qijun

    2015-12-01

    Cardio-renal fibrosis plays key roles in heart failure and chronic kidney disease. We sought to determine the effects of renal denervation (RDN) on cardiac and renal fibrosis in rats with isoproterenol induced cardiomyopathy. Sixty male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to Control (n = 10) and isoproterenol (ISO)-induced cardiomyopathy group (n = 50). At week 5, 31 survival ISO-induced cardiomyopathy rats were randomized to RDN (n = 15) and Sham group (n = 16). Compared with Control group, ejection fraction was decreased, diastolic interventricular septal thickness and left atrial dimension were increased in ISO-induced cardiomyopathy group at 5 week. After 10 weeks, cardio-renal pathophysiologic results demonstrated that the collagen volume fraction of left atrio-ventricular and kidney tissues reduced significantly in RDN group compared with Sham group. Moreover the pro-fibrosis factors (TGF-β1, MMP2 and Collagen I), inflammatory cytokines (CRP and TNF-α), and collagen synthesis biomarkers (PICP, PINP and PIIINP) concentration significantly decreased in RDN group. Compared with Sham group, RDN group showed that release of noradrenaline and aldosterone were reduced, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)/angiotensin II (Ang II)/angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1R) axis was downregulated. Meanwhile, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)/angiotensin-1-7 (Ang-(1-7))/mas receptor (Mas-R) axis was upregulated. RDN inhibits cardio-renal fibrogenesis through multiple pathways, including reducing SNS over-activity, rebalancing RAAS axis.

  14. Renal denervation for refractory hypertension. Technical aspects, complications and radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheurig-Muenkler, C.; Kroencke, T.J.; Powerski, M.J. [Charite Universitatesmedizin, Berlin (Germany). Radiologie; Weiss, W.; Toelle, M.; Giet, M. van der; Zidek, W. [Charite Universitatesmedizin, Berlin (Germany). Nephrologie; Foert, E. [DRK Klinikum Berlin Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Radiologie

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze procedural details, complications and radiation exposure in renal denervation (RDN) using the Medtronic Symplicity {sup registered} device in the treatment of refractory hypertension. Materials and Methods: Fifty three consecutive patients underwent RDN. The number of ablations per artery, peri-procedural complications, procedure time (PT), fluoroscopy time (FT), dose-area product (DAP) and procedure-related complications were documented. Additionally, the radiation dose was compared between obese (body mass index {>=} 30 kg/m{sup 2}) and non-obese patients. Results: Bilateral RDN was performed in 50/53 (94 %) cases and with a minimum of 4 ablations per artery in 33/50 (66 %), the mean count being 5.4 (range R: 2 - 13) on the right and 4.3 (R: 1 - 10) on the left. The FT and DAP decreased significantly over the first 12 procedures, reaching a steady state with a median FT of 11.2 min (R: 7.5 - 27) and a median DAP of 4796 cGy x cm{sup 2} (R: 1076 - 21 371), resulting in an effective dose of 15.7 mSv. The median PT was 57 min (R: 40 - 70). Obese patients had a 3.3-fold higher radiation dose (p < 0.001). We observed one severe spasm and one imminent respiratory depression, both resolved without sequelae. Conclusion: For an experienced interventionalist, RDN has a short learning curve with a low risk profile. The radiation dose does not exceed that of other renal artery interventions, but is explicitly higher in obese patients, who account for a large portion of patients with refractory hypertension. (orig.)

  15. Eligibility for Renal Denervation: Anatomical Classification and Results in Essential Resistant Hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Takuya, E-mail: okabone@gmail.com; Pellerin, Olivier [Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris (France); Savard, Sébastien [Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Department of Hypertension, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris (France); Curis, Emmanuel; Monge, Matthieu [INSERM, Clinical Investigation Center 9201 (France); Frank, Michael; Bobrie, Guillaume [Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Department of Hypertension, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris (France); Yamaguchi, Masato; Sugimoto, Koji [Kobe University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Center for Endovascular Therapy (Japan); Plouin, Pierre-François; Azizi, Michel [Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Department of Hypertension, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris (France); Sapoval, Marc [Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Department of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris (France)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo classify the renal artery (RA) anatomy based on specific requirements for endovascular renal artery denervation (RDN) in patients with drug-resistant hypertension (RH).Materials and MethodsThe RA anatomy of 122 consecutive RH patients was evaluated by computed tomography angiography and classified as two types: A (main RA ≥20 mm in length and ≥4.0 mm in diameter) or B (main RA <20 mm in length or main RA <4.0 mm in diameter). The A type included three subtypes: A1 (without accessory RAs), A2 (with accessory RAs <3.0 mm in diameter), and A3 (with accessory RAs ≥3.0 mm in diameter]. A1 and A2 types were eligible for RDN with the Simplicity Flex catheter. Type B included twi subtypes based on the main RA length and diameter. Patients were accordingly classified into three eligibility categories: complete (CE; both RAs were eligible), partial (PE; one eligible RA), and noneligibility (NE; no eligible RA).ResultsBilateral A1 type was the most prevalent and was observed in 48.4 % of the patients followed by the A1/A2 type (18 %). CE, PE, and NE were observed in 69.7, 22.9, and 7.4 % of patients, respectively. The prevalence of accessory RAs was 41 %.ConclusionsOf RH patients, 30.3 % were not eligible for bilateral RDN with the current Simplicity Flex catheter. This classification provides the basis for standardized reporting to allow for pooling of results of larger patient cohorts in the future.

  16. Glial response in the rat models of functionally distinct cholinergic neuronal denervations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataveljic, Danijela; Petrovic, Jelena; Lazic, Katarina; Saponjic, Jasna; Andjus, Pavle

    2015-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, particularly in the nucleus basalis (NB). Similarly, Parkinson's disease (PD) might involve the selective loss of pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) cholinergic neurons. Therefore, lesions of these functionally distinct cholinergic centers in rats might serve as models of AD and PD cholinergic neuropathologies. Our previous articles described dissimilar sleep/wake-state disorders in rat models of AD and PD cholinergic neuropathologies. This study further examines astroglial and microglial responses as underlying pathologies in these distinct sleep disorders. Unilateral lesions of the NB or the PPT were induced with rats under ketamine/diazepam anesthesia (50 mg/kg i.p.) by using stereotaxically guided microinfusion of the excitotoxin ibotenic acid (IBO). Twenty-one days after the lesion, loss of cholinergic neurons was quantified by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase histochemistry, and the astroglial and microglial responses were quantified by glia fibrillary acidic protein/OX42 immunohistochemistry. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the anatomofunctionally related astroglial response following unilateral excitotoxic PPT cholinergic neuronal lesion. Whereas IBO NB and PPT lesions similarly enhanced local astroglial and microglial responses, astrogliosis in the PPT was followed by a remote astrogliosis within the ipslilateral NB. Conversely, there was no microglial response within the NB after PPT lesions. Our results reveal the rostrorostral PPT-NB astrogliosis after denervation of cholinergic neurons in the PPT. This hierarchically and anatomofunctionally guided PPT-NB astrogliosis emerged following cholinergic neuronal loss greater than 17% throughout the overall rostrocaudal PPT dimension.

  17. Inflammation is involved in the organ damage induced by sinoaortic denervation in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chuan; CHEN Hong; XIE He-Hui; SHU He; YUAN Wen-Jun; SU Ding-Feng

    2004-01-01

    Objective:The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that inflammation is involved in the end-organ damage(EOD) induced by sinoaortic denervation(SAD) in rats.Method:SAD was performed in male Sprague-Dawley rats at the age of 10 weeks.Under anaesthesia,aortic nerves were cut and the sinus region of the carotid artery was stripped and painted with 10% phenol.Pathological evaluation of EOD and the determination of plasma or tissue levels of the factors related to inflammation,including thromboxane B2(TXB2) interleukin-1(IL-1),tumour necrosis factor α(TNF-α) and reactive oxygen species(ROS) were performed at 16 weeks after SAD.Pathological evaluation of EOD included heart weigh ratio,myocardial and blood vessel hydroxyproline and collagen volume fraction,glomerular injury score and number of infiltrating inflammatory cells.Indomethacin(20 mg/kg per day,orally) or vitamin E(100 mg/kg per day,orally) was administered for 12 weeks,beginning from4 weeks after SAD,to observe their effects on SAD-induced EOD.Results:There were significant fibrosis and inflammatory infiltration in the myocardium and blood vessels,represented by higher hydroxyproline and collagen volume fraction,and a large amount of inflammatory cells in the tissues of SAD rats.Heart weight and kidney glomerular injury score were significantly higher in ed significantly after SAD.Indomethacin and vitamin E significantly decreased the contents of some factors related to inflammation in SAD rats.Both drugs also alleviated myocardial and vessel fibrosis,inflammatory infiltration and kidney damage.Conclusion:Inflammation is involved in the organ damage induced by SAD in rats.

  18. Autonomic denervation added to pulmonary vein isolation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Romanov, Alexander; Giazitzoglou, Eleftherios; Siontis, George C M; Po, Sunny S; Camm, A John; Ioannidis, John P A

    2013-12-17

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the combination of conventional pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) by circumferential antral ablation with ganglionated plexi (GP) modification in a single ablation procedure, yields higher success rates than PVI or GP ablation alone, in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). Conventional PVI transects the major left atrial GP, and it is possible that autonomic denervation by inadvertent GP ablation plays a central role in the efficacy of PVI. A total of 242 patients with symptomatic PAF were recruited and randomized as follows: 1) circumferential PVI (n = 78); 2) anatomic ablation of the main left atrial GP (n = 82); or 3) circumferential PVI followed by anatomic ablation of the main left atrial GP (n = 82). The primary endpoint was freedom from atrial fibrillation (AF) or other sustained atrial tachycardia (AT), verified by monthly visits, ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring, and implantable loop recorders, during a 2-year follow-up period. Freedom from AF or AT was achieved in 44 (56%), 39 (48%), and 61 (74%) patients in the PVI, GP, and PVI+GP groups, respectively (p = 0.004 by log-rank test). PVI+GP ablation strategy compared with PVI alone yielded a hazard ratio of 0.53 (95% confidence interval: 0.31 to 0.91; p = 0.022) for recurrence of AF or AT. Fluoroscopy duration was 16 ± 3 min, 20 ± 5 min, and 23 ± 5 min for PVI, GP, and PVI+GP groups, respectively (p PVI, 4.9% in GP, and 6.1% in PVI+GP. No serious adverse procedure-related events were encountered. Addition of GP ablation to PVI confers a significantly higher success rate compared with either PVI or GP alone in patients with PAF. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pulmonary vein isolation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is associated with regional cardiac sympathetic denervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is the cornerstone of the current state-of-the-art management of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the precise mechanisms behind AF relapses post PVI are still unknown. Since the activity of the autonomous nervous system is crucial in triggering paroxysmal AF, we hypothesized that PVI is associated with changes of cardiac sympathetic activity. Methods Sixteen patients with paroxysmal AF underwent cardiac iodine-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (123I-mIBG) planar cardiac imaging and single-photon emission computed tomography with low-dose computed tomography (SPECT/CT) for attenuation correction before and 4 weeks after PVI. The heart-to-mediastinum ratio (H/M ratio), washout rate (WR), regional myocardial uptake, and regional washout were analyzed. Results The late H/M ratio was unchanged by PVI (pre, 2.9 ± 0.5 vs. post, 2.7 ± 0.6, p = 0.53). Four of the 16 patients (25%) displayed regional deficits before PVI. After PVI, regional deficits were present in ten patients (62.5%) with newly emerging deficits localized in the inferolateral wall. In a 6-month follow-up, four out of the ten patients (40%) with regional 123I-mIBG defects suffered from a recurrence of AF, while only one of the six patients (16.7%) without a regional 123I-mIBG defect experienced a recurrence. Conclusion A significant number of patients with paroxysmal AF show regional cardiac sympathetic innervation deficits at baseline. In addition, PVI is associated with newly emerging defects. The presence of regional sympathetic denervation after PVI may correlate with the risk of AF relapses. PMID:24360192

  20. Cardiac Dysregulation and Myocardial Injury in a 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Rat Model of Sympathetic Denervation.

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    Yue-Hua Jiang

    Full Text Available Cardiac sympathetic denervation is found in various cardiac pathologies; however, its relationship with myocardial injury has not been thoroughly investigated.Twenty-four rats were assigned to the normal control group (NC, sympathectomy control group (SC, and a sympathectomy plus mecobalamin group (SM. Sympathectomy was induced by injection of 6-OHDA, after which, the destruction and distribution of sympathetic and vagal nerve in the left ventricle (LV myocardial tissue were determined by immunofluorescence and ELISA. Heart rate variability (HRV, ECG and echocardiography, and assays for myocardial enzymes in serum before and after sympathectomy were examined. Morphologic changes in the LV by HE staining and transmission electron microscope were used to estimate levels of myocardial injury and concentrations of inflammatory cytokines were used to reflect the inflammatory reaction.Injection of 6-OHDA decreased NE (933.1 ± 179 ng/L for SC vs. 3418.1± 443.6 ng/L for NC, P < 0.01 and increased NGF (479.4± 56.5 ng/mL for SC vs. 315.85 ± 28.6 ng/mL for NC, P < 0.01 concentrations. TH expression was reduced, while ChAT expression showed no change. Sympathectomy caused decreased HRV and abnormal ECG and echocardiography results, and histopathologic examinations showed myocardial injury and increased collagen deposition as well as inflammatory cell infiltration in the cardiac tissue of rats in the SC and SM groups. However, all pathologic changes in the SM group were less severe compared to those in the SC group.Chemical sympathectomy with administration of 6-OHDA caused dysregulation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system and myocardial injuries. Mecobalamin alleviated inflammatory and myocardial damage by protecting myocardial sympathetic nerves.

  1. An improved strategy for evaluating the extent of chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation in conscious rats

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    M. Rodríguez-Martínez

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available There is no index or criterion of aortic barodenervation, nor can we differentiate among rats that have suffered chronic sham, aortic or sino-aortic denervation. The objective of this study was to develop a procedure to generate at least one quantitative, reproducible and validated index that precisely evaluates the extent of chronic arterial barodenervation performed in conscious rats. Data from 79 conscious male Wistar rats of about 65-70 days of age with diverse extents of chronic arterial barodenervation and used in previous experiments were reanalyzed. The mean arterial pressure (MAP and the heart rate (HR of all rats were measured systematically before (over 1 h and after three consecutive iv bolus injections of phenylephrine (PHE and sodium nitroprusside (SNP. Four expressions of the effectiveness of barodenervation (MAP lability, PHE ratio, SNP ratio, and SNP-PHE slope were assessed with linear fixed models, three-level average variance, average separation among levels, outlier box plot analysis, and overlapping graphic analysis. The analysis indicated that a neither MAP lability nor SNP-PHE slope was affected by the level of chronic sodium intake; b even though the Box-Cox transformations of both MAP lability [transformed lability index (TLI] and SNP-PHE slope [transformed general sensitivity index (TGSI, {((3-(ΔHRSNP-ΔHRPHE/ΔMAPSNP-ΔMAPPHE-0.4-1/-0.04597}] could be two promising indexes, TGSI proved to be the best index; c TLI and TGSI were not freely interchangeable indexes for this purpose. TGSI ranges that permit differentiation between sham (10.09 to 11.46, aortic (8.40 to 9.94 and sino-aortic (7.68 to 8.24 barodenervated conscious rats were defined.

  2. Mid-Term Vascular Safety of Renal Denervation Assessed by Follow-up MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Axel, E-mail: axel.schmid@uk-erlangen.de; Schmieder, Raphael; Lell, Michael; Janka, Rolf [Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Veelken, Roland; Schmieder, Roland E. [Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension (Germany); Uder, Michael [Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology (Germany); Ott, Christian [Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Background/AimsRenal denervation (RDN) emerged as a treatment option for reducing blood pressure (BP) in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH). However, concerns have been raised regarding the incidence of late renal artery stenosis or thromboembolism after RDN. The goal of the current study was, therefore, to conduct a prospective clinical trial on the mid-term vascular integrity of the renal arteries and the perfusion of the renal parenchyma assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the follow-up after catheter-based RDN.MethodsIn our single-centre investigator initiated study, 51 patients with true TRH underwent catheter-based RDN using the Symplicity Flex{sup TM} catheter (Medtronic Inc., Palo Alto, CA). Follow-up MRI was performed at a median of 11 months (interquartile range 6–18 months) after RDN on a 1.5T MR unit. High-resolution MR angiography (MRA) and MRI results were compared to the baseline digital angiography of renal arteries obtained at time of RDN. In case of uncertainties (N = 2) catheter angiography was repeated.ResultsBoth office and 24-h ambulatory BP were significantly reduced 6 and 12 months after RDN. Renal function remained unchanged 6 and 12 months after RDN. In all patients, MRA excluded new or progression of pre-existing low grade renal artery stenosis as well as focal aneurysms at the sites of radiofrequency ablation. In none of the patients new segmental perfusion deficits in either kidney were detected on MRI.ConclusionsNo vascular or parenchymal complications after radiofrequency-based RDN were detected in 51 patients followed up by MRI.

  3. Renal denervation, adjusted drugs, or combined therapy for resistant hypertension: A meta-regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiao-Yu; Cheng, Bin; Li, Ying-Li; Wang, Yue-Feng

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to systematically evaluate the efficacy of renal denervation (RD), adjusted drugs, or combined therapy for resistant hypertension (RH) through a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled studies.Publications were comprehensively searched. Studies that investigated the effects of RD and/or adjusted drugs in lowering blood pressure (BP) were included. After quality assessment and data extraction, subgroup analyzes were first performed according to blinding method. Meta-regression and inverted funnel plots were also conducted.A total of 13 studies containing 1604 RH patients were included. Compared with control, the meta-analysis showed that RD significantly reduced office-based BP and ambulatory BP in 6 months in the unblinded studies, while no significant difference was found in the blinded studies. Meta-regression demonstrated the significant influence of blinding method on BP reduction, and further analysis revealed a significant BP reduction compared with baseline even in the control arm of blinded studies. RD had similar effects compared with adjusted drugs, and combined therapy seemed to further reduce the level of BP.The efficacy of RD was different between blinded and unblinded studies, and our data revealed a significant BP-lowering effect in the control arm of blinded studies, which was helpful to explain this finding. Furthermore, RD seemed to be equivalent to adjusted drugs, and also we suggested a potential advantage of combined therapy of RD and adjusted drugs compared with monotherapy for RH. However, more studies are warranted to better address the issue.

  4. LMI1195 PET imaging in evaluation of regional cardiac sympathetic denervation and its potential role in antiarrhythmic drug treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ming; Bozek, Jody; Lamoy, Melanie; Kagan, Mikhail; Benites, Pedro; Onthank, David; Robinson, Simon P. [Lantheus Medical Imaging, Discovery Research, N. Billerica, MA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Regional cardiac sympathetic denervation (RCSD) associated with reduced noradrenaline transporter (NAT) function has been linked to cardiac arrhythmia. This study examined the association of LMI1195, an {sup 18}F-labeled NAT substrate developed for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, with NAT in vitro, and its imaging to detect RCSD and guide antiarrhythmic drug treatment in vivo. LMI1195 association with NAT was assessed in comparison with other substrates, noradrenaline (NA) and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), in NAT-expressing cells. LMI1195 cardiac imaging was performed for evaluation of RCSD in a rabbit model surgically developed by regional phenol application on the left ventricular (LV) wall. The normal LV areas in images were quantified as regions with radioactivity {>=}50 % maximum. Potential impact of RCSD on dofetilide, an antiarrhythmic drug, induced ECG changes was assessed. NAT blockade with desipramine reduced LMI1195 cell uptake by 90 {+-} 3 %, similar to NA and MIBG. NA, MIBG, or self inhibited LMI1195 cell uptake concentration-dependently with comparable IC{sub 50} values (1.09, 0.21, and 0.90 {mu}M). LMI1195 cardiac imaging differentiated innervated and denervated areas in RCSD rabbits. The surgery resulted in a large denervated LV area at 2 weeks which was partially recovered at 12 weeks. Myocardial perfusion imaging with flurpiridaz F 18 showed normal perfusion in RCSD areas. Dofetilide induced more prominent QTc prolongation in RCSD than control animals. However, changes in heart rate were comparable. LMI1195 exhibits high association with NAT and can be used for imaging RCSD. The detected RCSD increases cardiac risks to the antiarrhythmic drug, dofetilide, by inducing more QTc prolongation. (orig.)

  5. Renal Sympathetic Denervation by CT-Guided Ethanol Injection: A Phase II Pilot Trial of a Novel Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricke, J., E-mail: jens.ricke@med.ovgu.de; Seidensticker, M.; Becker, S. [Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg AöR (Germany); Schiefer, J. [Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg AöR, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Diabetes and Endocrinology (Germany); Adamchic, I.; Lohfink, K. [Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg AöR (Germany); Kandulski, M.; Heller, A.; Mertens, P. R. [Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg AöR, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Diabetes and Endocrinology (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    ObjectivesCT-guided ethanol-mediated renal sympathetic denervation in treatment of therapy-resistant hypertension was performed to assess patient safety and collect preliminary data on treatment efficacy.Materials and MethodsEleven patients with therapy-resistant hypertension (blood pressure of >160 mmHg despite three different antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic) and following screening for secondary causes were enrolled in a phase II single arm open label pilot trial of CT-guided neurolysis of sympathetic renal innervation. Primary endpoint was safety, and secondary endpoint was a decrease of the mean office as well as 24-h systolic blood pressure in follow-up. Follow-up visits at 4 weeks, 3, and 6 months included 24-h blood pressure assessments, office blood pressure, laboratory values, as well as full clinical and quality of life assessments.ResultsNo toxicities ≥3° occurred. Three patients exhibited worsened kidney function in follow-up analyses. When accounting all patients, office systolic blood pressure decreased significantly at all follow-up visits (maximal mean decrease −41.2 mmHg at 3 months). The mean 24-h systolic blood pressure values decreased significantly at 3 months, but not at 6 months (mean: −9.7 and −6.3 mmHg, respectively). Exclusion of five patients who had failed catheter-based endovascular denervation and/or were incompliant for antihypertensive drug intake revealed a more pronounced decrease of 24-h systolic blood pressure (mean: −18.3 and −15.2 mmHg at 3 and 6 months, p = 0.03 and 0.06).ConclusionCT-guided sympathetic denervation proved to be safe and applicable under various anatomical conditions with more renal arteries and such of small diameter.

  6. Cardiac sympathetic denervation in familial amyloid polyneuropathy assessed by iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy and heart rate variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahaye, N.; Le Guludec, D. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bichat Hospital, Paris (France); Dinanian, S.; Slama, M.S. [Department of Cardiology, A. Beclere Hospital, Paris (France); Mzabi, H.; Samuel, D. [Department of Hepatic Surgery, P. Brousse Hospital, Paris (France); Adams, D. [Department of Neurology, Bicetre Hospital, Paris (France); Merlet, P. [SHFJ, DSV-CEA, Orsay (France)

    1999-04-29

    Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is a rare and severe hereditary form of amyloidosis, due to nervous deposits of a genetic variant transthyretin produced by the liver and characterized by both sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathy. Left ventricular systolic dysfunction is rare, but conduction disturbances and sudden deaths can occur. The neurological status of the heart has not been elucidated, and an alteration of the sympathetic nerves may be involved. We studied 17 patients (42{+-}12 years) before liver transplantation by iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy, heart rate variability analysis, coronary angiography, radionuclide ventriculography, rest thallium single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and echocardiography. Coronary arteries, left ventricular systolic function and rest thallium SPET were normal in all patients. Only mild evidence of amyloid infiltration was found at echocardiographic examination. Cardiac MIBG uptake was dramatically decreased in patients compared with age-matched control subjects (heart-to-mediastinum activity ratio at 4 h: 1.36{+-}0.26 versus 1.98{+-}0.35, P<0.001), while there was no difference in MIBG washout rate. Heart rate variability analysis showed a considerable scatter of values, with high values in four patients despite cardiac sympathetic denervation as assessed by MIBG imaging. The clinical severity of the polyneuropathy correlated with MIBG uptake at 4 h but not with the heart rate variability indices. Cardiac MIBG uptake and the heart rate variability indices did not differ according to the presence or absence of conduction disturbances. Patients with FAP have sympathetic cardiac denervation as assessed by MIBG imaging despite a preserved left ventricular systolic function and cardiac perfusion, without correlation with conduction disturbances. Results of the heart rate variability analysis were more variable and this technique does not seem to be the best way to evaluate the extent of cardiac

  7. Characteristic enhancement of blood pressure V-shaped waves in sinoaortic-denervated rats in a conscious and quiet state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Huan; Gu, Hong-Xia; Gong, Min; Han, Ji-Ju; Wang, Yun; Xia, Zuo-Li; Zhao, Xiao-Min

    2016-11-08

    A hemodynamic feature of chronic sinoaortic-denervated (SAD) rats is the increase in blood pressure variability (BPV) without significant changes in the average level of blood pressure (BP). The current study was designed to investigate the changes in BP V-shaped waves (V waves) in SAD rats. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into 2 groups: SAD rats and sham-operated rats (n=13). Hemodynamics measurements were obtained in conscious, freely moving rats, four weeks after sinoaortic denervation or sham operation. V wave indices were evaluated in rats in both conscious and quiet states. Additionally, normal and high BPV was simulated by the production of V waves with different amplitudes. The results showed that the V wave amplitude was dramatically increased, with a significantly prolonged duration and reduced frequency in SAD rats. V wave BPV in SAD rats was significantly increased, though BP remained unchanged. The twenty-four hour BPV in all rats was positively correlated with amplitude, duration time and V wave BPV and negatively correlated with frequency. The systolic BP spectral powers in the low frequency range (0.38-0.45 Hz) were significantly reduced in the V waves of SAD rats. Moreover, there was a remarkable increase in mean BPV and a normal mean BP after simulating high BPV in SAD rats. These results suggest that enhancement of V waves might be a waveform character of BP in SAD rats in both the conscious and quiet states. These types of V waves appear to be related to a depression of sympathetic regulation of BP induced by sinoaortic denervation.

  8. Influence of renal denervation on blood pressure, sodium and water excretion in acute total obstructive apnea in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.V.M. Franquini

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive apnea (OA can exert significant effects on renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and hemodynamic parameters. The present study focuses on the modulatory actions of RSNA on OA-induced sodium and water retention. The experiments were performed in renal-denervated rats (D; N = 9, which were compared to sham (S; N = 9 rats. Mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate (HR were assessed via an intrafemoral catheter. A catheter was inserted into the bladder for urinary measurements. OA episodes were induced via occlusion of the catheter inserted into the trachea. After an equilibration period, OA was induced for 20 s every 2 min and the changes in urine, MAP, HR and RSNA were recorded. Renal denervation did not alter resting MAP (S: 113 ± 4 vs D: 115 ± 4 mmHg or HR (S: 340 ± 12 vs D: 368 ± 11 bpm. An OA episode resulted in decreased HR and MAP in both groups, but D rats showed exacerbated hypotension and attenuated bradycardia (S: -12 ± 1 mmHg and -16 ± 2 bpm vs D: -16 ± 1 mmHg and 9 ± 2 bpm; P < 0.01. The basal urinary parameters did not change during or after OA in S rats. However, D rats showed significant increases both during and after OA. Renal sympathetic nerve activity in S rats increased (34 ± 9% during apnea episodes. These results indicate that renal denervation induces elevations of sodium content and urine volume and alters bradycardia and hypotension patterns during total OA in unconscious rats.

