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Sample records for dendritic lipid-based cationic

  1. Drug loading to lipid-based cationic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcanti, Leide P.; Konovalov, Oleg; Torriani, Iris L.; Haas, Heinrich

    2005-01-01

    Lipid-based cationic nanoparticles are a new promising option for tumor therapy, because they display enhanced binding and uptake at the neo-angiogenic endothelial cells, which a tumor needs for its nutrition and growth. By loading suitable cytotoxic compounds to the cationic carrier, the tumor endothelial and consequently also the tumor itself can be destroyed. For the development of such novel anti-tumor agents, the control of drug loading and drug release from the carrier matrix is essential. We have studied the incorporation of the hydrophobic anti-cancer agent Paclitaxel (PXL) into a variety of lipid matrices by X-Ray reflectivity measurements. Liposome suspensions from cationic and zwitterionic lipids, comprising different molar fractions of Paclitaxel, were deposited on planar glass substrates. After drying at controlled humidity, well ordered, oriented multilayer stacks were obtained, as proven by the presence of bilayer Bragg peaks to several orders in the reflectivity curves. The presence of the drug induced a decrease of the lipid bilayer spacing, and with an excess of drug, also Bragg peaks of drug crystals could be observed. From the results, insight into the solubility of Paclitaxel in the model membranes was obtained and a structural model of the organization of the drug in the membrane was derived. Results from subsequent pressure/area-isotherm and grazing incidence diffraction (GID) measurements performed with drug/lipid Langmuir monolayers were in accordance with these conjectures

  2. Correlation between cationic lipid-based transfection and cell division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchenbuechler, Inka; Kirchenbuechler, David; Elbaum, Michael, E-mail: michael@elbaum.ac.il

    2016-07-01

    We evaluate the temporal relation between protein expression by cationic lipid-mediated transfection and cell division using time lapse fluorescence microscopy. Detailed image analysis provides new insights on the single cell level while simultaneously achieving appropriate statistics. Earlier evidence by less direct methods such as flow cytometry indicates a primary route for transfection involving nuclear envelope breakdown, but also suggests the existence of a pathway independent of mitosis. We confirm and quantify both mechanisms. We found the timing for successful transfection to be unexpectedly flexible, contrary to assertions of a narrow time window. Specifically, cells dividing more than 24 h after exposure to the transfection medium express the probed protein at a comparable level to cells in a mitotic state during or shortly after transfection. This finding can have a profound impact on the guidance and development of non-viral gene delivery materials. - Highlights: • Cationic lipid-based transfection supports protein expression without cell division. • Protein expression is unrelated to cell cycle status at the time of transfection. • Time-lapse imaging provides direct evaluation without statistical averaging. • Lipoplex dissociation is a likely target for improvement of transfection efficiency.

  3. Cationic lipid-based nanoparticles mediate functional delivery of acetate to tumor cells in vivo leading to significant anticancer effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brody LP

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Leigh P Brody,1,* Meliz Sahuri-Arisoylu,1,* James R Parkinson,1 Harry G Parkes,2 Po Wah So,3 Nabil Hajji,4 E Louise Thomas,1 Gary S Frost,5 Andrew D Miller,6,* Jimmy D Bell1,* 1Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Westminster, 2CR-UK Clinical MR Research Group, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey, 3Department of Neuroimaging, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, 4Department of Medicine, Division of Experimental Medicine, Centre for Pharmacology & Therapeutics, Toxicology Unit, Imperial College London, 5Faculty of Medicine, Nutrition and Dietetic Research Group, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Investigative Medicine, Imperial College London, Hammersmith Hospital, 6Institute of Pharmaceutical Science, King’s College London, London, UK *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Metabolic reengineering using nanoparticle delivery represents an innovative therapeutic approach to normalizing the deregulation of cellular metabolism underlying many diseases, including cancer. Here, we demonstrated a unique and novel application to the treatment of malignancy using a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA-encapsulated lipid-based delivery system – liposome-encapsulated acetate nanoparticles for cancer applications (LITA-CAN. We assessed chronic in vivo administration of our nanoparticle in three separate murine models of colorectal cancer. We demonstrated a substantial reduction in tumor growth in the xenograft model of colorectal cancer cell lines HT-29, HCT-116 p53+/+ and HCT-116 p53-/-. Nanoparticle-induced reductions in histone deacetylase gene expression indicated a potential mechanism for these anti-proliferative effects. Together, these results indicated that LITA-CAN could be used as an effective direct or adjunct therapy to treat malignant transformation in vivo. Keywords: lipid-based nanoparticles, liposomes

  4. A Lipid Based Antigen Delivery System Efficiently Facilitates MHC Class-I Antigen Presentation in Dendritic Cells to Stimulate CD8+ T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Mithun; Mazumder, Saumyabrata; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Choudhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Sabur, Abdus; Shadab, Md.; Bhattacharya, Pradyot; Ali, Nahid

    2016-06-01

    The most effective strategy for protection against intracellular infections such as Leishmania is vaccination with live parasites. Use of recombinant proteins avoids the risks associated with live vaccines. However, due to low immunogenicity, they fail to trigger T cell responses particularly of CD8+ cells requisite for persistent immunity. Previously we showed the importance of protein entrapment in cationic liposomes and MPL as adjuvant for elicitation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses for long-term protection. In this study we investigated the role of cationic liposomes on maturation and antigen presentation capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). We observed that cationic liposomes were taken up very efficiently by DCs and transported to different cellular sites. DCs activated with liposomal rgp63 led to efficient presentation of antigen to specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, lymphoid CD8+ T cells from liposomal rgp63 immunized mice demonstrated better proliferative ability when co-cultured ex vivo with stimulated DCs. Addition of MPL to vaccine enhanced the antigen presentation by DCs and induced more efficient antigen specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared to free and liposomal antigen. These liposomal formulations presented to CD8+ T cells through TAP-dependent MHC-I pathway offer new possibilities for a safe subunit vaccine.

  5. Multifunctional Cationic Lipid-Based Nanoparticles Facilitate Endosomal Escape and Reduction-Triggered Cytosolic siRNA Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujrati, Maneesh; Malamas, Anthony; Shin, Tesia; Jin, Erlei; Sun, Lulu; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has garnered much attention in recent years as a promising avenue for cancer gene therapy due to its ability to silence disease-related genes. Effective gene silencing is contingent upon the delivery of siRNA into the cytosol of target cells and requires the implementation of delivery systems possessing multiple functionalities to overcome delivery barriers. The present work explores the multifunctional properties and biological activity of a recently developed cationic lipid carrier, (1-aminoethyl)iminobis[N-(oleicylcysteinyl-1-amino-ethyl)propionamide]) (ECO). The physicochemical properties and biological activity of ECO/siRNA nanoparticles were assessed over a range of N/P ratios to optimize the formulation. Potent and sustained luciferase silencing in a U87 glioblastoma cell line was observed, even in the presence of serum proteins. ECO/siRNA nanoparticles exhibited pH-dependent membrane disruption at pH levels corresponding to various stages of the intracellular trafficking pathway. It was found that disulfide linkages created during nanoparticle formation enhanced the protection of siRNA from degradation and facilitated site-specific siRNA release in the cytosol by glutathione-mediated reduction. Confocal microscopy confirmed that ECO/siRNA nanoparticles readily escaped from late endosomes prior to cytosolic release of the siRNA cargo. These results demonstrate that the rationally designed multifunctionality of ECO/siRNA nanoparticles is critical for intracellular siRNA delivery and the continuing development of safe and effective delivery systems. PMID:25020033

  6. Electrografting of thionine diazonium cation onto the graphene edges and decorating with Au nano-dendrites or glucose oxidase: Characterization and electrocatalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervedani, Reza Karimi; Amini, Akbar; Sadeghi, Nima

    2016-03-15

    Thionine (Th) diazonium cation is covalently attached onto the glassy carbon (GC) electrode via graphene nanosheets (GNs) (GC-GNs-Th). The GC-GNs-Th electrode is subjected to further modifications to fabricate (i) glucose and (ii) nitrite sensors. Further modifications include: (i) direct immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) and (ii) electrodeposition of gold dendrite-like nanostructures (DGNs) on the GC-GNs-Th surface, constructing GC-GNs-Th-GOx and GC-GNs-Th-DGNs modified electrodes, respectively. The GC-GNs-Th-GOx biosensor exhibited a linear response range to glucose, from 0.5 to 6.0mM, with a limit of detection (LOD) of 9.6 μM and high sensitivity of 43.2 µAcm(-2)mM(-1). Also, the GC-GNs-Th-DGNs sensor showed a wide dynamic response range for NO2(-) ion with two linear parts, from 0.05 μM to 1.0 μM and 30.0 μM to 1.0mM, a sensitivity of 263.2 μAmM(-1) and a LOD of 0.01 μM. Applicability of the modified electrodes was successfully tested by determination of glucose in human blood serum and nitrite in water based on addition/recovery tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cationic liposomes promote antigen cross-presentation in dendritic cells by alkalizing the lysosomal pH and limiting the degradation of antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jie Gao,1–3 Lukasz J Ochyl,1,3 Ellen Yang,4 James J Moon1,3,5 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Biointerfaces Institute, 4Department of Chemistry, 5Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Abstract: Cationic liposomes (CLs have been widely examined as vaccine delivery nanoparticles since they can form complexes with biomacromolecules, promote delivery of antigens and adjuvant molecules to antigen-presenting cells (APCs, and mediate cellular uptake of vaccine components. CLs are also known to trigger antigen cross-presentation – the process by which APCs internalize extracellular protein antigens, degrade them into minimal CD8+ T-cell epitopes, and present them in the context of major histocompatibility complex-I (MHC-I. However, the precise mechanisms behind CL-mediated induction of cross-presentation and cross-priming of CD8+ T-cells remain to be elucidated. In this study, we have developed two distinct CL systems and examined their impact on the lysosomal pH in dendritic cells (DCs, antigen degradation, and presentation of peptide:MHC-I complexes to antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells. To achieve this, we have used 3β-[N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethane-carbamoyl] cholesterol (DC-Chol and 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP as the prototypical components of CLs with tertiary amine groups and compared the effect of CLs and anionic liposomes on lysosomal pH, antigen degradation, and cross-presentation by DCs. Our results showed that CLs, but not anionic liposomes, elevated the lysosomal pH in DCs and reduced antigen degradation, thereby promoting cross-presentation and cross-priming of CD8+ T-cell responses. These studies shed new light on CL-mediated cross-presentation and suggest that intracellular fate of vaccine

  8. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoyer, N.J.; Seaborg, G.T.

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO 2 + ) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO 2 + ; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO 2 + cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO 2 + species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO 2 + have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO 2 + cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe 3+ and Cr 3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , NpO 2 + ·Th 4+ , PuO 2 + ·UO 2 2+ , and PuO 2 + ·Th 4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ∼0.8 M -1

  9. Lipid-based Transfection Reagents Exhibit Cryo-induced Increase in Transfection Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Sork

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of lipid-based transfection reagents have permitted their widespread use in molecular biology and gene therapy. This study outlines the effect of cryo-manipulation of a cationic lipid-based formulation, Lipofectamine 2000, which, after being frozen and thawed, showed orders of magnitude higher plasmid delivery efficiency throughout eight different cell lines, without compromising cell viability. Increased transfection efficiency with the freeze-thawed reagent was also seen with 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligonucleotide delivery and in a splice-correction assay. Most importantly, a log-scale improvement in gene delivery using the freeze-thawed reagent was seen in vivo. Using three different methods, we detected considerable differences in the polydispersity of the different nucleic acid complexes as well as observed a clear difference in their surface spreading and sedimentation, with the freeze-thawed ones displaying substantially higher rate of dispersion and deposition on the glass surface. This hitherto overlooked elevated potency of the freeze-thawed reagent facilitates the targeting of hard-to-transfect cells, accomplishes higher transfection rates, and decreases the overall amount of reagent needed for delivery. Additionally, as we also saw a slight increase in plasmid delivery using other freeze-thawed transfection reagents, we postulate that freeze-thawing might prove to be useful for an even wider variety of transfection reagents.

  10. Lipid-Based Liquid Crystalline Nanoparticles Facilitate Cytosolic Delivery of siRNA via Structural Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shufang; Fan, Weiwei; Wu, Na; Zhu, Jingjing; Miao, Yunqiu; Miao, Xiaran; Li, Feifei; Zhang, Xinxin; Gan, Yong

    2018-04-11

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology has shown great promise for the treatment of cancer and other genetic disorders. Despite the efforts to increase the target tissue distribution, the safe and effective delivery of siRNA to the diseased cells with sufficient cytosolic transport is another critical factor for successful RNAi clinical application. Here, the constructed lipid-based liquid crystalline nanoparticles, called nano-Transformers, can transform thestructure in the intracellular acidic environment and perform high-efficient siRNA delivery for cancer treatment. The developed nano-Transformers have satisfactory siRNA loading efficiency and low cytotoxicity. Different from the traditional cationic nanocarriers, the endosomal membrane fusion induced by the conformational transition of lipids contributes to the easy dissociation of siRNA from nanocarriers and direct release of free siRNA into cytoplasm. We show that transfection with cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)-siRNA-loaded nano-Transformers causes up to 95% reduction of relevant mRNA in vitro and greatly inhibits the tumor growth without causing any immunogenic response in vivo. This work highlights that the lipid-based nano-Transformers may become the next generation of siRNA delivery system with higher efficacy and improved safety profiles.

  11. Recent developments in oral lipid-based drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, N.; Rades, T.; Müllertz, A.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of poorly water-soluble drugs in development in the pharmaceutical industry has sparked interest in novel drug delivery options such as lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDS). Several LbDDS have been marketed successfully and have shown superior and more reliable...... bioavailability compared to conventional formulations. However, some reluctance in the broader application of LbDDS still appears, despite the growing commercial interest in lipids as a drug delivery platform. This reluctance might at least in part be related to the complexity associated with the development...... and characterization of LbDDS. In particular, the lack of standardized test protocols can be identified as the major obstacles for the broader application of LbDDS. This review seeks to summarize recent approaches in the field of lipid-based drug delivery that try to elucidate some critical steps in their development...

  12. Lipid Based Nanosystems for Curcumin: Past, Present and Future.

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    Nayak, Aditya P; Mills, Tom; Norton, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is one of the principle bioactive compounds used in the ayurvedic medicine system that has the history of over 5000 years for human use. Curcumin an "Indian Gold" is used to treat simple ailments like the common cold to severe life threatening diseases like cancer, and HIV. Though its contribution is immense for the health protection and disease prevention, its clinical use is limited due to its susceptible nature to alkaline pH, high temperature, presence of oxygen and light. Hence it becomes extremely difficult to maintain its bioactivity during processing, storage and consumption. Recent advancements in the application of nanotechnology to curcumin offer an opportunity to enhance its stability, bioactivity and to overcome its pharmacokinetic mismatch. This in turn helps to bridge the gaps that exist between its bench top research data to its clinical findings. Among the various types of nano/micro delivery systems, lipid based delivery systems are well studied and are the best suited delivery systems to enhance the stability and pharmacokinetic profile of curcumin both for pharma and the food application. In the current review, effort will be made to recapitulate the work done in the past to use lipid based delivery systems (liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and emulsions) to enhance the application of curcumin for health promotion and disease prevention. Further, future prospects for the utilization of these lipid-based delivery systems will be discussed in detail.

  13. Dendritic cell vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Paul J; Lyerly, H Kim; Clay, Timothy M; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2007-05-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells that have been shown to stimulate tumor antigen-specific T cell responses in preclinical studies. Consequently, there has been intense interest in developing dendritic cell based cancer vaccines. A variety of methods for generating dendritic cells, loading them with tumor antigens, and administering them to patients have been described. In recent years, a number of early phase clinical trials have been performed and have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of dendritic cell immunotherapies. A number of these trials have generated valuable preliminary data regarding the clinical and immunologic response to DC-based immunotherapy. The emphasis of dendritic cell immunotherapy research is increasingly shifting toward the development of strategies to increase the potency of dendritic cell vaccine preparations.

  14. Pharmaceutical and biomedical applications of lipid-based nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Claudia; Leonardi, Antonio; Cupri, Sarha; Puglisi, Giovanni; Pignatello, Rosario

    2014-03-01

    Increasing attention is being given to lipid nanocarriers (LNs) as drug delivery systems, due to the advantages offered of a higher biocompatibility and lower toxicity compared with polymeric nanoparticles. Many administration routes are being investigated for LNs, including topical, oral and parenteral ones. LNs are also proposed for specific applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, diagnosis and medical devices production. However, the high number of published research articles does not match an equal amount of patents. A recent Review of ours, published in Pharmaceutical Patent Analyst, reported the patents proposing novel methods for the production of LNs. This review work discusses recent patents, filed in 2007-2013 and dealing with the industrial applications of lipid-based nanocarriers for the vectorization of therapeutically relevant molecules, as well as biotech products such as proteins, gene material and vaccines, in the pharmaceutical, diagnostic and biomedical areas.

  15. Enzymes as Biocatalysts for Lipid-based Bioproducts Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheong, Ling-Zhi; Guo, Zheng; Fedosov, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    Bioproducts are materials, chemicals and energy derived from renewable biological resources such as agriculture, forestry, and biologically-derived wastes. To date, the use of enzymes as biocatalysts for lipid-based bioproducts processing has shown marked increase. This is mainly due to the fact...... that cost benefit derived from enzymatic processing such as enzyme specificity, higher product purity and lesser or none toxic waste disposal has surpassed the cost of biocatalysts itself. This chapter provided insights into distinct enzymes characteristics essential in industrial processing especially...... enzymes kinetics. Understanding of enzyme kinetics is important especially in designing efficient reaction set-ups including type of bioreactors, reaction conditions and reusability of biocatalysts to ensure efficient running cost. A brief review of state-of-the-art in industrial applications of enzymes...

  16. Nucleoside-Lipid-Based Nanocarriers for Sorafenib Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benizri, Sebastien; Ferey, Ludivine; Alies, Bruno; Mebarek, Naila; Vacher, Gaelle; Appavoo, Ananda; Staedel, Cathy; Gaudin, Karen; Barthélémy, Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Although the application of sorafenib, a small inhibitor of tyrosine protein kinases, to cancer treatments remains a worldwide option in chemotherapy, novel strategies are needed to address the low water solubility (drug. In this context, the use of nanocarriers is currently investigated in order to overcome these drawbacks. In this contribution, we report a new type of sorafenib-based nanoparticles stabilized by hybrid nucleoside-lipids. The solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) showed negative or positive zeta potential values depending on the nucleoside-lipid charge. Transmission electron microscopy of sorafenib-loaded SLNs revealed parallelepiped nanoparticles of about 200 nm. Biological studies achieved on four different cell lines, including liver and breast cancers, revealed enhanced anticancer activities of Sorafenib-based SLNs compared to the free drug. Importantly, contrast phase microscopy images recorded after incubation of cancer cells in the presence of SLNs at high concentration in sorafenib (> 80 μM) revealed a total cancer cell death in all cases. These results highlight the potential of nucleoside-lipid-based SLNs as drug delivery systems.

  17. RAB-10 Regulates Dendritic Branching by Balancing Dendritic Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Caitlin A.; Yan, Jing; Howell, Audrey S.; Dong, Xintong; Shen, Kang

    2015-01-01

    The construction of a large dendritic arbor requires robust growth and the precise delivery of membrane and protein cargoes to specific subcellular regions of the developing dendrite. How the microtubule-based vesicular trafficking and sorting systems are regulated to distribute these dendritic development factors throughout the dendrite is not well understood. Here we identify the small GTPase RAB-10 and the exocyst complex as critical regulators of dendrite morphogenesis and patterning in the C. elegans sensory neuron PVD. In rab-10 mutants, PVD dendritic branches are reduced in the posterior region of the cell but are excessive in the distal anterior region of the cell. We also demonstrate that the dendritic branch distribution within PVD depends on the balance between the molecular motors kinesin-1/UNC-116 and dynein, and we propose that RAB-10 regulates dendrite morphology by balancing the activity of these motors to appropriately distribute branching factors, including the transmembrane receptor DMA-1. PMID:26633194

  18. Exploiting the Physicochemical Properties of Dendritic Polymers for Environmental and Biological Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Geitner, Nicholas K.; Sarupria, Sapna; Ke, Pu Chun

    2013-04-07

    In this Perspective we first examine the rich physicochemical properties of dendritic polymers for hosting cations, anions, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. We then extrapolate these conceptual discussions to the use of dendritic polymers for humic acid antifouling, oil dispersion, copper sensing, and fullerenol remediation. In addition, we review the state-of-the-art of dendrimer research and elaborate on their 10 implications for water purification, environmental remediation, nanomedicine, and energy harvesting.

  19. Oral delivery of peptides and proteins using lipid-based drug delivery systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ping; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Müllertz, Anette

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In order to successfully develop lipid-based drug delivery systems (DDS) for oral administration of peptides and proteins, it is important to gain an understanding of the colloid structures formed by these DDS, the mode of peptide and protein incorporation as well as the mechanism...... by which intestinal absorption of peptides and proteins is promoted. AREAS COVERED: The present paper reviews the literature on lipid-based DDS, employed for oral delivery of peptides and proteins and highlights the mechanisms by which the different lipid-based carriers are expected to overcome the two...... and proteins. EXPERT OPINION: Lipid-based DDS are safe and suitable for oral delivery of peptides and proteins. Significant progress has been made in this area with several technologies on clinical trials. However, a better understanding of the mechanism of action in vivo is needed in order to improve...

  20. Applications of lipid based formulation technologies in the delivery of biotechnology-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, Lissinda H; Marais, Etienne B; Mohammed, Faruq; Kotzé, Awie F

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades several new biotechnologically-based therapeutics have been developed due to progress in genetic engineering. A growing challenge facing pharmaceutical scientists is formulating these compounds into oral dosage forms with adequate bioavailability. An increasingly popular approach to formulate biotechnology-based therapeutics is the use of lipid based formulation technologies. This review highlights the importance of lipid based drug delivery systems in the formulation of oral biotechnology based therapeutics including peptides, proteins, DNA, siRNA and vaccines. The different production procedures used to achieve high encapsulation efficiencies of the bioactives are discussed, as well as the factors influencing the choice of excipient. Lipid based colloidal drug delivery systems including liposomes and solid lipid nanoparticles are reviewed with a focus on recent advances and updates. We further describe microemulsions and self-emulsifying drug delivery systems and recent findings on bioactive delivery. We conclude the review with a few examples on novel lipid based formulation technologies.

  1. Dendritic cell neoplasms: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairouz, Sebastien; Hashash, Jana; Kabbara, Wadih; McHayleh, Wassim; Tabbara, Imad A

    2007-10-01

    Dendritic cell neoplasms are rare tumors that are being recognized with increasing frequency. They were previously classified as lymphomas, sarcomas, or histiocytic neoplasms. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies dendritic cell neoplasms into five groups: Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, Langerhans' cell sarcoma, Interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma/tumor, Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma/tumor, and Dendritic cell sarcoma, not specified otherwise (Jaffe, World Health Organization classification of tumors 2001; 273-289). Recently, Pileri et al. provided a comprehensive immunohistochemical classification of histiocytic and dendritic cell tumors (Pileri et al., Histopathology 2002;59:161-167). In this article, a concise overview regarding the pathological, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of follicular dendritic, interdigitating dendritic, and Langerhans' cell tumors is presented.

  2. Platform for Lipid Based Nanocarriers' Formulation Components and their Potential Effects: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Ragwa Mohamed; Youssef, Nancy Abdel Hamid Abou; Kassem, Abeer Ahmed

    2017-11-27

    Lipid based nanocarriers have gained recently enormous interest for pharmaceutical application. They have the potential to provide controlled drug release and to target the drug to a specific area. In addition, lipid based nanocarriers can improve the bioavailability of drugs suffering from high hepatic first-pass metabolism, by enhancing their transport via the lymphatic system. The main components of lipid based nanocarriers are lipids and surfactants. Both have great influence on the prepared lipid based systems characteristics. The criteria for their selection are much related to physicochemical properties of the drug and the required administration route. This work gives an overview on the effect of both the type and amount of lipids and surfactants used in the manufacture of lipid based nanocarriers on their behavior and characteristics. Recent studies revealed that the properties of the final product including; particle size, homogeneity, drug loading capacity, zeta potential, drug release profile, stability, permeability, pharmacokinetic properties, crystallinity and cytotoxicity, may be significantly influenced not only by the type but also the amount of the lipids and/or surfactants included in the formulation of the lipid based nanocarriers. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Modification of dendritic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  4. Oral delivery of peptides and proteins using lipid-based drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Müllertz, Anette

    2012-10-01

    In order to successfully develop lipid-based drug delivery systems (DDS) for oral administration of peptides and proteins, it is important to gain an understanding of the colloid structures formed by these DDS, the mode of peptide and protein incorporation as well as the mechanism by which intestinal absorption of peptides and proteins is promoted. The present paper reviews the literature on lipid-based DDS, employed for oral delivery of peptides and proteins and highlights the mechanisms by which the different lipid-based carriers are expected to overcome the two most important barriers (extensive enzymatic degradation and poor transmucosal permeability). This paper also gives a clear-cut idea about advantages and drawbacks of using different lipidic colloidal carriers ((micro)emulsions, solid lipid core particles and liposomes) for oral delivery of peptides and proteins. Lipid-based DDS are safe and suitable for oral delivery of peptides and proteins. Significant progress has been made in this area with several technologies on clinical trials. However, a better understanding of the mechanism of action in vivo is needed in order to improve the design and development of lipid-based DDS with the desired bioavailability and therapeutic profile.

  5. Assessing cellular toxicities in fibroblasts upon exposure to lipid-based nanoparticles: a high content analysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmesky, Leonardo J.; Shuman, Michal; Goldsmith, Meir; Weil, Miguel; Peer, Dan

    2011-12-01

    Lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) are widely used for the delivery of drugs and nucleic acids. Although most of them are considered safe, there is confusing evidence in the literature regarding their potential cellular toxicities. Moreover, little is known about the recovery process cells undergo after a cytotoxic insult. We have previously studied the systemic effects of common LNPs with different surface charge (cationic, anionic, neutral) and revealed that positively charged LNPs ((+)LNPs) activate pro-inflammatory cytokines and induce interferon response by acting as an agonist of Toll-like receptor 4 on immune cells. In this study, we focused on the response of human fibroblasts exposed to LNPs and their cellular recovery process. To this end, we used image-based high content analysis (HCA). Using this strategy, we were able to show simultaneously, in several intracellular parameters, that fibroblasts can recover from the cytotoxic effects of (+)LNPs. The use of HCA opens new avenues in understanding cellular response and nanotoxicity and may become a valuable tool for screening safe materials for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  6. Assessing cellular toxicities in fibroblasts upon exposure to lipid-based nanoparticles: a high content analysis approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solmesky, Leonardo J; Weil, Miguel; Shuman, Michal; Goldsmith, Meir; Peer, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) are widely used for the delivery of drugs and nucleic acids. Although most of them are considered safe, there is confusing evidence in the literature regarding their potential cellular toxicities. Moreover, little is known about the recovery process cells undergo after a cytotoxic insult. We have previously studied the systemic effects of common LNPs with different surface charge (cationic, anionic, neutral) and revealed that positively charged LNPs ((+)LNPs) activate pro-inflammatory cytokines and induce interferon response by acting as an agonist of Toll-like receptor 4 on immune cells. In this study, we focused on the response of human fibroblasts exposed to LNPs and their cellular recovery process. To this end, we used image-based high content analysis (HCA). Using this strategy, we were able to show simultaneously, in several intracellular parameters, that fibroblasts can recover from the cytotoxic effects of (+)LNPs. The use of HCA opens new avenues in understanding cellular response and nanotoxicity and may become a valuable tool for screening safe materials for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  7. Single Ih channels in pyramidal neuron dendrites: properties, distribution, and impact on action potential output

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, Maarten H. P.; Hallermann, Stefan; Stuart, Greg J.

    2006-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) plays an important role in regulating neuronal excitability, yet its native single-channel properties in the brain are essentially unknown. Here we use variance-mean analysis to study the properties of single Ih channels in the apical dendrites of

  8. Toward the establishment of standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations, part 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Hywel D; Sassene, Philip; Kleberg, Karen

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recent studies have shown that digestion of lipid-based formulations (LBFs) can stimulate both supersaturation and precipitation. The current study has evaluated the drug, formulation and dose-dependence of the supersaturation - precipitation balance for a range of LBFs. METHODS: Type I,...

  9. Lipid-based liquid biofuels from autotrophic microalgae: energetic and environmental performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, L.

    2013-01-01

    Commercial cultivation of autotrophic microalgae for food production dates back to the 1950s. Autotrophic microalgae have also been proposed as a source for lipid-based liquid biofuels. As yet, there is no commercial production of such biofuels and estimated near-term prices are far in excess of

  10. Isomerization of propargyl cation to cyclopropenyl cation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    step) for isomeri- zation of the linear propargyl cation to ..... C3, C4 and C5. The ZPE corrections in each case are derived from the. B3LYP calculations. ..... the converse of which gives the relative capacity of the. LPD's to stabilize TS6 with respect ...

  11. Dendrite Injury Triggers DLK-Independent Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Stone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Axon injury triggers regeneration through activation of a conserved kinase cascade, which includes the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK. Although dendrites are damaged during stroke, traumatic brain injury, and seizure, it is not known whether mature neurons monitor dendrite injury and initiate regeneration. We probed the response to dendrite damage using model Drosophila neurons. Two larval neuron types regrew dendrites in distinct ways after all dendrites were removed. Dendrite regeneration was also triggered by injury in adults. Next, we tested whether dendrite injury was initiated with the same machinery as axon injury. Surprisingly, DLK, JNK, and fos were dispensable for dendrite regeneration. Moreover, this MAP kinase pathway was not activated by injury to dendrites. Thus, neurons respond to dendrite damage and initiate regeneration without using the conserved DLK cascade that triggers axon regeneration.

  12. Current and emerging lipid-based systems for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Sumeet K; Sachdeva, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Developing a transdermal drug delivery system is a challenging task considering the selective permeability of the skin and the physicochemical properties the drug must possess to permeate through the skin. Lipid-based drug delivery systems have contributed a great deal in this direction in the last few decades, and thereby have helped to expand the range of therapeutic molecules that can be delivered through the skin in a safe and effective manner. Additionally, vesicular delivery systems such as nanoparticles and emulsions have also played important roles in providing alternative novel approaches for drug delivery. In this article, we will discuss some of the current and future lipid-based systems for transdermal drug delivery along with the associated challenges.

  13. Enhanced bioavailability of nerve growth factor with phytantriol lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles in cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Meng Bu,1,2 Jingling Tang,3 Yinghui Wei,4 Yanhui Sun,1 Xinyu Wang,1 Linhua Wu,2 Hongzhuo Liu1 1School of Pharmacy, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmacy, the Second Affiliated Hospital, 3School of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People’s Republic of China; 4College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Supplementation of exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF into the cochlea of deafened animals rescues spiral ganglion cells from degeneration. However, a safe and potent delivery of therapeutic proteins, such as NGF, to spiral ganglion cells remains one of the greatest challenges. This study presents the development of self-assembled cubic lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles to enhance inner ear bioavailability of bioactive NGF via a round window membrane route.Methods: A novel nanocarrier-entrapped NGF was developed based on phytantriol by a liquid precursor dilution, with Pluronic® F127 and propylene glycol as the surfactant and solubilizer, respectively. Upon dilution of the liquid lipid precursors, monodispersed submicron-sized particles with a slight negative charge formed spontaneously.Results: Biological activity of entrapped NGF was assessed using pheochromocytoma cells with NGF-loaded reservoirs to induce significant neuronal outgrowth, similar to that seen in free NGF-treated controls. Finally, a 3.28-fold increase in inner ear bioavailability was observed after administration of phytantriol lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles as compared to free drug, contributing to an enhanced drug permeability of the round window membrane. Conclusion: Data presented here demonstrate the potential of lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles to improve the outcomes of patients bearing cochlear implants. Keywords: nerve growth factor, lipid-based crystalline nanoparticles, PC12 cells, inner ear drug

  14. Distribution and function of HCN channels in the apical dendritic tuft of neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, Mark T; Magee, Jeffrey C; Williams, Stephen R

    2015-01-21

    The apical tuft is the most remote area of the dendritic tree of neocortical pyramidal neurons. Despite its distal location, the apical dendritic tuft of layer 5 pyramidal neurons receives substantial excitatory synaptic drive and actively processes corticocortical input during behavior. The properties of the voltage-activated ion channels that regulate synaptic integration in tuft dendrites have, however, not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we use electrophysiological and optical approaches to examine the subcellular distribution and function of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated nonselective cation (HCN) channels in rat layer 5B pyramidal neurons. Outside-out patch recordings demonstrated that the amplitude and properties of ensemble HCN channel activity were uniform in patches excised from distal apical dendritic trunk and tuft sites. Simultaneous apical dendritic tuft and trunk whole-cell current-clamp recordings revealed that the pharmacological blockade of HCN channels decreased voltage compartmentalization and enhanced the generation and spread of apical dendritic tuft and trunk regenerative activity. Furthermore, multisite two-photon glutamate uncaging demonstrated that HCN channels control the amplitude and duration of synaptically evoked regenerative activity in the distal apical dendritic tuft. In contrast, at proximal apical dendritic trunk and somatic recording sites, the blockade of HCN channels decreased excitability. Dynamic-clamp experiments revealed that these compartment-specific actions of HCN channels were heavily influenced by the local and distributed impact of the high density of HCN channels in the distal apical dendritic arbor. The properties and subcellular distribution pattern of HCN channels are therefore tuned to regulate the interaction between integration compartments in layer 5B pyramidal neurons. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351024-14$15.00/0.

  15. Cation Exchange Water Softeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense released a notice of intent to develop a specification for cation exchange water softeners. The program has made the decision not to move forward with a spec at this time, but is making this information available.

  16. Lipid-based formulations for oral administration of poorly water-soluble drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Huiling; Holm, René; Müllertz, Anette

    2013-01-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems have shown great potentials in oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs, primarily for lipophilic drugs, with several successfully marketed products. Pre-dissolving drugs in lipids, surfactants, or mixtures of lipids and surfactants omits the dissolving....../dissolution step, which is a potential rate limiting factor for oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs. Lipids not only vary in structures and physiochemical properties, but also in their digestibility and absorption pathway; therefore selection of lipid excipients and dosage form has a pronounced effect...

  17. Clinical studies with oral lipid based formulations of poorly soluble compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatouros, Dimitrios; Karpf, Ditte M; Nielsen, Flemming S

    2007-01-01

    . Several drug products intended for oral administration have been marketed utilizing lipid and surfactant based formulations. Sandimmune((R)) and Sandimmune Neoral((R)) (cyclosporin A, Novartis), Norvir((R)) (ritonavir), and Fortovase((R)) (saquinavir) have been formulated in self-emulsifying drug delivery...... systems (SEDDS). This review summarizes published pharmacokinetic studies of orally administered lipid based formulations of poorly aqueous soluble drugs in human subjects. Special attention has been paid to the physicochemical characteristics of the formulations, when available and the impact...

  18. Lipid-Based Nanovectors for Targeting of CD44-Overexpressing Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Arpicco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA is a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan that exists in living systems, and it is a major component of the extracellular matrix. The hyaluronic acid receptor CD44 is found at low levels on the surface of epithelial, haematopoietic, and neuronal cells and is overexpressed in many cancer cells particularly in tumour initiating cells. HA has been therefore used as ligand attached to HA-lipid-based nanovectors for the active targeting of small or large active molecules for the treatment of cancer. This paper describes the different approaches employed for the preparation, characterization, and evaluation of these potent delivery systems.

  19. Calibrating passive sampling and passive dosing techniques to lipid based concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Philipp; Schmidt, Stine Nørgaard; Annika, A.

    2011-01-01

    Equilibrium sampling into various formats of the silicone polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is increasingly used to measure the exposure of hydrophobic organic chemicals in environmental matrices, and passive dosing from silicone is increasingly used to control and maintain their exposure in laboratory...... coated vials and with Head Space Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME) yielded lipid based concentrations that were in good agreement with each other, but about a factor of two higher than measured lipid-normalized concentrations in the organisms. Passive dosing was applied to bioconcentration...

  20. Coding and decoding with dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsi, Athanasia; Kastellakis, George; Psarrou, Maria; Anastasakis, Stelios; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of complex, voltage dependent mechanisms in the dendrites of multiple neuron types, great effort has been devoted in search of a direct link between dendritic properties and specific neuronal functions. Over the last few years, new experimental techniques have allowed the visualization and probing of dendritic anatomy, plasticity and integrative schemes with unprecedented detail. This vast amount of information has caused a paradigm shift in the study of memory, one of the most important pursuits in Neuroscience, and calls for the development of novel theories and models that will unify the available data according to some basic principles. Traditional models of memory considered neural cells as the fundamental processing units in the brain. Recent studies however are proposing new theories in which memory is not only formed by modifying the synaptic connections between neurons, but also by modifications of intrinsic and anatomical dendritic properties as well as fine tuning of the wiring diagram. In this review paper we present previous studies along with recent findings from our group that support a key role of dendrites in information processing, including the encoding and decoding of new memories, both at the single cell and the network level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Detection of zinc translocation into apical dendrite of CA1 pyramidal neuron after electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Sang Won

    2009-02-15

    Translocation of the endogenous cation zinc from presynaptic terminals to postsynaptic neurons after brain insult has been implicated as a potential neurotoxic event. Several studies have previously demonstrated that a brief electrical stimulation is sufficient to induce the translocation of zinc from presynaptic vesicles into the cytoplasm (soma) of postsynaptic neurons. In the present work I have extended those findings in three ways: (i) providing evidence that zinc translocation occurs into apical dendrites, (ii) presenting data that there is an apparent translocation into apical dendrites when only a zinc-containing synaptic input is stimulated, and (iii) presenting data that there is no zinc translocation into apical dendrite of ZnT3 KO mice following electrical stimulation. Hippocampal slices were preloaded with the "trappable" zinc fluorescent probe, Newport Green. After washout, a single apical dendrite in the stratum radiatum of hippocampal CA1 area was selected and focused on. Burst stimulation (100Hz, 500microA, 0.2ms, monopolar) was delivered to either the adjacent Schaffer-collateral inputs (zinc-containing) or to the adjacent temporo-ammonic inputs (zinc-free) to the CA1 dendrites. Stimulation of the Schaffer collaterals increased the dendritic fluorescence, which was blocked by TTX, low-Ca medium, or the extracellular zinc chelator, CaEDTA. Stimulation of the temporo-ammonic pathway caused no significant rise in the fluorescence. Genetic depletion of vesicular zinc by ZnT3 KO showed no stimulation-induced apical dendrite zinc rise. The present study provides evidence that synaptically released zinc translocates into postsynaptic neurons through the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons during physiological synaptic activity.

  2. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    role of dendritic cells in pancreatitis. Dendritic cells are professional antigen presenting cells which initiate innate and adaptive immune... Lymphoid -tissue-specific homing of bone- marrow-derived dendritic cells . Blood. 113:6638–6647. http://dx.doi .org/10.1182/blood-2009-02-204321 Dapito...Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0313 TITLE: Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. George Miller

  3. Cation radicals of xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinato, Mary Grace I; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Deal, Cailin; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2007-10-01

    Carotenes and xanthophylls are well known to act as electron donors in redox processes. This ability is thought to be associated with the inhibition of oxidative reactions in reaction centers and light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, cation radicals of neoxanthin, violaxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, beta-cryptoxanthin, beta-carotene, and lycopene were generated in solution using ferric chloride as an oxidant and then studied by absorption spectroscopy. The investigation provides a view toward understanding the molecular features that determine the spectral properties of cation radicals of carotenoids. The absorption spectral data reveal a shift to longer wavelength with increasing pi-chain length. However, zeaxanthin and beta-cryptoxanthin exhibit cation radical spectra blue-shifted compared to that of beta-carotene, despite all of these molecules having 11 conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. CIS molecular orbital theory quantum computations interpret this effect as due to the hydroxyl groups in the terminal rings selectively stabilizing the highest occupied molecular orbitals of preferentially populated s-trans-isomers. The data are expected to be useful in the analysis of spectral results from PSII pigment-protein complexes seeking to understand the role of carotene and xanthophyll cation radicals in regulating excited state energy flow, in protecting PSII reaction centers against photoinhibition, and in dissipating excess light energy absorbed by photosynthetic organisms but not used for photosynthesis.

  4. Identifi cation of Sectarianism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinovich Vladimir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available «New religious movements and society» is traditionally one of the most sophisticated topics in the area of new religions studies. Its problem field is so huge that up to now by far not all important research themes where even touched by scientists from all over the world. The problem of the process of the identification of sectarianism by diff erent societal institutions is one of such untouched themes that is taken as the main subject of this article. This process by itself is an inseparable part of the every societal deliberate reaction to the very existence of unconventional religiosity, its unstructured and mainly structured types. The focal point of the article is step-by-step analysis of the general structure elements of the process of the identification of sectarianism without any reference to the specific time and place of its flow. Special attention is paid to the analysis of the subjects of the identification of sectarianism, to the criteria for religious groups to be qualified as new religious movements, and to the specific features of the process of documents filtration. The causes of selective perception of sectarianism are disclosed. Some main consequences and unpredictable outcomes of the process of the identification of sectarianism are described.

  5. Development of New Lipid-Based Paclitaxel Nanoparticles Using Sequential Simplex Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaowei; Mattingly, Cynthia A.; Tseng, Michael; Cho, Moo; Adams, Val R.; Mumper, Russell J.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to develop Cremophor-free lipid-based paclitaxel (PX) nanoparticle formulations prepared from warm microemulsion precursors. To identify and optimize new nanoparticles, experimental design was performed combining Taguchi array and sequential simplex optimization. The combination of Taguchi array and sequential simplex optimization efficiently directed the design of paclitaxel nanoparticles. Two optimized paclitaxel nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained: G78 NPs composed of glyceryl tridodecanoate (GT) and polyoxyethylene 20-stearyl ether (Brij 78), and BTM NPs composed of Miglyol 812, Brij 78 and D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS). Both nanoparticles successfully entrapped paclitaxel at a final concentration of 150 μg/ml (over 6% drug loading) with particle sizes less than 200 nm and over 85% of entrapment efficiency. These novel paclitaxel nanoparticles were stable at 4°C over three months and in PBS at 37°C over 102 hours as measured by physical stability. Release of paclitaxel was slow and sustained without initial burst release. Cytotoxicity studies in MDA-MB-231 cancer cells showed that both nanoparticles have similar anticancer activities compared to Taxol®. Interestingly, PX BTM nanocapsules could be lyophilized without cryoprotectants. The lyophilized powder comprised only of PX BTM NPs in water could be rapidly rehydrated with complete retention of original physicochemical properties, in-vitro release properties, and cytotoxicity profile. Sequential Simplex Optimization has been utilized to identify promising new lipid-based paclitaxel nanoparticles having useful attributes. PMID:19111929

  6. An inverse approach for elucidating dendritic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Torben-Nielsen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We outline an inverse approach for investigating dendritic function-structure relationships by optimizing dendritic trees for a-priori chosen computational functions. The inverse approach can be applied in two different ways. First, we can use it as a `hypothesis generator' in which we optimize dendrites for a function of general interest. The optimization yields an artificial dendrite that is subsequently compared to real neurons. This comparison potentially allows us to propose hypotheses about the function of real neurons. In this way, we investigated dendrites that optimally perform input-order detection. Second, we can use it as a `function confirmation' by optimizing dendrites for functions hypothesized to be performed by classes of neurons. If the optimized, artificial, dendrites resemble the dendrites of real neurons the artificial dendrites corroborate the hypothesized function of the real neuron. Moreover, properties of the artificial dendrites can lead to predictions about yet unmeasured properties. In this way, we investigated wide-field motion integration performed by the VS cells of the fly visual system. In outlining the inverse approach and two applications, we also elaborate on the nature of dendritic function. We furthermore discuss the role of optimality in assigning functions to dendrites and point out interesting future directions.

  7. High dendritic expression of Ih in the proximity of the axon origin controls the integrative properties of nigral dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Dominique; Seutin, Vincent

    2015-11-15

    The hyperpolarization-activated cation current Ih is expressed in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra, but the subcellular distribution of the current and its role in synaptic integration remain unknown. We used cell-attached patch recordings to determine the localization profile of Ih along the somatodendritic axis of nigral dopamine neurons in slices from young rats. Ih density is higher in axon-bearing dendrites, in a membrane area close to the axon origin, than in the soma and axon-lacking dendrites. Dual current-clamp recordings revealed a similar contribution of Ih to the waveform of single excitatory postsynaptic potentials throughout the somatodendritic domain. The Ih blocker ZD 7288 increased the temporal summation in all dendrites with a comparable effect in axon- and non-axon dendrites. The strategic position of Ih in the proximity of the axon may influence importantly transitions between pacemaker and bursting activities and consequently the downstream release of dopamine. Dendrites of most neurons express voltage-gated ion channels in their membrane. In combination with passive properties, active currents confer to dendrites a high computational potential. The hyperpolarization-activated cation current Ih present in the dendrites of some pyramidal neurons affects their membrane and integration properties, synaptic plasticity and higher functions such as memory. A gradient of increasing h-channel density towards distal dendrites has been found to be responsible for the location independence of excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) waveform and temporal summation in cortical and hippocampal pyramidal cells. However, reports on other cell types revealed that smoother gradients or even linear distributions of Ih can achieve homogeneous temporal summation. Although the existence of a robust, slowly activating Ih current has been repeatedly demonstrated in nigral dopamine neurons, its subcellular distribution and precise role in synaptic integration

  8. Neutrophils, dendritic cells and Toxoplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkers, Eric Y; Butcher, Barbara A; Del Rio, Laura; Bennouna, Soumaya

    2004-03-09

    Toxoplasma gondii rapidly elicits strong Type 1 cytokine-based immunity. The necessity for this response is well illustrated by the example of IFN-gamma and IL-12 gene knockout mice that rapidly succumb to the effects of acute infection. The parasite itself is skilled at sparking complex interactions in the innate immune system that lead to protective immunity. Neutrophils are one of the first cell types to arrive at the site of infection, and the cells release several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in response to Toxoplasma. Dendritic cells are an important source of IL-12 during infection with T. gondii and other microbial pathogens, and they are also specialized for high-level antigen presentation to T lymphocytes. Tachyzoites express at least two types of molecules that trigger innate immune cell cytokine production. One of these involves Toll-like receptor/MyD88 pathways common to many microbial pathogens. The second pathway is less conventional and involves molecular mimicry between a parasite cyclophilin and host CC chemokine receptor 5-binding ligands. Neutrophils, dendritic cells and Toxoplasma work together to elicit the immune response required for host survival. Cytokine and chemokine cross-talk between parasite-triggered neutrophils and dendritic cells results in recruitment, maturation and activation of the latter. Neutrophil-empowered dendritic cells possess properties expected of highly potent antigen presenting cells that drive T helper 1 generation.

  9. Advanced dendritic web growth development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A program to develop the technology of the silicon dendritic web ribbon growth process is examined. The effort is being concentrated on the area rate and quality requirements necessary to meet the JPL/DOE goals for terrestrial PV applications. Closed loop web growth system development and stress reduction for high area rate growth is considered.

  10. Electrodeposition of Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites assisted by Faradaic AC-electroosmosis flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Jianlong; Li, Pengwei; Sang, Shengbo, E-mail: sbsang@tyut.edu.cn; Zhang, Wendong, E-mail: wdzhang@tyut.edu.cn; Li, Gang; Hu, Jie [Micro and Nano-system Research Centre, College of Information Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, 030024, Taiyuan (China); Zhou, Zhaoying, E-mail: zhouzy@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Yang, Xing; Dong, Hualai [MEMS Laboratory, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, 100084, Beijing (China)

    2014-03-15

    Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites were synthesized successfully from the corresponding aqueous solution via the AC electrodeposition method. Both of the morphologies and compositions could be tuned by the electrolyte concentration and AC frequency. The prepared bimetallic dendrites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV–vis spectroscopy. The underlying dendrite growth mechanism was then proposed in the context of the Directed Electrochemical Nanowires Assembly (DENA) models. Owing to the unscreened voltage dropping in the electrolyte bulk, electromigration dominates the species flux process, and cations tend to accumulate in areas with strong electric field intensity, such as electrode edges. Moreover, Faradaic AC-electro-osmosis (ACEO) flow could increase the effective diffusion layer thickness in these areas during the electrochemical reaction, and leads to dendrite growth. Further Micro-Raman observations illustrated that the Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites exhibited pronounced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity, using 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MP) as model molecules.

  11. Electrodeposition of Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites assisted by Faradaic AC-electroosmosis flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianlong Ji

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites were synthesized successfully from the corresponding aqueous solution via the AC electrodeposition method. Both of the morphologies and compositions could be tuned by the electrolyte concentration and AC frequency. The prepared bimetallic dendrites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and UV–vis spectroscopy. The underlying dendrite growth mechanism was then proposed in the context of the Directed Electrochemical Nanowires Assembly (DENA models. Owing to the unscreened voltage dropping in the electrolyte bulk, electromigration dominates the species flux process, and cations tend to accumulate in areas with strong electric field intensity, such as electrode edges. Moreover, Faradaic AC-electro-osmosis (ACEO flow could increase the effective diffusion layer thickness in these areas during the electrochemical reaction, and leads to dendrite growth. Further Micro-Raman observations illustrated that the Au/Ag bimetallic dendrites exhibited pronounced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS activity, using 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MP as model molecules.

  12. Toward the establishment of standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations, part 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Hywel D; Sassene, Philip; Kleberg, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The Lipid Formulation Classification System Consortium looks to develop standardized in vitro tests and to generate much-needed performance criteria for lipid-based formulations (LBFs). This article highlights the value of performing a second, more stressful digestion test to identify LBFs near...... a performance threshold and to facilitate lead formulation selection in instances where several LBF prototypes perform adequately under standard digestion conditions (but where further discrimination is necessary). Stressed digestion tests can be designed based on an understanding of the factors that affect LBF...... development, and facilitate dialogue with the regulatory authorities. This classification system is based on the concept that performance evaluations across three in vitro tests, designed to subject a LBF to progressively more challenging conditions, will enable effective LBF discrimination and performance...

  13. Lipidomics in translational research and the clinical significance of lipid-based biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Daniel J; Hoeferlin, L Alexis; Chalfant, Charles E

    2017-11-01

    Lipidomics is a rapidly developing field of study that focuses on the identification and quantitation of various lipid species in the lipidome. Lipidomics has now emerged in the forefront of scientific research due to the importance of lipids in metabolism, cancer, and disease. Using both targeted and untargeted mass spectrometry as a tool for analysis, progress in the field has rapidly progressed in the last decade. Having the ability to assess these small molecules in vivo has led to better understanding of several lipid-driven mechanisms and the identification of lipid-based biomarkers in neurodegenerative disease, cancer, sepsis, wound healing, and pre-eclampsia. Biomarker identification and mechanistic understanding of specific lipid pathways linked to a disease's pathologies can form the foundation in the development of novel therapeutics in hopes of curing human disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Implications of formulation design on lipid-based nanostructured carrier system for drug delivery to brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunkhe, Sachin S; Bhatia, Neela M; Bhatia, Manish S

    2016-05-01

    The aim of present investigation was to formulate and develop lipid-based nanostructured carriers (NLCs) containing Idebenone (IDE) for delivery to brain. Attempts have been made to evaluate IDE NLCs for its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile through the objective of enhancement in bioavailability and effectivity of drug. Nanoprecipitation technique was used for development of drug loaded NLCs. The components solid lipid Precirol ATO 5, oil Miglyol 840, surfactants Tween 80 and Labrasol have been screened out for formulation development by consideration of preformulation parameters including solubility, Required Hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) of lipids and stability study. Developed IDE NLCs were subjected for particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency (%EE), crystallographic investigation, transmission electron microscopy, in vitro drug release, pharmacokinetics, in vivo and stability study. Formulation under investigation has particle size 174.1 ± 2.6 nm, zeta potential -18.65 ± 1.13 mV and% EE 90.68 ± 2.90. Crystallographic studies exemplified for partial amorphization of IDE by molecularly dispersion within lipid crust. IDE NLCs showed drug release 93.56 ± 0.39% at end of 24 h by following Higuchi model which necessitates for appropriate drug delivery with enhancement in bioavailability of drug by 4.6-fold in plasma and 2.8-fold in brain over plain drug loaded aqueous dispersions. In vivo studies revealed that effect of drug was enhanced by prepared lipid nanocarriers. IDE lipid-based nanostructured carriers could have potential for efficient drug delivery to brain with enhancement in bioavailability of drug over the conventional formulations.

  15. Microtubule nucleation and organization in dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delandre, Caroline; Amikura, Reiko; Moore, Adrian W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendrite branching is an essential process for building complex nervous systems. It determines the number, distribution and integration of inputs into a neuron, and is regulated to create the diverse dendrite arbor branching patterns characteristic of different neuron types. The microtubule cytoskeleton is critical to provide structure and exert force during dendrite branching. It also supports the functional requirements of dendrites, reflected by differential microtubule architectural organization between neuron types, illustrated here for sensory neurons. Both anterograde and retrograde microtubule polymerization occur within growing dendrites, and recent studies indicate that branching is enhanced by anterograde microtubule polymerization events in nascent branches. The polarities of microtubule polymerization events are regulated by the position and orientation of microtubule nucleation events in the dendrite arbor. Golgi outposts are a primary microtubule nucleation center in dendrites and share common nucleation machinery with the centrosome. In addition, pre-existing dendrite microtubules may act as nucleation sites. We discuss how balancing the activities of distinct nucleation machineries within the growing dendrite can alter microtubule polymerization polarity and dendrite branching, and how regulating this balance can generate neuron type-specific morphologies. PMID:27097122

  16. Phase field modeling of dendritic coarsening during isothermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yutuo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic coarsening in Al-2mol%Si alloy during isothermal solidification at 880K was investigated by phase field modeling. Three coarsening mechanisms operate in the alloy: (a melting of small dendrite arms; (b coalescence of dendrites near the tips leading to the entrapment of liquid droplets; (c smoothing of dendrites. Dendrite melting is found to be dominant in the stage of dendritic growth, whereas coalescence of dendrites and smoothing of dendrites are dominant during isothermal holding. The simulated results provide a better understanding of dendrite coarsening during isothermal solidification.

  17. Thermosolutal convection during dendritic solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Nandapurkar, P.; Poirier, D. R.; Felicelli, S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for directional solidification of a binary alloy including a dendritic region underlying an all-liquid region. It is assumed initially that there exists a nonconvecting state with planar isotherms and isoconcentrates solidifying at a constant velocity. The stability of this system has been analyzed and nonlinear calculations are performed that show the effect of convection in the solidification process when the system is unstable. Results of calculations for various cases defined by the initial temperature gradient at the dendrite tips and varying strength of the gravitational field are presented for systems involving lead-tin alloys. The results show that the systems are stable for a gravitational constant of 0.0001 g(0) and that convection can be suppressed by appropriate choice of the container's size for higher values of the gravitational constant. It is also concluded that for the lead-tin systems considered, convection in the mushy zone is not significant below the upper 20 percent of the dendritic zone, if al all.

  18. A novel lipid-based nanomicelle of docetaxel: evaluation of antitumor activity and biodistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mingshu Ma,1 Yanli Hao,1 Nan Liu,1 Zhe Yin,1 Lan Wang,1 Xingjie Liang,2 Xiaoning Zhang11Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China; 2National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Beijing, ChinaPurpose: A lipid-based, nanomicelle-loaded docetaxel (M-DOC was designed and characterized. Optical imaging was employed to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and antitumor efficacy of docetaxel in vivo.Materials and methods: The M-DOC was prepared using the emulsion-diffusion method. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering were used to assess the morphology and particle size of the M-DOC. Critical micelle concentrations, their stability under physiological conditions, and their encapsulation efficiency – as measured by high-performance liquid chromatography – were assessed. Pharmacological features were evaluated in two different animal models by comparing M-DOC treatments with docetaxel injections (I-DOC. Bioluminescence imaging was used to assess antitumor activity and docetaxel distribution in vivo, using nude mice injected with luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231 human breast tumor cells. In addition, animals injected with B16 melanoma cells were used to measure survival time and docetaxel distribution.Results: The M-DOC was prepared as round, uniform spheres with an effective diameter of 20.8 nm. The critical micelle concentration of the original emulsion was 0.06%. Satisfactory encapsulation efficiency (87.6% ± 3.0% and 12-hour stability were achieved. Xenograft results demonstrated that the M-DOC was more effective in inhibiting tumor growth, without significantly changing body weight. Survival was prolonged by 12.6% in the M-DOC group. Tumor growth inhibitory rates in the M-DOC and I-DOC groups were 91.2% and 57.8% in volume and 71.8% and 44.9% in weight, respectively. Optical bioluminescence imaging of tumor growths yielded similar results. Area under the

  19. High-Throughput Lipolysis in 96-Well Plates for Rapid Screening of Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosgaard, Mette D; Sassene, Philip J; Mu, Huiling

    2017-01-01

    The high-throughput in vitro intestinal lipolysis model (HTP) applicable for rapid and low-scale screening of lipid-based drug delivery systems (LbDDSs) was optimized and adjusted as to be conducted in 96-well plates (HTP-96). Three different LbDDSs (I-III) loaded with danazol or cinnarizine were...

  20. Orientations of dendritic growth during solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Nyung

    2017-03-01

    Dendrites are crystalline forms which grow far from the limit of stability of the plane front and adopt an orientation which is as close as possible to the heat flux direction. Dendritic growth orientations for cubic metals, bct Sn, and hcp Zn, can be controlled by thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and surface energy. The control factors have been elaborated. Since the dendrite is a single crystal, its properties such as thermal conductivity that influences the heat flux direction, the minimum Young's modulus direction that influences the strain energy minimization, and the minimum surface energy plane that influences the crystal/liquid interface energy minimization have been proved to control the dendritic growth direction. The dendritic growth directions of cubic metals are determined by the minimum Young's modulus direction and/or axis direction of symmetry of the minimum crystal surface energy plane. The dendritic growth direction of bct Sn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction. The primary dendritic growth direction of hcp Zn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction and the secondary dendrite arm direction of hcp Zn is normal to the primary dendritic growth direction.