  9. Retrospective morphometric study of the suitability of renal arteries for renal denervation according to the Symplicity HTN2 trial criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönherr, Elisabeth; Rehwald, Rafael; Nasseri, Parinaz; Luger, Anna K; Grams, Astrid E; Kerschbaum, Julia; Rehder, Peter; Petersen, Johannes; Glodny, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe the renal arteries of humans in vivo, as precisely as possible, and to formulate an expected value for the exclusion of renal denervation due to the anatomical situation based on the criteria of the Symplicity HTN trials. Design and setting In a retrospective cohort study, the renal arteries of 126 patients (57 women, 69 men, mean age 60±17.2 years (CI 57.7 to 63.6)) were segmented semiautomatically from high-contrast CT angiographies. Results Among the 300 renal arteries, there were three arteries with fibromuscular dysplasia and one with ostial renal artery stenosis. The first left renal artery was shorter than the right (34±11.4 mm (CI 32 to 36) vs 45.9±15 mm (CI 43.2 to 48.6); p0.05). The first left renal arteries were 1.1±0.4 mm (CI 0.9 to 1.3), and the first right renal arteries were 0.3±0.6 mm (CI 0.1 to 0.5) thinner in women than in men (p4 mm. Some 46% of the patients, or 58.7% when variants and diseases were taken into consideration, were theoretically not suitable for denervation. Conclusions Based on these precise measurements, the anatomical situation as a reason for ruling out denervation appears to be significantly more common than previously suspected. Since this can be the cause of the failure of treatment in some cases, further development of catheters or direct percutaneous approaches may improve success rates. PMID:26729385

  10. Separation of the outer membrane and identification of major outer membrane proteins from Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yukitaka; Imai, Masashi; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2002-04-01

    The outer membrane of Porphyromonas gingivalis, an oral strict anaerobe, was isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The outer membrane obtained by the differential detergent extraction method, previously reported, showed an essentially similar protein pattern on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), confirming that the latter method is suitable for the study of outer membrane proteins in this organism. N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis revealed that major outer membrane proteins in this organism included Arg-gingipain, Lys-gingipain, RagA (a TonB-linked receptor), and putative porins that were homologous to Escherichia coli OmpA.

  11. Diverse effects of renal denervation on ventricular hypertrophy and blood pressure in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabral A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hypertrophy that accompanies hypertension seems to be a phenomenon of multifactorial origin whose development does not seem to depend on an increased pressure load alone, but also on local growth factors and cardioadrenergic activity. The aim of the present study was to determine if sympathetic renal denervation and its effects on arterial pressure level can prevent cardiac hypertrophy and if it can also delay the onset and attenuate the severity of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA-salt hypertension. DOCA-salt treatment was initiated in rats seven days after uninephrectomy and contralateral renal denervation or sham renal denervation. DOCA (15 mg/kg, sc or vehicle (soybean oil, 0.25 ml per animal was administered twice a week for two weeks. Rats treated with DOCA or vehicle (control were provided drinking water containing 1% NaCl and 0.03% KCl. At the end of the treatment period, mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate measurements were made in conscious animals. Under ether anesthesia, the heart was removed and the right and left ventricles (including the septum were separated and weighed. DOCA-salt treatment produced a significant increase in left ventricular weight/body weight (LVW/BW ratio (2.44 ± 0.09 mg/g and right ventricular weight/body weight (RVW/BW ratio (0.53 ± 0.01 mg/g compared to control (1.92 ± 0.04 and 0.48 ± 0.01 mg/g, respectively rats. MAP was significantly higher (39% in DOCA-salt rats. Renal denervation prevented (P>0.05 the development of hypertension in DOCA-salt rats but did not prevent the increase in LVW/BW (2.27 ± 0.03 mg/g and RVW/BW (0.52 ± 0.01 mg/g. We have shown that the increase in arterial pressure level is not responsible for cardiac hypertrophy, which may be more related to other events associated with DOCA-salt hypertension, such as an increase in cardiac sympathetic activity

  12. Blood pressure reductions following catheter-based renal denervation are not related to improvements in adherence to antihypertensive drugs measured by urine/plasma toxicological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Sebastian; Meyer, Markus R; Cremers, Bodo; Laufs, Ulrich; Helfer, Andreas G; Linz, Dominik; Kindermann, Ingrid; Ukena, Christian; Burnier, Michel; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Maurer, Hans H; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2015-12-01

    Renal denervation can reduce blood pressure in patients with uncontrolled hypertension. The adherence to prescribed antihypertensive medication following renal denervation is unknown. This study investigated adherence to prescribed antihypertensive treatment by liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry in plasma and urine at baseline and 6 months after renal denervation in 100 patients with resistant hypertension, defined as baseline office systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg despite treatment with ≥3 antihypertensive agents. At baseline, complete adherence to all prescribed antihypertensive agents was observed in 52 patients, 46 patients were partially adherent, and two patients were completely non-adherent. Baseline office blood pressure was 167/88 ± 19/16 mmHg with a corresponding 24-h blood pressure of 154/86 ± 15/13 mmHg. Renal denervation significantly reduced office and ambulatory blood pressure at 6-month follow-up by 15/5 mmHg (p treatment was significantly reduced from 85.0 % at baseline to 80.7 %, 6 months after renal denervation (p = 0.005). The blood pressure decrease was not explained by improvements in adherence following the procedure. Patients not responding to treatment significantly reduced their drug intake following the procedure. Adherence was highest for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and beta blockers (>90 %) and lowest for vasodilators (21 %). In conclusion, renal denervation can reduce office and ambulatory blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension despite a significant reduction in adherence to antihypertensive treatment after 6 months.

  13. Randomized comparison of renal denervation versus intensified pharmacotherapy including spironolactone in true-resistant hypertension: six-month results from the Prague-15 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ján; Widimský, Petr; Toušek, Petr; Petrák, Ondřej; Čurila, Karol; Waldauf, Petr; Bednář, František; Zelinka, Tomáš; Holaj, Robert; Štrauch, Branislav; Šomlóová, Zuzana; Táborský, Miloš; Václavík, Jan; Kociánová, Eva; Branny, Marian; Nykl, Igor; Jiravský, Otakar; Widimský, Jiří

    2015-02-01

    This prospective, randomized, open-label multicenter trial evaluated the efficacy of catheter-based renal denervation (Symplicity, Medtronic) versus intensified pharmacological treatment including spironolactone (if tolerated) in patients with true-resistant hypertension. This was confirmed by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring after excluding secondary hypertension and confirmation of adherence to therapy by measurement of plasma antihypertensive drug levels before enrollment. One-hundred six patients were randomized to renal denervation (n=52), or intensified pharmacological treatment (n=54) with baseline systolic blood pressure of 159±17 and 155±17 mm Hg and average number of drugs 5.1 and 5.4, respectively. A significant reduction in 24-hour average systolic blood pressure after 6 months (-8.6 [95% cofidence interval: -11.8, -5.3] mm Hg; P<0.001 in renal denervation versus -8.1 [95% cofidence interval: -12.7, -3.4] mm Hg; P=0.001 in pharmacological group) was observed, which was comparable in both groups. Similarly, a significant reduction in systolic office blood pressure (-12.4 [95% cofidence interval: -17.0, -7.8] mm Hg; P<0.001 in renal denervation versus -14.3 [95% cofidence interval: -19.7, -8.9] mm Hg; P<0.001 in pharmacological group) was present. Between-group differences in change were not significant. The average number of antihypertensive drugs used after 6 months was significantly higher in the pharmacological group (+0.3 drugs; P<0.001). A significant increase in serum creatinine and a parallel decrease of creatinine clearance were observed in the pharmacological group; between-group difference were borderline significant. The 6-month results of this study confirmed the safety of renal denervation. In conclusion, renal denervation achieved reduction of blood pressure comparable with intensified pharmacotherapy.

  14. Outer commutator words are uniformly concise

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández-Alcober, Gustavo A

    2009-01-01

    We prove that outer commutator words are uniformly concise, i.e. if an outer commutator word w takes m different values in a group G, then the order of the verbal subgroup w(G) is bounded by a function depending only on m and not on w or G. This is obtained as a consequence of a structure theorem for the subgroup w(G), which is valid if G is soluble, and without assuming that w takes finitely many values in G. More precisely, there is an abelian series of w(G), such that every section of the series can be generated by values of w all of whose powers are also values of w in that section. For the proof of this latter result, we introduce a new representation of outer commutator words by means of binary trees, and we use the structure of the trees to set up an appropriate induction.

  15. Electrical Stimulation of Denervated Rat Skeletal Muscle Ameliorates Bone Fragility and Muscle Loss in Early-Stage Disuse Musculoskeletal Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Yotani, Kengo; Ogita, Futoshi; Hayao, Keishi; Nakagawa, Kouki; Sugawara, Kazuhiro; Kirimoto, Hikari; Onishi, Hideaki; Kasuga, Norikatsu; Yamamoto, Noriaki

    2017-04-01

    We tested whether daily muscle electrical stimulation (ES) can ameliorate the decrease in cortical bone strength as well as muscle and bone geometric and material properties in the early stages of disuse musculoskeletal atrophy. 7-week-old male F344 rats were randomly divided into three groups: age-matched control group (Cont); a sciatic denervation group (DN); and a DN + direct electrical stimulation group (DN + ES). Denervated tibialis anterior (TA) muscle in the DN + ES group received ES with 16 mA at 10 Hz for 30 min/day, 6 days/week. Micro CT, the three-point bending test, and immunohistochemistry were used to characterize cortical bone mechanical, structural, and material properties of tibiae. TA muscle in the DN + ES group showed significant improvement in muscle mass and myofiber cross-sectional area relative to the DN group. Maximal load and stiffness of tibiae, bone mineral density estimated by micro CT, and immunoreactivity of DMP1 in the cortical bone tissue were also significantly greater in the DN + ES group than in the DN group. These results suggest that daily ES-induced muscle contraction treatment reduced the decrease in muscle mass and cortical bone strength in early-stage disuse musculoskeletal atrophy and is associated with a beneficial effect on material properties such as mineralization of cortical bone tissue.

  16. The Potential Role of Catheter-Based Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Chronic and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Yusuke; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-07-01

    Sympathetic activation is a hallmark of chronic and end-stage renal disease and adversely affects cardiovascular prognosis. Hypertension is present in the vast majority of these patients and plays a key role in the progressive deterioration of renal function and the high rate of cardiovascular events in this patient cohort. Augmentation of renin release, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renal vascular resistance are direct consequences of efferent renal sympathetic nerve stimulation and the major components of neural regulation of renal function. Renal afferent nerve activity directly influences sympathetic outflow to the kidneys and other highly innervated organs involved in blood pressure control via hypothalamic integration. Renal denervation of the kidney has been shown to reduce blood pressure in many experimental models of hypertension. Targeting the renal nerves directly may therefore be specifically useful in patients with chronic and end-stage renal disease. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of catheter-based renal denervation in patients with impaired kidney function and also reflect on the potential impact on other cardiovascular conditions commonly associated with chronic kidney disease such as heart failure and arrhythmias.

  17. Renal sympathetic denervation in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension after witnessed intake of medication before qualifying ambulatory blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadl Elmula, Fadl Elmula Mohamed; Hoffmann, Pavel; Fossum, Eigil; Brekke, Magne; Gjønnæss, Eyvind; Hjørnholm, Ulla; Kjær, Vibeke N; Rostrup, Morten; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Os, Ingrid; Stenehjem, Aud-E; Høieggen, Aud

    2013-09-01

    It is unknown whether the decline in blood pressure (BP) after renal denervation (RDN) is caused by denervation itself or concomitantly improved drug adherence. We aimed to investigate the BP lowering effect of RDN in true treatment-resistant hypertension by excluding patients with poor drug adherence. Patients with resistant hypertension (n=18) were referred for a thorough clinical and laboratory work-up. Treatment-resistant hypertension was defined as office systolic BP>140 mm Hg, despite maximally tolerated doses of ≥ 3 antihypertensive drugs, including a diuretic. In addition, ambulatory daytime systolic BP>135 mm Hg was required after witnessed intake of antihypertensive drugs to qualify. RDN (n=6) was performed with Symplicity Catheter System. The mean office and ambulatory BPs remained unchanged at 1, 3, and 6 months in the 6 patients, whereas there was no known change in antihypertensive medication. Two patients, however, had a fall in both office and ambulatory BPs. Our findings question whether BP falls in response to RDN in patients with true treatment-resistant hypertension. Additional research must aim to verify potential BP lowering effect and identify a priori responders to RDN before this invasive method can routinely be applied to patients with drug-resistant hypertension. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01673516.

  18. Electromyographic studies regarding denervation potentials in skeletal muscles at sites near and distant from the burn in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Simin; Mansoori, Korosh; Forogh, Bijan; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Ahadi, Tannaz; Chahardoli Razji, Mahnaz

    2016-04-01

    Changes in membrane AChRs in skeletal muscles located near or distant from burn injury similar to denervated muscles may make electrodiagnostic features indistinguishable from true neuropathic changes. The aim of this study was to examine electrodiagnostic changes of muscles at sites local and distant from the burn after thermal injuries due to neuromuscular junction dysfunction. A total of 40 adult male rats were randomly allocated to four groups. Rats in group 1 received thermal burn injury over gastrocnemius muscle of one leg and sham burn on the other leg. A 20-25% and 30-35% surface body area burn and also 30-35% surface body area sham burn were produced at distant site from gastrocnemius muscle in group 2, 3 and 4, respectively. To explore any fibrillation potential, the rats underwent serial electromyographic studies of bilateral gastrocnemius muscles over 5 weeks after burn injury. There were no denervation potentials either in muscles at sites distant from 20-25% and 30-35% of total body surface area burns or in muscles beneath the burn. In the present study on rats, thermal burn injury could not make fibrillation potentials in the electrodiagnostic study of muscles located near and distant from the burn site.

  19. The Young Outer Disk of M83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2010-08-01

    Deep near-infrared images recorded with NICI on Gemini South are used to investigate the evolved stellar content in the outer southeast quadrant of the spiral galaxy M83. A diffuse population of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is detected, indicating that there are stars outside of the previously identified young and intermediate age star clusters in the outer disk. The brightest AGB stars have M K >= -8, and the AGB luminosity function (LF) is well matched by model LFs that assume ages Innovacion Productiva (Argentina).

  20. 38 CFR 38.629 - Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Outer Burial Receptacle... (CONTINUED) NATIONAL CEMETERIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS § 38.629 Outer Burial Receptacle Allowance. (a) Definitions—Outer burial receptacle. For purposes of this section, an outer burial...

  1. 27 CFR 9.207 - Outer Coastal Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Outer Coastal Plain. 9.207... Outer Coastal Plain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Outer Coastal Plain”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Outer Coastal Plain” is a term of...

  2. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins in vesicle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Aimee K; Liew, Jean; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Whiteley, Marvin

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria produce outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that package and deliver proteins, small molecules, and DNA to prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The molecular details of OMV biogenesis have not been fully elucidated, but peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins that tether the outer membrane to the underlying peptidoglycan have been shown to be critical for OMV formation in multiple Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, we demonstrate that the peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins OprF and OprI, but not OprL, impact production of OMVs by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Interestingly, OprF does not appear to be important for tethering the outer membrane to peptidoglycan but instead impacts OMV formation through modulation of the levels of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), a quorum signal previously shown by our laboratory to be critical for OMV formation. Thus, the mechanism by which OprF impacts OMV formation is distinct from that for other peptidoglycan-associated outer membrane proteins, including OprI.

  3. 3D Modelling and monitoring of denervated muscle under Functional Electrical Stimulation treatment and associated bone structural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gargiulo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel clinical rehabilitation method for patients who have permanent and non recoverable muscle denervation in the legs was developed in the frame of the European Project RISE. The technique is based on FES and the project results shows, in these severely disabled patients, restoration of muscle tissue and function. This study propose novel methods based on image processing technique and medical modelling to monitor growth in denervated muscle treated with FES. Geometrical and structural changes in muscle and bone are studied and modelled. Secondary effects on the bone mineral density produced by the stimulation treatment and due the elicited muscle contraction are also investigated. The restoration process in DDM is an important object of discussion since there isn’t yet a complete understanding of the mechanisms regulating growth in denervated muscle. This study approaches the problem from a macroscopic point of view, developing 3-dimensional models of the whole stimulated muscles and following changes in volume, geometry and density very accurately. The method is based on the acquisition of high resolution Spiral CT scans from patients who have long-term flaccid paraplegia and the use of special image processing tools allowing tissue discriminations and muscle segmentation. Three patients were measured at different points of time during 4 years of electrical stimulation treatment. In this study is quantitatively demonstrated the influences of FES treatment on the different quadriceps bellies. The rectus femoris muscle is positioned in the middle of the quadriceps and responds (in general better to stimulation. In a patient with abundant adipose tissue surrounding the quadriceps, rectus femoris almost doubled the volume during the FES treatment while in the other bellies the changes measured were minimal. The analysis of the density shows clearly a restoration of the muscular structure in the growing muscle. The remarkable increase of

  4. Influence of noradrenaline denervation on MPTP-induced deficits in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, T; Fredriksson, A

    2006-09-01

    C57/BL6 mice were administered either DSP4 (50 mg/kg, s.c., 30 min after injection of zimeldine, 20 mg/kg, s.c.) or vehicle (saline) at 63 days of age. Three weeks later, one group (n = 10) of DSP4-treated and one group of vehicle-treated mice were administered MPTP (2 x 40 mg/kg, s.c., 24 hours between injections; the High dose groups), one group (n = 10) of DSP4-treated and one group of vehicle-treated mice were administered MPTP (2 x 20 mg/kg, s.c., 24 hours between injections; the Low dose groups), and one group (n = 10) of DSP4-treated and one group of vehicle-treated mice were administered vehicle. Three weeks later, all six groups were tested in motor activity test chambers, followed by injections of L-Dopa (20 mg/kg, s.c.), and then tested over a further 360 min in the activity test chambers. It was found that pretreatment with the selective NA neurotoxin, DSP4, deteriorated markedly the dose-dependent motor activity deficits observed in the vehicle pretreated MPTP treated mice. These 'ultra-deficits' in the spontaneous motor behaviour of MPTP-treated mice were observed over all three parameters: locomotion, rearing and total activity, and were restricted to the 1(st) and 2(nd) 20-min periods. Administration of L-Dopa (20 mg/kg) following the 60-min testing of spontaneous behaviour restored the motor activity of Vehicle + MPTP treated mice (neither the Vehicle + MPTP-Low nor the Vehicle + MPTP-High groups differed from the Vehicle-Vehicle group, here) but failed to do so in the DSP4 pretreated mice. Here, a dose-dependent deficit of L-Dopa-induced motor activity (over all three parameters) was obtained thereby offering further evidence of an 'ultra-deficit' of function due to previous denervation of the NA terminals. The present findings support the notion that severe damage to the locus coeruleus noradrenergic system, through systemic DSP4, disrupts the facilitatory influence on the nigrostriatal DA system, and interferes with the ability of the

  5. The Effect of Renal Denervation on Plasma Adipokine Profile in Patients with Treatment Resistant Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Eikelis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: We previously demonstrated the effectiveness of renal denervation (RDN to lower blood pressure (BP at least partially via the reduction of sympathetic stimulation to the kidney. A number of adipocyte-derived factors are implicated in BP control in obesity.Aim: The aim of this study was to examine whether RDN may have salutary effects on the adipokine profile in patients with resistant hypertension (RH.Methods: Fifty seven patients with RH undergoing RDN program have been included in this study (65% males, age 60.8 ± 1.5 years, BMI 32.6 ± 0.7 kg/m2, mean ± SEM. Throughout the study, the patients were on an average of 4.5 ± 2.7 antihypertensive drugs. Automated seated office BP measurements and plasma concentrations of leptin, insulin, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA, adiponectin and resistin were assessed at baseline and the 3 months after RDN.Results: There was a significant reduction in mean office systolic (168.75 ± 2.57 vs. 155.23 ± 3.17 mmHg, p < 0.001 and diastolic (90.68 ± 2.31 vs. 83.74 ± 2.36 mmHg, p < 0.001 BP 3 months after RDN. Body weight, plasma leptin and resistin levels and heart rate remained unchanged. Fasting insulin concentration significantly increased 3 months after the procedure (20.05 ± 1.46 vs. 29.70 ± 2.51 uU/ml, p = 0.002. There was a significant drop in circulating NEFA at follow up (1.01 ± 0.07 vs. 0.47 ± 0.04 mEq/l, p < 0.001. Adiponectin concentration was significantly higher after RDN (5,654 ± 800 vs. 6,644 ± 967 ng/ml, p = 0.024.Conclusions: This is the first study to demonstrate that RDN is associated with potentially beneficial effects on aspects of the adipokine profile. Increased adiponectin and reduced NEFA production may contribute to BP reduction via an effect on metabolic pathways.Clinical Trial Registration Number: NCT00483808, NCT00888433.

  6. Effects of renal sympathetic denervation on 24-hour blood pressure variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Stefanie Zuern

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In patients with arterial hypertension, increased blood pressure (BP variability contributes to end organ damage independently from mean levels of arterial BP. Increased BP variability has been linked to alterations in autonomic function including sympathetic overdrive. We hypothesized that catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RDN confers beneficial effects on BPV. Methods and Results: Eleven consecutive patients with therapy-refractory arterial hypertension (age 68.9±7.0 years; baseline systolic BP 189±23mmHg despite medication with 5.6±2.1 antihypertensive drugs underwent bilateral RDN. Twenty-four hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM was performed before RDN and six months thereafter. BPV was primarily assessed by means of standard deviation of 24-hour systolic arterial blood pressures (SDsys. Secondary measures of BPV were maximum systolic blood pressure (MAXsys and maximum difference between two consecutive readings of systolic BP (deltamaxsys over 24 hours. Six months after RDN, SDsys, MAXsys and deltamaxsys were significantly reduced from 16.9±4.6mmHg to 13.5±2.5mmHg (p=0.003, from 190±22mmHg to 172±20mmHg (p<0.001 and from 40±15mmHg to 28±7mmHg (p=0.006, respectively, without changes in concomitant antihypertensive therapy. Reductions of SDsys, MAXsys and deltamaxsys were observed in 10/11 (90.9%, 11/11 (100% and 9/11 (81.8% patients, respectively. Although we noted a significant reduction of systolic office blood pressure by 30.4±27.7mmHg (p=0.007, there was only a trend in reduction of average systolic BP assessed from ABPM (149±19mmHg to 142±18mmHg; p=0.086.Conclusions: In patients with therapy-refractory arterial hypertension, RDN leads to significant reductions of BP variability. Effects of RDN on BPV over 24 hours were more pronounced than on average levels of BP.

  7. Localization of outer surface proteins A and B in both the outer membrane and intracellular compartments of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca, J S; McDowall, A W; Norgard, M V; Radolf, J D

    1991-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi B31 with and without outer membranes contained nearly identical amounts of outer surface proteins A and B. The majority of each immunogen also was localized intracellularly by immunocryoultramicrotomy. These results are inconsistent with the widely held belief that outer surface proteins A and B are exclusively outer membrane proteins. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:1744059

  8. Dense Gas in the Outer Spiral Arm of M51

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Braine, Jonathan; Gao, Yu; Koda, Jin; Gu, Qiusheng

    2017-02-01

    There is a linear relation between the mass of dense gas traced by the HCN(1–0) luminosity and the star formation rate (SFR) traced by the far-infrared luminosity. Recent observations of galactic disks have shown some systematic variations. In order to explore the SFR–dense gas link at high resolution (∼4″, ∼150 pc) in the outer disk of an external galaxy, we have mapped a region about 5 kpc from the center along the northern spiral arm of M51 in the HCN(1–0), HCO+(1–0), and HNC(1–0) emission lines using the Northern Extended Millimeter Array interferometer. The HCN and HCO+ lines were detected in six giant molecular associations (GMAs), while HNC emission was only detected in the two brightest GMAs. One of the GMAs hosts a powerful H ii region, and HCN is stronger than HCO+ there. Comparing observations of GMAs in the disks of M31 and M33 at similar angular resolution (∼100 pc), we find that GMAs in the outer disk of M51 are brighter in both the HCN and the HCO+ lines by a factor of 3, on average. However, the {I}{HCN}/{I}{CO} and {I}{{HCO}+}/{I}{CO} ratios are similar to the ratios in nearby galactic disks and the Galactic plane. Using the Herschel 70 μm data to trace the total IR luminosity at the resolution of the GMAs, we find that both the {L}{IR}–{L}{HCN} and {L}{IR}–{L}{{HCO}+} relations in the outer disk GMAs are consistent with the proportionality between the {L}{IR} and the dense gas mass established globally in galaxies within the scatter. The IR/HCN and IR/HCO+ ratios of the GMAs vary by a factor of 3, probably depending on whether massive stars are forming.

  9. Outer Rail for Wall Plate Covering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The outer rail retains two lateral screw webs of an intermediate rail to construct a base for wall plate covering. Two retention devices are disposed oppositely on respective inner sides of each retention web for retaining a respective screw web of the intermediate rail. Each retention device...

  10. Intershell correlations in photoionization of outer shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M.Ya. [The Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Chernysheva, L.V. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Drukarev, E.G. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    We demonstrate that the cross sections for photoionization of the outer shells are noticeably modified at the photon energies close to the thresholds of ionization of the inner shells due to correlations with the latter. The correlations may lead to increase or to decrease of the cross sections just above the ionization thresholds.

  11. Outer Rail for Wall Plate Covering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The outer rail retains two lateral screw webs of an intermediate rail to construct a base for wall plate covering. Two retention devices are disposed oppositely on respective inner sides of each retention web for retaining a respective screw web of the intermediate rail. Each retention device...

  12. BIOREACTOR DESIGN - OUTER LOOP LANDFILL, LOUISVILLE, KY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bioreactor field demonstration projects are underway at the Outer Loop Landfill in Louisville, KY, USA. The research effort is a cooperative research effort between US EPA and Waste Management Inc. Two primary kinds of municipal waste bioreactors are under study at this site. ...

  13. Bioinformatics analysis of Shigella flexneri 2a outer membrane protein A and molecular designing of recombinant epitope vaccine%福氏志贺菌2a型外膜蛋白A的生物信息学分析与重组表位疫苗分子的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘祥

    2016-01-01

    福氏志贺菌外膜蛋白OmpA(outer membrane protein A)具有较强的免疫原性,在疫苗上有应用前景.采用MEGA(molecular evolutionary genetics analysis)软件对OmpA的系统发生分析显示,福氏志贺菌与肠道细菌间亲缘关系较其它菌属更近.利用在线软件预测OmpA为亲水的分泌型蛋白,存在多个酶切位点;采用TMHMM(transmembrahe hidden markov models) Server v.2.0程序预测OmpA无跨膜结构并定位于细胞膜外;SOPMA(self-optimized prediction method with alignment)服务器预测OmpA二级结构中含无规则卷曲41.09%,α-螺旋26.44%,β-转角10.06%,β-片层22.41%.通过SignalP 4.1软件分析显示,OmpA的1~21位氨基酸为信号肽序列.采用Swiss-Model程序预测的三维模型显示OmpA为桶装结构.利用ABCpred(artificial neural network based B-cell epitope prediction)和BepiPred(B-cell epitopes prediction)方案,预测OmpA存在3个B细胞表位.运用神经网络与量化矩阵法预测OmpA具有1个CTL表位.使用MHC-Ⅱ类分子结合肽在线程序预测显示OmpA具有1个Th表位.设计获得抗原性较好的OmpA蛋白重组表位多肽.为OmpA多表位串联疫苗的研究奠定基础.

  14. Chronic Kidney Pain in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease : A Case Report of Successful Treatment by Catheter-Based Renal Denervation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; de Jager, Rosa L.; Neeleman, M. Peer; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    Chronic pain is a common concern in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We report what to our knowledge is the first catheter-based renal denervation procedure in a patient with ADPKD resulting in successful management of chronic pain. The patient was a 43-year-old

  15. Chronic Kidney Pain in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease : A Case Report of Successful Treatment by Catheter-Based Renal Denervation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; de Jager, Rosa L.; Neeleman, M. Peer; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a common concern in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We report what to our knowledge is the first catheter-based renal denervation procedure in a patient with ADPKD resulting in successful management of chronic pain. The patient was a 43-year-old wo

  16. Katheterbasierte renale Sympathikus-Denervation zur Behandlung der therapierefraktären Hypertonie - Eine kritische Übersicht zu einer vielversprechenden Therapie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schillinger M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Die katheterbasierte renale Denervation stellt eine vielversprechende, derzeit jedoch noch experimentelle Methode zur Behandlung der refraktären Hypertonie dar. Der vorliegende Übersichtsartikel fasst die aktuelle Studienlage zusammen und beleuchtet einige kritische und ungeklärte Aspekte der Methode.

  17. Myostatin propeptide gene delivery by gene gun ameliorates muscle atrophy in a rat model of botulinum toxin-induced nerve denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sen-Wei; Tung, Yu-Tang; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Yang, Shang-Hsun; Liu, Chia-Yi; Lu, Michelle; Pai, Hui-Jing; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2016-02-01

    Muscle atrophy is a common symptom after nerve denervation. Myostatin propeptide, a precursor of myostatin, has been documented to improve muscle growth. However, the mechanism underlying the muscle atrophy attenuation effects of myostatin propeptide in muscles and the changes in gene expression are not well established. We investigated the possible underlying mechanisms associated with myostatin propeptide gene delivery by gene gun in a rat denervation muscle atrophy model, and evaluated gene expression patterns. In a rat botulinum toxin-induced nerve denervation muscle atrophy model, we evaluated the effects of wild-type (MSPP) and mutant-type (MSPPD75A) of myostatin propeptide gene delivery, and observed changes in gene activation associated with the neuromuscular junction, muscle and nerve. Muscle mass and muscle fiber size was moderately increased in myostatin propeptide treated muscles (pmuscle regulatory factors, neurite outgrowth factors (IGF-1, GAP43) and acetylcholine receptors was observed. Our results demonstrate that myostatin propeptide gene delivery, especially the mutant-type of MSPPD75A, attenuates muscle atrophy through myogenic regulatory factors and acetylcholine receptor regulation. Our data concluded that myostatin propeptide gene therapy may be a promising treatment for nerve denervation induced muscle atrophy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of outer membrane protein and biochemical profiles of Haemophilus aegyptius and Haemophilus influenzae biotype III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlone, G M; Sottnek, F O; Plikaytis, B D

    1985-11-01

    Haemophilus aegyptius and Haemophilus influenzae biotype III are morphologically and biochemically similar; however, their outer membrane protein (Sarkosyl insoluble) profiles are distinct. Of 18 strains of H. aegyptius examined, 15 had a type 1 protein profile, and 3 had a type 2 profile, whereas the 5 strains of H. influenzae biotype III examined had three other protein profile types. All Haemophilus strains examined had 31- and 76-kilodalton (kDa) proteins and minor proteins with molecular masses between 20 and 100 kDa. H. aegyptius, with a type 1 protein profile, had major outer membrane proteins with apparent molecular masses of 27, 35.5, and 41.5 kDa, and H. aegyptius, with a type 2 protein profile, had 26-, 29-, 39.5-, and 41-kDa proteins. The type strain of H. influenzae biotype III had three major outer membrane proteins with apparent molecular masses of 29, 38.5 and 40 kDa. Four other strains designated as H. influenzae biotype III had major outer membrane proteins between 27 and 41.5 kDa representing two additional protein profiles.

  19. TonB-dependent outer membrane transport: going for Baroque?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Michael C

    2005-08-01

    The import of essential organometallic micronutrients (such as iron-siderophores and vitamin B(12)) across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria proceeds via TonB-dependent outer membrane transporters (TBDTs). The TBDT couples to the TonB protein, which is part of a multiprotein complex in the plasma (inner) membrane. Five crystal structures of TBDTs illustrate clearly the architecture of the protein in energy-independent substrate-free and substrate-bound states. In each of the TBDT structures, an N-terminal hatch (or plug or cork) domain occludes the lumen of a 22-stranded beta barrel. The manner by which substrate passes through the transporter (the "hatch-barrel problem") is currently unknown. Solution NMR and X-ray crystallographic structures of various TonB domains indicate a striking structural plasticity of this protein. Thermodynamic, biochemical and bacteriological studies of TonB and TBDTs indicate further that existing structures do not yet capture critical energy-dependent and in vivo conformations of the transport cycle. The reconciliation of structural and non-structural experimental data, and the unambiguous experimental elucidation of a detailed molecular mechanism of transport are current challenges for this field.

  20. Assembly of β-barrel proteins into bacterial outer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkrig, Joel; Leyton, Denisse L; Webb, Chaille T; Lithgow, Trevor

    2014-08-01

    Membrane proteins with a β-barrel topology are found in the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and in the plastids and mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. The assembly of these membrane proteins depends on a protein folding reaction (to create the barrel) and an insertion reaction (to integrate the barrel within the outer membrane). Experimental approaches using biophysics and biochemistry are detailing the steps in the assembly pathway, while genetics and bioinformatics have revealed a sophisticated production line of cellular components that catalyze the assembly pathway in vivo. This includes the modular BAM complex, several molecular chaperones and the translocation and assembly module (the TAM). Recent screens also suggest that further components of the pathway might remain to be discovered. We review what is known about the process of β-barrel protein assembly into membranes, and the components of the β-barrel assembly machinery. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein trafficking and secretion in bacteria. Guest Editors: Anastassios Economou and Ross Dalbey.

  1. Acute Zonal Cone Photoreceptor Outer Segment Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Tomas S; Sandhu, Harpal S; Serrano, Leona W; Traband, Anastasia; Lau, Marisa K; Adamus, Grazyna; Avery, Robert A

    2017-05-01

    The diagnostic path presented narrows down the cause of acute vision loss to the cone photoreceptor outer segment and will refocus the search for the cause of similar currently idiopathic conditions. To describe the structural and functional associations found in a patient with acute zonal occult photoreceptor loss. A case report of an adolescent boy with acute visual field loss despite a normal fundus examination performed at a university teaching hospital. Results of a complete ophthalmic examination, full-field flash electroretinography (ERG) and multifocal ERG, light-adapted achromatic and 2-color dark-adapted perimetry, and microperimetry. Imaging was performed with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), near-infrared (NIR) and short-wavelength (SW) fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and NIR reflectance (REF). The patient was evaluated within a week of the onset of a scotoma in the nasal field of his left eye. Visual acuity was 20/20 OU, and color vision was normal in both eyes. Results of the fundus examination and of SW-FAF and NIR-FAF imaging were normal in both eyes, whereas NIR-REF imaging showed a region of hyporeflectance temporal to the fovea that corresponded with a dense relative scotoma noted on light-adapted static perimetry in the left eye. Loss in the photoreceptor outer segment detected by SD-OCT co-localized with an area of dense cone dysfunction detected on light-adapted perimetry and multifocal ERG but with near-normal rod-mediated vision according to results of 2-color dark-adapted perimetry. Full-field flash ERG findings were normal in both eyes. The outer nuclear layer and inner retinal thicknesses were normal. Localized, isolated cone dysfunction may represent the earliest photoreceptor abnormality or a distinct entity within the acute zonal occult outer retinopathy complex. Acute zonal occult outer retinopathy should be considered in patients with acute vision loss and abnormalities on NIR-REF imaging, especially if

  2. The Outer Space as an Educational Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, Melquíades; Hernández-López, Montserrat

    2017-06-01

    STEAM is an educational approach to learning that uses Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics as access points for guiding student inquiry, dialogue, and critical thinking. The end results are students who take thoughtful risks, engage in experiential learning, persist in problem-solving, embrace collaboration, and work through the creative process. The Outer Space is a window to the past and the future of our travel around the history of the Universe and can be used as a educational tool in primary and secondary education. This paper talks about the integration of the resources of European Space Agency, Space Awareness, Nuclio, Scientix and Schoolnet as motivation to integrate STEAM methodology in secondary education. Keywords: STEAM, outer space, motivation, methodology

  3. The Outer Banks of North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Robert; Lins, Harry; Smith, Jodi Jones

    2016-12-27

    The Outer Banks of North Carolina are excellent examples of the nearly 300 barrier islands rimming the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. These low, sandy islands are among the most dynamic natural landscapes occupied by man. Beach sands move offshore, onshore, and along the shore in the direction of the prevailing longshore currents. In this way, sandy coasts continuously adjust to different tide, wave, and current conditions and to rising sea level that causes the islands to migrate landward.Despite such changes, barrier islands are of considerable environmental importance. The Outer Banks are home to diverse natural ecosystems that are adapted to the harsh coastal environment. Native species tend to be robust and many are specifically adapted to withstand salt spray, periodic saltwater flooding, and the islands’ well-drained sandy soil. The Outer Banks provide an important stopover for birds on the Atlantic flyway, and many species inhabit the islands year round. In addition, Outer Banks beaches provide an important nesting habitat for five endangered or threatened sea turtle species.European explorers discovered North Carolina’s barrier islands in the 16th century, although the islands were not permanently settled until the middle 17th century. By the early 19th century, shipbuilding and lumber industries were among the most successful, until forest resources were depleted. Commercial fishing eventually followed, and it expanded considerably after the Civil War. By the Great Depression, however, little industry existed on the Outer Banks. In response to the effects of a severe hurricane in 1933, the National Park Service and the Civilian Conservation Corps proposed a massive sand-fixation program to stabilize the moving sand and prevent storm waves from sweeping across the entire width of some sections of the islands. Between 1933 and 1940, this program constructed sand fencing on 185 kilometers (115 miles) of beach and planted grass seedlings

  4. Rigidity of marginally outer trapped 2-spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Galloway, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    In a matter-filled spacetime, perhaps with positive cosmological constant, a stable marginally outer trapped 2-sphere must satisfy a certain area inequality. Namely, as discussed in the paper, its area must be bounded above by $4\\pi/c$, where $c > 0$ is a lower bound on a natural energy-momentum term. We then consider the rigidity that results for stable, or weakly outermost, marginally outer trapped 2-spheres that achieve this upper bound on the area. In particular, we prove a splitting result for 3-dimensional initial data sets analogous to a result of Bray, Brendle and Neves [10] concerning area minimizing 2-spheres in Riemannian 3-manifolds with positive scalar curvature. We further show that these initial data sets locally embed as spacelike hypersurfaces into the Nariai spacetime. Connections to the Vaidya spacetime and dynamical horizons are also discussed.

  5. Performance of the LHCb Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Arink, R; Bagaturia, Y; Band, H; Bauer, Th; Berkien, A; Farber, Ch; Bien, A; Blouw, J; Ceelie, L; Coco, V; Deckenhoff, M; Deng, Z; Dettori, F; van Eijk, D; Ekelhof, R; Gersabeck, E; Grillo, L; Hulsbergen, W D; Karbach, T M; Koopman, R; Kozlinskiy, A; Langenbruch, Ch; Lavrentyev, V; Linn, Ch; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Meissner, M; Michalowski, J; Morawski, P; Nawrot, A; Nedos, M; Pellegrino, A; Polok, G; van Petten, O; Rovekamp, J; Schimmel, F; Schuylenburg, H; Schwemmer, R; Seyfert, P; Serra, N; Sluijk, T; Spaan, B; Spelt, J; Storaci, B; Szczekowski, M; Swientek, S; Tolk, S; Tuning, N; Uwer, U; Wiedner, D; Witek, M; Zeng, M; Zwart, A

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb Outer Tracker is a gaseous detector covering an area of 5x6 m2 with 12 double layers of straw tubes. The detector with its services are described together with the commissioning and calibration procedures. Based on data of the first LHC running period from 2010 to 2012, the performance of the readout electronics and the single hit resolution and efficiency are presented. The efficiency to detect a hit in the central half of the straw is estimated to be 99.2%, and the position resolution is determined to be approximately 200 um. The Outer Tracker received a dose in the hottest region corresponding to 0.12 C/cm, and no signs of gain deterioration or other ageing effects are observed.

  6. Cryovolcanism in the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Cryovolcanism is defined as the extrusion of liquids and vapors of materials that would be frozen solid at the planetary surface temperatures of the icy bodies of the outer solar system. Active cryovolcanism is now known to occur on Saturn's moon Enceladus and on Neptune's moon Triton and is suspected on Jupiter's moon Europa, while evidence for past cryovolcanic activity is widespread throughout the outer solar system. This chapter examines the mechanisms and manifestations of cryovolcanism, beginning with a review of the materials that make up these unusual ‘‘magmas’’ and the means by which they might erupt and concluding with a volcanologist's tour of the farthest reaches of the solar system.

  7. Photopolarimetry team outer planets mission definition phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The work is reported of the Photopolarimetry Team in identifying scientific objectives for photometer/polarimeter experiments for outer planet flyby missions. A discussion of the scientific objectives which can be attained with a photometer/polarimeter experiment, and summaries of the special studies which were performed for the Photopolarimetry Team are presented along with a description of the photometer/polarimeter design which was developed for the Meteoroid Detection Team.

  8. The Upgrade of the CMS Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbrueck, Georg

    2014-01-01

    During the high luminosity phase of the LHC starting around 2025 (HL-LHC), the machine is expected to deliver an instantaneous luminosity of $5\\cdot10^{34}$~cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. A total of 3000~fb$^{-1}$ of data is foreseen to be delivered, hereby increasing the physics potential of the LHC experiments significantly. However, this fivefold increase in luminosity compared to the design luminosity of the LHC will lead to a higher track multiplicity in the silicon tracking detectors of the experiments, and to severe radiation levels. In order to maintain physics capability, CMS will build a completely new tracking detector comprising a pixel detector and an outer tracker. Furthermore, information from the outer tracker will be used in the first level trigger of CMS to ensure a sufficient trigger rejection. For this purpose, CMS will use so-called p$_{T}$ modules which will provide a momentum measurement at the module level. These modules consist of two back-to-back strip sensors for the outer layers, and a st...

  9. Estimation of arterial and cardiopulmonary total peripheral resistance baroreflex gain values: validation by chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Kim, Jong-Kyung; Li, Ying; Sala-Mercado, Javier; Hammond, Robert L; Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2006-05-01

    Feedback control of total peripheral resistance (TPR) by the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex systems is an important mechanism for short-term blood pressure regulation. Existing methods for measuring this TPR baroreflex mechanism typically aim to quantify only the gain value of one baroreflex system as it operates in open-loop conditions. As a result, the normal, integrated functioning of the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of TPR remains to be fully elucidated. To this end, the laboratory of Mukkamala et al. (Mukkamala R, Toska K, and Cohen RJ. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 284: H947-H959, 2003) previously proposed a potentially noninvasive technique for estimating the closed-loop (dimensionless) gain values of the arterial TPR baroreflex (GA) and the cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflex (GC) by mathematical analysis of the subtle, beat-to-beat fluctuations in arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, and stroke volume. Here, we review the technique with additional details and describe its experimental evaluation with respect to spontaneous hemodynamic variability measured from seven conscious dogs, before and after chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation. The technique was able to correctly predict the group-average changes in GA and GC that have previously been shown to occur following chronic arterial baroreceptor denervation. That is, reflex control by the arterial TPR baroreflex was virtually abolished (GA = -2.1 +/- 0.6 to 0.3 +/- 0.2; P TPR baroreflex more than doubled (GC = -0.7 +/- 0.4 to -1.8 +/- 0.2; P TPR baroreflex functioning in both humans and animals in health and disease.

  10. First report of the Global SYMPLICITY Registry on the effect of renal artery denervation in patients with uncontrolled hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix; Ukena, Christian; Hoppe, Uta C; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Negoita, Manuela; Ruilope, Luis; Schlaich, Markus P; Schmieder, Roland E; Whitbourn, Robert; Williams, Bryan; Zeymer, Uwe; Zirlik, Andreas; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to assess the safety and effectiveness of renal denervation using the Symplicity system in real-world patients with uncontrolled hypertension (NCT01534299). The Global SYMPLICITY Registry is a prospective, open-label, multicenter registry. Office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressures (BPs) were measured. Change from baseline to 6 months was analyzed for all patients and for subgroups based on baseline office systolic BP, diabetic status, and renal function; a cohort with severe hypertension (office systolic pressure, ≥160 mm Hg; 24-hour systolic pressure, ≥135 mm Hg; and ≥3 antihypertensive medication classes) was also included. The analysis included protocol-defined safety events. Six-month outcomes for 998 patients, including 323 in the severe hypertension cohort, are reported. Mean baseline office systolic BP was 163.5±24.0 mm Hg for all patients and 179.3±16.5 mm Hg for the severe cohort; the corresponding baseline 24-hour mean systolic BPs were 151.5±17.0 and 159.0±15.6 mm Hg. At 6 months, the changes in office and 24-hour systolic BPs were -11.6±25.3 and -6.6±18.0 mm Hg for all patients (Phypertension (P70% and 5 cases of hospitalization for a hypertensive emergency. In clinical practice, renal denervation resulted in significant reductions in office and 24-hour BPs with a favorable safety profile. Greater BP-lowering effects occurred in patients with higher baseline pressures. URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01534299. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Potential lifetime cost-effectiveness of catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation in patients with resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorenkamp, Marc; Bonaventura, Klaus; Leber, Alexander W; Boldt, Julia; Sohns, Christian; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Frei, Ulrich; Roser, Mattias

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) for the treatment of resistant hypertension. We aimed to determine the cost-effectiveness of this approach separately for men and women of different ages. A Markov state-transition model accounting for costs, life-years, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness was developed to compare RDN with best medical therapy (BMT) in patients with resistant hypertension. The model ran from age 30 to 100 years or death, with a cycle length of 1 year. The efficacy of RDN was modelled as a reduction in the risk of hypertension-related disease events and death. Analyses were conducted from a payer's perspective. Costs and QALYs were discounted at 3% annually. Both deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. When compared with BMT, RDN gained 0.98 QALYs in men and 0.88 QALYs in women 60 years of age at an additional cost of €2589 and €2044, respectively. As the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios increased with patient age, RDN consistently yielded more QALYs at lower costs in lower age groups. Considering a willingness-to-pay threshold of €35 000/QALY, there was a 95% probability that RDN would remain cost-effective up to an age of 78 and 76 years in men and women, respectively. Cost-effectiveness was influenced mostly by the magnitude of effect of RDN on systolic blood pressure, the rate of RDN non-responders, and the procedure costs of RDN. Renal sympathetic denervation is a cost-effective intervention for patients with resistant hypertension. Earlier treatment produces better cost-effectiveness ratios.

  12. A comparison of the efficacy of surgical renal denervation and pharmacologic therapies in post-myocardial infarction heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialu Hu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Although renal denervation (RD has been shown to be effective in treating post- myocardial Infarction (MI heart failure (HF in animal models and clinical trials, its utility as a standalone treatment without traditional drug treatment for post-MI HF still needs to be investigated. METHODS: Rats were randomly assigned into seven experimental groups: N group (control group with no MI and no RD, n = 10, MI group (MI, n = 20, RD group (renal denervation, n = 10, RD-3d+MI group (RD performed three days before MI, n = 15, β-blocker-3d+MI group (Metoprolol treated three days before MI, n = 15, ACEI-3d+MI group (Perindopril treated three days before MI, n = 15, and ARB-3d+MI group (Losartan treated three days before MI, n = 15. Cardiac function, autonomic nervous system parameters, and neuroendocrine activities were evaluated 8 weeks post MI. RESULTS: Compared to β-blockers, ACEIs, and ARBs, RD alone provided significantly better cardiac remodeling and function, enhanced water and sodium excretion, and improved autonomic modulation. CONCLUSIONS: In this post-MI HF animal model, surgical RD provides effective autonomic modulation, inhibition of the RAAS, improved cardiac remodeling, and preserved renal function, without affecting normal circulation and cardiopulmonary function in normal rats. Compared to β-blocker, ACEI, and ARB single-drug therapies, RD alone is more efficacious. These results suggest that RD may be an effective treatment option for HF, especially in patients who have contraindications to drug therapy.

  13. Circadian expression of clock genes and angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptors in suprachiasmatic nuclei of sinoaortic-denervated rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui LI; Ning-ling SUN; Jin WANG; Ai-jun LIU; Ding-feng SU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether the circadian expression of central clock genes and angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 (AT1) receptors was altered in sinoaortic-denervated (SAD)rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent sinoaortic denervation or a sham operation at the age of 12 weeks. Four weeks after the operation, blood pressure and heart period were measured in the conscious state in a group of sham-operated (n=10) and SAD rats (n=9). Rest SAD and sham-operated rats were divided into 6 groups (n=6 in each group). The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN)tissues were taken every 4 h throughout the day from each group for the determi-nation of the mRNA expression of clock genes (Per2 and Bmall) and the AT1receptor by RT-PCR; the protein expression of Per2 and Bmall was determined by Western blotting. Results: Blood pressure levels in the SAD rats were similar to those of the sham-operated rats. However, blood pressure variabilities signifi-cantly increased in the SAD rats compared with the sham-operated rats. The circadian variation of clock genes in the SCN of the sham-operated rats was char-acterized by a marked increase in the mRNA and protein expression during dark periods. Per2 and Bmall mRNA levels were significantly lower in the SAD rats,especially during dark periods. Western blot analysis confirmed an attenuation of the circadian rhythm of the 2 clock proteins in the SCN of the SAD rats. AT1 receptor mRNA expressions in the SCN were abnormally upregulated in the light phase, changed to a 12-h cycle in the SAD rats. Conclusion: The circadian varia-tion of the 2 central clock genes was attenuated in the SAD rats. Arterial baroreflex dysfunction also induced a disturbance in the expression of AT1 receptors in the SCN.

  14. Liquid Iron Alloys with Hydrogen at Outer Core Conditions by First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, K.; Hirose, K.

    2015-12-01

    Since the density of the outer core deduced from seismic data is about 10% lower than that of pure iron at core pressures and temperatures (P-T), it is widely believed that the outer core includes one or more light elements. Although intensive experimental and theoretical studies have been performed so far, the light element in the core has not yet been identified. Comparison of the density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys with observations, such as the PREM, is a promising way to determine the species and quantity of light alloying component(s) in the outer core. Here we report the results of a first-principles molecular dynamics study on liquid iron alloyed with hydrogen, one of candidates of the light elements. Hydrogen had been much less studied than other candidates. However, hydrogen has been known to reduce the melting temperature of Fe-H solid [1]. Furthermore, very recently, Nomura et al. argued that the outer core may include 24 at.% H in order to be molten under relatively low temperature (attracted strong interests. We clarify the effects of hydrogen on density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys under outer core P-T conditions. It is shown that ~1 wt% hydrogen can reproduce PREM density and sound velocity simultaneously very well. In addition, we show the presence of hydrogen rather reduces Gruneisen parameters. It indicates that, if hydrogen exists in the outer core, temperature profile of the outer core could be changed considerably from one estimated so far. [1] Sakamaki, K., E. Takahashi, Y. Nakajima, Y. Nishihara, K. Funakoshi, T. Suzuki, and Y. Fukai, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 174, 192-201 (2009). [2] Nomura, R., K. Hirose, K. Uesugi, Y. Ohishi, A. Tsuchiyama, A. Miyake, and Y. Ueno, Science 31, 522-525 (2014).

  15. Thermally driven molecular linear motors - A molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    We conduct molecular dynamics simulations of a molecular linear motor consisting of coaxial carbon nanotubes with a long outer carbon nanotube confining and guiding the motion of an inner short, capsule-like nanotube. The simulations indicate that the motion of the capsule can be controlled...

  16. Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics by month and summarized annually. Outer Continental Shelf consists of Gulf of Mexico, Pacific and...

  17. Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Resists Denervation-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy by Activating PGC-1α and Integrating Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Ting Kuo

    Full Text Available Denervation-mediated skeletal muscle atrophy results from the loss of electric stimulation and leads to protein degradation, which is critically regulated by the well-confirmed transcriptional co-activator peroxisome proliferator co-activator 1 alpha (PGC-1α. No adequate treatments of muscle wasting are available. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ, a naturally occurring antioxidant component with multiple functions including mitochondrial modulation, demonstrates the ability to protect against muscle dysfunction. However, it remains unclear whether PQQ enhances PGC-1α activation and resists skeletal muscle atrophy in mice subjected to a denervation operation. This work investigates the expression of PGC-1α and mitochondrial function in the skeletal muscle of denervated mice administered PQQ. The C57BL6/J mouse was subjected to a hindlimb sciatic axotomy. A PQQ-containing ALZET® osmotic pump (equivalent to 4.5 mg/day/kg b.w. was implanted subcutaneously into the right lower abdomen of the mouse. In the time course study, the mouse was sacrificed and the gastrocnemius muscle was prepared for further myopathological staining, energy metabolism analysis, western blotting, and real-time quantitative PCR studies. We observed that PQQ administration abolished the denervation-induced decrease in muscle mass and reduced mitochondrial activities, as evidenced by the reduced fiber size and the decreased expression of cytochrome c oxidase and NADH-tetrazolium reductase. Bioenergetic analysis demonstrated that PQQ reprogrammed the denervation-induced increase in the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR and led to an increase in the extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, a measurement of the glycolytic metabolism. The protein levels of PGC-1α and the electron transport chain (ETC complexes were also increased by treatment with PQQ. Furthermore, PQQ administration highly enhanced the expression of oxidative fibers and maintained the type II glycolytic

  18. Resistance to renal denervation therapy — Identification of underlying mechanisms by analysis of differential DNA methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Emschermann

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The present study describes novel molecular targets potentially contributing to reduction of blood pressure after RDN in some patients. Identifying patients with a high responsiveness to RDN could contribute to an individualized therapy in drug resistant hypertension.