  1. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabalaya, Rajan; Musa, Muhammad Nuh; Kifli, Nurolaini; David, Sheba R

    2017-01-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs), have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations.

  2. In-vitro release of diclofenac diethylammonium from lipid-based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsaee, Siamak; Sarbolouki, Mohammad N; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2002-07-08

    This article presents the preparation and topical performance of some new lipid-based formulations of diclofenac, namely (a) a diclofenac aqueous gel containing mixed micelles (sodium cholate:egg lecithin molar ratio 0.55); (b) diclofenac lotion that contains soya lecithin, ethanol and buffer; and (c) diclofenac lipogel containing egg lecithin, isopropyl myristate, propylene glycol and ethanol. Gel formulations were prepared using Carbomer 934. Release of diclofenac from all formulations was monitored via dialysis through Spectra/por membrane into phosphate buffer (0.2 M pH=7.4) using a Franz cell. Drug release profile and diffusion coefficients were compared with brand formulation (Geigy's Vlotaren Emulgel). Statistical analysis of data show that the diffusion coefficient of the drug from these formulations rank according to the following order: Diclofenac lotion (D=5.308x10(-7) cm(2)/s) >lipogel (D=2.102 x 10(-7) cm(2)/s) >Voltaren Emulgel (1.518 x 10(-7) cm(2)/s) >aqueous gel mixed micelle (0.966 x 10(-7) cm(2)/s). These results show that diclofenac lotion and lipogel maybe more suitable formulations than the conventional topical dosage form.

  3. Lipid Based Formulations of Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS Class II Drugs: Strategy, Formulations, Methods and Saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šoltýsová I.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Active ingredients in pharmaceuticals differ by their physico-chemical properties and their bioavailability therefore varies. The most frequently used and most convenient way of administration of medicines is oral, however many drugs are little soluble in water. Thus they are not sufficiently effective and suitable for such administration. For this reason a system of lipid based formulations (LBF was developed. Series of formulations were prepared and tested in water and biorelevant media. On the basis of selection criteria, there were selected formulations with the best emulsification potential, good dispersion in the environment and physical stability. Samples of structurally different drugs included in the Class II of the Biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS were obtained, namely Griseofulvin, Glibenclamide, Carbamazepine, Haloperidol, Itraconazol, Triclosan, Praziquantel and Rifaximin, for testing of maximal saturation in formulations prepared from commercially available excipients. Methods were developed for preparation of formulations, observation of emulsification and its description, determination of maximum solubility of drug samples in the respective formulation and subsequent analysis. Saturation of formulations with drugs showed that formulations 80 % XA and 20 % Xh, 35 % XF and 65 % Xh were best able to dissolve the drugs which supports the hypothesis that it is desirable to identify limited series of formulations which could be generally applied for this purpose.

  4. Relevance of Lipid-Based Products in the Management of Dry Eye Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrigue, Jean-Sébastien; Amrane, Mourad; Faure, Marie-Odile; Holopainen, Juha M; Tong, Louis

    2017-11-01

    Components of the ocular surface synergistically contribute to maintaining and protecting a smooth refractive layer to facilitate the optimal transmission of light. At the air-water interface, the tear film lipid layer (TFLL), a mixture of lipids and proteins, plays a key role in tear surface tension and is important for the physiological hydration of the ocular surface and for ocular homeostasis. Alterations in tear fluid rheology, differences in lipid composition, or downregulation of specific tear proteins are found in most types of ocular surface disease, including dry eye disease (DED). Artificial tears have long been a first line of treatment in DED and aim to replace or supplement tears. More recently, lipid-containing eye drops have been developed to more closely mimic the combination of aqueous and lipid layers of the TFLL. Over the last 2 decades, our understanding of the nature and importance of lipids in the tear film in health and disease has increased substantially. The aim of this article is to provide a brief overview of our current understanding of tear film properties and review the effectiveness of lipid-based products in the treatment of DED. Liposome lid sprays, emulsion eye drops, and other lipid-containing formulations are discussed.

  5. Why Fish Oil Fails: A Comprehensive 21st Century Lipids-Based Physiologic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Peskin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The medical community suffered three significant fish oil failures/setbacks in 2013. Claims that fish oil’s EPA/DHA would stop the progression of heart disease were crushed when The Risk and Prevention Study Collaborative Group (Italy released a conclusive negative finding regarding fish oil for those patients with high risk factors but no previous myocardial infarction. Fish oil failed in all measures of CVD prevention—both primary and secondary. Another major 2013 setback occurred when fish oil’s DHA was shown to significantly increase prostate cancer in men, in particular, high-grade prostate cancer, in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT analysis by Brasky et al. Another monumental failure occurred in 2013 whereby fish oil’s EPA/DHA failed to improve macular degeneration. In 2010, fish oil’s EPA/DHA failed to help Alzheimer’s victims, even those with low DHA levels. These are by no means isolated failures. The promise of fish oil and its so-called active ingredients EPA / DHA fails time and time again in clinical trials. This lipids-based physiologic review will explain precisely why there should have never been expectation for success. This review will focus on underpublicized lipid science with a focus on physiology.

  6. Why fish oil fails: a comprehensive 21st century lipids-based physiologic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskin, B S

    2014-01-01

    The medical community suffered three significant fish oil failures/setbacks in 2013. Claims that fish oil's EPA/DHA would stop the progression of heart disease were crushed when The Risk and Prevention Study Collaborative Group (Italy) released a conclusive negative finding regarding fish oil for those patients with high risk factors but no previous myocardial infarction. Fish oil failed in all measures of CVD prevention-both primary and secondary. Another major 2013 setback occurred when fish oil's DHA was shown to significantly increase prostate cancer in men, in particular, high-grade prostate cancer, in the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) analysis by Brasky et al. Another monumental failure occurred in 2013 whereby fish oil's EPA/DHA failed to improve macular degeneration. In 2010, fish oil's EPA/DHA failed to help Alzheimer's victims, even those with low DHA levels. These are by no means isolated failures. The promise of fish oil and its so-called active ingredients EPA / DHA fails time and time again in clinical trials. This lipids-based physiologic review will explain precisely why there should have never been expectation for success. This review will focus on underpublicized lipid science with a focus on physiology.

  7. Spray drying of lipid-based systems loaded with Camellia sinensis polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secolin, Vanessa A; Souza, Claudia R F; Oliveira, Wanderley P

    2017-03-01

    In this work, spray-dried lipid systems based on soy phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and lauroyl polyoxylglycerides for entrapping Green tea polyphenols were produced. The aim was to study the effects of the encapsulating composition and spray drying conditions on the system performance and physicochemical product properties. The spray dryer powder production yield falls around 50.7 ± 2.8%, which is typical for lab scale spray dryers. Wrinkled and rounded particles, with low surface porosities were generated, independent of the drying carriers (trehalose or lactose) used. The product showed high encapsulation efficiency of Green tea polyphenols, which was promptly redispersible in water. It presented low density, and good compressive and flow properties. The results herein reported confirm the feasibility of the entrapment of Green tea polyphenols in lipid-based compositions by spray drying in presence of the drying carriers evaluated. The spray-dried microparticles show high potential to be used as additive in food, nutraceutical and pharmaceutical products.

  8. Optimization and characterization of stable lipid-based, oxygen-filled microbubbles by mixture design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzotti, Brian D; Thomson, Lindsay M; O'Connell, Daniel W; McGowan, Francis X; Kheir, John N

    2014-08-01

    Tissue hypoxia is a final common pathway that leads to cellular injury and death in a number of critical illnesses. Intravenous injections of self-assembling, lipid-based oxygen microbubbles (LOMs) can be used to deliver oxygen gas, preventing organ injury and death from systemic hypoxemia. However, current formulations exhibit high polydispersity indices (which may lead to microvascular obstruction) and poor shelf-lives, limiting the translational capacity of LOMs. In this study, we report our efforts to optimize LOM formulations using a mixture response surface methodology (mRSM). We study the effect of changing excipient proportions (the independent variables) on microbubble diameter and product loss (the dependent variables). By using mRSM analysis, the experimental data were fit using a reduced Scheffé linear mixture model. We demonstrate that formulations manufactured from 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, corn syrup, and water produce micron-sized microbubbles with low polydispersity indices, and decreased product loss (relative to previously described formulations) when stored at room temperature over a 30-day period. Optimized LOMs were subsequently tested for their oxygen-releasing ability and found to have similar release kinetics as prior formulations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Sorption by cation exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B.

    1994-04-01

    A procedure for introducing exchange into geochemical/surface complexation codes is described. Beginning with selectivity coefficients, K c , defined in terms of equivalent fractional ion occupancies, a general expression for the molar based exchange code input parameters, K ex , is derived. In natural systems the uptake of nuclides onto complex sorbents often occurs by more than one mechanism. The incorporation of cation exchange and surface complexation into a geochemical code therefore enables sorption by both mechanisms to be calculated simultaneously. The code and model concepts are tested against sets of experimental data from widely different sorption studies. A proposal is made to set up a data base of selectivity coefficients. Such a data base would form part of a more general one consisting of sorption mechanism specific parameters to be used in conjunction with geochemical/sorption codes to model and predict sorption. (author) 6 figs., 6 tabs., 26 refs

  10. Recrystallization phenomena of solution grown paraffin dendrites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, F.F.A.; Hollander, F.; Stasse, O.; van Suchtelen, J.; van Enckevort, W.J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Paraffin crystals were grown from decane solutions using a micro-Bridgman set up for in-situ observation of the morphology at the growth front. It is shown that for large imposed velocities, dendrites are obtained. After dendritic growth, aging or recrystallization processes set in rather quickly,

  11. Vertical solidification of dendritic binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, J. C.; Felicelli, S.; Poirier, D. R.

    1991-01-01

    Three numerical techniques are employed to analyze the influence of thermosolutal convection on defect formation in directionally solidified (DS) alloys. The finite-element models are based on the Boussinesq approximation and include the plane-front model and two plane-front models incorporating special dendritic regions. In the second model the dendritic region has a time-independent volume fraction of liquid, and in the last model the dendritic region evolves as local conditions dictate. The finite-element models permit the description of nonlinear thermosolutal convection by treating the dendritic regions as porous media with variable porosities. The models are applied to lead-tin alloys including DS alloys, and severe segregation phenomena such as freckles and channels are found to develop in the DS alloys. The present calculations and the permeability functions selected are shown to predict behavior in the dendritic regions that qualitatively matches that observed experimentally.

  12. Oral and transdermal drug delivery systems: role of lipid-based lyotropic liquid crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajabalaya R

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Rajan Rajabalaya, Muhammad Nuh Musa, Nurolaini Kifli, Sheba R David PAPRSB Institute of Health Sciences, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Brunei Darussalam Abstract: Liquid crystal (LC dosage forms, particularly those using lipid-based lyotropic LCs (LLCs, have generated considerable interest as potential drug delivery systems. LCs have the physical properties of liquids but retain some of the structural characteristics of crystalline solids. They are compatible with hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds of many different classes and can protect even biologicals and nucleic acids from degradation. This review, focused on research conducted over the past 5 years, discusses the structural evaluation of LCs and their effects in drug formulations. The structural classification of LLCs into lamellar, hexagonal and micellar cubic phases is described. The structures of these phases are influenced by the addition of surfactants, which include a variety of nontoxic, biodegradable lipids; these also enhance drug solubility. LLC structure influences drug localization, particle size and viscosity, which, in turn, determine drug delivery properties. Through several specific examples, we describe the applications of LLCs in oral and topical drug formulations, the latter including transdermal and ocular delivery. In oral LLC formulations, micelle compositions and the resulting LLC structures can determine drug solubilization and stability as well as intestinal transport and absorption. Similarly, in topical LLC formulations, composition can influence whether the drug is retained in the skin or delivered transdermally. Owing to their enhancement of drug stability and promotion of controlled drug delivery, LLCs are becoming increasingly popular in pharmaceutical formulations. Keywords: liquid crystal, drug delivery, controlled release, lyotropic, surfactants, drug localization

  13. Providing lipid-based nutrient supplements does not affect developmental milestones among Malawian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangani, Charles; Cheung, Yin Bun; Maleta, Kenneth; Phuka, John; Thakwalakwa, Chrissie; Dewey, Kathryn; Manary, Mark; Puumalainen, Taneli; Ashorn, Per

    2014-01-01

    To assess whether using lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) to complement the diets of infants and young children affected when they achieved selected developmental milestones. In rural Malawi, 840 6-month-old healthy infants were enrolled to a randomised trial. Control participants received no supplements, others were provided with milk-containing LNS, soy-containing LNS or corn-soy blend (CSB) for 12 months. Outcomes were the age at which they achieved key milestone: motor (walking with assistance, standing and walking alone, running), social (drinking from a cup and eating by themselves) and language (saying single comprehensible words and waving goodbye). The mean age at which the subjects walked with assistance was 42.5, 42.3, 42.7 and 43.2 weeks in the control, milk-LNS, soy-LNS and CSB groups, respectively (p = 0.748). There were also no significant differences in the mean age at standing alone (45.0, 44.9, 45.1 and 46.3 weeks), walking alone (54.6, 55.1, 55.3, 56.5 weeks), running (64.6, 63.7, 64.8, 65.9 weeks) or any other social or language milestones (each p > 0.10). The findings do not support a hypothesis that providing tested formulations and doses of micronutrient-fortified LNS or CSB would have an impact on when young children in rural Malawi achieved selected developmental milestones. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Impact of change of matrix crystallinity and polymorphism on ovalbumin release from lipid-based implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Luisa; Körber, Martin; Bodmeier, Roland

    2018-05-30

    The objectives of this study were to prepare lipid-based implants by hot melt extrusion (HME) for the prolonged release of ovalbumin (OVA), and to relate protein release to crystallinity and polymorphic changes of the lipid matrix. Two lipids, glycerol tristearate and hydrogenated palm oil, with different composition and degree of crystallinity were studied. Solid OVA was dispersed within the lipid matrixes, which preserved its stability during extrusion. This was partially attributed to a protective effect of the lipidic matrix. The incorporation of OVA decreased the mechanical strength of the implants prepared with the more crystalline matrix, glycerol tristearate, whereas it remained comparable for the hydrogenated palm oil because of stronger physical and non-covalent interactions between the protein and this lipid. This was also the reason for the faster release of OVA from the glycerol tristearate matrix when compared to the hydrogenated palm oil (8 vs. 28 weeks). Curing induced and increased crystallinity, and changes in the release rate, especially for the more crystalline matrix. In this case, both an increase and a decrease in release, were observed depending on the tempering condition. Curing at higher temperatures induced a melt-mediated crystallization and solid state transformation of the glycerol tristearate matrix and led to rearrangements of the inner structure with the formation of larger pores, which accelerated the release. In contrast, changes in the hydrogenated palm oil under the same curing conditions were less noticeable leading to a more robust formulation, because of less polymorphic changes over time. This study helps to understand the effect of lipid matrix composition and crystallinity degree on the performance of protein-loaded implants, and to establish criteria for the selection of a lipid carrier depending on the release profile desired. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. The Precipitation Behavior of Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs with an Emphasis on the Digestion of Lipid Based Formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Jamal; Rades, Thomas; Boyd, Ben

    2016-01-01

    digestion and drug solubilisation during gastrointestinal transit have been explored in detail, but the implications of drug precipitation beyond the potential adverse effect on bioavailability have received attention only in recent years. Specifically, these implications are that different solid forms...... the events that lead to drug precipitation during the dispersion and digestion of lipid based formulations, common methods used to inhibit precipitation, as well as conventional and newly emerging characterization techniques for studying the solid state form of the precipitated drug. Moreover, selected case...... studies are discussed where drug precipitation has ensued from the digestion of lipid based formulations, as well as the apparent link between drug ionisability and altered solid forms on precipitation, culminating in a discussion about the importance of the solid form on precipitation with relevance...

  16. Cationic polymers and porous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yu

    2017-04-27

    According to one or more embodiments, cationic polymers may be produced which include one or more monomers containing cations. Such cationic polymers may be utilized as structure directing agents to form mesoporous zeolites. The mesoporous zeolites may include micropores as well as mesopores, and may have a surface area of greater than 350 m2/g and a pore volume of greater than 0.3 cm3/g. Also described are core/shell zeolites, where at least the shell portion includes a mesoporous zeolite material.

  17. Cationic polymers and porous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yu; Tian, Qiwei; Dong, Xinglong; Liu, Zhaohui; Basset, Jean-Marie; Saih, Youssef; Sun, Miao; Xu, Wei; Shaikh, Sohel

    2017-01-01

    According to one or more embodiments, cationic polymers may be produced which include one or more monomers containing cations. Such cationic polymers may be utilized as structure directing agents to form mesoporous zeolites. The mesoporous zeolites may include micropores as well as mesopores, and may have a surface area of greater than 350 m2/g and a pore volume of greater than 0.3 cm3/g. Also described are core/shell zeolites, where at least the shell portion includes a mesoporous zeolite material.

  18. The cation-π interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Dennis A

    2013-04-16

    The chemistry community now recognizes the cation-π interaction as a major force for molecular recognition, joining the hydrophobic effect, the hydrogen bond, and the ion pair in determining macromolecular structure and drug-receptor interactions. This Account provides the author's perspective on the intellectual origins and fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. Early studies on cyclophanes established that water-soluble, cationic molecules would forego aqueous solvation to enter a hydrophobic cavity if that cavity was lined with π systems. Important gas phase studies established the fundamental nature of the cation-π interaction. The strength of the cation-π interaction (Li(+) binds to benzene with 38 kcal/mol of binding energy; NH4(+) with 19 kcal/mol) distinguishes it from the weaker polar-π interactions observed in the benzene dimer or water-benzene complexes. In addition to the substantial intrinsic strength of the cation-π interaction in gas phase studies, the cation-π interaction remains energetically significant in aqueous media and under biological conditions. Many studies have shown that cation-π interactions can enhance binding energies by 2-5 kcal/mol, making them competitive with hydrogen bonds and ion pairs in drug-receptor and protein-protein interactions. As with other noncovalent interactions involving aromatic systems, the cation-π interaction includes a substantial electrostatic component. The six (four) C(δ-)-H(δ+) bond dipoles of a molecule like benzene (ethylene) combine to produce a region of negative electrostatic potential on the face of the π system. Simple electrostatics facilitate a natural attraction of cations to the surface. The trend for (gas phase) binding energies is Li(+) > Na(+) > K(+) > Rb(+): as the ion gets larger the charge is dispersed over a larger sphere and binding interactions weaken, a classical electrostatic effect. On other hand, polarizability does not define these interactions. Cyclohexane is

  19. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: permeant cations chaperoned by anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-28

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  20. Dendritic Actin Cytoskeleton: Structure, Functions, and Regulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Konietzny

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Actin is a versatile and ubiquitous cytoskeletal protein that plays a major role in both the establishment and the maintenance of neuronal polarity. For a long time, the most prominent roles that were attributed to actin in neurons were the movement of growth cones, polarized cargo sorting at the axon initial segment, and the dynamic plasticity of dendritic spines, since those compartments contain large accumulations of actin filaments (F-actin that can be readily visualized using electron- and fluorescence microscopy. With the development of super-resolution microscopy in the past few years, previously unknown structures of the actin cytoskeleton have been uncovered: a periodic lattice consisting of actin and spectrin seems to pervade not only the whole axon, but also dendrites and even the necks of dendritic spines. Apart from that striking feature, patches of F-actin and deep actin filament bundles have been described along the lengths of neurites. So far, research has been focused on the specific roles of actin in the axon, while it is becoming more and more apparent that in the dendrite, actin is not only confined to dendritic spines, but serves many additional and important functions. In this review, we focus on recent developments regarding the role of actin in dendrite morphology, the regulation of actin dynamics by internal and external factors, and the role of F-actin in dendritic protein trafficking.

  1. Effects of lipophilic components on the compatibility of lipid-based formulations with hard gelatin capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng-Jing; Etzler, Frank M; Ubben, Johanna; Birch, Amy; Zhong, Li; Schwabe, Robert; Dudhedia, Mayur S

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of lipophilic components on the compatibility of propylene glycol (PG)-containing lipid-based drug delivery system (LBDDS) formulations with hard gelatin capsules. The presence of a lipophilic active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) (log P approximately 6.1) and an additional lipophilic excipient (Capmul MCM) significantly affected the activity of PG in the fills and the equilibrium of PG between capsule shells and fills. These changes in activity and equilibrium of PG were furthermore correlated to the mechanical and thermal properties of the liquid-filled capsules and subsequently linked to the shelf-life of the capsules on stability with respect to capsule deformation. The present study also investigated the mechanism by which lipophilic component(s) might affect the activity of PG in the fill formulations and the equilibrium of PG between capsule shells and fills. The activities of PG in two series of "binary" mixtures with Capmul MCM and with Cremophor EL were measured, respectively. The mixtures of PG containing Capmul MCM were found to be more nearly ideal than those containing Cremophor EL. The observed negative deviation from Rauolt's law indicates that the excess free energies of mixing are less then zero indicating favorable interaction between PG and the other component. It is speculated that enhanced hydrogen bonding opportunities with Cremophor EL are responsible for the decreased excess free energy of mixing. Replacement of Cremophor EL with lipophilic API also reduces the hydrogen bonding opportunities for PG in the mixtures. This hypothesis may further explain the increased activity of PG in the fills and the shifted equilibrium of PG toward the capsule shells. Activity determination utilizing headspace gas chromatography (GC) using short 30 min incubation time seems to be a time-efficient approach for assessing capsule-fill compatibility. Direct measurements of PG migration and other physical properties of

  2. Simultaneous anionic and cationic redox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung-Kyun; Kang, Kisuk

    2017-12-01

    It is challenging to unlock anionic redox activity, accompanied by full utilization of available cationic redox process, to boost capacity of battery cathodes. Now, material design by tuning the metal-oxygen interaction is shown to be a promising solution.

  3. Cation disorder in Ga1212.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, K B; Ko, D; Vander Griend, D A; Sarjeant, G M; Milgram, J W; Garrity, E S; DeLoach, D I; Poeppelmeier, K R; Salvador, P A; Mason, T O

    2000-07-24

    Substitution of calcium for strontium in LnSr2-xCaxCu2GaO7 (Ln = La, Pr, Nd, Gd, Ho, Er, Tm, and Yb) materials at ambient pressure and 975 degrees C results in complete substitution of calcium for strontium in the lanthanum and praseodymium systems and partial substitution in the other lanthanide systems. The calcium saturation level depends on the size of the Ln cation, and in all cases, a decrease in the lattice parameters with calcium concentration was observed until a common, lower bound, average A-cation size is reached. Site occupancies from X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments for LnSr2-xCaxCu2GaO7 (x = 0 and x = 2) confirm that the A-cations distribute between the two blocking-layer sites and the active-layer site based on size. A quantitative link between cation distribution and relative site-specific cation enthalpy for calcium, strontium, and lanthanum within the gallate structure is derived. The cation distribution in other similar materials can potentially be modeled.

  4. Regulation of dendrite growth and maintenance by exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Yun; Lee, Jiae; Rowland, Kimberly; Wen, Yuhui; Hua, Hope; Carlson, Nicole; Lavania, Shweta; Parrish, Jay Z.; Kim, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Dendrites lengthen by several orders of magnitude during neuronal development, but how membrane is allocated in dendrites to facilitate this growth remains unclear. Here, we report that Ras opposite (Rop), the Drosophila ortholog of the key exocytosis regulator Munc18-1 (also known as STXBP1), is an essential factor mediating dendrite growth. Neurons with depleted Rop function exhibit reduced terminal dendrite outgrowth followed by primary dendrite degeneration, suggestive of differential req...

  5. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, Nicholas P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ion channel dysfunction or “channelopathy” is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Here we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. PMID:23216577

  6. Sequence learning in differentially activated dendrites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    . It is proposed that the neural machinery required in such a learning/retrieval mechanism could involve the NMDA receptor, in conjunction with the ability of dendrites to maintain differentially activated regions. In particular, it is suggested that such a parcellation of the dendrite allows the neuron......Differentially activated areas of a dendrite permit the existence of zones with distinct rates of synaptic modification, and such areas can be individually accessed using a reference signal which localizes synaptic plasticity and memory trace retrieval to certain subregions of the dendrite...... to participate in multiple sequences, which can be learned without suffering from the 'wash-out' of synaptic efficacy associated with superimposition of training patterns. This is a biologically plausible solution to the stability-plasticity dilemma of learning in neural networks....

  7. Liquid-solid extraction of cationic metals by cationic amphiphiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, W.

    2010-01-01

    In the field of selective separation for recycling of spent nuclear fuel, liquid-liquid extraction processes are widely used (PUREX, DIAMEX..) in industrial scale. In order to guarantee a sustainable nuclear energy for the forthcoming generations, alternative reprocessing techniques are under development. One of them bases on the studies from Heckmann et al in the 80's and consists in selectively precipitating actinides from aqueous waste solutions by cationic surfactants (liquid-solid extraction). This technique has some interesting advantages over liquid-liquid extraction techniques, because several steps are omitted like stripping or solvent washing. Moreover, the amount of waste is decreased considerably, since no contaminated organic solvent is produced. In this thesis, we have carried out a physico-chemical study to understand the specific interactions between the metallic cations with the cationic surfactant. First, we have analysed the specific effect of the different counter-ions (Cl - , NO 3 - , C 2 O 4 2- ) and then the effect of alkaline cations on the structural properties of the surfactant aggregation in varying thermodynamical conditions. Finally, different multivalent cations (Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ , UO 2 2+ , Fe 3+ , Nd 3+ , Eu 3+ , Th 4+ ) were considered; we have concluded that depending on the anionic complex of these metals formed in acidic media, we can observe either an adsorption at the micellar interface or not. This adsorption has a large influence of the surfactant aggregation properties and determines the limits of the application in term of ionic strength, temperature and surfactant concentration. (author) [fr

  8. Con-nectin axons and dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Gerard M J

    2006-07-03

    Unlike adherens junctions, synapses are asymmetric connections, usually between axons and dendrites, that rely on various cell adhesion molecules for structural stability and function. Two cell types of adhesion molecules found at adherens junctions, cadherins and nectins, are thought to mediate homophilic interaction between neighboring cells. In this issue, Togashi et al. (see p. 141) demonstrate that the differential localization of two heterophilic interacting nectins mediates the selective attraction of axons and dendrites in cooperation with cadherins.

  9. Dendritic growth forms of borax crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takoo, R.K.; Patel, B.R.; Joshi, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    A variety of dendritic forms of borax grown from solutions by the film formation method is given. The changing growth morphology is followed as a function of concentration and temperature. The initial, intermediate and final growth morphologies are described and discussed. Influence of evaporation rate and supersaturation on the mechanism of growth is assessed. It is suggested that under all crystallization conditions, borax crystals have dendritic form in the initial stages of growth. (author)

  10. Willingness-to-Pay for Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements in Burkina Faso

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guissou, Rosemonde; Adams, Katherine; Xu Yingying; Vosti, Stephen; Hess, Sonja; Ouedraogo, Jean Bosco

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Supplementing young children’s diets with small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (SQ-LNS) is a promising strategy to prevent growth restriction and improve development. It is uncertain how best to scale up the distribution of SQ-LNS and both private and public approaches are being considered. This paper reports on the willingness-to-pay (WTP) by households in rural Burkina Faso for SQ-LNS designed to prevent childhood undernutrition. In a recent randomized controlled nutrition efficacy trial in the Dandé Health District in rural Burkina Faso, 20 g of SQ-LNS per day along with selected health care services have been shown to increase the linear growth and weight gain of children who received the supplement daily from 9-18 months of age. Given the frequency and duration of prescribed consumption of SQ-LNS (one sachet per day, per child) and inter-household differences in poverty, a hybrid distribution system that reaches target consumers through both public channels and retail markets may be recommended; the viability of the latter will hinge on demand. Therefore, policy makers will need to consider household-level demand for SQ-LNS and the factors that influence demand to guide decisions regarding the cost burden borne by recipients versus public sector programs. Using a contingent valuation approach, we solicited, at baseline and six months later, the hypothetical WTP for a daily dose of 20 g of SQ-LNS and a traditional substitute, herbal teas, from a subsample (N = 319) of households participating in the efficacy trial. WTP for SQ-LNS is positive for almost all households, but WTP for SQ-LNS is, on average, lower than WTP for herbal teas. At baseline, average WTP for a day’s supply of SQ-LNS is $0.22 (4th quarter 2011 USD), while average WTP for herbal teas is $0.28. Approximately six months later, average WTP for LNS and for herbal teas, respectively, are $0.21 and $0.25. These results suggest that while households do value SQ

  11. Synaptic Control of Secretory Trafficking in Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Hanus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Localized signaling in neuronal dendrites requires tight spatial control of membrane composition. Upon initial synthesis, nascent secretory cargo in dendrites exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER from local zones of ER complexity that are spatially coupled to post-ER compartments. Although newly synthesized membrane proteins can be processed locally, the mechanisms that control the spatial range of secretory cargo transport in dendritic segments are unknown. Here, we monitored the dynamics of nascent membrane proteins in dendritic post-ER compartments under regimes of low or increased neuronal activity. In response to activity blockade, post-ER carriers are highly mobile and are transported over long distances. Conversely, increasing synaptic activity dramatically restricts the spatial scale of post-ER trafficking along dendrites. This activity-induced confinement of secretory cargo requires site-specific phosphorylation of the kinesin motor KIF17 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK. Thus, the length scales of early secretory trafficking in dendrites are tuned by activity-dependent regulation of microtubule-dependent transport.

  12. In vivo evaluation of lipid-based formulations for oral delivery of apomorphine and its diester prodrugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkar, Nrupa Nitin; Holm, René; Yang, Mingshi

    2016-01-01

    .05) than after DLA-w/o administration, indicating that triglycerides and surfactants improved the oral absorption of DLA. Similarly, Cmax and AUC after dosing apomorphine-o/w were significantly higher (p≤0.05) than that of aqueous suspension. This suggested that lipids and lipolysis products possibly aided......In the present study, the differences in oral absorption of apomorphine and its diester prodrugs and the effect of lipid-based formulations on the absorption of apomorphine or its prodrugs were investigated. Apomorphine, dilauroyl apomorphine (DLA) and dipalmitoyl apomorphine (DPA) were orally...

  13. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Clay, Timothy M; Woo, Christopher Y; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in the induction of antigen-specific T-cell responses, and therefore their use for the active immunotherapy of malignancies has been studied with considerable interest. More than a decade has passed since the publication of the first clinical data of DC-based vaccines, and through this and subsequent studies, a number of important developmental insights have been gleaned. These include the ideal source and type of DCs, the discovery of novel antigens and methods of loading DCs, the role of DC maturation, and the most efficient route of immunization. The generation of immune responses against tumor antigens after DC immunization has been demonstrated, and favorable clinical responses have been reported in some patients; however, it is difficult to pool the results as a whole, and thus the body of data remains inconclusive, in part because of varying DC preparation and vaccination protocols, the use of different forms of antigens, and, most importantly, a lack of rigorous criteria for defining clinical responses. As such, the standardization of clinical and immunologic criteria utilized, as well as DC preparations employed, will allow for the comparison of results across multiple clinical studies and is required in order for future trials to measure the true value and role of this treatment modality. In addition, issues regarding the optimal dose and clinical setting for the application of DC vaccines remain to be resolved, and recent clinical studies have been designed to begin to address these questions.

  14. Fluorescent water-Soluble Probes Based on Ammonium Cation Peg Substituted Perylenepisimides: Synthesis, Photophysical Properties, and Live Cell Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Cai, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Shuchen; Yi, Xuegang; Gao, Baoxiang

    2018-01-01

    To synthesize perylenbisimides (PBI) fluorescent probes that will improve the water-soluble ability and the cytocompatibility, the synthesis and properties of fluorescent water-soluble probes based on dendritic ammonium cation polyethylene glycol (PEG) substituted perylenebisimides(GPDIs) are presented. As we expected, with increased ammonium cation PEG, the aggregation of the PBI in an aqueous solution is completely suppressed by the hydrophilic ammonium cation PEG groups. And the fluorescence quantum yield increases from 25% for GPDI-1 to 62% for GPDI-2. When incubated with Hela cells for 48 h, the viabilities are 71% (for GPDI-1) and 76% (for GPDI-2). Live cell imaging shows that these probes are efficiently internalized by HeLa cells. The study of the photophysical properties indicated increasing the ammonium cation PEG generation can increase the fluorescence quantum yield. Live cell imaging shows that with the ammonium cation PEG chains of perylenebisimides has high biocompatibility. The exceptionally low cytotoxicity is ascribed to the ammonium cation PEG chains, which protect the dyes from nonspecifically interacting with the extracellular proteins. Live cell imaging shows that ammonium cations PEG chains can promote the internalization of these probes.

  15. The Precipitation Behavior of Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs with an Emphasis on the Digestion of Lipid Based Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Jamal; Rades, Thomas; Boyd, Ben

    2016-03-01

    An increasing number of newly discovered drugs are poorly water-soluble and the use of natural and synthetic lipids to improve the oral bioavailability of these drugs by utilizing the digestion pathway in-vivo has proved an effective formulation strategy. The mechanisms responsible for lipid digestion and drug solubilisation during gastrointestinal transit have been explored in detail, but the implications of drug precipitation beyond the potential adverse effect on bioavailability have received attention only in recent years. Specifically, these implications are that different solid forms of drug on precipitation may affect the total amount of drug absorbed in-vivo through their different physico-chemical properties, and the possibility that the dynamic environment of the small intestine may afford re-dissolution of precipitated drug if present in a high-energy form. This review describes the events that lead to drug precipitation during the dispersion and digestion of lipid based formulations, common methods used to inhibit precipitation, as well as conventional and newly emerging characterization techniques for studying the solid state form of the precipitated drug. Moreover, selected case studies are discussed where drug precipitation has ensued from the digestion of lipid based formulations, as well as the apparent link between drug ionisability and altered solid forms on precipitation, culminating in a discussion about the importance of the solid form on precipitation with relevance to the total drug absorbed.

  16. Protective Effect of a Lipid-Based Preparation from Mycobacterium smegmatis in a Murine Model of Progressive Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de los Angeles García

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A more effective vaccine against tuberculosis (TB is urgently needed. Based on its high genetic homology with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the nonpathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium smegmatis (Ms, could be an attractive source of potential antigens to be included in such a vaccine. We evaluated the capability of lipid-based preparations obtained from Ms to provide a protective response in Balb/c mice after challenge with Mtb H37Rv strain. The intratracheal model of progressive pulmonary TB was used to assess the level of protection in terms of bacterial load as well as the pathological changes in the lungs of immunized Balb/c mice following challenge with Mtb. Mice immunized with the lipid-based preparation from Ms either adjuvanted with Alum (LMs-AL or nonadjuvanted (LMs showed significant reductions in bacterial load (P<0.01 compared to the negative control group (animals immunized with phosphate buffered saline (PBS. Both lipid formulations showed the same level of protection as Bacille Calmette and Guerin (BCG. Regarding the pathologic changes in the lungs, mice immunized with both lipid formulations showed less pneumonic area when compared with the PBS group (P<0.01 and showed similar results compared with the BCG group. These findings suggest the potential of LMs as a promising vaccine candidate against TB.

  17. The Complete Reconfiguration of Dendritic Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paneru, Govind; Flanders, Bret

    2014-03-01

    Reconfigurability-by-design is an important strategy in modern materials science, as materials with this capability could potentially be used to confer hydrophobic, lipophobic, or anti-corrosive character to substrates in a regenerative manner. The present work extends the directed electrochemical nanowire assembly (DENA) methodology, which is a technique that employs alternating voltages to grow single crystalline metallic nanowires and nano-dendrites from simple salt solutions, to enable the complete dissolution of macroscopic arrays of metallic dendrites following their growth. Our main finding is that structural reconfiguration of dendritic gold is induced by changes in the MHz-level frequencies of voltages that are applied to the dendrites. Cyclic voltammetry and micro-Raman spectroscopy have been used to show that dendritic gold grows and dissolves by the same chemical mechanisms as bulk gold. Hence, the redox chemistry that occurs at the crystal-solution interface is no different than the established electrochemistry of gold. What differs in this process and allows for reconfiguration to occur is the diffusive behavior of the gold chloride molecules in the solution adjacent to the interface. We will present a simple model that captures the physics of this behavior.

  18. New double-cation borohydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindemann, Inge; Domenech Ferrer, Roger; Schultz, Ludwig; Gutfleisch, Oliver [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270016, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Filinchuk, Yaroslav [Swiss-Norwegian Beam Lines at ESRF, BP-220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Hagemann, Hans; Cerny, Radovan [Department of Physical Chemistry and Crystallography, University of Geneva, 1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    Complex hydrides are under consideration for on-board hydrogen storage due to their high hydrogen density. However, up to now conventional borohydrides are either too stable or unstable for applications as in PEM fuel cells (60-120 C). Recently, double-cation borohydride systems have attracted great interest. The desorption temperature of the borohydrides decreases with increasing electronegativity of the cation. Consequently, it is possible to tailor a feasible on-board hydrogen storage material by the combination of appropriate cations. The stability was found to be intermediate between the single-cation borohydride systems. Two combinations were sucessfully synthesised by metathesis reaction via high energy ball milling. Al-Li-borohydride shows desorption at about 70 C combined with a very high hydrogen density (17.2 wt.%) and the Na-Al-borohydride (14.2 wt.%) decomposes around 90 C. Both desorption temperatures are in the target range for applications. The decomposition pathways were observed by in-situ-Raman spectroscopy, DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry), TG (Thermogravimetry) and thermal desorption measurements.

  19. Liquid-solid extraction of metallic cations by cationic amphiphiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Wolfram; Sievers, Torsten K.; Zemb, Thomas; Diat, Olivier; Sievers, Torsten K.; Dejugnat, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    In the field of selective metal ion separation, liquid-liquid extraction is usually conducted through an emulsion mixing of hydrophobic complexants dispersed in an organic phase and acidic water containing the ionic species. Recently, it has been shown that amphiphilic complexants could influence strongly extraction efficiency by enhancing the interfacial interaction between the metal ion in the aqueous and the complexant in the organic phase. Moreover, these amphiphiles can also substitute the organic phase if an appropriate aliphatic chain is chosen. The dispersion of such amphiphilic complexants in an aqueous solution of salt mixtures is not only attractive for studying specific interactions but also to better the understanding of complex formation in aqueous solution of multivalent metal ions, such as lanthanides and actinides. This understanding is of potential interest for a broad range of industries including purification of rare earth metals and pollute treatment e.g. of fission byproducts. This principle can also be applied to liquid-solid extraction, where the final state of the separation is a solid phase containing the selectively extracted ions. Indeed, a novel solid-liquid extraction method exploits the selective precipitation of metal ions from an aqueous salt mixture using a cationic surfactant, below its Krafft point (temperature below which the long aliphatic chains of surfactant crystallize). This technique has been proven to be highly efficient for the separation of actinides and heavy metal using long chain ammonium or pyridinium amphiphiles. The most important point in this process is the recognition of cationic metal ions by cationic surfactants. By computing the free energy of the polar head group per micelle as a function of the different counter-anions, we have demonstrated for the first time that different interactions exist between the micellar surface and the ions. These interactions depend on the nature of the cation but also on

  20. Stress-driven lithium dendrite growth mechanism and dendrite mitigation by electroplating on soft substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Zeng, Wei; Hong, Liang; Xu, Wenwen; Yang, Haokai; Wang, Fan; Duan, Huigao; Tang, Ming; Jiang, Hanqing

    2018-03-01

    Problems related to dendrite growth on lithium-metal anodes such as capacity loss and short circuit present major barriers to next-generation high-energy-density batteries. The development of successful lithium dendrite mitigation strategies is impeded by an incomplete understanding of the Li dendrite growth mechanisms, and in particular, Li-plating-induced internal stress in Li metal and its effect on Li growth morphology are not well addressed. Here, we reveal the enabling role of plating residual stress in dendrite formation through depositing Li on soft substrates and a stress-driven dendrite growth model. We show that dendrite growth is mitigated on such soft substrates through surface-wrinkling-induced stress relaxation in the deposited Li film. We demonstrate that this dendrite mitigation mechanism can be utilized synergistically with other existing approaches in the form of three-dimensional soft scaffolds for Li plating, which achieves higher coulombic efficiency and better capacity retention than that for conventional copper substrates.

  1. Tripodal receptors for cation and anion sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman, [Unknown; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing

  2. Apparatus for growing a dendritic web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, C.S.; Mchugh, J.P.; Piotrowski, P.A.; Skutch, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    A melt system including a susceptor-crucible assembly having improved gradient control when melt replenishment is used during dendritic web growth. The improvement lies in the formation of a thermal barrier in the base of the receptor which is in the form of a vertical slot in the region of the susceptor underlying the crucible at the location of a compartmental separator dividing the crucible into a growth compartment and a melt replenishment compartment. The result achieved is a step change in temperature gradient in the melt thereby providing a more uniform temperature in the growth compartment from which the dendritic web is drawn

  3. Dendrite tungsten liquation in molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, M.M.; Ageeva, E.N.; Kolotinskij, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made on primary crystallization structure of ingots of Mo-W-B system alloys with electron microscopy were used to establish, that cells and cellular dendrites were the main elements of primary crystallization structure. Method of local X-ray spectral analysis enabled to establish, that intracrystallite liquation at cellular growth developed more intensively, as compared to the case of cellular dendrite formation. Change of boron content in alloys didn't practically affect the degree of development of intracrystallite W liquation in Mo

  4. Heavy metal cations permeate the TRPV6 epithelial cation channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gergely; Danko, Tamas; Bergeron, Marc J; Balazs, Bernadett; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zsembery, Akos; Hediger, Matthias A

    2011-01-01

    TRPV6 belongs to the vanilloid family of the transient receptor potential channel (TRP) superfamily. This calcium-selective channel is highly expressed in the duodenum and the placenta, being responsible for calcium absorption in the body and fetus. Previous observations have suggested that TRPV6 is not only permeable to calcium but also to other divalent cations in epithelial tissues. In this study, we tested whether TRPV6 is indeed also permeable to cations such as zinc and cadmium. We found that the basal intracellular calcium concentration was higher in HEK293 cells transfected with hTRPV6 than in non-transfected cells, and that this difference almost disappeared in nominally calcium-free solution. Live cell imaging experiments with Fura-2 and NewPort Green DCF showed that overexpression of human TRPV6 increased the permeability for Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and interestingly also for La(3+) and Gd(3+). These results were confirmed using the patch clamp technique. (45)Ca uptake experiments showed that cadmium, lanthanum and gadolinium were also highly efficient inhibitors of TRPV6-mediated calcium influx at higher micromolar concentrations. Our results suggest that TRPV6 is not only involved in calcium transport but also in the transport of other divalent cations, including heavy metal ions, which may have toxicological implications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulation of dendrite growth and maintenance by exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; Lee, Jiae; Rowland, Kimberly; Wen, Yuhui; Hua, Hope; Carlson, Nicole; Lavania, Shweta; Parrish, Jay Z.; Kim, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendrites lengthen by several orders of magnitude during neuronal development, but how membrane is allocated in dendrites to facilitate this growth remains unclear. Here, we report that Ras opposite (Rop), the Drosophila ortholog of the key exocytosis regulator Munc18-1 (also known as STXBP1), is an essential factor mediating dendrite growth. Neurons with depleted Rop function exhibit reduced terminal dendrite outgrowth followed by primary dendrite degeneration, suggestive of differential requirements for exocytosis in the growth and maintenance of different dendritic compartments. Rop promotes dendrite growth together with the exocyst, an octameric protein complex involved in tethering vesicles to the plasma membrane, with Rop–exocyst complexes and exocytosis predominating in primary dendrites over terminal dendrites. By contrast, membrane-associated proteins readily diffuse from primary dendrites into terminals, but not in the reverse direction, suggesting that diffusion, rather than targeted exocytosis, supplies membranous material for terminal dendritic growth, revealing key differences in the distribution of materials to these expanding dendritic compartments. PMID:26483382

  6. Transient potentials in dendritic systems of arbitrary geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, E G; Cowan, J D

    1974-09-01

    A simple graphical calculus is developed that generates analytic solutions for membrane potential transforms at any point on the dendritic tree of neurons with arbitrary dendritic geometries, in response to synaptic "current" inputs. Such solutions permit the computation of transients in neurons with arbitrary geometry and may facilitate analysis of the role of dendrites in such cells.

  7. Transforming lipid-based oral drug delivery systems into solid dosage forms: an overview of solid carriers, physicochemical properties, and biopharmaceutical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Angel; Rao, Shasha; Prestidge, Clive A

    2013-12-01

    The diversity of lipid excipients available commercially has enabled versatile formulation design of lipid-based drug delivery systems for enhancing the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs, such as emulsions, microemulsions, micelles, liposomes, niosomes and various self-emulsifying systems. The transformation of liquid lipid-based systems into solid dosage forms has been investigated for several decades, and has recently become a core subject of pharmaceutical research as solidification is regarded as viable means for stabilising lipid colloidal systems while eliminating stringent processing requirements associated with liquid systems. This review describes the types of pharmaceutical grade excipients (silica nanoparticle/microparticle, polysaccharide, polymer and protein-based materials) used as solid carriers and the current state of knowledge on the liquid-to-solid conversion approaches. Details are primarily focused on the solid-state physicochemical properties and redispersion capacity of various dry lipid-based formulations, and how these relate to the in vitro drug release and solubilisation, lipid carrier digestion and cell permeation performances. Numerous in vivo proof-of-concept studies are presented to highlight the viability of these dry lipid-based formulations. This review is significant in directing future research work in fostering translation of dry lipid-based formulations into clinical applications.

  8. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  9. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    The employment of metal salts is quite limited in asymmetric catalysis, although it would provide an additional arsenal of safe and inexpensive reagents to create molecular functions with high optical purity. Cation chelation by polyethers increases the salts' solubility in conventional organic...... solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...... highly enantioselective silylation reactions in polyether-generated chiral environments, and leading to a record-high turnover in asymmetric organocatalysis. This can lead to further applications by the asymmetric use of other inorganic salts in various organic transformations....

  10. Lipid-based nutrient supplements do not affect efavirenz but lower plasma nevirapine concentrations in Ethiopian adult HIV patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdissa, A; Olsen, Mette Frahm; Yilma, D

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) are increasingly used in HIV programmes in resource-limited settings. However, the possible effects of LNSs on the plasma concentrations of antiretroviral drugs have not been assessed. Here, we aimed to assess the effects of LNSs on plasma...... efavirenz and nevirapine trough concentrations in Ethiopian adult HIV-infected patients. METHODS: The effects of LNSs were studied in adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a randomized trial. Patients with body mass index (BMI) > 17 kg/m(2) (n = 282) received daily supplementation of an LNS.......9; -0.9 μg/mL; P = 0.01), respectively, compared with the group not receiving supplements. There were no differences between groups with respect to efavirenz plasma concentrations. The CYP2B6 516 G>T polymorphism was associated with a 5 μg/mL higher plasma efavirenz concentration compared with the wild...

  11. Phase Transitions of Isotropic to Anisotropic Biocompatible Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems Overcoming Insoluble Benznidazole Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, Letícia; Sarmento, Víctor H. V.; Machado, Paula R. L.; Farias, Kleber J. S.; Fernandes-Pedrosa, Matheus F.; da Silva-Júnior, Arnóbio Antônio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported low benznidazole (BNZ) loading in conventional emulsions due to the weak interaction of the drug with the most common oils used to produce foods or pharmaceuticals. In this study, we focused on how the type of surfactant, surfactant-to-oil ratio w/w (SOR) and oil-to-water ratio w/w (OWR) change the phase behavior of different lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) produced by emulsion phase inversion. The surfactant mixture composed of soy phosphatidylcholine and sodium oleate (1:7, w/w, hydrophilic lipophilic balance = 16) stabilized medium chain triglyceride in water. Ten formulations with the clear aspect or less turbid dispersions (five with the SOR ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 and five with the OWR from 0.06 to 0.4) were selected from the phase behavior diagram to assess structural features and drug-loading capacity. The rise in the SOR induced the formation of distinct lipid-based drug delivery systems (nanoemulsions and liquid crystal lamellar type) that were identified using rheological measurements and cross-polarized light microscopy images. Clear dispersions of small and narrow droplet-sized liquid-like nanoemulsions, Newtonian flow-type, were produced at SOR from 0.5 to 1.5 and OWR from 0.12 to 0.4, while clear liquid or gel-like liquid crystals were produced at SOR from 1.5 to 2.5. The BNZ loading was improved according to the composition and type of LBDDS produced, suggesting possible drug location among surfactant layers. The cell viability assays proved the biocompatibility for all of the prepared nanoemulsions at SOR less than 1.5 and liquid crystals at SOR less than 2.5, demonstrating their promising features for the oral or parenteral colloidal delivery systems containing benznidazole for Chagas disease treatment. PMID:27376278

  12. Phase Transitions of Isotropic to Anisotropic Biocompatible Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems Overcoming Insoluble Benznidazole Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Streck

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies reported low benznidazole (BNZ loading in conventional emulsions due to the weak interaction of the drug with the most common oils used to produce foods or pharmaceuticals. In this study, we focused on how the type of surfactant, surfactant-to-oil ratio w/w (SOR and oil-to-water ratio w/w (OWR change the phase behavior of different lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS produced by emulsion phase inversion. The surfactant mixture composed of soy phosphatidylcholine and sodium oleate (1:7, w/w, hydrophilic lipophilic balance = 16 stabilized medium chain triglyceride in water. Ten formulations with the clear aspect or less turbid dispersions (five with the SOR ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 and five with the OWR from 0.06 to 0.4 were selected from the phase behavior diagram to assess structural features and drug-loading capacity. The rise in the SOR induced the formation of distinct lipid-based drug delivery systems (nanoemulsions and liquid crystal lamellar type that were identified using rheological measurements and cross-polarized light microscopy images. Clear dispersions of small and narrow droplet-sized liquid-like nanoemulsions, Newtonian flow-type, were produced at SOR from 0.5 to 1.5 and OWR from 0.12 to 0.4, while clear liquid or gel-like liquid crystals were produced at SOR from 1.5 to 2.5. The BNZ loading was improved according to the composition and type of LBDDS produced, suggesting possible drug location among surfactant layers. The cell viability assays proved the biocompatibility for all of the prepared nanoemulsions at SOR less than 1.5 and liquid crystals at SOR less than 2.5, demonstrating their promising features for the oral or parenteral colloidal delivery systems containing benznidazole for Chagas disease treatment.

  13. Peptides and proteins in dendritic assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baal, van I.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple, simultaneous interactions are often used in biology to enhance the affinity and specificity of binding, an effect referred to as multivalency. This multivalency can be mimicked by anchoring multiple peptides and proteins onto synthetic dendritic scaffolds. The aim of this research was to

  14. Targeting nanoparticles to dendritic cells for immunotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz, L.J.; Tacken, P.J.; Rueda, F.; Domingo, J.C.; Albericio, F.; Figdor, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key players in the initiation of adaptive immune responses and are currently exploited in immunotherapy for treatment of cancer and infectious diseases. Development of targeted nanodelivery systems carrying vaccine components, including antigens and adjuvants, to DCs in

  15. Antigen dynamics of follicular dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesters, B.A.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal-derived follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are a major depot for antigen that are essential for formation of germinal centers, the site where memory and effector B cells differentiate and high-affinity antibody production takes place. Historically, FDCs have been characterized as ‘accessory’

  16. Dendritic cells: biology of the skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toebak, M.J.; Gibbs, S.; Bruynzeel, D.P.; Scheper, R.J.; Rustemeyer, T.

    2009-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis results from a T-cell-mediated, delayed-type hypersensitivity immune response induced by allergens. Skin dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the initiation of allergic skin responses. Following encounter with an allergen, DCs become activated and undergo

  17. Thermosolutal convection and macrosegregation in dendritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, David R.; Heinrich, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model of solidification, that simulates the formation of channel segregates or freckles, is presented. The model simulates the entire solidification process, starting with the initial melt to the solidified cast, and the resulting segregation is predicted. Emphasis is given to the initial transient, when the dendritic zone begins to develop and the conditions for the possible nucleation of channels are established. The mechanisms that lead to the creation and eventual growth or termination of channels are explained in detail and illustrated by several numerical examples. A finite element model is used for the simulations. It uses a single system of equations to deal with the all-liquid region, the dendritic region, and the all-solid region. The dendritic region is treated as an anisotropic porous medium. The algorithm uses the bilinear isoparametric element, with a penalty function approximation and a Petrov-Galerkin formulation. The major task was to develop the solidification model. In addition, other tasks that were performed in conjunction with the modeling of dendritic solidification are briefly described.

  18. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular...

  19. Dendritic cells modified by vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ayako Wakatsuki; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Zocca, Mai-Britt

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, express nuclear receptors for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (VD3) and they are one of its main targets. In the presence of VD3, DCs differentiate into a phenotype that resembles semimature DCs, with reduced T cell ...

  20. Randomly oriented twin domains in electrodeposited silver dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Evica R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver dendrites were prepared by electrochemical deposition. The structures of Ag dendrites, the type of twins and their distribution were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Z-contrast high angle annular dark field transmission electron microscopy (HAADF, and crystallografically sensitive orientation imaging microscopy (OIM. The results revealed that silver dendrites are characterized by the presence of randomly distributed 180° rotational twin domains. The broad surface of dendrites was of the {111} type. Growth directions of the main dendrite stem and all branches were of type. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172054

  1. Activity-dependent trafficking of lysosomes in dendrites and dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Marisa S; Sancho, Laura; Slepak, Natalia; Boassa, Daniela; Deerinck, Thomas J; Ellisman, Mark H; Bloodgood, Brenda L; Patrick, Gentry N

    2017-08-07

    In neurons, lysosomes, which degrade membrane and cytoplasmic components, are thought to primarily reside in somatic and axonal compartments, but there is little understanding of their distribution and function in dendrites. Here, we used conventional and two-photon imaging and electron microscopy to show that lysosomes traffic bidirectionally in dendrites and are present in dendritic spines. We find that lysosome inhibition alters their mobility and also decreases dendritic spine number. Furthermore, perturbing microtubule and actin cytoskeletal dynamics has an inverse relationship on the distribution and motility of lysosomes in dendrites. We also find trafficking of lysosomes is correlated with synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-type glutamate receptors. Strikingly, lysosomes traffic to dendritic spines in an activity-dependent manner and can be recruited to individual spines in response to local activation. These data indicate the position of lysosomes is regulated by synaptic activity and thus plays an instructive role in the turnover of synaptic membrane proteins. © 2017 Goo et al.

  2. Phospholipid Homeostasis Regulates Dendrite Morphogenesis in Drosophila Sensory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Meltzer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Disruptions in lipid homeostasis have been observed in many neurodevelopmental disorders that are associated with dendrite morphogenesis defects. However, the molecular mechanisms of how lipid homeostasis affects dendrite morphogenesis are unclear. We find that easily shocked (eas, which encodes a kinase with a critical role in phospholipid phosphatidylethanolamine (PE synthesis, and two other enzymes in this synthesis pathway are required cell autonomously in sensory neurons for dendrite growth and stability. Furthermore, we show that the level of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein (SREBP activity is important for dendrite development. SREBP activity increases in eas mutants, and decreasing the level of SREBP and its transcriptional targets in eas mutants largely suppresses the dendrite growth defects. Furthermore, reducing Ca2+ influx in neurons of eas mutants ameliorates the dendrite morphogenesis defects. Our study uncovers a role for EAS kinase and reveals the in vivo function of phospholipid homeostasis in dendrite morphogenesis.

  3. Dynamic visualization of dendritic cell-antigen interactions in the skin following transcutaneous immunization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerawan Rattanapak

    Full Text Available Delivery of vaccines into the skin provides many advantages over traditional parenteral vaccination and is a promising approach due to the abundance of antigen presenting cells (APC residing in the skin including Langerhans cells (LC and dermal dendritic cells (DDC. However, the main obstacle for transcutaneous immunization (TCI is the effective delivery of the vaccine through the stratum corneum (SC barrier to the APC in the deeper skin layers. This study therefore utilized microneedles (MN and a lipid-based colloidal delivery system (cubosomes as a synergistic approach for the delivery of vaccines to APC in the skin. The process of vaccine uptake and recruitment by specific types of skin APC was investigated in real-time over 4 hours in B6.Cg-Tg (Itgax-EYFP 1 Mnz/J mice by two-photon microscopy. Incorporation of the vaccine into a particulate delivery system and the use of MN preferentially increased vaccine antigen uptake by a highly motile subpopulation of skin APC known as CD207⁺ DC. No uptake of antigen or any response to immunisation by LC could be detected.

  4. Dendritic excitability modulates dendritic information processing in a purkinje cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coop, Allan D; Cornelis, Hugo; Santamaria, Fidel

    2010-01-01

    Using an electrophysiological compartmental model of a Purkinje cell we quantified the contribution of individual active dendritic currents to processing of synaptic activity from granule cells. We used mutual information as a measure to quantify the information from the total excitatory input current (I(Glu)) encoded in each dendritic current. In this context, each active current was considered an information channel. Our analyses showed that most of the information was encoded by the calcium (I(CaP)) and calcium activated potassium (I(Kc)) currents. Mutual information between I(Glu) and I(CaP) and I(Kc) was sensitive to different levels of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity that, at the same time, resulted in the same firing rate at the soma. Since dendritic excitability could be a mechanism to regulate information processing in neurons we quantified the changes in mutual information between I(Glu) and all Purkinje cell currents as a function of the density of dendritic Ca (g(CaP)) and Kca (g(Kc)) conductances. We extended our analysis to determine the window of temporal integration of I(Glu) by I(CaP) and I(Kc) as a function of channel density and synaptic activity. The window of information integration has a stronger dependence on increasing values of g(Kc) than on g(CaP), but at high levels of synaptic stimulation information integration is reduced to a few milliseconds. Overall, our results show that different dendritic conductances differentially encode synaptic activity and that dendritic excitability and the level of synaptic activity regulate the flow of information in dendrites.

  5. Cation-Coupled Bicarbonate Transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Aalkjaer, Christian; Boedtkjer, Ebbe; Choi, Inyeong; Lee, Soojung

    2014-01-01

    Cation-coupled HCO3− transport was initially identified in the mid-1970s when pioneering studies showed that acid extrusion from cells is stimulated by CO2/HCO3− and associated with Na+ and Cl− movement. The first Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporter (NCBT) was expression-cloned in the late 1990s. There are currently five mammalian NCBTs in the SLC4-family: the electrogenic Na,HCO3-cotransporters NBCe1 and NBCe2 (SLC4A4 and SLC4A5 gene products); the electroneutral Na,HCO3-cotransporter NBCn1 ...