  19. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given....

  20. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS General § 192.10 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in...

  1. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  2. 75 FR 1076 - Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ...: 2010-119] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf Civil... maximum daily civil penalty assessment. SUMMARY: The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act requires the MMS to... operations in the Outer Continental Shelf at least once every 3 years. This review ensures that the...

  3. 9 CFR 108.10 - Outer premises and stables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Outer premises and stables. 108.10 Section 108.10 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... LICENSED ESTABLISHMENTS § 108.10 Outer premises and stables. (a) The outer premises of...

  4. Resistance of Escherichia coli to nourseothricin (streptothricin): sensitization of resistant strains by abolition of its outer membrane resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltmann, G

    1992-01-01

    The polycationic antibiotic, nourseothricin, represents a mixture of several streptothricins, mainly D and F. The molecular weight of the latter compound amounts to 486. Obviously, although very slowly, it can pass the outer membrane via the porin pores. It has been shown earlier that nourseothricin is able to generate some kind of channels into the outer membrane through which it can pass the cell wall. On the other hand, there were indications that resistant strains containing a streptothricin-inactivating acetyl transferase possess an additional protecting system, namely a reduced penetrability of the outer membrane. In this study, it could be shown that such strains indeed could be rendered sensitive by damaging the barrier function of the outer membrane.

  5. The urgency of outer territories anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Milenković

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of transforming a part of Serbian anthropology into social theoretic management of identity, I suggest both comparative historiographic and ethnographic learning from societies with similar post-colonial experience, with the aim to include the discipline into an urgent defense of Serbia and Belgrade from further ethno-profiteering interests of elites in/from outer territories, left over on the ruins of our ill judged, resource incompatible, exaggerated or immoral twentieth century adventures. Serbian anthropology, written by anthropologists to whom Serbia and Belgrade are "homeland" by origin or civilized choice, should play the key role in the defense of Serbian citizens from the interest of elites in/from the outer "homelands", particularly by revealing the processes for which it is, as a discipline, most expert at – the professionalization of ethnicity, interactive and hybrid nature of identity, instrumental nature of tradition and the identity politics in general. Having in mind the latest attempt, a particularly successful one, conducted by the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century that the lives, health, well-being, dignity and future of persons born in and loyal to the interest of Serbia and Belgrade, in large scale, thoroughly and long term be sacrificed and dedicated to the interests of ethno-profiteering elites in/from outer territories, in this article I point to the possibility to, along with the comparative learning from the above mentioned post-colonial experiences, delicate experiences of urgent anthropology be applied as well as the rich tradition of collective research. This text analyzes the results of first such research, that represenst the initial, praiseworthy and a brave step in the wise striving to engage social sciences and humanities in a search of expert and not mythical/daily-political solutions of the key problem of the Serbian nation – that of how to settle the interests of the

  6. Overview of 2008 Outer Planet Flagship Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reh, Kim R.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the process involved in the Phase-2 studies for the next Outer Planets Flagship (OPF). These studies will be a cooperative effort with ESA and JAXA in partnership with NASA. The annoucement of oppurtunity (AO) for the science instruments and the launch approval/planetary protection processes are reviewed. There is also discussion about capturing relevant lessons from the Cassini team, supporting international collaboration, and support for science definition teams. Some mission specific tasks are also reviewed, for the three missions being proposed: (1) Europa Explorer, (2) Jupiter System Observer and (3) Titan Explorer. A timeline for the studies is also included.

  7. Aging phenomena in the LHCb outer tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, Tanja

    2007-01-01

    The Outer Tracker (OT) consists of 53 760 straw tubes, covering in total an area of 360 m$^2$. The detector is foreseen to operate under large particle rates, up to 30 kHz/cm per straw in the region closest to the beam. Extensive aging tests conducted earlier on with prototype modules indicated excellent gain stability. In contrast, mass production modules show significant degradation under a rather model level of radiation. This paper presents the observed phenomenon, together with ongoing investigations to both prevent the effect, as well as to recover the gain loss.

  8. A bilayer-couple model of bacterial outer membrane vesicle biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, Jeffrey W; Whiteley, Marvin

    2012-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria naturally produce outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that arise through bulging and pinching off of the outer membrane. OMVs have several biological functions for bacteria, most notably as trafficking vehicles for toxins, antimicrobials, and signaling molecules. While their biological roles are now appreciated, the mechanism of OMV formation has not been fully elucidated. We recently demonstrated that the signaling molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS) is required for OMV biogenesis in P. aeruginosa. We hypothesized that PQS stimulates OMV formation through direct interaction with the outer leaflet of the outer membrane. To test this hypothesis, we employed a red blood cell (RBC) model that has been used extensively to study small-molecule-membrane interactions. Our results revealed that addition of PQS to RBCs induced membrane curvature, resulting in the formation of membrane spicules (spikes), consistent with small molecules that are inserted stably into the outer leaflet of the membrane. Radiotracer experiments demonstrated that sufficient PQS was inserted into the membrane to account for this curvature and that curvature induction was specific to PQS structure. These data suggest that a low rate of interleaflet flip-flop forces PQS to accumulate in and expand the outer leaflet relative to the inner leaflet, thus inducing membrane curvature. In support of PQS-mediated outer leaflet expansion, the PQS effect was antagonized by chlorpromazine, a molecule known to be preferentially inserted into the inner leaflet. Based on these data, we propose a bilayer-couple model to describe P. aeruginosa OMV biogenesis and suggest that this is a general mechanism for bacterial OMV formation. Despite the ubiquity and importance of outer membrane vesicle (OMV) production in Gram-negative bacteria, the molecular details of OMV biogenesis are not fully understood. Early experiments showed that 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS) induces OMV formation

  9. Comparison of outer membrane protein and biochemical profiles of Haemophilus aegyptius and Haemophilus influenzae biotype III.

    OpenAIRE

    Carlone, G M; Sottnek, F O; Plikaytis, B. D.

    1985-01-01

    Haemophilus aegyptius and Haemophilus influenzae biotype III are morphologically and biochemically similar; however, their outer membrane protein (Sarkosyl insoluble) profiles are distinct. Of 18 strains of H. aegyptius examined, 15 had a type 1 protein profile, and 3 had a type 2 profile, whereas the 5 strains of H. influenzae biotype III examined had three other protein profile types. All Haemophilus strains examined had 31- and 76-kilodalton (kDa) proteins and minor proteins with molecular...

  10. Resistant hypertension: treatment with percutaneous renal denervation = Hipertensión Arterial Resistente: tratamiento con terapia de denervación renal percutánea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senior, Juan Manuel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the cases of three women with resistant hypertension who had no adequate response to pharmacological treatment with more than five classes of different anti-hypertensive drugs given in optimal doses and with appropriate schedules. Secondary causes of hypertension were ruled out. Percutaneous renal denervation therapy was successful and without complications. Clinical follow-up revealed significant improvement in the control of hypertension.

  11. Intrinsic denervation of the colon is associated with a decrease of some colonic preneoplastic markers in rats treated with a chemical carcinogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V.O. Vespúcio

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Denervation of the colon is protective against the colon cancer; however, the mechanisms involved are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the denervated colonic mucosa could be less responsive to the action of the chemical carcinogen dimethylhydrazine (DMH. Three groups of 32 male Wistar rats were treated as follows: group 1 (G1 had the colon denervated with 0.3 mL 1.5 mM benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium (benzalkonium chloride, BAC; G2 received a single ip injection of 125 mg/kg DMH; G3 was treated with BAC + the same dose and route of DMH. A control group (Sham, N = 32 did not receive any treatment. Each group was subdivided into four groups according to the sacrifice time (1, 2, 6, and 12 weeks after DMH. Crypt fission index, ß-catenin accumulated crypts, aberrant crypt foci, and cell proliferation were evaluated and analyzed by ANOVA and the Student t-test. G3 animals presented a small number of aberrant crypt foci and low crypt fission index compared to G2 animals after 2 and 12 weeks, respectively. From the second week on, the index of ß-catenin crypt in G3 animals increased slower than in G2 animals. From the 12th week on, G2 animals presented a significant increase in cell proliferation when compared to the other groups. Colonic denervation plays an anticarcinogenic role from early stages of colon cancer development. This finding can be of importance for the study of the role of the enteric nervous system in the carcinogenic process.

  12. Stellar evolution in the outer Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczerba, Ryszard; Siódmiak, Natasza; Leśniewska, Aleksandra; Karska, Agata; Sewiło, Marta

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the distribution of different classes of spectroscopically identified sources and theoretical models in the color-color diagrams (CCDs) combining the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) data to develop a method to classify Outer Galaxy sources detected with the Spitzer Space Telescope (hereafter Spitzer) SMOG survey in the IRAC 3.68.0 µm and MIPS 24 µm bands. We supplement the Spitzer data with the data from other satellite and ground-based surveys. The main goal of our study is to discover and characterize the population of intermediate- and low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Outer Galaxy and use it to study star formation in a significantly different environment than the Galaxy inside the solar circle. Since the YSOs can be confused with evolved stars in the MIR, these classes of objects need to be carefully separated. Here we present the initial results of our analysis using the Ks-[8.0] vs. Ks-[24] CCD as an example. The evolved stars separated from YSOs in the YSO selection process will be investigated in detail in the follow-up study.

  13. Stellar evolution in the outer Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Szczerba, Ryszard; Leśniewska, Aleksandra; Karska, Agata; Sewiło, Marta

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the distribution of different classes of spectroscopically identified sources and theoretical models in the color-color diagrams (CCDs) combining the near-infrared (NIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) data to develop a method to classify Outer Galaxy sources detected with the Spitzer Space Telescope (hereafter Spitzer) SMOG survey in the IRAC 3.6 and 8.0 micrometer and MIPS 24 micrometer bands. We supplement the Spitzer data with the NIR data from the 2MASS and UKIDSS (JHKs) surveys, as well as with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) at 12 and 22 micrometers and AKARI (9 and 18 micrometers) MIR surveys. The main goal of our study is to discover and characterise the population of intermediate- and low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Outer Galaxy and use it to study star formation in a significantly different environment than the Galaxy inside the solar circle. Since the YSOs can be confused with evolved stars in the MIR, these classes of objects need to be carefully separated. Here ...

  14. Cosmics in the LHCb Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider studies the decay of B mesons to test the description of CP violation in the Standard Model and to search for new physics. The decay $B_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ has been identified as very promising in the search for new physics. An excellent invariant mass resolution is required to suppress backgrounds to this decay. This in turn requires a momentum resolution of dp/p = 0.4%. The Outer Tracker is part of the LHCb tracking system and has been commissioned with cosmic muons. The noise in the Outer Tracker is shown to be less than 0.05%. To use drift time information in the reconstruction of cosmic tracks, the event time must be known. Four methods to obtain the event time are studied and compared. It is shown that the event time can be obtained with a resolution better than 2.6 ns. Using drift time information, tracks are reconstructed with a resolution of 344 $\\mu$m. Knowledge of the event time enables the calibration of electronic time offsets and the r(t)– relati...

  15. The role of subscapularis muscle denervation in the pathogenesis of shoulder internal rotation contracture after neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a study in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Vasco V; Casaccia, Marcelo; Fernandez-Martin, Alejandra; Marotta, Mario; Fontecha, Cesar G; Haddad, Sleiman; Knörr, Jorge; Soldado, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    We assessed the role of subscapularis muscle denervation in the development of shoulder internal rotation contracture in neonatal brachial plexus injury. Seventeen newborn rats underwent selective denervation of the subscapular muscle. The rats were evaluated at weekly intervals to measure passive shoulder external rotation. After 4 weeks, the animals were euthanized. The subscapularis thickness was measured using 7.2T MRI axial images. The subscapularis muscle was then studied grossly, and its mass was registered. The fiber area and the area of fibrosis were measured using collagen-I inmunostained muscle sections. Significant progressive decrease in passive shoulder external rotation was noted with a mean loss of 58° at four weeks. A significant decrease in thickness and mass of the subscapularis muscles in the involved shoulders was also found with a mean loss of 69%. Subscapularis muscle fiber size decreased significantly, while the area of fibrosis remained unchanged. Our study shows that subscapularis denervation, per se, could explain shoulder contracture after neonatal brachial plexus injury, though its relevance compared to other pathogenic factors needs further investigation. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effects of denervation on the sensitizing effect to noradrenaline induced by morphine in the vas deferens of mice treated chronically with morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, E; Tamayo, L; Gaete, S; Juica, S

    1982-08-01

    The acute administration of morphine to the isolated vas deferens from mice chronically exposed to this analgesic, induced a facilitatory effect on the responses of the muscle to exogenous noradrenaline. It has been suggested that this sensitizing property of morphine might reflect a dependence-like state of the vas deferens. In the present paper, the capability of met- and leu-enkephalin to substitute for morphine was studied, as well as the influence of innervation on the apparent dependence state. The contractile responses to noradrenaline and to acetylcholine were increased after the administration of morphine to the bath containing a denervated vas deferences, prepared from chronically morphinized mice. Morphine administration facilitated noradrenaline- but not acetylcholine-induced contractile effects in vas deferens isolated from mice which had been chronically treated with either morphine or morphine plus guanethidine. The presence of met- or leu-enkephalin in the isolated vas deferens from chronically morphinized mice (either intact, denervated or treated with guanethidine) failed to sensitize contractile responses to noradrenaline or acetylcholine. It is concluded that (a) the sensitizing effect induced by morphine in the vas deferens from mice chronically treated with morphine is specific for the adrenergic neurotransmitter; (b) the effect of morphine is not mimicked by opiate peptides; and (c) denervation of the vas deferens of mice treated chronically with morphine does not suppress the noradrenaline-sensitizing property of morphine.

  17. Can outer-to-outer diameter be used alone in diagnosing appendicitis on 128-slice MDCT?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jamal; Yaqoob; Muhammad; Idris; Muhammad; Shahbaz; Alam; Nazia; Kashif

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the frequency of visualization, position and diameter of normal appendix on 128-slice multidetector computed tomography(MDCT) in adult population.METHODS: Retrospective cross sectional study conducted at Radiology Department, Dallah Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from March 2013 to October 2013. Non-enhanced computed tomography scans of abdomen and pelvis of 98 patients presenting with hematuria(not associated with abdominal pain, fever or colonic disease) were reviewed by two radiologists, blinded to patient history. The study group included 55 females and 43 males with overall mean age of 54.7 years(range 21 to 94 years). The coronal reformatted images were reviewed in addition to the axial images. The frequency of visualization of appendix was recorded with assessment of position, diameter and luminal contents.RESULTS: The appendix was recorded as definitely visualized in 99% of patients and mean outer-to-outer diameter of the appendix was 5.6 ± 1.3 mm(range 3.0-11.0 mm).CONCLUSION: MDCT with its multiplanar reformation display is extremely useful for visualization of normal appendix. The normal appendix is very variable in its position and diameter. In the absence of other signs, the diagnosis of acute appendix should not be made solely on outer-to-outer appendiceal diameter.

  18. Outer Planet Assessment Group (OPAG) Recommended Exploration Strategy for the Outer Planets 2013-2022

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, William B.; Steering Committee, Opag; Planets Community, Outer

    2010-05-01

    The Outer Solar System provides critical clues to how solar systems form and evolve, how planetary systems become habitable, and how life has evolved in our solar system. NASA's Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG) was established to identify scientific priorities and pathways for Outer Solar System exploration. Fundamental new discoveries are best made with a mixture of mission sizes that includes large (flagship) missions, and medium-sized and smaller-sized (as practical) missions, along with vigorous support for basic research, data analysis, and technology development — a balanced strategy most efficiently implemented as an Outer Planets Exploration Program. Missions to the Outer Solar System are major undertakings, requiring large and expensive launch vehicles, long mission durations, highly reliable (frequently radiation hard) and autonomous spacecraft, and radioisotope power sources in most cases. OPAG has recommended to the US National Research Council Planetary Science Decadal Survey to explore the possibilities for ‘small flagship' class missions to be considered, providing a greater range of choice and capabilities in the mix to balance program size and science return. With the Galileo mission concluded, the Cassini equinox mission in progress, and Juno in development, OPAG has strongly endorsed the competitive selection by NASA of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) as the next Outer Planets Flagship and as part of the Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) with ESA, a collaboration that includes a Ganymede orbiter and an increased focus on Jupiter science; OPAG has strongly recommended support of JEO and EJSM in the Decadal Survey. In addition, OPAG has strongly endorsed approval by NASA of the Cassini Solstice Mission, including the Juno-like end-of-mission scenario, given the likely phenomenal return on investment. OPAG also advocates the need for a focused technology program for the next Outer Planet Flagship Mission after EJSM, in order to be ready

  19. In Outer Space without a Space Suit?

    CERN Document Server

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The author proposes and investigates his old idea - a living human in space without the encumbrance of a complex space suit. Only in this condition can biological humanity seriously attempt to colonize space because all planets of Solar system (except the Earth) do not have suitable atmospheres. Aside from the issue of temperature, a suitable partial pressure of oxygen is lacking. In this case the main problem is how to satiate human blood with oxygen and delete carbonic acid gas (carbon dioxide). The proposed system would enable a person to function in outer space without a space suit and, for a long time, without food. That is useful also in the Earth for sustaining working men in an otherwise deadly atmosphere laden with lethal particulates (in case of nuclear, chemical or biological war), in underground confined spaces without fresh air, under water or a top high mountains above a height that can sustain respiration.

  20. Radiation hardness of the LHCb Outer Tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eijk, D. van, E-mail: dveijk@nikhef.nl [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bachmann, S. [Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Bauer, Th. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Faerber, Ch.; Bien, A. [Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Coco, V. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Deckenhoff, M. [Technische Universitaet Dortmund (Germany); Dettori, F. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ekelhof, R. [Technische Universitaet Dortmund (Germany); Gersabeck, E. [Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Karbach, T.M. [Technische Universitaet Dortmund (Germany); Koopman, R.; Kozlinskiy, A. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Langenbruch, Ch.; Linn, Ch. [Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Merk, M. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Meissner, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Morawski, P. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Pellegrino, A. [Nikhef, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Serra, N. [Physik-Institut, Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); and others

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents results on the radiation hardness of the LHCb Outer Tracker (OT) during LHC operation in 2010 and 2011. Modules of the OT have shown to suffer from ageing effects that lead to gain loss, after irradiation in the laboratory. Under irradiation at moderate intensities an insulating layer is formed on the anode wire of the OT straw cells. This ageing effect is caused by contamination of the counting gas due to outgassing of the glue used in the construction of the OT modules. Two methods to monitor gain stability in the OT are presented: module scans with radioactive sources and the study of hit efficiency as a function of amplifier threshold. No gain loss is observed after receiving 1.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity corresponding to an integrated charge of 0.055 C/cm in the hottest spot of the detector.

  1. Dust Measurements in the Outer Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Grün, E; Landgraf, M; Grün, Eberhard; Krüger, Harald; Landgraf, Markus

    1999-01-01

    Dust measurements in the outer solar system are reviewed. Only the plasma wave instrument on board Voyagers 1 and 2 recorded impacts in the Edgeworth-Kuiper belt (EKB). Pioneers 10 and 11 measured a constant dust flux of 10-micron-sized particles out to 20 AU. Dust detectors on board Ulysses and Galileo uniquely identified micron-sized interstellar grains passing through the planetary system. Impacts of interstellar dust grains onto big EKB objects generate at least about a ton per second of micron-sized secondaries that are dispersed by Poynting-Robertson effect and Lorentz force. We conclude that impacts of interstellar particles are also responsible for the loss of dust grains at the inner edge of the EKB. While new dust measurements in the EKB are in an early planning stage, several missions (Cassini and STARDUST) are en route to analyze interstellar dust in much more detail.

  2. Radiation hardness of the LHCb Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    van Eijk, D; Bauer, T; Färber, C; Bien, A; Coco, V; Deckenhoff, M; Dettori, F; Ekelhof, R; Gersabeck, E; Karbach, T M; Koopman, R; Kozlinskiy, A; Langenbruch, C; Linn, C; Merk, M; Meissner, M; Morawski, P; Pellegrino, A; Serra, N; Seyfert, P; Spaan, B; Swientek, S; Storaci, B; Tuning, N; Szczekowski, M; Uwer, U; Visser, E; Wiedner, D; Witek, M

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results on the radiation hardness of the LHCb Outer Tracker (OT) during LHC operation in 2010 and 2011. Modules of the OT have shown to suffer from ageing effects that lead to gain loss, after irradiation in the laboratory. Under irradiation at moderate intensities an insulating layer is formed on the anode wire of the OT straw cells. This ageing effect is caused by contamination of the counting gas due to outgassing of the glue used in the construction of the OT modules. Two methods to monitor gain stability in the OT are presented: module scans with radioactive sources and the study of hit efficiency as a function of amplifier threshold. No gain loss is observed after receiving 1.3 fb−1 of integrated luminosity corresponding to an integrated charge of 0.055 C/cm in the hottest spot of the detector.

  3. Recurrent Neural Network for Computing Outer Inverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Živković, Ivan S; Stanimirović, Predrag S; Wei, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Two linear recurrent neural networks for generating outer inverses with prescribed range and null space are defined. Each of the proposed recurrent neural networks is based on the matrix-valued differential equation, a generalization of dynamic equations proposed earlier for the nonsingular matrix inversion, the Moore-Penrose inversion, as well as the Drazin inversion, under the condition of zero initial state. The application of the first approach is conditioned by the properties of the spectrum of a certain matrix; the second approach eliminates this drawback, though at the cost of increasing the number of matrix operations. The cases corresponding to the most common generalized inverses are defined. The conditions that ensure stability of the proposed neural network are presented. Illustrative examples present the results of numerical simulations.

  4. Nuclear Electric Propulsion for Outer Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Today we know of 66 moons in our very own Solar System, and many of these have atmospheres and oceans. In addition, the Hubble (optical) Space Telescope has helped us to discover a total of 100 extra-solar planets, i.e., planets going around other suns, including several solar systems. The Chandra (X-ray) Space Telescope has helped us to discover 33 Black Holes. There are some extremely fascinating things out there in our Universe to explore. In order to travel greater distances into our Universe, and to reach planetary bodies in our Solar System in much less time, new and innovative space propulsion systems must be developed. To this end NASA has created the Prometheus Program. When one considers space missions to the outer edges of our Solar System and far beyond, our Sun cannot be relied on to produce the required spacecraft (s/c) power. Solar energy diminishes as the square of the distance from the Sun. At Mars it is only 43% of that at Earth. At Jupiter, it falls off to only 3.6% of Earth's. By the time we get out to Pluto, solar energy is only .066% what it is on Earth. Therefore, beyond the orbit of Mars, it is not practical to depend on solar power for a s/c. However, the farther out we go the more power we need to heat the s/c and to transmit data back to Earth over the long distances. On Earth, knowledge is power. In the outer Solar System, power is knowledge. It is important that the public be made aware of the tremendous space benefits offered by Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) and the minimal risk it poses to our environment. This paper presents an overview of the reasons for NEP systems, along with their basic components including the reactor, power conversion units (both static and dynamic), electric thrusters, and the launch safety of the NEP system.

  5. Multiscale entropy analysis of heart rate variability in heart failure, hypertensive, and sinoaortic-denervated rats: classical and refined approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luiz Eduardo Virgilio; Lataro, Renata Maria; Castania, Jaci Airton; da Silva, Carlos Alberto Aguiar; Valencia, Jose Fernando; Murta, Luiz Otavio; Salgado, Helio Cesar; Fazan, Rubens; Porta, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) by nonlinear methods has been gaining increasing interest due to their ability to quantify the complexity of cardiovascular regulation. In this study, multiscale entropy (MSE) and refined MSE (RMSE) were applied to track the complexity of HRV as a function of time scale in three pathological conscious animal models: rats with heart failure (HF), spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), and rats with sinoaortic denervation (SAD). Results showed that HF did not change HRV complexity, although there was a tendency to decrease the entropy in HF animals. On the other hand, SHR group was characterized by reduced complexity at long time scales, whereas SAD animals exhibited a smaller short- and long-term irregularity. We propose that short time scales (1 to 4), accounting for fast oscillations, are more related to vagal and respiratory control, whereas long time scales (5 to 20), accounting for slow oscillations, are more related to sympathetic control. The increased sympathetic modulation is probably the main reason for the lower entropy observed at high scales for both SHR and SAD groups, acting as a negative factor for the cardiovascular complexity. This study highlights the contribution of the multiscale complexity analysis of HRV for understanding the physiological mechanisms involved in cardiovascular regulation.

  6. Striatal Neurons Expressing D1 and D2 Receptors are Morphologically Distinct and Differently Affected by Dopamine Denervation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, D; Petryszyn, S; Sanchez, M G; Bories, C; Beaulieu, J M; De Koninck, Y; Parent, A; Parent, M

    2017-01-27

    The loss of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease induces a reduction in the number of dendritic spines on medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum expressing D1 or D2 dopamine receptor. Consequences on MSNs expressing both receptors (D1/D2 MSNs) are currently unknown. We looked for changes induced by dopamine denervation in the density, regional distribution and morphological features of D1/D2 MSNs, by comparing 6-OHDA-lesioned double BAC transgenic mice (Drd1a-tdTomato/Drd2-EGFP) to sham-lesioned animals. D1/D2 MSNs are uniformly distributed throughout the dorsal striatum (1.9% of MSNs). In contrast, they are heterogeneously distributed and more numerous in the ventral striatum (14.6% in the shell and 7.3% in the core). Compared to D1 and D2 MSNs, D1/D2 MSNs are endowed with a smaller cell body and a less profusely arborized dendritic tree with less dendritic spines. The dendritic spine density of D1/D2 MSNs, but also of D1 and D2 MSNs, is significantly reduced in 6-OHDA-lesioned mice. In contrast to D1 and D2 MSNs, the extent of dendritic arborization of D1/D2 MSNs appears unaltered in 6-OHDA-lesioned mice. Our data indicate that D1/D2 MSNs in the mouse striatum form a distinct neuronal population that is affected differently by dopamine deafferentation that characterizes Parkinson's disease.

  7. Magnitude of blood pressure reduction in the placebo arms of modern hypertension trials: implications for trials of renal denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hitesh C; Hayward, Carl; Ozdemir, Baris Ata; Rosen, Stuart D; Krum, Henry; Lyon, Alexander R; Francis, Darrel P; di Mario, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    Early phase studies of novel interventions for hypertension, such as renal sympathetic denervation, are sometimes single-armed (uncontrolled). We explored the wisdom of this by quantifying the blood pressure fall in the placebo arms of contemporary trials of hypertension. We searched Medline up to June 2014 and identified blinded, randomized trials of hypertension therapy in which the control arm received placebo medication or a sham (placebo) procedure. For nonresistant hypertension, we have identified all such trials of drugs licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration since 2000 (5 drugs). This US Food and Drug Administration-related restriction was not applied to resistant hypertension trials. This produced 7451 patients, who were allocated to a blinded control from 52 trials of nonresistant hypertension and 694 patients from 8 trials of resistant hypertension (3 drugs and 2 interventions). Systolic blood pressure fell by 5.92 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 5.14-6.71; Pplacebo) illustrates that efficacy explorations of novel therapies for hypertension, once safety is established, should be performed with a randomized, appropriately controlled, and blinded design.

  8. The effect of renal denervation on arterial stiffness, central blood pressure and heart rate variability in treatment resistant essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Christian Daugaard; Mathiassen, Ole Norling; Vase, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate, whether renal denervation (RDN) improves arterial stiffness, central blood pressure (C-BP) and heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with treatment resistant hypertension. METHODS: ReSET was a randomized, sham-controlled, double-blinded trial (NCT01459900). RDN...... in this substudy. The groups were similar at baseline (SHAM/RDN): n = 27/n = 26; 78/65% males; age 59 ± 9/54 ± 8 years (mean ± SD); systolic brachial BP 158 ± 18/154 ± 17 mmHg; systolic 24-hour ambulatory BP 153 ± 14/151 ± 13 mmHg. Changes in PWV (0.1 ± 1.9 (SHAM) vs. -0.6 ± 1.3 (RDN) m/s), systolic C-BP (-2 ± 17...... (SHAM) vs. -8 ± 16 (RDN) mmHg), diastolic C-BP (-2 ± 9 (SHAM) vs. -5 ± 9 (RDN) mmHg), and augmentation index (0.7 ± 7.0 (SHAM) vs. 1.0 ± 7.4 (RDN) %) were not significantly different after six months. Changes in HRV-parameters were also not significantly different. Baseline HRV or PWV did not predict BP...

  9. Effects of renal denervation on vascular remodelling in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction: A randomised control trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Carl; Keegan, Jennifer; Gatehouse, Peter D; Rajani, Ronak; Khattar, Rajdeep S; Mohiaddin, Raad H; Rosen, Stuart D; Lyon, Alexander R; di Mario, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of renal denervation (RDT) on micro- and macro-vascular function in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Design A prospective, randomised, open-controlled trial with blinded end-point analysis. Setting A single-centre London teaching hospital. Participants Twenty-five patients with HFpEF who were recruited into the RDT-PEF trial. Main outcome measures Macro-vascular: 24-h ambulatory pulse pressure, aorta distensibilty (from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR), aorta pulse wave velocity (CMR), augmentation index (peripheral tonometry) and renal artery blood flow indices (renal MR). Micro-vascular: endothelial function (peripheral tonometry) and urine microalbuminuria. Results At baseline, 15 patients were normotensive, 9 were hypertensive and 1 was hypotensive. RDT did not lower any of the blood pressure indices. Though there was evidence of abnormal vascular function at rest, RDT did not affect these at 3 or 12 months follow-up. Conclusions RDT did not improve markers of macro- and micro-vascular function. PMID:28228942

  10. Phasic-like stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle augments striatal gene expression despite methamphetamine-induced partial dopamine denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Christopher D; Pastuzyn, Elissa D; Barker-Haliski, Melissa L; Garris, Paul A; Keefe, Kristen A

    2013-05-01

    Methamphetamine-induced partial dopamine depletions are associated with impaired basal ganglia function, including decreased preprotachykinin mRNA expression and impaired transcriptional activation of activity-regulated, cytoskeleton-associated (Arc) gene in striatum. Recent work implicates deficits in phasic dopamine signaling as a potential mechanism linking methamphetamine-induced dopamine loss to impaired basal ganglia function. This study thus sought to establish a causal link between phasic dopamine transmission and altered basal ganglia function by determining whether the deficits in striatal neuron gene expression could be restored by increasing phasic dopamine release. Three weeks after pretreatment with saline or a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine, rats underwent phasic- or tonic-like stimulation of ascending dopamine neurons. Striatal gene expression was examined using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Phasic-like, but not tonic-like, stimulation induced immediate-early genes Arc and zif268 in both groups, despite the partial striatal dopamine denervation in methamphetamine-pretreated rats, with the Arc expression occurring in presumed striatonigral efferent neurons. Phasic-like stimulation also restored preprotachykinin mRNA expression. These results suggest that disruption of phasic dopamine signaling likely underlies methamphetamine-induced impairments in basal ganglia function, and that restoring phasic dopamine signaling may be a viable approach to manage long-term consequences of methamphetamine-induced dopamine loss on basal ganglia functions.

  11. Greater hypertrophy in right than left ventricles is associated with pulmonary vasculopathy in sinoaortic-denervated Wistar-Kyoto rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao CY; Cai GJ; Tao X; Xie HH; Su DF

    2005-01-01

    1. Biventricular hypertrophy has been described in a high blood pressure variability (BPV) model of sinoaortic-denervated (SAD) rats without systemic hypertension. To explore the possible involvement of the lung in SAD-induced right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), we examined lung morphology, in addition to systemic haemodynamics and ventricle morphology, in Wistar-Kyoto rats 32 weeks after SAD. 2. In Wistar-Kyoto rats 32 weeks after SAD, there existed a substantial elevation in BPV, with no change in the average level of arterial pressure. Biventricular hypertrophy following SAD was characterized by a greater hypertrophy in right than left ventricles; both absolute and normalized right ventricular weights were significantly increased by 22 and 27%, respectively, and only normalized left ventricular weight was significantly increased by 12%. No infarcts were found in any ventricles examined. 3. In the lung, the most prominent change following SAD was pulmonary vasculopathy, including wall thickening, perivascular fibrosis and cell infiltration. In pulmonary arteries with an internal diameter of 70-130 microm, the external diameter, wall thickness and wall thickness to internal diameter ratio were increased in SAD compared with control rats. 4. There was no correlation between right and left ventricular weights. In contrast with BPV-correlated left ventricular weight, right ventricular weight was correlated with the wall thickness of the pulmonary artery, but not with BPV. 5. These findings suggest that greater RVH following SAD is associated with pulmonary vasculopathy, but is not secondary to the left ventricular problems or high BPV.

  12. Golgi fragmentation precedes neuromuscular denervation and is associated with endosome abnormalities in SOD1-ALS mouse motor neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Fragmentation of stacked cisterns of the Golgi apparatus into dispersed smaller elements is a feature associated with degeneration of neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and some other neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role of Golgi fragmentation in motor neuron degeneration is not well understood. Results Here we use a SOD1-ALS mouse model (low-copy Gurney G93A-SOD1 mouse) to show that motor neurons with Golgi fragmentation are retrogradely labeled by intramuscularly injected CTB (beta subunit of cholera toxin), indicating that Golgi fragmentation precedes neuromuscular denervation and axon retraction. We further show that Golgi fragmentation may occur in the absence of and precede two other pathological markers, i.e. somatodendritic SOD1 inclusions, and the induction of ATF3 expression. In addition, we show that Golgi fragmentation is associated with an altered dendritic organization of the Golgi apparatus, does not depend on intact apoptotic machinery, and is facilitated in transgenic mice with impaired retrograde dynein-dependent transport (BICD2-N mice). A connection to altered dynein-dependent transport also is suggested by reduced expression of endosomal markers in neurons with Golgi fragmentation, which also occurs in neurons with impaired dynein function. Conclusions Together the data indicate that Golgi fragmentation is a very early event in the pathological cascade in ALS that is associated with altered organization of intracellular trafficking. PMID:24708899

  13. Review of the outer scale of the atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziad, Aziz

    2016-07-01

    Outer scale is a relevant parameter for the experimental performance evaluation of large telescopes. Different techniques have been used for the outer scale estimation. In situ measurements with radiosounding balloons have given very small values of outer scale. This latter has also been estimated directly at the ground level from the wavefront analysis with High Angular Resolution (HAR) techniques using interferometric or Shack-Hartmann or more generally AO systems data. Dedicated instruments have been also developed for the outer scale monitoring such as the Generalized Seeing Monitor (GSM) and the Monitor of Outer Scale Profile (MOSP). The measured values of outer scale from HAR techniques, GSM and MOSP are somewhat coherent and are larger than the in situ results. The main explanation of this difference comes from the definition of the outer scale itself. This paper aims to give a review in a non-exhaustive way of different techniques and instruments for the measurement of the outer scale. Comparisons of outer scale measurements will be discussed in the light of the different definitions of this parameter, the associated observable quantities and the atmospheric turbulence model as well.

  14. SUPERMAN attenuates positive INNER NO OUTER autoregulation to maintain polar development of Arabidopsis ovule outer integuments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, Robert J; Kotow, Louren M; Gasser, Charles S

    2002-09-01

    The outer integument of Arabidopsis ovules exhibits marked polarity in its development, growing extensively from the abaxial side, but only to a very limited extent from the adaxial side of the ovule. Mutations in two genes affect this asymmetric growth. In strong inner no outer (ino) mutants outer integument growth is eliminated, whereas in superman (sup) mutants integument growth on the adaxial side is nearly equal to wild-type growth on the abaxial side. Through complementation and reporter gene analysis, a region of INO 5'-flanking sequences was identified that contains sufficient information for appropriate expression of INO. Using this INO promoter (P-INO) we show that INO acts as a positive regulator of transcription from P-INO, but is not sufficient for de novo initiation of transcription in other plant parts. Protein fusions demonstrate nuclear localization of INO, consistent with a proposed role as a transcription factor for this member of the YABBY protein family. Through its ability to inhibit expression of the endogenous INO gene and transgenes driven by P-INO, SUP is shown to be a negative regulator of INO transcription. Substitution of another YABBY protein coding region (CRABS CLAW) for INO overcomes this negative regulation, indicating that SUP suppresses INO transcription through attenuation of the INO positive autoregulatory loop.

  15. Spitzer's mid-infrared view on an outer Galaxy Infrared Dark Cloud candidate toward NGC 7538

    CERN Document Server

    Frieswijk, W F; Shipman, R F; Teyssier, D; Carey, S J; Tielens, A G G M

    2008-01-01

    Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs) represent the earliest observed stages of clustered star formation, characterized by large column densities of cold and dense molecular material observed in silhouette against a bright background of mid-IR emission. Up to now, IRDCs were predominantly known toward the inner Galaxy where background infrared emission levels are high. We present Spitzer observations with the Infrared Camera Array toward object G111.80+0.58 (G111) in the outer Galactic Plane, located at a distance of ~3 kpc from us and ~10 kpc from the Galactic center. Earlier results show that G111 is a massive, cold molecular clump very similar to IRDCs. The mid-IR Spitzer observations unambiguously detect object G111 in absorption. We have identified for the first time an IRDC in the outer Galaxy, which confirms the suggestion that cluster-forming clumps are present throughout the Galactic Plane. However, against a low mid-IR back ground such as the outer Galaxy it takes some effort to find them.

  16. A LAMP-based schematic prototype instrument for detection of microorganisms in human outer space activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongfei; Liu, Zhiheng; Li, Junxiong; Zhu, Baoli

    One of the main tasks of human outer space exploration is to detect signs of life. Based on meteoritic evidence, common ancestry hypothesis has been posed. Therefore, searching for the fundamental molecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) that constitute life as we know on Earth is feasible and now the typical approach. To achieve this goal, portable, robust, and highly sensitive instrument is also needed. In this study, based on Loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) technique that targets life information storage molecular, DNA, we designed a schematic prototype instrument for microorganism detection. First, we designed LAMP primers used for amplification of DNA markers of Bacteria, Archaea, and Fungus; then, we optimized the LAMP reaction system for space using; and finally, we designed a prototype instrument and operating software system that are compatible with the LAMP reaction system. The results of simulation experiments showed that our instrument performed well for detecting representative microorganisms and the device can achieve semi-automatization. The detection process, from sample preparation to signal visualization, was completed in 1.5 hour. Our study provides a new method and corresponding device for detection of DNA molecular, which has great potential for applications in outer space exploration. Besides, the instrument we designed can also been used for monitoring changes of terrestrial microorganisms in outer space, for example in aircraft.

  17. Radio seismology of the outer solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoliy; Panchenko, Mykhaylo; Konovalenko, Alexander; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Rucker, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    Observed oscillations of coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines have been successfully used to estimate plasma parameters in the inner corona ( 0.2R0). We used the large Ukrainian radio telescope URAN-2 to observe type IV radio bursts at the frequency range of 8-32 MHz during the time interval of 09:50-12:30 UT on April 14, 2011. The burst was connected to C2.3 flare, which occurred in AR 11190 during 09:38-09:49 UT. The dynamic spectrum of radio emission shows clear quasi-periodic variations in the emission intensity at almost all frequencies. Wavelet analysis at four different frequencies (29 MHz, 25 MHz, 22 MHz, and 14 MHz) shows the quasi-periodic variation of emission intensity with periods of ~ 34 min and ~ 23 min. The periodic variations can be explained by the first and second harmonics of vertical kink oscillation of transequatorial coronal loops, which were excited by the same flare. The apex of transequatorial loops may reach up to 1.2 R0 altitude. We derive and solve the dispersion relation of trapped magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in a longitudinally inhomogeneous magnetic slab. The analysis shows that a thin (with width to length ratio of 0.1), dense (with the ratio of internal and external densities of ≥ 20) magnetic slab with weak longitudinal inhomogeneity may trap the observed oscillations. Seismologically estimated Alfvén speed inside the loop at the height of ~ 1 R0 is ~ 1000 km s-1. The magnetic field strength at this height is estimated as ~ 0.9 G. Extrapolation of magnetic field strength to the inner corona gives ~ 10 G at the height of 0.1 R0. Radio observations can be successfully used for the sounding of the outer solar corona, where EUV observations of coronal loops fail. Therefore, radio seismology of the outer solar corona is complementary to EUV seismology of the inner corona. The research leading to these results has received funding from the Austrian 'Fonds zur Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung' under

  18. Modelling turbulence in the outer heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macek, Wieslaw

    2016-07-01

    Turbulence is complex behaviour that is ubiquitous both in laboratory and astrophysical magnetized plasmas. Notwithstanding the progress in simulation of turbulence in various continuous media, its mechanism is still not sufficiently clear. Therefore, following the basic idea of Kolmogorov, some phenomenological models of scaling behaviour have been proposed, including fractal and multifractal modelling, that can reveal the intermittent character of turbulence. Based on wealth of data provided by deep spacecraft missions including Voyager 1 and 2, these models show that the turbulence in the entire heliosphere is intermittent and multifractal. Moreover, the degree of multifractality decreases with the heliocentric distance and is modulated by the phases of the solar cycles, also beyond the heliospheric termination shock, i. e. in the heliosheath. However, in the very local interstellar medium beyond the heliopause turbulence becomes rather weak and less intermittent, as shown by recent measurements from Voyager 1. This suggests that the heliosphere is immersed in a relatively quiet environment. Hence these studies of turbulence, especially at the heliospheric boundaries, demonstrate that the outer heliosphere provides an interesting possibility to look into turbulence in various media.

  19. Inner and outer horizons of time experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackermann, Jirí

    2007-05-01

    Human experience of temporal durations exhibits a multi-regional structure, with more or less distinct boundaries, or horizons, on the scale of physical duration. The inner horizons are imposed by perceptual thresholds for simultaneity (approximately equal to 3 ms) and temporal order (approximatly equal to 30 ms), and are determined by the dynamical properties of the neural substrate integrating sensory information. Related to the inner horizon of experienced time are perceptual or cognitive "moments." Comparative data on autokinetic times suggest that these moments may be relatively invariant (approximately equal to 10(2) ms) across a wide range of species. Extension of the "sensible present" (approximately equal to 3 s) defines an intermediate horizon, beyond which the generic experience of duration develops. The domain of immediate duration experience is delimited by the ultimate outer horizon at about = 10(2) s, as evidenced by analysis of duration reproduction experiments (reproducibility horizon), probably determined by relaxation times of "neural accumulators." Beyond these phenomenal horizons, time is merely cognitively (re)constructed, not actually experienced or "perceived," a fact that is frequently ignored by contemporary time perception research. The nyocentric organization of time experience shows an interesting analogy with the egocentric organization of space, suggesting that structures of subjective space and time are derived from active motion as a common experiential basis.

  20. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles and vaccine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates.

  1. BACTERIAL OUTER MEMBRANE VESICLES AND VACCINE APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo eAcevedo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of self meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA, serogroup W (dOMVW and serogroup X (dOMVX were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC, Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP, Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM and BCG (dOMVBCG. The immunogenicity of the OMV have been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice have shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-self neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates.

  2. The role of outer membrane in Serratia marcescens intrinsic resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, L; Ruiz, N; Leranoz, S; Viñas, M; Puig, M

    1997-09-01

    Three different porins from Serratia marcescens were described. They were named Omp1, Omp2 and Omp3 and their molecular weights were 42, 40 and 39 kDa respectively. Omp2 and Omp3 showed osmoregulation and thermoregulation in a similar way to OmpC and OmpF of Escherichia coli. Permeability coefficients of the outer membrane of this species were calculated following the Zimmermann and Rosselet method. P values were similar to those obtained in Escherichia coli, which suggests that the chromosomal beta-lactamase would play a major role in the resistance of Serratia marcescens to beta-lactam antibiotics. Both MIC values and permeabilities were modified by salycilates and acetylsalycilate. Synergism between the outer membrane and the beta-lactamase was also evaluated. When bacteria grew in the presence of a beta-lactam in the medium, the beta-lactamase accounted for most of the resistance.

  3. New tunes from Corti's organ: the outer hair cell boogie rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    2003-08-01

    The amplification of acoustic stimuli is a feature of hair cells that evolved early on in vertebrates. Though standard stereocilia mechanisms to promote such amplification may persist in the mammal, an additional mechanism evolved to enhance high frequency sensation. Only in mammals, a special cell type, the outer hair cell, arose that possesses a remarkably fast somatic mechanical response, which probably endows the passive cochlea with a boost in sensitivity by a factor of 100 (40dB), at least. Experiments conducted over the past few years have shed light on many aspects of outer hair cell electromotility, including the molecular identification of the motor, the effects of a knockout, and underlying mechanisms of action. A review of this remarkable progress is attempted.

  4. Outer Spiral Disks as Clues to Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Vlajić, Marija

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of outer spiral disks have given rise to an abundance of new results. We discuss the observational and theoretical advances that have spurred the interest in disk outskirts, as well as where we currently stand in terms of our understanding of outer disk structure, ages and metallicities.

  5. Loss of elongation factor P disrupts bacterial outer membrane integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, S Betty; Hersch, Steven J; Roy, Hervé;

    2012-01-01

    increased uptake of the hydrophobic dye 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN). Analysis of the membrane proteomes of wild-type and efp mutant Salmonella strains reveals few changes, including the prominent overexpression of a single porin, KdgM, in the efp mutant outer membrane. Removal of KdgM in the efp mutant...... overexpression of an outer membrane porin....

  6. Newborns' Face Recognition: Role of Inner and Outer Facial Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turati, Chiara; Macchi Cassia, Viola; Simion, Francesca; Leo, Irene

    2006-01-01

    Existing data indicate that newborns are able to recognize individual faces, but little is known about what perceptual cues drive this ability. The current study showed that either the inner or outer features of the face can act as sufficient cues for newborns' face recognition (Experiment 1), but the outer part of the face enjoys an advantage…

  7. Distinct pathways mediate the sorting of tail-anchored proteins to the plastid outer envelope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetinder K Dhanoa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tail-anchored (TA proteins are a distinct class of membrane proteins that are sorted post-translationally to various organelles and function in a number of important cellular processes, including redox reactions, vesicular trafficking and protein translocation. While the molecular targeting signals and pathways responsible for sorting TA proteins to their correct intracellular destinations in yeasts and mammals have begun to be characterized, relatively little is known about TA protein biogenesis in plant cells, especially for those sorted to the plastid outer envelope. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the biogenesis of three plastid TA proteins, including the 33-kDa and 34-kDa GTPases of the translocon at the outer envelope of chloroplasts (Toc33 and Toc34 and a novel 9-kDa protein of unknown function that we define here as an outer envelope TA protein (OEP9. Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that OEP9 utilizes a different sorting pathway than that used by Toc33 and Toc34. For instance, while all three TA proteins interact with the cytosolic OEP chaperone/receptor, AKR2A, the plastid targeting information within OEP9 is distinct from that within Toc33 and Toc34. Toc33 and Toc34 also appear to differ from OEP9 in that their insertion is dependent on themselves and the unique lipid composition of the plastid outer envelope. By contrast, the insertion of OEP9 into the plastid outer envelope occurs in a proteinaceous-dependent, but Toc33/34-independent manner and membrane lipids appear to serve primarily to facilitate normal thermodynamic integration of this TA protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, the results provide evidence in support of at least two sorting pathways for plastid TA outer envelope proteins and shed light on not only the complex diversity of pathways involved in the targeting and insertion of proteins into plastids, but also the molecular mechanisms that underlie

  8. Structural dynamics of HIV-1 envelope Gp120 outer domain with V3 loop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Yokoyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The net charge of the hypervariable V3 loop on the HIV-1 envelope gp120 outer domain plays a key role in modulating viral phenotype. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation remain poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By combining computational and experimental approaches, we examined how V3 net charge could influence the phenotype of the gp120 interaction surface. Molecular dynamics simulations of the identical gp120 outer domain, carrying a V3 loop with net charge of +3 or +7, showed that the V3 change alone could induce global changes in fluctuation and conformation of the loops involved in binding to CD4, coreceptor and antibodies. A neutralization study using the V3 recombinant HIV-1 infectious clones showed that the virus carrying the gp120 with +3 V3, but not with +7 V3, was resistant to neutralization by anti-CD4 binding site monoclonal antibodies. An information entropy study shows that otherwise variable surface of the gp120 outer domain, such as V3 and a region around the CD4 binding loop, are less heterogeneous in the gp120 subpopulation with +3 V3. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop acts as an electrostatic modulator that influences the global structure and diversity of the interaction surface of the gp120 outer domain. Our findings will provide a novel structural basis to understand how HIV-1 adjusts relative replication fitness by V3 mutations.

  9. OmpW of Caulobacter crescentus Functions as an Outer Membrane Channel for Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Roland; Jones, Michael D; Younas, Farhan; Maier, Elke; Modi, Niraj; Mentele, Reinhard; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Smit, John

    2015-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus is an oligotrophic bacterium that lives in dilute organic environments such as soil and freshwater. This bacterium represents an interesting model for cellular differentiation and regulation because daughter cells after division have different forms: one is motile while the other is non-motile and can adhere to surfaces. Interestingly, the known genome of C. crescentus does not contain genes predicted to code for outer membrane porins of the OmpF/C general diffusion type present in enteric bacteria or those coding for specific porins selective for classes of substrates. Instead, genes coding for 67 TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors have been identified, suggesting that active transport of specific nutrients may be the norm. Here, we report that high channel-forming activity was observed with crude outer membrane extracts of C. crescentus in lipid bilayer experiments, indicating that the outer membrane of C. crescentus contained an ion-permeable channel with a single-channel conductance of about 120 pS in 1M KCl. The channel-forming protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 20 kDa was purified to homogeneity. Partial protein sequencing of the protein indicated it was a member of the OmpW family of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria. This channel was not observed in reconstitution experiments with crude outer membrane extracts of an OmpW deficient C. crescentus mutant. Biophysical analysis of the C. crescentus OmpW suggested that it has features that are special for general diffusion porins of Gram-negative outer membranes because it was not a wide aqueous channel. Furthermore, OmpW of C. crescentus seems to be different to known OmpW porins and has a preference for ions, in particular cations. A putative model for OmpW of C. crescentus was built on the basis of the known 3D-structures of OmpW of Escherichia coli and OprG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using homology modeling. A comparison of the two known structures

  10. OmpW of Caulobacter crescentus Functions as an Outer Membrane Channel for Cations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Benz

    Full Text Available Caulobacter crescentus is an oligotrophic bacterium that lives in dilute organic environments such as soil and freshwater. This bacterium represents an interesting model for cellular differentiation and regulation because daughter cells after division have different forms: one is motile while the other is non-motile and can adhere to surfaces. Interestingly, the known genome of C. crescentus does not contain genes predicted to code for outer membrane porins of the OmpF/C general diffusion type present in enteric bacteria or those coding for specific porins selective for classes of substrates. Instead, genes coding for 67 TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors have been identified, suggesting that active transport of specific nutrients may be the norm. Here, we report that high channel-forming activity was observed with crude outer membrane extracts of C. crescentus in lipid bilayer experiments, indicating that the outer membrane of C. crescentus contained an ion-permeable channel with a single-channel conductance of about 120 pS in 1M KCl. The channel-forming protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 20 kDa was purified to homogeneity. Partial protein sequencing of the protein indicated it was a member of the OmpW family of outer membrane proteins from Gram-negative bacteria. This channel was not observed in reconstitution experiments with crude outer membrane extracts of an OmpW deficient C. crescentus mutant. Biophysical analysis of the C. crescentus OmpW suggested that it has features that are special for general diffusion porins of Gram-negative outer membranes because it was not a wide aqueous channel. Furthermore, OmpW of C. crescentus seems to be different to known OmpW porins and has a preference for ions, in particular cations. A putative model for OmpW of C. crescentus was built on the basis of the known 3D-structures of OmpW of Escherichia coli and OprG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using homology modeling. A comparison of the two

  11. The properties of the outer membrane localized Lipid A transporter LptD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haarmann, Raimund; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Stevanovic, Mara; Bredemeier, Rolf; Schleiff, Enrico, E-mail: schleiff@bio.uni-frankfurt.d [JWGU Frankfurt/Main, Cluster of Excellence Macromolecular Complexes, Center of Membrane Proteomics, Department of Biosciences, Molecular Cell Biology, Max-von-Laue Strasse 9, D-60439 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-11-17

    Gram-negative bacteria are surrounded by a cell wall including the outer membrane. The outer membrane is composed of two distinct monolayers where the outer layer contains lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with the non-phospholipid Lipid A as the core. The synthesis of Lipid A is initiated in the cytosol and thereby the molecule has to be transported across the inner and outer membranes. The {beta}-barrel lipopolysaccharide-assembly protein D (LptD) was discovered to be involved in the transfer of Lipid A into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. At present the molecular procedure of lipid transfer across the outer membrane remains unknown. Here we approached the functionality of the transfer system by an electrophysiological analysis of the outer membrane protein from Escherichia coli named ecLptD. In vitro the protein shows cation selectivity and has an estimated pore diameter of about 1.8 nm. Addition of Lipid A induces a transition of the open state to a sub-conductance state with two independent off-rates, which might suggest that LptD is able to bind and transport the molecule in vitro. To generalize our findings with respect to the Lipid A transport system of other Gram-negative bacteria we have explored the existence of the proteins involved in this pathway by bioinformatic means. We were able to identify the membrane-inserted components of the Lipid A transport system in all Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the periplasmic components appear to be species-specific. The LptD proteins of different bacteria are characterized by their periplasmic N-terminal domain and a C-terminal barrel region. The latter shows distinct sequence properties, particularly in LptD proteins of cyanobacteria, and this specific domain can be found in plant proteins as well. By electrophysiological experiments on LptD from Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 we are able to confirm the functional relation of anaLptD to Lipid A transport.