  6. Cation disorder in shocked orthopyroxene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundon, R. W.; Hafner, S. S.

    1971-01-01

    The study of cation distributions over nonequivalent lattice sites in minerals may reveal information on the history of temperature and pressure in rocks. Chemically homogeneous orthopyroxene specimens were shocked under well-controlled conditions in the laboratory in order to provide a basis for the interpretation of more complex natural materials. As a result of the investigation it is concluded that the distribution of magnesium and iron over the M1 and M2 positions in Bamle enstatite shocked at 1 megabar is highly disordered. It corresponds to an equilibrium distribution of at least 1000 C.

  7. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J A [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Holland, D [Physics Department, Warwick University, Coventry (United Kingdom); Bland, J [Physics Department, University of Liverpool, PO Box 147, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Johnson, C E [Physics Department, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Thomas, M F [Physics Department, University of Liverpool, PO Box 147, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-19

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}]{sub x} - [ZnCl{sub 2}]{sub 1-x} where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Moessbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb){sub 2}(OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn){sub 2}(OSb){sub 2}].

  8. Cation coordination in oxychloride glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J A; Holland, D; Bland, J; Johnson, C E; Thomas, M F

    2003-01-01

    Glasses containing mixtures of cations and anions of nominal compositions [Sb 2 O 3 ] x - [ZnCl 2 ] 1-x where x = 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00, have been studied by means of neutron diffraction and Raman and Moessbauer spectroscopy. There is preferential bonding within the system with the absence of Sb-Cl bonds. Antimony is found to be threefold coordinated to oxygen, and zinc fourfold coordinated. The main contributing species are of the form [Sb(OSb) 2 (OZn)] and [Zn(ClZn) 2 (OSb) 2

  9. The Free Tricoordinated Silyl Cation Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čičak, H.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available As the importance and abundance of silicon in our environment is large, it has been thought that silicon might take the place of carbon in forming a host of similar compounds and silicon-based life. However, until today there is no experimental evidence for such a hypothesis and carbon is still unique among the elements in the vast number and variety of compounds it can form. Also, the corresponding derivatives of the two elements show considerable differences in their chemical properties.The essential debate concerning organosilicon chemistry relates to the existence of the free planar tricoordinated silyl cations in condensed phase (R3Si+, in analogy to carbocations (R3C+ which have been known and characterized as free species. Although silyl cations are thermodynamically more stable than their carbon analogs, they are very reactive due to their high inherent electrophilicity and the ability of hypervalent coordination. On the other hand, stabilization by inductive and hyperconjugative effects and larger steric effects of carbocations make them less sensitive to solvation or other environmental effects than silyl cations. Hence, observation of free silyl cations in the condensed phase proved extremely difficult and the actual problem is the question of the degree of the (remaining silyl cation character.The first free silyl cation, trimesitylsilyl cation, and in analogy with it tridurylsilyl cation, were synthesized by Lambert et al. Free silyl cations based on analogy to aromatic ions (homocyclopropenylium and tropylium have also been prepared. However, in these silyl cations the cationic character is reduced by internal π -conjugation. Čičak et al. prepared some silyl-cationic intermediates (Me3Si--CH≡CR+in solid state. With the help of quantum-mechanical calculations it was concluded that these adducts have much more silyl cation than carbocation character.

  10. Toward the establishment of standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations, part 3: understanding supersaturation versus precipitation potential during the in vitro digestion of type I, II, IIIA, IIIB and IV lipid-based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Hywel D; Sassene, Philip; Kleberg, Karen; Calderone, Marilyn; Igonin, Annabel; Jule, Eduardo; Vertommen, Jan; Blundell, Ross; Benameur, Hassan; Müllertz, Anette; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that digestion of lipid-based formulations (LBFs) can stimulate both supersaturation and precipitation. The current study has evaluated the drug, formulation and dose-dependence of the supersaturation - precipitation balance for a range of LBFs. Type I, II, IIIA/B LBFs containing medium-chain (MC) or long-chain (LC) lipids, and lipid-free Type IV LBF incorporating different doses of fenofibrate or tolfenamic acid were digested in vitro in a simulated intestinal medium. The degree of supersaturation was assessed through comparison of drug concentrations in aqueous digestion phases (APDIGEST) during LBF digestion and the equilibrium drug solubility in the same phases. Increasing fenofibrate or tolfenamic acid drug loads (i.e., dose) had negligible effects on LC LBF performance during digestion, but promoted drug crystallization (confirmed by XRPD) from MC and Type IV LBF. Drug crystallization was only evident in instances when the calculated maximum supersaturation ratio (SR(M)) was >3. This threshold SR(M) value was remarkably consistent across all LBF and was also consistent with previous studies with danazol. The maximum supersaturation ratio (SR(M)) provides an indication of the supersaturation 'pressure' exerted by formulation digestion and is strongly predictive of the likelihood of drug precipitation in vitro. This may also prove effective in discriminating the in vivo performance of LBFs.

  11. RAB-10-Dependent Membrane Transport Is Required for Dendrite Arborization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Yadav, Smita; DeVault, Laura; Jan, Yuh Nung; Sherwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Formation of elaborately branched dendrites is necessary for the proper input and connectivity of many sensory neurons. Previous studies have revealed that dendritic growth relies heavily on ER-to-Golgi transport, Golgi outposts and endocytic recycling. How new membrane and associated cargo is delivered from the secretory and endosomal compartments to sites of active dendritic growth, however, remains unknown. Using a candidate-based genetic screen in C. elegans, we have identified the small GTPase RAB-10 as a key regulator of membrane trafficking during dendrite morphogenesis. Loss of rab-10 severely reduced proximal dendritic arborization in the multi-dendritic PVD neuron. RAB-10 acts cell-autonomously in the PVD neuron and localizes to the Golgi and early endosomes. Loss of function mutations of the exocyst complex components exoc-8 and sec-8, which regulate tethering, docking and fusion of transport vesicles at the plasma membrane, also caused proximal dendritic arborization defects and led to the accumulation of intracellular RAB-10 vesicles. In rab-10 and exoc-8 mutants, the trans-membrane proteins DMA-1 and HPO-30, which promote PVD dendrite stabilization and branching, no longer localized strongly to the proximal dendritic membranes and instead were sequestered within intracellular vesicles. Together these results suggest a crucial role for the Rab10 GTPase and the exocyst complex in controlling membrane transport from the secretory and/or endosomal compartments that is required for dendritic growth. PMID:26394140

  12. Lipid-based oral delivery systems for skin deposition of a potential chemopreventive DIM derivative: characterization and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boakye, Cedar H A; Patel, Ketan; Patel, Apurva R; Faria, Henrique A M; Zucolotto, Valtencir; Safe, Stephen; Singh, Mandip

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the oral route as a viable potential for the skin deposition of a novel diindolylmethane derivative (DIM-D) for chemoprevention activity. Various lipid-based oral delivery systems were optimized and compared for enhancing DIM-D's oral bioavailability and skin deposition. Preformulation studies were performed to evaluate the log P and solubility of DIM-D. Microsomal metabolism, P-glycoprotein efflux, and caco-2 monolayer permeability of DIM-D were determined. Comparative evaluation of the oral absorption and skin deposition of DIM-D-loaded various lipid-based formulations was performed in rats. DIM-D showed pH-dependent solubility and a high log P value. It was not a strong substrate of microsomal degradation and P-glycoprotein. SMEDDs comprised of medium chain triglycerides, monoglycerides, and kolliphor-HS15 (36.70 ± 0.42 nm). SNEDDs comprised of long chain triglycerides, cremophor RH40, labrasol, and TPGS (84.00 ± 14.14 nm). Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) consisted of compritol, miglyol, and surfactants (116.50 ± 2.12 nm). The blank formulations all showed >70 % cell viability in caco-2 cells. Differential Scanning Calorimetry confirmed the amorphization of DIM-D within the lipid matrices while Atomic Force Microscopy showed particle size distribution similar to the dynamic light scattering data. DIM-D also showed reduced permeation across caco-2 monolayer that was enhanced (p < 0.05) by SNEDDs in comparison to SMEDDs and NLC. Fabsolute for DIM-D SNEDDs, SMEDDs, and NLC was 0.14, 0.04, and 0.007, respectively. SNEDDs caused 53.90, 11.32, and 15.08-fold more skin deposition of DIM-D than the free drug, SMEDDs, and NLC, respectively, at 2 h following oral administration and shows a viable potential for use in skin cancer chemoprevention. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  13. Feeding behaviors during home-based treatment of moderate acute malnutrition using corn-soy blends or lipid-based nutrient supplements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iuel-Brockdorff, Ann-Sophie Julie D; Ouedraogo, Albertine; Ritz, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Feeding behaviors have an important impact on children's nutritional status and are essential to consider when implementing nutrition programs. The objective of this study was to explore and compare feeding behaviors related to supplementary feeding with corn-soy blends (CSB) and lipid-based nutr...

  14. Sleeping dendrites: fiber-optic measurements of dendritic calcium activity in freely moving and sleeping animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Seibt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendrites are the post-synaptic sites of most excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the brain, making them the main location of cortical information processing and synaptic plasticity. Although current hypotheses suggest a central role for sleep in proper cognitive function and brain plasticity, virtually nothing is known about changes in dendritic activity across the sleep-wake cycle and how waking experience modifies this activity. To start addressing these questions, we developed a method that allows long-term recordings of EEGs/EMG combined with in vivo cortical calcium (Ca2+ activity in freely moving and sleeping rats. We measured Ca2+ activity from populations of dendrites of layer (L 5 pyramidal neurons (n = 13 rats that we compared with Ca2+ activity from populations of neurons in L2/3 (n = 11 rats. L5 and L2/3 neurons were labelled using bolus injection of OGB1-AM or GCaMP6 (1. Ca2+ signals were detected using a fiber-optic system (cannula diameter = 400µm, transmitting the changes in fluorescence to a photodiode. Ca2+ fluctuations could then be correlated with ongoing changes in brain oscillatory activity during 5 major brain states: active wake [AW], quiet wake [QW], NREM, REM and NREM-REM transition (or intermediate state, [IS]. Our Ca2+ recordings show large transients in L5 dendrites and L2/3 neurons that oscillate predominantly at frequencies In summary, we show that this technique is successful in monitoring fluctuations in ongoing dendritic Ca2+ activity during natural brain states and allows, in principle, to combine behavioral measurement with imaging from various brain regions (e.g. deep structures in freely behaving animals. Using this method, we show that Ca2+ transients from populations of L2/3 neurons and L5 dendrites are deferentially regulated across the sleep/wake cycle, with dendritic activity being the highest during the IS sleep. Our correlation analysis suggests that specific sleep EEG activity during NREM and IS

  15. A Genome-Wide Screen for Dendritically Localized RNAs Identifies Genes Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mala Misra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Localizing messenger RNAs at specific subcellular sites is a conserved mechanism for targeting the synthesis of cytoplasmic proteins to distinct subcellular domains, thereby generating the asymmetric protein distributions necessary for cellular and developmental polarity. However, the full range of transcripts that are asymmetrically distributed in specialized cell types, and the significance of their localization, especially in the nervous system, are not known. We used the EP-MS2 method, which combines EP transposon insertion with the MS2/MCP in vivo fluorescent labeling system, to screen for novel localized transcripts in polarized cells, focusing on the highly branched Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization neurons. Of a total of 541 lines screened, we identified 55 EP-MS2 insertions producing transcripts that were enriched in neuronal processes, particularly in dendrites. The 47 genes identified by these insertions encode molecularly diverse proteins, and are enriched for genes that function in neuronal development and physiology. RNAi-mediated knockdown confirmed roles for many of the candidate genes in dendrite morphogenesis. We propose that the transport of mRNAs encoded by these genes into the dendrites allows their expression to be regulated on a local scale during the dynamic developmental processes of dendrite outgrowth, branching, and/or remodeling.

  16. Evaluating Local Primary Dendrite Arm Spacing Characterization Techniques Using Synthetic Directionally Solidified Dendritic Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschopp, Mark A.; Miller, Jonathan D.; Oppedal, Andrew L.; Solanki, Kiran N.

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure characterization continues to play an important bridge to understanding why particular processing routes or parameters affect the properties of materials. This statement certainly holds true in the case of directionally solidified dendritic microstructures, where characterizing the primary dendrite arm spacing is vital to developing the process-structure-property relationships that can lead to the design and optimization of processing routes for defined properties. In this work, four series of simulations were used to examine the capability of a few Voronoi-based techniques to capture local microstructure statistics (primary dendrite arm spacing and coordination number) in controlled (synthetically generated) microstructures. These simulations used both cubic and hexagonal microstructures with varying degrees of disorder (noise) to study the effects of length scale, base microstructure, microstructure variability, and technique parameters on the local PDAS distribution, local coordination number distribution, bulk PDAS, and bulk coordination number. The Voronoi tesselation technique with a polygon-side-length criterion correctly characterized the known synthetic microstructures. By systematically studying the different techniques for quantifying local primary dendrite arm spacings, we have evaluated their capability to capture this important microstructure feature in different dendritic microstructures, which can be an important step for experimentally correlating with both processing and properties in single crystal nickel-based superalloys.

  17. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria Motta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies.

  18. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  19. ADSORPTION METHOD FOR SEPARATING METAL CATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khym, J.X.

    1959-03-10

    The chromatographic separation of fission product cations is discussed. By use of this method a mixture of metal cations containing Zr, Cb, Ce, Y, Ba, and Sr may be separated from one another. Mentioned as preferred exchange adsorbents are resins containing free sulfonic acid groups. Various eluants, such as tartaric acid, HCl, and citric acid, used at various acidities, are employed to effect the selective elution and separation of the various fission product cations.

  20. Electronic spectra of astrophysically interesting cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, John P., E-mail: j.p.maier@unibas.ch; Rice, Corey A., E-mail: j.p.maier@unibas.ch; Mazzotti, Fabio J., E-mail: j.p.maier@unibas.ch; Johnson, Anatoly, E-mail: j.p.maier@unibas.ch [Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstr. 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-01-22

    The electronic spectra of polyacetylene cations were recorded at 20K in the laboratory in an ion trap instrument. These can then be compared with diffuse interstellar band (DIB) absorptions. Examination of recently published data shows that the attribution of a weak DIB at ∼506.9 nm to diacetylene cation is not justified. Study of the higher excited electronic states of polyacetylene cations shows that their widths can still be sufficiently narrow for consideration as DIB carriers.

  1. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    The growth of dendrites is governed by the interplay between two simple and familiar processes---the irreversible diffusion of energy, and the reversible work done in the formation of new surface area. To advance our understanding of these processes, NASA sponsored a project that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia is 1994, 1996, and 1997 to record and analyze benchmark data in an apparent-microgravity ``laboratory.'' In this laboratory, energy transfer by gravity driven convection was essentially eliminated and one could test independently, for the first time, both components of dendritic growth theory. The analysis of this data shows that although the diffusion of energy can be properly accounted for, the results from interfacial physics appear to be in disagreement and alternate models should receive increased attention. Unfortunately, currently and for the foreseeable future, there is no access or financial support to develop and conduct additional experiments of this type. However, the benchmark data of 35mm photonegatives, video, and all supporting instrument data are now available at the IDGE Archive at the College of the Holy Cross. This data may still have considerable relevance to researchers working specifically with dendritic growth, and more generally those working in the synthesis, growth & processing of materials, multiscale computational modeling, pattern formation, and systems far from equilibrium.

  2. Uranium isotope separation using styrene cation exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahovec, J.

    1980-01-01

    The separation of 235 U and 238 U isotopes is carried out either by simple isotope exchange in the system uranium-cation exchanger (sulphonated styrene divinylbenzene resin), or by combination of isotope exchange in a uranium-cation exchanger (Dowex 50, Amberlite IR-120) system and a chemical reaction. A review is presented of elution agents used, the degree of cation exchanger cross-linking, columns length, and 235 U enrichment. The results are described of the isotope effect study in a U(IV)-U(VI)-cation exchanger system conducted by Japanese and Romanian authors (isotope exchange kinetics, frontal analysis, reverse (indirect) frontal analysis). (H.S.)

  3. Cation-π interactions in structural biology

    OpenAIRE

    Gallivan, Justin P.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    1999-01-01

    Cation-pi interactions in protein structures are identified and evaluated by using an energy-based criterion for selecting significant sidechain pairs. Cation-pi interactions are found to be common among structures in the Protein Data Bank, and it is clearly demonstrated that, when a cationic sidechain (Lys or Arg) is near an aromatic sidechain (Phe, Tyr, or Trp), the geometry is biased toward one that would experience a favorable cation-pi interaction. The sidechain of Arg is more likely tha...

  4. Simultaneous anion and cation mobility in polypyrrole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Bay, Lasse; Vidanapathirana, K.

    2003-01-01

    and the expulsion of anions; a broad anodic peak centered at ca. - 0.5 V representing the expulsion of cations; and a second broad peak at +0.2 to +0.5 V corresponding to anions being inserted. Although the motion of cations is the most important, as expected, there is a significant anion contribution, thereby...... complicating reproducibility when employing PPy(DBS) polymers as actuators. When the cation is doubly charged, it enters the film less readily, and anions dominate the mobility. Using a large and bulky cation switches the mechanism to apparently total anion motion. The changes in area of the three peaks...

  5. Novel Nanostructured Solid Materials for Modulating Oral Drug Delivery from Solid-State Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) have gained significant attention in recent times, owing to their ability to overcome the challenges limiting the oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. Despite the successful commercialization of several LBDDS products over the years, a large discrepancy exists between the number of poorly water-soluble drugs displaying suboptimal in vivo performances and the application of LBDDS to mitigate their various delivery challenges. Conventional LBDDS, including lipid solutions and suspensions, emulsions, and self-emulsifying formulations, suffer from various drawbacks limiting their widespread use and commercialization. Accordingly, solid-state LBDDS, fabricated by adsorbing LBDDS onto a chemically inert solid carrier material, have attracted substantial interest as a viable means of stabilizing LBDDS whilst eliminating some of the various limitations. This review describes the impact of solid carrier choice on LBDDS performance and highlights the importance of appropriate solid carrier material selection when designing hybrid solid-state LBDDS. Specifically, emphasis is placed on discussing the ability of the specific solid carrier to modulate drug release, control lipase action and lipid digestion, and enhance biopharmaceutical performance above the original liquid-state LBDDS. To encourage the interested reader to consider their solid carrier choice on a higher level, various novel materials with the potential for future use as solid carriers for LBDDS are described. This review is highly significant in guiding future research directions in the solid-state LBDDS field and fostering the translation of these delivery systems to the pharmaceutical marketplace.

  6. Effect of lipid-based dry eye supplements on the tear film in wearers of eye cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael T M; Cho, Irene Sung Hee; Jung, Soo Hee; Craig, Jennifer P

    2017-08-01

    To compare the effects on tear film parameters and contamination in cosmetic eyeliner wearers, after single application of two lipid-based dry eye treatments: a lipid-containing lubricant eye drop and a phospholipid liposomal spray. Fifty participants were enrolled in a prospective, randomised, paired-eye, investigator-masked trial. Pencil eyeliner (Body Shop ® Crayon Eye Definer) was applied to the upper eyelid periocular skin of both eyes, anterior to the lash line. Baseline tear film quality was assessed fifteen minutes after eyeliner application. A lubricant drop (Systane ® Balance) was then applied to one eye (randomised), and liposomal spray (Tears Again ® ) to the contralateral eye. Tear film contamination, lipid layer grade, non-invasive tear film break-up time and tear evaporation rate were evaluated fifteen minutes post-treatment and compared to pre-treatment values. Pre-treatment measurements did not differ between eyes assigned to lubricant drop and liposomal spray. Tear film contamination was observed in a greater proportion of eyes following both treatments (both p0.05). Changes in tear film parameters did not differ between treatments (all p>0.05). Both the lipid-containing lubricant eye drop and phospholipid liposomal spray result in clinically apparent tear film contamination in eyeliner cosmetic wearers. Although both treatments effected an increase in lipid layer thickness, neither displayed clinical efficacy in improving tear film stability. Copyright © 2017 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Preventative lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) and young child feeding practices: findings from qualitative research in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesorogol, Carolyn; Jean-Louis, Sherlie; Green, Jamie; Iannotti, Lora

    2015-12-01

    To prevent undernutrition in an urban slum in Haiti, a lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) was introduced through a randomised control trial. Food supplementation for young child nutrition has a long history in Haiti, but there is little empirical information regarding the effects of supplementation on young child feeding practices. One of the concerns raised by supplementation is that it may disrupt other positive feeding practices such as breastfeeding and use of other complementary foods, with negative consequences for child nutrition. We conducted 29 in-depth interviews with mother-baby pairs from the three comparison groups: control, 3-month LNS supplementation and 6-month LNS supplementation. Findings from those in the LNS groups indicated high acceptance and satisfaction with LNS and perceptions that it positively affects child health and development. LNS was integrated into and enhanced ongoing complementary feeding practices. The effects of LNS use on duration and perceived quantity of breastfeeding were variable, but generally, breastfeeding was maintained during and after the intervention. Interviews generated insights into beliefs regarding infant and young child feeding practices such as introduction and use of complementary foods, and breastfeeding duration, exclusivity and cessation. Implications for the use of LNS in public health nutrition programmes are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Polar Quassinoids in Standardized Eurycoma longifolia Extract Formulated into a Lipid-Based Solid Dispersion to Improve Rat Sperm Count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hai-Qiu; Ebrahimi, Forough; Low, Bin-Seng; Khan, Nurzalina Abdul Karim; Chan, Kit-Lam

    2017-12-01

    Eurycoma longifolia Jack is popularly sought in Southeast Asian countries for traditional remedies to improve sexual performance and fertility. 13α(21)-Epoxyeurycomanone and eurycomanone, two major quassinoids in a root extract (TAF2) were reported to improve rat spermatogenesis and fertility. Unfortunately, these quassinoids possess low bioavailability because of high aqueous solubility and low lipid membrane permeability. Often, other possible barriers may be P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux in the gut and presystemic hepatic metabolism. The present study attempted to solve these problems by formulating a lipid-based solid dispersion (TAF2-SD) of optimized mixture of TAF2 and emulsifiers, which was then orally administered to rats prior to sperm count analysis. The TAF2-SD-treated rats showed significantly twofold (p < 0.001) and fourfold (p < 0.001) higher sperm count than did TAF2-treated and vehicle-treated (control) rats, respectively. The study also demonstrated no significant in vitro ileal absorption changes of the quassinoids by P-gp efflux inhibitors and concentration change or secondary metabolite formation upon in vitro incubation with rat liver homogenates, suggesting that P-gp-mediated efflux and presystemic metabolism were not limiting their bioavailability. Further study on orally TAF2-treated rats confirmed that the area under the curve and bioavailability curve of each quassinoid in the absence and presence of ketoconazole were unchanged. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Molecular identity of dendritic voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorincz, Andrea; Nusser, Zoltan

    2010-05-14

    Active invasion of the dendritic tree by action potentials (APs) generated in the axon is essential for associative synaptic plasticity and neuronal ensemble formation. In cortical pyramidal cells (PCs), this AP back-propagation is supported by dendritic voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channels, whose molecular identity is unknown. Using a highly sensitive electron microscopic immunogold technique, we revealed the presence of the Nav1.6 subunit in hippocampal CA1 PC proximal and distal dendrites. Here, the subunit density is lower by a factor of 35 to 80 than that found in axon initial segments. A gradual decrease in Nav1.6 density along the proximodistal axis of the dendritic tree was also detected without any labeling in dendritic spines. Our results reveal the characteristic subcellular distribution of the Nav1.6 subunit, identifying this molecule as a key substrate enabling dendritic excitability.

  10. Polyaniline nanotubes and their dendrites doped with different naphthalene sulfonic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiming; Wei Zhixiang; Zhang Lijuan; Wan Meixiang

    2005-01-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanotubes (130-250 nm in average diameter) doped with α-naphthalene sulfonic acid (α-NSA), β-naphthalene sulfonic acid (β-NSA) and 1,5-naphthalene disulfonic acid were synthesized via a self-assembly process. It was found that the formation yield, morphology (hollow or solid), size, crystalline and electrical properties of the nanostructures are affected by the position and number of -SO 3 H groups attached to the naphthalene ring of NSA as well as the synthesis conditions. Moreover, these nanotubes aggregate to form a dendritic morphology when the polymerization is performed at a static state. The micelles composed of dopant or dopant/anilinium cations might act in a template-like fashion in forming self-assembled PANI nanotubes, which was further confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements, while the aggregated morphology of the nanotubes might result from polymer chain interactions including π-π interactions, hydrogen and ionic bonds

  11. Afrikaans Syllabification Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilla Fick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to English, automatic hyphenation by computer of Afrikaans words is a problem that still needs to be addressed, since errors are still often encountered in printed text. An initial step in this task is the ability to automatically syllabify words. Since new words are created continuously by joining words, it is necessary to develop an “intelligent” technique for syllabification. As a first phase of the research, we consider only the orthographic information of words, and disregard both syntactic and morphological information. This approach allows us to use machine-learning techniques such as artificial neural networks and decision trees that are known for their pattern recognition abilities. Both these techniques are trained with isolated patterns consisting of input patterns and corresponding outputs (or targets that indicate whether the input pattern should be split at a certain position, or not. In the process of compiling a list of syllabified words from which to generate training data for the  syllabification problem, irregular patterns were identified. The same letter patterns are split differently in different words and complete words that are spelled identically are split differently due to meaning. We also identified irregularities in and between  the different dictionaries that we used. We examined the influence range of letters that are involved in irregularities. For example, for their in agter-ente and vaste-rente we have to consider three letters to the left of r to be certain where the hyphen should be inserted. The influence range of the k in verstek-waarde and kleinste-kwadrate is four to the left and three to the right. In an analysis of letter patterns in Afrikaans words we found that the letter e has the highest frequency overall (16,2% of all letters in the word list. The frequency of words starting with s is the highest, while the frequency of words ending with e is the highest. It is important to

  12. Optimizing cationic and neutral lipids for efficient gene delivery at high serum content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chia-Ling; Ewert, Kai K; Majzoub, Ramsey N; Hwu, Yeu-Kuang; Liang, Keng S; Leal, Cecília; Safinya, Cyrus R

    2014-01-01

    Cationic liposome (CL)-DNA complexes are promising gene delivery vectors with potential application in gene therapy. A key challenge in creating CL-DNA complexes for application is that their transfection efficiency (TE) is adversely affected by serum. In particular, little is known about the effects of a high serum content on TE, even though this may provide design guidelines for application in vivo. We prepared CL-DNA complexes in which we varied the neutral lipid [1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerophosphatidylcholine, glycerol-monooleate (GMO), cholesterol], the headgroup charge and chemical structure of the cationic lipid, and the ratio of neutral to cationic lipid; we then measured the TE of these complexes as a function of serum content and assessed their cytotoxicity. We tested selected formulations in two human cancer cell lines (M21/melanoma and PC-3/prostate cancer). In the absence of serum, all CL-DNA complexes of custom-synthesized multivalent lipids show high TE. Certain combinations of multivalent lipids and neutral lipids, such as MVL5(5+)/GMO-DNA complexes or complexes based on the dendritic-headgroup lipid TMVLG3(8+) exhibited high TE both in the absence and presence of serum. Although their TE still dropped to a small extent in the presence of serum, it reached or surpassed that of benchmark commercial transfection reagents, particularly at a high serum content. Two-component vectors (one multivalent cationic lipid and one neutral lipid) can rival or surpass benchmark reagents at low and high serum contents (up to 50%, v/v). We propose guidelines for optimizing the serum resistance of CL-DNA complexes based on a given cationic lipid. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Cationic polymers and their therapeutic potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samal, S.K.; Dash, M.; van Vlierberghe, S.; Kaplan, D.; Chiellini, E.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo; Dubruel, P.

    2012-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed enormous research focused on cationic polymers. Cationic polymers are the subject of intense research as non-viral gene delivery systems, due to their flexible properties, facile synthesis, robustness and proven gene delivery efficiency. Here, we review the most recent

  14. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N. Reinhoudt

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  15. Asymmetric Aminalization via Cation-Binding Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sang Yeon; Liu, Yidong; Oh, Joong Suk

    2018-01-01

    Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, in principle, can generate "chiral" anionic nucleophiles, where the counter cations are coordinated within chiral environments. Nitrogen-nucleophiles are intrinsically basic, therefore, its use as nucleophiles is often challenging and limiting the scope of the...

  16. Structural and energetic study of cation-π-cation interactions in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Silvana; Soteras, Ignacio; Gelpí, Josep Lluis; Dehez, François; Chipot, Christophe; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles

    2017-04-12

    Cation-π interactions of aromatic rings and positively charged groups are among the most important interactions in structural biology. The role and energetic characteristics of these interactions are well established. However, the occurrence of cation-π-cation interactions is an unexpected motif, which raises intriguing questions about its functional role in proteins. We present a statistical analysis of the occurrence, composition and geometrical preferences of cation-π-cation interactions identified in a set of non-redundant protein structures taken from the Protein Data Bank. Our results demonstrate that this structural motif is observed at a small, albeit non-negligible frequency in proteins, and suggest a preference to establish cation-π-cation motifs with Trp, followed by Tyr and Phe. Furthermore, we have found that cation-π-cation interactions tend to be highly conserved, which supports their structural or functional role. Finally, we have performed an energetic analysis of a representative subset of cation-π-cation complexes combining quantum-chemical and continuum solvation calculations. Our results point out that the protein environment can strongly screen the cation-cation repulsion, leading to an attractive interaction in 64% of the complexes analyzed. Together with the high degree of conservation observed, these results suggest a potential stabilizing role in the protein fold, as demonstrated recently for a miniature protein (Craven et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016, 138, 1543). From a computational point of view, the significant contribution of non-additive three-body terms challenges the suitability of standard additive force fields for describing cation-π-cation motifs in molecular simulations.

  17. Willingness to pay for lipid-based nutrient supplements for young children in four urban sites of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segrè, Joel; Winnard, Kim; Abrha, Teweldebrhan Hailu; Abebe, Yewelsew; Shilane, David; Lapping, Karin

    2015-12-01

    Malnutrition in children under 5 years of age is pervasive in Ethiopia across all wealth quintiles. The objective of this study was to determine the willingness to pay (WTP) for a week's supply of Nutributter® (a lipid-based nutrient supplement, or LNS) through typical urban Ethiopian retail channels. In February, 2012, 128 respondents from 108 households with 6-24-month-old children had the opportunity to sample Nutributter® for 2 days in their homes as a complementary food. Respondents were asked directly and indirectly what they were willing to pay for the product, and then participated in market simulation where they could demonstrate their WTP through an exchange of real money for real product. Nearly all (96%) of the respondents had a positive WTP, and 25% were willing to pay the equivalent of at least $1.05, which we calculated as the likely minimum, unsubsidised Ethiopian retail price of Nutributter® for 1 week for one child. Respondents willing to pay at least $1.05 included urban men and women with children 6-24 months old from low-, middle- and high-wealth groups from four study sites across three cities. Additionally, we estimated the initial annual market size for Nutributter® in the cities where the study took place to be around $500 000. The study has important implications for retail distribution of LNS in Ethiopia, showing who the most likely customers could be, and also suggesting why the initial market may be too small to be of interest to food manufacturers seeking profit maximisation. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Prenatal lipid-based nutrient supplements increase cord leptin concentration in pregnant women from rural Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huybregts, Lieven; Roberfroid, Dominique; Lanou, Hermann; Meda, Nicolas; Taes, Youri; Valea, Innocent; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Kolsteren, Patrick; Van Camp, John

    2013-05-01

    In developing countries, prenatal lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) were shown to increase birth size; however, the mechanism of this effect remains unknown. Cord blood hormone concentrations are strongly associated with birth size. Therefore, we hypothesize that LNSs increase birth size through a change in the endocrine regulation of fetal development. We compared the effect of daily prenatal LNSs with multiple micronutrient tablets on cord blood hormone concentrations using a randomized, controlled design including 197 pregnant women from rural Burkina Faso. Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) I and II, their binding proteins IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3, leptin, cortisol, and insulin were quantified in cord sera using immunoassays. LNS was associated with higher cord blood leptin mainly in primigravidae (+57%; P = 0.02) and women from the highest tertile of BMI at study inclusion (+41%; P = 0.02). We did not find any significant LNS effects on other measured cord hormones. The observed increase in cord leptin was associated with a significantly higher birth weight. Cord sera from small-for-gestational age newborns had lower median IGF-I (-9 μg/L; P = 0.003), IGF-II (-79 μg/L; P = 0.003), IGFBP-3 (-0.7 μg/L; P = 0.007), and leptin (-1.0 μg/L; P = 0.016) concentrations but higher median cortisol (+18 μg/L; P = 0.037) concentrations compared with normally grown newborns. Prenatal LNS resulted in increased cord leptin concentrations in primigravidae and mothers with higher BMI at study inclusion. The elevated leptin concentrations could point toward a higher neonatal fat mass.

  19. Drug Solubility in Fatty Acids as a Formulation Design Approach for Lipid-Based Formulations: A Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yung-Chi; Dalton, Chad; Regler, Brian; Harris, David

    2018-06-06

    Lipid-based drug delivery systems have been intensively investigated as a means of delivering poorly water-soluble drugs. Upon ingestion, the lipases in the gastrointestinal tract digest lipid ingredients, mainly triglycerides, within the formulation into monoglycerides and fatty acids. While numerous studies have addressed the solubility of drugs in triglycerides, comparatively few publications have addressed the solubility of drugs in fatty acids, which are the end product of digestion and responsible for the solubility of drug within mixed micelles. The objective of this investigation was to explore the solubility of a poorly water-soluble drug in fatty acids and raise the awareness of the importance of drug solubility in fatty acids. The model API (active pharmaceutical ingredient), a weak acid, is considered a BCS II compound with an aqueous solubility of 0.02 μg/mL and predicted partition coefficient >7. The solubility of API ranged from 120 mg/mL to over 1 g/mL in fatty acids with chain lengths across the range C18 to C6. Hydrogen bonding was found to be the main driver of the solubilization of API in fatty acids. The solubility of API was significantly reduced by water uptake in caprylic acid but not in oleic acid. This report demonstrates that solubility data generated in fatty acids can provide an indication of the solubility of the drug after lipid digestion. This report also highlights the importance of measuring the solubility of drugs in fatty acids in the course of lipid formulation development.

  20. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...

  1. Nanofibrous nonwovens based on dendritic-linear-dendritic poly(ethylene glycol) hybrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kikionis, Stefanos; Ioannou, Efstathia; Andren, Oliver C.J.

    2017-01-01

    unsuccessful. Nevertheless, when these DLD hybrids were blended with an array of different biodegradable polymers as entanglement enhancers, nanofibrous nonwovens were successfully prepared by electrospinning. The pseudogeneration degree of the DLDs, the nature of the co-electrospun polymer and the solvent...... nanofibers. Such dendritic nanofibrous scaffolds can be promising materials for biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, multifunctionality, and advanced structural architecture....

  2. Exploring backbone-cation alkyl spacers for multi-cation side chain anion exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang; Yu, Xuedi; Hickner, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    In order to systematically study how the arrangement of cations on the side chain and length of alkyl spacers between cations impact the performance of multi-cation AEMs for alkaline fuel cells, a series of polyphenylene oxide (PPO)-based AEMs with different cationic side chains were synthesized. This work resulted in samples with two or three cations in a side chain pendant to the PPO backbone. More importantly, the length of the spacer between cations varied from 3 methylene (-CH2-) (C3) groups to 8 methylene (C8) groups. The highest conductivity, up to 99 mS/cm in liquid water at room temperature, was observed for the triple-cation side chain AEM with pentyl (C5) or hexyl (C6) spacers. The multi-cation AEMs were found to have decreased water uptake and ionic conductivity when the spacer chains between cations were lengthened from pentyl (C5) or hexyl (C6) to octyl (C8) linking groups. The triple-cation membranes with pentyl (C5) or hexyl (C6) groups between cations showed greatest stability after immersion in 1 M NaOH at 80 °C for 500 h.

  3. Fine structure of synapses on dendritic spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eFrotscher

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Camillo Golgi’s Reazione Nera led to the discovery of dendritic spines, small appendages originating from dendritic shafts. With the advent of electron microscopy (EM they were identified as sites of synaptic contact. Later it was found that changes in synaptic strength were associated with changes in the shape of dendritic spines. While live-cell imaging was advantageous in monitoring the time course of such changes in spine structure, EM is still the best method for the simultaneous visualization of all cellular components, including actual synaptic contacts, at high resolution. Immunogold labeling for EM reveals the precise localization of molecules in relation to synaptic structures. Previous EM studies of spines and synapses were performed in tissue subjected to aldehyde fixation and dehydration in ethanol, which is associated with protein denaturation and tissue shrinkage. It has remained an issue to what extent fine structural details are preserved when subjecting the tissue to these procedures. In the present review, we report recent studies on the fine structure of spines and synapses using high-pressure freezing (HPF, which avoids protein denaturation by aldehydes and results in an excellent preservation of ultrastructural detail. In these studies, HPF was used to monitor subtle fine-structural changes in spine shape associated with chemically induced long-term potentiation (cLTP at identified hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. Changes in spine shape result from reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. We report that cLTP was associated with decreased immunogold labeling for phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing protein. Phosphorylation of cofilin renders it unable to depolymerize F-actin, which stabilizes the actin cytoskeleton. Decreased levels of p-cofilin, in turn, suggest increased actin turnover, possibly underlying the changes in spine shape associated with cLTP. The findings reviewed here establish HPF as

  4. Dendritic cells during Epstein Barr virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eMunz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Epstein Barr virus (EBV causes persistent infection in more than 90% of the human adult population and is associated with 2% of all tumors in humans. This -herpesvirus infects primarily human B and epithelial cells, but has been reported to be sensed by dendritic cells (DCs during primary infection. These activated DCs are thought to contribute to innate restriction of EBV infection and initiate EBV specific adaptive immune responses via cross-priming. The respective evidence and their potential importance for EBV specific vaccine development will be discussed in this review.

  5. Gliadin fragments promote migration of dendritic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chládková, Barbara; Kamanová, Jana; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Cinová, Jana; Šebo, Peter; Tučková, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2011), 938-948 ISSN 1582-1838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA AV ČR IAA500200801; GA AV ČR IAA500200914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * gliadin * dendritic cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2011

  6. [Effects of a lipid-based nutrient supplement on hemoglobin levels and anthropometric indicators in children from five districts in Huánuco Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Vásquez, Alejandro; Bado, Ricardo; Alcázar, Lorena; Aquino, Oscar; Rodríguez, Amelia; Novalbos, José Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives . To determine the effect of consumption of a lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) on hemoglobin levels, anemia and anthropometric indicators in children aged six to eleven months old in five districts in the province of Ambo in the region of Huanuco, Peru. A pre-experimental, pre-post study was performed. The study population included children aged six to eleven months old in 19 health facilities in five districts with very high vulnerability to chronic malnutrition in the province of Ambo, Huanuco. Data from 147 children who received the lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) from six to eleven months old were obtained. The mean hemoglobin significantly increased by 0.67 g/dL (panemia dropped by 27 percentage points (panemia in children under twelve months, which might constitute an effective alternative to prevent and control childhood anemia.

  7. The Use of Quasi-Isothermal Modulated Temperature Differential Scanning Calorimetry for the Characterization of Slow Crystallization Processes in Lipid-Based Solid Self-Emulsifying Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Otun, Sarah O.; Meehan, Elizabeth; Qi, Sheng; Craig, Duncan Q. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Slow or incomplete crystallization may be a significant manufacturing issue for solid lipid-based dosage forms, yet little information is available on this phenomenon. In this investigation we suggest a novel means by which slow solidification may be monitored in Gelucire 44/14 using quasi-isothermal modulated temperature DSC (QiMTDSC). Methods Conventional linear heating and cooling DSC methods were employed, along with hot stage microscopy (HSM), for basic thermal profiling of Geluc...

  8. Barriers in the brain : resolving dendritic spine morphology and compartmentalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian, Max; Kusters, Remy; Wierenga, Corette J; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are micron-sized protrusions that harbor the majority of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. The head of the spine is connected to the dendritic shaft by a 50-400 nm thin membrane tube, called the spine neck, which has been hypothesized to confine biochemical and

  9. Dendrites Enable a Robust Mechanism for Neuronal Stimulus Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazé, Romain D; Jarvis, Sarah; Foust, Amanda J; Schultz, Simon R

    2017-09-01

    Hearing, vision, touch: underlying all of these senses is stimulus selectivity, a robust information processing operation in which cortical neurons respond more to some stimuli than to others. Previous models assume that these neurons receive the highest weighted input from an ensemble encoding the preferred stimulus, but dendrites enable other possibilities. Nonlinear dendritic processing can produce stimulus selectivity based on the spatial distribution of synapses, even if the total preferred stimulus weight does not exceed that of nonpreferred stimuli. Using a multi-subunit nonlinear model, we demonstrate that stimulus selectivity can arise from the spatial distribution of synapses. We propose this as a general mechanism for information processing by neurons possessing dendritic trees. Moreover, we show that this implementation of stimulus selectivity increases the neuron's robustness to synaptic and dendritic failure. Importantly, our model can maintain stimulus selectivity for a larger range of loss of synapses or dendrites than an equivalent linear model. We then use a layer 2/3 biophysical neuron model to show that our implementation is consistent with two recent experimental observations: (1) one can observe a mixture of selectivities in dendrites that can differ from the somatic selectivity, and (2) hyperpolarization can broaden somatic tuning without affecting dendritic tuning. Our model predicts that an initially nonselective neuron can become selective when depolarized. In addition to motivating new experiments, the model's increased robustness to synapses and dendrites loss provides a starting point for fault-resistant neuromorphic chip development.

  10. Modelling dendritic ecological networks in space: An integrated network perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erin E. Peterson; Jay M. Ver Hoef; Dan J. Isaak; Jeffrey A. Falke; Marie-Josee Fortin; Chris E. Jordan; Kristina McNyset; Pascal Monestiez; Aaron S. Ruesch; Aritra Sengupta; Nicholas Som; E. Ashley Steel; David M. Theobald; Christian E. Torgersen; Seth J. Wenger

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic ecological networks (DENs) are a unique form of ecological networks that exhibit a dendritic network topology (e.g. stream and cave networks or plant architecture). DENs have a dual spatial representation; as points within the network and as points in geographical space. Consequently, some analytical methods used to quantify relationships in other types of...

  11. Dendritic Spines in Depression: What We Learned from Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Hui; Li, Ming-Xing; Xu, Chang; Chen, Hui-Bin; An, Shu-Cheng; Ma, Xin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Depression, a severe psychiatric disorder, has been studied for decades, but the underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Depression is closely associated with alterations in dendritic spine morphology and spine density. Therefore, understanding dendritic spines is vital for uncovering the mechanisms underlying depression. Several chronic stress models, including chronic restraint stress (CRS), chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), and chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), have ...

  12. Cation transport in isomeric pentanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoergy, Istvan; Gee, Norman; Freeman, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    The cation mobility μsub(+) is measured in n-pentane, isopentane, neo-pentane, and mixtures of n- and neo-pentane over conditions from the normal liquid, through the critical fluid, to the low density gas. Most of the liquid data correlate with the reduced temperature T/Tsub(c). The T/Tsub(c) reflects free volume and viscosity changes. Comparison is made to neutral molecule diffusion. The transition from viscosity control of mobility in the liquid to density control in the dilute gas occurs over the reduced viscosity region 3 > eta/etasub(c) > 0.6, which corresponds to the reduced density region 1.9 > eta/etasub(c) > 0.5. In the saturated gas etaμsub(+) is similar in all pentanes, but iso- approximately> n- > neo-pentane. At constant density dμsub(+)/dT >= 0 for gases. The average gas nμsub(+) is similar in all pentanes, but iso- approximately> n- > neo-pentane. At constant density dμsub(+)/dT >= 0 for gases. The average momentum transfer cross sections in the n-/neo-pentane mixtures are similar to those in neo-pentane at low T but similar to those in n-pentane at high T. The present findings are combined with previous electron mobility data in addressing the effect of hydrocarbon molecular (external) shape on the electric breakdown strength of gases

  13. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  14. Stressor states and the cation crossroads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Karl T; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Newman, Kevin P; Soberman, Judith E; Ramanathan, Kodangudi B; McGee, Jesse E; Malik, Kafait U; Hickerson, William L

    2010-12-01

    Neurohormonal activation involving the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and adrenergic nervous and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems is integral to stressor state-mediated homeostatic responses. The levels of effector hormones, depending upon the degree of stress, orchestrate the concordant appearance of hypokalemia, ionized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia, hypozincemia, and hyposelenemia. Seemingly contradictory to homeostatic responses wherein the constancy of extracellular fluid would be preserved, upregulation of cognate-binding proteins promotes coordinated translocation of cations to injured tissues, where they participate in wound healing. Associated catecholamine-mediated intracellular cation shifts regulate the equilibrium between pro-oxidants and antioxidant defenses, a critical determinant of cell survival. These acute and chronic stressor-induced iterations in extracellular and intracellular cations are collectively referred to as the cation crossroads. Intracellular cation shifts, particularly excessive accumulation of Ca2+, converge on mitochondria to induce oxidative stress and raise the opening potential of their inner membrane permeability transition pores (mPTPs). The ensuing loss of cationic homeostasis and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, together with osmotic swelling, leads to organellar degeneration and cellular necrosis. The overall impact of iterations in extracellular and intracellular cations and their influence on cardiac redox state, cardiomyocyte survival, and myocardial structure and function are addressed herein.

  15. Immune monitoring using mRNA-transfected dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by m......RNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate...... and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA....

  16. Self-Amplifying Replicon RNA Vaccine Delivery to Dendritic Cells by Synthetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C. McCullough

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC play essential roles determining efficacy of vaccine delivery with respect to immune defence development and regulation. This renders DCs important targets for vaccine delivery, particularly RNA vaccines. While delivery of interfering RNA oligonucleotides to the appropriate intracellular sites for RNA-interference has proven successful, the methodologies are identical for RNA vaccines, which require delivery to RNA translation sites. Delivery of mRNA has benefitted from application of cationic entities; these offer value following endocytosis of RNA, when cationic or amphipathic properties can promote endocytic vesicle membrane perturbation to facilitate cytosolic translocation. The present review presents how such advances are being applied to the delivery of a new form of RNA vaccine, replicons (RepRNA carrying inserted foreign genes of interest encoding vaccine antigens. Approaches have been developed for delivery to DCs, leading to the translation of the RepRNA and encoded vaccine antigens both in vitro and in vivo. Potential mechanisms favouring efficient delivery leading to translation are discussed with respect to the DC endocytic machinery, showing the importance of cytosolic translocation from acidifying endocytic structures. The review relates the DC endocytic pathways to immune response induction, and the potential advantages for these self-replicating RNA vaccines in the near future.

  17. Interactions between cells and ionized dendritic biomaterials: Flow cytometry and fluorescence spectroscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, R. M.; Kolhe, Parag; Khandare, Jayant; Kannan, Sujatha; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2004-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers are a new class of macromolecules characterized by large density of "tunable" peripheral functional groups. Therefore dendrimers can serve as a model macromolecular system to study the influence of molecular geometry and charge density on transport across biological barriers, especially cellular interfaces. The effect of size, end-functionality, surface charge (pH), and the nature of the cell surface are expected to play an important role in transport, and are investigated using flow cytometry, fluorescene microscopy and UV/Vis spectroscopy. Our results suggest that at physiological pH, cationic polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers can enter the A549 cancer lung epithelial cells within 5 minutes, perhaps due to the favorable interaction between anionic surface receptors of cells and cationic PAMAM dendrimer, through adsorptive endocytosis. On the other hand, hyperbranched polyol, which is a neutral polymer at physiological pH, enters cells at a much slower rate. The entry of hyperbranched polyol may be because of fluid-phase pinocytosis. Our results also indicate that the dendritic polymers enter the cell surface much more rapidly than linear polymers, and some small drugs, suggesting that the high density of functional groups plays a key role in the interaction with the cell surface, and the subsequent transport inside.

  18. Alpha-defensins 1-3 release by dendritic cells is reduced by estrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperling Rhoda

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During pregnancy the immune system of the mother must protect any activation that may negatively affect the fetus. Changes in susceptibility to infection as well as resolution of some autoimmune disorders represent empirical evidence for pregnancy related alterations in immunity. Sex hormones reach extremely high levels during pregnancy and have been shown to have direct effects on many immune functions including the antiviral response of dendritic cells. Among the immunologically active proteins secreted by monocyte derived DCs (MDDC are the alpha-defensins 1-3. This family of cationic antimicrobial peptides has a broad spectrum of microbicidal activity and has also been shown to link innate to adaptive immunity by attracting T cells and immature DCs, which are essential for initiating and polarizing the immune response. Methods We compare culture-generated monocyte derived DCs (MDDCs with directly isolated myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs and measure their alpha-defensins 1-3 secretion by ELISA both, in basal situations and after hormone (E2 or PG treatments. Moreover, using a cohort of pregnant women we isolated mDCs from blood and also measure the levels of these anti-microbial peptides along pregnancy. Results We show that mDCs and pDCs constitutively produce alpha-defensins 1-3 and at much higher levels than MDDCs. Alpha-defensins 1-3 production from mDCs and MDDCs but not pDCs is inhibited by E2. PG does not affect alpha-defensins 1-3 in any of the populations. Moreover, alpha-defensins 1-3 production by mDCs was reduced in the later stages of pregnancy in 40% of the patients. Conclusions Here, we demonstrate that mDCs and pDCs secrete alpha-defensins 1-3 and present a novel effect of E2 on the secretion of alpha-defensins 1-3 by dendritic cells.

  19. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  20. Radioimmunoassay of human eosinophil cationic protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venge, P.; Roxin, L.E.; Olsson, I.

    1977-01-01

    A radioimmunosorbent assay has been developed which allows the detection in serum of a cationic protein derived from eosinophil granulocytes. In 34 healthy individuals the mean level was 31 μg/l. with a range of 5 to 55 μg/l. The serum concentration of 'eosinophil' cationic protein was correlated (P<0.001) to the number of eosinophil granulocytes in peripheral blood. Quantitiation of 'eosinophil' cationic protein in serum might be useful in the study of eosinophil granulocyte turnover and function in vivo. (author)

  1. Responsive linear-dendritic block copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Eva; Piñol, Milagros; Oriol, Luis

    2014-06-01

    The combination of dendritic and linear polymeric structures in the same macromolecule opens up new possibilities for the design of block copolymers and for applications of functional polymers that have self-assembly properties. There are three main strategies for the synthesis of linear-dendritic block copolymers (LDBCs) and, in particular, the emergence of click chemistry has made the coupling of preformed blocks one of the most efficient ways of obtaining libraries of LDBCs. In these materials, the periphery of the dendron can be precisely functionalised to obtain functional LDBCs with self-assembly properties of interest in different technological areas. The incorporation of stimuli-responsive moieties gives rise to smart materials that are generally processed as self-assemblies of amphiphilic LDBCs with a morphology that can be controlled by an external stimulus. Particular emphasis is placed on light-responsive LDBCs. Furthermore, a brief review of the biomedical or materials science applications of LDBCs is presented. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Analyzing dendritic growth in a population of immature neurons in the adult dentate gyrus using laminar quantification of disjointed dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira eRosenzweig

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, new granule neurons are continuously produced throughout adult life. A prerequisite for the successful synaptic integration of these neurons is the sprouting and extension of dendrites into the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. Thus, studies aimed at investigating the developmental stages of adult neurogenesis often use dendritic growth as an important indicator of neuronal health and maturity. Based on the known topography of the dentate gyrus, characterized by distinct laminar arrangement of granule neurons and their extensions, we have developed a new method for analysis of dendritic growth in immature adult-born granule neurons. The method is comprised of laminar quantification of cell bodies, primary, secondary and tertiary dendrites separately and independently from each other. In contrast to most existing methods, laminar quantification of dendrites does not require the use of exogenous markers and does not involve arbitrary selection of individual neurons. The new method relies on immonuhistochemical detection of endogenous markers such as doublecortin to perform a comprehensive analysis of a sub-population of immature neurons. Disjointed, orphan dendrites that often appear in the thin histological sections are taken into account. Using several experimental groups of rats and mice, we demonstrate here the suitable techniques for quantifying neurons and dendrites, and explain how the ratios between the quantified values can be used in a comparative analysis to indicate variations in dendritic growth and complexity.

  3. Elucidation of the outer membrane proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium utilising a lipid-based protein immobilization technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appleton Hazel

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a major cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. The outer membrane proteins expressed by S. Typhimurium mediate the process of adhesion and internalisation within the intestinal epithelium of the host thus influencing the progression of disease. Since the outer membrane proteins are surface-exposed, they provide attractive targets for the development of improved antimicrobial agents and vaccines. Various techniques have been developed for their characterisation, but issues such as carryover of cytosolic proteins still remain a problem. In this study we attempted to characterise the surface proteome of S. Typhimurium using Lipid-based Protein Immobilisation technology in the form of LPI™ FlowCells. No detergents are required and no sample clean up is needed prior to downstream analysis. The immobilised proteins can be digested with proteases in multiple steps to increase sequence coverage, and the peptides eluted can be characterised directly by liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and identified from mass spectral database searches. Results In this study, 54 outer membrane proteins, were identified with two or more peptide hits using a multi-step digest approach. Out of these 28 were lipoproteins, nine were involved in transport and three with enzyme activity These included the transporters BtuB which is responsible for the uptake of vitamin B12, LamB which is involved in the uptake of maltose and maltodextrins and LolB which is involved in the incorporation of lipoproteins in the outer membrane. Other proteins identified included the enzymes MltC which may play a role in cell elongation and division and NlpD which is involved in catabolic processes in cell wall formation as well as proteins involved in virulence such as Lpp1, Lpp2 and OmpX. Conclusion Using a multi-step digest approach the LPI™ technique enables the incorporation of a

  4. Outcomes associated with conventional versus lipid-based formulations of amphotericin B in propensity-matched groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell RS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca S Campbell,1 Paresh Chaudhari,2 Harlen D Hays,1 Robert J Taylor,1 Brian H Nathanson,3 Samuel A Bozzette,1 David Horn4 1Cerner Research, Culver City, CA, USA; 2Astellas Scientific and Medical Affairs, Inc., Northbrook, IL, USA; 3OptiStatim, LLC, Longmeadow, MA, USA; 4David Horn LLC, Doylestown, PA, USA Background: Lipid-based formulations of amphotericin B (LF-AMB are indicated for treatment of invasive fungal infections in patients intolerant to conventional amphotericin B (CAB or with refractory infections. Physicians still may choose to administer CAB to such patients. We described the use of CAB and LF-AMB in this population and quantified differences in post-amphotericin B length of stay (LOS among survivors and hospital mortality in matched patients. Methods: Data were extracted from Health Facts (Cerner Corporation, Kansas City, MO, USA for a retrospective cohort analysis. Inpatients aged ≥18 years with evidence of fungal infection and with orders for LF-AMB or CAB on  ≥2 days from January 2001 to June 2010 were identified. Patients were required to have renal insufficiency or other relative contraindications to use of CAB, exposure to nephrotoxic agents, or evidence of a CAB-refractory infection. Multilevel (hierarchical mixed-effects logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with initial exposure to LF-AMB versus CAB. Multivariate adjustment of outcomes was done using propensity score matching. Results: 655 patients were identified: 322 patients initiated therapy with CAB and 333 initiated treatment with LF-AMB. Compared to those initiating CAB, patients initiating LF-AMB had greater acuity and underlying disease severity. In unadjusted analyses, hospital mortality was significantly higher in the LF-AMB group (32.2% versus 23.7%; P = 0.02. After propensity score matching and covariate adjustment, mortality equalized and observed differences in LOS after amphotericin B initiation decreased. Conclusion

  5. Loss of Dendritic Complexity Precedes Neurodegeneration in a Mouse Model with Disrupted Mitochondrial Distribution in Mature Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo López-Doménech

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Correct mitochondrial distribution is critical for satisfying local energy demands and calcium buffering requirements and supporting key cellular processes. The mitochondrially targeted proteins Miro1 and Miro2 are important components of the mitochondrial transport machinery, but their specific roles in neuronal development, maintenance, and survival remain poorly understood. Using mouse knockout strategies, we demonstrate that Miro1, as opposed to Miro2, is the primary regulator of mitochondrial transport in both axons and dendrites. Miro1 deletion leads to depletion of mitochondria from distal dendrites but not axons, accompanied by a marked reduction in dendritic complexity. Disrupting postnatal mitochondrial distribution in vivo by deleting Miro1 in mature neurons causes a progressive loss of distal dendrites and compromises neuronal survival. Thus, the local availability of mitochondrial mass is critical for generating and sustaining dendritic arbors, and disruption of mitochondrial distribution in mature neurons is associated with neurodegeneration.

  6. Cationization of heparin for film applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimkovic, I.; Mendichi, R.; Kelnar, Ivan; Filip, J.; Hricovíni, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 115, 22 January (2015), s. 551-558 ISSN 0144-8617 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : heparin * cationization * NMR Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.219, year: 2015

  7. Test procedure for cation exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate the synthesis of inorganic antimonate ion exchangers and compare their performance against the standard organic cation exchangers. Of particular interest is the degradation rate of both inorganic and organic cation exchangers. This degradation rate will be tracked by determining the ion exchange capacity and thermal stability as a function of time, radiation dose, and chemical reaction

  8. Cycloaliphatic epoxide resins for cationic UV - cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschueren, K.; Balwant Kaur

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces the cyclo - aliphatic epoxide resins used for the various applications of radiation curing and their comparison with acrylate chemistry. Radiation curable coatings and inks are pre - dominantly based on acrylate chemistry but over the last few years, cationic chemistry has emerged successfully with the unique properties inherent with cyclo - aliphatic epoxide ring structures. Wide variety of cationic resins and diluents, the formulation techniques to achieve the desired properties greatly contributes to the advancement of UV - curing technology

  9. Chemical reactivity of cation-exchanged zeolites

    OpenAIRE

    Pidko, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Zeolites modified with metal cations have been extensively studied during the last two decades because of their wide application in different technologically important fields such as catalysis, adsorption and gas separation. Contrary to the well-understood mechanisms of chemical reactions catalyzed by Brønsted acid sites in the hydrogen forms of zeolites, the nature of chemical reactivity, and related, the structure of the metal-containing ions in cation-exchanged zeolites remains the subject...