  12. Renal Denervation Normalizes Arterial Pressure With No Effect on Glucose Metabolism or Renal Inflammation in Obese Hypertensive Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asirvatham-Jeyaraj, Ninitha; Fiege, Jessica K; Han, Ruijun; Foss, Jason; Banek, Christopher T; Burbach, Brandon J; Razzoli, Maria; Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Shimizu, Yoji; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Osborn, John W

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension often occurs in concurrence with obesity and diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as metabolic syndrome. Renal denervation (RDNx) lowers arterial pressure (AP) and improves glucose metabolism in drug-resistant hypertensive patients with high body mass index. In addition, RDNx has been shown to reduce renal inflammation in the mouse model of angiotensin II hypertension. The present study tested the hypothesis that RDNx reduces AP and renal inflammation and improves glucose metabolism in obesity-induced hypertension. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were fed either a low-fat diet (10 kcal%) or a high-fat diet (45 kcal%) for 10 weeks. Body weight, food intake, fasting blood glucose, and glucose metabolism (glucose tolerance test) were measured. In a parallel study, radiotelemeters were implanted in mice for AP measurement. High fat-fed C57BL/6J mice exhibited an inflammatory and metabolic syndrome phenotype, including increased fat mass, increased AP, and hyperglycemia compared with low-fat diet mice. RDNx, but not Sham surgery, normalized AP in high-fat diet mice (115.8±1.5 mm Hg in sham versus 96.6±6.7 mm Hg in RDNx). RDNx had no significant effect on AP in low-fat diet mice. Also, RDNx had no significant effect on glucose metabolism or renal inflammation as measured by the number of CD8, CD4, and T helper cells or levels of inflammatory cytokines in the kidneys. These results indicate that although renal nerves play a role in obesity-induced hypertension, they do not contribute to impaired glucose metabolism or renal inflammation in this model.

  13. Blood pressure decrease in spontaneously hypertensive rats folowing renal denervation or dopamine β-hydroxylase inhibition with etamicastat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Nuno Miguel; Igreja, Bruno; Moura, Eduardo; Wright, Lyndon Christopher; Serrão, Maria Paula; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2015-09-01

    Overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system has an important role in the development and progression of arterial hypertension. Catheter-based renal nerve ablation for the treatment of drug-resistant hypertension has recently been developed. An alternative strategy for the modulation of sympathetic nerve function is to reduce the biosynthesis of noradrenaline (NA) by inhibiting dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH), the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of dopamine (DA) to NA in the sympathetic nerves. Renal denervation (RDN) surgery was performed in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) to evaluate the effect of RDN on the DA and NA levels and on blood pressure over a 28-day period. The selective peripheral DβH inhibitor etamicastat (30 mg kg (-1)day(-1)) was administered to another cohort of SHR. RDN and etamicastat treatment had no effect on the renal function, as assessed by measuring the water balance response, renal function and urinary electrolyte levels. RDN significantly decreased the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and the diastolic blood pressure (DBP). A gradual return of the SBP and the DBP to the high baseline levels was observed over time. Conversely, treatment with etamicastat resulted in a significant decrease in the SBP and the DBP at all time points. On the last day of the assessment, NA levels in renal tissue were significantly decreased in both RDN and etamicastat-treated groups. In contrast, the NA levels in the left ventricle were decreased only in the etamicastat-treated group. Thus, RDN produces transitory decreases in blood pressure, whereas prolonged downregulation of sympathetic drive with the DβH inhibitor etamicastat results in a sustained decrease in the SBP and the DBP.

  14. Renal Denervation Attenuates Multi-Organ Fibrosis and Improves Vascular Remodeling in Rats with Transverse Aortic Constriction Induced Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To investigate the effects of renal denervation (RDN on multi-organ fibrosis and vascular remodeling in cardiomyopathy. Methods: Thirty-six male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent transverse aortic constriction (TAC. Five weeks later, 28 surviving TAC rats were randomly assigned to three groups: (1 RDN, (2 Sham, (3 Carvedilol. Six male Sham TAC rats served as the Control. Ten weeks after TAC, samples were collected. Results: TAC rats showed an increased diastolic interventricular septal thickness at week 5. At 10 weeks, Masson staining showed that left ventricular and renal glomerular fibrosis were significantly reduced in RDN compared with Sham group. In comparison to Sham group, hepatic perivascular fibrosis was attenuated in both RDN and Carvedilol group, so were the media thickness and the media/lumen of aorta. The plasma levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP, Cystatin C (Cys-C, Alanine Transaminase, angiotensin II (Ang II, transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1, and malondialdehyde increased, and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD decreased in Sham but not in RDN group, compared with Control group. Both RDN and Carvedilol reduced the Cys-C and TGF-β1 levels, and restored T-SOD concentration, compared with Sham group. While only RDN lowered the plasma levels of BNP and Ang II. No significant effects of RDN on blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR were oberved. Conclusions: RDN can attenuate multi-organ fibrosis and improve vascular remodeling independent of BP and HR change in TAC-induced cardiomyopathy. These effects of RDN may be associated with the direct inhibition of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and oxidative stress.

  15. Nonuniform cardiac denervation observed by 11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine PET in 6-OHDA-treated monkeys.

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    Valerie Joers

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease presents nonmotor complications such as autonomic dysfunction that do not respond to traditional anti-parkinsonian therapies. The lack of established preclinical monkey models of Parkinson's disease with cardiac dysfunction hampers development and testing of new treatments to alleviate or prevent this feature. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of developing a model of cardiac dysautonomia in nonhuman primates and preclinical evaluations tools. Five rhesus monkeys received intravenous injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (total dose: 50 mg/kg. The animals were evaluated before and after with a battery of tests, including positron emission tomography with the norepinephrine analog (11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine. Imaging 1 week after neurotoxin treatment revealed nearly complete loss of specific radioligand uptake. Partial progressive recovery of cardiac uptake found between 1 and 10 weeks remained stable between 10 and 14 weeks. In all five animals, examination of the pattern of uptake (using Logan plot analysis to create distribution volume maps revealed a persistent region-specific significant loss in the inferior wall of the left ventricle at 10 (P<0.001 and 14 weeks (P<0.01 relative to the anterior wall. Blood levels of dopamine, norepinephrine (P<0.05, epinephrine, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (P<0.01 were notably decreased after 6-hydroxydopamine at all time points. These results demonstrate that systemic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine in nonhuman primates creates a nonuniform but reproducible pattern of cardiac denervation as well as a persistent loss of circulating catecholamines, supporting the use of this method to further develop a monkey model of cardiac dysautonomia.

  16. Renal denervation enhances GABA-ergic input into the PVN leading to blood pressure lowering in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Masaaki; Takesue, Ko; Hirooka, Yoshitaka

    2017-05-01

    Sympathoexcitation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) in the brain controls sympathetic outflow through γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic mechanisms. Renal denervation (RDN) exerts a long-term antihypertensive effect in hypertension with CKD; however, the effects of RDN on sympathetic nerve activity and GABA-ergic modulation in the PVN are not clear. We aimed to elucidate whether RDN modulates sympathetic outflow through GABA-ergic mechanisms in the PVN in hypertensive mice with CKD. In 5/6-nephrectomized male Institute of Cancer Research mice (Nx) at 4 weeks after nephrectomy, systolic blood pressure (SBP) was significantly increased, accompanied by sympathoexcitation. The Nx-mice underwent RDN or sham operation, and the mice were divided into three groups (Control, Nx-Sham, and Nx-RDN). At 2 weeks after RDN, SBP was significantly decreased and urinary sodium excretion was increased in Nx-RDN compared with Nx-Sham. Urinary norepinephrine excretion (uNE) levels did not differ significantly between Nx-RDN and Nx-Sham. At 6 weeks after RDN, SBP continued to decrease and uNE levels also decreased in Nx-RDN compared with Nx-Sham. Bicuculline microinjection into the PVN increased mean arterial pressure and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in all groups. The pressor responses and change in lumbar sympathetic nerve activity were significantly attenuated in Nx-Sham, but were enhanced in Nx-RDN at 6 weeks after RDN. The findings from the present study indicate that RDN has a prolonged antihypertensive effect and, at least in the late phase, decreases sympathetic nerve activity in association with enhanced GABA-ergic input into the PVN in mice with CKD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dietary Genistein Prevents Denervation-Induced Muscle Atrophy in Male Rodents via Effects on Estrogen Receptor-α.

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    Aoyama, Shinya; Jia, Huijuan; Nakazawa, Kyoko; Yamamura, Junki; Saito, Kenji; Kato, Hisanori

    2016-06-01

    Genistein has high estrogenic activity. Previous studies have shown beneficial effects of estrogen or hormone replacement therapy on muscle mass and muscle atrophy. We investigated the preventive effects and underlying mechanisms of genistein on muscle atrophy. In Expt. 1, male Wistar rats were fed a diet containing no genistein [control (CON)] or 0.05% genistein (GEN; wt:wt diet) for 24 d. On day 14, the sciatic nerve in the left hind leg was severed, and the right hind leg was sham-treated. In Expt. 2, male C57BL6J mice were subcutaneously administered a vehicle (Veh group) or the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780 (ICI group) via an osmotic pump for 27 d, and each group was subsequently fed CON or GEN diets from day 3 to day 27. Muscle atrophy was induced on day 17 as in Expt. 1. In Expt. 3, male C57BL6J mice were subcutaneously administered vehicle or a selective ER agonist-ER-α [4,4',4'-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol (PPT)] or ER-β [2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (DPN)]-or genistein (GEN-sc-i) via an osmotic pump for 13 d, and muscle atrophy was induced on day 3 as in Expt. 1. The ratio of denervated soleus muscle weight to sham-operated soleus muscle weight (d/s ratio) was used as the index of muscle atrophy. Expt. 1: The d/s ratio in the GEN group was 20% higher than that in the CON group (P muscle atrophy. ER-α was related to the preventive effect of genistein on muscle atrophy. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Pulmonary vein isolation alone and combined with renal sympathetic denervation in chronic kidney disease patients with refractory atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Márcio G; Chen, Shaojie; E Silva, Gustavo R; Paz, Luis M R; Kiuchi, Tetsuaki; de Paula Filho, Ary G; Souto, Gladyston L L

    2016-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) commonly occurs in association with chronic kidney disease (CKD), resulting in adverse outcomes. Combining pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) and renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) may reduce the recurrence of AF in patients with CKD and hypertension. We considered that RSD could reduce the recurrence of AF in patients with CKD by modulating sympathetic hyperactivity. Our goal was to compare the impact of PVI + RSD with that of PVI alone in patients with concurrent AF and CKD. This was a single-center, prospective, longitudinal, randomized, double-blind study. Forty-five patients with controlled hypertension, symptomatic paroxysmal AF and/or persistent AF, stage 2 or 3 CKD, and a dual-chamber pacemaker were enrolled from January 2014 to January 2015. We assessed the 30-second recurrence of AF recorded by the pacemaker, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurements, estimated glomerular filtration rate, albuminuria, echocardiographic parameters, and safety of RSD. No patient developed procedural or other complications. The ambulatory blood pressure measurements did not differ within the PVI + RSD group or between the PVI + RSD and PVI groups throughout the study. Significantly more patients in the PVI + RSD group than in the PVI group were free of AF at the 12-month follow-up evaluation. The PVI group had an unacceptable response to ablation with respect to changes in echocardiographic parameters, whereas these parameters improved in the PVI + RSD group. PVI + RSD were associated with a lower AF recurrence rate than PVI alone; it also improved renal function and some echocardiographic parameters. These encouraging data will serve as baseline information for further long-term studies on larger patient populations.

  19. The effect of renal denervation on kidney oxygenation as determined by BOLD MRI in patients with hypertension

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    Vink, E.E.; Boer, A.; Blankestijn, P.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Nephrology, P.O. Box 85500, GA, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verloop, W.L.; Voskuil, M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Spiering, W.; Leiner, T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Vascular Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vonken, E.; Hoogduin, J.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bots, M.L. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    Renal denervation (RDN) is a promising therapy for resistant hypertension. RDN is assumed to decrease sympathetic activity. Consequently, RDN can potentially increase renal oxygenation. Blood oxygen level-dependent MRI (BOLD-MRI) provides a non-invasive tool to determine renal oxygenation in humans. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of RDN on renal oxygenation as determined by BOLD-MRI. Patients with resistant hypertension or the inability to follow a stable drug regimen due to unacceptable side effects were included. BOLD-MRI was performed before and 12 months after RDN. Twenty-seven patients were imaged on 3 T and 19 on 1.5 T clinical MRI systems. Fifty-four patients were included, 46 patients (23 men, mean age 57 years) completed the study. Mean 24-h BP changed from 163(±20)/98(±14) mmHg to 154(±22)/92(±13) mmHg (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001). eGFR did not change after RDN [77(±18) vs. 79(±20) mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}; p = 0.13]. RDN did not affect renal oxygenation [1.5 T: cortical R2*: 12.5(±0.9) vs. 12.5(±0.9), p = 0.94; medullary R2*: 19.6(±1.7) vs. 19.3(1.4), p = 0.40; 3 T: cortical R2*: 18.1(±0.8) vs. 17.8(±1.2), p = 0.47; medullary R2*: 27.4(±1.9) vs. 26.7(±1.8), p = 0.19]. The current study shows that RDN does not lead to changes in renal oxygenation 1 year after RDN as determined by BOLD-MRI. (orig.)

  20. Simulation of the electrical field in equine larynx to optimize functional electrical stimulation in denervated musculus cricoarythenoideus dorsalis

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    Martin Reichel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of the electrical field is very important to activate muscle and nerve cells properly. One therapeutic method to treat Recurrent Laryngeal Neuropathy (RLN in horses can be performed by Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES. Current method to optimize the stimulation effect is to use implanted quadripolar electrodes to the musculus cricoarythenoideus dorsalis (CAD and testing electrode configuration until best possible optimum is reached. For better understanding and finding of maximum possible activation of CAD a simulation model of the actual entire setting is currently in development. Therefore the geometric model is built from CT-data of a dissected larynx containing the quadripolar electrodes as well as fiducials for later data registration. The geometric model is the basis for a finite difference method containing of voxels with corresponding electrical conductivity of the different types of tissue due to threshold segmentation of the CT-data. Model validation can be done by the measurement of the 3D electrical potential distribution of a larynx positioned in an electrolytic tray. Finally, measured and calculated results have to be compared as well as further investigated. Preliminary results show, that changes of electrode as well as conductivity configuration leads to significant different voltage distributions and can be well presented by equipotential lines superimposed CT-slices – a Matlab graphical user interface visualizes the results in freely selectable slices of the 3D geometry. Voltage distribution along theoretically estimated fiber paths could be calculated as well as visualized. For further calculation of nerve or denervated muscle fiber activation and its optimization, real fiber paths have to be defined and referenced to the potential- and the CT-data.

  1. Simulation of the electrical field in equine larynx to optimize functional electrical stimulation in denervated musculus cricoarythenoideus dorsalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Reichel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of the electrical field is very important to activate muscle and nerve cells properly. One therapeutic method to treat Recurrent Laryngeal Neuropathy (RLN in horses can be performed by Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES. Current method to optimize the stimulation effect is to use implanted quadripolar electrodes to the musculus cricoarythenoideus dorsalis (CAD and testing electrode configuration until best possible optimum is reached. For better understanding and finding of maximum possible activation of CAD a simulation model of the actual entire setting is currently in development. Therefore the geometric model is built from CT-data of a dissected larynx containing the quadripolar electrodes as well as fiducials for later data registration. The geometric model is the basis for a finite difference method containing of voxels with corresponding electrical conductivity of the different types of tissue due to threshold segmentation of the CT-data. Model validation can be done by the measurement of the 3D electrical potential distribution of a larynx positioned in an electrolytic tray. Finally, measured and calculated results have to be compared as well as further investigated. Preliminary results show, that changes of electrode as well as conductivity configuration leads to significant different voltage distributions and can be well presented by equipotential lines superimposed CT-slices – a Matlab graphical user interface visualizes the results in freely selectable slices of the 3D geometry. Voltage distribution along theoretically estimated fiber paths could be calculated as well as visualized. For further calculation of nerve or denervated muscle fiber activation and its optimization, real fiber paths have to be defined and referenced to the potential- and the CT-data.

  2. Role of Adding Spironolactone and Renal Denervation in True Resistant Hypertension: One-Year Outcomes of Randomized PRAGUE-15 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ján; Widimský, Petr; Waldauf, Petr; Lambert, Lukáš; Zelinka, Tomáš; Táborský, Miloš; Branny, Marian; Toušek, Petr; Petrák, Ondřej; Čurila, Karol; Bednář, František; Holaj, Robert; Štrauch, Branislav; Václavík, Jan; Nykl, Igor; Krátká, Zuzana; Kociánová, Eva; Jiravský, Otakar; Rappová, Gabriela; Indra, Tomáš; Widimský, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    This randomized, multicenter study compared the relative efficacy of renal denervation (RDN) versus pharmacotherapy alone in patients with true resistant hypertension and assessed the effect of spironolactone addition. We present here the 12-month data. A total of 106 patients with true resistant hypertension were enrolled in this study: 52 patients were randomized to RDN and 54 patients to the spironolactone addition, with baseline systolic blood pressure of 159±17 and 155±17 mm Hg and average number of drugs 5.1 and 5.4, respectively. Twelve-month results are available in 101 patients. The intention-to-treat analysis found a comparable mean 24-hour systolic blood pressure decline of 6.4 mm Hg, P=0.001 in RDN versus 8.2 mm Hg, P=0.002 in the pharmacotherapy group. Per-protocol analysis revealed a significant difference of 24-hour systolic blood pressure decline between complete RDN (6.3 mm Hg, P=0.004) and the subgroup where spironolactone was added, and this continued within the 12 months (15 mm Hg, P= 0.003). Renal artery computed tomography angiograms before and after 1 year post-RDN did not reveal any relevant changes. This study shows that over a period of 12 months, RDN is safe, with no serious side effects and no major changes in the renal arteries. RDN in the settings of true resistant hypertension with confirmed compliance is not superior to intensified pharmacological treatment. Spironolactone addition (if tolerated) seems to be more effective in blood pressure reduction.

  3. Adjusted drug treatment is superior to renal sympathetic denervation in patients with true treatment-resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadl Elmula, Fadl Elmula M; Hoffmann, Pavel; Larstorp, Anne C; Fossum, Eigil; Brekke, Magne; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Gjønnæss, Eyvind; Hjørnholm, Ulla; Kjaer, Vibeke N; Rostrup, Morten; Os, Ingrid; Stenehjem, Aud; Høieggen, Aud

    2014-05-01

    We aimed to investigate for the first time the blood pressure (BP)-lowering effect of renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) versus clinically adjusted drug treatment in true treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH) after excluding patients with confounding poor drug adherence. Patients with apparent TRH (n=65) were referred for RDN, and those with secondary and spurious hypertension (n=26) were excluded. TRH was defined as office systolic BP (SBP) >140 mm Hg, despite maximally tolerated doses of ≥3 antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic. In addition, ambulatory daytime SBP >135 mm Hg after witnessed intake of antihypertensive drugs was required, after which 20 patients had normalized BP and were excluded. Patients with true TRH were randomized and underwent RDN (n=9) performed with Symplicity Catheter System versus clinically adjusted drug treatment (n=10). The study was stopped early for ethical reasons because RDN had uncertain BP-lowering effect. Office SBP and diastolic BP in the drug-adjusted group changed from 160±14/88±13 mm Hg (±SD) at baseline to 132±10/77±8 mm Hg at 6 months (Pdrug-adjusted group at 6 months (P=0.002 and P=0.004, respectively), and absolute changes in SBP were larger in the drug-adjusted group (P=0.008). Ambulatory BPs changed in parallel to office BPs. Our data suggest that adjusted drug treatment has superior BP lowering effects compared with RDN in patients with true TRH. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01673516.

  4. Hemodynamic and neural responses to renal denervation of the nerve to the clipped kidney by cryoablation in two-kidney, one-clip hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Noreen F; Pajewski, Russell; Chen, Haiping; Littrup, Peter J; Maliszewska-Scislo, Maria

    2016-01-15

    Renal artery stenosis is increasing in prevalence. Angioplasty plus stenting has not proven to be better than medical management. There has been a reluctance to use available denervation methodologies in this condition. We studied conscious, chronically instrumented, two-kidney, one-clip (2K-1C) Goldblatt rats, a model of renovascular hypertension, to test the hypothesis that renal denervation by cryoablation (cryo-DNX) of the renal nerve to the clipped kidney decreases mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma and tissue ANG II, and contralateral renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Five-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent sham (ShC) or right renal artery clipping (2K-1C), placement of telemetry transmitters, and pair-feeding with a 0.4% NaCl diet. After 6 wk, rats were randomly assigned to cryo-DNX or sham cryotreatment (sham DNX) of the renal nerve to the clipped kidney. MAP was elevated in 2K-1C and decreased significantly in both ShC cryo-DNX and 2K-1C cryo-DNX. Tissue norepinephrine was ∼85% lower in cryo-DNX kidneys. Plasma ANG II was higher in 2K-1C sham DNX but not in 2K-1C cryo-DNX vs ShC. Renal tissue ANG II in the clipped kidney decreased after cryo-DNX. Baseline integrated RSNA of the unclipped kidney was threefold higher in 2K-1C versus ShC and decreased in 2K-1C cryo-DNX to values similar to ShC. Maximum reflex response of RSNA to baroreceptor unloading in 2K-1C was lower after cryo-DNX. Thus, denervation by cryoablation of the renal nerve to the clipped kidney decreases not only MAP but also plasma and renal tissue ANG II levels and RSNA to the contralateral kidney in conscious, freely moving 2K-1C rats.

  5. Outer membrane vesicles as platform vaccine technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pol, Leo; Stork, Michiel; van der Ley, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are released spontaneously during growth by many Gram-negative bacteria. They present a range of surface antigens in a native conformation and have natural properties like immunogenicity, self-adjuvation and uptake by immune cells which make them attractive for application as vaccines against pathogenic bacteria. In particular with Neisseria meningitidis, they have been investigated extensively and an OMV-containing meningococcal vaccine has recently been approved by regulatory agencies. Genetic engineering of the OMV-producing bacteria can be used to improve and expand their usefulness as vaccines. Recent work on meningitis B vaccines shows that OMVs can be modified, such as for lipopolysaccharide reactogenicity, to yield an OMV product that is safe and effective. The overexpression of crucial antigens or simultaneous expression of multiple antigenic variants as well as the expression of heterologous antigens enable expansion of their range of applications. In addition, modifications may increase the yield of OMV production and can be combined with specific production processes to obtain high amounts of well-defined, stable and uniform OMV particle vaccine products. Further improvement can facilitate the development of OMVs as platform vaccine product for multiple applications. © 2015 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. The copyright line of the article for this article was changed on 23 February 2016 after original online publication.

  6. 3D false color computed tomography for diagnosis and follow-up of permanent denervated human muscles submitted to home-based Functional Electrical Stimulation

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    Ugo Carraro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This report outlines the use of a customized false-color 3D computed tomography (CT protocol for the imaging of the rectus femoris of spinal cord injury (SCI patients suffering from complete and permanent denervation, as characterized by complete Conus and Cauda Equina syndrome. This muscle imaging method elicits the progression of the syndrome from initial atrophy to eventual degeneration, as well as the extent to which patients' quadriceps could be recovered during four years of home-based functional electrical stimulation (h-b FES. Patients were pre-selected from several European hospitals and functionally tested by, and enrolled in the EU Commission Shared Cost Project RISE (Contract n. QLG5-CT-2001-02191 at the Department of Physical Medicine, Wilhelminenspital, Vienna, Austria. Denervated muscles were electrically stimulated using a custom-designed stimulator, large surface electrodes, and customized progressive stimulation settings. Spiral CT images and specialized computational tools were used to isolate the rectus femoris muscle and produce 3D and 2D reconstructions of the denervated muscles. The cross sections of the muscles were determined by 2D Color CT, while muscle volumes were reconstructed by 3D Color CT. Shape, volume, and density changes were measured over the entirety of each rectus femoris muscle. Changes in tissue composition within the muscle were visualized by associating different colors to specified Hounsfield unit (HU values for fat, (yellow: [-200; -10], loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, (cyan: [-9; 40], and normal muscle, fascia and tendons included, (red: [41; 200]. The results from this analysis are presented as the average HU values within the rectus femoris muscle reconstruction, as well as the percentage of these tissues with respect to the total muscle volume. Results from this study demonstrate that h-b FES induces a compliance-dependent recovery of muscle volume and size of muscle fibers, as

  7. Strain specific variation of outer membrane proteins of wild Yersinia pestis strains subjected to different growth temperatures

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    Frederico Guilherme Coutinho Abath

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available Three Yersinia pestis strains isolated from humans and one laboratory strain (EV76 were grown in rich media at 28§C and 37§C and their outer membrane protein composition compared by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-Page. Several proteins with molecular weights ranging from 34 kDa to 7 kDa were observed to change in relative abundance in samples grown at different temperatures. At least seven Y. pestis outer membrane proteins showed a temperature-dependent and strain-specific behaviour. Some differences between the outer membrane proteins of full-pathogenic wild isolates and the EV76 strain could aldso be detected and the relevance of this finding on the use of laboratory strains as a reference to the study of Y. pestis biological properties is discuted.

  8. Guillain-Barré综合征患者空肠弯曲菌的主要外膜蛋白基因的分子分型%Molecular typing of the major outer membrane protein gene ofCampylobacterjejuni isolates from patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome

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    马建军; 徐军; 西村公孝; 齐田孝彦

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study thd momecular typing of the major outer membrane protein gene(momp) of Campylobacter jejuni(C.jejuni). Methods: The C. jejuni major outer membrane protein gene was arnplified by PCR from a total of 163 strains. AfterHind Ⅲ , HaeⅢ, Mbo Ⅱ and HhaI restriction enzyme digestions, the digest was analyzed by electrophoresis, and then comparedwith heat-stable(HS) serotype and PCR-based restriction fragnent length polymorphism(RFLP) typing of flagellin A gene (flaA). Results: Eight distinct momp RFLP genotypes were observed. Among all of them, one major type (momp-3) accounted for61% of all isolates. All 34 HS-19:Cj(fla)-1 strains,including isolates from patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome(GBS) and en-teritis,belonged to a single genotype(momp-1). Conclusion: The HS-19:Cj(fla)-1 :momp-1 strain is distinctive among C.jejunistains,and HS-19 related GBS may be an excellent model to elucidate the pathogenesis of GBS.%目的:研究空肠弯曲菌(Cj)的主要外膜蛋白(momp)基因的分子分型。方法:采用PCR方法对163株空肠弯曲菌的主要外膜蛋白基因进行扩增,用HindⅢ,HaeⅢ,MboⅡ和HhaI四种内切酶消化后进行电泳分析,并与热稳定性血清型(HS)和鞭毛蛋白A基因(flagellin A gene,fal A)分型方法相比较。结果:共观察到8种不同的主要外膜蛋白的限制性片段长度多态性的基因型,其中主要外膜蛋白基因-3(momp-3)占61%。Guillain-Barré综合征(GBS)和腹泻患者所有34株HS-19:Cj(fla)-1菌株均属同一个单一基因型,即主要外膜蛋白基因-1(momp-1)。结论:HS-19:Cj(fla)-1:momp-1菌株是空肠弯曲菌的一个特殊类型,与HS-19相关的GBS可能是阐明GBS发病机制最好的模型。

  9. O efeito do estrógeno nas reservas glicogênicas de musculoesqueléticos desnervados de ratas The estrogen effect on glycogen reserves of denervated skeletal muscles of female rats

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    MTM Severi

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito muscular do estrógeno em ratas submetidas à desnervação de membro posterior. MÉTODO: Ratas Wistar foram divididas em 5 grupos (n=6: Controle, Desnervado 7 dias, Desnervado 15 dias, Desnervado tratado com estrógeno (200µg/rato, via subcutânea, diariamente durante 7 dias e Desnervado tratado com estrógeno durante 15 dias. Após os períodos experimentais, foi realizada a avaliação de glicogênio (GLI dos músculos sóleo (S, gastrocnêmio branco (GB e vermelho (GV, além da avaliação do peso do sóleo. A análise estatística foi feita através do teste de normalidade, ANOVA e teste de Tukey (pOBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of estrogen on muscles in female rats subjected to hindlimb denervation. METHODS: Female Wistar rats were divided into five groups (n=6: control; denervated 7 days; denervated 15 days; denervated treated with estrogen (200µg/rat, subcutaneously, daily for 7 days; and denervated treated with estrogen for 15 days. After the experimental periods, glycogen (GLY evaluations were performed on the soleus (S, white gastrocnemius (WG and red gastrocnemius (RG, and the soleus was weighed. The statistical analysis was performed using the normality test, ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05. RESULTS: The denervation caused a reduction (p<0.05 in GLY over a 7-day period (S: 44%, WG: 32%; RG: 32% and 15-day period (S: 62%, WG: 44%; RG: 53%, and also S weight reduction (7 days: 29.7%; 15 days: 36.6%. However, the estrogen treatment caused elevation (p<0.05 of GLY under this condition, both over 7 days (S: 19%; WG: 60%; RG: 18% and over 15 days (S: 52%; WG: 51%; RG: 11%, but it was not enough to minimize the muscle weight reduction. CONCLUSIONS: The treatment with low doses of estrogen minimized the metabolic alterations induced by denervation, but it was not effective in interfering in the weight loss of the soleus muscle. This suggests that the hormone acts by enabling chemical-metabolic protection that

  10. Estrogen up-regulation of semaphorin 3F correlates with sympathetic denervation of the rat uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richeri, Analía; Chalar, Cora; Martínez, Gaby; Greif, Gonzalo; Bianchimano, Paola; Brauer, M Mónica

    2011-10-28

    Current evidence indicates that rises in systemic levels of estrogen create in the uterus an inhibitory environment for sympathetic nerves. However, molecular insights of these changes are far from complete. We evaluated if semaphorin 3F mRNA, a sympathetic nerve repellent, was produced by the rat uterus and if its expression was modulated by estrogen. We also analyzed whether uterine nerves express the semaphorin 3F binding receptor, neuropilin-2. Uterine levels of semaphorin 3F mRNA were measured using real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in prepubertal rat controls and following chronic estrogen treatment. Localization of semaphorin 3F transcripts was determined by in situ hybridization and the expression of neuropilin-2 was assessed by immunohistochemistry. These studies showed that: (1) chronic estrogen treatment led to a 5-fold induction of semaphorin 3F mRNA in the immature uterus; (2) estrogen provoked a tissue-specific induction of semaphorin 3F which was particularly localized in the connective tissue that borders muscle bundles and surrounds intrauterine blood vessels; (3) two major cell-types were recognized in the areas where transcripts were concentrated, fibroblast-like cells and infiltrating eosinophil leukocytes; and (4) some delicate nerve terminal profiles present in the estrogenized uterus were immunoreactive for neuropilin-2. Temporal and spatial expression patterns of semaphorin 3F/neuropilin-2 are consistent with a possible role of this guidance cue in the remodeling of uterine sympathetic innervation by estrogen. Though correlative in its nature, these data support a model whereby semaphorin 3F, in combination with other inhibitory molecules, converts the estrogenized myometrium to an inhospitable environment for sympathetic nerves.

  11. Outer automorphism groups of certain 1-relator groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KIM; Goansu

    2010-01-01

    Grossman first showed that outer automorphism groups of 1-relator groups given by orientable surface groups are residually finite,whence mapping class groups of orientable surfaces are residually finite.Allenby,Kim and Tang showed that outer automorphism groups of cyclically pinched 1-relator groups are residually finite,whence mapping class groups of orientable and non-orientable surfaces are residually finite.In this paper we show that outer automorphism groups of certain conjugacy separable 1-relator groups are residually finite.

  12. Defects in the outer limiting membrane are associated with rosette development in the Nrl-/- retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W Stuck

    Full Text Available The neural retinal leucine zipper (Nrl knockout mouse is a widely used model to study cone photoreceptor development, physiology, and molecular biology in the absence of rods. In the Nrl(-/- retina, rods are converted into functional cone-like cells. The Nrl(-/- retina is characterized by large undulations of the outer nuclear layer (ONL commonly known as rosettes. Here we explore the mechanism of rosette development in the Nrl(-/- retina. We report that rosettes first appear at postnatal day (P8, and that the structure of nascent rosettes is morphologically distinct from what is seen in the adult retina. The lumen of these nascent rosettes contains a population of aberrant cells protruding into the subretinal space that induce infolding of the ONL. Morphologically adult rosettes do not contain any cell bodies and are first detected at P15. The cells found in nascent rosettes are photoreceptors in origin but lack inner and outer segments. We show that the adherens junctions between photoreceptors and Müller glia which comprise the retinal outer limiting membrane (OLM are not uniformly formed in the Nrl(-/- retina and thus allow protrusion of a population of developing photoreceptors into the subretinal space where their maturation becomes delayed. These data suggest that the rosettes of the Nrl(-/- retina arise due to defects in the OLM and delayed maturation of a subset of photoreceptors, and that rods may play an important role in the proper formation of the OLM.

  13. Defects in the outer limiting membrane are associated with rosette development in the Nrl-/- retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuck, Michael W; Conley, Shannon M; Naash, Muna I

    2012-01-01

    The neural retinal leucine zipper (Nrl) knockout mouse is a widely used model to study cone photoreceptor development, physiology, and molecular biology in the absence of rods. In the Nrl(-/-) retina, rods are converted into functional cone-like cells. The Nrl(-/-) retina is characterized by large undulations of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) commonly known as rosettes. Here we explore the mechanism of rosette development in the Nrl(-/-) retina. We report that rosettes first appear at postnatal day (P)8, and that the structure of nascent rosettes is morphologically distinct from what is seen in the adult retina. The lumen of these nascent rosettes contains a population of aberrant cells protruding into the subretinal space that induce infolding of the ONL. Morphologically adult rosettes do not contain any cell bodies and are first detected at P15. The cells found in nascent rosettes are photoreceptors in origin but lack inner and outer segments. We show that the adherens junctions between photoreceptors and Müller glia which comprise the retinal outer limiting membrane (OLM) are not uniformly formed in the Nrl(-/-) retina and thus allow protrusion of a population of developing photoreceptors into the subretinal space where their maturation becomes delayed. These data suggest that the rosettes of the Nrl(-/-) retina arise due to defects in the OLM and delayed maturation of a subset of photoreceptors, and that rods may play an important role in the proper formation of the OLM.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies against the iron regulated outer membrane Proteins of Acinetobacter baumannii are bactericidal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel Vikas

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is an important nutrient required by all forms of life.In the case of human hosts,the free iron availability is 10-18M,which is far less than what is needed for the survival of the invading bacterial pathogen.To survive in such conditions, bacteria express new proteins in their outer membrane and also secrete iron chelators called siderophores. Results/ Discussion Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 19606, a nosocomial pathogen which grows under iron restricted conditions, expresses four new outer membrane proteins,with molecular weight ranging from 77 kDa to 88 kDa, that are called Iron Regulated Outer Membrane Proteins (IROMPs. We studied the functional and immunological properties of IROMPs expressed by A.baumanii ATCC 19606.The bands corresponding to IROMPs were eluted from SDS-PAGE and were used to immunize BALB/c mice for the production of monoclonal antibodies. Hybridomas secreting specific antibodies against these IROMPs were selected after screening by ELISA and their reactivity was confirmed by Western Blot. The antibodies then generated belonged to IgM isotype and showed bactericidical and opsonising activities against A.baumanii in vitro.These antibodies also blocked siderophore mediated iron uptake via IROMPs in bacteria. Conclusion This proves that iron uptake via IROMPs,which is mediated through siderophores,may have an important role in the survival of A.baumanii inside the host,and helps establishing the infection.

  15. Sensing the Mechanical State of the Axoneme and Integration of Ca2+ Signaling by Outer Arm Dynein

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Axonemal dyneins have been demonstrated to monitor the mechanical state of the axoneme and must also alter activity in response to various signaling pathways. The central pair/radial spoke systems are clearly involved in controlling inner dynein arm function; however, the mechanisms by which the outer dynein arm transduces regulatory signals appear quite distinct at the molecular level. In Chlamydomonas, these regulatory components include thioredoxins involved in response to redox changes, molecules that tether the γ heavy chain motor unit to the A-tubule of the outer doublet and a Ca2+-binding protein that controls the structure of the γ heavy chain N-terminal domain. Together, these studies now suggest that the γ heavy chain acts as a key regulatory node for controlling outer arm function in response to alterations in curvature and ligand binding. Furthermore, they allow us to propose a testable molecular mechanism by which altered Ca2+ levels might lead to a change in ciliary waveform by controlling whether one heavy chain of outer arm dynein acts as a microtubule translocase or as an ATP-dependent brake that limits the amount of inter-doublet sliding. PMID:20186692

  16. SNAREs Interact with Retinal Degeneration Slow and Rod Outer Segment Membrane Protein-1 during Conventional and Unconventional Outer Segment Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulliger, Rahel; Conley, Shannon M; Mwoyosvi, Maggie L; Stuck, Michael W; Azadi, Seifollah; Naash, Muna I

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the photoreceptor protein peripherin-2 (also known as RDS) cause severe retinal degeneration. RDS and its homolog ROM-1 (rod outer segment protein 1) are synthesized in the inner segment and then trafficked into the outer segment where they function in tetramers and covalently linked larger complexes. Our goal is to identify binding partners of RDS and ROM-1 that may be involved in their biosynthetic pathway or in their function in the photoreceptor outer segment (OS). Here we utilize several methods including mass spectrometry after affinity purification, in vitro co-expression followed by pull-down, in vivo pull-down from mouse retinas, and proximity ligation assay to identify and confirm the SNARE proteins Syntaxin 3B and SNAP-25 as novel binding partners of RDS and ROM-1. We show that both covalently linked and non-covalently linked RDS complexes interact with Syntaxin 3B. RDS in the mouse is trafficked from the inner segment to the outer segment by both conventional (i.e., Golgi dependent) and unconventional secretory pathways, and RDS from both pathways interacts with Syntaxin3B. Syntaxin 3B and SNAP-25 are enriched in the inner segment (compared to the outer segment) suggesting that the interaction with RDS/ROM-1 occurs in the inner segment. Syntaxin 3B and SNAP-25 are involved in mediating fusion of vesicles carrying other outer segment proteins during outer segment targeting, so could be involved in the trafficking of RDS/ROM-1.

  17. A rat model for functional characterization of pregnancy-induced denervation and postpartum reinnervation in the myometrium and cervix: a superfusion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupkó, I; Csonka, D; Falkay, G

    2005-11-01

    The pregnancy-induced rapid degeneration of the adrenergic nerves innervating the uterus is a well-known but poorly understood phenomenon. Since most of the published investigations were carried out by histological assay, our aim was to describe the loss of the adrenergic function during pregnancy and the re-innervational procedure in the postpartum period. Myometrial and cervical samples from rats were loaded with [3H]noradrenaline and then transferred into a chamber for superfusion. After a wash-out period, fractions were collected. The fifth and fifteenth fraction tissues were stimulated with an electric field. The [3H]noradrenaline contents of the fractions were determined, together with the amount remaining in the tissue. The myometrial [3H]noradrenaline release was substantially decreased in early pregnancy, and absent in the late stage. Differences in release profile were detected between the implantation sites and the interimplantation areas. As a refinement of the results of previous histochemical studies, the noradrenergic functions of the cervix were found to be deeply affected in the early postpartum period. The pregnancy-induced denervational procedure can be followed by means of a superfusional technique after [3H]noradrenaline loading. As our technique is considered to be similar in sensitivity to histological methods, superfusion can be regarded as a model for functional investigations of pregnancy-induced denervation.

  18. Advances in Renal Sympathetic Denervation%肾脏交感神经射频消融术临床效应研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖宜超

    2012-01-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) is a novel catheter-based approach to directly target renal sympathetic nerves using radiofrequency ablation technology, which can suppress the activation of the sympathetic nervous system. It has been indicated that RSD can not only significantly lower peripheral blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension, but shows improvement in left ventricular hypertrophy , heart failure, insulin resistance and albuminuria. This review focuses on the clinical effects of renal sympathetic denervation and the prospects of its clinical application.%肾脏交感神经射频消融术是一种新型的、选择性降低肾脏交感神经活性的介入治疗手段,最新研究证实不仅可显著降低顽固性高血压患者血压水平,而且临床研究发现还具有逆转左心室肥厚、改善心功能、改善胰岛素抵抗、降低尿蛋白等临床效应;现主要对肾脏交感神经射频消融术的临床效应及应用前景进行综述.

  19. Early changes of graft function, cytokines and superoxide dismutase serum levels after donor liver denervation and Kupffer cell depletion in a rat-to-rat liver transplantation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zhu; Catena Marco; Ferla Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Hepatic reperfusion injury may cause acute inlfammatory damage, producing signiifcant organ dysfunction, and is an important problem in liver transplantation. This experiment aimed to study early changes of hepatic function after donor liver denervation and Kupffer cell depletion in rat-to-rat liver transplantation and to evaluate the effect of pre-treatment on liver reperfusion injury. METHODS:Donor rats were divided into four groups:control group; group G was pre-treated with gadolinium chloride (G), an inhibitor of Kupffer cells; group H with hexamethonium (H), a sympathetic ganglionic blocking agent; and group HG, with combined H and G pre-treatment. Under the same conditions, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), arterial ketone body ratio (AKBR), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) of recipient rats were assessed at 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours after liver transplantation. Histological studies of the grafts were compared. RESULTS:HG pre-treatment signiifcantly decreased ALT, TNF-α, and IL-6 levels, increased AKBR and SOD levels, and demonstrated less pathological damage at 8, 16 and 24 hours compared with the control group. Similar trends were also found in the other groups (G and H). However, the differences among them were not signiifcant at 4 post-operative hours.CONCLUSIONS:Donor denervation and Kupffer cell depletion had preventive effect on liver reperfusion injury. HG pre-treatment is a feasible and reproducible method to protect grafts from reperfusion injury.

  20. Denervation of the infraspinatus and release of the posterior deltoid muscles in the management of dyskinetic external shoulder rotation in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaszczyk, Izabela; Granström, Anna Cecilia; Wiberg, Mikael

    2015-04-01

    The dyskinetic subtype of cerebral palsy is difficult to manage, and there is no established gold standard for treatment. External rotation of the shoulder(s) is often managed nonsurgically using injections of botulinum toxin A into the external rotator muscles. This article reports a new surgical technique for managing external rotation when botulinum toxin A treatment is not sufficient or possible. Six patients with dyskinetic cerebral palsy underwent denervation of the infraspinatus muscle and release of the posterior part of the deltoid muscle. Postoperative questionnaires were given to the patients/caregivers, and video recordings were made both pre- and postoperatively. Preoperative and postoperative Assisting Hand Assessment was possible in only 1 case. Five patients were very satisfied with their outcome. Four patients' video recordings showed improvement in their condition. One patient developed postoperative complications. The results indicate that denervation of the infraspinatus muscle and posterior deltoid release can be an option for patients with dyskinetic cerebral palsy to manage external rotation of the shoulder when other treatment alternatives are insufficient.

  1. Consequence of nigrostriatal denervation and L-dopa therapy on the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase messenger RNA in the pallidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, M T; Levy, R; Ruberg, M; Luquin, M R; Villares, J; Guillen, J; Faucheux, B; Javoy-Agid, F; Guridi, J; Agid, Y; Obeso, J A; Hirsch, E C

    1996-07-01

    To examine the consequences of nigrostriatal denervation and L-dopa treatment on the basal ganglia output system, we analyzed, by quantitative in situ hybridization, the messenger RNA coding for glutamic acid decarboxylase (Mr 67,000) (GAD67 mRNA) in pallidal cells from patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), monkeys rendered parkinsonian by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) receiving or not receiving L-dopa, and their respective control subjects. In MPTP-treated monkeys, the expression of GAD67 mRNA was increased in cells from the internal pallidum, and this effect was abolished by L-dopa treatment. There were no differences in the levels of GAD67 mRNA between patients with PD, who were all treated with L-dopa, and control subjects. These results indicate that the level of GAD67 mRNA is increased in the cells of the internal pallidum after nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation and that this increase can be reversed by L-dopa therapy.

  2. CT-guided injection of botulinic toxin for percutaneous therapy of piriformis muscle syndrome with preliminary MRI results about denervative process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanucci, E.; Masala, S.; Sodani, G.; Varrucciu, V.; Romagnoli, A.; Squillaci, E.; Simonetti, G. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Rome (Italy)

    2001-12-01

    Piriformis muscle syndrome (PMS) is a cause of sciatica, leg or buttock pain and disability. The pain is usually increased by muscular contraction, palpation or prolonged sitting. The aim of our paper was to evaluate the feasibility of CT-guided percutaneous botulinic toxin (BTX) injection for the purpose of PMS treatment. Thirty patients suffering from PMS, suspected with clinical and electrophysiological criteria, after imaging examinations excluding other causes of sciatic pain, resulted positive at the lidocaine test and were treated by intramuscular injection of BTX type A under CT guidance. The follow-up (12 months) was performed with clinical examination in all cases and with MR 3 months after the procedure in 9 patients to evaluate the denervative process entity of the treated muscle. In 26 cases relief of symptoms was obtained after 5-7 days. In 4 patients an insufficient relief of pain justified a second percutaneous treatment which was clinically successful. No complications or side effects were recorded after BTX injection. The MR examination showed a signal intensity change of the treated muscle in 7 patients due to the denervative process of PM, whereas in the remaining 2 cases only an atrophy of the treated muscle was detected. Larger series are necessary to confirm these MRI preliminary results. The CT-guided BTX injection in the PMS is an emergent and feasible technique that obtains an excellent local therapeutic effect without risk of imprecise inoculation. (orig.)

  3. Evaluation of Autologous Fascia Implantation With Controlled Release of Fibroblast Growth Factor for Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Paralysis Due to Long-term Denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hiromi; Nishiyama, Koichiro; Seino, Yutomo; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Makito

    2016-06-01

    Paralyzed tissue due to long-term denervation is resistant to many treatments because it induces irreversible histological changes and disorders of deglutition or phonation. We sought to determine the effect of autologous transplantation of fascia into the vocal fold (ATFV) with controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on long-term unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). Unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) section was performed on 20 rats. Five rats were implanted with autologous fascia only (fascia group), and 10 rats were implanted with autologous fascia and a gelatin hydrogel sheet with 1 μg (1 μg bFGF + fascia group) or 0.1 μg (0.1 μg bFGF + fascia group) of bFGF 4 months after RLN section. We evaluated the normalized glottal gap and laryngeal volume and histological changes 3 months after implantation. The normalized glottal gap was significantly reduced in the 3 fascia implantation groups. Normalized laryngeal volume, fat volume, and lateral thyroarytenoid muscle volume were significantly increased in the 2 fascia implantation with bFGF groups. The ATFV with controlled release of bFGF repaired the glottal gap and laryngeal volume after RLN section and may reduce the occurrence of aspiration and hoarseness. We speculate that this treatment improves laryngeal function in long-term RLN denervation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. One-year outcomes of percutaneous renal denervation for the treatment of resistant hypertension: the first Chinese experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Hui; Jiang Xiongjing; Liang Tuo; Zou Yubao; Guan Ting; Peng Meng; Song Lei

    2014-01-01

    Background As a novel device-based approach targeting the renal sympathetic nerves,percutaneous renal denervation (RDN) has been shown to be effective and safe for reducing blood pressure.However,while considerable data on RDN have been obtained from Western populations,there is limited findings from East Asian populations.The purpose of this study was to evaluate one-year outcomes of RDN for the treatment of resistant hypertension in Chinese patients.Methods Between February and August 2012,14 patients (mean age 39±8 years,10 males) with resistant hypertension underwent successful RDN at the Fuwai Hospital.All 14 patients were followed up at 1,3,6 and 12 months postprocedure.Blood pressure,use of antihypertensive agents,renal function,and complications were investigated.Results Baseline values included mean office blood pressure of 164/103±14/10 mmHg,mean 3.9±0.6 anti-hypertensive agents,and an estimated glomerular filtration rate of (79±19) mlmin-1.1.73 m-2.Office blood pressure after the procedure was reduced by-14/-10,-17/-11,-21/-12,and-24/-14 mmHg at 1,3,6,and 12 months respectively,and the reduction of the number of antihypertensive agents at the above corresponding time points was-1.3,-1.5,-1.7 and-1.8 respectively (all P <0.001).The mean reduction of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure was similar to the reduction of office blood pressure at the four corresponding time points.Renal function did not significantly change at any time point (all P >0.05).No clinical complications were observed at 12-month follow-up.Conclusion This study showed that RDN seems to be effective in reducing blood pressure of Chinese patients with resistant hypertension,with minimal adverse events at 12-month follow-up.

  5. {sup 123}I-Labelled metaiodobenzylguanidine for the evaluation of cardiac sympathetic denervation in early stage amyloidosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordzij, Walter; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.; Rheenen, Ronald W.J. van; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O.; Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands); Hazenberg, Bouke P.C. [University of Groningen, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Tio, Rene A. [University of Groningen, Department of Cardiology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    Cardiac amyloidosis is a rare disorder, but it may lead to potentially life-threatening restrictive cardiomyopathy. Cardiac manifestations frequently occur in primary amyloidosis (AL) and familial amyloidosis (ATTR), but are uncommon in secondary amyloidosis (AA). Echocardiography is the method of choice for assessing cardiac amyloidosis. Amyloid deposits impair the function of sympathetic nerve endings. Disturbance of myocardial sympathetic innervations may play an important role in the remodelling process. {sup 123}I-MIBG can detect these innervation changes. Patients with biopsy-proven amyloidosis underwent general work-up, echocardiography and {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy. Left ventricular internal dimensions and wall thickness were measured, and highly refractile cardiac echoes (sparkling) were analysed. Early (15 min) and late (4 h) heart-to-mediastinum ratio (HMR) and wash-out rate were determined after administration of MIBG. Included in the study were 61 patients (30 women and 31 men; mean age 62 years; 39 AL, 11 AA, 11 ATTR). Echocardiographic parameters were not significantly different between the groups. Sparkling was present in 72 % of ATTR patients, in 54 % of AL patients and in 45 % of AA patients. Mean late HMR in all patients was 2.3 {+-} 0.75, and the mean wash-out rate was 8.6 {+-} 14 % (the latter not significantly different between the patient groups). Late HMR was significantly lower in patients with echocardiographic signs of amyloidosis than in patients without (2.0 {+-} 0.70 versus 2.8 {+-} 0.58, p < 0.001). Wash-out rates were significantly higher in these patients (-3.3 {+-} 9.9 % vs. 17 {+-} 10 %, p < 0.001). In ATTR patients without echocardiographic signs of amyloidosis, HMR was lower than in patients with the other types (2.0 {+-} 0.59 vs. 2.9 {+-} 0.50, p = 0.007). MIBG HMR is lower and wash-out rate is higher in patients with echocardiographic signs of amyloidosis. Also, {sup 123}I-MIBG scintigraphy can detect cardiac denervation in

  6. Outer Continental Shelf Lease Blocks - Alaska Region NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Outer Continental Shelf block outlines in ArcGIS shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. OCS blocks are used to define small geographic...

  7. Nuclear power sources in outer space. [spacecraft propulsion legal aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosenball, S. N.

    1978-01-01

    Legal problems associated with nuclear power sources in space are discussed with particular reference to the Cosmos 954 incident. Deliberations of the Legal and Scientific and Technical Subcommittees on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space on this subject are discussed.

  8. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess retinal morphology in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR) without ophthalmoscopically visible fundus changes. METHODS: Retrospective case series. Two consecutive patients with bilateral AZOOR with photopsia corresponding to areas of visual field loss and a normal fundus...

  9. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2008-01-01

    To assess retinal morphology in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR) without ophthalmoscopically visible fundus changes. Retrospective case series. Two consecutive patients with bilateral AZOOR with photopsia corresponding to areas of visual field loss and a normal fundus appearance were...