  10. Restructuring of a peat in interaction with multivalent cations: effect of cation type and aging time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunhi Mouvenchery, Yamuna; Jaeger, Alexander; Aquino, Adelia J A; Tunega, Daniel; Diehl, Dörte; Bertmer, Marko; Schaumann, Gabriele Ellen

    2013-01-01

    It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM) molecules via cation bridges (CaB). The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al(3+), Ca(2+) or Na(+), respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>2 h) than deprotonation of functional groups (cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB) and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis) suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat) cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is decisive for CaB and aging-induced structural reorganisation can enhance cross-link formation.

  11. Formation of radical cations of diaryloxadiazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmstreit, W.

    1988-01-01

    The nature of the formation of the radical cation of the 2,5-bis-(p-diethylaminophenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PC) in liquid n-butyl chloride and acetonitrile has been investigated by observing excited state fluorescence and transient absorption using nanosecond pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis. The formation of solute oxonium ions has also been observed. At concentrations -4 mol dm -3 the growth time at which the transient absorption of the radical cation reaches the maximum follows the rise time of the electron pulse ( 2 laser yields the solute radical cation in an acetonitrile solution of 2 x 10 -4 mol dm -3 PC via an electronically excited state. Here, the generation time was smaller than 5 ns. The yield of the cation is increased by addition of CCl 4 . A reaction mechanism is proposed that explains the fast cation formation in terms of an exciplex formed by interaction between an electronically excited state of diaryloxadiazole and the ground state of the solvent. This exciplex yields the solute radical cation. (author)

  12. Luminescent sulfides of monovalent and trivalent cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The invention discloses a family of luminescent materials or phosphors having a rhombohedral crystal structure and consisting essentially of a mixed host sulfide of at least one monovalent host cation and at least one trivalent host cation, and containing, for each mole of phosphor, 0.0005 to 0.05 mole of at least one activating cation. The monovalent host cations may be Na, K or Rb and Cs. The trivalent host cations may be Gd, La, Lu, Sc and Y. The activating cations may be one or more of trivalent As, Bi, Ce, Dy, Er, Pr, Sb, Sm, Tb and Tm; divalent Lu, Mn, Pb and Sn; and monovalent Ag, Cu and Tl. The novel phosphors may be used in devices to convert electron-beam, ultraviolet or x-ray energy to light in the visible spectrum. Such energy conversion can be employed for example in fluoroscopic screens, and in viewing screens of cathode-ray tubes and other electron tubes

  13. Mathematical foundations of the dendritic growth models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacorta, José A; Castro, Jorge; Negredo, Pilar; Avendaño, Carlos

    2007-11-01

    At present two growth models describe successfully the distribution of size and topological complexity in populations of dendritic trees with considerable accuracy and simplicity, the BE model (Van Pelt et al. in J. Comp. Neurol. 387:325-340, 1997) and the S model (Van Pelt and Verwer in Bull. Math. Biol. 48:197-211, 1986). This paper discusses the mathematical basis of these models and analyzes quantitatively the relationship between the BE model and the S model assumed in the literature by developing a new explicit equation describing the BES model (a dendritic growth model integrating the features of both preceding models; Van Pelt et al. in J. Comp. Neurol. 387:325-340, 1997). In numerous studies it is implicitly presupposed that the S model is conditionally linked to the BE model (Granato and Van Pelt in Brain Res. Dev. Brain Res. 142:223-227, 2003; Uylings and Van Pelt in Network 13:397-414, 2002; Van Pelt, Dityatev and Uylings in J. Comp. Neurol. 387:325-340, 1997; Van Pelt and Schierwagen in Math. Biosci. 188:147-155, 2004; Van Pelt and Uylings in Network. 13:261-281, 2002; Van Pelt, Van Ooyen and Uylings in Modeling Dendritic Geometry and the Development of Nerve Connections, pp 179, 2000). In this paper we prove the non-exactness of this assumption, quantify involved errors and determine the conditions under which the BE and S models can be separately used instead of the BES model, which is more exact but considerably more difficult to apply. This study leads to a novel expression describing the BE model in an analytical closed form, much more efficient than the traditional iterative equation (Van Pelt et al. in J. Comp. Neurol. 387:325-340, 1997) in many neuronal classes. Finally we propose a new algorithm in order to obtain the values of the parameters of the BE model when this growth model is matched to experimental data, and discuss its advantages and improvements over the more commonly used procedures.

  14. Dendritic cells in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Tran, Dinh; Killingsworth, Murray C; Buckland, Michael; Lord, Reginald V N

    2009-01-01

    Like other premalignant conditions that develop in the presence of chronic inflammation, the development and progression of Barrett's esophagus is associated with the development of an immune response, but how this immune response is regulated is poorly understood. A comprehensive literature search failed to find any report of the presence of dendritic cells in Barrett's intestinal metaplasia and esophageal adenocarcinoma and this prompted our study. We used immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy to examine whether dendritic cells are present in Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining with CD83, a specific marker for dendritic cells, was performed on paraffin-embedded sections of Barrett's intestinal metaplasia (IM, n = 12), dysplasia (n = 11) and adenocarcinoma (n = 14). CD83+ cells were identified in the lamina propria surrounding intestinal type glands in Barrett's IM, dysplasia, and cancer tissues. Computerized quantitative analysis showed that the numbers of dendritic cells were significantly higher in cancer tissues. Double immunostaining with CD83, CD20, and CD3, and electron microscopy demonstrated that dendritic cells are present in Barrett's esophagus and form clusters with T cells and B cells directly within the lamina propria. These findings demonstrate that dendritic cells are present in Barrett's tissues, with a significant increase in density in adenocarcinoma compared to benign Barrett's esophagus. Dendritic cells may have a role in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy treatment of Barrett's esophagus and adenocarcinoma.

  15. Statistical Physics of Neural Systems with Nonadditive Dendritic Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Breuer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available How neurons process their inputs crucially determines the dynamics of biological and artificial neural networks. In such neural and neural-like systems, synaptic input is typically considered to be merely transmitted linearly or sublinearly by the dendritic compartments. Yet, single-neuron experiments report pronounced supralinear dendritic summation of sufficiently synchronous and spatially close-by inputs. Here, we provide a statistical physics approach to study the impact of such nonadditive dendritic processing on single-neuron responses and the performance of associative-memory tasks in artificial neural networks. First, we compute the effect of random input to a neuron incorporating nonlinear dendrites. This approach is independent of the details of the neuronal dynamics. Second, we use those results to study the impact of dendritic nonlinearities on the network dynamics in a paradigmatic model for associative memory, both numerically and analytically. We find that dendritic nonlinearities maintain network convergence and increase the robustness of memory performance against noise. Interestingly, an intermediate number of dendritic branches is optimal for memory functionality.

  16. Adolescent cocaine exposure simplifies orbitofrontal cortical dendritic arbors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M DePoy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine and amphetamine remodel dendritic spines within discrete cortico-limbic brain structures including the orbitofrontal cortex (oPFC. Whether dendrite structure is similarly affected, and whether pre-existing cellular characteristics influence behavioral vulnerabilities to drugs of abuse, remain unclear. Animal models provide an ideal venue to address these issues because neurobehavioral phenotypes can be defined both before, and following, drug exposure. We exposed mice to cocaine from postnatal days 31-35, corresponding to early adolescence, using a dosing protocol that causes impairments in an instrumental reversal task in adulthood. We then imaged and reconstructed excitatory neurons in deep-layer oPFC. Prior cocaine exposure shortened and simplified arbors, particularly in the basal region. Next, we imaged and reconstructed orbital neurons in a developmental-genetic model of cocaine vulnerability – the p190rhogap+/- mouse. p190RhoGAP is an actin cytoskeleton regulatory protein that stabilizes dendrites and dendritic spines, and p190rhogap+/- mice develop rapid and robust locomotor activation in response to cocaine. Despite this, oPFC dendritic arbors were intact in drug-naïve p190rhogap+/- mice. Together, these findings provide evidence that adolescent cocaine exposure has long-term effects on dendrite structure in the oPFC, and they suggest that cocaine-induced modifications in dendrite structure may contribute to the behavioral effects of cocaine more so than pre-existing structural abnormalities in this cell population.

  17. Divalent cation shrinks DNA but inhibits its compaction with trivalent cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongu, Chika; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Zinchenko, Anatoly; Chen, Ning; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-05-28

    Our observation reveals the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA 166 kbp) by fluorescence microscopy. It was found that divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. As the control experiment, we have confirmed the minimum effect of monovalent cation, Na(+) on the DNA higher-order structure. We interpret the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counterions. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we consider the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly charged polyelectrolyte, double-stranded DNA, by the 3+ cations. In contrast, the presence of 2+ cation decreases the gain of entropy contribution by the ion-exchange between monovalent and 3+ ions.

  18. Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfate for Therapy and Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Rades

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS has originally been investigated as an anticoagulant to potentially substitute for the natural glycosaminoglycan heparin. Compared to unfractionated heparin, dPGS possesses lower anticoagulant activity but a much higher anticomplementary effect. Since coagulation, complement activation, and inflammation are often present in the pathophysiology of numerous diseases, dPGS polymers with both anticoagulant and anticomplementary activities represent promising candidates for the development of polymeric drugs of nanosized architecture. In this review, we describe the nanomedical applications of dPGS based on its anti-inflammatory activity. Furthermore, the application of dPGS as a carrier molecule for diagnostic molecules and therapeutic drugs is reviewed, based on the ability to target tumors and localize in tumor cells. Finally, the application of dPGS for inhibition of virus infections is described.

  19. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenxian, E-mail: wl240@uowmail.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Solar Energy Technologies, School of Computing, Engineering, and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Penrith NSW 2751 (Australia); Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Tian, Dongliang [Key Laboratory of Bio-Inspired Smart Interfacial Science and Technology of the Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and the Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2014-07-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ∼4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  20. Towards deep learning with segregated dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerguiev, Jordan; Lillicrap, Timothy P; Richards, Blake A

    2017-12-05

    Deep learning has led to significant advances in artificial intelligence, in part, by adopting strategies motivated by neurophysiology. However, it is unclear whether deep learning could occur in the real brain. Here, we show that a deep learning algorithm that utilizes multi-compartment neurons might help us to understand how the neocortex optimizes cost functions. Like neocortical pyramidal neurons, neurons in our model receive sensory information and higher-order feedback in electrotonically segregated compartments. Thanks to this segregation, neurons in different layers of the network can coordinate synaptic weight updates. As a result, the network learns to categorize images better than a single layer network. Furthermore, we show that our algorithm takes advantage of multilayer architectures to identify useful higher-order representations-the hallmark of deep learning. This work demonstrates that deep learning can be achieved using segregated dendritic compartments, which may help to explain the morphology of neocortical pyramidal neurons.

  1. Harnessing dendritic cells in inflammatory skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chung-Ching; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-02-01

    The skin immune system harbors a complex network of dendritic cells (DCs). Recent studies highlight a diverse functional specialization of skin DC subsets. In addition to generating cellular and humoral immunity against pathogens, skin DCs are involved in tolerogenic mechanisms to ensure the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation in the skin when excessive immune responses are initiated and unrestrained. Harnessing DCs by directly targeting DC-derived molecules or selectively modulate DC subsets is a convincing strategy to tackle inflammatory skin diseases. In this review we discuss recent advances underlining the functional specialization of skin DCs and discuss the potential implication for future DC-based therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  3. Efficient estimation of diffusion during dendritic solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeum, K. S.; Poirier, D. R.; Laxmanan, V.

    1989-01-01

    A very efficient finite difference method has been developed to estimate the solute redistribution during solidification with diffusion in the solid. This method is validated by comparing the computed results with the results of an analytical solution derived by Kobayashi (1988) for the assumptions of a constant diffusion coefficient, a constant equilibrium partition ratio, and a parabolic rate of the advancement of the solid/liquid interface. The flexibility of the method is demonstrated by applying it to the dendritic solidification of a Pb-15 wt pct Sn alloy, for which the equilibrium partition ratio and diffusion coefficient vary substantially during solidification. The fraction eutectic at the end of solidification is also obtained by estimating the fraction solid, in greater resolution, where the concentration of solute in the interdendritic liquid reaches the eutectic composition of the alloy.

  4. Induction of RNA interference in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mu; Qian, Hua; Ichim, Thomas E; Ge, Wei-Wen; Popov, Igor A; Rycerz, Katarzyna; Neu, John; White, David; Zhong, Robert; Min, Wei-Ping

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) reside at the center of the immunological universe, possessing the ability both to stimulate and inhibit various types of responses. Tolerogenic/regulatory DC with therapeutic properties can be generated through various means of manipulations in vitro and in vivo. Here we describe several attractive strategies for manipulation of DC using the novel technique of RNA interference (RNAi). Additionally, we overview some of our data regarding yet undescribed characteristics of RNAi in DC such as specific transfection strategies, persistence of gene silencing, and multi-gene silencing. The advantages of using RNAi for DC genetic manipulation gives rise to the promise of generating tailor-made DC that can be used effectively to treat a variety of immunologically mediated diseases.

  5. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wenxian; Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue; Tian, Dongliang

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ∼4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  6. Location matters: the endoplasmic reticulum and protein trafficking in dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A Ramírez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are highly polarized, but the trafficking mechanisms that operate in these cells and the topological organization of their secretory organelles are still poorly understood. Particularly incipient is our knowledge of the role of the neuronal endoplasmic reticulum. Here we review the current understanding of the endoplasmic reticulum in neurons, its structure, composition, dendritic distribution and dynamics. We also focus on the trafficking of proteins through the dendritic endoplasmic reticulum, emphasizing the relevance of transport, retention, assembly of multi-subunit protein complexes and export. We additionally discuss the roles of the dendritic endoplasmic reticulum in synaptic plasticity.

  7. Photoinduced electron transfer between the dendritic zinc phthalocyanines and anthraquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuizhi; Wen, Junri; Liu, Jiangsheng; Chen, Zhenzhen; Pan, Sujuan; Huang, Zheng; Peng, Yiru

    2015-03-01

    The intermolecular electron transfer between the novel dendritic zinc (II) phthalocyanines (G1-DPcB and G2-DPcB) and anthraquinone (AQ) was studied by steady-state fluorescence and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopic methods. The effect of dendron generation on intermolecular electron transfer was investigated. The results showed that the fluorescence emission of these dendritic phthalocyanines could be greatly quenched by AQ upon excitation at 610 nm. The Stern- Volmer constant (KSV) of electron transfer was decreased with increasing the dendron generations. Our study suggested that these novel dendritic phthalocyanines were effective new electron donors and transmission complexes and could be used as a potential artifical photosysthesis system.

  8. Dendritic cells in chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuckovic, S; Fearnley, D B; Gunningham, S; Spearing, R L; Patton, W N; Hart, D N

    1999-06-01

    Blood dendritic cells (DC) differentiate in vitro via two separate pathways: either directly from blood DC precursors (DCp) or from CD14+ monocytes. In chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) abnormal bone marrow precursors contribute to blood monocyte development but DC development has not been studied previously. Monocytes comprised 60% of blood MNC in 15 CMML patients studied, compared with 20% in 16 age-matched controls. The increase in blood monocytes was accompanied by a reciprocal decrease in mean blood DC percentage (from 0.42% of MNC in normal individuals to 0.16% of MNC in CMML patients). Absolute blood DC numbers showed a minimal (non-significant) reduction from 9.8 x 10(6)/l in normal individuals to 7.5 x 10(6)/l in CMML patients. The CD14(low) WCD16+ monocyte subpopulation was not found in CMML patients. After culture in GM-CSF/IL-4, CMML CD14+ monocytes acquired the phenotype of immature monocyte derived DC (Mo-DC) with similar yields to normal blood Mo-DC generation. Addition of TNF-alpha or LPS induced both normal and CMML Mo-DC to express prominent dendritic processes, the CMRF44+ and CD83+ antigens and high levels of HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86. Treatment either with TNF-alpha or LPS increased the allostimulatory activity of normal Mo-DC, but had little effect on the allostimulatory activity of CMML Mo-DC, perhaps reflecting the underlying neoplastic changes in monocyte precursors. We conclude that the blood DC numbers are relatively unaffected in CMML, suggesting discrete regulation of monocyte and DC production.

  9. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease.

  10. Accelerators for forming cationic technetium complexes useful as radiodiagnostic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tweedle, M.F.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to compositions for making cationic radiodiagnostic agents and, in particular, to accelerator compounds for labelling such cationic radiodiagnostic agents, kits for preparing such 99m Tc-labelled cationic radiodiagnostic agents with technetium, and methods for labelling such cationic radiodiagnostic agents with technetium

  11. Evaluation of conformity of a first prescription of lipid-based formulation of amphotericin B in a university-teaching pediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agogué, Claire; Bussières, Jean-François; Dehaut, Catherine; Lebel, Denis; Brochet, Marie-Sophie

    2006-04-01

    Invasive fungal infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunodeficient children. Amphotericin B is an important therapeutic agent for the treatment of invasive fungal infections but is associated with significant toxicities and high acquisition costs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate physician adherence to a local guideline for the use of lipid-based amphotericin B. The study was approved through Pharmacology & Therapeutics (P&T) committee activities. A retrospective drug utilization review (DUR) was conducted. All orders written between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2004, were reviewed. Demographic and descriptive clinical data were collected as well as variables related to the drug order process. Conformity rates were calculated for the primary objective criteria (authorized prescribers - infectious disease members; recommended drug of choice-Abelcet; accepted indications; and presence of underlying conditions). A total of 109 orders for 70 patients were reviewed by a single research assistant for a 2-year period. Global conformity rate for all four criteria was calculated at 7.3%. Non-conformity was mostly associated with the absence of underlying conditions (e.g., prerenal insufficiency or presence of nephrotoxicity due to amphotericin B desoxycholate) in 84.5% of the cases. Infusionrelated adverse drug reactions partly explained a switch to a non-formulary lipid-based amphotericin B product. External factors (newly published results since the adoption of the guideline and continuous marketing practices) and internal factors (availability of non-formulary process, inefficient DUR process) could have contributed to non-adherence to a local guideline. This study shows low adherence to P&T committee drug guidelines on lipid-based amphotericin B. Continuous and efficient DUR processes should be in place to monitor drug guideline adherence.

  12. Gas phase chemistry of N-benzylbenzamides with silver(I) cations: characterization of benzylsilver cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hezhi; Jin, Zhe; Quan, Hong; Sun, Cuirong; Pan, Yuanjiang

    2015-03-07

    The benzylsilver cation which emerges from the collisional dissociation of silver(I)-N-benzylbenzamide complexes was characterized by deuterium-labeling experiments, theoretical calculations, breakdown curves and substituent effects. The nucleophilic attack of the carbonyl oxygen on an α-hydrogen results in the generation of the benzylsilver cation, which is competitive to the AgH loss with the α-hydrogen.

  13. Toward the Establishment of Standardized In Vitro Tests for Lipid-Based Formulations. 5. Lipolysis of Representative Formulations by Gastric Lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakala-N'Goma, Jean-Claude; Williams, Hywel D.; Sassene, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Lipid-based formulations (LBF) are substrates for digestive lipases and digestion can significantly alter their properties and potential to support drug absorption. LBFs have been widely examined for their behaviour in the presence of pancreatic enzymes. Here, the impact of gastric lipase...... on the digestion of representative formulations from the Lipid Formulation Classification System has been investigated. Methods The pHstat technique was used to measure the lipolysis by recombinant dog gastric lipase (rDGL) of eight LBFs containing either medium (MC) or long (LC) chain triglycerides and a range...

  14. Facile fabrication of dendritic silver structures and their surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    have high sensitivity to surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy response. ... of interfaces and molecularly thin-films. SERS is a ... face plasmon polaritons, while the second is attributed ... 2.2 Fabrication and characterization of dendritic.

  15. Simulation of dendritic growth of magnesium alloys with fluid flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-wu Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluid flow has a significant impact on the microstructure evolution of alloys during solidification. Based on the previous work relating simulation of the dendritic growth of magnesium alloys with hcp (hexagonal close-packed structure, an extension was made to the formerly established CA (cellular automaton model with the purpose of studying the effect of fluid flow on the dendritic growth of magnesium alloys. The modified projection method was used to solve the transport equations of flow field. By coupling the flow field with the solute field, simulation results of equiaxed and columnar dendritic growth of magnesium alloys with fluid flow were achieved. The simulated results were quantitatively compared with those without fluid flow. Moreover, a comparison was also made between the present work and previous works conducted by others. It can be concluded that a deep understanding of the dendritic growth of magnesium alloys with fluid flow can be obtained by applying the present numerical model.

  16. CD163 positive subsets of blood dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2006-01-01

    CD163 and CD91 are scavenging receptors with highly increased expression during the differentiation of monocytes into the anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype. In addition, CD91 is expressed in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs), where the receptor is suggested to be important...... for internalization of CD91-targeted antigens to be presented on the dendritic cell surface for T-cell stimulation. Despite their overlap in functionality, the expression of CD91 and CD163 has never been compared and the expression of CD163 in the monocyte-dendritic cell lineage is not yet characterized. CD163...... expression in dendritic cells (DCs) was investigated using multicolor flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 31 healthy donors and 15 HIV-1 patients in addition to umbilical cord blood from 5 newborn infants. Total RNA was isolated from MACS purified DCs and CD163 mRNA was determined with real-time reverse...

  17. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mule, James

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to establish a new modality for the treatment of breast cancer that employs the combination of chemokine gene-modified fibroblasts with breast tumor-pulsed dendritic cells (DC...

  18. CD56 marks human dendritic cell subsets with cytotoxic potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roothans, D.; Smits, E.; Lion, E.; Tel, J.; Anguille, S.

    2013-01-01

    Human plasmacytoid and myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), when appropriately stimulated, can express the archetypal natural killer (NK)-cell surface marker CD56. In addition to classical DC functions, CD56(+) DCs are endowed with an unconventional cytotoxic capacity.

  19. Supramolecular Dendriphores: Anionic Organometallic Phosphors Embedded in Polycationic Dendritic Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDonald, A.R.; Mores, D.; de Mello-Donega, C.; van Walree, C.A.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; Meijerink, A.; van Klink, G.P.M.; van Koten, G.

    2009-01-01

    Heteroleptic iridium(III) organometallic complexes have been functionalized with sulfate tethers. These systems have been thoroughly characterized spectroscopically. Subsequently these iridium(III) complexes were reacted with polyionic dendritic materials yielding iridium(III) organometallic

  20. Supramolecular effects in dendritic systems containing photoactive groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIANLUCA CAMILLO AZZELLINI

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article are described dendritic structures containing photoactive groups at the surface or in the core. The observed supramolecular effects can be attributed to the nature of the photoactive group and their location in the dendritic architecture. The peripheric azobenzene groups in these dendrimeric compounds can be regarded as single residues that retain the spectroscopic and photochemical properties of free azobenzene moiety. The E and Z forms of higher generation dendrimer, functionalized with azobenzene groups, show different host ability towards eosin dye, suggesting the possibility of using such dendrimer in photocontrolled host-guest systems. The photophysical properties of many dendritic-bipyridine ruthenium complexes have been investigated. Particularly in aerated medium more intense emission and a longer excited-state lifetime are observed as compared to the parent unsubstituted bipyridine ruthenium complexes. These differences can be attributed to a shielding effect towards dioxygen quenching originated by the dendritic branches.

  1. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mule, James

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to establish a new modality for the treatment of breast cancer that employs the combination of chemokine gene modified fibroblasts with breast tumor pulsed dendritic cells (DC...

  2. Molecule Matters-Dendritic Architecture-A Clever Route to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 1. Molecule Matters - Dendritic Architecture - A Clever Route to Monodispersed Macromolecules. N Jayaraman. Feature Article Volume 12 Issue 1 January 2007 pp 60-66 ...

  3. Effect of Divalent Cations on RED Performance and Cation Exchange Membrane Selection to Enhance Power Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnaarts, Timon; Huerta, Elisa; van Baak, Willem; Nijmeijer, Kitty

    2017-11-07

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) is a membrane-based renewable energy technology that can harvest energy from salinity gradients. The anticipated feed streams are natural river and seawater, both of which contain not only monovalent ions but also divalent ions. However, RED using feed streams containing divalent ions experiences lower power densities because of both uphill transport and increased membrane resistance. In this study, we investigate the effects of divalent cations (Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ ) on RED and demonstrate the mitigation of those effects using both novel and existing commercial cation exchange membranes (CEMs). Monovalent-selective Neosepta CMS is known to block divalent cations transport and can therefore mitigate reductions in stack voltage. The new multivalent-permeable Fuji T1 is able to transport divalent cations without a major increase in resistance. Both strategies significantly improve power densities compared to standard-grade CEMs when performing RED using streams containing divalent cations.

  4. Dendritic biomimicry: microenvironmental hydrogen-bonding effects on tryptophan fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, S; Müller, L; Smith, D K

    2001-03-02

    Two series of dendritically modified tryptophan derivatives have been synthesised and their emission spectra measured in a range of different solvents. This paper presents the syntheses of these novel dendritic structures and discusses their emission spectra in terms of both solvent and dendritic effects. In the first series of dendrimers, the NH group of the indole ring is available for hydrogen bonding, whilst in the second series, the indole NH group has been converted to NMe. Direct comparison of the emission wavelengths of analogous NH and NMe derivatives indicates the importance of the Kamlet-Taft solvent beta3 parameter, which reflects the ability of the solvent to accept a hydrogen bond from the NH group, an effect not possible for the NMe series of dendrimers. For the NH dendrimers, the attachment of a dendritic shell to the tryptophan subunit leads to a red shift in emission wavelength. This dendritic effect only operates in non-hydrogen-bonding solvents. For the NMe dendrimers, however, the attachment of a dendritic shell has no effect on the emission spectra of the indole ring. This proves the importance of hydrogen bonding between the branched shell and the indole NH group in causing the dendritic effect. This is the first time a dendritic effect has been unambiguously assigned to individual hydrogen-bonding interactions and indicates that such intramolecular interactions are important in dendrimers, just as they are in proteins. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the use of tryptophan residues as a probe of the microenvironment within proteins--in particular, it stresses the importance of hydrogen bonds formed by the indole NH group.

  5. The unfolded protein response is required for dendrite morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xing; Howell, Audrey S; Dong, Xintong; Taylor, Caitlin A; Cooper, Roshni C; Zhang, Jianqi; Zou, Wei; Sherwood, David R; Shen, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Precise patterning of dendritic fields is essential for the formation and function of neuronal circuits. During development, dendrites acquire their morphology by exuberant branching. How neurons cope with the increased load of protein production required for this rapid growth is poorly understood. Here we show that the physiological unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced in the highly branched Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neuron PVD during dendrite morphogenesis. Perturbation of the IRE1 arm of the UPR pathway causes loss of dendritic branches, a phenotype that can be rescued by overexpression of the ER chaperone HSP-4 (a homolog of mammalian BiP/ grp78). Surprisingly, a single transmembrane leucine-rich repeat protein, DMA-1, plays a major role in the induction of the UPR and the dendritic phenotype in the UPR mutants. These findings reveal a significant role for the physiological UPR in the maintenance of ER homeostasis during morphogenesis of large dendritic arbors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06963.001 PMID:26052671

  6. Forging Colloidal Nanostructures via Cation Exchange Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Trizio, Luca; Manna, Liberato

    2016-09-28

    Among the various postsynthesis treatments of colloidal nanocrystals that have been developed to date, transformations by cation exchange have recently emerged as an extremely versatile tool that has given access to a wide variety of materials and nanostructures. One notable example in this direction is represented by partial cation exchange, by which preformed nanocrystals can be either transformed to alloy nanocrystals or to various types of nanoheterostructures possessing core/shell, segmented, or striped architectures. In this review, we provide an up to date overview of the complex colloidal nanostructures that could be prepared so far by cation exchange. At the same time, the review gives an account of the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic parameters governing these types of reactions, as they are currently understood, and outlines the main open issues and possible future developments in the field.

  7. Forging Colloidal Nanostructures via Cation Exchange Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Among the various postsynthesis treatments of colloidal nanocrystals that have been developed to date, transformations by cation exchange have recently emerged as an extremely versatile tool that has given access to a wide variety of materials and nanostructures. One notable example in this direction is represented by partial cation exchange, by which preformed nanocrystals can be either transformed to alloy nanocrystals or to various types of nanoheterostructures possessing core/shell, segmented, or striped architectures. In this review, we provide an up to date overview of the complex colloidal nanostructures that could be prepared so far by cation exchange. At the same time, the review gives an account of the fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic parameters governing these types of reactions, as they are currently understood, and outlines the main open issues and possible future developments in the field. PMID:26891471

  8. Dendritic cells recognize tumor-specific glycosylation of carcinoembryonic antigen on colorectal cancer cells through dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gisbergen, Klaas P. J. M.; Aarnoudse, Corlien A.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Immature dendritic cells are located intratumorally within colorectal cancer and intimately interact with tumor cells, whereas mature dendritic cells are present peripheral to the tumor. The majority of colorectal

  9. Equine dendritic cells generated with horse serum have enhanced functionality in comparison to dendritic cells generated with fetal bovine serum

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Anja; Everett, Helen; Hamza, Eman; Garbani, Mattia; Gerber, Vinzenz; Marti, Eliane; Steinbach, Falko

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells are professional antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in the initiation and modulation of T cell responses. They have been studied widely for their potential clinical applications, but for clinical use to be successful, alternatives to xenogeneic substances like fetal bovine serum (FBS) in cell culture need to be found. Protocols for the generation of dendritic cells ex vivo from monocytes are well established for several species, including hor...

  10. Formulation and characterization of lipid-based drug delivery system of raloxifene-microemulsion and self-microemulsifying drug delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Hetal; Nangesh, Jitesh; Parmar, Mayur; Patel, Divyakant

    2011-01-01

    Background: Raloxifene, a second-generation selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) used to prevent osteoporosis in postmenopausal women is administered orally in the form of a tablet. The absolute bioavailability of the drug is only 2% because of extensive hepatic first-pass metabolism. Lipid-based formulations are reported to reduce the first-pass metabolism by promoting its lymphatic uptake. Materials and Methods: In the present investigation, microemulsion and Self-Microemulsifying Drug Delivery System (SMEDDS) formulations of Raloxifene were prepared. The prepared formulations were characterized for drug loading, size, transparency, zeta potential, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and in vitro intestinal permeability. Results: The results indicated that high drug loading, optimum size and desired zeta potential and transparency could be achieved with both SMEDDS and microemulsion. The TEM studies indicated the absence of aggregation with both the systems. The in vitro intestinal permeability results showed that the permeation of the drug from the microemulsion and SMEDDs was significantly higher than that obtained from the drug dispersion and marketed formulation. Conclusion: Lipid based formulations such as microemulsion and Self Microemulsifying drug delivery systems are expected to increase the oral bioavailability as evidenced by the increased intestinal permeation. PMID:21966167

  11. Dissolution of Lipid-Based Matrices in Simulated Gastrointestinal Solutions to Evaluate Their Potential for the Encapsulation of Bioactive Ingredients for Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Yves; Champagne, Claude P

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to compare the dissolution of chocolate to other lipid-based matrices suitable for the microencapsulation of bioactive ingredients in simulated gastrointestinal solutions. Particles having approximately 750 μm or 2.5 mm were prepared from the following lipid-based matrices: cocoa butter, fractionated palm kernel oil (FPKO), chocolate, beeswax, carnauba wax, and paraffin. They were added to solutions designed to simulate gastric secretions (GS) or duodenum secretions (DS) at 37°C. Paraffin, carnauba wax, and bees wax did not dissolve in either the GS or DS media. Cocoa butter, FPKO, and chocolate dissolved in the DS medium. Cocoa butter, and to a lesser extent chocolate, also dissolved in the GS medium. With chocolate, dissolution was twice as fast as that with small particles (750 μm) as compared to the larger (2.5 mm) ones. With 750 μm particle sizes, 90% dissolution of chocolate beads was attained after only 60 minutes in the DS medium, while it took 120 minutes for 70% of FPKO beads to dissolve in the same conditions. The data are discussed from the perspective of controlled release in the gastrointestinal tract of encapsulated ingredients (minerals, oils, probiotic bacteria, enzymes, vitamins, and peptides) used in the development of functional foods.

  12. Dissolution of Lipid-Based Matrices in Simulated Gastrointestinal Solutions to Evaluate Their Potential for the Encapsulation of Bioactive Ingredients for Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to compare the dissolution of chocolate to other lipid-based matrices suitable for the microencapsulation of bioactive ingredients in simulated gastrointestinal solutions. Particles having approximately 750 μm or 2.5 mm were prepared from the following lipid-based matrices: cocoa butter, fractionated palm kernel oil (FPKO, chocolate, beeswax, carnauba wax, and paraffin. They were added to solutions designed to simulate gastric secretions (GS or duodenum secretions (DS at 37°C. Paraffin, carnauba wax, and bees wax did not dissolve in either the GS or DS media. Cocoa butter, FPKO, and chocolate dissolved in the DS medium. Cocoa butter, and to a lesser extent chocolate, also dissolved in the GS medium. With chocolate, dissolution was twice as fast as that with small particles (750 μm as compared to the larger (2.5 mm ones. With 750 μm particle sizes, 90% dissolution of chocolate beads was attained after only 60 minutes in the DS medium, while it took 120 minutes for 70% of FPKO beads to dissolve in the same conditions. The data are discussed from the perspective of controlled release in the gastrointestinal tract of encapsulated ingredients (minerals, oils, probiotic bacteria, enzymes, vitamins, and peptides used in the development of functional foods.

  13. Formulation and characterization of lipid-based drug delivery system of raloxifene-microemulsion and self-microemulsifying drug delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetal Thakkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Raloxifene, a second-generation selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM used to prevent osteoporosis in postmenopausal women is administered orally in the form of a tablet. The absolute bioavailability of the drug is only 2% because of extensive hepatic first-pass metabolism. Lipid-based formulations are reported to reduce the first-pass metabolism by promoting its lymphatic uptake. Materials and Methods : In the present investigation, microemulsion and Self-Microemulsifying Drug Delivery System (SMEDDS formulations of Raloxifene were prepared. The prepared formulations were characterized for drug loading, size, transparency, zeta potential, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and in vitro intestinal permeability. Results : The results indicated that high drug loading, optimum size and desired zeta potential and transparency could be achieved with both SMEDDS and microemulsion. The TEM studies indicated the absence of aggregation with both the systems. The in vitro intestinal permeability results showed that the permeation of the drug from the microemulsion and SMEDDs was significantly higher than that obtained from the drug dispersion and marketed formulation. Conclusion : Lipid based formulations such as microemulsion and Self Microemulsifying drug delivery systems are expected to increase the oral bioavailability as evidenced by the increased intestinal permeation.

  14. Computational Models of the Gastrointestinal Environment. 2. Phase Behavior and Drug Solubilization Capacity of a Type I Lipid-Based Drug Formulation after Digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birru, Woldeamanuel A; Warren, Dallas B; Han, Sifei; Benameur, Hassan; Porter, Christopher J H; Pouton, Colin W; Chalmers, David K

    2017-03-06

    Lipid-based drug formulations can greatly enhance the bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Following the oral administration of formulations containing tri- or diglycerides, the digestive processes occurring within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract hydrolyze the glycerides to mixtures of free fatty acids and monoglycerides that are, in turn, solubilized by bile. The behavior of drugs within the resulting colloidal mixtures is currently not well characterized. This work presents matched in vitro experimental and molecular dynamics (MD) theoretical models of the GI microenvironment containing a digested triglyceride-based (Type I) drug formulation. Both the experimental and theoretical models consist of molecular species representing bile (glycodeoxycholic acid), digested triglyceride (1:2 glyceryl-1-monooleate and oleic acid), and water. We have characterized the phase behavior of the physical system using nephelometry, dynamic light scattering, and polarizing light microscopy and compared these measurements to phase behavior observed in multiple MD simulations. Using this model microenvironment, we have investigated the dissolution of the poorly water-soluble drug danazol experimentally using LC-MS and theoretically by MD simulation. The results show how the formulation lipids alter the environment of the GI tract and improve the solubility of danazol. The MD simulations successfully reproduce the experimental results showing the utility of MD in modeling the fate of drugs after digestion of lipid-based formulations within the intestinal lumen.

  15. Deciphering dendritic cell heterogenity in immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël eChopin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These finding open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle – identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man – now set the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  16. Epigenetic regulation of axon and dendrite growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ephraim F Trakhtenberg

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroregenerative therapies for central nervous system (CNS injury, neurodegenerative disease, or stroke require axons of damaged neurons to grow and reinnervate their targets. However, mature mammalian CNS neurons do not regenerate their axons, limiting recovery in these diseases (Yiu and He, 2006. CNS’ regenerative failure may be attributable to the development of an inhibitory CNS environment by glial-associated inhibitory molecules (Yiu and He, 2006, and by various cell-autonomous factors (Sun and He, 2010. Intrinsic axon growth ability also declines developmentally (Li et al., 1995; Goldberg et al., 2002; Bouslama-Oueghlani et al., 2003; Blackmore and Letourneau, 2006 and is dependent on transcription (Moore et al., 2009. Although neurons’ intrinsic capacity for axon growth may depend in part on the panoply of expressed transcription factors (Moore and Goldberg, 2011, epigenetic factors such as the accessibility of DNA and organization of chromatin are required for downstream genes to be transcribed. Thus a potential approach to overcoming regenerative failure focuses on the epigenetic mechanisms regulating regenerative gene expression in the CNS. Here we review molecular mechanisms regulating the epigenetic state of DNA through chromatin modifications, their implications for regulating axon and dendrite growth, and important new directions for this field of study.

  17. Isolation of Human Skin Dendritic Cell Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Merry; Jardine, Laura; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes with antigen-processing and antigen-presenting functions. DCs can be divided into distinct subsets by anatomical location, phenotype and function. In human, the two most accessible tissues to study leukocytes are peripheral blood and skin. DCs are rare in human peripheral blood (skin covering an average total surface area of 1.8 m(2) has approximately tenfold more DCs than the average 5 L of total blood volume (Wang et al., J Invest Dermatol 134:965-974, 2014). DCs migrate spontaneously from skin explants cultured ex vivo, which provide an easy method of cell isolation (Larsen et al., J Exp Med 172:1483-1493, 1990; Lenz et al., J Clin Invest 92:2587-2596, 1993; Nestle et al., J Immunol 151:6535-6545, 1993). These factors led to the extensive use of skin DCs as the "prototype" migratory DCs in human studies. In this chapter, we detail the protocols to isolate DCs and resident macrophages from human skin. We also provide a multiparameter flow cytometry gating strategy to identify human skin DCs and to distinguish them from macrophages.

  18. Crosstalk between T lymphocytes and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hivroz, Claire; Chemin, Karine; Tourret, Marie; Bohineust, Armelle

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) with the unique property of inducing priming and differentiation of naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells into helper and cytotoxic effectors. Their efficiency is due to their unique ability to process antigen, express costimulatory molecules, secrete cytokines, and migrate to tissues or lymphoid organs to prime T cells. DCs also play an important role in T-cell peripheral tolerance. There is ample evidence that the DC ability to present antigens is regulated by CD4+ helper T cells. Indeed, interactions between surface receptors and ligands expressed respectively by T cells and DCs, as well as T-cell-derived cytokines modify DC functions. This T-cell-induced modification of DCs has been called "education" or "licensing." This intimate crosstalk between DCs and T lymphocytes is key in establishing appropriate adaptive immune responses. It requires cognate interactions between T lymphocytes and DCs, which are organized in time and space by structures called immunological synapses. Here we discuss the particular aspects of immunological synapses formed between T cells and DCs and the role these organized interactions have in T-cell-DC crosstalk.

  19. Dendritic Cells—Importance in Allergy—

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuya Aiba

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review we discuss the role of dendritic cells (DC in the pathogenesis of allergic contact hypersensitivity (ACH and atopic disorders, such as asthma and atopic eczema. In ACH patients, DC recognize the invasion of simple chemicals such as haptens, and trigger antigen-specific T cell responses leading to the characteristic histological and clinical changes such as spongiosis and papulovesicular eruptions. During atopic disorders, it is well known that the Th2-deviated immune response plays a crucial role in their pathogenesis. DC provide T cells with antigen and costimulatory signals (signals 1 and 2, respectively, as well as with a polarizing signal (signal 3. When studying ACH, it is important to understand how simple chemicals induce the activation of DC and their migration to the draining lymph nodes where they supply signals 1 and 2 to naïve T cells. The mechanisms by which DC induce the Th2-deviated immune response, namely via the Th2-deviated signal 3, are central topics in the pathogenesis of atopic disorders.

  20. The role of dendritic cells in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Though present in low numbers, dendritic cells (DCs) are recognized as major players in the control of cancer by adaptive immunity. The roles of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and Th1 helper CD4+ T-cells are well-documented in murine models of cancer and associated with a profound prognostic impact when...... infiltrating human tumors, but less information is known about how these T-cells gain access to the tumor or how they are primed to become tumor-specific. Here, we highlight recent findings that demonstrate a vital role of CD103+ DCs, which have been shown to be experts in cross-priming and the induction...... of anti-tumor immunity. We also focus on two different mediators that impair the function of tumor-associated DCs: prostaglandin E2 and β-catenin. Both of these mediators seem to be important for the exclusion of T-cells in the tumor microenvironment and may represent key pathways to target in optimized...

  1. Restructuring of a peat in interaction with multivalent cations: effect of cation type and aging time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamuna Kunhi Mouvenchery

    Full Text Available It is assumed to be common knowledge that multivalent cations cross-link soil organic matter (SOM molecules via cation bridges (CaB. The concept has not been explicitly demonstrated in solid SOM by targeted experiments, yet. Therefore, the requirements for and characteristics of CaB remain unidentified. In this study, a combined experimental and molecular modeling approach was adopted to investigate the interaction of cations on a peat OM from physicochemical perspective. Before treatment with salt solutions of Al(3+, Ca(2+ or Na(+, respectively, the original exchangeable cations were removed using cation exchange resin. Cation treatment was conducted at two different values of pH prior to adjusting pH to 4.1. Cation sorption is slower (>>2 h than deprotonation of functional groups (<2 h and was described by a Langmuir model. The maximum uptake increased with pH of cation addition and decreased with increasing cation valency. Sorption coefficients were similar for all cations and at both pH. This contradicts the general expectations for electrostatic interactions, suggesting that not only the interaction chemistry but also spatial distribution of functional groups in OM determines binding of cations in this peat. The reaction of contact angle, matrix rigidity due to water molecule bridges (WaMB and molecular mobility of water (NMR analysis suggested that cross-linking via CaB has low relevance in this peat. This unexpected finding is probably due to the low cation exchange capacity, resulting in low abundance of charged functionalities. Molecular modeling demonstrates that large average distances between functionalities (∼3 nm in this peat cannot be bridged by CaB-WaMB associations. However, aging strongly increased matrix rigidity, suggesting successive increase of WaMB size to connect functionalities and thus increasing degree of cross-linking by CaB-WaMB associations. Results thus demonstrated that the physicochemical structure of OM is

  2. Well-defined block copolymers for gene delivery to dendritic cells: probing the effect of polycation chain-length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rupei; Palumbo, R Noelle; Nagarajan, Lakshmi; Krogstad, Emily; Wang, Chun

    2010-03-03

    The development of safe and efficient polymer carriers for DNA vaccine delivery requires mechanistic understanding of structure-function relationship of the polymer carriers and their interaction with antigen-presenting cells. Here we have synthesized a series of diblock copolymers with well-defined chain-length using atom transfer radical polymerization and characterized the influence of polycation chain-length on the physico-chemical properties of the polymer/DNA complexes as well as the interaction with dendritic cells. The copolymers consist of a hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) block and a cationic poly(aminoethyl methacrylate) (PAEM) block. The average degree of polymerization (DP) of the PAEM block was varied among 19, 39, and 75, with nearly uniform distribution. With increasing PAEM chain-length, polyplexes formed by the diblock copolymers and plasmid DNA had smaller average particle size and showed higher stability against electrostatic destabilization by salt and heparin. The polymers were not toxic to mouse dendritic cells (DCs) and only displayed chain-length-dependent toxicity at a high concentration (1mg/mL). In vitro gene transfection efficiency and polyplex uptake in DCs were also found to correlate with chain-length of the PAEM block with the longer polymer chain favoring transfection and cellular uptake. The polyplexes induced a modest up-regulation of surface markers for DC maturation that was not significantly dependent on PAEM chain-length. Finally, the polyplex prepared from the longest PAEM block (DP of 75) achieved an average of 20% enhancement over non-condensed anionic dextran in terms of uptake by DCs in the draining lymph nodes 24h after subcutaneous injection into mice. Insights gained from studying such structurally well-defined polymer carriers and their interaction with dendritic cells may contribute to improved design of practically useful DNA vaccine delivery systems. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Adsorption of cationic amylopectin on microcrystalline cellulose.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeg, van de H.G.M.; Keizer, de A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Bijsterbosch, B.H.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of electrolyte concentration and pH on the adsorption of cationic amylopectin on microcrystalline cellulose were investigated. The adsorbed amount in the pseudo-plateau of the isotherm showed a maximum as a function of the electrolyte concentration. We compared the data with a recent

  4. Alkynylcarbenium ions and related unsaturated cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukyanov, Sergey M; Koblik, Alla V; Muradyan, Lyudmila A [Institute of Physical and Organic Chemistry, Rostov State University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation)

    1998-10-31

    Published data on carbenium ions containing carbon-carbon triple bonds both directly conjugated with the carbenium centre and separated from it are surveyed and described systematically. Ammonium, diazonium, iminium, phosphonium and iodonium cations containing alkynyl groups, which can be regarded as heteroanalogues of alkynylcarbenium ions, are also considered. The bibliography includes 283 references.

  5. Alkynylcarbenium ions and related unsaturated cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukyanov, Sergey M; Koblik, Alla V; Muradyan, Lyudmila A

    1998-01-01

    Published data on carbenium ions containing carbon-carbon triple bonds both directly conjugated with the carbenium centre and separated from it are surveyed and described systematically. Ammonium, diazonium, iminium, phosphonium and iodonium cations containing alkynyl groups, which can be regarded as heteroanalogues of alkynylcarbenium ions, are also considered. The bibliography includes 283 references

  6. Effect of cations on the hydrated proton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosson, Niklas; Hunger, Johannes; Bakker, Huib J

    2014-09-17

    We report on a strong nonadditive effect of protons and other cations on the structural dynamics of liquid water, which is revealed using dielectric relaxation spectroscopy in the frequency range of 1-50 GHz. For pure acid solutions, protons are known to have a strong structuring effect on water, leading to a pronounced decrease of the dielectric response. We observe that this structuring is reduced when protons are cosolvated with salts. This reduction is exclusively observed for combinations of protons with other ions; for all studied solutions of cosolvated salts, the effect on the structural dynamics of water is observed to be purely additive, even up to high concentrations. We derive an empirical model that quantitatively describes the nonadditive effect of cosolvated protons and cations. We argue that the effect can be explained from the special character of the proton in water and that Coulomb fields exerted by other cations, in particular doubly charged cations like Mg(2+)aq and Ca(2+)aq, induce a localization of the H(+)aq hydration structures.

  7. Mixed cation effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    , network structure, and the resistances associated with the deformation processes in mixed cation glasses by partially substituting magnesium for calcium and calcium for lithium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and 27Al NMR spectroscopies to obtain insights into the structural...

  8. Cationic flotation of some lithium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valadao, G.E.S.; Peres, A.E.C.; Silva, H.C. da

    1984-01-01

    The cationic flotation of some lithium ores (spodumene, amblygonite, petalite, lepidolite) is studied by the measure of zeta potential and micro-flotation tests in Hallimond tube. The effect of some modifier agents (corn starch, meta sodium silicate) on the lithium flotation is studied. (M.A.C.) [pt

  9. Letter: OCCO*+, NNCO*+ and NNNN*+ radical cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammang, R; Srinivas, R; Nguyen, M T; Gerbaux, P

    2007-01-01

    Chemical ionization of a mixture of nitrogen and carbon monoxide produces three stable isobaric species at m/z 56: OCCO, OCNN and NNNN radical cations. Separated at increased resolution, these ions are readily identified by collisional activation. Neutralization-reionization experiments performed on two different mass spectrometers have not allowed the detection of any recovery signals for the corresponding neutrals.

  10. Al cation induces aggregation of serum proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanphai, P; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2017-07-15

    Al cation is known to induce protein fibrillation and causes several neurodegenerative disorders. We report the spectroscopic, thermodynamic analysis and AFM imaging for the Al cation binding process with human serum albumin (HSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and milk beta-lactoglobulin (b-LG) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. Hydrophobicity played a major role in Al-protein interactions with more hydrophobic b-LG forming stronger Al-protein complexes. Thermodynamic parameters ΔS, ΔH and ΔG showed Al-protein bindings occur via hydrophobic and H-bonding contacts for b-LG, while van der Waals and H-bonding interactions prevail in HSA and BSA adducts. AFM clearly indicated that aluminum cations are able to force BSA and b-LG into larger or more robust aggregates than HSA, with HSA 4±0.2 (SE, n=801) proteins per aggregate, for BSA 17±2 (SE, n=148), and for b-LG 12±3 (SE, n=151). Thioflavin T test showed no major protein fibrillation in the presence of Al cation. Al complexation induced major alterations of protein conformations with the order of perturbations b-LG>BSA>HSA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemical reactivity of cation-exchanged zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pidko, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Zeolites modified with metal cations have been extensively studied during the last two decades because of their wide application in different technologically important fields such as catalysis, adsorption and gas separation. Contrary to the well-understood mechanisms of chemical reactions catalyzed

  12. Selective crystallization of cations with crown ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffels, Dennis Egidius

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the selectivity and preferences of the incorporation of differently sized cations in the cavities of various crown ethers and the characterization of the resulting compounds. The coordination preferences of crown ethers with different cavities have long been known, and the impact of other effects on the structure formation have increasingly become the focus of attention. In this work a comparative overview of the coordination preferences depending on various factors was undertaken. The focus was mainly on the variation of the cavity of the crown ether in the presence of differently sized cations. In addition, the effects of the solvent and differently coordinating anions have been investigated. Within the framework of this work, basic coordination preferences could be detected with rare earth nitrates, which are affected particularly by the choice of the solvent. The formation of different types of structures could be controlled by varying the conditions such that the incorporation of the cation in the cavity of the crown ether was influenced and the formation of a particular type of structure can be influenced partly by the choice of solvent. In this case no direct preferences for the incorporation into the cavity of the crown ether in relation to the cation size were observed for rare earth cations. However, the coordination of the crown ether leads in each case - for lanthanides - to rather high coordination numbers. A total of five new rare earth complexes and two structural variants could be observed with crown ethers. In the study of the selectivity of the incorporation into the cavity, known structures were also reproduced and further structures were characterized but the crystal structures not entirely solved. With the use of monovalent cations such as potassium, lithium or silver a total of nine new compounds could be synthesized, while no clear preferences for the incorporation of certain cations were detected. The

  13. [Noncovalent cation-π interactions--their role in nature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Krzysztof; Boratyński, Janusz

    2014-11-07

    Non-covalent interactions play an extremely important role in organisms. The main non-covalent interactions in nature are: ion-ion interactions, dipole-dipole interactions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals interactions. A new kind of intermolecular interactions--cation-π interactions--is gaining increasing attention. These interactions occur between a cation and a π system. The main contributors to cation-π interactions are electrostatic, polarization and, to a lesser extent, dispersion interactions. At first, cation-π interactions were studied in a gas phase, with metal cation-aromatic system complexes. The characteristics of these complexes are as follows: an increase of cation atomic number leads to a decrease of interaction energy, and an increase of cation charge leads to an increase of interaction energy. Aromatic amino acids bind with metal cations mainly through interactions with their main chain. Nevertheless, cation-π interaction with a hydrophobic side chain significantly enhances binding energy. In water solutions most cations preferentially interact with water molecules rather than aromatic systems. Cation-π interactions occur in environments with lower accessibility to a polar solvent. Cation-π interactions can have a stabilizing role on the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins. These interactions play an important role in substrate or ligand binding sites in many proteins, which should be taken into consideration when the screening of effective inhibitors for these proteins is carried out. Cation-π interactions are abundant and play an important role in many biological processes.

  14. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  15. Location-dependent excitatory synaptic interactions in pyramidal neuron dendrites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardia F Behabadi

    Full Text Available Neocortical pyramidal neurons (PNs receive thousands of excitatory synaptic contacts on their basal dendrites. Some act as classical driver inputs while others are thought to modulate PN responses based on sensory or behavioral context, but the biophysical mechanisms that mediate classical-contextual interactions in these dendrites remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that if two excitatory pathways bias their synaptic projections towards proximal vs. distal ends of the basal branches, the very different local spike thresholds and attenuation factors for inputs near and far from the soma might provide the basis for a classical-contextual functional asymmetry. Supporting this possibility, we found both in compartmental models and electrophysiological recordings in brain slices that the responses of basal dendrites to spatially separated inputs are indeed strongly asymmetric. Distal excitation lowers the local spike threshold for more proximal inputs, while having little effect on peak responses at the soma. In contrast, proximal excitation lowers the threshold, but also substantially increases the gain of distally-driven responses. Our findings support the view that PN basal dendrites possess significant analog computing capabilities, and suggest that the diverse forms of nonlinear response modulation seen in the neocortex, including uni-modal, cross-modal, and attentional effects, could depend in part on pathway-specific biases in the spatial distribution of excitatory synaptic contacts onto PN basal dendritic arbors.

  16. A dendrite-suppressing composite ion conductor from aramid nanofibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Siu-On; Ho, Szushen; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Ruilin; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2015-01-27

    Dendrite growth threatens the safety of batteries by piercing the ion-transporting separators between the cathode and anode. Finding a dendrite-suppressing material that combines high modulus and high ionic conductance has long been considered a major technological and materials science challenge. Here we demonstrate that these properties can be attained in a composite made from Kevlar-derived aramid nanofibres assembled in a layer-by-layer manner with poly(ethylene oxide). Importantly, the porosity of the membranes is smaller than the growth area of the dendrites so that aramid nanofibres eliminate 'weak links' where the dendrites pierce the membranes. The aramid nanofibre network suppresses poly(ethylene oxide) crystallization detrimental for ion transport, giving a composite that exhibits high modulus, ionic conductivity, flexibility, ion flux rates and thermal stability. Successful suppression of hard copper dendrites by the composite ion conductor at extreme discharge conditions is demonstrated, thereby providing a new approach for the materials engineering of solid ion conductors.

  17. Noise tolerant dendritic lattice associative memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Gerhard X.; Schmalz, Mark S.; Hayden, Eric; Tucker, Marc

    2011-09-01

    Linear classifiers based on computation over the real numbers R (e.g., with operations of addition and multiplication) denoted by (R, +, x), have been represented extensively in the literature of pattern recognition. However, a different approach to pattern classification involves the use of addition, maximum, and minimum operations over the reals in the algebra (R, +, maximum, minimum) These pattern classifiers, based on lattice algebra, have been shown to exhibit superior information storage capacity, fast training and short convergence times, high pattern classification accuracy, and low computational cost. Such attributes are not always found, for example, in classical neural nets based on the linear inner product. In a special type of lattice associative memory (LAM), called a dendritic LAM or DLAM, it is possible to achieve noise-tolerant pattern classification by varying the design of noise or error acceptance bounds. This paper presents theory and algorithmic approaches for the computation of noise-tolerant lattice associative memories (LAMs) under a variety of input constraints. Of particular interest are the classification of nonergodic data in noise regimes with time-varying statistics. DLAMs, which are a specialization of LAMs derived from concepts of biological neural networks, have successfully been applied to pattern classification from hyperspectral remote sensing data, as well as spatial object recognition from digital imagery. The authors' recent research in the development of DLAMs is overviewed, with experimental results that show utility for a wide variety of pattern classification applications. Performance results are presented in terms of measured computational cost, noise tolerance, classification accuracy, and throughput for a variety of input data and noise levels.

  18. Structure relationship of cationic lipids on gene transfection mediated by cationic liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paecharoenchai, Orapan; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Apirakaramwong, Auayporn; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-ek; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the transfection efficiency of cationic liposomes formulated with phosphatidylcholine (PC) and novel synthesized diethanolamine-based cationic lipids at a molar ratio of 5:1 in comparison with Lipofectamine™ 2000. Factors affecting transfection efficiency and cell viability, including the chemical structure of the cationic lipids, such as different amine head group (diamine and polyamine; and non-spermine and spermine) and acyl chain lengths (C14, C16, and C18) and the weight ratio of liposomes to DNA were evaluated on a human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa cells) using the pDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C2). Characterizations of these lipoplexes in terms of size and charge measurement and agarose gel electrophoresis were performed. The results from this study revealed that almost no transfection was observed in the liposome formulations composed of cationic lipids with a non-spermine head group. In addition, the transfection efficiency of these cationic liposomes was in the following order: spermine-C14 > spermine-C16 > spermine-C18. The highest transfection efficiency was observed in the formulation of spermine-C14 liposomes at a weight ratio of 25; furthermore, this formulation was safe for use in vitro. In conclusion, cationic liposomes containing spermine head groups demonstrated promising potential as gene carriers.

  19. Fluconazole affects the alkali-metal-cation homeostasis and susceptibility to cationic toxic compounds of Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elicharova, Hana; Sychrova, Hana

    2014-08-01

    Candida glabrata is a salt-tolerant and fluconazole (FLC)-resistant yeast species. Here, we analyse the contribution of plasma-membrane alkali-metal-cation exporters, a cation/proton antiporter and a cation ATPase to cation homeostasis and the maintenance of membrane potential (ΔΨ). Using a series of single and double mutants lacking CNH1 and/or ENA1 genes we show that the inability to export potassium and toxic alkali-metal cations leads to a slight hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane of C. glabrata cells; this hyperpolarization drives more cations into the cells and affects cation homeostasis. Surprisingly, a much higher hyperpolarization of C. glabrata plasma membrane was produced by incubating cells with subinhibitory concentrations of FLC. FLC treatment resulted in a substantially increased sensitivity of cells to various cationic drugs and toxic cations that are driven into the cell by negative-inside plasma-membrane potential. The effect of the combination of FLC plus cationic drug treatment was enhanced by the malfunction of alkali-metal-cation transporters that contribute to the regulation of membrane potential and cation homeostasis. In summary, we show that the combination of subinhibitory concentrations of FLC and cationic drugs strongly affects the growth of C. glabrata cells. © 2014 The Authors.

  20. The Outwardly Rectifying Current of Layer 5 Neocortical Neurons that was Originally Identified as "Non-Specific Cationic" Is Essentially a Potassium Current.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Revah

    Full Text Available In whole-cell patch clamp recordings from layer 5 neocortical neurons, blockade of voltage gated sodium and calcium channels leaves a cesium current that is outward rectifying. This current was originally identified as a "non-specific cationic current", and subsequently it was hypothesized that it is mediated by TRP channels. In order to test this hypothesis, we used fluorescence imaging of intracellular sodium and calcium indicators, and found no evidence to suggest that it is associated with influx of either of these ions to the cell body or dendrites. Moreover, the current is still prominent in neurons from TRPC1-/- and TRPC5-/- mice. The effects on the current of various blocking agents, and especially its sensitivity to intracellular tetraethylammonium, suggest that it is not a non-specific cationic current, but rather that it is generated by cesium-permeable delayed rectifier potassium channels.

  1. (4 + 3) Cycloadditions of Nitrogen-Stabilized Oxyallyl Cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Andrew G.; Hsung, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    The use of heteroatom-substituted oxyallyl cations in (4 + 3) cycloadditions has had a tremendous impact on the development of cycloaddition chemistry. Extensive efforts have been exerted toward investigating the effect of oxygen-, sulfur-, and halogen-substituents on the reactivity of oxyallyl cations. Most recently, the use of nitrogen-stabilized oxyallyl cations has gained prominence in the area of (4 + 3) cycloadditions. The following article will provide an overview of this concept utilizing nitrogen-stabilized oxyallyl cations. PMID:21384451

  2. Comparative physical-chemical characterization of encapsulated lipid-based isotretinoin products assessed by particle size distribution and thermal behavior analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Carla Aiolfi, E-mail: carlaaiolfi@usp.br [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Menaa, Farid [Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg 97080 (Germany); Fluorotronics, Inc., 1425 Russ Bvld, San Diego Technology Incubator, San Diego, CA 92101 (United States); Menaa, Bouzid, E-mail: bouzid.menaa@gmail.com [Fluorotronics, Inc., 1425 Russ Bvld, San Diego Technology Incubator, San Diego, CA 92101 (United States); Quenca-Guillen, Joyce S. [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Matos, Jivaldo do Rosario [Department of Fundamental Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Mercuri, Lucildes Pita [Department of Exact and Earth Sciences, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Diadema, SP 09972-270 (Brazil); Braz, Andre Borges [Department of Engineering of Mines and Oil, Polytechnical School, University of Sao Paulo, SP 05508-900 (Brazil); Rossetti, Fabia Cristina [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP 14015-120 (Brazil); Kedor-Hackmann, Erika Rosa Maria; Santoro, Maria Ines Rocha Miritello [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil)

    2010-06-10

    Isotretinoin is the drug of choice for the management of severe recalcitrant nodular acne. Nevertheless, some of its physical-chemical properties are still poorly known. Hence, the aim of our study consisted to comparatively evaluate the particle size distribution (PSD) and characterize the thermal behavior of the three encapsulated isotretinoin products in oil suspension (one reference and two generics) commercialized in Brazil. Here, we show that the PSD, estimated by laser diffraction and by polarized light microscopy, differed between the generics and the reference product. However, the thermal behavior of the three products, determined by thermogravimetry (TGA), differential thermal (DTA) analyses and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), displayed no significant changes and were more thermostable than the isotretinoin standard used as internal control. Thus, our study suggests that PSD analyses in isotretinoin lipid-based formulations should be routinely performed in order to improve their quality and bioavailability.

  3. Acceptability of new formulations of corn-soy blends and lipid-based nutrient supplements in Province du Passoré, Burkina Faso

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iuel-Brockdorff, Ann-Sophie Julie D; Dræbel, Tania; Fabiansen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the acceptability of new formulations of six corn-soy blended flours (CSB) and six lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) with different quantities of milk and qualities of soy to be used for the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). Furthermore......, we wanted to explore the acceptability of foods currently used for the prevention and treatment of malnutrition in Burkina Faso to identify possible barriers that could affect the acceptability of the new formulations of supplementary foods. The study was carried out prior to a randomized controlled...... trial evaluating the effectiveness of these new formulations. The study involved an observed test-meal and a three-day take-home ration of the experimental food supplements to 6-30-months-old healthy children, followed by questionnaire-based interviews about the acceptability of these supplements...

  4. Lipid-Based Formulations Can Enable the Model Poorly Water-Soluble Weakly Basic Drug Cinnarizine to Precipitate in an Amorphous-Salt Form during in Vitro Digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Jamal; Rades, Thomas; Boyd, Ben J

    2016-01-01

    The tendency for poorly water-soluble weakly basic drugs to precipitate in a noncrystalline form during the in vitro digestion of lipid-based formulations (LBFs) was linked to an ionic interaction between drug and fatty acid molecules produced upon lipid digestion. Cinnarizine was chosen as a model...... from the starting free base crystalline material to the hydrochloride salt, thus supporting the case that ionic interactions between weak bases and fatty acid molecules during digestion are responsible for producing amorphous-salts upon precipitation. The conclusion has wide implications...... weakly basic drug and was dissolved in a medium-chain (MC) LBF, which was subject to in vitro lipolysis experiments at various pH levels above and below the reported pKa value of cinnarizine (7.47). The solid-state form of the precipitated drug was analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier...

  5. Orchestration of transplantation tolerance by regulatory dendritic cell therapy or in-situ targeting of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Adrian E; Thomson, Angus W

    2014-08-01

    Extensive research in murine transplant models over the past two decades has convincingly demonstrated the ability of regulatory dendritic cells (DCregs) to promote long-term allograft survival. We review important considerations regarding the source of therapeutic DCregs (donor or recipient) and their mode of action, in-situ targeting of DCregs, and optimal therapeutic regimens to promote DCreg function. Recent studies have defined protocols and mechanisms whereby ex-vivo-generated DCregs of donor or recipient origin subvert allogeneic T-cell responses and promote long-term organ transplant survival. Particular interest has focused on how donor antigen is acquired, processed and presented by autologous dendritic cells, on the stability of DCregs, and on in-situ targeting of dendritic cells to promote their tolerogenic function. New evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of DCregs in a clinically relevant nonhuman primate organ transplant model and production of clinical grade DCregs support early evaluation of DCreg therapy in human graft recipients. We discuss strategies currently used to promote dendritic cell tolerogenicity, including DCreg therapy and in-situ targeting of dendritic cells, with a view to improved understanding of underlying mechanisms and identification of the most promising strategies for therapeutic application.

  6. Selective alkylation by photogenerated aryl and vinyl cation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slegt, Micha

    2006-01-01

    Seven para-substituted phenyl cations and the parent phenyl cation were prepared from iodonium salt precursors. Product studies revealed remarkable chemoselectivity and regioselectivity that could be related to the spin multiplicity of the cations. Also an universal method to fingerprint singlet and

  7. Dendritic protein synthesis in the normal and diseased brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, Sharon A.; Bassell, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic activity is a spatially-limited process that requires a precise, yet dynamic, complement of proteins within the synaptic micro-domain. The maintenance and regulation of these synaptic proteins is regulated, in part, by local mRNA translation in dendrites. Protein synthesis within the postsynaptic compartment allows neurons tight spatial and temporal control of synaptic protein expression, which is critical for proper functioning of synapses and neural circuits. In this review, we discuss the identity of proteins synthesized within dendrites, the receptor-mediated mechanisms regulating their synthesis, and the possible roles for these locally synthesized proteins. We also explore how our current understanding of dendritic protein synthesis in the hippocampus can be applied to new brain regions and to understanding the pathological mechanisms underlying varied neurological diseases. PMID:23262237

  8. A Model of Dendritic Cell Therapy for Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ami eRadunskaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are a promising immunotherapy tool for boosting an individual's antigen specific immune response to cancer. We develop a mathematical model using differential and delay-differential equations to describe the interactions between dendritic cells, effector-immune cells and tumor cells. We account for the trafficking of immune cells between lymph, blood, and tumor compartments. Our model reflects experimental results both for dendritic-cell trafficking and for immune suppression of tumor growth in mice. In addition, in silico experiments suggest more effective immunotherapy treatment protocols can be achieved by modifying dose location and schedule. A sensitivity analysis of the model reveals which patient-specific parameters have the greatest impact on treatment efficacy.

  9. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Aliberti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions.

  10. A Novel Forward Genetic Screen for Identifying Mutations Affecting Larval Neuronal Dendrite Development in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, Paul Mark B.; Swick, Lance L.; Andersen, Ryan; Blalock, Zachary; Brenman, Jay E.

    2006-01-01

    Vertebrate and invertebrate dendrites are information-processing compartments that can be found on both central and peripheral neurons. Elucidating the molecular underpinnings of information processing in the nervous system ultimately requires an understanding of the genetic pathways that regulate dendrite formation and maintenance. Despite the importance of dendrite development, few forward genetic approaches have been used to analyze the latest stages of dendrite development, including the ...

  11. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with absolute monocytosis at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M Jaworski,1,2 Vanlila K Swami,1 Rebecca C Heintzelman,1 Carrie A Cusack,3 Christina L Chung,3 Jeremy Peck,3 Matthew Fanelli,3 Micheal Styler,4 Sanaa Rizk,4 J Steve Hou1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby, PA, USA; 3Department of Dermatology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an uncommon malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nearly all patients present initially with cutaneous manifestations, with many having extracutaneous disease additionally. While response to chemotherapy initially is effective, relapse occurs in most, with a leukemic phase ultimately developing. The prognosis is dismal. While most of the clinical and pathologic features are well described, the association and possible prognostic significance between peripheral blood absolute monocytosis (>1.0 K/µL and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm have not been reported. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a rash for 4–5 months. On physical examination, there were multiple, dull-pink, indurated plaques on the trunk and extremities. Complete blood count revealed thrombocytopenia, absolute monocytosis of 1.7 K/µL, and a negative flow cytometry study. Biopsy of an abdominal lesion revealed typical features of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Patients having both hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies have an increased incidence of absolute monocytosis. Recent studies examining Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients have suggested that this is a negative prognostic factor. The association between

  12. Radiation chemistry of aromatic dimer radical cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Kazumasa; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    π-π Interactions of aromatic molecules are paid attention much in many fields, especially biology, chemistry, and applied physics, represented as protein, DNA, electron donor-accepter complexes, charge transfers, and self assembly molecules. Aromatic molecules including benzene rings are the simplest case to study the π-π interactions. To interpret the charge resonance (CR) structure in the dimer radical cations, spectroscopic and ESR methods have been carried out. The spectroscopic study on the dimer radical ion of molecules with two chromophores would be profitable to identify the electronic and configurational properties. In this article, dynamics of the dimer radical cation of benzenes, polystyrenes, and resist polymers is described on the basis of direct observation of CR band by the nanosecond pulse radiolysis and low temperature γ-radiolysis methods. (author)

  13. Electronic spectrum of 9-methylanthracenium radical cation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Connor, Gerard D.; Schmidt, Timothy W., E-mail: timothy.schmidt@unsw.edu.au [School of Chemistry, UNSW Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Sanelli, Julian A.; Dryza, Vik; Bieske, Evan J. [School of Chemistry, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2016-04-21

    The predissociation spectrum of the cold, argon-tagged, 9-methylanthracenium radical cation is reported from 8000 cm{sup −1} to 44 500 cm{sup −1}. The reported spectrum contains bands corresponding to at least eight electronic transitions ranging from the near infrared to the ultraviolet. These electronic transitions are assigned through comparison with ab initio energies and intensities. The infrared D{sub 1}←D{sub 0} transitions exhibit significant vibronic activity, which is assigned through comparison with TD-B3LYP excited state frequencies and intensities, as well as modelled vibronic interactions. Dissociation of 9-methylanthracenium is also observed at high visible-photon energies, resulting in the loss of either CH{sub 2} or CH{sub 3}. The relevance of these spectra, and the spectra of other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical cations, to the largely unassigned diffuse interstellar bands, is discussed.

  14. Photodissociation of spatially aligned acetaldehyde cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Suk Kyoung; Silva, Ruchira; Kim, Myung Hwa; Shen, Lei; Suits, Arthur G

    2007-07-26

    Photofragment translational energy and angular distributions are reported for the photodissociation of acetaldehyde cations in the wavelength range 354-363 nm obtained using the DC slice ion imaging technique. Vibrationally selected parent ions were produced by 2+1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) via the 3sCH3CO+, and CH4+. The angular distributions reveal that all product channels have a predominantly parallel recoil anisotropy although the lower beta2 parameter of CH3CO+ indicates the concomitant presence of a perpendicular component. Furthermore, the distinct angular distribution of the CH3CO+ fragments shows a large value of the higher order Legendre polynomial term, providing evidence that acetaldehyde cations are spatially aligned during the ionization process.

  15. Mechanism of adsorption of cations onto rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Akira; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Fujiwara, Kenso; Nishikawa, Sataro; Moriyama, Hirotake

    1999-01-01

    Adsorption behavior of cations onto granite was investigated. The distribution coefficient (K d ) of Sr 2+ and Ba 2+ onto granite was determined in the solution of which pH was ranged from 3.5 to 11.3 and ionic strength was set at 10 -2 and 10 -1 . The K d values were found to increase with increasing pH and with deceasing ionic strength. The obtained data were successfully analyzed by applying an electrical double layer model. The optimum parameter values of the double layer electrostatics and adsorption reactions were obtained, and the mechanism of adsorption of cations onto granite was discussed. Feldspar was found to play an important role in their adsorption. (author)

  16. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  17. Involvement of dendritic cells in allograft rejection new implications of dendritic cell-endothelial cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, C L; Schareck, W D; Kofler, S; Weis, M

    2007-04-01

    For almost half a century immunologists have tried to tear down the MHC barrier, which separates two unrelated individuals during transplantation. Latest experimental data suggest that a breakthrough in vitro is imminent. Dendritic cells (DCs), which activate naïve allo-reactive T-cells (TCs), play a central role in the establishment of allo-antigen-specific immunity. Allograft solid organ rejection is initiated at the foreign endothelial cell (EC) layer, which forms an immunogenic barrier for migrating DCs. Thus, DC/EC interactions might play a crucial role in antigen-specific allograft rejection. Organ rejection is mediated by host allo-reactive TCs, which are activated by donor DCs (direct activation) or host DCs (indirect activation). Direct allo-antigen presentation by regulatory dendritic cells (DCreg) can play an instructive role towards tolerance induction. Several groups established that, DCregs, if transplanted beforehand, enter host thymus, spleen, or bone marrow where they might eventually establish allo-antigen-specific tolerance. A fundamental aspect of DC function is migration throughout the entire organism. After solid organ transplantation, host DCs bind to ECs, invade allograft tissues, and finally transmigrate into lymphoid vessels and secondary lymphoid organs, where they present allo-antigens to naïve host TCs. Recent data suggest that in vitro manipulated DCregs may mediate allo-transplantation tolerance induction. However, the fundamental mechanisms on how such DCregs cause host TCs in the periphery towards tolerance remain unclear. One very promising experimental concept is the simultaneous manipulation of DC direct and indirect TC activation/suppression, towards donor antigen-specific allo-transplantation tolerance. The allo-antigen-specific long-term tolerance induction mediated by DCreg pre-transplantation (with simultaneous short-term immunosuppression) has become reproducible in the laboratory animal setting. Despite the shortcomings

  18. Domain shape instabilities and dendrite domain growth in uniaxial ferroelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, Vladimir Ya.; Akhmatkhanov, Andrey R.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of domain wall shape instabilities and the formation of nanodomains in front of moving walls obtained in various uniaxial ferroelectrics are discussed. Special attention is paid to the formation of self-assembled nanoscale and dendrite domain structures under highly non-equilibrium switching conditions. All obtained results are considered in the framework of the unified kinetic approach to domain structure evolution based on the analogy with first-order phase transformation. This article is part of the theme issue `From atomistic interfaces to dendritic patterns'.

  19. Neuron array with plastic synapses and programmable dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Shubha; Wunderlich, Richard; Hasler, Jennifer; George, Suma

    2013-10-01

    We describe a novel neuromorphic chip architecture that models neurons for efficient computation. Traditional architectures of neuron array chips consist of large scale systems that are interfaced with AER for implementing intra- or inter-chip connectivity. We present a chip that uses AER for inter-chip communication but uses fast, reconfigurable FPGA-style routing with local memory for intra-chip connectivity. We model neurons with biologically realistic channel models, synapses and dendrites. This chip is suitable for small-scale network simulations and can also be used for sequence detection, utilizing directional selectivity properties of dendrites, ultimately for use in word recognition.

  20. Electrical and Structural Characterization of Web Dendrite Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwuttke, G. H.; Koliwad, K.; Dumas, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    Minority carrier lifetime distributions in silicon web dendrites are measured. Emphasis is placed on measuring areal homogeneity of lifetime, show its dependency on structural defects, and its unique change during hot processing. The internal gettering action of defect layers present in web crystals and their relation to minority carrier lifetime distributions is discussed. Minority carrier lifetime maps of web dendrites obtained before and after high temperature heat treatment are compared to similar maps obtained from 100 mm diameter Czochralski silicon wafers. Such maps indicate similar or superior areal homogeneity of minority carrier lifetime in webs.

  1. Modelling dendritic ecological networks in space: anintegrated network perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Erin E.; Ver Hoef, Jay M.; Isaak, Dan J.; Falke, Jeffrey A.; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Jordon, Chris E.; McNyset, Kristina; Monestiez, Pascal; Ruesch, Aaron S.; Sengupta, Aritra; Som, Nicholas; Steel, E. Ashley; Theobald, David M.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Wenger, Seth J.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic ecological networks (DENs) are a unique form of ecological networks that exhibit a dendritic network topology (e.g. stream and cave networks or plant architecture). DENs have a dual spatial representation; as points within the network and as points in geographical space. Consequently, some analytical methods used to quantify relationships in other types of ecological networks, or in 2-D space, may be inadequate for studying the influence of structure and connectivity on ecological processes within DENs. We propose a conceptual taxonomy of network analysis methods that account for DEN characteristics to varying degrees and provide a synthesis of the different approaches within

  2. Clinical application of dendritic cells in cancer vaccination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Soot, Mette Line; Buus, Søren

    2003-01-01

    During the last decade use of dendritic cells (DC) has moved from murine and in vitro studies to clinical trials as adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy. Here they function as delivery vehicles for exogenous tumor antigens, promoting an efficient antigen presentation. The development of protocols...... for large-scale generation of dendritic cells for clinical applications has made possible phase I/II studies designed to analyze the toxicity, feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In clinical trials, DC-based vaccination of patients with advanced cancer has in many cases led to immunity...

  3. Reducible cationic lipids for gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzer, B; Byk, G; Frederic, M; Airiau, M; Blanche, F; Pitard, B; Scherman, D

    2001-01-01

    One of the main challenges of gene therapy remains the increase of gene delivery into eukaryotic cells. We tested whether intracellular DNA release, an essential step for gene transfer, could be facilitated by using reducible cationic DNA-delivery vectors. For this purpose, plasmid DNA was complexed with cationic lipids bearing a disulphide bond. This reduction-sensitive linker is expected to be reduced and cleaved in the reducing milieu of the cytoplasm, thus potentially improving DNA release and consequently transfection. The DNA--disulphide-lipid complexation was monitored by ethidium bromide exclusion, and the size of complexes was determined by dynamic light scattering. It was found that the reduction kinetics of disulphide groups in DNA--lipid complexes depended on the position of the disulphide linker within the lipid molecule. Furthermore, the internal structure of DNA--lipid particles was examined by small-angle X-ray scattering before and after lipid reduction. DNA release from lipid complexes was observed after the reduction of disulphide bonds of several lipids. Cell-transfection experiments suggested that complexes formed with selected reducible lipids resulted in up to 1000-fold higher reporter-gene activity, when compared with their analogues without disulphide bonds. In conclusion, reduction-sensitive groups introduced into cationic lipid backbones potentially allow enhanced DNA release from DNA--lipid complexes after intracellular reduction and represent a tool for improved vectorization. PMID:11389682

  4. File list: InP.Bld.05.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Unc.Bld.50.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: Unc.Bld.20.AllAg.Dendritic_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. Anchoring cationic amphiphiles for nucleotide delivery: significance of DNA release from cationic liposomes for transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, Naohide; Minatani, Kazuhiro; Hattori, Yoshifumi; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2007-06-01

    We have designed and synthesized lithocholic acid-based cationic amphiphile molecules as components of cationic liposomes for gene transfection (lipofection). To study the relationship between the molecular structures of those amphiphilic molecules, particularly the extended hydrophobic appendant (anchor) at the 3-hydroxyl group, and transfection efficiency, we synthesized several lithocholic and isolithocholic acid derivatives, and examined their transfection efficiency. We also compared the physico-chemical properties of cationic liposomes prepared from these derivatives. We found that isolithocholic acid derivatives exhibit higher transfection efficiency than the corresponding lithocholic acid derivatives. This result indicates that the orientation and extension of hydrophobic regions influence the gene transfection process. Isolithocholic acid derivatives showed a high ability to encapsulate DNA in a compact liposome-DNA complex and to protect it from enzymatic degradation. Isolithocholic acid derivatives also facilitated the release of DNA from the liposome-DNA complex, which is a crucial step for DNA entry into the nucleus. Our results show that the transfection efficiency is directly influenced by the ability of the liposome complex to release DNA, rather than by the DNA-encapsulating ability. Molecular modeling revealed that isolithocholic acid derivatives take relatively extended conformations, while the lithocholic acid derivatives take folded structures. Thus, the efficiency of release of DNA from cationic liposomes in the cytoplasm, which contributes to high transfection efficiency, appears to be dependent upon the molecular shape of the cationic amphiphiles.

  9. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chu-Yu; Yang, Xiaohan; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2013-06-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant species was reported. We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240 members are separated into three families, i.e., Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, K(+) efflux antiporters, and cation/H(+) exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H(+) exchangers in the examined angiosperm species. Sliding window analysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and found most motifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Radical cations of quadricyclane and norbornadiene in polar ZSM-5 matrices: Radical cation photochemical transformations without photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnabas, M.V.; Trifunac, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    Radical cations of quadricyclane (Q) and norbornadiene (NBD) are produced by γ-radiolysis in zeolites. In polar ZSM-5, only one radical cation is initially observed below 100K. Increasing the temperature above 200K gives rise to the cyclopentadiene radical cation. Higher temperatures (>360K) give rise to the cyclopenten-4-yl radical. The observation of cyclopentadiene radical cation implies the occurrence of the reverse Diels-Alder reaction. This is a thermally forbidden, photochemically allowed, process, which is made possible by the interaction of the polar zeolite matrix sites with parent NBD and Q radical cations

  11. Modulation of cytokine production profiles in splenic dendritic cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined the role of splenic dendritic cells in immune response to Toxoplasma gondii infection in SAG1 (P30+) transgenic mice by investigating the kinetics of intracellular cytokines expression of IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-γ by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) using flow cytometry, and compared the results to those of ...

  12. The effects of renal transplantation on circulating dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A. Hesselink (Dennis); L.M.B. Vaessen (Leonard); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); W. Schoordijk-Verschoor (Wenda); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); C.C. Baan (Carla); W. Weimar (Willem)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe effects of immunosuppressive agents on T cell function have been well characterized but virtually nothing is known about the effects of renal transplantation on human dendritic cells (DCs). With the use of flow cytometry, we studied the kinetics of myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs in

  13. Circulating dendritic cells in pediatric patients with nephrotic syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Dendritic cells (DCs) represent one of the most extensively studied topics in immunology, because of their central role in the induction and regulation of adaptive immunity, and because of their therapeutic potential for manipulating immune responses. Objectives: To evaluate circulating DC levels in pediatric ...

  14. Unimpaired dendritic cell functions in MVP/LRP knockout mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mossink, MH; Groot, de J.; Zon, van A; Franzel-Luiten, E; Schoester, M.; Scheffer, G.L.; Sonneveld, P.; Scheper, R.J.; Wiemer, EA

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) act as mobile sentinels of the immune system. By stimulating T lymphocytes, DCs are pivotal for the initiation of both T- and B-cell-mediated immune responses. Recently, ribonucleoprotein particles (vaults) were found to be involved in the development and/or function of human

  15. Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids and immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Nicolas, Alexandra; Bouchot, André

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells currently being used as a cellular adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy strategies. Unfortunately, DC-based vaccines have not demonstrated spectacular clinical results. DC loading with tumor antigens and DC differentiation and activation...

  16. Search for a solute-drag effect in dendritic solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckler, K.; Herlach, D.M.; Aziz, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    The authors report the results of an indirect experimental test for the solute-drag effect in alloy solidification by fitting the data of Eckler et.al. for Ni-B dendrite tip velocities vs undercooling to models in several ways. The unknown equilibrium partition coefficient, k e , was varied as a fitting parameter. When they combine the dendrite growth model of Boettinger et al. with the Continuous Growth Model (CGM) of Aziz and Kaplan with solute drag, they cannot fit the data for any value of k e . When they combine dendrite growth theory with the CGM without solute drag, they obtain a reasonable fit to the data for k e = 4 x 10 -6 . When they combine dendrite growth theory with a new partial-solute-drag interpolation between the with-solute-drag and the without-solute-drag versions of the CGM, they obtain a still better fit to the data for k e = 2.8 x 10 - 4. This result points out the possibility of partial solute-drag during solidification and the importance of an independent determination of k e in order to distinguish between models

  17. Genetically engineered dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2001), s. 475-478 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526 Keywords : dendritic cell s * tumour vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.330, year: 2001

  18. Tumor-Mediated Suppression of Dendritic Cell Vaccines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akporiaye, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    .... One of these factors is Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-beta). TGF-beta is produced in large quantities by different types of cancer including breast cancer and inhibits the actions of several immune cells including dendritic cells (DC...

  19. Genetically modified dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 5 (2001), s. 153-155 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526 Keywords : dendritic cell s * cancer vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.519, year: 2001

  20. Fractal analysis of electrolytically-deposited palladium hydride dendrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursill, L.A.; Julin, Peng; Xudong, Fan.

    1990-01-01

    The fractal scaling characteristics of the surface profile of electrolytically-deposited palladium hydride dendritic structures have been obtained using conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The results are in remarkable agreement with the modified diffusion-limited aggregation model. 19 refs., 3 tabs., 13 figs

  1. Utilizing dendritic scaffold for feasible formation of naphthalene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the effect of dendritic scaffolds on the feasibility of naphthalene excimer formation has not been reported in the literature. Here, we report synthesis and photophysical study of naphthalene functionalized zero and first genera- tion PAMAM dendrimers in order to understand the mechanism of excimer formation in the system.

  2. Cryotherapy in Dendritic Keratitis. | Mpyet | Nigerian Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of cryotherapy in the treatment of Dendritic Keratitis where antiviral agents are not available. The result show some improvement in visual acuity while one patient has a drop in vision. The extent of corneal scarring appears to depend on the duration of the disease and extent of stroma ...

  3. Dendritic Spines in Depression: What We Learned from Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression, a severe psychiatric disorder, has been studied for decades, but the underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Depression is closely associated with alterations in dendritic spine morphology and spine density. Therefore, understanding dendritic spines is vital for uncovering the mechanisms underlying depression. Several chronic stress models, including chronic restraint stress (CRS, chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS, and chronic social defeat stress (CSDS, have been used to recapitulate depression-like behaviors in rodents and study the underlying mechanisms. In comparison with CRS, CUMS overcomes the stress habituation and has been widely used to model depression-like behaviors. CSDS is one of the most frequently used models for depression, but it is limited to the study of male mice. Generally, chronic stress causes dendritic atrophy and spine loss in the neurons of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Meanwhile, neurons of the amygdala and nucleus accumbens exhibit an increase in spine density. These alterations induced by chronic stress are often accompanied by depression-like behaviors. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This review summarizes our current understanding of the chronic stress-induced remodeling of dendritic spines in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens and also discusses the putative underlying mechanisms.

  4. Identification of human tissue cross-presenting dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Haniffa, Muzlifah; Collin, Matthew; Ginhoux, Florent

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous group of functionally specialized antigen-presenting cells. We recently characterized the human tissue cross-presenting DCs and aligned the human and mouse DC subsets. Our findings will facilitate the translation of murine DC studies to the human setting and aid the design of DC-based vaccine strategies for infection and cancer immunotherapy.

  5. Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia in a Black Malian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... BPDCN in Mali. KEYWORDS: Acute Leukemia, black african, dendritic cell, Mali ... myeloid neoplasm by the 2008 world health organization classification of .... There are many standardized treatment regimens, and many protocols with ... leukemia chemotherapy regimen[7,11] or chronic leukemia treatment ...

  6. Characteristics of the Dendrite Growth in the Electrochemical Alane Production Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hyun-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical alane production process was proposed for a feasible production of alane. The operation of process was difficult because of short circuit by a dendrite growth in the reactor. Therefore, characteristics of the dendrite growth in the process were investigated. We conducted the electrochemical alane production process using Teflon block for inhibition of the dendrite growth. The obtained dendrite was characterized by XRD, SEM and ICP-AES. It was concluded that the dendrite growth was attributed to a melting and agglomeration of Al fine particles existed in the solution.

  7. Cationic niosomes an effective gene carrier composed of novel spermine-derivative cationic lipids: effect of central core structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Leksantikul, Lalita; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek

    2017-05-01

    Cationic niosomes formulated from Span 20, cholesterol (Chol) and novel spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures (di(oxyethyl)amino, di(oxyethyl)amino carboxy, 3-amino-1,2-dioxypropyl and 2-amino-1,3-dioxypropyl) were successfully prepared for improving transfection efficiency in vitro. The niosomes composed of spermine cationic lipid with central core structure of di(oxyethyl)amino revealed the highest gene transfection efficiency. To investigate the factors affecting gene transfection and cell viability including differences in the central core structures of cationic lipids, the composition of vesicles, molar ratio of cationic lipids in formulations and the weight ratio of niosomes to DNA. Cationic niosomes composed of nonionic surfactants (Span20), cholesterol and spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures were formulated. Gene transfection and cell viability were evaluated on a human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa cells) using pDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C2). The morphology, size and charge were also characterized. High transfection efficiency was obtained from cationic niosomes composed of Span20:Chol:cationic lipid at the molar ratio of 2.5:2.5:0.5 mM. Cationic lipids with di(oxyethyl)amino as a central core structure exhibited highest transfection efficiency. In addition, there was also no serum effect on transfection efficiency. These novel cationic niosomes may constitute a good alternative carrier for gene transfection.

  8. Dendritic development of Drosophila high order visual system neurons is independent of sensory experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuter John E

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complex and characteristic structures of dendrites are a crucial part of the neuronal architecture that underlies brain function, and as such, their development has been a focal point of recent research. It is generally believed that dendritic development is controlled by a combination of endogenous genetic mechanisms and activity-dependent mechanisms. Therefore, it is of interest to test the relative contributions of these two types of mechanisms towards the construction of specific dendritic trees. In this study, we make use of the highly complex Vertical System (VS of motion sensing neurons in the lobula plate of the Drosophila visual system to gauge the importance of visual input and synaptic activity to dendritic development. Results We find that the dendrites of VS1 neurons are unchanged in dark-reared flies as compared to control flies raised on a 12 hour light, 12 hour dark cycle. The dendrites of these flies show no differences from control in dendrite complexity, spine number, spine density, or axon complexity. Flies with genetically ablated eyes show a slight but significant reduction in the complexity and overall length of VS1 dendrites, although this effect may be due to a reduction in the overall size of the dendritic field in these flies. Conclusions Overall, our results indicate no role for visual experience in the development of VS dendrites, while spontaneous activity from photoreceptors may play at most a subtle role in the formation of fully complex dendrites in these high-order visual processing neurons.

  9. Variability in millimeter wave scattering properties of dendritic ice crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botta, Giovanni; Aydin, Kültegin; Verlinde, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    A detailed electromagnetic scattering model for ice crystals is necessary for calculating radar reflectivity from cloud resolving model output in any radar simulator. The radar reflectivity depends on the backscattering cross sections and size distributions of particles in the radar resolution volume. The backscattering cross section depends on the size, mass and distribution of mass within the crystal. Most of the available electromagnetic scattering data for ice hydrometeors rely on simple ice crystal types and a single mass–dimensional relationship for a given type. However, a literature survey reveals that the mass–dimensional relationships for dendrites cover a relatively broad region in the mass–dimensional plane. This variability of mass and mass distribution of dendritic ice crystals cause significant variability in their backscattering cross sections, more than 10 dB for all sizes (0.5–5 mm maximum dimension) and exceeding 20 dB for the larger ones at X-, Ka-, and W-band frequencies. Realistic particle size distributions are used to calculate radar reflectivity and ice water content (IWC) for three mass–dimensional relationships. The uncertainty in the IWC for a given reflectivity spans an order of magnitude in value at all three frequencies because of variations in the unknown mass–dimensional relationship and particle size distribution. The sensitivity to the particle size distribution is reduced through the use of dual frequency reflectivity ratios, e.g., Ka- and W-band frequencies, together with the reflectivity at one of the frequencies for estimating IWC. -- Highlights: • Millimeter wave backscattering characteristics of dendritic crystals are modeled. • Natural variability of dendrite shapes leads to large variability in their mass. • Dendrite mass variability causes large backscattering cross section variability. • Reflectivity–ice water content relation is sensitive to mass and size distribution. • Dual frequency

  10. Large-conductance calcium-dependent potassium channels prevent dendritic excitability in neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhassine, Narimane; Berger, Thomas

    2009-03-01

    Large-conductance calcium-dependent potassium channels (BK channels) are homogeneously distributed along the somatodendritic axis of layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the rat somatosensory cortex. The relevance of this conductance for dendritic calcium electrogenesis was studied in acute brain slices using somatodendritic patch clamp recordings and calcium imaging. BK channel activation reduces the occurrence of dendritic calcium spikes. This is reflected in an increased critical frequency of somatic spikes necessary to activate the distal initiation zone. Whilst BK channels repolarise the somatic spike, they dampen it only in the distal dendrite. Their activation reduces dendritic calcium influx via glutamate receptors. Furthermore, they prevent dendritic calcium electrogenesis and subsequent somatic burst discharges. However, the time window for coincident somatic action potential and dendritic input to elicit dendritic calcium events is not influenced by BK channels. Thus, BK channel activation in layer 5 pyramidal neurons affects cellular excitability primarily by establishing a high threshold at the distal action potential initiation zone.

  11. Cation-Cation Complexes of Pentavalent Uranyl: From Disproportionation Intermediates to Stable Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougel, Victor; Horeglad, Pawel; Nocton, Gregory; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella [CEA, INAC, SCIB, Laboratoire de Reconnaissance Ionique et Chimie de Coordination, CEA-Grenoble, 38054 GRENOBLE, Cedex 09 (France)

    2010-07-01

    Three new cation cation complexes of pentavalent uranyl, stable with respect to the disproportionation reaction, have been prepared from the reaction of the precursor [(UO{sub 2}py{sub 5})-(KI{sub 2}py{sub 2})]{sub n} (1) with the Schiff base ligands salen{sup 2-}, acacen{sup 2-}, and salophen{sup 2-} (H{sub 2}salen N, N'-ethylene-bis(salicylidene-imine), H{sub 2}acacen=-N, N'-ethylenebis(acetylacetone-imine), H{sub 2}salophen=N, N'-phenylene-bis(salicylidene-imine)). The preparation of stable complexes requires a careful choice of counter ions and reaction conditions. Notably the reaction of 1 with salophen{sup 2-} in pyridine leads to immediate disproportionation, but in the presence of [18]crown-6 ([18]C-6) a stable complex forms. The solid-state structure of the four tetra-nuclear complexes ([UO{sub 2}-(acacen)]{sub 4}[{mu}{sub 8}-]{sub 2}[K([18]C-6)(py)]{sub 2}) (3) and ([UO{sub 2}(acacen)](4)[{mu}{sub 8}-]).2[K([222])(py)] (4) ([UO{sub 2}(salophen)](4)[{mu}{sub 8}-K]{sub 2}[mu(5)-KI]{sub 2}[(K([18]C-6)]).2 [K([18]C-6)-(thf){sub 2}].2I (5), and ([UO{sub 2}(salen)(4)][{mu}{sub 8}-Rb]{sub 2}[Rb([18]C-6)]{sub 2}) (9) ([222] = [222]cryptand, py =pyridine), presenting a T-shaped cation cation interaction has been determined by X-ray crystallographic studies. NMR spectroscopic and UV/Vis studies show that the tetra-nuclear structure is maintained in pyridine solution for the salen and acacen complexes. Stable mononuclear complexes of pentavalent uranyl are also obtained by reduction of the hexavalent uranyl Schiff base complexes with cobaltocene in pyridine in the absence of coordinating cations. The reactivity of the complex [U{sup V}O{sub 2}(salen)(py)][Cp*{sub 2}Co] with different alkali ions demonstrates the crucial effect of coordinating cations on the stability of cation cation complexes. The nature of the cation plays a key role in the preparation of stable cation cation complexes. Stable tetra-nuclear complexes form in the presence of K

  12. Complexes of natural carbohydrates with metal cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, Yurii E; Garnovskii, Alexander D; Zhdanov, Yu A

    1998-01-01

    Data on the interaction of natural carbohydrates (mono-, oligo-, and poly-saccharides, amino sugars, and natural organic acids of carbohydrate origin) with metal cations are surveyed and described systematically. The structural diversity of carbohydrate metal complexes, caused by some specific features of carbohydrates as ligands, is demonstrated. The influence of complex formation on the chemical properties of carbohydrates is discussed. It is shown that the formation of metal complexes plays an important role in the configurational and conformational analysis of carbohydrates. The practical significance of the coordination interaction in the series of carbohydrate ligands is demonstrated. The bibliography includes 571 references.

  13. Complex Macromolecular Architectures by Living Cationic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Alghamdi, Reem D.

    2015-05-01

    Poly (vinyl ether)-based graft polymers have been synthesized by the combination of living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers with other living or controlled/ living polymerization techniques (anionic and ATRP). The process involves the synthesis of well-defined homopolymers (PnBVE) and co/terpolymers [PnBVE-b-PCEVE-b-PSiDEGVE (ABC type) and PSiDEGVE-b-PnBVE-b-PSiDEGVE (CAC type)] by sequential living cationic polymerization of n-butyl vinyl ether (nBVE), 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (CEVE) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl ethylene glycol vinyl ether (SiDEGVE), using mono-functional {[n-butoxyethyl acetate (nBEA)], [1-(2-chloroethoxy) ethyl acetate (CEEA)], [1-(2-(2-(t-butyldimethylsilyloxy)ethoxy) ethoxy) ethyl acetate (SiDEGEA)]} or di-functional [1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol di(1-ethyl acetate) (cHMDEA), (VEMOA)] initiators. The living cationic polymerizations of those monomers were conducted in hexane at -20 0C using Et3Al2Cl3 (catalyst) in the presence of 1 M AcOEt base.[1] The PCEVE segments of the synthesized block terpolymers were then used to react with living macroanions (PS-DPE-Li; poly styrene diphenyl ethylene lithium) to afford graft polymers. The quantitative desilylation of PSiDEGVE segments by n-Bu4N+F- in THF at 0 °C led to graft co- and terpolymers in which the polyalcohol is the outer block. These co-/terpolymers were subsequently subjected to “grafting-from” reactions by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene to afford more complex macromolecular architectures. The base assisted living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers were also used to synthesize well-defined α-hydroxyl polyvinylether (PnBVE-OH). The resulting polymers were then modified into an ATRP macro-initiator for the synthesis of well-defined block copolymers (PnBVE-b-PS). Bifunctional PnBVE with terminal malonate groups was also synthesized and used as a precursor for more complex architectures such as H-shaped block copolymer by “grafting-from” or

  14. Homogeneous cation exchange membrane by radiation grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolhe, Shailesh M.; G, Agathian; Ashok Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Preparation of a strong cation exchange membrane by radiation grafting of styrene on to polyethylene (LDPE) film by mutual irradiation technique in the presence of air followed by sulfonation is described. The grafting has been carried out in the presence of air and without any additive. Low dose rate has been seen to facilitate the grafting. Further higher the grafting percentage more is the exchange capacity. The addition of a swelling agent during the sulfonation helped in achieving the high exchange capacity. The TGA-MASS analysis confirmed the grafting and the sulfonation. (author)

  15. Antiretroviral therapy provided to HIV-infected Malawian women in a randomized trial diminishes the posiitive effect of lipid-based nutrient supplements on breast milk B-vitamins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: There is little information on B-vitamin concentrations in human milk or how they are affected by maternal B-vitamin deficiencies, antiretroviral (ARV) therapy or maternal supplementation. Objective: To evaluate effects of ARV therapy and/or lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) on B-v...

  16. Effect of supplementation with a lipid-based nutrient supplement on the micronutrient status of children aged 6–18 months living in the rural region of Intibucá, Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) have been effective in the treatment of acute malnutrition among children. We evaluated the use of LNS supplementation for improving the micronutrient status of young children. Methods: A 12-month randomised controlled trial was conducted among chil...

  17. Maternal cortisol and stress are associated with birth outcomes, but are not affected by lipid-based micronutrient supplements during pregnancy: an analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial in rural Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Prenatal micronutrient supplements have been found to increase birth weight, but mechanisms for increased growth are poorly understood. Our hypotheses were that 1) women who receive lipid-based micronutrient supplements (LNS) during pregnancy would have lower salivary cortisol concentrat...

  18. DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin on dendritic cells that unveils many aspects of dendritic cell biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Engering, Anneke; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are present in essentially every tissue where they operate at the interface of innate and acquired immunity by recognizing pathogens and presenting pathogen-derived peptides to T cells. It is becoming clear that not all C-type lectins on DC serve as antigen receptors recognizing

  19. Equine dendritic cells generated with horse serum have enhanced functionality in comparison to dendritic cells generated with fetal bovine serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Anja; Everett, Helen; Hamza, Eman; Garbani, Mattia; Gerber, Vinzenz; Marti, Eliane; Steinbach, Falko

    2016-11-15

    Dendritic cells are professional antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in the initiation and modulation of T cell responses. They have been studied widely for their potential clinical applications, but for clinical use to be successful, alternatives to xenogeneic substances like fetal bovine serum (FBS) in cell culture need to be found. Protocols for the generation of dendritic cells ex vivo from monocytes are well established for several species, including horses. Currently, the gold standard protocol for generating dendritic cells from monocytes across various species relies upon a combination of GM-CSF and IL-4 added to cell culture medium which is supplemented with FBS. The aim of this study was to substitute FBS with heterologous horse serum. For this purpose, equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (eqMoDC) were generated in the presence of horse serum or FBS and analysed for the effect on morphology, phenotype and immunological properties. Changes in the expression of phenotypic markers (CD14, CD86, CD206) were assessed during dendritic cell maturation by flow cytometry. To obtain a more complete picture of the eqMoDC differentiation and assess possible differences between FBS- and horse serum-driven cultures, a transcriptomic microarray analysis was performed. Lastly, immature eqMoDC were primed with a primary antigen (ovalbumin) or a recall antigen (tetanus toxoid) and, after maturation, were co-cultured with freshly isolated autologous CD5 + T lymphocytes to assess their T cell stimulatory capacity. The microarray analysis demonstrated that eqMoDC generated with horse serum were indistinguishable from those generated with FBS. However, eqMoDC incubated with horse serum-supplemented medium exhibited a more characteristic dendritic cell morphology during differentiation from monocytes. A significant increase in cell viability was also observed in eqMoDC cultured with horse serum. Furthermore, eqMoDC generated in the presence of horse serum

  20. Orchestration of transplantation tolerance by regulatory dendritic cell therapy or in situ targeting of dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Adrian E.; Thomson, Angus W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Extensive research in murine transplant models over the past two decades has convincingly demonstrated the ability of regulatory dendritic cells (DCreg) to promote long-term allograft survival. We review important considerations regarding the source of therapeutic DCreg (donor or recipient) and their mode of action, in situ targeting of DCreg, and optimal therapeutic regimens to promote DCreg function. Recent findings Recent studies have defined protocols and mechanisms whereby ex vivo-generated DCreg of donor or recipient origin subvert allogeneic T cell responses and promote long-term organ transplant survival. Particular interest has focused on how donor antigen (Ag) is acquired, processed and presented by autologous DCs, on the stability of DCreg, and on in situ targeting of DC to promote their tolerogenic function. New evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of DCreg in a clinically-relevant non-human primate organ transplant model and production of clinical grade DCreg support early evaluation of DCreg therapy in human graft recipients. Summary We discuss strategies currently used to promote DC tolerogenicity, including DCreg therapy and in situ targeting of DC, with a view to improved understanding of underlying mechanisms and identification of the most promising strategies for therapeutic application. PMID:24926700

  1. Cationic polymers in water treatment: Part 1: Treatability of water with cationic polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polasek, P.; Mutl, Silvestr

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2002), s. 69-82 ISSN 0378-4738 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK2067107 Keywords : cationic polymers * treatability * water quality Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.481, year: 2002

  2. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas-phase Cl-X and [HCl-X](+) complexes for X(+)= H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+), using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl(-) and HCl for the various cations. The Cl-X bond becomes longer and weaker along X(+) = H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+). Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities.

  3. Cobalt 60 cation exchange with mexican clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nava Galve, R.G.

    1993-01-01

    Mexican clays can be used to remove radioactive elements from contaminated aqueous solutions. Cation exchange experiments were performed with 60 Co radioactive solution. In the present work the effect of contact time on the sorption of Co 2+ was studied. The contact time in hydrated montmorillonite was from 5 to 120 minutes and in dehydrated montmorillonite 5 to 1400 minutes. The Co 2+ uptake value was, in hydrated montmorillonite, between 0.3 to 0.85 m eq/g and in dehydrated montmorillonite, between 0.6 to 1.40 m eq/g. The experiments were done in a pH 5.1 to 5.7 and normal conditions. XRD patterns were used to characterize the samples. The crystallinity was determined by X-ray Diffraction and it was maintained before and after the cation exchange. DTA thermo grams showed the temperatures of the lost humidity and crystallization water. Finally, was observed that dehydrated montmorillonite adsorb more cobalt than hydrated montmorillonite. (Author)

  4. Cationic antimicrobial peptides in penaeid shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Amparyup, Piti; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Supungul, Premruethai

    2011-08-01

    Penaeid shrimp aquaculture has been consistently affected worldwide by devastating diseases that cause a severe loss in production. To fight a variety of harmful microbes in the surrounding environment, particularly at high densities (of which intensive farming represents an extreme example), shrimps have evolved and use a diverse array of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as part of an important first-line response of the host defense system. Cationic AMPs in penaeid shrimps composed of penaeidins, crustins, and anti-lipopolysaccharide factors are comprised of multiple classes or isoforms and possess antibacterial and antifungal activities against different strains of bacteria and fungi. Shrimp AMPs are primarily expressed in circulating hemocytes, which is the main site of the immune response, and hemocytes expressing AMPs probably migrate to infection sites to fight against pathogen invasion. Indeed, most AMPs are produced as early as the nauplii developmental stage to protect shrimp larvae from infections. In this review, we discuss the sequence diversity, expression, gene structure, and antimicrobial activities of cationic AMPs in penaeid shrimps. The information available on antimicrobial activities indicates that these shrimp AMPs have potential therapeutic applications in the control of disease problems in aquaculture.

  5. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2013-01-01

    Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs). The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications. PMID:23665898

  6. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs. The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications.

  7. Basic exchangeable cations in Finnish mineral soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armi Kaila

    1972-09-01

    Full Text Available The content of exchangeable Ca, Mg, K and Na replaced by neutral ammonium acetate was determined in 470 samples of mineral soils from various parts of Finland, except from Lapland. The amount of all these cations tended to increase with an increase in the clay content, but variation within each textural class was large, and the ranges usually overlapped those of the other classes. The higher acidity of virgin surface soils was connected with a lower average degree of saturation by Ca as compared with the corresponding textural classes of cultivated soils. No significant difference in the respective contents of other cations was detected. The samples of various textural groups from deeper layers were usually poorer in exchangeable Ca and K than the corresponding groups of plough layer. The mean content of exchangeable Mg was equal or even higher in the samples from deeper layers than in the samples from plough layer, except in the group of sand soils. The percentage of Mg of the effective CEC increased, as an average, from 9 in the sand and fine sand soils of plough layer to 30 in the heavy clay soils; in the heavy clay soils from deeper layers its mean value was 38 ± 4 %. In the samples of plough layer, the mean ratio of Ca to Mg in sand and fine sand soils was about 9, in silt and loam soils about 6, in the coarser clay soils about 4, and in heavy clay about 2.

  8. Radiochemical study of isomerization of free butyl cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinotova, E.N.; Nefedov, V.D.; Skorokhodov, S.S.; Arkhipov, Yu.M.

    1987-01-01

    Ion-molecular reactions of free butyl cations, generated by nuclear chemical method, with carbon monoxide containing small quantities of ethanol vapors are studied. Carbon monoxide was used to fix instable butyl cations in the form of corresponding acyl ions. Ester of α-methyl-butyric acid appears to be the only product of free butyl cation interaction with carbon monoxide in the presence of ethanol vapors. That means, that up to the moment of butyl cation reaction with carbon monoxide, the primary butyl cations are almost completely isomerized into secondary in agreement with results of previous investigations. This allows one to study free butyl cation isomerization process according to ion-molecular reaction product isomeric composition

  9. Willingness to pay for small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements for women and children: Evidence from Ghana and Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Katherine P; Vosti, Stephen A; Ayifah, Emmanuel; Phiri, Thokozani E; Adu-Afarwuah, Seth; Maleta, Kenneth; Ashorn, Ulla; Arimond, Mary; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2018-04-01

    Small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (SQ-LNS) are designed to enrich maternal and child diets with the objective of preventing undernutrition during the first 1,000 days. Scaling up the delivery of supplements such as SQ-LNS hinges on understanding private demand and creatively leveraging policy-relevant factors that might influence demand. We used longitudinal stated willingness-to-pay (WTP) data from contingent valuation studies that were integrated into randomized controlled nutrition trials in Ghana and Malawi to estimate private valuation of SQ-LNS during pregnancy, postpartum, and early childhood. We found that average stated WTP for a day's supply of SQ-LNS was more than twice as high in Ghana than Malawi, indicating that demand for SQ-LNS (and by extension, the options for effective delivery of SQ-LNS) may be very context specific. We also examined factors associated with WTP, including intervention group, household socioeconomic status, birth outcomes, child growth, and maternal and child morbidity. In both sites, WTP was consistently negatively associated with household food insecurity, indicating that subsidization might be needed to permit food insecure households to acquire SQ-LNS if it is made available for purchase. In Ghana, WTP was higher among heads of household than among mothers, which may be related to control over household resources. Personal experience using SQ-LNS was not associated with WTP in either site. © 2017 The Authors. Maternal and Child Nutrition published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Toward the establishment of standardized in vitro tests for lipid-based formulations, part 4: proposing a new lipid formulation performance classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Hywel D; Sassene, Philip; Kleberg, Karen; Calderone, Marilyn; Igonin, Annabel; Jule, Eduardo; Vertommen, Jan; Blundell, Ross; Benameur, Hassan; Müllertz, Anette; Porter, Christopher J H; Pouton, Colin W

    2014-08-01

    The Lipid Formulation Classification System Consortium looks to develop standardized in vitro tests and to generate much-needed performance criteria for lipid-based formulations (LBFs). This article highlights the value of performing a second, more stressful digestion test to identify LBFs near a performance threshold and to facilitate lead formulation selection in instances where several LBF prototypes perform adequately under standard digestion conditions (but where further discrimination is necessary). Stressed digestion tests can be designed based on an understanding of the factors that affect LBF performance, including the degree of supersaturation generated on dispersion/digestion. Stresses evaluated included decreasing LBF concentration (↓LBF), increasing bile salt, and decreasing pH. Their capacity to stress LBFs was dependent on LBF composition and drug type: ↓LBF was a stressor to medium-chain glyceride-rich LBFs, but not more hydrophilic surfactant-rich LBFs, whereas decreasing pH stressed tolfenamic acid LBFs, but not fenofibrate LBFs. Lastly, a new Performance Classification System, that is, LBF composition independent, is proposed to promote standardized LBF comparisons, encourage robust LBF development, and facilitate dialogue with the regulatory authorities. This classification system is based on the concept that performance evaluations across three in vitro tests, designed to subject a LBF to progressively more challenging conditions, will enable effective LBF discrimination and performance grading. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  11. Providing lipid-based nutrient supplement during pregnancy does not reduce the risk of maternal P falciparum parasitaemia and reproductive tract infections: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkhoma, Minyanga; Ashorn, Per; Ashorn, Ulla; Dewey, Kathryn G; Gondwe, Austrida; Mbotwa, John; Rogerson, Stephen; Taylor, Steve M; Maleta, Kenneth

    2017-01-17

    Maternal infections are associated with maternal and foetal adverse outcomes. Nutrient supplementation during pregnancy may reduce the occurrence of infections by improving maternal immunity. We aimed to investigate the impact of small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplement (SQ-LNS) on the occurrence of Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia during pregnancy and trichomoniasis, vaginal candidiasis and urinary tract infection (UTI) after delivery. Pregnant Malawian women enrolled in the iLiNS-DYAD trial receiving daily supplementation with SQ-LNS, multiple micronutrients (MMN) or iron & folic acid (IFA) from UTI using urine dipstick analysis. The prevalence of each infection by intervention group was estimated at the prescribed time points and the global null hypothesis was tested using logistic regression. Adjusted analyses were performed using preselected covariates. The prevalence of P. falciparum parasitaemia was 10.7% at 32 gw, 9% at 36 gw, and 8.3% by RDT and 20.2% by PCR at delivery. After delivery the prevalence of trichomoniasis was 10.5%, vaginal candidiasis was 0.5%, and UTI was 3.1%. There were no differences between intervention groups in the prevalence of any of the infections. In this population, SQ-LNS did not influence the occurrence of maternal P. falciparum parasitaemia, trichomoniasis, vaginal candidiasis or UTI. Identifier: NCT01239693 (10 November 2010).

  12. Enhanced microemulsion formation in lipid-based drug delivery systems by combining mono-esters of mediumchain fatty acids with di- or tri-esters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshil P. Patel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To develop strategies for selecting appropriate lipids from mono-, di- and tri-esters of medium-chain fatty acids for the development of lipid-based drug delivery systems, ternary phase diagrams of propylene glycol (PG monocaprylate (Capryol® 90; HLB~7, PG dicaprylocaprate (Labrafac™ PG; HLB~2 and glycerol tricaprylocaprate (Labrafac™ Lipophile WL1349; HLB~2 were determined in combination with a common surfactant, PEG-35 castor oil (Cremophor® EL, HLB~13, and water. Particle size and viscosity in different regions of the phase diagrams were measured, solubility of a model drug, danazol, in different lipid-surfactant mixtures was determined, and dispersion testing by diluting selected preconcentrates with 250 ml 0.01 NHCl was performed. Further, phase diagrams were constructed using binary mixtures of lipids (monoester with diester, or monoester with triester in place of single lipids. The phase diagrams of PG dicaprylocaprate and glycerol tricaprylocaprate were similar, while it was distinctly different for PG monocaprylate. The microemulsion regions in phase diagrams were rather limited for individual lipids, and additionally, the diand tri-esters showed pronounced gel regions in the phase diagrams, which could influence drug release from preconcentrates. The mixing of PG monocaprylate (monoester with PG dicaprylocaprate (diester or glycerol tricaprylocaprate (triester had dramatic effects on the performance of lipids as evidenced by the greatly reduced gel phases, much larger microemulsion regions, faster dispersion of the preconcentrates in an aqueous medium, and smaller particle size of the microemulsions subsequently formed.

  13. A new in vitro lipid digestion - in vivo absorption model to evaluate the mechanisms of drug absorption from lipid-based formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, Matthew F; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Williams, Hywel D; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2016-04-01

    In vitro lipid digestion models are commonly used to screen lipid-based formulations (LBF), but in vitro-in vivo correlations are in some cases unsuccessful. Here we enhance the scope of the lipid digestion test by incorporating an absorption 'sink' into the experimental model. An in vitro model of lipid digestion was coupled directly to a single pass in situ intestinal perfusion experiment in an anaesthetised rat. The model allowed simultaneous real-time analysis of the digestion and absorption of LBFs of fenofibrate and was employed to evaluate the influence of formulation digestion, supersaturation and precipitation on drug absorption. Formulations containing higher quantities of co-solvent and surfactant resulted in higher supersaturation and more rapid drug precipitation in vitro when compared to those containing higher quantities of lipid. In contrast, when the same formulations were examined using the coupled in vitro lipid digestion - in vivo absorption model, drug flux into the mesenteric vein was similar regardless of in vitro formulation performance. For some drugs, simple in vitro lipid digestion models may underestimate the potential for absorption from LBFs. Consistent with recent in vivo studies, drug absorption for rapidly absorbed drugs such as fenofibrate may occur even when drug precipitation is apparent during in vitro digestion.

  14. The use of quasi-isothermal modulated temperature differential scanning calorimetry for the characterization of slow crystallization processes in lipid-based solid self-emulsifying systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otun, Sarah O; Meehan, Elizabeth; Qi, Sheng; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2015-04-01

    Slow or incomplete crystallization may be a significant manufacturing issue for solid lipid-based dosage forms, yet little information is available on this phenomenon. In this investigation we suggest a novel means by which slow solidification may be monitored in Gelucire 44/14 using quasi-isothermal modulated temperature DSC (QiMTDSC). Conventional linear heating and cooling DSC methods were employed, along with hot stage microscopy (HSM), for basic thermal profiling of Gelucire 44/14. QiMTDSC experiments were performed on cooling from the melt, using a range of incremental decreases in temperature and isothermal measurement periods. DSC and HSM highlighted the main (primary) crystallization transition; solid fat content analysis and kinetic analysis were used to profile the solidification process. The heat capacity profile from QiMTDSC indicated that after an initial energetic primary crystallisation, the lipid underwent a slower period of crystallization which continued to manifest at much lower temperatures than indicated by standard DSC. We present evidence that Gelucire 44/14 undergoes an initial crystallization followed by a secondary, slower process. QIMTDSC appears to be a promising tool in the investigation of this secondary crystallization process.

  15. Stability and recovery of DNA origami structure with cation concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Wang, Ping; Liu, Yang; Liu, Ting; Xu, Yan; Zhu, Shanshan; Zhu, Jun; Ye, Kai; Huang, Guang; Dannong, He

    2018-01-01

    We synthesized triangular and rectangular DNA origami nanostructures and investigated the stability and recovery of them under low cation concentration. Our results demonstrated that the origami nanostructures would melt when incubated in low cation concentration, and recover whilst kept in the concentration for less than 10 min. However, extending the incubation time would lead to irreversible melting. Our results show the possibility of application of DNA origami nanostructures for things such as a sensor for cation concentration response, etc.

  16. REMOD: a computational tool for remodeling neuronal dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Bozelos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several modeling studies have indicated that dendritic morphology is a key determinant of how individual neurons acquire a unique signal processing profile. The highly branched dendritic structure that originates from the cell body, explores the surrounding 3D space in a fractal-like manner, until it reaches a certain amount of complexity. Its shape undergoes significant alterations not only in various neuropathological conditions, but in physiological, too. Yet, despite the profound effect that these alterations can have on neuronal function, the causal relationship between structure and function remains largely elusive. The lack of a systematic approach for remodeling neuronal cells and their dendritic trees is a key limitation that contributes to this problem. In this context, we developed a computational tool that allows the remodeling of any type of neurons, given a set of exemplar morphologies. The tool is written in Python and provides a simple GUI that guides the user through various options to manipulate selected neuronal morphologies. It provides the ability to load one or more morphology files (.swc or .hoc and choose specific dendrites to operate one of the following actions: shrink, remove, extend or branch (as shown in Figure 1. The user retains complete control over the extent of each alteration and if a chosen action is not possible due to pre-existing structural constraints, appropriate warnings are produced. Importantly, the tool can also be used to extract morphology statistics for one or multiple morphologies, including features such as the total dendritic length, path length to the root, branch order, diameter tapering, etc. Finally, an experimental utility enables the user to remodel entire dendritic trees based on preloaded statistics from a database of cell-type specific neuronal morphologies. To our knowledge, this is the first tool that allows (a the remodeling of existing –as opposed to the de novo

  17. Cigarette smoke promotes dendritic cell accumulation in COPD; a Lung Tissue Research Consortium study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Eunhee S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal immune responses are believed to be highly relevant in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Dendritic cells provide a critical checkpoint for immunity by their capacity to both induce and suppress immunity. Although evident that cigarette smoke, the primary cause of COPD, significantly influences dendritic cell functions, little is known about the roles of dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of COPD. Methods The extent of dendritic cell infiltration in COPD tissue specimens was determined using immunohistochemical localization of CD83+ cells (marker of matured myeloid dendritic cells, and CD1a+ cells (Langerhans cells. The extent of tissue infiltration with Langerhans cells was also determined by the relative expression of the CD207 gene in COPD versus control tissues. To determine mechanisms by which dendritic cells accumulate in COPD, complimentary studies were conducted using monocyte-derived human dendritic cells exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE, and dendritic cells extracted from mice chronically exposed to cigarette smoke. Results In human COPD lung tissue, we detected a significant increase in the total number of CD83+ cells, and significantly higher amounts of CD207 mRNA when compared with control tissue. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells exposed to CSE (0.1-2% exhibited enhanced survival in vitro when compared with control dendritic cells. Murine dendritic cells extracted from mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks, also demonstrated enhanced survival compared to dendritic cells extracted from control mice. Acute exposure of human dendritic cells to CSE induced the cellular pro-survival proteins heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1, and B cell lymphoma leukemia-x(L (Bcl-xL, predominantly through oxidative stress. Although activated human dendritic cells conditioned with CSE expressed diminished migratory CCR7 expression, their migration towards the CCR7 ligand CCL21 was not

  18. Dendritic thickness: a morphometric parameter to classify mouse retinal ganglion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.D. Loopuijt

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available To study the dendritic morphology of retinal ganglion cells in wild-type mice we intracellularly injected these cells with Lucifer yellow in an in vitro preparation of the retina. Subsequently, quantified values of dendritic thickness, number of branching points and level of stratification of 73 Lucifer yellow-filled ganglion cells were analyzed by statistical methods, resulting in a classification into 9 groups. The variables dendritic thickness, number of branching points per cell and level of stratification were independent of each other. Number of branching points and level of stratification were independent of eccentricity, whereas dendritic thickness was positively dependent (r = 0.37 on it. The frequency distribution of dendritic thickness tended to be multimodal, indicating the presence of at least two cell populations composed of neurons with dendritic diameters either smaller or larger than 1.8 µm ("thin" or "thick" dendrites, respectively. Three cells (4.5% were bistratified, having thick dendrites, and the others (95.5% were monostratified. Using k-means cluster analysis, monostratified cells with either thin or thick dendrites were further subdivided according to level of stratification and number of branching points: cells with thin dendrites were divided into 2 groups with outer stratification (0-40% and 2 groups with inner (50-100% stratification, whereas cells with thick dendrites were divided into one group with outer and 3 groups with inner stratification. We postulate, that one group of cells with thin dendrites resembles cat ß-cells, whereas one group of cells with thick dendrites includes cells that resemble cat a-cells.

  19. Spiny Neurons of Amygdala, Striatum and Cortex Use Dendritic Plateau Potentials to Detect Network UP States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina D Oikonomou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spiny neurons of amygdala, striatum, and cerebral cortex share four interesting features: [1] they are the most abundant cell type within their respective brain area, [2] covered by thousands of thorny protrusions (dendritic spines, [3] possess high levels of dendritic NMDA conductances, and [4] experience sustained somatic depolarizations in vivo and in vitro (UP states. In all spiny neurons of the forebrain, adequate glutamatergic inputs generate dendritic plateau potentials (dendritic UP states characterized by (i fast rise, (ii plateau phase lasting several hundred milliseconds and (iii abrupt decline at the end of the plateau phase. The dendritic plateau potential propagates towards the cell body decrementally to induce a long-lasting (longer than 100 ms, most often 200 – 800 ms steady depolarization (~20 mV amplitude, which resembles a neuronal UP state. Based on voltage-sensitive dye imaging, the plateau depolarization in the soma is precisely time-locked to the regenerative plateau potential taking place in the dendrite. The somatic plateau rises after the onset of the dendritic voltage transient and collapses with the breakdown of the dendritic plateau depolarization. We hypothesize that neuronal UP states in vivo reflect the occurrence of dendritic plateau potentials (dendritic UP states. We propose that the somatic voltage waveform during a neuronal UP state is determined by dendritic plateau potentials. A mammalian spiny neuron uses dendritic plateau potentials to detect and transform coherent network activity into a ubiquitous neuronal UP state. The biophysical properties of dendritic plateau potentials allow neurons to quickly attune to the ongoing network activity, as well as secure the stable amplitudes of successive UP states.

  20. Endothelial cell-derived microparticles induce plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation: potential implications in inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelot, Fanny; Seillès, Estelle; Biichlé, Sabeha; Berda, Yael; Gaugler, Béatrice; Plumas, Joel; Chaperot, Laurence; Dignat-George, Françoise; Tiberghien, Pierre; Saas, Philippe; Garnache-Ottou, Francine

    2009-11-01

    Increased circulating endothelial microparticles, resulting from vascular endothelium dysfunction, and plasmacytoid dendritic cell activation are both encountered in common inflammatory disorders. The aim of our study was to determine whether interactions between endothelial microparticles and plasmacytoid dendritic cells could contribute to such pathologies. Microparticles generated from endothelial cell lines, platelets or activated T cells were incubated with human plasmacytoid dendritic cells sorted from healthy donor blood or with monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Dendritic cell maturation was evaluated by flow cytometry, cytokine secretion as well as naive T-cell activation and polarization. Labeled microparticles were also used to study cellular interactions. Endothelial microparticles induced plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation. In contrast, conventional dendritic cells were resistant to endothelial microparticle-induced maturation. In addition to upregulation of co-stimulatory molecules, endothelial microparticle-matured plasmacytoid dendritic cells secreted inflammatory cytokines (interleukins 6 and 8, but no interferon-alpha) and also induced allogeneic naive CD4(+) T cells to proliferate and to produce type 1 cytokines such as interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Endothelial microparticle endocytosis by plasmacytoid dendritic cells appeared to be required for plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation. Importantly, the ability of endothelial microparticles to induce plasmacytoid dendritic cells to mature was specific as microparticles derived from activated T cells or platelets (the major source of circulating microparticules in healthy subjects) did not induce such plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation. Our data show that endothelial microparticles specifically induce plasmacytoid dendritic cell maturation and production of inflammatory cytokines. This novel activation pathway may be implicated in various inflammatory disorders and

  1. Cationic amino acid transporter 2 enhances innate immunity during Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Barry

    Full Text Available Once acquired, Helicobacter pylori infection is lifelong due to an inadequate innate and adaptive immune response. Our previous studies indicate that interactions among the various pathways of arginine metabolism in the host are critical determinants of outcomes following infection. Cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2 is essential for transport of L-arginine (L-Arg into monocytic immune cells during H. pylori infection. Once within the cell, this amino acid is utilized by opposing pathways that lead to elaboration of either bactericidal nitric oxide (NO produced from inducible NO synthase (iNOS, or hydrogen peroxide, which causes macrophage apoptosis, via arginase and the polyamine pathway. Because of its central role in controlling L-Arg availability in macrophages, we investigated the importance of CAT2 in vivo during H. pylori infection. CAT2(-/- mice infected for 4 months exhibited decreased gastritis and increased levels of colonization compared to wild type mice. We observed suppression of gastric macrophage levels, macrophage expression of iNOS, dendritic cell activation, and expression of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in CAT2(-/- mice suggesting that CAT2 is involved in enhancing the innate immune response. In addition, cytokine expression in CAT2(-/- mice was altered from an antimicrobial Th1 response to a Th2 response, indicating that the transporter has downstream effects on adaptive immunity as well. These findings demonstrate that CAT2 is an important regulator of the immune response during H. pylori infection.

  2. Cation depletion by the sodium pump in red cells with pathologic cation leaks. Sickle cells and xerocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Joiner, C H; Platt, O S; Lux, S E

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism by which sickle cells and xerocytic red cells become depleted of cations in vivo has not been identified previously. Both types of cells exhibit elevated permeabilities to sodium and potassium, in the case of sickle cells, when deoxygenated. The ouabain-insensitive fluxes of sodium and potassium were equivalent, however, in both cell types under these conditions. When incubated 18 hours in vitro, sickle cells lost cations but only when deoxygenated. This cation depletion was blo...

  3. Dendritic spine pathology in autism: lessons learned from mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiangge Zhang; Dingxi Zhou; Guoping Feng

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders that affect up to 1.5% of population in the world. Recent large scale genomic studies show that genetic causes of ASD are very heterogeneous. Gene ontology, pathway analysis and animal model studies have revealed several potential converging mechanisms including postsynaptic dysfunction of excitatory synapses. In this review, we focus on the structural and functional specializations of dendritic spines, and describe their defects in ASD. We use Fragile X syndrome, Rett syndrome and Phe-lan-McDermid syndrome, three of the most studied neurodevelopmental disorders with autism features, as examples to demonstrate the significant contribution made by mouse models towards the understanding of monogenic ASD. We envision that the development and application of new technologies to study the function of dendritic spines in valid animal models will eventually lead to innovative treatments for ASD.

  4. Suppressing Lithium Dendrite Growth with a Single-Component Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haodong; Zhou, Hongyao; Lee, Byoung-Sun; Xing, Xing; Gonzalez, Matthew; Liu, Ping

    2017-09-13

    A single-component coating was formed on lithium (Li) metal in a lithium iodide/organic carbonate [dimethyl carbonate (DMC) and ethylene carbonate (EC)] electrolyte. LiI chemically reacts with DMC to form lithium methyl carbonate (LMC), which precipitates and forms the chemically homogeneous coating layer on the Li surface. This coating layer is shown to enable dendrite-free Li cycling in a symmetric Li∥Li cell even at a current density of 3 mA cm -2 . Adding EC to DMC modulates the formation of LMC, resulting in a stable coating layer that is essential for long-term Li cycling stability. Furthermore, the coating can enable dendrite-free cycling after being transferred to common LiPF 6 /carbonate electrolytes, which are compatible with metal oxide cathodes.

  5. EphB/syndecan-2 signaling in dendritic spine morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethell, I M; Irie, F; Kalo, M S

    2001-01-01

    We previously reported that the cell surface proteoglycan syndecan-2 can induce dendritic spine formation in hippocampal neurons. We demonstrate here that the EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylates syndecan-2 and that this phosphorylation event is crucial for syndecan-2 clustering and spine...... formation. Syndecan-2 is tyrosine phosphorylated and forms a complex with EphB2 in mouse brain. Dominant-negative inhibition of endogenous EphB receptor activities blocks clustering of endogenous syndecan-2 and normal spine formation in cultured hippocampal neurons. This is the first evidence that Eph...... receptors play a physiological role in dendritic spine morphogenesis. Our observations suggest that spine morphogenesis is triggered by the activation of Eph receptors, which causes tyrosine phosphorylation of target molecules, such as syndecan-2, in presumptive spines....

  6. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: report of two pediatric cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmani, Preeti Ashok; Mittal, Neha Manish; Subramanian, P G; Galani, Komal; Badrinath, Yajamanam; Amare, Pratibha; Gujral, Sumeet

    2015-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare subtype of acute leukemia that typically follows a highly aggressive clinical course in adults, whereas experience in children with this disease is very limited. We report cases of two children in whom bone marrow showed infiltration by large atypical monocytoid 'blast-like' cells which on immunophenotyping expressed CD4, CD56, HLA-DR and CD33 while were negative for CD34 other T-cell, B-cell and myeloid markers. The differential diagnoses considered were AML, T/NK-cell leukemia and acute undifferentiated leukemia. Additional markers CD303/BDCA-2 and CD123 which are recently validated plasmacytoid dendritic cell markers were done which helped us clinch the diagnosis of this rare neoplasm. An accurate diagnosis of BPDCN is essential in order to provide prompt treatment. Due to its rarity and only recent recognition as a distinct clinicopathological entity, no standardized therapeutic approach has been established for BPDCN.

  7. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal models used for analyzing dendritic web growth and calculating the thermal stress were reexamined to establish the validity limits imposed by the assumptions of the models. Also, the effects of thermal conduction through the gas phase were evaluated and found to be small. New growth designs, both static and dynamic, were generated using the modeling results. Residual stress effects in dendritic web were examined. In the laboratory, new techniques for the control of temperature distributions in three dimensions were developed. A new maximum undeformed web width of 5.8 cm was achieved. A 58% increase in growth velocity of 150 micrometers thickness was achieved with dynamic hardware. The area throughput goals for transient growth of 30 and 35 sq cm/min were exceeded.

  8. Numerical model for dendritic solidification of binary alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicelli, S. D.; Heinrich, J. C.; Poirier, D. R.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element model capable of simulating solidification of binary alloys and the formation of freckles is presented. It uses a single system of equations to deal with the all-liquid region, the dendritic region, and the all-solid region. The dendritic region is treated as an anisotropic porous medium. The algorithm uses the bilinear isoparametric element, with a penalty function approximation and a Petrov-Galerkin formulation. Numerical simulations are shown in which an NH4Cl-H2O mixture and a Pb-Sn alloy melt are cooled. The solidification process is followed in time. Instabilities in the process can be clearly observed and the final compositions obtained.

  9. Synaptic clustering within dendrites: an emerging theory of memory formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastellakis, George; Cai, Denise J.; Mednick, Sara C.; Silva, Alcino J.; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that complex memories are stored in distributed representations throughout the brain, however the mechanisms underlying these representations are not understood. Here, we review recent findings regarding the subcellular mechanisms implicated in memory formation, which provide evidence for a dendrite-centered theory of memory. Plasticity-related phenomena which affect synaptic properties, such as synaptic tagging and capture, synaptic clustering, branch strength potentiation and spinogenesis provide the foundation for a model of memory storage that relies heavily on processes operating at the dendrite level. The emerging picture suggests that clusters of functionally related synapses may serve as key computational and memory storage units in the brain. We discuss both experimental evidence and theoretical models that support this hypothesis and explore its advantages for neuronal function. PMID:25576663

  10. Predicting Organic Cation Sorption Coefficients: Accounting for Competition from Sorbed Inorganic Cations Using a Simple Probe Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolin, William C; Goyetche, Reaha; Carter, Katherine; Medina, John; Vasudevan, Dharni; MacKay, Allison A

    2017-06-06

    With the increasing number of emerging contaminants that are cationic at environmentally relevant pH values, there is a need for robust predictive models of organic cation sorption coefficients (K d ). Current predictive models fail to account for the differences in the identity, abundance, and affinity of surface-associated inorganic exchange ions naturally present at negatively charged receptor sites on environmental solids. To better understand how organic cation sorption is influenced by surface-associated inorganic exchange ions, sorption coefficients of 10 organic cations (including eight pharmaceuticals and two simple probe organic amines) were determined for six homoionic forms of the aluminosilicate mineral, montmorillonite. Organic cation sorption coefficients exhibited consistent trends for all compounds across the various homoionic clays with sorption coefficients (K d ) decreasing as follows: K d Na + > K d NH 4 + ≥ K d K + > K d Ca 2+ ≥ K d Mg 2+ > K d Al 3+ . This trend for competition between organic cations and exchangeable inorganic cations is consistent with the inorganic cation selectivity sequence, determined for exchange between inorganic ions. Such consistent trends in competition between organic and inorganic cations suggested that a simple probe cation, such as phenyltrimethylammonium or benzylamine, could capture soil-to-soil variations in native inorganic cation identity and abundance for the prediction of organic cation sorption to soils and soil minerals. Indeed, sorption of two pharmaceutical compounds to 30 soils was better described by phenyltrimethylammonium sorption than by measures of benzylamine sorption, effective cation exchange capacity alone, or a model from the literature (Droge, S., and Goss, K. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2013, 47, 14224). A hybrid approach integrating structural scaling factors derived from this literature model of organic cation sorption, along with phenyltrimethylammonium K d values, allowed for

  11. Plastic deformation of silicon dendritic web ribbons during the growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L. J.; Dumas, K. A.; Su, B. M.; Leipold, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of slip dislocations in silicon dendritic web ribbons due to plastic deformation during the cooling phase of the growth was studied. The results show the existence of two distinguishable stress regions across the ribbon formed during the plastic deformation stage, namely, shear stress at the ribbon edges and tensile stress at the middle. In addition, slip dislocations caused by shear stress near the edges appear to originate at the twin plane.

  12. Solute redistribution in dendritic solidification with diffusion in the solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, S.; Poirier, D. R.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of solute redistribution during dendritic solidification with diffusion in the solid has been performed using numerical techniques. The extent of diffusion is characterized by the instantaneous and average diffusion parameters. These parameters are functions of the diffusion Fourier number, the partition ratio and the fraction solid. Numerical results are presented as an approximate model, which is used to predict the average diffusion parameter and calculate the composition of the interdendritic liquid during solidification.

  13. Prospective Clinical Testing of Regulatory Dendritic Cells in Organ Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Thomson, Angus W.; Zahorchak, Alan F.; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Metes, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are rare, professional antigen-presenting cells with ability to induce or regulate alloimmune responses. Regulatory DC (DCreg) with potential to down-modulate acute and chronic inflammatory conditions that occur in organ transplantation can be generated in vitro under a variety of conditions. Here, we provide a rationale for evaluation of DCreg therapy in clinical organ transplantation with the goal of promoting sustained, donor-specific hyporesponsiveness, while lowering...

  14. Computational study of cation substitutions in apatites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamm, Toomas; Peld, Merike

    2006-01-01

    Density-functional theory plane-wave modeling of fluor- and hydroxyapatites has been performed, where one or two calcium ions per unit cell were replaced with cadmium or zinc cations. It was found that cadmium ions favor Ca(1) positions in fluorapatites and Ca(2) positions in hydroxyapatites, in agreement with experiment. A similar pattern is predicted for zinc substitutions. In the doubly substituted cases, where only hydroxyapatites were modeled, a preference for the substituting ions to be located in Ca(2) position was also observed. Displacement of the hydroxide ions from their symmetrical positions on the hexagonal axis can be used to explain the preferred configurations of substituting ions around the axis. -- Deformation of the hydroxide ion chain due to substitutions around the ion channel in substituted hydroxyapatites

  15. Retention of Cationic Starch onto Cellulose Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaoui, Mohamed; Mauret, Evelyne; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur

    2008-08-01

    Three methods of cationic starch titration were used to quantify its retention on cellulose fibres, namely: (i) the complexation of CS with iodine and measurement of the absorbency of the ensuing blue solution by UV-vis spectroscopy; (ii) hydrolysis of the starch macromolecules followed by the conversion of the resulting sugars to furan-based molecules and quantifying the ensuing mixture by measuring their absorbance at a Ι of 490 nm, using the same technique as previous one and; finally (iii) hydrolysis of starch macromolecules by trifluoro-acetic acid and quantification of the sugars in the resulting hydrolysates by high performance liquid chromatography. The three methods were found to give similar results within the range of CS addition from 0 to 50 mg per g of cellulose fibres.

  16. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Dehlendorff, Christian; Vind, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD) library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We...... then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients...... with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any...

  17. Use of a material conducting hydrogen cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, A.T.; Shilton, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The invention concerns a separator conducting hydrogenous for electrical devices, which contains at least one compound with the formula H(UO 2 )PO 4 x nH 2 O, H(UO 2 )AsO 4 x nH 2 O or H(UO 2 )IO 4 (OH) 2 x nH 2 O, where not more than 50% by weight of the H + is replaced by one or more cations, such as Li + , Na + , K + , NH 4 + , Cu 2+ , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , Ba 2+ , Sr 2+ , Pb 2+ , Fe 2+ , Co 2+ , Ni 2+ , Mn 2+ or Al 3+ . The electrical device having the separator can be an electrolysis cell, for example, an electro chromium cell. (H x WO 3 ), a hydrogen isotope enrichment device, a proton-sensitive electrode (eg for a pH meter), a battery or a fuel cell. (orig./MM) [de

  18. A Cationic Smart Copolymer for DNA Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Ribeiro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A new block copolymer with a temperature-responsive block and a cationic block was prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT polymerization, with good control of its size and composition. The first block is composed by di(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (DEGMA and oligo(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (OEGMA, with the ratio DEGMA/OEGMA being used to choose the volume phase transition temperature of the polymer in water, tunable from ca. 25 to above 90 °C. The second block, of trimethyl-2-methacroyloxyethylammonium chloride (TMEC, is positively charged at physiological pH values and is used for DNA binding. The coacervate complexes between the block copolymer and a model single strand DNA are characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. The new materials offer good prospects for biomedical application, for example in controlled gene delivery.

  19. Hydration Structure of the Quaternary Ammonium Cations

    KAUST Repository

    Babiaczyk, Wojtek Iwo

    2010-11-25

    Two indicators of the hydropathicity of small solutes are introduced and tested by molecular dynamics simulations. These indicators are defined as probabilities of the orientation of water molecules\\' dipoles and hydrogen bond vectors, conditional on a generalized distance from the solute suitable for arbitrarily shaped molecules. Using conditional probabilities, it is possible to distinguish features of the distributions in close proximity of the solute. These regions contain the most significant information on the hydration structure but cannot be adequately represented by using, as is usually done, joint distance-angle probability densities. Our calculations show that using our indicators a relative hydropathicity scale for the interesting test set of the quaternary ammonium cations can be roughly determined. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  20. Calixarenes synthesized for seducing and trapping cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dozol, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Calixarenes are known to be selective extractants for cesium radioactive cations. This liquid-liquid extraction is still to be studied and would allow to reduce the volume of years living radioactive wastes before they were stored and perhaps to remove then the cesium by transmutation. Calixarenes are macrocycles with phenolic units bridged by methylene groups. They have the important property to have a flexible structure. On this basic structure, all kinds of chemical functions can be branched. They thus confer particular properties to the molecule. A computerized virtual construction phase of molecules is actually studied in order to optimize the extraction. It is currently known that with small modifications it will be possible to selectively extract heavy metals (Hg, Cd..) coming from industrial pollution. (O.M.)

  1. Safety evaluation of cation-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1977-08-01

    Results are presented of a study to evaluate whether sufficient information is available to establish conservative limits for the safe use of cation-exchange resins in separating radionuclides and, if not, to recommend what new data should be acquired. The study was also an attempt to identify in-line analytical techniques for the evaluation of resin degradation during radionuclide processing. The report is based upon a review of the published literature and upon discussions with many people engaged in the use of these resins. It was concluded that the chief hazard in the use of cation-exchange resins for separating radionuclides is a thermal explosion if nitric acid or other strong oxidants are present in the process solution. Thermal explosions can be avoided by limiting process parameters so that the rates of heat and gas generation in the system do not exceed the rates for their transfer to the surroundings. Such parameters include temperature, oxidant concentration, the amounts of possible catalysts, the radiation dose absorbed by the resin and the diameter of the resin column. Current information is not sufficient to define safe upper limits for these parameters. They can be evaluated, however, from equations derived from the Frank-Kamenetskii theory of thermal explosions provided the heat capacities, thermal conductivities and rates of heat evolution in the relevant resin-oxidant mixtures are known. It is recommended that such measurements be made and the appropriate limits be evaluated. A list of additional safety precautions are also presented to aid in the application of these limits and to provide additional margins of safety. In-line evaluation of resin degradation to assess its safety hazard is considered impractical. Rather, it is recommended that the resin be removed from use before it has received the limiting radiation dose, evaluated as described above

  2. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Tolaymat, Thabet

    2016-01-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag"+ under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10–15 nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5 mg L"−"1, the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100 mg L"−"1 as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag"+. Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100 mg L"−"1 as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • At concentrations -1 the anaerobic decomposition process was not impacted. • An impact on the microbial community at concentrations -1 were observed. • At high concentrations (100 mg L"−"1), the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity. • Toxicity was demonstrated without the presence of oxidative dissolution of silver. • A one size fits all approach for the evaluation of NPs may not be accurate.

  3. Overview of the Tusas Code for Simulation of Dendritic Solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trainer, Amelia J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Newman, Christopher Kyle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Francois, Marianne M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-07

    The aim of this project is to conduct a parametric investigation into the modeling of two dimensional dendrite solidification, using the phase field model. Specifically, we use the Tusas code, which is for coupled heat and phase-field simulation of dendritic solidification. Dendritic solidification, which may occur in the presence of an unstable solidification interface, results in treelike microstructures that often grow perpendicular to the rest of the growth front. The interface may become unstable if the enthalpy of the solid material is less than that of the liquid material, or if the solute is less soluble in solid than it is in liquid, potentially causing a partition [1]. A key motivation behind this research is that a broadened understanding of phase-field formulation and microstructural developments can be utilized for macroscopic simulations of phase change. This may be directly implemented as a part of the Telluride project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), through which a computational additive manufacturing simulation tool is being developed, ultimately to become part of the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program within the U.S. Department of Energy [2].

  4. Evaluation of two different dendritic cell preparations with BCG reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fol Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a key-role in the immune response against intracellular bacterial pathogens, including mycobacteria. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs are considered to behave as inflammatory cell populations. Different immunomagnetic methods (positive and negative can be used to purify monocytes before their in vitro differentiation and their culture behavior can be expected to be different. In this study we evaluated the reactivity of two dendritic cell populations towards the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG antigen. Monocytes were obtained from the blood of healthy donors, using positive and negative immunomagnetic separation methods. The expression of DC-SIGN, CD86, CD80, HLA-DR and CD40 on MoDCs was estimated by flow cytometry. The level of IL-12p70, IL-10 and TNF-α was measured by ELISA. Neither of the tested methods affected the surface marker expression of DCs. No significant alteration in immunological response, measured by cytokine production, was noted either. After BCG stimulation, the absence of IL-12, but the IL-23 production was observed in both cell preparations. Positive and negative magnetic separation methods are effective techniques to optimize the preparation of monocytes as the source of MoDCs for potential clinical application.

  5. Dextromethorphan Inhibits Activations and Functions in Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Yuan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play an important role in connecting innate and adaptive immunity. Thus, DCs have been regarded as a major target for the development of immunomodulators. In this study, we examined the effect of dextromethorphan (DXM, a common cough suppressant with a high safety profile, on the activation and function of DCs. In the presence of DXM, the LPS-induced expression of the costimulatory molecules in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs was significantly suppressed. In addition, DXM treatment reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines in maturing BMDCs that were activated by LPS. Therefore, DXM abrogated the ability of LPS-stimulated DCs to induce Ag-specific T-cell activation, as determined by their decreased proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in mixed leukocyte cultures. Moreover, the inhibition of LPS-induced MAPK activation and NF-κB translocation may contribute to the suppressive effect of DXM on BMDCs. Remarkably, DXM decreased the LPS-induced surface expression of CD80, CD83, and HLA-DR and the secretion of IL-6 and IL-12 in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs. These findings provide a new insight into the impact of DXM treatment on DCs and suggest that DXM has the potential to be used in treating DC-related acute and chronic diseases.

  6. Anti tumor vaccination with hybrid dendritic-tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbuto, Jose Alexandre M.; Neves, Andreia R.; Ensina, Luis Felipe C.; Anselmo, Luciene B.

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the most potent antigen-presenting cells, and the possibility of their use for cancer vaccination has renewed the interest in this therapeutic modality. Nevertheless, the ideal immunization protocol with these cells has not been described yet. In this paper we describe the preliminary results of a protocol using autologous tumor and allogeneic dendritic hybrid cell vaccination every 6 weeks, for metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients. Thirty-five patients were enrolled between March 2001 and March 2003. Though all patients included presented with large tumor burdens and progressive diseases, 71% of them experienced stability after vaccination, with durations up to 19 months. Among RCC patients 3/22 (14%) presented objective responses. The median time to progression was 4 months for melanoma and 5.7 months for RCC patients; no significant untoward effects were noted. Furthermore, immune function, as evaluated by cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens and by peripheral blood proliferative responses to tumor-specific and nonspecific stimuli, presented a clear tendency to recover in vaccinated patients. These data indicate that dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrid vaccination affects the natural history of advanced cancer and provide support for its study in less advanced patients, who should, more likely, benefit even more from this approach. (author)

  7. Dendritic cell fate is determined by BCL11A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Gregory C.; Dekker, Joseph D.; Wang, Yui-Hsi; Lee, Bum-Kyu; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Lin, Jian; Wall, Jason K.; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Staudt, Louis M.; Liu, Yong-Jun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tucker, Haley O.

    2014-01-01

    The plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) is vital to the coordinated action of innate and adaptive immunity. pDC development has not been unequivocally traced, nor has its transcriptional regulatory network been fully clarified. Here we confirm an essential requirement for the BCL11A transcription factor in fetal pDC development, and demonstrate this lineage-specific requirement in the adult organism. Furthermore, we identify BCL11A gene targets and provide a molecular mechanism for its action in pDC commitment. Embryonic germ-line deletion of Bcl11a revealed an absolute cellular, molecular, and functional absence of pDCs in fetal mice. In adults, deletion of Bcl11a in hematopoietic stem cells resulted in perturbed yet continued generation of progenitors, loss of downstream pDC and B-cell lineages, and persisting myeloid, conventional dendritic, and T-cell lineages. Challenge with virus resulted in a marked reduction of antiviral response in conditionally deleted adults. Genome-wide analyses of BCL11A DNA binding and expression revealed that BCL11A regulates transcription of E2-2 and other pDC differentiation modulators, including ID2 and MTG16. Our results identify BCL11A as an essential, lineage-specific factor that regulates pDC development, supporting a model wherein differentiation into pDCs represents a primed “default” pathway for common dendritic cell progenitors. PMID:24591644

  8. Mucolipin 1 positively regulates TLR7 responses in dendritic cells by facilitating RNA transportation to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobing; Saitoh, Shin-Ichiroh; Shibata, Takuma; Tanimura, Natsuko; Fukui, Ryutaro; Miyake, Kensuke

    2015-02-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and TLR9 sense microbial single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) and ssDNA in endolysosomes. Nucleic acid (NA)-sensing in endolysosomes is thought to be important for avoiding TLR7/9 responses to self-derived NAs. Aberrant self-derived NA transportation to endolysosomes predisposes to autoimmune diseases. To restrict NA-sensing in endolysosomes, TLR7/9 trafficking is tightly controlled by a multiple transmembrane protein Unc93B1. In contrast to TLR7/9 trafficking, little is known about a mechanism underlying NA transportation. We here show that Mucolipin 1 (Mcoln1), a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel gene family, has an important role in ssRNA trafficking into lysosomes. Mcoln1(-/-) dendritic cells (DCs) showed impaired TLR7 responses to ssRNA. A mucolipin agonist specifically enhanced TLR7 responses to ssRNAs. The channel activity of Mcoln1 is activated by a phospholipid phosphatidylinositol (3,5) bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2), which is generated by a class III lipid kinase PIKfyve. A PIKfyve inhibitor completely inhibited TLR7 responses to ssRNA in DCs. Confocal analyses showed that ssRNA transportation to lysosomes in DCs was impaired by PIKfyve inhibitor as well as by the lack of Mcoln1. Transportation of TLR9 ligands was also impaired by the PIKfyve inhibitor. These results demonstrate that the PtdIns(3,5)P2-Mcoln1 axis has an important role in ssRNA transportation into lysosomes in DCs. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Immunogenic Properties of a BCG Adjuvanted Chitosan Nanoparticle-Based Dengue Vaccine in Human Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taweewun Hunsawong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENVs are among the most rapidly and efficiently spreading arboviruses. WHO recently estimated that about half of the world's population is now at risk for DENV infection. There is no specific treatment or vaccine available to treat or prevent DENV infections. Here, we report the development of a novel dengue nanovaccine (DNV composed of UV-inactivated DENV-2 (UVI-DENV and Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin cell wall components (BCG-CWCs loaded into chitosan nanoparticles (CS-NPs. CS-NPs were prepared by an emulsion polymerization method prior to loading of the BCG-CWCs and UVI-DENV components. Using a scanning electron microscope and a zetasizer, DNV was determined to be of spherical shape with a diameter of 372.0 ± 11.2 nm in average and cationic surface properties. The loading efficacies of BCG-CWCs and UVI-DENV into the CS-NPs and BCG-CS-NPs were up to 97.2 and 98.4%, respectively. THP-1 cellular uptake of UVI-DENV present in the DNV was higher than soluble UVI-DENV alone. DNV stimulation of immature dendritic cells (iDCs resulted in a significantly higher expression of DCs maturation markers (CD80, CD86 and HLA-DR and induction of various cytokine and chemokine productions than in UVI-DENV-treated iDCs, suggesting a potential use of BCG- CS-NPs as adjuvant and delivery system for dengue vaccines.

  10. Xenopus laevis Retinal Ganglion Cell Dendritic Arbors Develop Independently of Visual Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Lom

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Newly formed neurons must locate their appropriate target cells and then form synaptic connections with these targets in order to establish a functional nervous system. In the vertebrate retina, retinal ganglion cell (RGC dendrites extend from the cell body and form synapses with nearby amacrine and bipolar cells. RGC axons, however, exit the retina and synapse with the dendrites of midbrain neurons in the optic tectum. We examined how visual stimulation influenced Xenopus RGC dendritic arborization. Neuronal activity is known to be an important factor in shaping dendritic and axonal arborization. Thus, we reared tadpoles in dark and light environments then used rhodamine dextran retrograde labeling to identify RGCs in the retina. When we compared RGC dendritic arbors from tadpoles reared in dark and light environments, we found no morphological differences, suggesting that physiological visual activity did not contribute to the morphological development of Xenopus RGC dendritic arbors.

  11. Sarcomeres pattern proprioceptive sensory dendritic endings through Perlecan/UNC-52 in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xing; Dong, Xintong; Moerman, Donald G.; Shen, Kang; Wang, Xiangming

    2015-01-01

    Sensory dendrites innervate peripheral tissues through cell-cell interactions that are poorly understood. The proprioceptive neuron PVD in C. elegans extends regular terminal dendritic branches between muscle and hypodermis. We found that the PVD branch pattern was instructed by adhesion molecule SAX-7/L1CAM, which formed regularly spaced stripes on the hypodermal cell. The regularity of the SAX-7 pattern originated from the repeated and regularly spaced dense body of the sarcomeres in the muscle. The extracellular proteoglycan, UNC-52/Perlecan, links the dense body to the hemidesmosome on the hypodermal cells, which in turn instructed the SAX-7 stripes and PVD dendrites. Both UNC-52 and hemidesmosome components exhibited highly regular stripes that interdigitated with the SAX-7 stripe and PVD dendrites, reflecting the striking precision of subcellular patterning between muscle, hypodermis and dendrites. Hence, the muscular contractile apparatus provides the instructive cues to pattern proprioceptive dendrites. PMID:25982673

  12. Multiple modes of action potential initiation and propagation in mitral cell primary dendrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wei R; Shen, Gongyu Y; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2002-01-01

    recordings with computational modeling to analyze action-potential initiation and propagation in the primary dendrite. In response to depolarizing current injection or distal olfactory nerve input, fast Na(+) action potentials were recorded along the entire length of the primary dendritic trunk. With weak......-to-moderate olfactory nerve input, an action potential was initiated near the soma and then back-propagated into the primary dendrite. As olfactory nerve input increased, the initiation site suddenly shifted to the distal primary dendrite. Multi-compartmental modeling indicated that this abrupt shift of the spike......-initiation site reflected an independent thresholding mechanism in the distal dendrite. When strong olfactory nerve excitation was paired with strong inhibition to the mitral cell basal secondary dendrites, a small fast prepotential was recorded at the soma, which indicated that an action potential was initiated...

  13. Organic cation rhodamines for screening organic cation transporters in early stages of drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugwu, Malachy C; Oli, Angus; Esimone, Charles O; Agu, Remigius U

    The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of rhodamine-123, rhodamine-6G and rhodamine B as non-radioactive probes for characterizing organic cation transporters in respiratory cells. Fluorescent characteristics of the compounds were validated under standard in vitro drug transport conditions (buffers, pH, and light). Uptake/transport kinetics and intracellular accumulation of the compounds were investigated. Uptake/transport mechanisms were investigated by comparing the effect of pH, temperature, concentration, polarity, OCTs/OCTNs inhibitors/substrates, and metabolic inhibitors on the cationic dyes uptake in Calu-3 cells. Fluorescence stability and intensity of the compounds were altered by buffer composition, light, and pH. Uptake of the dyes was concentration-, temperature- and pH-dependent. OCTs/OCTNs inhibitors significantly reduced intracellular accumulation of the compounds. Whereas rhodamine-B uptake was sodium-dependent, pH had no effect on rhodamine-123 and rhodamine-6G uptake. Transport of the dyes across the cells was polarized: (AP→BL>BL→AP transport) and saturable: {V max =14.08±2.074, K m =1821±380.4 (rhodamine-B); V max =6.555±0.4106, K m =1353±130.4 (rhodamine-123) and V max =0.3056±0.01402, K m =702.9±60.97 (rhodamine-6G)}. The dyes were co-localized with MitoTracker®, the mitochondrial marker. Cationic rhodamines, especially rhodamine-B and rhodamine- 6G can be used as organic cation transporter substrates in respiratory cells. During such studies, buffer selection, pH and light exposure should be taken into consideration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Linear growth increased in young children in an urban slum of Haiti: a randomized controlled trial of a lipid-based nutrient supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannotti, Lora L; Dulience, Sherlie Jean Louis; Green, Jamie; Joseph, Saminetha; François, Judith; Anténor, Marie-Lucie; Lesorogol, Carolyn; Mounce, Jacqueline; Nickerson, Nathan M

    2014-01-01

    Haiti has experienced rapid urbanization that has exacerbated poverty and undernutrition in large slum areas. Stunting affects 1 in 5 young children. We aimed to test the efficacy of a daily lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) for increased linear growth in young children. Healthy, singleton infants aged 6-11 mo (n = 589) were recruited from an urban slum of Cap Haitien and randomly assigned to receive: 1) a control; 2) a 3-mo LNS; or 3) a 6-mo LNS. The LNS provided 108 kcal and other nutrients including vitamin A, vitamin B-12, iron, and zinc at ≥80% of the recommended amounts. Infants were followed monthly on growth, morbidity, and developmental outcomes over a 6-mo intervention period and at one additional time point 6 mo postintervention to assess sustained effects. The Bonferroni multiple comparisons test was applied, and generalized least-squares (GLS) regressions with mixed effects was used to examine impacts longitudinally. Baseline characteristics did not differ by trial arm except for a higher mean age in the 6-mo LNS group. GLS modeling showed LNS supplementation for 6 mo significantly increased the length-for-age z score (±SE) by 0.13 ± 0.05 and the weight-for-age z score by 0.12 ± 0.02 compared with in the control group after adjustment for child age (P < 0.001). The effects were sustained 6 mo postintervention. Morbidity and developmental outcomes did not differ by trial arm. A low-energy, fortified product improved the linear growth of young children in this urban setting. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01552512.

  15. Feeding behaviors during home-based treatment of moderate acute malnutrition using corn-soy blends or lipid-based nutrient supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuel-Brockdorf, Ann-Sophie; Ouedraogo, Albertine; Ritz, Christian; Draebel, Tania Aase; Ashorn, Per; Filteau, Suzanne; Michaelsen, Kim F

    2017-10-01

    Feeding behaviors have an important impact on children's nutritional status and are essential to consider when implementing nutrition programs. The objective of this study was to explore and compare feeding behaviors related to supplementary feeding with corn-soy blends (CSB) and lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) based on best practice feeding behaviors. The study was conducted as part of a randomized controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of new formulations of CSB and LNS and comprised 1,546 children from 6 to 23 months. The study included a mixed methods approach using questionnaires, focus group discussions and home visits and interviews with a subsample of 20 caretakers of trial participants. We found that LNS, compared to CSB, were more likely to be mixed into other foods (OR [95% CI] 1.7 [1.3-2.2], p = <.001), served with a meal (OR [95% CI] 1.6 [1.1-2.3], p = <.018)or between meals (OR [95% CI] 1.5 [1.1-1.9], p = <.005), and fed using an encouraging feeding style (mean difference in percentage points [95% CI] 23% [6%:40%], p = .01). CSB were more likely to be fed using a forced feeding style (mean difference in percentage points [95% CI] 18% [3%:33%], p = .02) and were often observed to be served unprepared. The main differences in feeding behaviors between the two diet groups were linked to how and when supplements were served. Educational instructions should therefore be adapted according to the supplement provided; when providing CSB, efforts should be made to promote an encouraging feeding style, and emphasis should be made to ensure preparations are made according to recommendations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Incorporation of photosenzitizer hypericin into synthetic lipid-based nano-particles for drug delivery and large unilamellar vesicles with different content of cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joniova, Jaroslava; Blascakova, Ludmila; Jancura, Daniel; Nadova, Zuzana; Sureau, Franck; Miskovsky, Pavol

    2014-08-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) are attractive natural occurring vehicles for drug delivery and targeting to cancer tissues. The capacity of both types of the lipoproteins to bind hydrophobic drugs and their functionality as drug carriers have been examined in several studies and it has been also shown that mixing of anticancer drugs with LDL or HDL before administration led to an increase of cytotoxic effects of the drugs in the comparison when the drugs were administered alone. However, a difficult isolation of the lipoproteins in large quantity from a biological organism as well as a variability of the composition and size of these molecules makes practical application of LDL and HDL as drug delivery systems quite complicated. Synthetic LDL and HDL and large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) are potentially suitable candidates to substitute the native lipoproteins for targeted and effective drug delivery. In this work, we have studied process of an association of potent photosensitizer hypericin (Hyp) with synthetic lipid-based nano-particles (sLNP) and large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) containing various amount of cholesterol. Cholesterol is one of the main components of both LDL and HDL particles and its presence in biological membranes is known to be a determining factor for membrane properties. It was found that the behavior of Hyp incorporation into sLNP particles with diameter ca ~ 90 nm is qualitatively very similar to that of Hyp incorporation into LDL (diameter ca. 22 nm) and these particles are able to enter U-87 MG cells by endocytosis. The presence of cholesterol in LUV influences the capacity of these vesicles to incorporate Hyp into their structure.

  17. Complementary feeding messages that target cultural barriers enhance both the use of lipid-based nutrient supplements and underlying feeding practices to improve infant diets in rural Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Keriann H; Muti, Monica; Chasekwa, Bernard; Mbuya, Mduduzi N N; Madzima, Rufaro C; Humphrey, Jean H; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2012-04-01

    Supplementation with lipid-based nutrient supplements (LiNS) is promoted as an approach to prevent child undernutrition and growth faltering. Previous LiNS studies have not tested the effects of improving the underlying diet prior to providing LiNS. Formative research was conducted in rural Zimbabwe to develop feeding messages to improve complementary feeding with and without LiNS. Two rounds of Trials of Improved Practices were conducted with mothers of infants aged 6-12 months to assess the feasibility of improving infant diets using (1) only locally available resources and (2) locally available resources plus 20 g of LiNS as Nutributter®/day. Common feeding problems were poor dietary diversity and low energy density. Popular improved practices were to process locally available foods so that infants could swallow them and add processed local foods to enrich porridges. Consumption of beans, fruits, green leafy vegetables, and peanut/seed butters increased after counselling (P < 0.05). Intakes of energy, protein, vitamin A, folate, calcium, iron and zinc from complementary foods increased significantly after counselling with or without the provision of Nutributter (P < 0.05). Intakes of fat, folate, iron, and zinc increased only (fat) or more so (folate, iron, and zinc) with the provision of Nutributter (P < 0.05). While provision of LiNS was crucial to ensure adequate intakes of iron and zinc, educational messages that were barrier-specific and delivered directly to mothers were crucial to improving the underlying diet. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Responsive feeding and child interest in food vary when rural Malawian children are fed lipid-based nutrient supplements or local complementary food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flax, Valerie L; Mäkinen, Samppa; Ashorn, Ulla; Cheung, Yin Bun; Maleta, Kenneth; Ashorn, Per; Bentley, Margaret E

    2013-07-01

    Caregiver and child behaviours during feeding have been used to measure responsiveness, which has been recognised as important for child growth and development. The aims of this study were to understand how caregiver and child behaviours differ when feeding lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) vs. local complementary food and to detect associations between behaviours and child interest in food. Sixteen moderately underweight 6-17-month-old Malawian children receiving 50 g/day of supplementary LNS for 12 weeks were videotaped during LNS (n = 32) and local complementary feeding (n = 28) episodes. Behaviours were coded at the level of the intended bite (1674 total bites). The analysis used regression models adjusted for within-subject correlation. Caregivers were less likely to allow children to self-feed and more likely to use physical pressure during LNS vs. complementary food bites. Positive caregiver verbalization was infrequent and did not differ by type of food. Higher odds of accepting a bite were associated with the bite containing LNS, odds ratio (OR) 3.05; 90% confidence interval (CI) (1.98, 4.71), the child self-feeding, OR 5.70; 90% CI (2.77, 11.69), and positive caregiver verbalization, OR 2.46; 90% CI (1.26, 4.80), while lower odds of acceptance were associated with negative child verbalization during feeding, OR 0.27; 90% CI (0.17, 0.42). In this sample, caregivers used more responsive feeding practices during bites of local complementary food and were more controlling when feeding LNS. Responsive caregiver behaviours predicted child acceptance of food. These results could be used to design interventions in Malawi to improve responsive feeding practices in general and during LNS use. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Efficacy of an oral and tropically stable lipid-based formulation of Amphotericin B (iCo-010) in an experimental mouse model of systemic candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Fady; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Ellen K; Bartlett, Karen; Wasan, Kishor M

    2013-10-29

    An oral lipid based formulation that exhibits tropical stability (iCo-010) was developed to enhance the absorption of orally administered amphotericin B (AmB). iCo-010 has previously shown high efficacy in an acute model of systemic candidiasis in rats, directing the focus of this study to be its efficacy in a chronic model of systemic candidiasis in mice. Mice were infected with 0.6 to 1×108 CFUs of Candida albicans ATCC 18804 strain by tail vein injection and were left for three days to develop the infection after which time treatment was initiated. The infected animals were assigned to the following treatment groups: no treatment (control) or iCo-010 at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg administered by oral gavage once daily (QD) for 5 consecutive days. The animals were sacrificed 7 days after the last dose and the concentration of AmB and the fungal burden were assessed within the liver, kidneys, heart, lungs, spleen and brain. Although the infection was relatively low (~ 60-100 CFUs/ 1 ml tissue homogenate) in the liver, lungs and heart, the infection level was very high (70 000 CFUs / 1 ml tissue homogenate) in the kidney tissues for the control group. The highest concentrations of AmB were recovered in the kidneys and the spleen. The fungal burden in the tissues was lowered by 69-96% in the treatment groups when compared to the control group. Oral iCo-010 is an effective treatment of systemic candidiasis in the mouse model.

  20. Crossover trial to test the acceptability of a locally produced lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) for children under 2 years in Cambodia: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Bindi; Mihrshahi, Seema; Griffin, Mark; Chamnan, Chhoun; Laillou, Arnaud; Wieringa, Frank T

    2017-09-06

    The acceptability and efficacy of existing ready-to-use supplementary and therapeutic foods has been low in Cambodia, thus limiting success in preventing and treating malnutrition among Cambodian children. In that context, UNICEF and IRD have developed a locally produced, multiple micronutrient fortified lipid-based nutrient supplement. This food is innovative, in that it uses fish instead of milk as the animal source food. Very few supplementary foods have non-milk animal source foods, and in addition they have not been widely tested. This trial will assess the novel food's acceptability to children and caregivers. This is a cluster-randomised, incomplete block, 4×4 crossover design with no blinding. It will take place in four sites in a community setting in periurban Phnom Penh. Healthy children aged 9-23 months (n=100) will eat each of four foods for 3 days at a time. The amount they consume will be measured, and at the end of each 3-day set, caregivers will assess how well their child liked the food. After 12 days, caregivers themselves will do a sensory test of the 4 foods and will rank them in terms of preference. Ethical clearance was received from the University of Queensland Medical Research Ethics Committee (2014001070) and from Cambodia's National Ethics Committee for Health Research (03/8 NECHR). ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: LNS-CAMB-INFANTS; NCT02257437. Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Effects of metallic cations in the beryl flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Leonel, C.M. de; Peres, A.E.C.

    1984-01-01

    The beryl zeta potential in microelectrophoretic cell is studied in the presence of neutral electrolyte, cations of calcium, magnesium and iron. The petroleum sulfonate is used how collector in Hallimond tube. Hydroxy complex of metallic cations seems activate the ore and precipitates of colloidal metallic hidroxies seems lower him when added to the mixture. (M.A.C.) [pt

  2. Stable polyfluorinated cycloalkenyl cations and their NMR spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snegirev, V.F.; Galakhov, M.V.; Makarov, K.N.; Bakhmutov, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    New stable 1-methoxyperfluoro-2-ethylcyclobutenyl, 1-methoxyperfluoro-2-methylcyclo-pentenyl, and 1-methoxyperfluoro-2-ethylcyclohexenyl cations were obtained by the action of antimony pentafluoride on the corresponding olefins. The distribution of the charges in the investigated polyfluorinated cycloalkenyl cations was investigated by 13 C NMR method

  3. Synthesis of Cationic Core-Shell Latex Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dziomkina, N.; Hempenius, Mark A.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant-free seeded (core-shell) polymerization of cationic polymer colloids is presented. Polystyrene core particles with sizes between 200 nm and 500 nm were synthesized. The number average diameter of the colloidal core particles increased with increasing monomer concentration. Cationic shells

  4. Cationic antimicrobial peptides inactivate Shiga toxin-encoding bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cogliano, Manuel E.; Hollmann, Axel; Martinez, Melina; Semorile, Liliana; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D.; Maffía, Paulo C.; Bentancor, Leticia V.

    2017-12-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is the principal virulence factor during Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections. We have previously reported the inactivation of bacteriophage encoding Stx after treatment with chitosan, a linear polysaccharide polymer with cationic properties. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs) are short linear aminoacidic sequences, with a positive net charge, which display bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against a wide range of bacterial species. They are promising novel antibiotics since they have shown bactericidal effects against multiresistant bacteria. To evaluate whether cationic properties are responsible for bacteriophage inactivation, we tested seven cationic peptides with proven antimicrobial activity as anti-bacteriophage agents, and one random sequence cationic peptide with no antimicrobial activity as a control. We observed bacteriophage inactivation after incubation with five cAMPs, but no inactivating activity was observed with the random sequence cationic peptide or with the non alpha helical cAMP Omiganan. Finally, to confirm peptide-bacteriophage interaction, zeta potential was analyzed by following changes on bacteriophage surface charges after peptide incubation. According to our results we could propose that: 1) direct interaction of peptides with phage is a necessary step for bacteriophage inactivation, 2) cationic properties are necessary but not sufficient for bacteriophage inactivation, and 3) inactivation by cationic peptides could be sequence (or structure) specific. Overall our data suggest that these peptides could be considered a new family of molecules potentially useful to decrease bacteriophage replication and Stx expression.

  5. CATION EXCHANGE METHOD FOR THE RECOVERY OF PROTACTINIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studier, M.H.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1959-07-14

    A cation exchange prccess is described for separating protactinium values from thorium values whereby they are initially adsorbed together from an aqueous 0.1 to 2 N hydrochloric acid on a cation exchange resin in a column. Then selectively eluting the thorium by an ammonium sulfate solution and subsequently eluting the protactinium by an oxalate solution.

  6. pi-Dimers of end-capped oligopyrrole cation radicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haare, van J.A.E.H.; Groenendaal, L.; Havinga, E.E.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Meijer, E.W.

    1996-01-01

    In two consecutive one-electron oxidations, oligopyrroles substituted with phenyl capping groups (PhPynPh, n = 2–4) can be oxidized reversibly to give stable cation radicals and dications. Spectroelectrochemical studies give direct evidence that diamagnetic p-dimers of cation radicals are formed in

  7. Cation exchange of 53 elements in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Alarid, J.E.; Hamond, C.F.; McLeod, M.J.; Roensch, F.R.; Rein, J.E.

    1978-02-01

    Cation-exchange distribution data are presented for 53 elements from 3 to 12M HNO 3 for three strong-acid resins, having cross-linkages of 8%, 4%, and macroporous. Data obtained by 16- to 18-h dynamic batch contacts are compared to cation-exchange distribution data from strong HCl and HClO 4

  8. Base Cation Leaching From the Canopy of a Rubber ( Hevea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Base cations are essential to the sustainability of forest ecosystems. They are important for neutralizing the acidifying effects of atmospheric deposition. There is the need for in-depth understanding of base cation depletion and leaching from forest canopy. This is important particularly due to the increasing acidification and ...

  9. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Inactivate Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Del Cogliano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx is the principal virulence factor during Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infections. We have previously reported the inactivation of bacteriophage encoding Stx after treatment with chitosan, a linear polysaccharide polymer with cationic properties. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs are short linear aminoacidic sequences, with a positive net charge, which display bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against a wide range of bacterial species. They are promising novel antibiotics since they have shown bactericidal effects against multiresistant bacteria. To evaluate whether cationic properties are responsible for bacteriophage inactivation, we tested seven cationic peptides with proven antimicrobial activity as anti-bacteriophage agents, and one random sequence cationic peptide with no antimicrobial activity as a control. We observed bacteriophage inactivation after incubation with five cAMPs, but no inactivating activity was observed with the random sequence cationic peptide or with the non-alpha helical cAMP Omiganan. Finally, to confirm peptide-bacteriophage interaction, zeta potential was analyzed by following changes on bacteriophage surface charges after peptide incubation. According to our results we could propose that: (1 direct interaction of peptides with phage is a necessary step for bacteriophage inactivation, (2 cationic properties are necessary but not sufficient for bacteriophage inactivation, and (3 inactivation by cationic peptides could be sequence (or structure specific. Overall our data suggest that these peptides could be considered a new family of molecules potentially useful to decrease bacteriophage replication and Stx expression.

  10. Cation substitution induced blue-shift of optical band gap

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cation substitution induced blue-shift of optical band gap in nanocrystalline Zn ( 1 − x ) Ca x O thin films deposited by sol–gel dip coating technique ... thin films giving 13.03% enhancement in theenergy gap value due to the electronic perturbation caused by cation substitution as well as deterioration in crystallinity.

  11. In vivo toxicity of cationic micelles and liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Northeved, Helle; Ek, Pramod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated toxicity of nanocarriers comprised of cationic polymer and lipid components often used in gene and drug delivery, formulated as cationic micelles and liposomes. Rats were injected intravenously with 10, 25 or 100 mg/kg and sacrificed after 24 or 48 h, or 24 h after the las...

  12. Inversion of membrane surface charge by trivalent cations probed with a cation-selective channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnev, Philip A; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2012-11-13

    We demonstrate that the cation-selective channel formed by gramicidin A can be used as a reliable sensor for studying the multivalent ion accumulation at the surfaces of charged lipid membranes and the "charge inversion" phenomenon. In asymmetrically charged membranes with the individual leaflets formed from pure negative and positive lipids bathed by 0.1 M CsCl solutions the channel exhibits current rectification, which is comparable to that of a typical n/p semiconductor diode. We show that even at these highly asymmetrical conditions the channel conductance can be satisfactorily described by the electrodiffusion equation in the constant field approximation but, due to predictable limitations, only when the applied voltages do not exceed 50 mV. Analysis of the changes in the voltage-dependent channel conductance upon addition of trivalent cations allows us to gauge their interactions with the membrane surface. The inversion of the sign of the effective surface charge takes place at the concentrations, which correlate with the cation size. Specifically, these concentrations are close to 0.05 mM for lanthanum, 0.25 mM for hexaamminecobalt, and 4 mM for spermidine.

  13. Contextual Learning Induces Dendritic Spine Clustering in Retrosplenial Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and electrophysiological studies find convergent evidence suggesting that plasticity within a dendritic tree is not randomly dispersed, but rather clustered into functional groups. Further, results from in silico neuronal modeling show that clustered plasticity is able to increase storage capacity 45 times compared to dispersed plasticity. Recent in vivo work utilizing chronic 2-photon microscopy tested the clustering hypothesis and showed that repetitive motor learning is able to induce clustered addition of new dendritic spines on apical dendrites of L5 neurons in primary motor cortex; moreover, clustered spines were found to be more stable than non-clustered spines, suggesting a physiological role for spine clustering. To further test this hypothesis we used in vivo 2-photon imaging in Thy1-YFP-H mice to chronically examine dendritic spine dynamics in retrosplenial cortex (RSC during spatial learning. RSC is a key component of an extended spatial learning and memory circuit that includes hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. Importantly, RSC is known from both lesion and immediate early gene studies to be critically involved in spatial learning and more specifically in contextual fear conditioning. We utilized a modified contextual fear conditioning protocol wherein animals received a mild foot shock each day for five days; this protocol induces gradual increases in context freezing over several days before the animals reach a behavioral plateau. We coupled behavioral training with four separate in vivo imaging sessions, two before training begins, one early in training, and a final session after training is complete. This allowed us to image spine dynamics before training as well as early in learning and after animals had reached behavioral asymptote. We find that this contextual learning protocol induces a statistically significant increase in the formation of clusters of new dendritic spines in trained animals when compared to home

  14. Dynamics of action potential backpropagation in basal dendrites of prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Yan, Ping; Wuskell, Joseph P; Loew, Leslie M; Antic, Srdjan D

    2008-02-01

    Basal dendrites of neocortical pyramidal neurons are relatively short and directly attached to the cell body. This allows electrical signals arising in basal dendrites to strongly influence the neuronal output. Likewise, somatic action potentials (APs) should readily propagate back into the basilar dendritic tree to influence synaptic plasticity. Two recent studies, however, determined that sodium APs are severely attenuated in basal dendrites of cortical pyramidal cells, so that they completely fail in distal dendritic segments. Here we used the latest improvements in the voltage-sensitive dye imaging technique (Zhou et al., 2007) to study AP backpropagation in basal dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the rat prefrontal cortex. With a signal-to-noise ratio of > 15 and minimal temporal averaging (only four sweeps) we were able to sample AP waveforms from the very last segments of individual dendritic branches (dendritic tips). We found that in short- (< 150 microm) and medium (150-200 microm in length)-range basal dendrites APs backpropagated with modest changes in AP half-width or AP rise-time. The lack of substantial changes in AP shape and dynamics of rise is inconsistent with the AP-failure model. The lack of substantial amplitude boosting of the third AP in the high-frequency burst also suggests that in short- and medium-range basal dendrites backpropagating APs were not severely attenuated. Our results show that the AP-failure concept does not apply in all basal dendrites of the rat prefrontal cortex. The majority of synaptic contacts in the basilar dendritic tree actually received significant AP-associated electrical and calcium transients.

  15. A route for direct retinal input to the preoptic hypothalamus: dendritic projections into the optic chiasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, J; Brand, S

    1979-07-01

    With the use of Golgi, horseradish peroxidase, and electron microscopic techniques, neurons within a broad region of the preoptic hypothalamus of the mouse were shown to have dendrites that projected well into the depths of the optic chiasm. Further experimental and ultrastructural investigation demonstrated synapses between these dendrites and retinal axonal boutons within the chiasm. All synapses located in the chiasm were classified as Gray's type I. The possible function of these dendritic projections is discussed.

  16. The role of dendritic non-linearities in single neuron computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Gutkin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Experiment has demonstrated that summation of excitatory post-synaptic protientials (EPSPs in dendrites is non-linear. The sum of multiple EPSPs can be larger than their arithmetic sum, a superlinear summation due to the opening of voltage-gated channels and similar to somatic spiking. The so-called dendritic spike. The sum of multiple of EPSPs can also be smaller than their arithmetic sum, because the synaptic current necessarily saturates at some point. While these observations are well-explained by biophysical models the impact of dendritic spikes on computation remains a matter of debate. One reason is that dendritic spikes may fail to make the neuron spike; similarly, dendritic saturations are sometime presented as a glitch which should be corrected by dendritic spikes. We will provide solid arguments against this claim and show that dendritic saturations as well as dendritic spikes enhance single neuron computation, even when they cannot directly make the neuron fire. To explore the computational impact of dendritic spikes and saturations, we are using a binary neuron model in conjunction with Boolean algebra. We demonstrate using these tools that a single dendritic non-linearity, either spiking or saturating, combined with somatic non-linearity, enables a neuron to compute linearly non-separable Boolean functions (lnBfs. These functions are impossible to compute when summation is linear and the exclusive OR is a famous example of lnBfs. Importantly, the implementation of these functions does not require the dendritic non-linearity to make the neuron spike. Next, We show that reduced and realistic biophysical models of the neuron are capable of computing lnBfs. Within these models and contrary to the binary model, the dendritic and somatic non-linearity are tightly coupled. Yet we show that these neuron models are capable of linearly non-separable computations.

  17. Active action potential propagation but not initiation in thalamic interneuron dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Amanda E.; McCormick, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus modulate the activity of thalamocortical cells in response to excitatory input through the release of inhibitory neurotransmitter from both axons and dendrites. The exact mechanisms by which release can occur from dendrites are, however, not well understood. Recent experiments using calcium imaging have suggested that Na/K based action potentials can evoke calcium transients in dendrites via local active conductances, making the back-propagating action potential a candidate for dendritic neurotransmitter release. In this study, we employed high temporal and spatial resolution voltage-sensitive dye imaging to assess the characteristics of dendritic voltage deflections in response to Na/K action potentials in interneurons of the mouse dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. We found that trains or single action potentials elicited by somatic current injection or local synaptic stimulation led to action potentials that rapidly and actively back-propagated throughout the entire dendritic arbor and into the fine filiform dendritic appendages known to release GABAergic vesicles. Action potentials always appeared first in the soma or proximal dendrite in response to somatic current injection or local synaptic stimulation, and the rapid back-propagation into the dendritic arbor depended upon voltage-gated sodium and TEA-sensitive potassium channels. Our results indicate that thalamic interneuron dendrites integrate synaptic inputs that initiate action potentials, most likely in the axon initial segment, that then back-propagate with high-fidelity into the dendrites, resulting in a nearly synchronous release of GABA from both axonal and dendritic compartments. PMID:22171033

  18. Cation interdiffusion in polycrystalline calcium and strontium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, E.P.; Jain, H.; Smyth, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses a method that has been developed to study bulk lattice interdiffusion between calcium and strontium titanate by fabrication of a diffusion couple using cosintering. The measured interdiffusion coefficients, D(C), indicate that strontium impurity diffusion in calcium titanate occurs at a faster rate than calcium impurity diffusion in strontium titanate. These interdiffusion coefficients are composition independent when the concentration of the calcium cation exceeds that of the strontium cation; otherwise D(C) is strongly composition dependent. Investigations into the effect of cation nonstoichiometry give results that are consistent with a defect incorporation reaction in which excess TiO 2 , within the solid solubility limit, produces A-site cation vacancies as compensating defects. The interdiffusion coefficients increase with increasing concentrations of TiO 2 , so it is concluded that interdiffusion of these alkaline-earth cations in their titanates occurs via a vacancy mechanism

  19. Thermochemical stability of Soviet macroporous sulfonated cation-exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rukhlyada, N.N.; Plotnikova, V.P.; Roginskaya, B.S.; Znamenskii, Yu.P.; Zavodovskaya, A.S.; Dobrova, E.I.

    1988-10-20

    The purpose of this work was to study the influence of macroporosity on the thermochemical stability of sulfonated cation-exchangers. The investigations were carried out on commercial macroporous sulfonated cation-exchangers based on styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers. Study of the thermochemical stability of macroporous sulfonated cation-exchangers in dilute hydrogen peroxide solutions showed that the type of macroporosity has virtually no influence on their stability. The determining factor in thermal stability of macroporous cation-exchangers, as of the gel type, is the degree of cross-linking of the polymer matrix. The capacity loss of macroporous cation-exchangers during oxidative thermolysis is caused by destruction of the macromolecular skeleton and elution of fragments of polar chains containing sulfo groups into the solution.

  20. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy of Breast Cancer: Modulation by CpG

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baar, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    ... in the United States in 2004. Thus, patients with MBC who fail conventional therapies are candidates for clinical trials using novel therapeutic approaches, including immunotherapy. Dendritic cells (DC...

  1. Cellular Automaton Modeling of Dendritic Growth Using a Multi-grid Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natsume, Y; Ohsasa, K

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional cellular automaton model with a multi-grid method was developed to simulate dendritic growth. In the present model, we used a triple-grid system for temperature, solute concentration and solid fraction fields as a new approach of the multi-grid method. In order to evaluate the validity of the present model, we carried out simulations of single dendritic growth, secondary dendrite arm growth, multi-columnar dendritic growth and multi-equiaxed dendritic growth. From the results of the grid dependency from the simulation of single dendritic growth, we confirmed that the larger grid can be used in the simulation and that the computational time can be reduced dramatically. In the simulation of secondary dendrite arm growth, the results from the present model were in good agreement with the experimental data and the simulated results from a phase-field model. Thus, the present model can quantitatively simulate dendritic growth. From the simulated results of multi-columnar and multi-equiaxed dendrites, we confirmed that the present model can perform simulations under practical solidification conditions. (paper)

  2. hamlet, a binary genetic switch between single- and multiple- dendrite neuron morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Adrian W; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2002-08-23

    The dendritic morphology of neurons determines the number and type of inputs they receive. In the Drosophila peripheral nervous system (PNS), the external sensory (ES) neurons have a single nonbranched dendrite, whereas the lineally related multidendritic (MD) neurons have extensively branched dendritic arbors. We report that hamlet is a binary genetic switch between these contrasting morphological types. In hamlet mutants, ES neurons are converted to an MD fate, whereas ectopic hamlet expression in MD precursors results in transformation of MD neurons into ES neurons. Moreover, hamlet expression induced in MD neurons undergoing dendrite outgrowth drastically reduces arbor branching.

  3. Separate transcriptionally regulated pathways specify distinct classes of sister dendrites in a nociceptive neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Barbara M J; Palumbos, Sierra D; Novakovic, Michaela; Shang, Xueying; Sundararajan, Lakshmi; Miller, David M

    2017-12-15

    The dendritic processes of nociceptive neurons transduce external signals into neurochemical cues that alert the organism to potentially damaging stimuli. The receptive field for each sensory neuron is defined by its dendritic arbor, but the mechanisms that shape dendritic architecture are incompletely understood. Using the model nociceptor, the PVD neuron in C. elegans, we determined that two types of PVD lateral branches project along the dorsal/ventral axis to generate the PVD dendritic arbor: (1) Pioneer dendrites that adhere to the epidermis, and (2) Commissural dendrites that fasciculate with circumferential motor neuron processes. Previous reports have shown that the LIM homeodomain transcription factor MEC-3 is required for all higher order PVD branching and that one of its targets, the claudin-like membrane protein HPO-30, preferentially promotes outgrowth of pioneer branches. Here, we show that another MEC-3 target, the conserved TFIIA-like zinc finger transcription factor EGL-46, adopts the alternative role of specifying commissural dendrites. The known EGL-46 binding partner, the TEAD transcription factor EGL-44, is also required for PVD commissural branch outgrowth. Double mutants of hpo-30 and egl-44 show strong enhancement of the lateral branching defect with decreased numbers of both pioneer and commissural dendrites. Thus, HPO-30/Claudin and EGL-46/EGL-44 function downstream of MEC-3 and in parallel acting pathways to direct outgrowth of two distinct classes of PVD dendritic branches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Conserved RNA-Binding Proteins Required for Dendrite Morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans Sensory Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacci, Simona; Forand, Daniel; Wolf, Margaret; Tyus, Courtney; Barney, Julia; Kellogg, Leah; Simon, Margo A.; Kerr, Genevieve; Wells, Kristen L.; Younes, Serena; Mortimer, Nathan T.; Olesnicky, Eugenia C.; Killian, Darrell J.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of dendritic branching is critical for sensory reception, cell−cell communication within the nervous system, learning, memory, and behavior. Defects in dendrite morphology are associated with several neurologic disorders; thus, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern dendrite morphogenesis is important. Recent investigations of dendrite morphogenesis have highlighted the importance of gene regulation at the posttranscriptional level. Because RNA-binding proteins mediate many posttranscriptional mechanisms, we decided to investigate the extent to which conserved RNA-binding proteins contribute to dendrite morphogenesis across phyla. Here we identify a core set of RNA-binding proteins that are important for dendrite morphogenesis in the PVD multidendritic sensory neuron in Caenorhabditis elegans. Homologs of each of these genes were previously identified as important in the Drosophila melanogaster dendritic arborization sensory neurons. Our results suggest that RNA processing, mRNA localization, mRNA stability, and translational control are all important mechanisms that contribute to dendrite morphogenesis, and we present a conserved set of RNA-binding proteins that regulate these processes in diverse animal species. Furthermore, homologs of these genes are expressed in the human brain, suggesting that these RNA-binding proteins are candidate regulators of dendrite development in humans. PMID:25673135

  5. Electroless Growth of Aluminum Dendrites in NaCl-AlCl3 Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Hjuler, H.A.; Berg, Rolf W.

    1989-01-01

    The spontaneous growth of aluminum dendrites after deposition was observed and examined in sodium chloride-aluminumchloride melts. The concentration gradient of AlCl3 in the vicinity of the cathode surface resulting from electrolysisconstitutes a type of concentration cell with aluminum dendrites...... as electrodes. The short-circuit discharge of thecell is found to be the driving force for the growth of aluminum dendrites. Such a concentration gradient is proposed to beone of the causes for dendrite formation in the case of metal deposition....

  6. Molecular signatures of maturing dendritic cells: implications for testing the quality of dendritic cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are often produced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin-4 (IL-4 stimulation of monocytes. To improve the effectiveness of DC adoptive immune cancer therapy, many different agents have been used to mature DCs. We analyzed the kinetics of DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN-γ induction in order to characterize the usefulness of mature DCs (mDCs for immune therapy and to identify biomarkers for assessing the quality of mDCs. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from 6 healthy subjects by apheresis, monocytes were isolated by elutriation, and immature DCs (iDCs were produced by 3 days of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4. The iDCs were sampled after 4, 8 and 24 hours in culture with LPS and IFN-γ and were then assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, and global gene and microRNA (miRNA expression analysis. Results After 24 hours of LPS and IFN-γ stimulation, DC surface expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA Class II antigens were up-regulated. Th1 attractant genes such as CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11 and CCL5 were up-regulated during maturation but not Treg attractants such as CCL22 and CXCL12. The expression of classical mDC biomarker genes CD83, CCR7, CCL5, CCL8, SOD2, MT2A, OASL, GBP1 and HES4 were up-regulated throughout maturation while MTIB, MTIE, MTIG, MTIH, GADD45A and LAMP3 were only up-regulated late in maturation. The expression of miR-155 was up-regulated 8-fold in mDCs. Conclusion DCs, matured with LPS and IFN-γ, were characterized by increased levels of Th1 attractants as opposed to Treg attractants and may be particularly effective for adoptive immune cancer therapy.

  7. Increasing Base Cations in Streams: Another Legacy of Deicing Salts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helton, A. M.; Barclay, J. R.; Bellucci, C.; Rittenhouse, C.

    2017-12-01

    Elevated use of deicing salts directly increases sodium chloride inputs to watersheds. Sodium can accumulate in soils over time and has the potential to leach other cations (e.g., calcium, magnesium, and potassium) from the soil through cation exchange. We hypothesize that increased use of deicing salts results in a legacy of soils depleted in non-sodium base cations with loss of cations to receiving waters. The goal of this project is to quantify temporal trends in base cations and chloride in streams and rivers across the United States. We used Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season (WRTDS) to analyze trends in base cations. Our preliminary analysis of 10 rivers in Connecticut with chemical periods of record ranging from 24 - 64 years (median = 55 years), shows that the flux of base cations is increasing in all sites (25 - 366 103 meq ha-1 yr-1 yr-1), driven largely by increases in sodium (23 - 222 103 meq ha-1 yr-1 yr-1), the dominant cation in 7 of the sites. Chloride is also increasing at all sites (26 - 261 103 meq ha-1 yr-1 yr-1), which, in combination with salt use trends, suggests a road salt source for the increased sodium. Non-sodium cations are also increasing in 9 of the sites (8 - 54 103 meq ha-1 yr-1 yr-1), though they are not directly added with most deicing salts. We will compare these trends to other long-term sites across the United States, and quantify relationships between cation trends and land cover, road density, and snowfall.

  8. Cation depletion by the sodium pump in red cells with pathologic cation leaks. Sickle cells and xerocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, C H; Platt, O S; Lux, S E

    1986-12-01

    The mechanism by which sickle cells and xerocytic red cells become depleted of cations in vivo has not been identified previously. Both types of cells exhibit elevated permeabilities to sodium and potassium, in the case of sickle cells, when deoxygenated. The ouabain-insensitive fluxes of sodium and potassium were equivalent, however, in both cell types under these conditions. When incubated 18 hours in vitro, sickle cells lost cations but only when deoxygenated. This cation depletion was blocked by ouabain, removal of external potassium, or pretreatment with 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate, which blocks the increase in cation permeability induced by deoxygenation. The loss of cation exhibited by oxygenated xerocytes similarly incubated was also blocked by ouabain. These data support the hypothesis that the elevated "passive" cation fluxes of xerocytes and deoxygenated sickle cells are not directly responsible for cation depletion of these cells; rather, these pathologic leaks interact with the sodium pump to produce a net loss of cellular cation.

  9. Comparison of "type I" and "type II" organic cation transport by organic cation transporters and organic anion-transporting polypeptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Montfoort, JE; Muller, M; Groothuis, GMM; Meijer, DKF; Koepsell, H; Meier, PJ

    Previous inhibition studies with taurocholate and cardiac glycosides suggested the presence of separate uptake systems for small "type I" (system1) and for bulky "type II" (system2) organic cations in rat hepatocytes. To identify the transport systems involved in type I and type II organic cation

  10. IRMPD Action Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Cation-Cytosine Complexes: Effects of Alkali Metal Cation Size on Gas Phase Conformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, B.; Wu, R.R.; Polfer, N.C.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes generated by electrospray ionization are probed via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. IRMPD action spectra of five alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes exhibit both

  11. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W. [Biomedical, Chemical, and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Scheckel, Kirk G. [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Tolaymat, Thabet, E-mail: tolaymat.thabet@epa.gov [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag{sup +} under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10–15 nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5 mg L{sup −1}, the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1} as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag{sup +}. Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100 mg L{sup −1} as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • At concentrations -1 the anaerobic decomposition process was not impacted. • An impact on the microbial community at concentrations -1 were observed. • At high concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1}), the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity. • Toxicity was demonstrated without the presence of oxidative dissolution of silver. • A one size fits all approach for the evaluation of NPs may not be accurate.

  12. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Cation and Anion Channelrhodopsins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Adrian S.

    Optogenetics is a technique to control and monitor cell activity with light by expression of specific microbial rhodopsins. Cation channelrhodopsins (CCRs) and anion channelrhodopsins (ACRs) have been demonstrated to activate and silence cell activity, respectively. In this dissertation, the molecular mechanisms of two channelrhodopsins are studied: a CCR from Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) and an ACR from Guillardia theta (GtACR1). The recently discovered GtACR1is especially interesting, as it achieves neural silencing with 1/1000th of the light intensity compared to previous microbial rhodopsin silencing ion pumps. Static and time-resolved resonance Raman, FTIR difference, and UV-visible spectroscopies were utilized in addition to various biochemical and genetic techniques to explore the molecular mechanisms of these channelrhodopsins. In CaChR1, Glu169 and Asp299 residues are located nearby the Schiff base (SB) similar to the homologous residues Asp85 and Asp212, which exist in an ionized state in unphotolyzed bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and play a key role in proton pumping. We observe significant changes in the protonation states of the SB, Glu169, and Asp299 of CaChR1 leading up to the open-channel P2 state, where all three groups exist in a charge neutral state. This unusual charge neutrality along with the position of these groups in the CaChR1 ion channel suggests that charge neutrality plays an important role in cation gating and selectivity in these low efficiency CCRs. Significant differences exist in the photocycle and protonation/hydrogen bonding states of key residues inGtACR1compared to BR and CaChR1. Resonance Raman studies reveal that in the unphotolyzed state of GtACR1, residues Glu68, Ser97 (BR Asp85 homolog), and Asp234 (BR Asp212 homolog) located near the SB exist in charge neutral states. Furthermore, upon K formation, these residues do not change their protonation states. At room temperature, a slow decay of the red-shifted K intermediate is

  13. Cation-π interaction of the univalent sodium cation with [2.2.2]paracyclophane: Experimental and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrlík, Emanuel; Sýkora, David; Böhm, Stanislav; Vaňura, Petr

    2018-02-01

    By employing electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), it was proven experimentally that the univalent sodium cation (Na+) forms with [2.2.2]paracyclophane (C24H24) the cationic complex [Na(C24H24)]+. Further, applying quantum chemical DFT calculations, the most probable structure of the [Na(C24H24)]+ complex was derived. In the resulting complex with a symmetry very close to C3, the "central" cation Na+, fully located in the cavity of the parent [2.2.2]paracyclophane ligand, is bound to all three benzene rings of [2.2.2]paracyclophane via cation-π interaction. Finally, the interaction energy, E(int), of the considered cation-π complex [Na(C24H24)]+ was found to be -267.3 kJ/mol, confirming the formation of this fascinating complex species as well.

  14. Removal of radiocesium using cation exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita-Murase, Yuko; Mizumura, Ryosuke; Tachibana, Yoshitaka; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2013-01-01

    Cation exchange resins (calcium polystyrene sulfonate, Ca-resin and sodium polystyrene sulfonate, Na-resin) have been used as agents to improve hyperkerlemia. For removing 137 Cs from the human body, the adsorption ability of the resin for 137 Cs was examined and evaluated. Resin (0.03 g) and 137 Cs (ca.1 kBq) were introduced into 3 mL of water, the Japanese Pharmacopoeia 1st fluid for a dissolution test (pH 1.2) and 2nd fluid (pH 6.8), respectively, and shaken. After 1-3 hours, the 137 Cs adsorption (%) of Na-resin was 99% in water, 60% in a pH 1.2 fluid and, 66% in a pH 6.8 fluid. By adding potassium, the 137 Cs adsorption (%) of Ca-resin was reduced. However, the 137 Cs adsorption (%) of Na-resin was almost unchanged. These results show that both resins have adsorption ability for 137 Cs in the stomach and the intestines. Therefore, the proposed method will be an effective means in the case of a radiological emergency due to 137 Cs. (author)

  15. Cyanide ion complexation by a cationic borane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ching-Wen; Gabbaï, François P

    2008-02-14

    While we have previously reported that [1-(Mes2B)-8-(Me3NCH2)-C10H6]+ ([2]+) complexes fluoride ions to form [1-(Mes2FB)-8-(Me3NCH2)-C10H6] (2-F), we now show that this cationic borane also complexes cyanide to form [1-(Mes2(NC)B)-8-(Me3NCH2)-C10H6] (2-CN). This reaction also occurs under biphasic conditions (H2O-CHCl3) and may serve to transport cyanide in organic phases. The zwitterionic cyanoborate 2-CN has been fully characterized and its crystal structure determined. UV-vis titration experiments carried out in THF indicate that [2]+ has a higher affinity for fluoride (K > 10(8) M(-1)) than cyanide (K = 8.0 (+/-0.5) x 10(5) M(-1)). Steric effects which impede cyanide binding to the sterically congested boron center of [2]+ are most likely at the origin of this selectivity. Finally, electrochemical studies indicate that [2]+ is significantly more electrophilic than its neutral precursor 1-(Mes2B)-8-(Me2NCH2)-(C10H6) (1). These studies also show that reduction of [2]+ is irreversible, possibly because of elimination of the NMe3 moiety under reductive conditions. In fact, [2]OTf reacts with NaBH4 to afford 1-(Mes2B)-8-(CH3)-(C10H6) (4) which has also been fully characterized.

  16. Interaction of cationic drugs with liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Brett A; Chauhan, Anuj

    2009-10-20

    Interactions between cationic drugs and anionic liposomes were studied by measuring binding of drugs and the effect of binding on liposome permeability. The measurements were analyzed in the context of a continuum model based on electrostatic interactions and a Langmuir isotherm. Experiments and modeling indicate that, although electrostatic interactions are important, the fraction of drug sequestered in the double-layer is negligible. The majority of drug enters the bilayer with the charged regions interacting with the charged lipid head groups and the lipophilic regions associated with the bilayer. The partitioning of the drug can be described by a Langmuir isotherm with the electrostatic interactions increasing the sublayer concentration of the drug. The binding isotherms are similar for all tricyclic antidepressants (TCA). Bupivacaine (BUP) binds significantly less compared to TCA because its structure is such that the charged region has minimal interactions with the lipid heads once the BUP molecule partitions inside the bilayer. Conversely, the TCAs are linear with distinct hydrophilic and lipophilic regions, allowing the lipophilic regions to lie inside the bilayer and the hydrophilic regions to protrude out. This conformation maximizes the permeability of the bilayer, leading to an increased release of a hydrophilic fluorescent dye from liposomes.

  17. Radical Cations and Acid Protection during Radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zarzana, Christopher A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mezyk, Stephen P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-09

    Ligand molecules for used nuclear fuel separation schemes are exposed to high radiation fields and high concentrations of acid. Thus, an understanding of the complex interactions between extraction ligands, diluent, and acid is critical to understanding the performance of a separation process. The diglycolamides are ligands with important structural similarities to CMPO; however, previous work has shown that their radiolytic degradation has important mechanistic differences from CMPO. The DGAs do not enjoy radioprotection by HNO3 and the kinetics of DGA radiolytic degradation are different. CMPO degrades with pseudo-zero-order kinetics in linear fashion with absorbed dose while the DGAs degrade in pseudo-first-order, exponential fashion. This suggests that the DGAs degrade by simple reaction with some product of direct diluent radiolysis, while CMPO degradation is probably multi-step, with a slow step that is not dependent on the CMPO concentration, and mitigated by HNO3. It is thus believed that radio-protection and the zero-order radiolytic degradation kinetics are related, and that these phenomena are a function of either the formation of strong acid complexes with CMPO and/or to the presence of the CMPO phenyl ring. Experiments to test both these hypotheses have been designed and partially conducted. This report summarizes findings related to these phenomena for FY16, in satisfaction of milestone M3FT-16IN030104053. It also reports continued kinetic measurements for the reactions of the dodecane radical cation with solvent extraction ligands.

  18. Radical Cations and Acid Protection during Radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Zarzana, Christopher A.; Mezyk, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Ligand molecules for used nuclear fuel separation schemes are exposed to high radiation fields and high concentrations of acid. Thus, an understanding of the complex interactions between extraction ligands, diluent, and acid is critical to understanding the performance of a separation process. The diglycolamides are ligands with important structural similarities to CMPO; however, previous work has shown that their radiolytic degradation has important mechanistic differences from CMPO. The DGAs do not enjoy radioprotection by HNO3 and the kinetics of DGA radiolytic degradation are different. CMPO degrades with pseudo-zero-order kinetics in linear fashion with absorbed dose while the DGAs degrade in pseudo-first-order, exponential fashion. This suggests that the DGAs degrade by simple reaction with some product of direct diluent radiolysis, while CMPO degradation is probably multi-step, with a slow step that is not dependent on the CMPO concentration, and mitigated by HNO 3 . It is thus believed that radio-protection and the zero-order radiolytic degradation kinetics are related, and that these phenomena are a function of either the formation of strong acid complexes with CMPO and/or to the presence of the CMPO phenyl ring. Experiments to test both these hypotheses have been designed and partially conducted. This report summarizes findings related to these phenomena for FY16, in satisfaction of milestone M3FT-16IN030104053. It also reports continued kinetic measurements for the reactions of the dodecane radical cation with solvent extraction ligands.

  19. Electrochemical migration of tin in electronics and microstructure of the dendrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minzari, Daniel, E-mail: dmin@mek.dtu.d [Section for Materials and Surface Technology, Department for Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg; Jellesen, Morten S.; Moller, Per; Ambat, Rajan [Section for Materials and Surface Technology, Department for Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark)

    2011-05-15

    Graphical abstract: The electrochemical migration of tin in electronics forms dendritic structures, consisting of a metallic tin core, which is surrounded by oxide layers having various thickness. Display Omitted Research highlights: Electrochemical migration occurs if two conductors are connected by condensed moisture. Metallic ions are dissolved and grow in a dendritic structure that short circuit the electrodes. The dendrite consists of a metallic tin core with oxide layers of various thickness surrounding. Detailed microstructure of dendrites is investigated using electron microscopy. The dendrite microstructure is heterogeneous along the growth direction. - Abstract: The macro-, micro-, and nano-scale morphology and structure of tin dendrites, formed by electrochemical migration on a surface mount ceramic chip resistor having electrodes consisting of tin with small amounts of Pb ({approx}2 wt.%) was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy including Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The tin dendrites were formed under 5 or 12 V potential bias in 10 ppm by weight NaCl electrolyte as a micro-droplet on the resistor during electrochemical migration experiments. The dendrites formed were found to have heterogeneous microstructure along the growth direction, which is attributed to unstable growth conditions inside the micro-volume of electrolyte. Selected area electron diffraction showed that the dendrites are metallic tin having sections of single crystal orientation and lead containing intermetallic particles embedded in the structure. At certain areas, the dendrite structure was found to be surrounded by an oxide crust, which is believed to be due to unstable growth conditions during the dendrite formation. The oxide layer was found to be of nanocrystalline structure, which is expected to be formed by the dehydration of the hydrated oxide originally formed in solution ex-situ in ambient air.

  20. Cation exchange properties of zeolites in hyper alkaline aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; de Blochouse, Benny; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Snellings, Ruben; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Maes, André; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-03

    Construction of multibarrier concrete based waste disposal sites and management of alkaline mine drainage water requires cation exchangers combining excellent sorption properties with a high stability and predictable performance in hyper alkaline media. Though highly selective organic cation exchange resins have been developed for most pollutants, they can serve as a growth medium for bacterial proliferation, impairing their long-term stability and introducing unpredictable parameters into the evolution of the system. Zeolites represent a family of inorganic cation exchangers, which naturally occur in hyper alkaline conditions and cannot serve as an electron donor or carbon source for microbial proliferation. Despite their successful application as industrial cation exchangers under near neutral conditions, their performance in hyper alkaline, saline water remains highly undocumented. Using Cs(+) as a benchmark element, this study aims to assess the long-term cation exchange performance of zeolites in concrete derived aqueous solutions. Comparison of their exchange properties in alkaline media with data obtained in near neutral solutions demonstrated that the cation exchange selectivity remains unaffected by the increased hydroxyl concentration; the cation exchange capacity did however show an unexpected increase in hyper alkaline media.

  1. Effect of alkali metal cations on anodic dissolution of gold in cyanide solutions. Potentiodynamic measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bek, R.Yu.; Rogozhnikov, N.A.; Kosolapov, G.V.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that gold dissolution rate in cyanic solutions in Li + , Na + , K + , Cs + cation series increases basically and decreases under cation concentration increasing. Cation effect on current value is caused by cations drawing in dense layer. A model of dense part of double layer with two Helmholtz planes (anion and cation) is suggested. Effect of nature and concentration of alkali metal cations on gold dissolution rate is explained on the base of the model [ru

  2. Prenatal Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements Do Not Affect Pregnancy or Childbirth Complications or Cesarean Delivery in Bangladesh: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mridha, Malay K; Matias, Susana L; Paul, Rina Rani; Hussain, Sohrab; Sarker, Mostofa; Hossain, Mokbul; Peerson, Janet M; Vosti, Stephen A; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2017-09-01

    Background: Pregnancy and childbirth complications and cesarean delivery are common in Bangladesh. Objective: We evaluated the effect of lipid-based nutrient supplements for pregnant and lactating women (LNS-PL) on pregnancy and childbirth complications and cesarean delivery. Methods: We conducted the Rang-Din Nutrition Study, a cluster-randomized controlled effectiveness trial within a community health program in rural Bangladesh. We enrolled 4011 pregnant women in early pregnancy. Women in 48 clusters received iron and folic acid (IFA; 60 mg Fe + 400 μg folic acid/d) and women in 16 clusters received LNS-PL (20 g/d, 118 kcal) containing essential fatty acids and 22 vitamins and minerals. Pregnancy and childbirth complications and the cesarean delivery rate were secondary outcomes of the study. Results: Women in the LNS-PL group did not differ significantly from the IFA group with respect to mean systolic blood pressure at 36 wk gestation (113 and 112 mm Hg; P = 0.17), diastolic blood pressure at 36 wk gestation (68.9 and 68.7 mmHg; P = 0.88), or mean total number of pregnancy and childbirth complications (0.32 and 0.31; P = 0.86). They also did not differ significantly with respect to the prevalence of high blood pressure at 36 wk (1.74% and 2.03%; P = 0.62), antepartum hemorrhage (0.83% and 1.39%; P = 0.21), prolonged labor (8.34% and 8.79%; P = 0.68), early rupture of membranes (9.30% and 8.45%; P = 0.43), convulsions (1.57% and 1.08%; P = 0.24), high blood pressure in labor (1.54% and 1.19%; P = 0.46), obstructed labor (2.83% and 2.91%; P = 0.90), any complications during pregnancy or childbirth (35.9% and 37.1%; P = 0.64), episiotomy (6.31% and 6.44%; P = 0.90), or cesarean delivery (15.6% and 14.2%; P = 0.48). Conclusion: Compared with IFA, antenatal LNS-PL did not increase or decrease pregnancy and childbirth complications or cesarean delivery among women in rural Bangladesh. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01715038. © 2017 American

  3. Maternal and Child Supplementation with Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements, but Not Child Supplementation Alone, Decreases Self-Reported Household Food Insecurity in Some Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Katherine P; Ayifah, Emmanuel; Phiri, Thokozani E; Mridha, Malay K; Adu-Afarwuah, Seth; Arimond, Mary; Arnold, Charles D; Cummins, Joseph; Hussain, Sohrab; Kumwenda, Chiza; Matias, Susana L; Ashorn, Ulla; Lartey, Anna; Maleta, Kenneth M; Vosti, Stephen A; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2017-12-01

    Background: It is unknown whether self-reported measures of household food insecurity change in response to food-based nutrient supplementation. Objective: We assessed the impacts of providing lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) to women during pregnancy and postpartum and/or to their children on self-reported household food insecurity in Malawi [DOSE and DYAD trial in Malawi (DYAD-M)], Ghana [DYAD trial in Ghana (DYAD-G)], and Bangladesh [Rang-Din Nutrition Study (RDNS) trial]. Methods: Longitudinal household food-insecurity data were collected during 3 individually randomized trials and 1 cluster-randomized trial testing the efficacy or effectiveness of LNSs (generally 118 kcal/d). Seasonally adjusted Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS) scores were constructed for 1127 DOSE households, 732 DYAD-M households, 1109 DYAD-G households, and 3671 RDNS households. The impact of providing LNSs to women during pregnancy and the first 6 mo postpartum and/or to their children from 6 to 18-24 mo on seasonally adjusted HFIAS scores was assessed by using negative binomial models (DOSE, DYAD-M, and DYAD-G trials) and mixed-effect negative binomial models (RDNS trial). Results: In the DOSE and DYAD-G trials, seasonally adjusted HFIAS scores were not different between the LNS and non-LNS groups. In the DYAD-M trial, the average household food-insecurity scores were 14% lower ( P = 0.01) in LNS households than in non-LNS households. In the RDNS trial, compared with non-LNS households, food-insecurity scores were 17% lower ( P = 0.02) during pregnancy and the first 6 mo postpartum and 15% lower ( P = 0.02) at 6-24 mo postpartum in LNS households. Conclusions: The daily provision of LNSs to mothers and their children throughout much of the "first 1000 d" may improve household food security in some settings, which could be viewed as an additional benefit that may accrue in households should policy makers choose to invest in LNSs to promote child growth and development

  4. Thiamin and Riboflavin in Human Milk: Effects of Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplementation and Stage of Lactation on Vitamer Secretion and Contributions to Total Vitamin Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Daniela; Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Adair, Linda S; Bentley, Margaret E; Flax, Valerie L; Jamieson, Denise J; Ellington, Sascha R; Tegha, Gerald; Chasela, Charles S; Kamwendo, Debbie; Allen, Lindsay H

    2016-01-01

    While thiamin and riboflavin in breast milk have been analyzed for over 50 years, less attention has been given to the different forms of each vitamin. Thiamin-monophosphate (TMP) and free thiamin contribute to total thiamin content; flavin adenine-dinucleotide (FAD) and free riboflavin are the main contributors to total riboflavin. We analyzed milk collected at 2 (n = 258) or 6 (n = 104), and 24 weeks (n = 362) from HIV-infected Malawian mothers within the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals and Nutrition (BAN) study, randomly assigned at delivery to lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) or a control group, to investigate each vitamer's contribution to total milk vitamin content and the effects of supplementation on the different thiamin and riboflavin vitamers at early and later stages of lactation, and obtain insight into the transport and distribution of these vitamers in human milk. Thiamin vitamers were derivatized into thiochrome-esters and analyzed by high-performance liquid-chromatography-fluorescence-detection (HPLC-FLD). Riboflavin and FAD were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid-chromatography-tandem-mass-spectrometry (ULPC-MS/MS). Thiamin-pyrophosphate (TPP), identified here for the first time in breast milk, contributed 1.9-4.5% to total thiamin. Free thiamin increased significantly from 2/6 to 24 weeks regardless of treatment indicating an active transport of this vitamer in milk. LNS significantly increased TMP and free thiamin only at 2 weeks compared to the control: median 170 versus 151 μg/L (TMP), 13.3 versus 10.5 μg/L (free thiamin, priboflavin was consistently and significantly increased with LNS (range: 14.8-19.6 μg/L (LNS) versus 5.0-7.4 μg/L (control), priboflavin relative amounts from 92-94:6-8% to 85:15%, indicating a preferred secretion of the free form into breast milk. The continuous presence of FAD in breast milk suggests an active transport and secretion system for this vitamer or possibly formation of this co-enymatic form in the

  5. Validation of ethnopharmacology of ayurvedic sarasvata ghrita and comparative evaluation of its neuroprotective effect with modern alcoholic and lipid based extracts in β-amyloid induced memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelar, Madhuri; Nanaware, Sadhana; Arulmozhi, S; Lohidasan, Sathiyanarayanan; Mahadik, Kakasaheb

    2018-06-12

    Sarasvata ghrita (SG), a polyherbal formulation from ayurveda, an ancient medicinal system of India, has been used to improve intelligence and memory, treat speech delay, speaking difficulties and low digestion power in children. Study aimed to validate the ethno use of SG in memory enhancement through systematic scientific protocol. The effect of SG and modern extracts of ingredients of SG was compared on cognitive function and neuroprotection in amyloid-β peptide 25-35(Aβ25-35) induced memory impairment in wistar rats. Further the underlying mechanism for neuroprotective activity was investigated. SG was prepared as per traditional method, ethanolic extract (EE) was prepared by conventional method and lipid based extract was prepared by modern extraction method. All extracts were standardised by newly developed HPLC method with respect to marker compounds. SG, EE and LE were administered orally to male Wistar rats at doses of 100,200 and 400 mg/kg Body Weight by feeding needle for a period of 21 days after the intracerebroventricular administration of Aβ25-35 bilaterally. Spatial memory of rats was tested using Morris water maze (MWM) and Radial arm maze (RAM) test. The possible underlying mechanisms for the cognitive improvement exhibited by SG, EE and LE was investigated through ex-vivo brain antioxidant effect, monoamine level estimation, acetylcholine esterase (AchE) inhibitory effect and Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) levels estimation. SG, EE and LE were analyzed by HPLC method, results showed that EE extract has high percent of selected phytoconstituents as compared with SG and LE. SG and LE decrease escape latency and searching distance in a dose dependant manner during MWM test. In case of RAM significant decrease in number of errors and increase in number of correct choices indicate an elevation in retention and recall aspects of learning and memory after administration of SG an LE. SG and LE extract can efficiently prevent accumulation of

  6. Preparation, characterization, and efficient transfection of cationic liposomes and nanomagnetic cationic liposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samadikhah HR

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Hamid Reza Samadikhah1,*, Asia Majidi2,*, Maryam Nikkhah2, Saman Hosseinkhani11Department of Biochemistry, 2Department of Nanobiotechnology, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: Cationic liposomes (CLs are composed of phospholipid bilayers. One of the most important applications of these particles is in drug and gene delivery. However, using CLs to deliver therapeutic nucleic acids and drugs to target organs has some problems, including low transfection efficiency in vivo. The aim of this study was to develop novel CLs containing magnetite to overcome the deficiencies. Patients and methods: CLs and magnetic cationic liposomes (MCLs were prepared using the freeze-dried empty liposome method. Luciferase-harboring vectors (pGL3 were transferred into liposomes and the transfection efficiencies were determined by luciferase assay. Firefly luciferase is one of most popular reporter genes often used to measure the efficiency of gene transfer in vivo and in vitro. Different formulations of liposomes have been used for delivery of different kinds of gene reporters. Lipoplex (liposome–plasmid DNA complexes formation was monitored by gel retardation assay. Size and charge of lipoplexes were determined using particle size analysis. Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected by lipoplexes (liposome-pGL3; transfection efficiency and gene expression level was evaluated by luciferase assay. Results: High transfection efficiency of plasmid by CLs and novel nanomagnetic CLs was achieved. Moreover, lipoplexes showed less cytotoxicity than polyethyleneimine and Lipofectamine™. Conclusion: Novel liposome compositions (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [DPPC]/dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide [DOAB] and DPPC/cholesterol/DOAB with high transfection efficiency can be useful in gene delivery in vitro. MCLs can also be used for targeted gene delivery, due to

  7. Functional changes of dendritic cells in hypersensivity reactions to amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.F. Lima

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of dendritic cell (DC involvement in responses to haptenic drugs is needed, because it represents a possible approach to the development of an in vitro test, which could identify patients prone to drug allergies. There are two main DC subsets: plasmacytoid DC (pDC and myeloid DC (mDC. β-lactams form hapten-carrier conjugates and may provide a suitable model to study DC behavior in drug allergy reactions. It has been demonstrated that drugs interact differently with DC in drug allergic and non-allergic patients, but there are no studies regarding these subsets. Our aim was to assess the functional changes of mDC and pDC harvested from an amoxicillin-hypersensitive 32-year-old woman who experienced a severe maculopapular exanthema as reflected in interleukin-6 (IL-6 production after stimulation with this drug and penicillin. We also aim to demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of this method for dendritic cell isolation followed by in vitro stimulation for studies of drug allergy physiopathology. DC were harvested using a double Percoll density gradient, which generates a basophil-depleted cell (BDC suspension. Further, pDC were isolated by blood DC antigen 4-positive magnetic selection and gravity filtration through magnetized columns. After stimulation with amoxicillin, penicillin and positive and negative controls, IL-6 production was measured by ELISA. A positive dose-response curve for IL-6 after stimulation with amoxicillin and penicillin was observed for pDC, but not for mDC or BDC suspension. These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of this methodology to expand the knowledge of the effect of dendritic cell activation by drug allergens.

  8. Fragmentation alters stream fish community structure in dendritic ecological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkin, Joshuah S; Gido, Keith B

    2012-12-01

    Effects of fragmentation on the ecology of organisms occupying dendritic ecological networks (DENs) have recently been described through both conceptual and mathematical models, but few hypotheses have been tested in complex, real-world ecosystems. Stream fishes provide a model system for assessing effects of fragmentation on the structure of communities occurring within DENs, including how fragmentation alters metacommunity dynamics and biodiversity. A recently developed habitat-availability measure, the "dendritic connectivity index" (DCI), allows for assigning quantitative measures of connectivity in DENs regardless of network extent or complexity, and might be used to predict fish community response to fragmentation. We characterized stream fish community structure in 12 DENs in the Great Plains, USA, during periods of dynamic (summer) and muted (fall) discharge regimes to test the DCI as a predictive model of fish community response to fragmentation imposed by road crossings. Results indicated that fish communities in stream segments isolated by road crossings had reduced species richness (alpha diversity) relative to communities that maintained connectivity with the surrounding DEN during summer and fall. Furthermore, isolated communities had greater dissimilarity (beta diversity) to downstream sites notisolated by road crossings during summer and fall. Finally, dissimilarity among communities within DENs decreased as a function of increased habitat connectivity (measured using the DCI) for summer and fall, suggesting that communities within highly connected DENs tend to be more homogeneous. Our results indicate that the DCI is sensitive to community effects of fragmentation in riverscapes and might be used by managers to predict ecological responses to changes in habitat connectivity. Moreover, our findings illustrate that relating structural connectivity of riverscapes to functional connectivity among communities might aid in maintaining metacommunity

  9. Evaluation of phenomena affecting diffusion of cations in compacted bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muurinen, A.; Lehikoinen, J.

    1995-04-01

    In a number of diffusion studies, contradictions between the apparent diffusivities of cations and their distribution coefficients in bentonite have been found. Two principal reasons have been offered as explanations for this discrepancy; diffusion of the sorbed cations, often called surface diffusion, and the decrease of sorption in compacted clay compared to a sorption value obtained from a batch experiment. In the study the information available from the literature on sorption-diffusion mechanisms of cations in bentonite has been compiled and re-interpreted in order to improve the understanding of the diffusion process. (103 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.)

  10. Microscopic theory of cation exchange in CdSe nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Florian D; Spiegel, Leo L; Norris, David J; Erwin, Steven C

    2014-10-10

    Although poorly understood, cation-exchange reactions are increasingly used to dope or transform colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots). We use density-functional theory and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations to develop a microscopic theory that explains structural, optical, and electronic changes observed experimentally in Ag-cation-exchanged CdSe nanocrystals. We find that Coulomb interactions, both between ionized impurities and with the polarized nanocrystal surface, play a key role in cation exchange. Our theory also resolves several experimental puzzles related to photoluminescence and electrical behavior in CdSe nanocrystals doped with Ag.

  11. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Boughlala, Z.; Guerra, C.F.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas?phase Cl?X and [HCl?X]+ complexes for X+=?H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+, using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl? and HCl for the various cations. The Cl?X bond becomes longer and weaker along X+?=?H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+. Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence ...

  12. Intestinal dendritic cells in the regulation of mucosal immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekiaris, Vasileios; Persson, Emma K.; Agace, William Winston

    2014-01-01

    immune cells within the mucosa must suitably respond to maintain intestinal integrity, while also providing the ability to mount effective immune responses to potential pathogens. Dendritic cells (DCs) are sentinel immune cells that play a central role in the initiation and differentiation of adaptive....... The recognition that dietary nutrients and microbial communities in the intestine influence both mucosal and systemic immune cell development and function as well as immune-mediated disease has led to an explosion of literature in mucosal immunology in recent years and a growing interest in the functionality...

  13. Bone marrow dendritic cell-based anticancer vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Indrová, Marie; Mendoza, Luis; Reiniš, Milan; Vonka, V.; Šmahel, M.; Němečková, Š.; Jandlová, Táňa; Bubeník, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 495, - (2001), s. 355-358 ISSN 0065-2598 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5526; GA ČR GA312/98/0826; GA ČR GA312/99/0542; GA ČR GA301/00/0114; GA ČR GA301/01/0985; GA AV ČR IAA7052002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : HPV16 * dendritic cell s * tumour vaccines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.513, year: 2000

  14. Targeting dendritic cells in vivo for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina eCaminschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that recognise cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumour immunity elicited using this immunisation strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialisation of DC-subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC-subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumour immunity. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress towards targeting human DC in vivo.

  15. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Dendritic Spines in the Living Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chien eChen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are ubiquitous postsynaptic sites of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain, and thus may serve as structural indicators of functional synapses. Recent works have suggested that neuronal coding of memories may be associated with rapid alterations in spine formation and elimination. Technological advances have enabled researchers to study spine dynamics in vivo during development as well as under various physiological and pathological conditions. We believe that better understanding of the spatiotemporal patterns of spine dynamics will help elucidate the principles of experience-dependent circuit modification and information processing in the living brain.

  16. Regulatory dendritic cell therapy: from rodents to clinical application

    OpenAIRE

    Raïch-Regué, Dalia; Glancy, Megan; Thomson, Angus W.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are highly-specialized, bone marrow-derived antigen-presenting cells that induce or regulate innate and adaptive immunity. Regulatory or “tolerogenic” DC play a crucial role in maintaining self tolerance in the healthy steady-state. These regulatory innate immune cells subvert naïve or memory T cell responses by various mechanisms. Regulatory DC (DCreg) also exhibit the ability to induce or restore T cell tolerance in many animal models of autoimmune disease or transplant...

  17. Dendritic cell immunotherapy for HIV infection: from theory to reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Telma Miyuki; de Almeida, Alexandre; da Silva Duarte, Alberto José

    2009-11-01

    Knowledge concerning the immunology of dendritic cells (DCs) accumulated over the last few decades and the development of methodologies to generate and manipulate these cells in vitro has made their therapeutic application a reality. Currently, clinical protocols for DC-based therapeutic vaccine in HIV-infected individuals show that it is a safe and promising approach. Concomitantly, important advances continue to be made in the development of methodologies to optimize DC acquisition, as well as the selection of safe, immunogenic HIV antigens and the evaluation of immune response in treated individuals.

  18. Piezo Is Essential for Amiloride-Sensitive Stretch-Activated Mechanotransduction in Larval Drosophila Dorsal Bipolar Dendritic Sensory Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslak, Thomas J; Watson, Sonia; Thompson, Karen J; Shenton, Fiona C; Bewick, Guy S; Armstrong, J Douglas; Jarman, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Stretch-activated afferent neurons, such as those of mammalian muscle spindles, are essential for proprioception and motor co-ordination, but the underlying mechanisms of mechanotransduction are poorly understood. The dorsal bipolar dendritic (dbd) sensory neurons are putative stretch receptors in the Drosophila larval body wall. We have developed an in vivo protocol to obtain receptor potential recordings from intact dbd neurons in response to stretch. Receptor potential changes in dbd neurons in response to stretch showed a complex, dynamic profile with similar characteristics to those previously observed for mammalian muscle spindles. These profiles were reproduced by a general in silico model of stretch-activated neurons. This in silico model predicts an essential role for a mechanosensory cation channel (MSC) in all aspects of receptor potential generation. Using pharmacological and genetic techniques, we identified the mechanosensory channel, DmPiezo, in this functional role in dbd neurons, with TRPA1 playing a subsidiary role. We also show that rat muscle spindles exhibit a ruthenium red-sensitive current, but found no expression evidence to suggest that this corresponds to Piezo activity. In summary, we show that the dbd neuron is a stretch receptor and demonstrate that this neuron is a tractable model for investigating mechanisms of mechanotransduction.

  19. Converting Hg-1212 to Tl-2212 via Tl-Hg cation exchange in combination with Tl cation intercalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hua; Wu, Judy Z

    2007-01-01

    In a cation exchange process developed recently for epitaxy of HgBa 2 CaCu 2 O 6 (Hg-1212) thin films, TlBa 2 CaCu 2 O 7 (Tl-1212) or Tl 2 Ba 2 CaCu 2 O 9 (Tl-2212) precursor films were employed as the precursor matrices and Hg-1212 was obtained by replacing Tl cations on the precursor lattice with Hg cations. The reversibility of the cation exchange dictates directly the underlying mechanism. Following our recent success in demonstrating a complete reversibility within '1212' structure, we show the conversion from Hg-1212 to Tl-2212 can be achieved via two steps: conversion from Hg-1212 to Tl-1212 followed by Tl intercalation to form double Tl-O plans in each unit cell. The demonstrated reversibility of the cation exchange process has confirmed the process is a thermal perturbation of weakly bonded cations on the lattice and the direction of the process is determined by the population ratio between the replacing cations and that to be replaced

  20. Large-Scale mRNA Transfection of Dendritic Cells by Electroporation in Continuous Flow Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmeczi, Dávid; Hansen, Thomas Steen; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    with high cell survival. Continuous flow of suspended dendritic cells through a channel incorporating spatially separated microporous meshes with a synchronized electrical pulsing sequence can yield dendritic cell transfection rates of >75 % with survival rates of >90 %. This chapter describes...

  1. Calcium spikes and calcium plateaux evoked by differential polarization in dendrites of turtle motoneurones in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, J; Kiehn, O

    1993-01-01

    The ability of dendrites in turtle motoneurones to support calcium spikes and calcium plateaux was investigated using differential polarization by applied electric fields. 2. Electric fields were generated by passing current through transverse slices of the turtle spinal cord between two plate......+ spikes and Ca2+ plateaux are present in dendrites of spinal motoneurones of the turtle....

  2. Formation mechanism of PbTe dendritic nanostructures grown by electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sangwoo; Kim, Hyunghoon; Lee, Ho Seong, E-mail: hs.lee@knu.ac.kr

    2017-02-01

    The formation mechanism of PbTe dendritic nanostructures grown at room temperature by electrodeposition in nitric acid electrolytes containing Pb and Te was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses indicated that the PbTe dendritic nanostructures were composed of triangular-shaped units surrounded by {111} and {110} planes. Because of the interfacial energy anisotropy of the {111} and {110} planes and the difference in the current density gradient, the growth rate in the vertical direction of the (111) basal plane was slower than that in the direction of the tip of the triangular shape, leading to growth in the tip direction. In contrast to the general growth direction of fcc dendrites, namely <100>, the tip direction of the {111} basal plane for our samples was <112>, and the PbTe dendritic nanostructures grew in the tip direction. The angles formed by the main trunk and first branches were regular and approximately 60°, and those between the first and second branches were also approximately 60°. Finally, the nanostructures grew in single-crystalline dendritic form. - Highlights: • PbTe dendrite nanostructures were grown by electrodeposition. • PbTe dendritic nanostructures were composed of triangular-shaped units. • The formation mechanism of PbTe dendrite nanostructures was characterized.

  3. A dendrite-autonomous mechanism for direction selectivity in retinal starburst amacrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausselt, Susanne E; Euler, Thomas; Detwiler, Peter B; Denk, Winfried

    2007-07-01

    Detection of image motion direction begins in the retina, with starburst amacrine cells (SACs) playing a major role. SACs generate larger dendritic Ca(2+) signals when motion is from their somata towards their dendritic tips than for motion in the opposite direction. To study the mechanisms underlying the computation of direction selectivity (DS) in SAC dendrites, electrical responses to expanding and contracting circular wave visual stimuli were measured via somatic whole-cell recordings and quantified using Fourier analysis. Fundamental and, especially, harmonic frequency components were larger for expanding stimuli. This DS persists in the presence of GABA and glycine receptor antagonists, suggesting that inhibitory network interactions are not essential. The presence of harmonics indicates nonlinearity, which, as the relationship between harmonic amplitudes and holding potential indicates, is likely due to the activation of voltage-gated channels. [Ca(2+)] changes in SAC dendrites evoked by voltage steps and monitored by two-photon microscopy suggest that the distal dendrite is tonically depolarized relative to the soma, due in part to resting currents mediated by tonic glutamatergic synaptic input, and that high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels are active at rest. Supported by compartmental modeling, we conclude that dendritic DS in SACs can be computed by the dendrites themselves, relying on voltage-gated channels and a dendritic voltage gradient, which provides the spatial asymmetry necessary for direction discrimination.

  4. A dendrite-autonomous mechanism for direction selectivity in retinal starburst amacrine cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne E Hausselt

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Detection of image motion direction begins in the retina, with starburst amacrine cells (SACs playing a major role. SACs generate larger dendritic Ca(2+ signals when motion is from their somata towards their dendritic tips than for motion in the opposite direction. To study the mechanisms underlying the computation of direction selectivity (DS in SAC dendrites, electrical responses to expanding and contracting circular wave visual stimuli were measured via somatic whole-cell recordings and quantified using Fourier analysis. Fundamental and, especially, harmonic frequency components were larger for expanding stimuli. This DS persists in the presence of GABA and glycine receptor antagonists, suggesting that inhibitory network interactions are not essential. The presence of harmonics indicates nonlinearity, which, as the relationship between harmonic amplitudes and holding potential indicates, is likely due to the activation of voltage-gated channels. [Ca(2+] changes in SAC dendrites evoked by voltage steps and monitored by two-photon microscopy suggest that the distal dendrite is tonically depolarized relative to the soma, due in part to resting currents mediated by tonic glutamatergic synaptic input, and that high-voltage-activated Ca(2+ channels are active at rest. Supported by compartmental modeling, we conclude that dendritic DS in SACs can be computed by the dendrites themselves, relying on voltage-gated channels and a dendritic voltage gradient, which provides the spatial asymmetry necessary for direction discrimination.

  5. CD1 and major histocompatibility complex II molecules follow a different course during dendritic cell maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, Nicole N.; Sugita, Masahiko; Fluitsma, Donna M.; Cao, Xaiochun; Schreibelt, Gerty; Brenner, Michael B.; Peters, Peter J.

    2003-01-01

    The maturation of dendritic cells is accompanied by the redistribution of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules from the lysosomal MHC class IT compartment to the plasma membrane to mediate presentation of peptide antigens. Besides MHC molecules, dendritic cells also express CD1

  6. Numerical Simulation on Dendrite Growth During Solidification of Al-4%Cu Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Min

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new two-dimensional cellular automata and finite difference (CA-FD model of dendritic growth was improved, which a perturbation function was introduced to control the growth of secondary and tertiary dendrite, the concentration of the solute was clearly defined as the liquid solute concentration and the solid-phase solute concentration in dendrite growth processes, and the eight moore calculations method was used to reduce the anisotropy caused by the shape of the grid in the process of redistribution and diffusion of solute. Single and multi equiaxed dendrites along different preferential direction, single and multi directions of columnar dendrites of Al-4% Cu alloy were simulated, as well as the distribution of liquid solute concentration and solid solute concentration. The simulation results show that the introduced perturbation function can promote the dendrite branching, liquid/solid phase solute calculation model is able to simulate the solute distribution of liquid/solid phase accurately in the process of dendritic growth, and the improved model can realize competitive growth of dendrite in any direction.

  7. Dendritic calcium activity precedes inspiratory bursts in preBotzinger complex neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Negro, Christopher A; Hayes, John A; Rekling, Jens C

    2011-01-01

    to evoke a Ca(2+)-activated inward current that contributes to inspiratory burst generation. We measured Ca(2+) transients by two-photon imaging dendrites while recording neuronal somata electrophysiologically. Dendritic Ca(2+) accumulation frequently precedes inspiratory bursts, particularly at recording...

  8. Controlling T-Cell Activation with Synthetic Dendritic Cells Using the Multivalency Effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammink, R.; Mandal, S.; Eggermont, L.J.; Nooteboom, M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Tel, J.; Rowan, A.E.; Figdor, C.G.; Blank, K.G.

    2017-01-01

    Artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) have recently gained a lot of attention. They efficiently activate T cells and serve as powerful replacements for dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy. Focusing on a specific class of polymer-based aAPCs, so-called synthetic dendritic cells (sDCs), we

  9. POMT1-associated walker-warburg syndrome: a disorder of dendritic development of neocortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judas, M; Sedmak, G; Rados, M; Sarnavka, V; Fumić, K; Willer, T; Gross, C; Hehr, U; Strahl, S; Cuk, M; Barić, I

    2009-02-01

    We have analyzed the morphology and dendritic development of neocortical neurons in a 2.5-month-old infant with Walker-Warburg syndrome homozygotic for a novel POMT1 gene mutation, by Golgi methods. We found that pyramidal neurons frequently displayed abnormal (oblique, horizontal, or inverted) orientation. A novel finding of this study is that members of the same population of pyramidal neurons display different stages of development of their dendritic arborizations: some neurons had poorly developed dendrites and thus resembled pyramidal neurons of the late fetal cortex; for some neurons, the level of differentiation corresponded to that in the newborn cortex; finally, some neurons had quite elaborate dendritic trees as expected for the cortex of 2.5-month-old infant. In addition, apical dendrites of many pyramidal neurons were conspiciously bent to one side, irrespective to the general orientation of the pyramidal neuron. These findings suggest that Walker-Warburg lissencephaly is characterized by two hitherto unnoticed pathogenetic changes in the cerebral cortex: (a) heterochronic decoupling of dendritic maturation within the same neuronal population (with some members significantly lagging behind the normal maturational schedule) and (b) anisotropically distorted shaping of dendritic trees, probably caused by patchy displacement of molecular guidance cues for dendrites in the malformed cortex. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  10. The shaping of two distinct dendritic spikes by A-type voltage-gated K+ channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungchil eYang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic ion channels have been a subject of intense research in neuroscience because active ion channels in dendrites shape input signals. Ca2+-permeable channels including NMDA receptors (NMDARs have been implicated in supralinear dendritic integration, and the IA conductance in sublinear integration. Despite their essential roles in dendritic integration, it has remained uncertain whether these conductances coordinate with, or counteract, each other in the process of dendritic integration. To address this question, experiments were designed in hippocampal CA1 neurons with a recent 3D digital holography system that has shown excellent performance for spatial photoactivation. The results demonstrated a role of IA as a key contributor to two distinct dendritic spikes, low- and high-threshold Ca2+ spikes, through a preferential action of IA on Ca2+-permeable channel-mediated currents, over fast AMPAR-mediated currents. It is likely that the rapid kinetics of IA provides feed-forward inhibition to counteract the delayed Ca2+ channel-mediated dendritic excitability. This research reveals one dynamic ionic mechanism of dendritic integration, and may contribute to a new understanding of neuronal hyperexcitability embedded in several neural diseases such as epilepsy, fragile X syndrome and Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Endomembrane Cation Transporters and Membrane Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, Heven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics

    2017-04-01

    Multicellular, as well as unicellular, organisms have evolved mechanisms to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental cues and to a changing environment. The working hypothesis is that the balance of fluxes mediated by diverse transporters at the plasma membrane and in subcellular organelles determines ionic cellular distribution, which is critical for maintenance of membrane potential, pH control, osmolality, transport of nutrients, and protein activity. An emerging theme in plant cell biology is that cells respond and adapt to diverse cues through changes of the dynamic endomembrane system. Yet we know very little about the transporters that might influence the operation of the secretory system in plants. Here we focus on transporters that influence alkali cation and pH homeostasis, mainly in the endomembrane/ secretory system. The endomembrane system of eukaryote cells serves several major functions: i) sort cargo (e.g. enzymes, transporters or receptors) to specific destinations, ii) modulate the protein and lipid composition of membrane domains through remodeling, and iii) determine and alter the properties of the cell wall through synthesis and remodeling. We had uncovered a novel family of predicted cation/H+ exchangers (CHX) and K+ efflux antiporters (KEA) that are prevalent in higher plants, but rare in metazoans. We combined phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses with molecular genetic, cell biological and biochemical studies, and have published the first reports on functions of plant CHXs and KEAs. CHX studied to date act at the endomembrane system where their actions are distinct from the better-studied NHX (Na/K-H+ exchangers). Arabidopsis thaliana CHX20 in guard cells modulate stomatal opening, and thus is significant for vegetative survival. Other CHXs ensure reproductive success on dry land, as they participate in organizing pollen walls, targeting of pollen tubes to the ovule or promoting

  12. Dendritic nonlinearities are tuned for efficient spike-based computations in cortical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujfalussy, Balázs B; Makara, Judit K; Branco, Tiago; Lengyel, Máté

    2015-12-24

    Cortical neurons integrate thousands of synaptic inputs in their dendrites in highly nonlinear ways. It is unknown how these dendritic nonlinearities in individual cells contribute to computations at the level of neural circuits. Here, we show that dendritic nonlinearities are critical for the efficient integration of synaptic inputs in circuits performing analog computations with spiking neurons. We developed a theory that formalizes how a neuron's dendritic nonlinearity that is optimal for integrating synaptic inputs depends on the statistics of its presynaptic activity patterns. Based on their in vivo preynaptic population statistics (firing rates, membrane potential fluctuations, and correlations due to ensemble dynamics), our theory accurately predicted the responses of two different types of cortical pyramidal cells to patterned stimulation by two-photon glutamate uncaging. These results reveal a new computational principle underlying dendritic integration in cortical neurons by suggesting a functional link between cellular and systems--level properties of cortical circuits.

  13. Stochastic modeling of columnar dendritic grain growth in weld pool of Al-Cu alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Z.B.; Tian, N. [The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Wei, Y.H. [College of Materials Science and Technology, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); The State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Zhan, X.H.

    2009-04-15

    A multi-scale model is used to simulate columnar dendritic growth in TIG (tungsten inert-gas) weld molten pool of Al-Cu alloy. The grain morphologies at the edge of the weld pool are studied. The simulated results indicate that the average primary dendrite spacing changes during the solidification process in the weld pool because of the complicated thermal field, solute diffusion field and competitive growth. And it is shown that the secondary dendrite arms grow insufficiently in the space between dendrite trunks if the primary dendrite spacing is small. And the phenomenon has been explained by analyzing the influence of the solute accumulation on the constitutional undercooling and undercooling gradient when there are two different opposite solute diffusion fields. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Rapid synthesis of dendritic Pt/Pb nanoparticles and their electrocatalytic performance toward ethanol oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke; Xu, Hui; Yan, Bo; Wang, Jin; Gu, Zhulan; Du, Yukou

    2017-12-01

    This article reports a rapid synthetic method for the preparation of dendritic platinum-lead bimetallic catalysts by using an oil bath for 5 min in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) and ascorbic acid (AA). CTAC acts as a shape-direction agent, and AA acts as a reducing agent during the reaction process. A series of physical techniques are used to characterize the morphology, structure and electronic properties of the dendritic Pt/Pb nanoparticles, indicating the Pt/Pb dendrites are porous, highly alloying, and self-supported nanostructures. Various electrochemical techniques were also investigated the catalytic performance of the Pt/Pb catalysts toward the ethanol electrooxidation reaction. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry indicated that the synthesized dendritic Pt/Pb nanoparticles possessed much higher electrocatalytic performance than bulk Pt catalyst. This study may inspire the engineering of dendritic bimetallic catalysts, which are expected to have great potential applications in fuel cells.

  15. Hierarchical Pd-Sn alloy nanosheet dendrites: an economical and highly active catalyst for ethanol electrooxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liang-Xin; Wang, An-Liang; Ou, Yan-Nan; Li, Qi; Guo, Rui; Zhao, Wen-Xia; Tong, Ye-Xiang; Li, Gao-Ren

    2013-01-01

    Hierarchical alloy nanosheet dendrites (ANSDs) are highly favorable for superior catalytic performance and efficient utilization of catalyst because of the special characteristics of alloys, nanosheets, and dendritic nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a facile and efficient electrodeposition approach for the controllable synthesis of Pd-Sn ANSDs with high surface area. These synthesized Pd-Sn ANSDs exhibit high electrocatalytic activity and superior long-term cycle stability toward ethanol oxidation in alkaline media. The enhanced electrocataytic activity of Pd-Sn ANSDs may be attributed to Pd-Sn alloys, nanosheet dendrite induced promotional effect, large number of active sites on dendrite surface, large surface area, and good electrical contact with the base electrode. Because of the simple implement and high flexibility, the proposed approach can be considered as a general and powerful strategy to synthesize the alloy electrocatalysts with high surface areas and open dendritic nanostructures.

  16. Radial macrosegregation and dendrite clustering in directionally solidified Al-7Si and Al-19Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, M.; Johnson, L.; Lauer, M.; Grugel, R. N.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.

    2016-05-01

    Hypoeutectic Al-7 wt% Si and Al-19 wt% Cu alloys were directionally solidified upward in a Bridgman furnace through a range of constant growth speeds and thermal gradients. Though processing is thermo-solutally stable, flow initiated by gravity-independent advection at, slightly leading, central dendrites moves rejected solute out ahead and across the advancing interface. Here any lagging dendrites are further suppressed which promotes a curved solid-liquid interface and the eventual dendrite "clustering" seen in transverse sections (dendrite "steepling" in longitudinal orientations) as well as extensive radial macrosegregation. Both aluminum alloys showed considerable macrosegregation at the low growth speeds (10 and 30 μm s-1) but not at higher speed (72 μm s-1). Distribution of the fraction eutectic-constituent on transverse sections was determined in order to quantitatively describe radial macrosegregation. The convective mechanisms leading to dendrite-steepling were elucidated with numerical simulations, and their results compared with the experimental observations.

  17. Cation binding to 15-TBA quadruplex DNA is a multiple-pathway cation-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, Roman V; Sponer, Jiri; Rassokhina, Olga I; Kopylov, Alexei M; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Makarov, Alexander A; Golovin, Andrey V

    2011-12-01

    A combination of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation (30 simulations reaching 4 µs in total), hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach and isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the atomistic picture of ion binding to 15-mer thrombin-binding quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) aptamer. Binding of ions to G-DNA is complex multiple pathway process, which is strongly affected by the type of the cation. The individual ion-binding events are substantially modulated by the connecting loops of the aptamer, which play several roles. They stabilize the molecule during time periods when the bound ions are not present, they modulate the route of the ion into the stem and they also stabilize the internal ions by closing the gates through which the ions enter the quadruplex. Using our extensive simulations, we for the first time observed full spontaneous exchange of internal cation between quadruplex molecule and bulk solvent at atomistic resolution. The simulation suggests that expulsion of the internally bound ion is correlated with initial binding of the incoming ion. The incoming ion then readily replaces the bound ion while minimizing any destabilization of the solute molecule during the exchange. © The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Cation binding to 15-TBA quadruplex DNA is a multiple-pathway cation-dependent process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, Roman V.; Sponer, Jiri; Rassokhina, Olga I.; Kopylov, Alexei M.; Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Makarov, Alexander A.; Golovin, Andrey V.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation (30 simulations reaching 4 µs in total), hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach and isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the atomistic picture of ion binding to 15-mer thrombin-binding quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) aptamer. Binding of ions to G-DNA is complex multiple pathway process, which is strongly affected by the type of the cation. The individual ion-binding events are substantially modulated by the connecting loops of the aptamer, which play several roles. They stabilize the molecule during time periods when the bound ions are not present, they modulate the route of the ion into the stem and they also stabilize the internal ions by closing the gates through which the ions enter the quadruplex. Using our extensive simulations, we for the first time observed full spontaneous exchange of internal cation between quadruplex molecule and bulk solvent at atomistic resolution. The simulation suggests that expulsion of the internally bound ion is correlated with initial binding of the incoming ion. The incoming ion then readily replaces the bound ion while minimizing any destabilization of the solute molecule during the exchange. PMID:21893589

  19. Use of marker ion and cationic surfactant plastic membrane electrode for potentiometric titration of cationic polyelectrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masadome, Takashi; Imato, Toshihiko

    2003-07-04

    A plasticized poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane electrode sensitive to stearyltrimethylammonium (STA) ion is applied to the determination of cationic polyelectrolytes such as poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (Cat-floc) by potentiometric titration, using a potassium poly (vinyl sulfate) (PVSK) solution as a titrant. The end-point of the titration is detected as the potential change of the plasticized PVC membrane electrode caused by decrease in the concentration of STA ion added to the sample solution as a marker ion due to the ion association reaction between the STA ion and PVSK. The effects of the concentration of STA ion, coexisting electrolytes in the sample solution and pH of the sample on the degree of the potential change at the end-point were examined. A linear relationship between the concentration of cationic polyelectrolyte and the end-point volume of the titrant exists in the concentration range from 2x10(-5) to 4x10(-4) N for Cat-floc, glycol chitosan, and methylglycol chitosan.

  20. Opposing effects of cationic antimicrobial peptides and divalent cations on bacterial lipopolysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Matthew; Rajagopal, Aruna; Liu, Wing-Ki; Ha, Bae-Yeun

    2017-10-01

    The permeability of the bacterial outer membrane, enclosing Gram-negative bacteria, depends on the interactions of the outer, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) layer, with surrounding ions and molecules. We present a coarse-grained model for describing how cationic amphiphilic molecules (e.g., antimicrobial peptides) interact with and perturb the LPS layer in a biologically relevant medium, containing monovalent and divalent salt ions (e.g., Mg2+). In our approach, peptide binding is driven by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions and is assumed to expand the LPS layer, eventually priming it for disruption. Our results suggest that in parameter ranges of biological relevance (e.g., at micromolar concentrations) the antimicrobial peptide magainin 2 effectively disrupts the LPS layer, even though it has to compete with Mg2+ for the layer. They also show how the integrity of LPS is restored with an increasing concentration of Mg2+. Using the approach, we make a number of predictions relevant for optimizing peptide parameters against Gram-negative bacteria and for understanding bacterial strategies to develop resistance against cationic peptides.

  1. Chemical bonding and structural ordering of cations in silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calas, G.; Cormier, L.; Galoisy, L.; Ramos, A.; Rossano, St.

    1997-01-01

    The specific surrounding of cations in multicomponent silicate glasses is briefly presented. Information about interatomic distances and site geometry may be gained by using spectroscopic methods among which x-ray absorption spectroscopy may be used for the largest number of glass components. Scattering of x-rays and neutrons may also be used to determine the importance of medium range order around specific cations. All the existing data show that cations occur in sites with a well-defined geometry, which are in most cases connected to the silicate polymeric network. Medium range order has been detected around cations such as Ti, Ca and Ni, indicating that these elements have an heterogeneous distribution within the glassy matrix. (authors)

  2. Dynamics of photoexcited Ba+ cations in 4He nanodroplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain))" data-affiliation=" (Departament ECM, Facultat de Física, and IN2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain))" >Leal, Antonio; 2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain))" data-affiliation=" (Departament ECM, Facultat de Física, and IN2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain))" >Pi, Martí; Zhang, Xiaohang; Drabbels, Marcel; 2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Laboratoire des Collisions, Agrégats, Réactivité, IRSAMC, UMR 5589, CNRS et Université Paul Sabatier-Toulouse 3, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France))" data-affiliation=" (Departament ECM, Facultat de Física, and IN2UB, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Laboratoire des Collisions, Agrégats, Réactivité, IRSAMC, UMR 5589, CNRS et Université Paul Sabatier-Toulouse 3, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France))" >Barranco, Manuel; Cargnoni, Fausto; Hernando, Alberto; Mateo, David; Mella, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We present a joint experimental and theoretical study on the desolvation of Ba + cations in 4 He nanodroplets excited via the 6p ← 6s transition. The experiments reveal an efficient desolvation process yielding mainly bare Ba + cations and Ba + He n exciplexes with n = 1 and 2. The speed distributions of the ions are well described by Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions with temperatures ranging from 60 to 178 K depending on the excitation frequency and Ba + He n exciplex size. These results have been analyzed by calculations based on a time-dependent density functional description for the helium droplet combined with classical dynamics for the Ba + . In agreement with experiment, the calculations reveal the dynamical formation of exciplexes following excitation of the Ba + cation. In contrast to experimental observation, the calculations do not reveal desolvation of excited Ba + cations or exciplexes, even when relaxation pathways to lower lying states are included.

  3. Aggregation of trypsin and trypsin inhibitor by Al cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanphai, P; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2017-04-01

    Al cation may trigger protein structural changes such as aggregation and fibrillation, causing neurodegenerative diseases. We report the effect of Al cation on the solution structures of trypsin (try) and trypsin inhibitor (tryi), using thermodynamic analysis, UV-Visible, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic methods and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Thermodynamic parameters showed Al-protein bindings occur via H-bonding and van der Waals contacts for trypsin and trypsin inhibitor. AFM showed that Al cations are able to force trypsin into larger or more robust aggregates than trypsin inhibitor, with trypsin 5±1 SE (n=52) proteins per aggregate and for trypsin inhibitor 8.3±0.7 SE (n=118). Thioflavin T test showed no major protein fibrillation in the presence of Al cation. Al complexation induced more alterations of trypsin inhibitor conformation than trypsin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Significant role of cationic polymers in drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshbaf, Masoud; Davaran, Soodabeh; Zarebkohan, Amir; Annabi, Nasim; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Salehi, Roya

    2017-11-06

    Cationic polymers are characterized as the macromolecules that possess positive charges, which can be either inherently in the polymer side chains and/or its backbone. Based on their origins, cationic polymers are divided in two category including natural and synthetic, in which the possessed positive charges are as result of primary, secondary or tertiary amine functional groups that could be protonated in particular situations. Cationic polymers have been employed commonly as drug delivery agents due to their superior encapsulation efficacy, enhanced bioavailability, low toxicity and improved release profile. In this paper, we focus on the most prominent examples of cationic polymers which have been revealed to be applicable in drug delivery systems and we also discuss their general synthesis and surface modification methods as well as their controlled release profile in drug delivery.

  5. Changing certain dietary cationic and anionic minerals: Impact on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changing certain dietary cationic and anionic minerals: Impact on blood chemistry, milk ... Increased blood pH and serum HCO3 were noticed in buffaloes fed with LC ... Serum calcium and chloride increased with decreased DCAD level while ...

  6. DMPD: The role of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic celldevelopment and function. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17702640 The role of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic celldevelopment and function...in dendritic celldevelopment and function. PubmedID 17702640 Title The role of th...e interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic celldevelopment and function. Authors Gabriele L, O

  7. DMPD: Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17142025 Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. Watt...) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic cells. PubmedID... 17142025 Title Proximal effects of Toll-like receptor activation in dendritic ce

  8. Mercury release from deforested soils triggered by base cation enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farella, N.; Lucotte, M.; Davidson, R.; Daigle, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Brazilian Amazon has experienced considerable colonization in the last few decades. Family agriculture based on slash-and-burn enables millions of people to live in that region. However, the poor nutrient content of most Amazonian soils requires cation-rich ashes from the burning of the vegetation biomass for cultivation to be successful, which leads to forest ecosystem degradation, soil erosion and mercury contamination. While recent studies have suggested that mercury present in soils was transferred towards rivers upon deforestation, little is known about the dynamics between agricultural land-use and mercury leaching. In this context, the present study proposes an explanation that illustrates how agricultural land-use triggers mercury loss from soils. This explanation lies in the competition between base cations and mercury in soils which are characterized by a low adsorption capacity. Since these soils are naturally very poor in base cations, the burning of the forest biomass suddenly brings high quantities of base cations to soils, destabilizing the previous equilibrium amongst cations. Base cation enrichment triggers mobility in soil cations, rapidly dislocating mercury atoms. This conclusion comes from principal component analyses illustrating that agricultural land-use was associated with base cation enrichment and mercury depletion. The overall conclusions highlight a pernicious cycle: while soil nutrient enrichment actually occurs through biomass burning, although on a temporary basis, there is a loss in Hg content, which is leached to rivers, entering the aquatic chain, and posing a potential health threat to local populations. Data presented here reflects three decades of deforestation activities, but little is known about the long-term impact of such a disequilibrium. These findings may have repercussions on our understanding of the complex dynamics of deforestation and agriculture worldwide

  9. Isomerizations of the Nitromethane Radical Cation in the Gas Phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, Helge; Carlsen, Lars; Elbel, Susanne

    1986-01-01

    The concurrent isomerizations of the nitromethane radical cation to its aci-nitromethane and methylnitrite isomers, respectively, has been established based on metastable ion studies and collision activation mass spectrometry. The energy diagram for the ionized nitromethane/aci-nitromethane tauto......The concurrent isomerizations of the nitromethane radical cation to its aci-nitromethane and methylnitrite isomers, respectively, has been established based on metastable ion studies and collision activation mass spectrometry. The energy diagram for the ionized nitromethane...

  10. The spine problem: Finding a function for dendritic spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eMalanowski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Why do neurons have dendritic spines? This question— the heart of what Yuste calls the spine problem— presupposes that why-questions of this sort have scientific answers: that empirical findings can favor or count against claims about why neurons have spines. Here we show how such questions can receive empirical answers. We construe such why-questions as questions about how spines make a difference to the behavior of some mechanism that we take to be significant. Why-questions are driven fundamentally by the effort to understand how some item, such as the dendritic spine, is situated in the causal structure of the world (the causal nexus. They ask for a filter on that busy world that allows us to see a part’s individual contribution to a mechanism, independent of everything else going on. So understood, answers to why-questions can be assessed by testing the claims these answers make about the causal structure of a mechanism. We distinguish four ways of making a difference to a mechanism (necessary, modulatory, component, background condition, and we sketch their evidential requirements. One consequence of our analysis is that there are many spine problems and that any given spine problem might have many acceptable answers.

  11. A Septin-Dependent Diffusion Barrier at Dendritic Spine Necks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helge Ewers

    Full Text Available Excitatory glutamatergic synapses at dendritic spines exchange and modulate their receptor content via lateral membrane diffusion. Several studies have shown that the thin spine neck impedes the access of membrane and solute molecules to the spine head. However, it is unclear whether the spine neck geometry alone restricts access to dendritic spines or if a physical barrier to the diffusion of molecules exists. Here, we investigated whether a complex of septin cytoskeletal GTPases localized at the base of the spine neck regulates diffusion across the spine neck. We found that, during development, a marker of the septin complex, Septin7 (Sept7, becomes localized to the spine neck where it forms a stable structure underneath the plasma membrane. We show that diffusion of receptors and bulk membrane, but not cytoplasmic proteins, is slower in spines bearing Sept7 at their neck. Finally, when Sept7 expression was suppressed by RNA interference, membrane molecules explored larger membrane areas. Our findings indicate that Sept7 regulates membrane protein access to spines.

  12. Dendritic brushes under theta and poor solvent conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergidis, Leonidas N.; Kalogirou, Andreas; Charalambopoulos, Antonios; Vlahos, Costas

    2013-07-01

    The effects of solvent quality on the internal stratification of polymer brushes formed by dendron polymers up to third generation were studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations with Langevin thermostat. The distributions of polymer units, of the free ends, the radii of gyration, and the back folding probabilities of the dendritic spacers were studied at the macroscopic states of theta and poor solvent. For high grafting densities we observed a small decrease in the height of the brush as the solvent quality decreases. The internal stratification in theta solvent was similar to the one we found in good solvent, with two and in some cases three kinds of populations containing short dendrons with weakly extended spacers, intermediate-height dendrons, and tall dendrons with highly stretched spacers. The differences increase as the grafting density decreases and single dendron populations were evident in theta and poor solvent. In poor solvent at low grafting densities, solvent micelles, polymeric pinned lamellae, spherical and single chain collapsed micelles were observed. The scaling dependence of the height of the dendritic brush at high density brushes for both solvents was found to be in agreement with existing analytical results.

  13. Induction and identification of rabbit peripheral blood derived dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Yang, FuYuan; Chen, WenLi

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study a method of the induction of dendritic cells (DCs) from rabbit peripheral blood. Methods: Peripheral blood cells were removed from rabbit, filtered through nylon mesh. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from the blood cells by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation (density of 1.077g/cm3).To obtain DCs, PBMC were cultured in RPMI1640 medium containing 10% fetal calf serum, 50U/mL penicillin and streptomycin, referred to subsequently as complete medium, at 37°C in 5% CO2 atmosphere for 4 hours. Nonadherent cells were aspirated, adherent cells were continued incubated in complete medium, supplemented with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, 50ng/ml),and interleukin 4 (IL-4, 50ng/ml) for 9 days. Fluorescein labeled antibodies(anti-CD14, anti-HLA-DR, anti-CD86) were used to sign cells cultured for 3,6,9 days respectively, Then flow cytometry was performed. Results: Ratio of anti-HLA-DR and anti-CD86 labeled cells increased with induction time extension, in contrast with anti-CD14. Conclusion: Dendritic cells can be effectively induced by the method of this experiment, cell maturation status increased with induction time extension.

  14. Resistivity and thickness effects in dendritic web silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, D. L.; Hwang, J. M.; Greggi, J.; Campbell, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    The decrease of minority carrier lifetime as resistivity decreases in dendritic-web silicon solar cells is addressed. This variation is shown to be consistent with the presence of defect levels in the bandgap which arise from extended defects in the web material. The extended defects are oxide precipitates (SiOx) and the dislocation cores they decorate. Sensitivity to this background distribution of defect levels increases with doping because the Fermi level moves closer to the majority carrier band edge. For high-resistivity dendritic-web silicon, which has a low concentration of these extended defects, cell efficiencies as high as 16.6 percent (4 sq cm, 40 ohm-cm boron-doped base, AM1.5 global, 100 mW/sq cm, 25 C JPL LAPSS1 measurement) and a corresponding electron lifetime of 38 microsec have been obtained. Thickness effects occur in bifacial cell designs and in designs which use light trapping. In some cases, the dislocation/precipitate defect can be passivated through the full thickness of web cells by hydrogen ion implantation.

  15. Nutrient-dependent increased dendritic arborization of somatosensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kaori; Furumizo, Yuki; Usui, Tadao; Hattori, Yukako; Uemura, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    Suboptimal nutrition imposes developmental constraints on infant animals, which marshal adaptive responses to eventually become mature adults. Such responses are mounted at multiple levels from systemic to cellular. At the cellular level, the underlying mechanisms of cell proliferation control have been intensively studied. However, less is known about how growth of postmitotic and morphologically complex cells, such as neurons, is controlled by nutritional status. We address this question using Class I and Class IV dendritic arborization neurons in Drosophila larvae. Class IV neurons have been shown to sense nociceptive thermal, mechanical and light stimuli, whereas Class I neurons are proprioceptors. We reared larvae on diets with different protein and carbohydrate content throughout larval stages and examined how morphologies of Class I or Class IV neurons were affected. Dendritic arbors of Class IV neurons became more complex when larvae were reared on a low-yeast diet, which contains lower amounts of amino acids and other ingredients, compared to a high-yeast diet. In contrast, such low-yeast-dependent hyperarborization was not seen in Class I neurons. The physiological and metabolic implications of the hyperarborization phenotype are discussed in relation to a recent hypothesis that Class IV neurons sense protein-deficient stress and to our characterization of how the dietary yeast contents impacted larval metabolism. © 2016 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Dendritic spine morphology and dynamics in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stacey Lee,1 Huaye Zhang,2 Donna J Webb1,3,4 1Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 2Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ, 3Department of Cancer Biology, 4Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: Dendritic spines are actin-rich structures that form the postsynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses in the brain. The development and plasticity of spines are essential for cognitive processes, such as learning and memory, and defects in their density, morphology, and size underlie a number of neurological disorders. In this review, we discuss the contribution and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in spine formation and plasticity as well as learning and memory. We also highlight the role of key receptors and intracellular signaling pathways in modulating the development and morphology of spines and cognitive function. Moreover, we provide insight into spine/synapse defects associated with several neurological disorders and the molecular mechanisms that underlie these spine defects. Keywords: dendritic spines, synapses, synaptic plasticity, actin cytoskeleton, glutamate receptors, neurological disorders

  17. Ebola virus infection induces irregular dendritic cell gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Vanessa R; Kalina, Warren V; Williams, Priscilla

    2015-02-01

    Filoviruses subvert the human immune system in part by infecting and replicating in dendritic cells (DCs). Using gene arrays, a phenotypic profile of filovirus infection in human monocyte-derived DCs was assessed. Monocytes from human donors were cultured in GM-CSF and IL-4 and were infected with Ebola virus Kikwit variant for up to 48 h. Extracted DC RNA was analyzed on SuperArray's Dendritic and Antigen Presenting Cell Oligo GEArray and compared to uninfected controls. Infected DCs exhibited increased expression of cytokine, chemokine, antiviral, and anti-apoptotic genes not seen in uninfected controls. Significant increases of intracellular antiviral and MHC I and II genes were also noted in EBOV-infected DCs. However, infected DCs failed to show any significant difference in co-stimulatory T-cell gene expression from uninfected DCs. Moreover, several chemokine genes were activated, but there was sparse expression of chemokine receptors that enabled activated DCs to home to lymph nodes. Overall, statistically significant expression of several intracellular antiviral genes was noted, which may limit viral load but fails to stop replication. EBOV gene expression profiling is of vital importance in understanding pathogenesis and devising novel therapeutic treatments such as small-molecule inhibitors.

  18. Cdk5 Is Essential for Amphetamine to Increase Dendritic Spine Density in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Ferreras

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Psychostimulant drugs of abuse increase dendritic spine density in reward centers of the brain. However, little is known about their effects in the hippocampus, where activity-dependent changes in the density of dendritic spine are associated with learning and memory. Recent reports suggest that Cdk5 plays an important role in drug addiction, but its role in psychostimulant’s effects on dendritic spines in hippocampus remain unknown. We used in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that amphetamine increases dendritic spine density in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. Primary cultures and organotypic slice cultures were used for cellular, molecular, pharmacological and biochemical analyses of the role of Cdk5/p25 in amphetamine-induced dendritic spine formation. Amphetamine (two-injection protocol increased dendritic spine density in hippocampal neurons of thy1-green fluorescent protein (GFP mice, as well as in hippocampal cultured neurons and organotypic slice cultures. Either genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Cdk5 activity prevented the amphetamine–induced increase in dendritic spine density. Amphetamine also increased spine density in neurons overexpressing the strong Cdk5 activator p25. Finally, inhibition of calpain, the protease necessary for the conversion of p35 to p25, prevented amphetamine’s effect on dendritic spine density. We demonstrate, for the first time, that amphetamine increases the density of dendritic spine in hippocampal pyramidal neurons in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, we show that the Cdk5/p25 signaling and calpain activity are both necessary for the effect of amphetamine on dendritic spine density. The identification of molecular mechanisms underlying psychostimulant effects provides novel and promising therapeutic approaches for the treatment of drug addiction.

  19. Dendritic branching of olfactory bulb mitral and tufted cells: regulation by TrkB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Imamura

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Projection neurons of mammalian olfactory bulb (OB, mitral and tufted cells, have dendrites whose morphologies are specifically differentiated for efficient odor information processing. The apical dendrite extends radially and arborizes in single glomerulus where it receives primary input from olfactory sensory neurons that express the same odor receptor. The lateral dendrites extend horizontally in the external plexiform layer and make reciprocal dendrodendritic synapses with granule cells, which moderate mitral/tufted cell activity. The molecular mechanisms regulating dendritic development of mitral/tufted cells is one of the unsolved important problems in the olfactory system. Here, we focused on TrkB receptors to test the hypothesis that neurotrophin-mediate mechanisms contributed to dendritic differentiation of OB mitral/tufted cells.With immunohistochemical analysis, we found that the TrkB neurotrophin receptor is expressed by both apical and lateral dendrites of mitral/tufted cells and that expression is evident during the early postnatal days when these dendrites exhibit their most robust growth and differentiation. To examine the effect of TrkB activation on mitral/tufted cell dendritic development, we cultured OB neurons. When BDNF or NT4 were introduced into the cultures, there was a significant increase in the number of primary neurites and branching points among the mitral/tufted cells. Moreover, BDNF facilitated filopodial extension along the neurites of mitral/tufted cells.In this report, we show for the first time that TrkB activation stimulates the dendritic branching of mitral/tufted cells in developing OB. This suggests that arborization of the apical dendrite in a glomerulus is under the tight regulation of TrkB activation.

  20. Tumour tissue microenvironment can inhibit dendritic cell maturation in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Michielsen, Adriana J

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators in the tumour microenvironment promote tumour growth, vascular development and enable evasion of anti-tumour immune responses, by disabling infiltrating dendritic cells. However, the constituents of the tumour microenvironment that directly influence dendritic cell maturation and function are not well characterised. Our aim was to identify tumour-associated inflammatory mediators which influence the function of dendritic cells. Tumour conditioned media obtained from cultured colorectal tumour explant tissue contained high levels of the chemokines CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 in addition to VEGF. Pre-treatment of monocyte derived dendritic cells with this tumour conditioned media inhibited the up-regulation of CD86, CD83, CD54 and HLA-DR in response to LPS, enhancing IL-10 while reducing IL-12p70 secretion. We examined if specific individual components of the tumour conditioned media (CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5) could modulate dendritic cell maturation or cytokine secretion in response to LPS. VEGF was also assessed as it has a suppressive effect on dendritic cell maturation. Pre-treatment of immature dendritic cells with VEGF inhibited LPS induced upregulation of CD80 and CD54, while CXCL1 inhibited HLA-DR. Interestingly, treatment of dendritic cells with CCL2, CXCL1, CXCL5 or VEGF significantly suppressed their ability to secrete IL-12p70 in response to LPS. In addition, dendritic cells treated with a combination of CXCL1 and VEGF secreted less IL-12p70 in response to LPS compared to pre-treatment with either cytokine alone. In conclusion, tumour conditioned media strongly influences dendritic cell maturation and function.

  1. Functional Identification of Dendritic Cells in the Teleost Model, Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassity, Elizabeth; Clark, Theodore G.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells are specialized antigen presenting cells that bridge innate and adaptive immunity in mammals. This link between the ancient innate immune system and the more evolutionarily recent adaptive immune system is of particular interest in fish, the oldest vertebrates to have both innate and adaptive immunity. It is unknown whether dendritic cells co-evolved with the adaptive response, or if the connection between innate and adaptive immunity relied on a fundamentally different cell type early in evolution. We approached this question using the teleost model organism, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), with the aim of identifying dendritic cells based on their ability to stimulate naïve T cells. Adapting mammalian protocols for the generation of dendritic cells, we established a method of culturing highly motile, non-adherent cells from trout hematopoietic tissue that had irregular membrane processes and expressed surface MHCII. When side-by-side mixed leukocyte reactions were performed, these cells stimulated greater proliferation than B cells or macrophages, demonstrating their specialized ability to present antigen and therefore their functional homology to mammalian dendritic cells. Trout dendritic cells were then further analyzed to determine if they exhibited other features of mammalian dendritic cells. Trout dendritic cells were found to have many of the hallmarks of mammalian DCs including tree-like morphology, the expression of dendritic cell markers, the ability to phagocytose small particles, activation by toll-like receptor-ligands, and the ability to migrate in vivo. As in mammals, trout dendritic cells could be isolated directly from the spleen, or larger numbers could be derived from hematopoietic tissue and peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. PMID:22427987

  2. Neuronal gain modulability is determined by dendritic morphology: A computational optogenetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Sarah; Nikolic, Konstantin; Schultz, Simon R

    2018-03-01

    The mechanisms by which the gain of the neuronal input-output function may be modulated have been the subject of much investigation. However, little is known of the role of dendrites in neuronal gain control. New optogenetic experimental paradigms based on spatial profiles or patterns of light stimulation offer the prospect of elucidating many aspects of single cell function, including the role of dendrites in gain control. We thus developed a model to investigate how competing excitatory and inhibitory input within the dendritic arbor alters neuronal gain, incorporating kinetic models of opsins into our modeling to ensure it is experimentally testable. To investigate how different topologies of the neuronal dendritic tree affect the neuron's input-output characteristics we generate branching geometries which replicate morphological features of most common neurons, but keep the number of branches and overall area of dendrites approximately constant. We found a relationship between a neuron's gain modulability and its dendritic morphology, with neurons with bipolar dendrites with a moderate degree of branching being most receptive to control of the gain of their input-output relationship. The theory was then tested and confirmed on two examples of realistic neurons: 1) layer V pyramidal cells-confirming their role in neural circuits as a regulator of the gain in the circuit in addition to acting as the primary excitatory neurons, and 2) stellate cells. In addition to providing testable predictions and a novel application of dual-opsins, our model suggests that innervation of all dendritic subdomains is required for full gain modulation, revealing the importance of dendritic targeting in the generation of neuronal gain control and the functions that it subserves. Finally, our study also demonstrates that neurophysiological investigations which use direct current injection into the soma and bypass the dendrites may miss some important neuronal functions, such as gain

  3. Tunable states of interlayer cations in two-dimensional materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Numata, K.; Dai, W.; Hunger, M.

    2014-01-01

    The local state of cations inside the Ångstrom-scale interlayer spaces is one of the controlling factors for designing sophisticated two-dimensional (2D) materials consisting of 2D nanosheets. In the present work, the molecular mechanism on how the interlayer cation states are induced by the local structures of the 2D nanosheets is highlighted. For this purpose, the local states of Na cations in inorganic 2D materials, in which the compositional fluctuations of a few percent are introduced in the tetrahedral and octahedral units of the 2D nanosheets, were systematically studied by means of 23 Na magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 23 Na multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) NMR spectroscopy. In contrast with an uniform distribution of Na cations expected so far, various well-defined cation states sensitive to the local structures of the 2D nanosheets were identified. The tunability of the interlayer cation states along with the local structure of the 2D nanosheets, as the smallest structural unit of the 2D material, is discussed

  4. Tunable states of interlayer cations in two-dimensional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Numata, K. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Dai, W. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Hunger, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, University of Stuttgart, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-03-31

    The local state of cations inside the Ångstrom-scale interlayer spaces is one of the controlling factors for designing sophisticated two-dimensional (2D) materials consisting of 2D nanosheets. In the present work, the molecular mechanism on how the interlayer cation states are induced by the local structures of the 2D nanosheets is highlighted. For this purpose, the local states of Na cations in inorganic 2D materials, in which the compositional fluctuations of a few percent are introduced in the tetrahedral and octahedral units of the 2D nanosheets, were systematically studied by means of {sup 23}Na magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and {sup 23}Na multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) NMR spectroscopy. In contrast with an uniform distribution of Na cations expected so far, various well-defined cation states sensitive to the local structures of the 2D nanosheets were identified. The tunability of the interlayer cation states along with the local structure of the 2D nanosheets, as the smallest structural unit of the 2D material, is discussed.

  5. Separation of cations of heavy metalsfrom concentrated galvanic drains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Bondareva

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available When applying galvanic coatings, soluble salts of heavy metals such as iron, copper, nickel, zinc, cadmium, chromium and other metals are used, toxic cations enter the water, with subsequent migration to the biosphere. To date, many methods have been developed for cleaning galvanic sewage, which cannot be considered sufficiently effective. The joint sorption of divalent cations of copper, nickel and cadmium from concentrated aqueous solutions was investigated. Calculation and experimental methods were used to determine the separation conditions of the bivalent ion systems that differed and close in sorption properties on the aminophosphonic polyampholyte Purolite S950 in a natrium form. It is shown that the cadmium (II cations can be isolated from solutions containing copper (II or nickel (II cations even at the height of the sorption layer of 0.13 m due to the difference in the defining characteristics of the cations. This layer height can be used not only in a chromatographic column, but also in a concentrating cartridge. Separation of the copper (II and nickel (II close to the sorption properties requires an absorbing layer of 0.76 m, which can only be used in a chromatographic column, but not for a concentrating cartridge. In this paper, the degrees of ion separation in various sorption conditions are calculated. The applicability of the conductometric method for controlling the ion exchange process is shown not only when the free cations are isolated from aqueous solutions but also bound to complexes.

  6. How the cation-cation π-π stacking occurs: A theoretical investigation into ionic clusters of imidazolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Tian, Yong; Xuan, Xiaopeng

    2015-07-01

    The cation-cation π-π stacking is uncommon but it is essential for the understanding of some supramolecular structures. We explore theoretically the nature of non-covalent interaction occurring in the stacked structure within modeled clusters of 1,3-dimethylimidazolium and halide. The evidences of the energy decomposition analysis (EDA) and reduced density gradient (RDG) approach are different from those of common π-π interaction. Isosurfaces with RDG also illustrate the strength of the titled π-π interaction and their region. Additionally, we find that the occurrence of this interaction is attributed to a few C-H···X interactions, as depicted using atom in molecule (AIM) method. This work presents a clear picture of the typical cation-cation π-π interaction and can serve to advance the understanding of this uncommon interaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel Reactivity Of The Cationic Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Dash, A.K.; Eisen, AM.; Berthet, J.C.; Ephritikhine, M.

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic chemistry of electrophilic d 0 /f organometallic complexes is nowadays under intense investigation, reaching a high level of sophistication. General aspects concerning these complexes are concentrated for most studies to the functionalization of unsaturated organic molecules. To cite an instance, the actinide-promoted oligomerization of terminal alkynes is of essential present concern since it may introduce to a diversity of organic enynes and oligoacetylene products that are valuable synthons for the synthesis of natural products. Enynes are the simplest oligomerization products of alkynes. We have demonstrated that organoactinides complexes of the type [Cp* 2 AnMe 2 AnMe 2 ] (Cp* = C 5 Me 5 ; An = U, Th) are active catalysts for the linear oligomerization of terminal alkynes and the extent of oligomerization was found to be strongly dependent on the electronic and steric properties of the alkyne substituents. Bulky alkynes were reacted with high regioselectivity toward dimer and/or trimers whereas for non-bulky alkynes, these compounds were transformed into oligomers with a total deficiency of regioselectivity. The addition of primary amines to the catalytic cycle, for An = Th, granted the chemoselective formation of dimers, chemoselectively, whereas for An = U, this control was not succeeded. In distinction to the neutral organoactinide complexes, homogeneous cationic d 0 /f n actinide complexes have been used as in the homogeneous polymerization of olefins as extremely active catalysts. Hence, the catalytic alkyne oligomerization is a opportune route to explore insertions and σ-bond metathesis reactivity of complexes. We have recently shown that the reaction of terminal alkynes (RC≡CH), promoted by [(Et 2 N) 3 U][BPh 4 ], in toluene, produces efficiently mostly the gem dimers (for R = Me, i Pr and n Bu) as the major products, whereas for bulky alkynes (R = t MS or t Bu) small amounts of the cis dimer was concomitantly obtained. A plausible

  8. Small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements, together with malaria and diarrhoea treatment, improve growth and prevent MAM in young Burkinabe children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Sonja Y; Abbeddou, Souheila; Somé, Jerome W; Vosti, Stephen A; Brown, Kenneth H; Yakes Jimenez, Elizabeth; Ouédraogo, Zinéwindé P; Guissou, Rosemonde M; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco

    2014-01-01

    Background: Supplementing young children’s diets with small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) may prevent growth restriction, but the optimal amount of zinc to include in these products is uncertain. Objectives: To assess zinc-related functional responses among young Burkinabe children who received LNS without or with varied amounts of zinc, and to compare these outcomes among children who do or do not receive LNS and selected health services. Methods: In a partially masked, placebo-controlled, randomized trial, 34 communities were assigned to immediate (II) or non-intervention (NI) cohorts. 2469 eligible II children were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups to receive LNS containing 0, 5 or 10 mg zinc (and placebo tablet) or LNS without zinc and 5 mg zinc tablet from 9 to 18 months of age. The daily ration of LNS was 20 g which provided 118 kcal along with 20 other micronutrients in addition to zinc. Weekly morbidity surveillance was conducted at children’s homes; malaria treatment was provided for confirmed malaria, and ORS for reported diarrhea. Children in NI (n = 797) received neither supplements nor illness treatment. At 9 and 18 months, length, weight, mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) and hemoglobin (Hb) concentration were measured in all children. Results: Reported adherence was 97 ± 5% for LNS and tablets. Mean baseline Hb was 89 ± 15 g/L, and 91% were anemic (Hb <110 g/L). At 18 months, change in Hb was greater in II cohort than NI (+8 vs -1 g/L, p<0.0001), but 79% of II were still anemic (vs. 91% in NI). During the 9 month follow-up in the II cohort, the incidence of diarrhea and malaria was 1.15 ± 1.18 and 0.55 ± 0.54 episodes per 100 child-days, respectively and did not differ by intervention group. At baseline, mean length-for-age z-score (LAZ), weight-for-length z-score (WLZ) and MUAC were -1.21 ± 1.10, -0.99 ± 1.05 and 133 ± 12 mm, respectively, in all groups combined. Mean length, weight and MUAC were significantly greater

  9. Does the cation really matter? The effect of modifying an ionic liquid cation on an SN2 process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Eden E L; Yau, Hon Man; Hawker, Rebecca R; Croft, Anna K; Harper, Jason B

    2013-09-28

    The rate of reaction of a Menschutkin process in a range of ionic liquids with different cations was investigated, with temperature-dependent kinetic data giving access to activation parameters for the process in each solvent. These data, along with molecular dynamics simulations, demonstrate the importance of accessibility of the charged centre on the cation and that the key interactions are of a generalised electrostatic nature.

  10. Sorption of the organic cation metoprolol on silica gel from its aqueous solution considering the competition of inorganic cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Susann; Schaffer, Mario; Börnick, Hilmar; Licha, Tobias; Worch, Eckhard

    2014-05-01

    Systematic batch experiments with the organic monovalent cation metoprolol as sorbate and the synthetic material silica gel as sorbent were conducted with the aim of characterizing the sorption of organic cations onto charged surfaces. Sorption isotherms for metoprolol (>99% protonated in the tested pH of around 6) in competition with mono- and divalent inorganic cations (Na(+), NH4(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+)) were determined in order to assess their influence on cation exchange processes and to identify the role of further sorptive interactions. The obtained sorption isotherms could be described well by an exponential function (Freundlich isotherm model) with consistent exponents (about 0.8). In general, a decreasing sorption of metoprolol with increasing concentrations in inorganic cations was observed. Competing ions of the same valence showed similar effects. A significant sorption affinity of metoprolol with ion type dependent Freundlich coefficients KF,0.77 between 234.42 and 426.58 (L/kg)(0.77) could still be observed even at very high concentrations of competing inorganic cations. Additional column experiments confirm this behavior, which suggests the existence of further relevant interactions beside cation exchange. In subsequent batch experiments, the influence of mixtures with more than one competing ion and the effect of a reduced negative surface charge at a pH below the point of zero charge (pHPZC ≈ 2.5) were also investigated. Finally, the study demonstrates that cation exchange is the most relevant but not the sole mechanism for the sorption of metoprolol on silica gel. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemoresistance of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells is regulated by IL-17A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Olsson Åkefeldt

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells initiate adaptive immune responses, leading either to control cancer by effector T cells or to exacerbate cancer by regulatory T cells that inhibit IFN-γ-mediated Th1-type response. Dendritic cells can also induce Th17-type immunity, mediated by IL-17A. However, the controversial role of this cytokine in cancer requires further investigations. We generated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes to investigate lifespan, phenotype and chemoresistance of dendritic cells, treated with IL-17A with or without IFN-γ. Studying the expression of Bcl-2 family members, we demonstrated that dendritic cells constitutively express one pro-survival Bcl-2 member: MCL1. Immature dendritic cells were CD40(lowHLADR(low CD1a(+ MCL1(+, did not express CD14, CD68 or BCL2A1, and displayed a short 2-day lifespan. IL-17A-treated DC exhibited a semi-mature (CD40(high HLADR(low pre-M2 (CCL22(+ CD206(+ CD163(+ IL1RN(+ IL-10(- CXCL10(- IL-12(- mixed (CD1a(+ CD14+ CD68(+ macrophage-dendritic cell phenotype. They efficiently exerted mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis and did not produce superoxide anions, in the absence of TLR engagement. Interestingly, IL-17A promoted a long-term survival of dendritic cells, beyond 12 days, that correlated to BCL2A1 induction, a pro-survival Bcl-2 family member. BCL2A1 transcription was activated by NF-κB, downstream of IL-17A transduction. Thus, immature dendritic cells only express MCL1, whereas IL-17A-treated dendritic cells concomitantly expressed two pro-survival Bcl-2 family members: MCL1 and BCL2A1. These latter developed chemoresistance to 11 of the 17 chemotherapy agents tested. However, high doses of either vinblastine or cytarabine decreased MCL1 expression and induced dendritic cell death. When IL-17A is produced in vivo, administration of anti-IL-17A biotherapy may impair dendritic cell survival by targeting BCL2A1 expression. Consequently, depending on the effector or regulatory role of dendritic

  12. High-capacity cation-exchange column for enhanced resolution of adjacent peaks of cations in ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, M A

    2001-06-22

    One of the advantages of ion chromatography [Anal Chem. 47 (1975) 1801] as compared to other analytical techniques is that several ions may be analyzed simultaneously. One of the most important contributions of cation-exchange chromatography is its sensitivity to ammonium ion, which is difficult to analyze by other techniques [J. Weiss, in: E.L. Johnson (Ed.), Handbook of Ion Chromatography, Dionex, Sunnyvale, CA, USA]. The determination of low concentrations of ammonium ion in the presence of high concentrations of sodium poses a challenge in cation-exchange chromatography [J. Weiss, Ion Chromatography, VCH, 2nd Edition, Weinheim, 1995], as both cations have similar selectivities for the common stationary phases containing either sulfonate or carboxylate functional groups. The task was to develop a new cation-exchange stationary phase (for diverse concentration ratios of adjacent peaks) to overcome limitations experienced in previous trails. Various cation-exchange capacities and column body formats were investigated to optimize this application and others. The advantages and disadvantages of two carboxylic acid columns of different cation-exchange capacities and different column formats will be discussed.

  13. Theoretical modeling of cellular and dendritic solidification microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Younggil

    In this dissertation, we use three-dimensional (3D) phase-field (PF) modeling to investigate (i) 3D solid-liquid interface dynamics observed in microgravity experiments, and (ii) array patterns in a thin-sample geometry. In addition, using the two-dimensional (2D) dendritic-needle-network (DNN) model, we explore (iii) secondary sidebranching dynamics. Recently, solidification experiments are carried out in the DSI (Directional Solidification Insert) of the DECLIC (Device for the study of Critical LIquids and Crystallization) facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Thus, the directional solidification experiments are achieved under limited convective currents, and the experimental observations reveal unique dynamics of 3D microstructure in a purely diffusive growth regime. In this directional solidification setup, a temperature field between heat sources could evolve due to two main factors: (i) heat transfer within an adiabatic zone and (ii) latent heat rejection at the interface. These two thermal effects are phenomenologically characterized using a time-dependent thermal shift. In addition, we could quantitatively account for these thermal factors using a numerical calculation of the evolution of temperature field. We introduce these phenomenological and quantitative thermal representations into the PF model. The performed simulations using different thermal descriptions are compared to the experimental measurements from the initial planar interface dynamics to the final spacing selection. The DECLIC-DSI experimental observations exhibit complex grain boundary (GB) dynamics between large grains with a small misorientation. In the observations, several large grains with a small misorientation with respect to the temperature gradient are formed during solidification. Specifically, at a convergent GB, a localized group of misoriented cells penetrates into a nearby grain, which yields the morphological instability of grain boundaries. Remarkably, while

  14. [Quantitative analysis of the structure of neuronal dendritic spines in the striatum using the Leitz-ASM system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontovich, T A; Zvegintseva, E G

    1985-10-01

    Two principal classes of striatum long axonal neurons (sparsely ramified reticular cells and densely ramified dendritic cells) were analyzed quantitatively in four animal species: hedgehog, rabbit, dog and monkey. The cross section area, total dendritic length and the area of dendritic field were measured using "LEITZ-ASM" system. Classes of neurons studied were significantly different in dogs and monkeys, while no differences were noted between hedgehog and rabbit. Reticular neurons of different species varied much more than dendritic ones. Quantitative analysis has revealed the progressive increase in the complexity of dendritic tree in mammals from rabbit to monkey.

  15. Effect of temperature gradient and crystallization rate on morphological peculiarities of cellular-dendrite structure in iron-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralina, A.A.; Vorontsov, V.B.

    1977-01-01

    Cellular and dendritic structure of Fe-Ni single crystals (31 and 45 wt%Ni) grown according to Bridgeman have been studied by metallography. Growth rates at which the crystallization frontier becomes unstable and splits into cells have been determined for three temperature gradients. The transition from cells to dendrites occurs gradually through the changes in the cells regular structure and formation of secondary and tertiary branches. The dependence of cell diameter and distance between dendrites on crystallization rate and temperature gradient are discussed in terms of the admixture substructures development according to the schedule: cells - cellular dendrites - dendrites

  16. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France); Vernhet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2013-01-15

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  17. Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Experimental studies have demonstrated that the antileukemic trivalent inorganic arsenic prevents the development of severe pro-inflammatory diseases mediated by excessive Th1 and Th17 cell responses. Differentiation of Th1 and Th17 subsets is mainly regulated by interleukins (ILs) secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) and the ability of inorganic arsenic to impair interferon-γ and IL-17 secretion by interfering with the physiology of DCs is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that high concentrations of sodium arsenite (As(III), 1–2 μM) clinically achievable in plasma of arsenic-treated patients, block differentiation of human peripheral blood monocytes into immature DCs (iDCs) by inducing their necrosis. Differentiation of monocytes in the presence of non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) (0.1 to 0.5 μM) only slightly impacts endocytotic activity of iDCs or expression of co-stimulatory molecules in cells activated with lipopolysaccharide. However, this differentiation in the presence of As(III) strongly represses secretion of IL-12p70 and IL-23, two major regulators of Th1 and Th17 activities, from iDCs stimulated with different toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in metalloid-free medium. Such As(III)-exposed DCs also exhibit reduced mRNA levels of IL12A and/or IL12B genes when activated with TLR agonists. Finally, differentiation of monocytes with non-cytotoxic concentrations of As(III) subsequently reduces the ability of activated DCs to stimulate the release of interferon-γ and IL-17 from Th cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that clinically relevant concentrations of inorganic arsenic markedly impair in vitro differentiation and functions of DCs, which may contribute to the putative beneficial effects of the metalloid towards inflammatory autoimmune diseases. Highlights: ► Inorganic arsenic impairs differentiation and functions of human dendritic cells (DCs) ► Arsenite (> 1 μM) blocks differentiation of dendritic cells by

  18. Dendrite and spine modifications in autism and related neurodevelopmental disorders in patients and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2017-04-01

    Dendrites and spines are the main neuronal structures receiving input from other neurons and glial cells. Dendritic and spine number, size, and morphology are some of the crucial factors determining how signals coming from individual synapses are integrated. Much remains to be understood about the characteristics of neuronal dendrites and dendritic spines in autism and related disorders. Although there have been many studies conducted using autism mouse models, few have been carried out using postmortem human tissue from patients. Available animal models of autism include those generated through genetic modifications and those non-genetic models of the disease. Here, we review how dendrite and spine morphology and number is affected in autism and related neurodevelopmental diseases, both in human, and genetic and non-genetic animal models of autism. Overall, data obtained from human and animal models point to a generalized reduction in the size and number, as well as an alteration of the morphology of dendrites; and an increase in spine densities with immature morphology, indicating a general spine immaturity state in autism. Additional human studies on dendrite and spine number and morphology in postmortem tissue are needed to understand the properties of these structures in the cerebral cortex of patients with autism. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 419-437, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Dscam1-mediated self-avoidance counters netrin-dependent targeting of dendrites in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Benjamin J; Grueber, Wesley B

    2011-09-13

    Dendrites and axons show precise targeting and spacing patterns for proper reception and transmission of information in the nervous system. Self-avoidance promotes complete territory coverage and nonoverlapping spacing between processes from the same cell [1, 2]. Neurons that lack Drosophila Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1 (Dscam1) show aberrant overlap, fasciculation, and accumulation of dendrites and axons, demonstrating a role in self-recognition and repulsion leading to self-avoidance [3-11]. Fasciculation and accumulation of processes suggested that Dscam1 might promote process spacing by counterbalancing developmental signals that otherwise promote self-association [9, 12]. Here we show that Dscam1 functions to counter Drosophila sensory neuron dendritic targeting signals provided by secreted Netrin-B and Frazzled, a netrin receptor. Loss of Dscam1 function resulted in aberrant dendrite accumulation at a Netrin-B-expressing target, whereas concomitant loss of Frazzled prevented accumulation and caused severe deficits in dendritic territory coverage. Netrin misexpression was sufficient to induce ectopic dendritic targeting in a Frazzled-dependent manner, whereas Dscam1 was required to prevent ectopic accumulation, consistent with separable roles for these receptors. Our results suggest that Dscam1-mediated self-avoidance counters extrinsic signals that are required for normal dendritic patterning, but whose action would otherwise favor neurite accumulation. Counterbalancing roles for Dscam1 may be deployed in diverse contexts during neural circuit formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Immunological Characterization of Whole Tumour Lysate-Loaded Dendritic Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottobrini, Luisa; Biasin, Mara; Borelli, Manuela; Lucignani, Giovanni; Trabattoni, Daria; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dendritic cells play a key role as initiators of T-cell responses, and even if tumour antigen-loaded dendritic cells can induce anti-tumour responses, their efficacy has been questioned, suggesting a need to enhance immunization strategies. Matherials & Methods We focused on the characterization of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with whole tumour lysate (TAA-DC), as a source of known and unknown antigens, in a mouse model of breast cancer (MMTV-Ras). Dendritic cells were evaluated for antigen uptake and for the expression of MHC class I/II and costimulatory molecules and markers associated with maturation. Results Results showed that antigen-loaded dendritic cells are characterized by a phenotypically semi-mature/mature profile and by the upregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation and T-cell priming. Activated dendritic cells stimulated T-cell proliferation and induced the production of high concentrations of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ but only low levels of IL-10, indicating their ability to elicit a TH1-immune response. Furthermore, administration of Antigen loaded-Dendritic Cells in MMTV-Ras mice evoked a strong anti-tumour response in vivo as demonstrated by a general activation of immunocompetent cells and the release of TH1 cytokines. Conclusion Data herein could be useful in the design of antitumoral DC-based therapies, showing a specific activation of immune system against breast cancer. PMID:26795765