  10. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess retinal morphology in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). Methods: Three patients with a normal ophthalmoscopic fundus appearance, a history of photopsia, and visual field loss compatible with AZOOR were examined using optical coherence tomography, automated perimetry...

  11. 75 FR 71734 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Scientific Committee (SC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Scientific Committee (SC) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE),...

  12. Mode interference patterns in retinal receptor outer segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaard, W.

    1974-01-01

    Some calculated interference patterns of electromagnetic modes are given for a dielectric waveguide representative for the receptor outer segment. The results are qualitatively in accordance with observations of Enoch.

  13. Delivery of Foreign Antigens by Engineered Outer Membrane Vesicle Vaccines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David J. Chen; Nikolaus Osterrieder; Stephan M. Metzger; Elizabeth Buckled; Anne M. Dood; Matthew P. DeLisa; David Putnam; Robert Langer

    2010-01-01

    .... We show here that engineered Escherichia coli outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are an easily purified vaccine-delivery system capable of greatly enhancing the immunogenicity of a low-immunogenicity protein antigen without added adjuvants...

  14. Atmospheric Mining in the Outer Solar System: Outer Planet Orbital Transfer and Lander Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric mining in the outer solar system has been investigated as a means of fuel production for high energy propulsion and power. Fusion fuels such as Helium 3 (3He) and deuterium can be wrested from the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune and either returned to Earth or used in-situ for energy production. Helium 3 and deuterium were the primary gases of interest with hydrogen being the primary propellant for nuclear thermal solid core and gas core rocket-based atmospheric flight. A series of analyses were undertaken to investigate resource capturing aspects of atmospheric mining in the outer solar system. This included the gas capturing rate, storage options, and different methods of direct use of the captured gases. While capturing 3He, large amounts of hydrogen and 4He are produced. Analyses of orbital transfer vehicles (OTVs), landers, and the issues with in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) mining factories are included. Preliminary observations are presented on near-optimal selections of moon base orbital locations, OTV power levels, and OTV and lander rendezvous points. For analyses of round trip OTV flights from Uranus to Miranda or Titania, a 10- Megawatt electric (MWe) OTV power level and a 200 metricton (MT) lander payload were selected based on a relative short OTV trip time and minimization of the number of lander flights. A similar optimum power level is suggested for OTVs flying from low orbit around Neptune to Thalassa or Triton. Several moon base sites at Uranus and Neptune and the OTV requirements to support them are also addressed.

  15. Acinetobacter baumannii secretes cytotoxic outer membrane protein A via outer membrane vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Sook Jin

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that causes a high morbidity and mortality rate in infected patients, but pathogenic mechanisms of this microorganism regarding the secretion and delivery of virulence factors to host cells have not been characterized. Gram-negative bacteria naturally secrete outer membrane vesicles (OMVs that play a role in the delivery of virulence factors to host cells. A. baumannii has been shown to secrete OMVs when cultured in vitro, but the role of OMVs in A. baumannii pathogenesis is not well elucidated. In the present study, we evaluated the secretion and delivery of virulence factors of A. baumannii to host cells via the OMVs and assessed the cytotoxic activity of outer membrane protein A (AbOmpA packaged in the OMVs. A. baumannii ATCC 19606(T secreted OMVs during in vivo infection as well as in vitro cultures. Potential virulence factors, including AbOmpA and tissue-degrading enzymes, were associated with A. baumannii OMVs. A. baumannii OMVs interacted with lipid rafts in the plasma membranes and then delivered virulence factors to host cells. The OMVs from A. baumannii ATCC 19606(T induced apoptosis of host cells, whereas this effect was not detected in the OMVs from the ΔompA mutant, thereby reflecting AbOmpA-dependent host cell death. The N-terminal region of AbOmpA(22-170 was responsible for host cell death. In conclusion, the OMV-mediated delivery of virulence factors to host cells may well contribute to pathogenesis during A. baumannii infection.

  16. The Velocity Structure of SN 1987A's Outer Circumstellar Envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotts, A. P. S.; Heathcote, S. R.

    1997-12-01

    We present high-resolution optical spectroscopy, (obtained with the CTIO 4-meter/echelle spectrograph over many epochs between 1989 and 1997) of the circumstellar nebula of SN 1987A, including the outer rings (within 3 arcsec of the SN), the inner (equatorial) ring, and fainter features at larger radii never studied before spectroscopically. We report velocity displacements for portions of the outer rings, up to 26 km s(-1) with respect the SN centroid velocity, with blueshifted components in the location of the southern outer ring and the redshifted portions of the northern outer ring. The largest shifts are near the SN, as predicted by a model in which the outer rings are the crowns of an expanding, bipolar nebula with the inner ring at its waist. We also confirm that the inner ring shows a velocity full-width of about 13 km s(-1) , which, along with the geometry of the rings and our outer ring velocity measurements, allows us to estimate a characteristic timescale of about 20,000 y for each of the three rings, implying that all are coeval. This contrasts with measurements by others of compositional ratios in the inner versus outer rings indicating that they were, perhaps, ejected at different times from the progenitor's star's outer envelope. Additionally, we measure the velocity of low surface brightness features at larger radii indicating that circumstellar material even farther from the SN was ejected up to 400,000 y before the explosion. Finally, we note the presence of transient emission features within the circumstellar nebula and describe their behaviour, and consider what implications our observations may have for the coming transformation of this nebula into Supernova Remnant 1987A.

  17. Inner and outer cylinders of the CMS vacuum tank.

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The vacuum tank of the CMS magnet system consists of inner and outer stainless-steel cylinders and houses the superconducting coil. The inner cylinder contains all the barrel sub-detectors, which it supports via a system of horizontal rails. The cylinder is pictured here in the vertical position on a yellow platform mounted on the ferris-wheel support structure. This will allow it to be pivoted and inserted into the already installed outer cylinder, through which this photo was taken.

  18. Prevalence of outer retinal tubulation in eyes with choroidal neovascularization

    OpenAIRE

    Giachetti Filho, Richard Geraldo; Zacharias,Leandro Cabral; Monteiro,Thaís Vera; Preti, Rony Carlos; Pimentel, Sérgio Gianoti

    2016-01-01

    Background Outer retinal tubulations (ORTs) are branching tubular structures located in the outer nuclear layer of the retina. The goal of this study is to determine the prevalence of ORTs observed in eyes with choroidal neovascularization (CNV) undergoing treatment with anti-angiogenic intravitreous injection (IVI) with anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) at the Ophthalmology Department of a tertiary hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. Methods This is a descriptive study based on medic...

  19. Developments for the outer tracking system of the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Bachmann, S; Haas, T; Uwer, U; Walter, M; Wiedner, D

    2004-01-01

    The outer tracking system of the LHCb experiment is discussed. The outer tracking system (OT) is made of three stations and every station is made up of four detecting planes with a double layer of straw tubes. The straw tubes are mounted in detector module boxes made up of sandwich panels. The use of a counting gas with a high drift velocity is suggested to cope with high bunch crossing rate at the LHCb experiment. (Edited abstract) 3 Refs.

  20. STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISK OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Cote, Stephanie [Canadian Gemini Office, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada); Schade, David, E-mail: barneskl@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: Stephanie.Cote@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: David.Schade@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada)

    2012-09-20

    We combine new deep and wide field of view H{alpha} imaging of a sample of eight nearby (d Almost-Equal-To 17 Mpc) spiral galaxies with new and archival H I and CO imaging to study the star formation and the star formation regulation in the outer disk. We find that, in agreement with previous studies, star formation in the outer disk has low covering fractions, and star formation is typically organized into spiral arms. The star formation in the outer disk is at extremely low levels, with typical star formation rate surface densities of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We find that the ratio of the radial extent of detected H II regions to the radius of the H I disk is typically {approx}>85%. This implies that in order to further our understanding of the implications of extended star formation, we must further our understanding of the formation of extended H I disks. We measure the gravitational stability of the gas disk, and find that the outer gaseous disk is typically a factor of {approx}2 times more stable than the inner star-forming disk. We measure the surface density of outer disk H I arms, and find that the disk is closer to gravitational instability along these arms. Therefore, it seems that spiral arms are a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for star formation in the outer disk. We use an estimation of the flaring of the outer gas disk to illustrate the effect of flaring on the Schmidt power-law index; we find that including flaring increases the agreement between the power-law indices of the inner and outer disks.

  1. Assembly of outer-membrane proteins in bacteria and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommassen, Jan

    2010-09-01

    The cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria consists of two membranes separated by the periplasm. In contrast with most integral membrane proteins, which span the membrane in the form of hydrophobic alpha-helices, integral outer-membrane proteins (OMPs) form beta-barrels. Similar beta-barrel proteins are found in the outer membranes of mitochondria and chloroplasts, probably reflecting the endosymbiont origin of these eukaryotic cell organelles. How these beta-barrel proteins are assembled into the outer membrane has remained enigmatic for a long time. In recent years, much progress has been reached in this field by the identification of the components of the OMP assembly machinery. The central component of this machinery, called Omp85 or BamA, is an essential and highly conserved bacterial protein that recognizes a signature sequence at the C terminus of its substrate OMPs. A homologue of this protein is also found in mitochondria, where it is required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins into the outer membrane as well. Although accessory components of the machineries are different between bacteria and mitochondria, a mitochondrial beta-barrel OMP can be assembled into the bacterial outer membrane and, vice versa, bacterial OMPs expressed in yeast are assembled into the mitochondrial outer membrane. These observations indicate that the basic mechanism of OMP assembly is evolutionarily highly conserved.

  2. Development of outer-iteration free scheme for MATRA code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyuk; Kim, S. J.; Park, J. P.; Hwang, D. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The Picard scheme involves successive updating of the coefficient on the previously calculated values. The outer-iteration is terminated at that time being satisfied with boundary condition on which a lateral pressure difference between subchannels is even at exit plane. Diversion cross flow is generated to reduce the lateral pressure difference at each axial node. The physics can be numerically implemented with using approximation to force the lateral pressure difference to be the zero. The idea is firstly realized by prediction-correction method by C. Chiu. In this code, two-step method is adopted to approximate the lateral pressure difference term using diversion cross flow. The approximation allows the outer-iteration free scheme. The present study describes the implementation of outer-iteration free scheme, called non-iterative prediction-correction method into MATRA code. Outer-iteration free algorithm is implemented into the subchannel code MATRA. Original prediction-correction method applied only two channel is successfully expanded into the multichannel application. In comparison with the convectional outer-iteration numerical scheme, the present algorithm showed the more efficient and compatible accuracy on the verification problems, such as SMT- 5x5 problem and KSNP single assembly problem. In addition, outer-iteration free algorithm can be calculated in lower mass flow condition in which conventional scheme is breakdown.

  3. 76 FR 58273 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Outer Continental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Outer Continental... Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; EPA ICR... all outer continental shelf (OCS) sources except those located in the Gulf of Mexico west of...

  4. 76 FR 7518 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska AGENCY... of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources..., Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Nitrogen oxides, Outer Continental Shelf, Ozone, Particulate...

  5. 77 FR 52630 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for California AGENCY... of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources..., Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Nitrogen oxides, Outer Continental Shelf, Ozone, Particulate...

  6. 75 FR 3423 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska AGENCY.... Requirements applying to Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') sources located within 25 miles of States' seaward..., Incorporation by reference, Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Nitrogen oxides, Outer...

  7. 76 FR 15898 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; Consistency Update for California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations; Consistency Update for California AGENCY... of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources... oxides, Outer Continental Shelf, Ozone, Particulate matter, Permits, Reporting and...

  8. Outer P(ρ,σ)-set’s Random Characteristic and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Huan-li; WANG Dong-mei

    2014-01-01

    Based on the conception of P(ρ,σ)-set (XPF¯ρ , XPFσ ), this paper studied the relation between outer P(ρ,σ)-set and outer P-set: give outer P(ρ,σ)-set and outer P-set relation theorem, outer P(ρ,σ)-set and numerical value σ relation theorem, outer P(ρ,σ)-set’s range;studied other characteristics of outer P(ρ,σ)-set: give the finiteness theorem of outer P(ρ,σ)-set, the set chain theorem of outer P(ρ,σ)-set, the outer P(ρ,σ)-set probability interval finite partition theorem, and its corollary; also give generation, reduction, identification theorem of outer P(ρ,σ)-set, filter generation theorem of outer P(ρ,σ)-set;finally give its application.

  9. Antigen sequence typing of outer membrane protein (fetA gene of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A from Delhi & adjoining areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dwivedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis is a fatal disease. Meningococcal meningitis is an endemic disease in Delhi and irregular pattern of outbreaks has been reported in India. All these outbreaks were associated with serogroup A. Detailed molecular characterization of N. meningitidis is required for the management of this fatal disease. In this study, we characterized antigenic diversity of surface exposed outer membrane protein (OMP FetA antigen of N. meningitidis serogroup A isolates obtained from cases of invasive meningococcal meningitis in Delhi, India. Methods: Eight isolates of N. meningitidis were collected from cerebrospinal fluid during October 2008 to May 2011 from occasional cases of meningococcal meningitis. Seven isolates were from outbreaks of meningococcal meningitis in 2005-2006 in Delhi and its adjoining areas. These were subjected to molecular typing of fetA gene, an outer membrane protein gene. Results: All 15 N. meningitides isolates studied were serogroup A. This surface exposed porin is putatively under immune pressure. Hence as a part of molecular characterization, genotyping was carried out to find out the diversity in outer membrane protein (FetA gene among the circulating isolates of N. meningitidis. All 15 isolates proved to be of the same existing allele type of FetA variable region (VR when matched with global database. The allele found was F3-1 for all the isolates. Interpretation & conclusions: There was no diversity reported in the outer membrane protein FetA in the present study and hence this protein appeared to be a stable molecule. More studies on molecular characterization of FetA antigen are required from different serogroups circulating in different parts of the world.

  10. Building a flagellum in biological outer space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis D. B. Evans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flagella, the rotary propellers on the surface of bacteria, present a paradigm for how cells build and operate complex molecular ‘nanomachines’. Flagella grow at a constant rate to extend several times the length of the cell, and this is achieved by thousands of secreted structural subunits transiting through a central channel in the lengthening flagellum to incorporate into the nascent structure at the distant extending tip. A great mystery has been how flagella can assemble far outside the cell where there is no conventional energy supply to fuel their growth. Recent work published by Evans et al.[Nature (2013 504: 287-290], has gone some way towards solving this puzzle, presenting a simple and elegant transit mechanism in which growth is powered by the subunits themselves as they link head-to-tail in a chain that is pulled through the length of the growing structure to the tip. This new mechanism answers an old question and may have resonance in other assembly processes.

  11. Laboratory chemical dynamics and outer planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    Reactions of CN (2Σ+) and C2H (2Σ+) radicals with unsaturated hydrocarbons are of fundamental relevance to form complex nitriles and polyynes in hydrocarbon rich atmospheres, planets, and moons. Here we present results on crossed molecular beams experiments combined with electronic structure calculations on the reactions of C2H and CN radicals with acetylene, methylacetylene, allene, and benzene. Our investigation show that both radicals attack the unsaturated bond without entrance barrier in exothermic reactions. The collision complex decomposes to form the hydrocarbon and a H atom or shows a H atom migration prior to hydrogen atom loss. The identification of this C2H /CN - H exchange opens a versatile route to form unsaturated nitriles and polyynes and predicts their formation in hydrocarbon rich planetary atmospheres. Further, our studies provide a solid database on reaction products and shall guide chemical investigation of the NASA-ESA Cassini-Huygens mission to identify unsaturated hydrocarbons in Titan. Most important, these experiments verify unambiguously that the knowledge of reaction rate constants only is insufficient for detailed chemical models of planetary atmospheres. Reaction products and most important reactive intermediates MUST be included to get a plausible chemical model of planetary atmospheres.

  12. Essential Role of the Chaperonin CCT in Rod Outer Segment Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Satyabrata; Belcastro, Marycharmain; Datta, Poppy; Seo, Seongjin; Sokolov, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. While some evidence suggests an essential role for the chaperonin containing t-complex protein 1 (CCT) in ciliogenesis, this function remains poorly understood mechanistically. We used transgenic mice, previously generated in our lab, and characterized by a genetically-induced suppression of CCT in rod photoreceptors as well as a malformation of the rod sensory cilia, the outer segments, to gain new insights into this underlying molecular mechanism. Methods. The CCT activity in rod photoreceptors of mice was suppressed by overexpressing the chaperonin inhibitor, phosducin-like protein short, and the ensuing changes of cellular morphology were analyzed by light and electron microscopy. Protein expression levels were studied by fluorescent microscopy and Western blotting. Results. Suppressing the chaperonin made the photoreceptors incompetent to build their outer segments. Specifically, the CCT-deficient rods appeared unable to expand the outer segment plasma membrane, and accommodate growth of this compartment. Seeking the molecular mechanisms underlying such a shortcoming, we found that the affected rods could not express normal levels of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS) proteins 2, 5, and 7 and, owing to that deficiency, were unable to assemble the BBSome, a multisubunit complex responsible for ciliary trafficking. A similar effect in response to the chaperonin suppression was also observed in cultured ciliated cells. Conclusions. Our data provide new evidence indicating the essential role of the chaperonin CCT in the biogenesis of vertebrate photoreceptor sensory cilia, and suggest that it may be due to the direct participation of the chaperonin in the posttranslational processing of selected BBS proteins and assembly of the BBSome. PMID:24854858

  13. The Distant Outer Gas Arm Between l=35d and l=45d

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Yang; Li, Chong; Zhang, Shaobo; Zhou, Xin; Fang, Min; Yang, Ji; Chen, Xuepeng

    2016-01-01

    The Galactic plane has been mapped from l=34.75d to 45.25d and b=-5.25d to 5.25d in the CO (J=1-0) emission with the 13.7 m telescope of the Purple Mountain Observatory. The unbiased survey covers a large area of 100 square degrees sampled every 30" with a velocity resolution of ~0.2km/s. In this paper, we present the result of an unbiased CO survey of this longitude and latitude range in the velocity range from -60km/s to -10km/s. Over 500 molecular clouds (MCs) are picked out from the 12CO emission, and 131 of these MCs are associated with 13CO emission.The distant MCs, which lie beyond the solar circle and are mostly concentrated in the Galactic plane, trace the large-scale molecular gas structure over 10 degrees of Galactic azimuth. We suggest that the CO emission of the segment is from the Outer Arm. The physical mid-plane traced by the Outer Arm seems to be slightly displaced from the IAU-defined plane on a large scale, which could be explained by the warped plane at large Galactocentric distances of >~...

  14. Localization of phosphatidylcholine in outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the effects of phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus on the extent of phospholipid hydrolysis in envelope membrane vesicles and in intact chloroplasts. When isolated envelope vesicles were incubated in presence of phospholipase C, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol, but not phosphatidylinositol, were totally converted into diacylglycerol if they were available to the enzyme (i.e., when the vesicles were sonicated in presence of phospholipase C). These experiments demonstrate that phospholipase C can be used to probe the availability of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol in the cytosolic leaflet of the outer envelope membrane from spinach chloroplasts. When isolated, purified, intact chloroplasts were incubated with low amounts of phospholipase C (0.3 U/mg chlorophyll) under very mild conditions (12 degrees C for 1 min), greater than 80% of phosphatidylcholine molecules and almost none of phosphatidylglycerol molecules were hydrolyzed. Since we have also demonstrated, by using several different methods (phase-contrast and electron microscopy, immunochemical and electrophoretic analyses) that isolated spinach chloroplasts, and especially their outer envelope membrane, remained intact after mild treatment with phospholipase C, we can conclude that there is a marked asymmetric distribution of phospholipids across the outer envelope membrane of spinach chloroplasts. Phosphatidylcholine, the major polar lipid of the outer envelope membrane, is almost entirely accessible from the cytosolic side of the membrane and therefore is probably localized in the outer leaflet of the outer envelope bilayer. On the contrary, phosphatidylglycerol, the major polar lipid in the inner envelope membrane and the thylakoids, is probably not accessible to phospholipase C from the cytosol and therefore is probably localized mostly in the inner leaflet of the outer envelope membrane and in the other chloroplast membranes. PMID:3988805

  15. KINETIC ASSESSMENT OF GOLF SHOE OUTER SOLE DESIGN FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary J. Dyson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed human kinetics in relation to golf shoe outer sole design features during the golf swing using a driver club by measuring both within the shoe, and beneath the shoe at the natural grass interface. Three different shoes were assessed: metal 7- spike shoe, alternative 7-spike shoe, and a flat soled shoe. In-shoe plantar pressure data were recorded using Footscan RS International pressure insoles and sampling at 500 Hz. Simultaneously ground reaction force at the shoe outer sole was measured using 2 natural grass covered Kistler force platforms and 1000 Hz data acquisition. Video recording of the 18 right-handed golfers at 200 Hz was undertaken while the golfer performed 5 golf shots with his own driver in each type of shoe. Front foot (nearest to shot direction maximum vertical force and torque were greater than at the back foot, and there was no significant difference related to the shoe type. Wearing the metal spike shoe when using a driver was associated with more torque generation at the back foot (p < 0. 05 than when the flat soled shoe was worn. Within shoe regional pressures differed significantly with golf shoe outer sole design features (p < 0.05. Comparison of the metal spike and alternative spike shoe results provided indications of the quality of regional traction on the outer sole. Potential golf shoe outer sole design features and traction were presented in relation to phases of the golf swing movement. Application of two kinetic measurement methods identified that moderated (adapted muscular control of foot and body movement may be induced by golf shoe outer sole design features. Ground reaction force measures inform comparisons of overall shoe functional performance, and insole pressure measurements inform comparisons of the underfoot conditions induced by specific regions of the golf shoe outer sole

  16. Direct observation of the uptake of outer membrane proteins by the periplasmic chaperone Skp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Xin Lyu

    Full Text Available The transportation of membrane proteins through the aqueous subcellular space is an important and challenging process. Its molecular mechanism and the associated structural change are poorly understood. Periplasmic chaperones, such as Skp in Escherichia coli, play key roles in the transportation and protection of outer membrane proteins (OMPs in Gram-negative bacteria. The molecular mechanism through which Skp interacts with and protects OMPs remains mysterious. Here, a combined experimental and molecular dynamics simulation study was performed to gain the structural and dynamical information in the process of OMPs and Skp binding. Stopped-flow experiments on site specific mutated and labeled Skp and several OMPs, namely OmpC, the transmembrane domain of OmpA, and OmpF, allowed us to obtain the mechanism of OMP entering the Skp cavity, and molecular dynamics simulations yielded detailed molecular interactions responsible for this process. Both experiment and simulation show that the entrance of OMP into Skp is a highly directional process, which is initiated by the interaction between the N-terminus of OMP and the bottom "tentacle" domain of Skp. The opening of the more flexible tentacle of Skp, the non-specific electrostatic interactions between OMP and Skp, and the constant formation and breaking of salt bridges between Skp and its substrate together allow OMP to enter Skp and gradually "climb" into the Skp cavity in the absence of an external energy supply.

  17. Use of iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy to assess cardiac sympathetic denervation and the impact of hypertension in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Koji; Nakatani, Yuko; Onishi, Satoshi [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Keihanna Hospital, Hirakata City, Osaka (Japan); Utsunomiya, Keita; Saika, Yoshinori [Dept. of Radiology, Keihanna Hospital, Hirakata City (Japan); Iwasaka, Toshiji [Cardiovascular Center, Kansai Medical University, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    The objectives of this clinical study using iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy were (a) to evaluate cardiac sympathetic denervation in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients with and without hypertension and (b) to investigate the relation between cardiac sympathetic denervation and prognosis in NIDDM patients. We compared clinical characteristics and MIBG data [heart to mediastinum (H/M) ratio and % washout rate (WR)] in a control group and NIDDM patients with and without hypertension. MIBG scintigraphy was performed in 11 controls and 82 NIDDM patients without overt cardiovascular disease except for hypertension (systolic blood pressure {>=}140 and/or diastolic blood pressure {>=}90 mmHg). After MIBG examination, blood pressure was measured regularly in all NIDDM patients. There were significant differences between 65 normotensive and 17 hypertensive NIDDM patients with respect to age (55{+-}11 vs 63{+-}12 years, respectively, P<0.05), prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (12% vs 35%, respectively, P<0.05) and systolic blood pressure (120{+-}12 vs 145{+-}16 mmHg, respectively, P<0.001). The H/M ratio in hypertensive NIDDM patients was significantly lower than in the control group (1.81{+-}0.29 vs 2.27{+-}0.20, respectively, P<0.01). During the follow-up period (18{+-} 12 months), 17 NIDDM patients newly developed hypertension after MIBG examination. There were no significant differences in their clinical characteristics compared with persistently normotensive or hypertensive NIDDM patients. %WR in patients with new onset hypertension was significantly higher than in the control group (30.88%{+-}16.87% vs 12.89%{+-}11.94%, respectively, P<0.05). Moreover, in these patients %WR correlated with duration from the date of MIBG scintigraphy to the onset of hypertension (r=-0.512, P<0.05). Five NIDDM patients died during the follow-up period (four newly hypertensive patients and one normotensive patient). There were significant

  18. Renal denervation: under pressure?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, R.L.

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, 871 million people suffers from hypertension (an office systolic blood pressure (BP) of ≥140 and/or diastolic BP ≥90 mmHg). Only 35% of the patients known with hypertension reaches guideline targets. The remaining 65% percent is defined as having resistant hypertension, in other words,

  19. The fate of proteins in outer space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Gavin M.; Bywater, Robert Paul

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that any properly conducted biophysical studies of proteins must take appropriate account of solvent. For water-soluble proteins it has been an article of faith that water is largely responsible for stabilizing the fold, a notion that has recently come under increasing scrutiny. Further, there are some instances when proteins are studied experimentally in the absence of solvent, as in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization or electrospray mass spectrometry, for example, or in organic solvents for protein engineering purposes. Apart from these considerations, there is considerable speculation as to whether there is life on planets other than Earth, where conditions including the presence of water (both in liquid or vapour form and indeed ice), temperature and pressure may be vastly different from those prevailing on Earth. Mars, for example, has only 0.6% of Earth's mean atmospheric pressure which presents profound problems to protein structures, as this paper and a large corpus of experimental work demonstrate. Similar objections will most likely apply in the case of most exoplanets and other bodies such as comets whose chemistry and climate are still largely unknown. This poses the question, how do proteins survive in these different environments? In order to cast some light on these issues we have conducted a series of molecular dynamics simulations on protein dehydration under a variety of conditions. We find that, while proteins undergoing dehydration can retain their integrity for a short duration they ultimately become disordered, and we further show that the disordering can be retarded if superficial water is kept in place on the surface. These findings are compared with other published results on protein solvation in an astrobiological and astrochemical setting. Inter alia, our results suggest that there are limits as to what to expect in terms of the existence of possible extraterrestrial forms as well to what can be achieved in

  20. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM.