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Sample records for dendritic hcn channelopathy

  1. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, Nicholas P; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Ion channel dysfunction or "channelopathy" is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Herein we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, Nicholas P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ion channel dysfunction or “channelopathy” is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Here we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. PMID:23216577

  3. HCN channelopathies: pathophysiology in genetic epilepsy and therapeutic implications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reid, Christopher A; Phillips, A Marie; Petrou, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarization‐activated cyclic nucleotide‐gated channels (HCN) can act as pacemakers in the brain making them strong candidates for driving aberrant hypersynchronous network activity seen in epilepsy...

  4. Channelopathies and dendritic dysfunction in fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brager, Darrin H; Johnston, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Dendritic spine abnormalities and the metabotropic glutamate receptor theory put the focus squarely on synapses and protein synthesis as the cellular locus of fragile X syndrome. Synapses however, are only partly responsible for information processing in neuronal networks. Neurotransmitter triggered excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) are shaped and integrated by dendritic voltage-gated ion channels. These EPSPs, and in some cases the resultant dendritic spikes, are further modified by dendritic voltage-gated ion channels as they propagate to the soma. If the resultant somatic depolarization is large enough, action potential(s) will be triggered and propagate both orthodromically down the axon, where it may trigger neurotransmitter release, and antidromically back into the dendritic tree, where it can activate and modify dendritic voltage-gated and receptor activated ion channels. Several channelopathies, both soma-dendritic (L-type calcium channels, Slack potassium channels, h-channels, A-type potassium channels) and axo-somatic (BK channels and delayed rectifier potassium channels) were identified in the fmr1-/y mouse model of fragile X syndrome. Pathological function of these channels will strongly influence the excitability of individual neurons as well as overall network function. In this chapter we discuss the role of voltage-gated ion channels in neuronal processing and describe how identified channelopathies in models of fragile X syndrome may play a role in dendritic pathophysiology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. HCN channelopathy and cardiac electrophysiologic dysfunction in genetic and acquired rat epilepsy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Kim L; Jones, Nigel C; Kennard, Jeremy T; Ng, Caroline; Urmaliya, Vijay; Lau, Shannen; Tran, Adora; Zheng, Thomas; Ozturk, Ezgi; Dezsi, Gabi; Megatia, Ika; Delbridge, Lea M; Pinault, Didier; Reid, Christopher A; White, Paul J; O'Brien, Terence J

    2014-04-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies indicates that epilepsy can affect cardiac function, although the molecular basis of this remains poorly understood. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels generate pacemaker activity and modulate cellular excitability in the brain and heart, with altered expression and function associated with epilepsy and cardiomyopathies. Whether HCN expression is altered in the heart in association with epilepsy has not been investigated previously. We studied cardiac electrophysiologic properties and HCN channel subunit expression in rat models of genetic generalized epilepsy (Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg, GAERS) and acquired temporal lobe epilepsy (post-status epilepticus SE). We hypothesized that the development of epilepsy is associated with altered cardiac electrophysiologic function and altered cardiac HCN channel expression. Electrocardiography studies were recorded in vivo in rats and in vitro in isolated hearts. Cardiac HCN channel messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression were measured using quantitative PCR and Western blotting respectively. Cardiac electrophysiology was significantly altered in adult GAERS, with slower heart rate, shorter QRS duration, longer QTc interval, and greater standard deviation of RR intervals compared to control rats. In the post-SE model, we observed similar interictal changes in several of these parameters, and we also observed consistent and striking bradycardia associated with the onset of ictal activity. Molecular analysis demonstrated significant reductions in cardiac HCN2 mRNA and protein expression in both models, providing a molecular correlate of these electrophysiologic abnormalities. These results demonstrate that ion channelopathies and cardiac dysfunction can develop as a secondary consequence of chronic epilepsy, which may have relevance for the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction in patients with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, June-Bum

    2014-01-01

    Channelopathies are a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting from the dysfunction of ion channels located in the membranes of all cells and many cellular organelles. These include diseases of the nervous system (e.g., generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus, familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia, and hyperkalemic and hypokalemic periodic paralysis), the cardiovascular system (e.g., long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia), the respiratory system (e.g., cystic fibrosis), the endocrine system (e.g., neonatal diabetes mellitus, familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis, and familial hyperaldosteronism), the urinary system (e.g., Bartter syndrome, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease, and hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia), and the immune system (e.g., myasthenia gravis, neuromyelitis optica, Isaac syndrome, and anti-NMDA [N-methyl-D-aspartate] receptor encephalitis). The field of channelopathies is expanding rapidly, as is the utility of molecular-genetic and electrophysiological studies. This review provides a brief overview and update of channelopathies, with a focus on recent advances in the pathophysiological mechanisms that may help clinicians better understand, diagnose, and develop treatments for these diseases. PMID:24578711

  7. Inherited cortical HCN1 channel loss amplifies dendritic calcium electrogenesis and burst firing in a rat absence epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Maarten H P; Bräuer, Anja U; Stuart, Greg J

    2007-01-15

    While idiopathic generalized epilepsies are thought to evolve from temporal highly synchronized oscillations between thalamic and cortical networks, their cellular basis remains poorly understood. Here we show in a genetic rat model of absence epilepsy (WAG/Rij) that a rapid decline in expression of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide gated (HCN1) channels (I(h)) precedes the onset of seizures, suggesting that the loss of HCN1 channel expression is inherited rather than acquired. Loss of HCN1 occurs primarily in the apical dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the cortex, leading to a spatially uniform 2-fold reduction in dendritic HCN current throughout the entire somato-dendritic axis. Dual whole-cell recordings from the soma and apical dendrites demonstrate that loss of HCN1 increases somato-dendritic coupling and significantly reduces the frequency threshold for generation of dendritic Ca2+ spikes by backpropagating action potentials. As a result of increased dendritic Ca2+ electrogenesis a large population of WAG/Rij layer 5 neurons showed intrinsic high-frequency burst firing. Using morphologically realistic models of layer 5 pyramidal neurons from control Wistar and WAG/Rij animals we show that the experimentally observed loss of dendritic I(h) recruits dendritic Ca2+ channels to amplify action potential-triggered dendritic Ca2+ spikes and increase burst firing. Thus, loss of function of dendritic HCN1 channels in layer 5 pyramidal neurons provides a somato-dendritic mechanism for increasing the synchronization of cortical output, and is therefore likely to play an important role in the generation of absence seizures.

  8. Dendritic HCN channels shape excitatory postsynaptic potentials at the inner hair cell afferent synapse in the mammalian cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Eunyoung; Roux, Isabelle; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Synaptic transmission at the inner hair cell (IHC) afferent synapse, the first synapse in the auditory pathway, is specialized for rapid and reliable signaling. Here we investigated the properties of a hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)), expressed in the afferent dendrite of auditory nerve fibers, and its role in shaping postsynaptic activity. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings from afferent dendrites directly where they contact the IHC in excised postnatal rat cochlear turns. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) of variable amplitude (1-35 mV) were found with 10-90% rise times of about 1 ms and time constants of decay of about 5 ms at room temperature. Current-voltage relations recorded in afferent dendrites revealed I(h). The pharmacological profile and reversal potential (-45 mV) indicated that I(h) is mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels. The HCN channel subunits HCN1, HCN2, and HCN4 were found to be expressed in afferent dendrites using immunolabeling. Raising intracellular cAMP levels sped up the activation kinetics, increased the magnitude of I(h) and shifted the half activation voltage (V(half)) to more positive values (-104 +/- 3 to -91 +/- 2 mV). Blocking I(h) with 50 microM ZD7288 resulted in hyperpolarization of the resting membrane potential (approximately 4 mV) and slowing the decay of the EPSP by 47%, suggesting that I(h) is active at rest and shortens EPSPs, thereby potentially improving rapid and reliable signaling at this first synapse in the auditory pathway.

  9. Neuron-restrictive silencer factor-mediated cyclic nucleotide gated channelopathy in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Shawn; Flynn, Corey; Dubé, Celine; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Ghestem, Antoine; Esclapez, Monique; Bernard, Christophe; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Enduring, abnormal expression and function of the ion channel hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-AMP gated channel type 1 (HCN1) occurs in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We examined the underlying mechanisms, and queried if interfering with these mechanisms could modify disease course. Methods Experimental TLE was provoked by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (SE), HCN1 channel repression was examined at mRNA, protein and functional levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was employed to identify the transcriptional mechanism of repressed hcn1 expression, and the basis for their endurance. Physical interaction of the repressor, NRSF, was abolished using decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). Video-EEG recordings were performed to assess the onset and initial pattern of spontaneous seizures. Results Levels of NRSF and its physical binding to the hcn1 gene were augmented after SE, resulting in repression of hcn1 expression and HCN1-mediated currents (Ih), and reduced Ih-dependent resonance in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites. Chromatin changes typical of enduring, epigenetic gene repression were apparent at the hcn1 gene within a week after SE. Administration of decoy ODNs comprising the NRSF DNA-binding sequence (NRSE) in vitro and in vivo, reduced NRSF binding to hcn1, prevented its repression and restored Ih function. In vivo, decoy NRSE-ODN treatment restored theta rhythm and altered the initial pattern of spontaneous seizures. Interpretation Acquired HCN1 channelopathy derives from NRSF-mediated transcriptional repression that endures via chromatin modification and may provide insight into the mechanisms of a number of channelopathies that co-exist with, and may contribute to, the conversion of a normal brain into an epileptic one. PMID:21905079

  10. Dendritic channelopathies contribute to neocortical and sensory hyperexcitability in Fmr1(-/y) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Bonnan, Audrey; Bony, Guillaume; Ferezou, Isabelle; Pietropaolo, Susanna; Ginger, Melanie; Sans, Nathalie; Rossier, Jean; Oostra, Ben; LeMasson, Gwen; Frick, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Hypersensitivity in response to sensory stimuli and neocortical hyperexcitability are prominent features of Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) and autism spectrum disorders, but little is known about the dendritic mechanisms underlying these phenomena. We found that the primary somatosensory neocortex (S1) was hyperexcited in response to tactile sensory stimulation in Fmr1(-/y) mice. This correlated with neuronal and dendritic hyperexcitability of S1 pyramidal neurons, which affect all major aspects of neuronal computation, from the integration of synaptic input to the generation of action potential output. Using dendritic electrophysiological recordings, calcium imaging, pharmacology, biochemistry and a computer model, we found that this defect was, at least in part, attributable to the reduction and dysfunction of dendritic h- and BKCa channels. We pharmacologically rescued several core hyperexcitability phenomena by targeting BKCa channels. Our results provide strong evidence pointing to the utility of BKCa channel openers for the treatment of the sensory hypersensitivity aspects of FXS.

  11. Neuron-restrictive silencer factor-mediated hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channelopathy in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Shawn; Flynn, Corey; Dubé, Celine; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Ghestem, Antoine; Esclapez, Monique; Bernard, Christophe; Baram, Tallie Z

    2011-09-01

    Enduring, abnormal expression and function of the ion channel hyperpolarization-activated cyclic adenosine monophosphate gated channel type 1 (HCN1) occurs in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We examined the underlying mechanisms, and investigated whether interfering with these mechanisms could modify disease course. Experimental TLE was provoked by kainic acid-induced status epilepticus (SE). HCN1 channel repression was examined at mRNA, protein, and functional levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was employed to identify the transcriptional mechanism of repressed HCN1 expression, and the basis for their endurance. Physical interaction of the repressor, NRSF, was abolished using decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). Video/electroencephalographic recordings were performed to assess the onset and initial pattern of spontaneous seizures. Levels of NRSF and its physical binding to the Hcn1 gene were augmented after SE, resulting in repression of HCN1 expression and HCN1-mediated currents (I(h) ), and reduced I(h) -dependent resonance in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites. Chromatin changes typical of enduring, epigenetic gene repression were apparent at the Hcn1 gene within a week after SE. Administration of decoy ODNs comprising the NRSF DNA-binding sequence (neuron restrictive silencer element [NRSE]), in vitro and in vivo, reduced NRSF binding to Hcn1, prevented its repression, and restored I(h) function. In vivo, decoy NRSE ODN treatment restored theta rhythm and altered the initial pattern of spontaneous seizures. Acquired HCN1 channelopathy derives from NRSF-mediated transcriptional repression that endures via chromatin modification and may provide insight into the mechanisms of a number of channelopathies that coexist with, and may contribute to, the conversion of a normal brain into an epileptic one. Copyright © 2011 American Neurological Association.

  12. [Autoimmune channelopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, M; Delrieu, J; Astudillo, L

    2011-12-01

    Autoimmune channelopathies are rare neuromuscular diseases that have been characterized clinically for several decades but for which the evidence of associated antibodies has only been recently demonstrated. Ion channels have an important role of activation, inhibition and regulation in neuromuscular transmission. Myasthenia gravis, generally associated with the presence of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody, is the best-known channelopathy. Other anti-channel antibodies, including voltage-dependent, are associated with several neurological diseases, as illustrated by anti-voltage-gated calcium channels found in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome and paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia, and anti-voltage-gated potassium channels found in neuromyotonia, Morvan's syndrome and limbic encephalitis. The treatment of autoimmune channelopathies is logically based on corticosteroids, immunosuppressant drugs, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. Copyright © 2011 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Neurological channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Dimitri M

    2010-01-01

    Inherited ion channel mutations can affect the entire nervous system. Many cause paroxysmal disturbances of brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or skeletal muscle function, with normal neurological development and function in between attacks. To fully understand how mutations of ion channel genes cause disease, we need to know the normal location and function of the channel subunit, consequences of the mutation for biogenesis and biophysical properties, and possible compensatory changes in other channels that contribute to cell or circuit excitability. Animal models of monogenic channelopathies increasingly help our understanding. An important challenge for the future is to determine how more subtle derangements of ion channel function, which arise from the interaction of genetic and environmental influences, contribute to common paroxysmal disorders, including idiopathic epilepsy and migraine, that share features with rare monogenic channelopathies.

  14. Muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statland, Jeffrey; Phillips, Lauren; Trivedi, Jaya R

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle channelopathies are rare heterogeneous diseases with marked genotypic and phenotypic variability. Despite advances in understanding of the molecular pathology of these disorders, the diverse phenotypic manifestations remain a challenge in diagnosis and therapeutics. These disorders can cause lifetime disability and affect quality of life. There is no treatment of these disorders approved by the US Food and Drug Administration at this time. Recognition and treatment of symptoms might reduce morbidity and improve quality of life. This article summarizes the clinical manifestations, diagnostic studies, pathophysiology, and treatment options in nondystrophic myotonia, congenital myasthenic syndrome, and periodic paralyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. HCN channel dendritic targeting requires bipartite interaction with TRIP8b and regulates antidepressant-like behavioral effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ye; Heuermann, Robert J.; Lyman, Kyle A.; Fisher, Daniel; Ismail, Quratul-Ain; Chetkovich, Dane M.

    2016-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder is a prevalent psychiatric condition with limited therapeutic options beyond monoaminergic therapies. Although effective in some individuals, many patients fail to respond adequately to existing treatments and new pharmacologic targets are needed. HCN channels regulate excitability in neurons and blocking HCN channel function has been proposed as a novel antidepressant strategy. However, systemic blockade of HCN channels produces cardiac effects that limit this approach. Knockout (KO) of the brain-specific HCN channel auxiliary subunit TRIP8b also produces antidepressant-like behavioral effects and suggests that inhibiting TRIP8b function could produce antidepressant-like effects without affecting the heart. We examined the structural basis of TRIP8b-mediated HCN channel trafficking and its relationship to antidepressant-like behavior using a viral rescue approach in TRIP8b KO mice. We found that restoring TRIP8b to the hippocampus was sufficient to reverse the impaired HCN channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavioral effects caused by TRIP8b KO. Moreover, we found that hippocampal expression of a mutated version of TRIP8b further impaired HCN channel trafficking and increased the antidepressant-like behavioral phenotype of TRIP8b KO mice. Thus, modulating the TRIP8b-HCN interaction bidirectionally influences channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavior. Overall, our work suggests that small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between TRIP8b and HCN should produce antidepressant-like behaviors and could represent a new paradigm for the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder. PMID:27400855

  16. HCN-channel dendritic targeting requires bipartite interaction with TRIP8b and regulates antidepressant-like behavioral effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y; Heuermann, R J; Lyman, K A; Fisher, D; Ismail, Q-A; Chetkovich, D M

    2017-03-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent psychiatric condition with limited therapeutic options beyond monoaminergic therapies. Although effective in some individuals, many patients fail to respond adequately to existing treatments, and new pharmacologic targets are needed. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels regulate excitability in neurons, and blocking HCN channel function has been proposed as a novel antidepressant strategy. However, systemic blockade of HCN channels produces cardiac effects that limit this approach. Knockout (KO) of the brain-specific HCN-channel auxiliary subunit tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b-interacting protein (TRIP8b) also produces antidepressant-like behavioral effects and suggests that inhibiting TRIP8b function could produce antidepressant-like effects without affecting the heart. We examined the structural basis of TRIP8b-mediated HCN-channel trafficking and its relationship with antidepressant-like behavior using a viral rescue approach in TRIP8b KO mice. We found that restoring TRIP8b to the hippocampus was sufficient to reverse the impaired HCN-channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavioral effects caused by TRIP8b KO. Moreover, we found that hippocampal expression of a mutated version of TRIP8b further impaired HCN-channel trafficking and increased the antidepressant-like behavioral phenotype of TRIP8b KO mice. Thus, modulating the TRIP8b-HCN interaction bidirectionally influences channel trafficking and antidepressant-like behavior. Overall, our work suggests that small-molecule inhibitors of the interaction between TRIP8b and HCN should produce antidepressant-like behaviors and could represent a new paradigm for the treatment of MDD.

  17. Pain channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cregg, Roman; Momin, Aliakmal; Rugiero, Francois; Wood, John N; Zhao, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Pain remains a major clinical challenge, severely afflicting around 6% of the population at any one time. Channelopathies that underlie monogenic human pain syndromes are of great clinical relevance, as cell surface ion channels are tractable drug targets. The recent discovery that loss-of-function mutations in the sodium channel Nav1.7 underlie a recessive pain-free state in otherwise normal people is particularly significant. Deletion of channel-encoding genes in mice has also provided insights into mammalian pain mechanisms. Ion channels expressed by immune system cells (e.g. P2X7) have been shown to play a pivotal role in changing pain thresholds, whilst channels involved in sensory transduction (e.g. TRPV1), the regulation of neuronal excitability (potassium channels), action potential propagation (sodium channels) and neurotransmitter release (calcium channels) have all been shown to be potentially selective analgesic drug targets in some animal pain models. Migraine and visceral pain have also been associated with voltage-gated ion channel mutations. Insights into such channelopathies thus provide us with a number of potential targets to control pain. PMID:20142270

  18. CRAC channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is an important Ca2+ influx pathway in many non-excitable and some excitable cells. It is regulated by the filling state of intracellular Ca2+ stores, notably the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Reduction in [Ca2+]ER results in activation of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels that mediate sustained Ca2+ influx which is required for many cell functions as well as refilling of Ca2+ stores. The Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel is the best characterized SOC channel with well-defined electrophysiological properties. In recent years, the molecular components of the CRAC channel, long mysterious, have been defined. ORAI1 (or CRACM1) acts as the pore-forming subunit of the CRAC channel in the plasma membrane. Stromal interaction molecule (STIM) 1 is localized in the ER, senses [Ca2+]ER, and activates the CRAC channel upon store depletion by binding to ORAI1. Both proteins are widely expressed in many tissues in both human and mouse consistent with the widespread prevalence of SOCE and CRAC channel currents in many cells types. CRAC channelopathies in human patients with mutations in STIM1 and ORAI1 are characterized by abolished CRAC channel currents, lack of SOCE and—clinically—immunodeficiency, congenital myopathy, and anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia. This article reviews the role of ORAI and STIM proteins for SOCE and CRAC channel function in a variety of cell types and tissues and compares the phenotypes of ORAI1 and STIM1-deficient human patients and mice with targeted deletion of Orai and Stim genes. PMID:20111871

  19. Skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole, Sophie; Fontaine, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    This is an update on skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies since knowledge in the field have dramatically increased in the past years. The relationship between two phenotypes and SCN4A has been confirmed with additional cases that remain extremely rare: severe neonatal episodic laryngospasm mimicking encephalopathy, which should be actively searched for since patients respond well to sodium channel blockers; congenital myasthenic syndromes, which have the particularity to be the first recessive Nav1.4 channelopathy. Deep DNA sequencing suggests the contribution of other ion channels in the clinical expressivity of sodium channelopathies, which may be one of the factors modulating the latter. The increased knowledge of channel molecular structure, the quantity of sodium channel blockers, and the availability of preclinical models would permit a most personalized choice of medication for patients suffering from these debilitating neuromuscular diseases. Advances in the understanding of the molecular structure of voltage-gated sodium channels, as well as availability of preclinical models, would lead to improved medical care of patients suffering from skeletal muscle, as well as other sodium channelopathies.

  20. Myotonic Disorders and Channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Colin; Salajegheh, Mohammad Kian

    2015-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophies and channelopathies are rare but important causes of muscle diseases which may present with myotonia, episodic attacks of weakness, fixed muscle weakness, and atrophy or their combination. Here, the authors provide an overview of these disorders and describe their clinical and pathophysiological features, diagnostic methods, and management. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Cardiac sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Ahmad S; Asghari-Roodsari, Alaleh; Tan, Hanno L

    2010-07-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (INa) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of INa for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of arrhythmias in cardiac sodium channelopathies, i.e., arrhythmogenic diseases in patients with mutations in SCN5A, the gene responsible for the pore-forming ion-conducting alpha-subunit, or in genes that encode the ancillary beta-subunits or regulatory proteins of the cardiac sodium channel. While clinical and genetic studies have laid the foundation for our understanding of cardiac sodium channelopathies by establishing links between arrhythmogenic diseases and mutations in genes that encode various subunits of the cardiac sodium channel, biophysical studies (particularly in heterologous expression systems and transgenic mouse models) have provided insights into the mechanisms by which INa dysfunction causes disease in such channelopathies. It is now recognized that mutations that increase INa delay cardiac repolarization, prolong action potential duration, and cause long QT syndrome, while mutations that reduce INa decrease cardiac excitability, reduce electrical conduction velocity, and induce Brugada syndrome, progressive cardiac conduction disease, sick sinus syndrome, or combinations thereof. Recently, mutation-induced INa dysfunction was also linked to dilated cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation, and sudden infant death syndrome. This review describes the structure and function of the cardiac sodium channel and its various subunits, summarizes major cardiac sodium channelopathies and the current knowledge concerning their genetic background and underlying molecular mechanisms, and discusses recent advances in the discovery of mutation-specific therapies in the management of these channelopathies.

  2. Impaired Dendritic Expression and Plasticity of h-Channels in the fmr1−/y Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin H. Brager

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive research into both synaptic and morphological changes, surprisingly little is known about dendritic function in fragile X syndrome (FXS. We found that the dendritic input resistance of CA1 neurons was significantly lower in fmr1−/y versus wild-type mice. Consistent with elevated dendritic Ih, voltage sag, rebound, and resonance frequency were significantly higher and temporal summation was lower in the dendrites of fmr1−/y mice. Dendritic expression of the h-channel subunit HCN1, but not HCN2, was higher in the CA1 region of fmr1−/y mice. Interestingly, whereas mGluR-mediated persistent decreases in Ih occurred in both wild-type and fmr1−/y mice, persistent increases in Ih that occurred after LTP induction in wild-type mice were absent in fmr1−/y mice. Thus, chronic upregulation of dendritic Ih in conjunction with impairment of homeostatic h-channel plasticity represents a dendritic channelopathy in this model of mental retardation and may provide a mechanism for the cognitive impairment associated with FXS.

  3. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFrancesco, Jacopo C; DiFrancesco, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4) in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current) in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation, and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials, and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic, and physiopathological

  4. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo C. DiFrancesco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4 in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic and

  5. The renal channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, K W; Fry, A C

    2014-07-01

    Specific channels permit movement of selected ions through cellular membranes, and are of vital importance in a number of physiological processes, particularly in excitable tissues such as nerve and muscle, but also in endocrine organs and in epithelial biology. Disorders of channel proteins are termed channelopathies, and their importance is increasingly recognised within medicine. In the kidney, ion channels have critical roles enabling sodium and potassium reuptake or excretion along the nephron, in magnesium homeostasis, in the control of water reabsorption in the collecting duct, and in determining glomerular permeability. In this review, we assess the channelopathies encountered in each nephron segment, and see how their molecular and genetic characterisation in the past 20-30 years has furthered our understanding of normal kidney physiology and disease processes, aids correct diagnosis and promises future therapeutic opportunities. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Ryanodine receptor channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzenhauser, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyR) are intracellular Ca2+-permeable channels that provide the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release required for skeletal and cardiac muscle contractions. RyR1 underlies skeletal muscle contraction, and RyR2 fulfills this role in cardiac muscle. Over the past 20 years, numerous mutations in both RyR isoforms have been identified and linked to skeletal and cardiac diseases. Malignant hyperthermia, central core disease, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia have been genetically linked to mutations in either RyR1 or RyR2. Thus, RyR channelopathies are both of interest because they cause significant human diseases and provide model systems that can be studied to elucidate important structure–function relationships of these ion channels. PMID:20179962

  7. Episodic neurological channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Devon P; Ptácek, Louis J

    2010-10-21

    Inherited episodic neurological disorders are often due to mutations in ion channels or their interacting proteins, termed channelopathies. There are a wide variety of such disorders, from those causing paralysis, to extreme pain, to ataxia. A common theme in these is alteration of action potential properties or synaptic transmission and a resulting increased propensity of the resulting tissue to enter into or stay in an altered excitability state. Manifestations of these disorders are triggered by an array of precipitants, all of which stress the particular affected tissue in some way and aid in propelling its activity into an aberrant state. Study of these disorders has aided in the understanding of disease risk factors and elucidated the cause of clinically related sporadic disorders. The findings from study of these disorders will aid in the diagnosis and efficient targeted treatment of affected patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Periodic paralysis: understanding channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Rüdel, Reinhardt

    2002-01-01

    Familial periodic paralyses are typical channelopathies (i.e., caused by functional disturbances of ion channel proteins). The episodes of flaccid muscle weakness observed in these disorders are due to underexcitability of sarcolemma leading to a silent electromyogram and the lack of action potentials even upon electrical stimulation. Interictally, ion channel malfunction is well compensated, so that special exogenous or endogenous triggers are required to produce symptoms in the patients. An especially obvious trigger is the level of serum potassium (K+), the ion responsible for resting membrane potential and degree of excitability. The clinical symptoms can be caused by mutations in genes coding for ion channels that mediate different functions for maintaining the resting potential or propagating the action potential, the basis of excitability. The phenotype is determined by the type of functional defect brought about by the mutations, rather than the channel effected, because the contrary phenotypes hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP) and hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) may be caused by point mutations in the same gene. Still, the common mechanism for inexcitability in all known episodic-weakness phenotypes is a long-lasting depolarization that inactivates sodium ion (Na+) channels, initiating the action potential.

  9. HCN4 subunit expression in fast-spiking interneurons of the rat spinal cord and hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, D.I.; Boyle, K.A.; Kinnon, C.M.; Bilsland, C.; Quayle, J A; Callister, R. J.; Graham, B.A.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarisation-activated (Ih ) currents are considered important for dendritic integration, synaptic transmission, setting membrane potential and rhythmic action potential (AP) discharge in neurons of the central nervous system. Hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels underlie these currents and are composed of homo- and hetero-tetramers of HCN channel subunits (HCN1–4), which confer distinct biophysical properties on the channel. Despite understanding the struct...

  10. Biomolecules from HCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, J. P.; Wos, J. D.; Ryan, T. J.; Lobo, A. P.; Donner, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    It has been suggested by Sanchez et al. (1967) that HCN might have been one of the more important precursors of biological molecules on the primitive earth. Studies were conducted to determine the mechanisms involved in HCN oligomerizations in dilute aqueous solutions and to identify the compounds which are produced in these oligomerization mixtures. Indirect evidence for the formation of cyanate was obtained along with direct evidence for the formation of citrulline, aspartic acid, and orotic acid.

  11. Ion channelopathies in functional GI disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2016-10-01

    In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, abnormalities in secretion, absorption, motility, and sensation have been implicated in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). Ion channels play important roles in all these GI functions. Disruptions of ion channels' ability to conduct ions can lead to diseases called ion channelopathies. Channelopathies can result from changes in ion channel biophysical function or expression due to mutations, posttranslational modification, and accessory protein malfunction. Channelopathies are strongly established in the fields of cardiology and neurology, but ion channelopathies are only beginning to be recognized in gastroenterology. In this review, we describe the state of the emerging field of GI ion channelopathies. Several recent discoveries show that channelopathies result in alterations in GI motility, secretion, and sensation. In the epithelium, mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) or CFTR-associating proteins result in channelopathies with constipation or diarrhea as phenotypes. In the muscle, mutations in the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.5 are associated with irritable bowel syndrome. In the sensory nerves, channelopathies of voltage-gated sodium channels NaV1.7 and NaV1.9 (encoded by SCN9A, SCN11A, respectively) manifest by either GI hyper- or hyposensation. Recent advances in structural biology and ion channel biophysics, coupled with personalized medicine, have fueled rapid discoveries of novel channelopathies and direct drug targeting of specific channelopathies. In summary, the emerging field of GI ion channelopathies has significant implications for functional GI disease stratification, diagnosis, and treatment. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Genetic testing for inheritable cardiac channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szepesváry, Eszter; Kaski, Juan Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac channelopathies are linked to an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden death. This article reviews the clinical characteristics and genetic basis of common cardiac ion-channel diseases, highlights some genotype-phenotype correlations, and summarizes genetic testing for inheritable cardiac channelopathies.

  13. Functional Characterization of Cnidarian HCN Channels Points to an Early Evolution of Ih.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma C Baker

    Full Text Available HCN channels play a unique role in bilaterian physiology as the only hyperpolarization-gated cation channels. Their voltage-gating is regulated by cyclic nucleotides and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. Activation of HCN channels provides the depolarizing current in response to hyperpolarization that is critical for intrinsic rhythmicity in neurons and the sinoatrial node. Additionally, HCN channels regulate dendritic excitability in a wide variety of neurons. Little is known about the early functional evolution of HCN channels, but the presence of HCN sequences in basal metazoan phyla and choanoflagellates, a protozoan sister group to the metazoans, indicate that the gene family predates metazoan emergence. We functionally characterized two HCN channel orthologs from Nematostella vectensis (Cnidaria, Anthozoa to determine which properties of HCN channels were established prior to the emergence of bilaterians. We find Nematostella HCN channels share all the major functional features of bilaterian HCNs, including reversed voltage-dependence, activation by cAMP and PIP2, and block by extracellular Cs+. Thus bilaterian-like HCN channels were already present in the common parahoxozoan ancestor of bilaterians and cnidarians, at a time when the functional diversity of voltage-gated K+ channels was rapidly expanding. NvHCN1 and NvHCN2 are expressed broadly in planulae and in both the endoderm and ectoderm of juvenile polyps.

  14. Diagnosis of skeletal muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, Jennifer; Fialho, Doreen; Hanna, Michael G

    2013-11-01

    Skeletal muscle channelopathies are rare disorders of muscle membrane excitability. Their episodic nature may result in diagnostic difficulty and delays in diagnosis. Advances in diagnostic clinical electrophysiology combined with DNA-based diagnosis have improved diagnostic accuracy and efficiency. Ascribing pathogenic status to identified genetic variants in muscle channel genes may be complex and functional analysis, including molecular expression, may help with this. Accurate clinical and genetic diagnosis enables genetic counselling, advice regarding prognosis and aids treatment selection. An approach to accurate and efficient diagnosis is outlined. The importance of detailed clinical evaluation including careful history, examination and family history is emphasised. The role of specialised electrodiagnostics combined with DNA testing and molecular expression is considered. New potential biomarkers including muscle MRI using MRC Centre protocols are discussed. A combined diagnostic approach using careful clinical assessment, specialised neurophysiology and DNA testing will now achieve a clear diagnosis in most patients with muscle channelopathies. An accurate diagnosis enables genetic counselling and provides information regarding prognosis and treatment selection. Genetic analysis often identifies new variants of uncertain significance. In this situation, functional expression studies as part of a diagnostic service will enable determination of pathogenic status of novel genetic variants.

  15. [Cystic fibrosis and other channelopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, A; Saussereau, E

    2012-05-01

    Mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene, CFTR, are responsible for cystic fibrosis, CF, a channelopathie. CFTR protein is a multifunctional protein with a main function of Cl(-) channel. CFTR is expressed in epithelia (upper airways, intestine, pancreas etc.). In the first part of this revue, we describe the main properties of CFTR underlying that it is not only a Cl(-) channel protein but also a multifunctional protein. We present a hypothesis which postulates that CFTR is a hub protein interacting with more than 140 proteins, and through these interactions regulates a number of functions which are abnormal in CF (ion transport, inflammation etc.). In the second part of the revue we briefly present a selection of other epithelial channelopathies due to mutations in genes of other Cl(-) or cation channels. Of note, these channels either interacts with CFTR or are considered as alternative channels in CF, and, as such, are targets for pharmacotherapies. We want to leave the reader with a message that to investigate channalopathies, to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying channels'activity, allow not only to better understand basic mechanisms of channel regulation but in fine, to propose new targets for pharmacotherapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. The puzzle of TRPV4 channelopathies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary channelopathies, that is, mutations in channel genes that alter channel function and are causal for the pathogenesis of the disease, have been described for several members of the transient...

  17. Ion channelopathies and migraine pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albury, Cassie L; Stuart, Shani; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-08-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder that affects approximately 12-20% of the general adult population. Migraine pathogenesis is complex and not wholly understood. Molecular genetic investigations, imaging and biochemical studies, have unveiled a number of interconnected neurological pathways which seem to have a cause and effect component integral to its cause. Much weight of migraine attack initiation can be placed on the initial trigger and the pathways involved in its neuronal counter reaction. Ion channels play a large role in the generation, portrayal and mitigation of the brains response to external triggers. Several genetic studies have identified and implicated a number of ion channelopathy genes which may contribute to this generalised process. This review will focus on the genetics of migraine with particular emphasis placed on the potentially important role genes HEPH (responsible for iron transport and homeostasis) and KCNK18 (important for the transport and homeostasis of potassium) play in migraine cause.

  18. Channelopathies: Summary of the hot topic keynotes session

    Science.gov (United States)

    The "Hot Topic Keynotes: Channelopathies" session of the 26th International Neurotoxicology Conference brought together toxicologists studying interactions of environmental toxicants with ion channels, to review the state of the science of channelopathies and to discuss the poten...

  19. HCN Channels and Heart Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Dentamaro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization and Cyclic Nucleotide (HCN -gated channels represent the molecular correlates of the “funny” pacemaker current (If, a current activated by hyperpolarization and considered able to influence the sinus node function in generating cardiac impulses. HCN channels are a family of six transmembrane domain, single pore-loop, hyperpolarization activated, non-selective cation channels. This channel family comprises four members: HCN1-4, but there is a general agreement to consider HCN4 as the main isoform able to control heart rate. This review aims to summarize advanced insights into the structure, function and cellular regulation of HCN channels in order to better understand the role of such channels in regulating heart rate and heart function in normal and pathological conditions. Therefore, we evaluated the possible therapeutic application of the selective HCN channels blockers in heart rate control.

  20. Channelopathies: summary of the hot topic keynotes session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magby, Jason P; Neal, April P; Atchison, William D; Pessah, Isaac P; Shafer, Timothy J

    2011-10-01

    The "Hot Topic Keynotes: Channelopathies" session of the 26th International Neurotoxicology Conference brought together toxicologists studying interactions of environmental toxicants with ion channels, to review the state of the science of channelopathies and to discuss the potential for interactions between environmental exposures and channelopathies. This session presented an overview of chemicals altering ion channel function and background about different channelopathy models. It then explored the available evidence that individuals with channelopathies may or may not be more sensitive to effects of chemicals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract. PMID:27784845

  2. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-11-15

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract.

  3. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behere, Shashank P; Weindling, Steven N

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years) and age (birth-18 years), yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH) database with the search terms “Long QT Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Short QT Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Brugada Syndrome” (MeSH) and “Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia” (MeSH), applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full. PMID:26556967

  4. Inherited arrhythmias: The cardiac channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank P Behere

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels in the myocardial cellular membrane are responsible for allowing the cardiac action potential. Genetic abnormalities in these channels can predispose to life-threatening arrhythmias. We discuss the basic science of the cardiac action potential; outline the different clinical entities, including information regarding overlapping diagnoses, touching upon relevant genetics, new innovations in screening, diagnosis, risk stratification, and management. The special considerations of sudden unexplained death and sudden infant death syndrome are discussed. Scientists and clinicians continue to reconcile the rapidly growing body of knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms and genetics while continuing to improve our understanding of the various clinical entities and their diagnosis and management in clinical setting. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information′s website. The first using the term cardiac channelopathies was run on the PubMed database using filters for time (published in past 5 years and age (birth-18 years, yielding 47 results. The second search using the medical subject headings (MeSH database with the search terms "Long QT Syndrome" (MeSH and "Short QT Syndrome" (MeSH and "Brugada Syndrome" (MeSH and "Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia" (MeSH, applying the same filters yielded 467 results. The abstracts of these articles were studied, and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles where further explored and read in full.

  5. Muscle channelopathies and related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Muscle channelopathies and related disorders are neuromuscular disorders predominantly of genetic origin which are caused by mutations in ion channels or genes that play a role in muscle excitability. They include different forms of periodic paralysis which are characterized by acute and reversible attacks of muscle weakness concomitant to changes in blood potassium levels. These disorders may also present as distinguishable myotonic syndromes (slowed muscle relaxation) which have in common lack of involvement of dystrophic changes of the muscle, in contrast to dystrophia myotonica. Recent advances have been made in the diagnosis of these different disorders, which require, in addition to a careful clinical evaluation, detailed EMG and molecular study. Although these diseases are rare, they deserve attention since patients may benefit from drugs which can dramatically improve their condition. Patients may have atypical presentations, sometimes life-threatening, which may delay a proper diagnosis, mostly in the first months of life. The creation of specialized reference centers in the Western world has greatly benefited the proper recognition of these neuromuscular diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Stephen C

    2015-04-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K(+) levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are "channelopathies" caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1), and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, and Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. © 2015 American Physiological Society.

  7. Painful Na-channelopathies: an expanding universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, Stephen G

    2013-07-01

    The universe of painful Na-channelopathies--human disorders caused by mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels--has recently expanded in three dimensions. We now know that mutations of sodium channels cause not only rare genetic 'model disorders' such as inherited erythromelalgia and channelopathy-associated insensitivity to pain but also common painful neuropathies. We have learned that mutations of NaV1.8, as well as mutations of NaV1.7, can cause painful Na-channelopathies. Moreover, recent studies combining atomic level structural models and pharmacogenomics suggest that the goal of genomically guided pain therapy may not be unrealistic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Arrhythmogenic channelopathy syndromes presenting as refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazle, Matthew A; Shellhaas, Renée A; Bradley, David J; Dick, Macdonald; Lapage, Martin J

    2013-08-01

    Children and young adults with potentially lethal cardiac channelopathies often present to medical care with a history of syncope or seizures due to episodic ventricular arrhythmias and associated cerebral hypoperfusion. Two important types of genetic arrhythmia syndromes-long QT syndrome and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia-are discussed using relevant case examples. The pathophysiology and distinguishing clinical features of these conditions are reviewed. The patients in each case were ultimately diagnosed with a cardiac channelopathy as the cause for their syncope and refractory seizures. With appropriate medical management, no further events have occurred to date. Cardiac channelopathies can be misdiagnosed as refractory epilepsy when in fact these events represent convulsive syncopes. Knowledge of and suspicion for these arrhythmogenic conditions may expedite diagnosis and improve outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnosis and new treatment in muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, G; Hanna, M G; Fontaine, B

    2009-04-01

    The skeletal muscle fibre membrane plays a major role in muscle contraction by generating and propagating action potentials, and linking the latter to the release of intracellular calcium stores which triggers mechanical contraction. This function relies on the proper functioning of ion channels. In the last two decades, diseases caused by mutations in muscle ion channel genes have been identified, the so-called muscle channelopathies. Even though the pathophysiology of muscle channelopathies is not completely elucidated, major advances have been made in their understanding, thus linking patient symptoms and neurophysiology with abnormal functioning of the muscle membrane. This has facilitated significant progress both in the diagnosis of these disorders and in the rationale for therapeutic intervention. In this review, we will focus on diagnosis and treatments of muscle channelopathies of relevance to the clinical neurologist.

  10. A hot topic: temperature sensitive sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egri, Csilla; Ruben, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Perturbations to body temperature affect almost all cellular processes and, within certain limits, results in minimal effects on overall physiology. Genetic mutations to ion channels, or channelopathies, can shift the fine homeostatic balance resulting in a decreased threshold to temperature induced disturbances. This review summarizes the functional consequences of currently identified voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channelopathies that lead to disorders with a temperature sensitive phenotype. A comprehensive knowledge of the relationships between genotype and environment is not only important for understanding the etiology of disease, but also for developing safe and effective treatment paradigms.

  11. The puzzle of TRPV4 channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Hereditary channelopathies, that is, mutations in channel genes that alter channel function and are causal for the pathogenesis of the disease, have been described for several members of the transient receptor potential channel family. Mutations in the TRPV4 gene, encoding a polymodal Ca(2+) permeable channel, are causative for several human diseases, which affect the skeletal system and the peripheral nervous system, with highly variable phenotypes. In this review, we describe the phenotypes of TRPV4 channelopathies and overlapping symptoms. Putative mechanisms to explain the puzzle, and how mutations in the same region of the channel cause different diseases, are discussed and experimental approaches to tackle this surprising problem are suggested.

  12. Sodium and chloride channelopathies with myositis: coincidence or connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Emma; Miller, James A L; MacLeod, Malcolm R; Ironside, James; Ambler, Gareth; Labrum, Robin; Sud, Richa; Holton, Janice L; Hanna, Michael G

    2011-08-01

    A proximal myopathy develops in some patients with muscle channelopathies, but the causative molecular mechanisms are unknown. We reviewed retrospectively all clinical and muscle biopsy findings of 3 patients with channelopathy and additional myositis. Direct DNA sequencing was performed. Pathogenic mutations were identified in each case. Biopsies demonstrated inflammatory infiltrates. Clinicians should consider muscle biopsy in channelopathy patients with severe myalgia and/or subacute weakness and accompanying elevated creatine kinase. Chance association of myositis and channelopathy is statistically unlikely. An alternative hypothesis suggests that inflammatory insults could contribute to myopathy in some patients. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Dravet syndrome—From epileptic encephalopathy to channelopathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brunklaus, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2014-01-01

    ... dysfunction in different neuronal networks across the brain pointing toward a channelopathy model causing the neurologic features of Dravet syndrome that is beyond purely seizure related damage...

  14. Sodium and chloride channelopathies with myositis: coincidence or connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, E.; Miller, J.A.L.; Macleod, M.R.; Ironside, J.; Ambler, G.; Labrum, R.; Sud, R.; Holton, J.L.; Hanna, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction A proximal myopathy develops in some patients with muscle channelopathies, but the causative molecular mechanisms are unknown. Methods We reviewed retrospectively all clinical and muscle biopsy findings of three patients with channelopathy and additional myositis. Direct DNA sequencing was performed. Results Pathogenic mutations were identified in each case. Biopsies illustrated inflammatory infiltrates. Conclusions Clinicians should consider muscle biopsy in channelopathy patients with severe myalgia and/or subacute weakness and accompanying elevated CK. Chance association of myositis and channelopathy is statistically unlikely. An alternative hypothesis suggests that inflammatory insults could contribute to myopathy in some patients. PMID:21698652

  15. Cardiac channelopathies: genetic and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriel, Hugues; Zaklyazminskaya, Elena V

    2013-03-15

    Channelopathies are diseases caused by dysfunctional ion channels, due to either genetic or acquired pathological factors. Inherited cardiac arrhythmic syndromes are among the most studied human disorders involving ion channels. Since seminal observations made in 1995, thousands of mutations have been found in many of the different genes that code for cardiac ion channel subunits and proteins that regulate the cardiac ion channels. The main phenotypes observed in patients carrying these mutations are congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS), Brugada syndrome (BrS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), short QT syndrome (SQTS) and variable types of conduction defects (CD). The goal of this review is to present an update of the main genetic and molecular mechanisms, as well as the associated phenotypes of cardiac channelopathies as of 2012. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    OpenAIRE

    R. Begum; Bakiri, Y.; Volynski, K. E.; Kullmann, D M

    2016-01-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for...

  17. Autoimmune channelopathies in paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Bastien; Honnorat, Jérôme

    2015-10-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are immune neurological disorders occurring or not in association with a cancer. They are thought to be due to an autoimmune reaction against neuronal antigens ectopically expressed by the underlying tumour or by cross-reaction with an unknown infectious agent. In some instances, paraneoplastic neurological syndromes and autoimmune encephalitides are related to an antibody-induced dysfunction of ion channels, a situation that can be labelled as autoimmune channelopathies. Such functional alterations of ion channels are caused by the specific fixation of an autoantibody upon its target, implying that autoimmune channelopathies are usually highly responsive to immuno-modulatory treatments. Over the recent years, numerous autoantibodies corresponding to various neurological syndromes have been discovered and their mechanisms of action partially deciphered. Autoantibodies in neurological autoimmune channelopathies may target either directly ion channels or proteins associated to ion channels and induce channel dysfunction by various mechanisms generally leading to the reduction of synaptic expression of the considered channel. The discovery of those mechanisms of action has provided insights on the regulation of the synaptic expression of the altered channels as well as the putative roles of some of their functional subdomains. Interestingly, patients' autoantibodies themselves can be used as specific tools in order to study the functions of ion channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of pharmacotherapy in cardiac ion channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sherif, Nabil; Boutjdir, Mohamed

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade, there have been considerable advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT) and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Over 80% of SCD occurs in patients with organic heart disease. However, approximately 10%-15% of SCD occurs in the presence of structurally normal heart, and the majority of these patients are young. In this group of patients, changes in genes encoding cardiac ion channels produce modifications of the function of the channel resulting in an electrophysiological substrate of VT and SCD. Collectively, these disorders are referred to as cardiac ion channelopathies. The four major syndromes in this group are: the long QT syndrome (LQTS), the Brugada syndrome (BrS), the short QT syndrome (SQTS), and the catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). Each of these syndromes includes multiple subtypes with different and sometimes complex cardiac ion channel genetic abnormalities. Many are associated with other somatic and neurological abnormalities besides the risk of VT and SCD. The current management of cardiac ion channelopathies can be summarized as follows: (1) in symptomatic patients, the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is the only viable option; (2) in asymptomatic patients, risk stratification is necessary, followed by either the ICD, pharmacotherapy, or a combination of both. A genotype-specific approach to pharmacotherapy requires a thorough understanding of the molecular-cellular basis of arrhythmogenesis in cardiac ion channelopathies as well as the specific drug profile. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Channelopathies linked to plasma membrane phosphoinositides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logothetis, Diomedes E; Petrou, Vasileios I; Adney, Scott K; Mahajan, Rahul

    2010-07-01

    The plasma membrane phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) controls the activity of most ion channels tested thus far through direct electrostatic interactions. Mutations in channel proteins that change their apparent affinity to PIP2 can lead to channelopathies. Given the fundamental role that membrane phosphoinositides play in regulating channel activity, it is surprising that only a small number of channelopathies have been linked to phosphoinositides. This review proposes that for channels whose activity is PIP2-dependent and for which mutations can lead to channelopathies, the possibility that the mutations alter channel-PIP2 interactions ought to be tested. Similarly, diseases that are linked to disorders of the phosphoinositide pathway result in altered PIP2 levels. In such cases, it is proposed that the possibility for a concomitant dysregulation of channel activity also ought to be tested. The ever-growing list of ion channels whose activity depends on interactions with PIP2 promises to provide a mechanism by which defects on either the channel protein or the phosphoinositide levels can lead to disease.

  20. Autism-associated SHANK3 haploinsufficiency causes Ih channelopathy in human neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Fei; Danko, Tamas; Botelho, Salome Calado; Patzke, Christopher; Pak, ChangHui; Wernig, Marius; Südhof, Thomas C

    2016-05-06

    Heterozygous SHANK3 mutations are associated with idiopathic autism and Phelan-McDermid syndrome. SHANK3 is a ubiquitously expressed scaffolding protein that is enriched in postsynaptic excitatory synapses. Here, we used engineered conditional mutations in human neurons and found that heterozygous and homozygous SHANK3 mutations severely and specifically impaired hyperpolarization-activated cation (Ih) channels. SHANK3 mutations caused alterations in neuronal morphology and synaptic connectivity; chronic pharmacological blockage of Ih channels reproduced these phenotypes, suggesting that they may be secondary to Ih-channel impairment. Moreover, mouse Shank3-deficient neurons also exhibited severe decreases in Ih currents. SHANK3 protein interacted with hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel proteins (HCN proteins) that form Ih channels, indicating that SHANK3 functions to organize HCN channels. Our data suggest that SHANK3 mutations predispose to autism, at least partially, by inducing an Ih channelopathy that may be amenable to pharmacological intervention. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Cardiac channelopathies and sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Grunnet, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is always a devastating and unexpected occurrence. SIDS is the leading cause of death in the first 6 months after birth in the industrialized world. Since the discovery in 1998 of long QT syndrome as an underlying substrate for SIDS, around 10-20% of SIDS cases...... ion channel ß-subunits, and 3 genes encode other channel-interacting proteins. All 10 genes have been associated with primary electrical heart diseases. SIDS may hereby be the initial symptom of rare primary electric channelopathies such as long QT, short QT and Brugada syndrome, as well...

  2. Life threatening causes of syncope: channelopathies and cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Adam; Bennett, Matthew T; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Chakrabarti, Santabahnu; Krahn, Andrew D

    2014-09-01

    Syncope is common, has a high recurrence rate and carries a risk of morbidity and, dependent on the cause, mortality. Although the majority of patients with syncope have a benign prognosis, syncope as a result of cardiomyopathy or channelopathy carries a poor prognosis. In addition, the identification of these disorders allows for the institution of treatments, which are effective at reducing the risk of both syncope and mortality. It is for these reasons that the identification of a cardiomyopathy or channelopathy in patients with syncope is crucial. This review article will describe the characteristics of common cardiomyopathies and channelopathies and their investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cardiac channelopathies and sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is always a devastating and unexpected occurrence. SIDS is the leading cause of death in the first 6 months after birth in the industrialized world. Since the discovery in 1998 of long QT syndrome as an underlying substrate for SIDS, around 10-20% of SIDS cases have been proposed as being caused by genetic variants in either ion channel or ion channel-associated proteins. Until now, 10 cardiac channelopathy susceptibility genes have been found to be implicated in the pathogenesis of SIDS. Four of the genes encode cardiac ion channel α-subunits, 3 genes encode ion channel β-subunits, and 3 genes encode other channel-interacting proteins. All 10 genes have been associated with primary electrical heart diseases. SIDS may hereby be the initial symptom of rare primary electric channelopathies such as long QT, short QT and Brugada syndrome, as well as catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. In this review we describe the functional role of sodium, potassium and calcium channels in propagation, depolarization and repolarization in the context of the 4 arrhythmogenic diseases reported to be associated with SIDS. Lastly, the possibility of postmortem genetic testing and potential recommendations on how to deal with family members are discussed. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Channelopathy Pathogenesis in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina eSchmunk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a syndrome that affects normal brain development and is characterized by impaired social interaction as well as verbal and non-verbal communication and by repetitive, stereotypic behavior. ASD is a complex disorder arising from a combination of multiple genetic and environmental factors that are independent from racial, ethnic and socioeconomical status. The high heritability of ASD suggests a strong genetic basis for the disorder. Furthermore, a mounting body of evidence implies a role of various ion channel gene defects (channelopathies in the pathogenesis of autism. Indeed, recent genome-wide association, and whole exome- and whole- genome resequencing studies linked polymorphisms and rare variants in calcium, sodium and potassium channels and their subunits with susceptibility to ASD, much as they do with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders, and animal models with these genetic variations recapitulate endophenotypes considered to be correlates of autistic behavior seen in patients. An ion flux across the membrane regulates a variety of cell functions, from generation of action potentials to gene expression and cell morphology, thus it is not surprising that channelopathies have profound effects on brain functions. In the present work, we summarize existing evidence for the role of ion channel gene defects in the pathogenesis of autism with a focus on calcium signaling and its downstream effects.

  5. Cardiac channelopathies in pediatric patients - 7-years single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illikova, V; Hlivak, P; Hatala, R

    2015-01-01

    Channelopathies are associated with mutations of genes encoding proteins creating or interacting with the specialized ion channels in myocardial cell membranes, thus forming arrhythmogenic substrate predisposing the patient to sudden cardiac death. The study focuses the clinical and ECG presentation and management of children with channelopathies in Slovakia. Twenty-two children with suspected channelopathy were admitted to Children's Cardiac Center Bratislava in the years 2007-2014. Genetic testing was made in 19 patients. Fourteen patients were symptomatic. Long QT syndrome was genetically proven in eight and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in five patients. Twenty children are treated with beta-blockers, five in combination with mexiletine or flecainide. Nine patients received implantable cardiac defibrillator and one underwent left cardiac sympathetic denervation. Both clinical presentation and genetic testing must be considered in the diagnostic and therapeutic process of channelopathies. Early diagnosis allows for adequate treatment and lifestyle modification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic neurological channelopathies: molecular genetics and clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillane, J; Kullmann, D M; Hanna, M G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over recent years has shown that genetic neurological channelopathies can cause many different neurological diseases. Presentations relating to the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or muscle mean that channelopathies can impact on almost any area of neurological practice. Typically, neurological channelopathies are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and cause paroxysmal disturbances of neurological function, although the impairment of function can become fixed with time. These disorders are individually rare, but an accurate diagnosis is important as it has genetic counselling and often treatment implications. Furthermore, the study of less common ion channel mutation-related diseases has increased our understanding of pathomechanisms that is relevant to common neurological diseases such as migraine and epilepsy. Here, we review the molecular genetic and clinical features of inherited neurological channelopathies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. HCN4 subunit expression in fast-spiking interneurons of the rat spinal cord and hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D.I.; Boyle, K.A.; Kinnon, C.M.; Bilsland, C.; Quayle, J.A.; Callister, R.J.; Graham, B.A.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarisation-activated (Ih) currents are considered important for dendritic integration, synaptic transmission, setting membrane potential and rhythmic action potential (AP) discharge in neurons of the central nervous system. Hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels underlie these currents and are composed of homo- and hetero-tetramers of HCN channel subunits (HCN1–4), which confer distinct biophysical properties on the channel. Despite understanding the structure–function relationships of HCN channels with different subunit stoichiometry, our knowledge of their expression in defined neuronal populations remains limited. Recently, we have shown that HCN subunit expression is a feature of a specific population of dorsal horn interneurons that exhibit high-frequency AP discharge. Here we expand on this observation and use neuroanatomical markers to first identify well-characterised neuronal populations in the lumbar spinal cord and hippocampus and subsequently determine whether HCN4 expression correlates with high-frequency AP discharge in these populations. In the spinal cord, HCN4 is expressed in several putative inhibitory interneuron populations including parvalbumin (PV)-expressing islet cells (84.1%; SD: ±2.87), in addition to all putative Renshaw cells and Ia inhibitory interneurons. Similarly, virtually all PV-expressing cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield (93.5%; ±3.40) and the dentate gyrus (90.9%; ±6.38) also express HCN4. This HCN4 expression profile in inhibitory interneurons mirrors both the prevalence of Ih sub-threshold currents and high-frequency AP discharge. Our findings indicate that HCN4 subunits are expressed in several populations of spinal and hippocampal interneurons, which are known to express both Ih sub-threshold currents and exhibit high-frequency AP discharge. As HCN channel function plays a critical role in pain perception, learning and memory, and sleep as well as the pathogenesis of several

  8. HCN4 subunit expression in fast-spiking interneurons of the rat spinal cord and hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D I; Boyle, K A; Kinnon, C M; Bilsland, C; Quayle, J A; Callister, R J; Graham, B A

    2013-05-01

    Hyperpolarisation-activated (Ih) currents are considered important for dendritic integration, synaptic transmission, setting membrane potential and rhythmic action potential (AP) discharge in neurons of the central nervous system. Hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels underlie these currents and are composed of homo- and hetero-tetramers of HCN channel subunits (HCN1-4), which confer distinct biophysical properties on the channel. Despite understanding the structure-function relationships of HCN channels with different subunit stoichiometry, our knowledge of their expression in defined neuronal populations remains limited. Recently, we have shown that HCN subunit expression is a feature of a specific population of dorsal horn interneurons that exhibit high-frequency AP discharge. Here we expand on this observation and use neuroanatomical markers to first identify well-characterised neuronal populations in the lumbar spinal cord and hippocampus and subsequently determine whether HCN4 expression correlates with high-frequency AP discharge in these populations. In the spinal cord, HCN4 is expressed in several putative inhibitory interneuron populations including parvalbumin (PV)-expressing islet cells (84.1%; SD: ±2.87), in addition to all putative Renshaw cells and Ia inhibitory interneurons. Similarly, virtually all PV-expressing cells in the hippocampal CA1 subfield (93.5%; ±3.40) and the dentate gyrus (90.9%; ±6.38) also express HCN4. This HCN4 expression profile in inhibitory interneurons mirrors both the prevalence of Ih sub-threshold currents and high-frequency AP discharge. Our findings indicate that HCN4 subunits are expressed in several populations of spinal and hippocampal interneurons, which are known to express both Ih sub-threshold currents and exhibit high-frequency AP discharge. As HCN channel function plays a critical role in pain perception, learning and memory, and sleep as well as the pathogenesis of several

  9. Gene therapy and editing: Novel potential treatments for neuronal channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wykes, R C; Lignani, G

    2017-05-28

    Pharmaceutical treatment can be inadequate, non-effective, or intolerable for many people suffering from a neuronal channelopathy. Development of novel treatment options, particularly those with the potential to be curative is warranted. Gene therapy approaches can permit cell-specific modification of neuronal and circuit excitability and have been investigated experimentally as a therapy for numerous neurological disorders, with clinical trials for several neurodegenerative diseases ongoing. Channelopathies can arise from a wide array of gene mutations; however they usually result in periods of aberrant network excitability. Therefore gene therapy strategies based on up or downregulation of genes that modulate neuronal excitability may be effective therapy for a wide range of neuronal channelopathies. As many channelopathies are paroxysmal in nature, optogenetic or chemogenetic approaches may be well suited to treat the symptoms of these diseases. Recent advances in gene-editing technologies such as the CRISPR-Cas9 system could in the future result in entirely novel treatment for a channelopathy by repairing disease-causing channel mutations at the germline level. As the brain may develop and wire abnormally as a consequence of an inherited or de novo channelopathy, the choice of optimal gene therapy or gene editing strategy will depend on the time of intervention (germline, neonatal or adult). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Human KATP channelopathies: diseases of metabolic homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Assembly of an inward rectifier K+ channel pore (Kir6.1/Kir6.2) and an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding regulatory subunit (SUR1/SUR2A/SUR2B) forms ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel heteromultimers, widely distributed in metabolically active tissues throughout the body. KATP channels are metabolism-gated biosensors functioning as molecular rheostats that adjust membrane potential-dependent functions to match cellular energetic demands. Vital in the adaptive response to (patho)physiological stress, KATP channels serve a homeostatic role ranging from glucose regulation to cardioprotection. Accordingly, genetic variation in KATP channel subunits has been linked to the etiology of life-threatening human diseases. In particular, pathogenic mutations in KATP channels have been identified in insulin secretion disorders, namely, congenital hyperinsulinism and neonatal diabetes. Moreover, KATP channel defects underlie the triad of developmental delay, epilepsy, and neonatal diabetes (DEND syndrome). KATP channelopathies implicated in patients with mechanical and/or electrical heart disease include dilated cardiomyopathy (with ventricular arrhythmia; CMD1O) and adrenergic atrial fibrillation. A common Kir6.2 E23K polymorphism has been associated with late-onset diabetes and as a risk factor for maladaptive cardiac remodeling in the community-at-large and abnormal cardiopulmonary exercise stress performance in patients with heart failure. The overall mutation frequency within KATP channel genes and the spectrum of genotype–phenotype relationships remain to be established, while predicting consequences of a deficit in channel function is becoming increasingly feasible through systems biology approaches. Thus, advances in molecular medicine in the emerging field of human KATP channelopathies offer new opportunities for targeted individualized screening, early diagnosis, and tailored therapy. PMID:20033705

  11. Flavonoid Regulation of HCN2 Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Anne E.; Rosenbaum, Joel C.; Brelidze, Tinatin I.; Klevit, Rachel E.; Zagotta, William N.

    2013-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN) channels are pacemaker channels whose currents contribute to rhythmic activity in the heart and brain. HCN channels open in response to hyperpolarizing voltages, and the binding of cAMP to their cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) facilitates channel opening. Here, we report that, like cAMP, the flavonoid fisetin potentiates HCN2 channel gating. Fisetin sped HCN2 activation and shifted the conductance-voltage relationship to more depolarizing potentials with a half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 1.8 μm. When applied together, fisetin and cAMP regulated HCN2 gating in a nonadditive fashion. Fisetin did not potentiate HCN2 channels lacking their CNBD, and two independent fluorescence-based binding assays reported that fisetin bound to the purified CNBD. These data suggest that the CNBD mediates the fisetin potentiation of HCN2 channels. Moreover, binding assays suggest that fisetin and cAMP partially compete for binding to the CNBD. NMR experiments demonstrated that fisetin binds within the cAMP-binding pocket, interacting with some of the same residues as cAMP. Together, these data indicate that fisetin is a partial agonist for HCN2 channels. PMID:24085296

  12. Cardiac HCN Channels: From Basic to Bedside%心脏HCN通道:从基础到临床

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范新荣; 王超

    2012-01-01

    研究表明超极化激活环核苷酸门控阳离子通道(HCN通道)大量分布于心脏及神经系统的特定部位,其介导的起搏电流引起窦房结细胞舒张期去极化,从而在心脏自主搏动及心律的调节等方面发挥着十分重要的生理功能.目前,已克隆得到4种HCN亚型基因,并通过功能表达分析指出各种HCN亚型具有不同的电生理学特性.但是目前有关HCN逶道在心脏电活动中的生理及病理生理机制仍未完全阐明.本篇综述旨在详细阐述心脏HCN通道的生物物理学特性、心脏通道蛋白表达、各种HCN通道突变引起的离子通道疾病以及几种通道阻滞药物电药理学特性的研究进展.%Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ( HCN) channels, responsible for pacemaker current, are widely expressed in heart and nervous system, and HCN mediated currents play a key role in generation and regulation of diastolic depolarization which controls the spontaneous rate in sinoatrial node myocytes. Recently, four mammalian HCN isoforms, respectively termed HCN1-4, have been cloned. When heterologously expressed, each of the four HCN subunits has different electrophysiological properties. However, the physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms of HCN channels on cardiac electric activity have not been revealed completely. In this review we summarize recent insight into the biophysical characteristics of cardiac HCN channels, distribution of channels in heart, five kinds of HCN-related ionic channelopathies and electropharmacological properties of several If blockers.

  13. Cardiac channelopathy testing in 274 ethnically diverse sudden unexplained deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dawei; Shah, Krunal R; Um, Sung Yon; Eng, Lucy S; Zhou, Bo; Lin, Ying; Mitchell, Adele A; Nicaj, Leze; Prinz, Mechthild; McDonald, Thomas V; Sampson, Barbara A; Tang, Yingying

    2014-04-01

    Sudden unexplained deaths (SUD) in apparently healthy individuals, for which the causes of deaths remained undetermined after comprehensive forensic investigations and autopsy, present vexing challenges to medical examiners and coroners. Cardiac channelopathies, a group of inheritable diseases that primarily affect heart rhythm by altering the cardiac conduction system, have been known as one of the likely causes of SUD. Adhering to the recommendations of including molecular diagnostics of cardiac channelopathies in SUD investigation, the Molecular Genetics Laboratory of the New York City (NYC) Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) has been routinely testing for six major channelopathy genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, KCNE2, and RyR2) since 2008. Presented here are the results of cardiac channelopathy testing in 274 well-characterized autopsy negative SUD cases, all with thorough medicolegal death investigation including complete autopsy by NYC OCME between 2008 and 2012. The cohort consisted of 141 infants (92.9% younger than six-month old) and 133 non-infants (78.2% were between 19 and 58 years old). Among the ethnically diverse cohort, African American infants had the highest risks of SUD, and African American non-infants died at significantly younger age (23.7 years old, mean age-at-death) than those of other ethnicities (30.3 years old, mean age-at-death). A total of 22 previously classified cardiac channelopathy-associated variants and 24 novel putative channelopathy-associated variants were detected among the infants (13.5%) and non-infants (19.5%). Most channelopathy-associated variants involved the SCN5A gene (68.4% in infants, 50% in non-infants). We believe this is the first study assessing the role of cardiac channelopathy genes in a large and demographically diverse SUD population drawn from a single urban medical examiner's office in the United States. Our study supports that molecular testing for cardiac channelopathy is a valuable tool in SUD

  14. Spectrum of Nondystrophic Skeletal Muscle Channelopathies in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, Fouad; Darras, Basil T; Ghosh, Partha S

    2017-05-01

    The nondystrophic skeletal muscle channelopathies are a group of disorders caused by mutations of various voltage-gated ion channel genes, including nondystrophic myotonia and periodic paralysis. We identified patients with a diagnosis of muscle channelopathy from our neuromuscular database in a tertiary care pediatric center from 2005 to 2015. We then performed a retrospective review of their medical records for demographic characteristics, clinical features, investigations, treatment, and follow-up. Thirty-three patients were identified. Seventeen had nondystrophic myotonia. Seven of them had chloride channelopathy (four Becker disease and three Thomsen disease). Warm-up phenomenon and muscle hypertrophy were common clinical manifestations in this subgroup. Ten patients had sodium channelopathy (four paramyotonia congenita and six other sodium channel myotonia). Stiffness of the facial muscles was an important presenting symptom, and eyelid myotonia was a common clinical finding in this subgroup. The majority of these patients had electrical myotonia. Mexiletine was effective in controlling the symptoms in patients who had received treatment. Sixteen children had periodic paralysis (four hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, eight hypokalemic periodic paralysis, and four Andersen-Tawil syndrome). Acetazolamide was commonly used to prevent paralytic attacks and was found to be effective. Nondystrophic muscle channelopathies present with diverse clinical manifestations (myotonia, muscle hypertrophy, proximal weakness, swallowing difficulties, and periodic paralysis). Cardiac arrhythmias are potentially life threatening in Andersen-Tawil syndrome. Timely identification of these disorders is helpful for effective symptomatic management and genetic counseling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Myotonic discharges discriminate chloride from sodium muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drost, Gea; Stunnenberg, Bas C; Trip, Jeroen; Borm, George; McGill, Kevin C; Ginjaar, Ieke H B; van der Kooi, Arendina W; Zwarts, Machiel J; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Faber, Catharina G; Stegeman, Dick F; Lateva, Zoia

    2015-01-01

    Non-dystrophic myotonic syndromes represent a heterogeneous group of clinically quite similar diseases sharing the feature of myotonia. These syndromes can be separated into chloride and sodium channelopathies, with gene-defects in chloride or sodium channel proteins of the sarcolemmal membrane. Myotonia has its basis in an electrical instability of the sarcolemmal membrane. In the present study we examine the discriminative power of the resulting myotonic discharges for these disorders. Needle electromyography was performed by an electromyographer blinded for genetic diagnosis in 66 non-dystrophic myotonia patients (32 chloride and 34 sodium channelopathy). Five muscles in each patient were examined. Individual trains of myotonic discharges were extracted and analyzed with respect to firing characteristics. Myotonic discharge characteristics in the rectus femoris muscle almost perfectly discriminated chloride from sodium channelopathy patients. The first interdischarge interval as a single variable was longer than 30 ms in all but one of the chloride channelopathy patients and shorter than 30 ms in all of the sodium channelopathy patients. This resulted in a detection rate of over 95%. Myotonic discharges of a single muscle can be used to better guide toward a molecular diagnosis in non-dystrophic myotonic syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Action potential broadening in a presynaptic channelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Rahima; Bakiri, Yamina; Volynski, Kirill E.; Kullmann, Dimitri M.

    2016-07-01

    Brain development and interictal function are unaffected in many paroxysmal neurological channelopathies, possibly explained by homoeostatic plasticity of synaptic transmission. Episodic ataxia type 1 is caused by missense mutations of the potassium channel Kv1.1, which is abundantly expressed in the terminals of cerebellar basket cells. Presynaptic action potentials of small inhibitory terminals have not been characterized, and it is not known whether developmental plasticity compensates for the effects of Kv1.1 dysfunction. Here we use visually targeted patch-clamp recordings from basket cell terminals of mice harbouring an ataxia-associated mutation and their wild-type littermates. Presynaptic spikes are followed by a pronounced afterdepolarization, and are broadened by pharmacological blockade of Kv1.1 or by a dominant ataxia-associated mutation. Somatic recordings fail to detect such changes. Spike broadening leads to increased Ca2+ influx and GABA release, and decreased spontaneous Purkinje cell firing. We find no evidence for developmental compensation for inherited Kv1.1 dysfunction.

  17. Chloride Channelopathies of ClC-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Miao Miao; Hong, Sen; Zhou, Hong Yan; Wang, Hong Wei; Wang, Li Na; Zheng, Ya Juan

    2014-01-01

    Chloride channels (ClCs) have gained worldwide interest because of their molecular diversity, widespread distribution in mammalian tissues and organs, and their link to various human diseases. Nine different ClCs have been molecularly identified and functionally characterized in mammals. ClC-2 is one of nine mammalian members of the ClC family. It possesses unique biophysical characteristics, pharmacological properties, and molecular features that distinguish it from other ClC family members. ClC-2 has wide organ/tissue distribution and is ubiquitously expressed. Published studies consistently point to a high degree of conservation of ClC-2 function and regulation across various species from nematodes to humans over vast evolutionary time spans. ClC-2 has been intensively and extensively studied over the past two decades, leading to the accumulation of a plethora of information to advance our understanding of its pathophysiological functions; however, many controversies still exist. It is necessary to analyze the research findings, and integrate different views to have a better understanding of ClC-2. This review focuses on ClC-2 only, providing an analytical overview of the available literature. Nearly every aspect of ClC-2 is discussed in the review: molecular features, biophysical characteristics, pharmacological properties, cellular function, regulation of expression and function, and channelopathies. PMID:24378849

  18. Chloride Channelopathies of ClC-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Miao Bi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Chloride channels (ClCs have gained worldwide interest because of their molecular diversity, widespread distribution in mammalian tissues and organs, and their link to various human diseases. Nine different ClCs have been molecularly identified and functionally characterized in mammals. ClC-2 is one of nine mammalian members of the ClC family. It possesses unique biophysical characteristics, pharmacological properties, and molecular features that distinguish it from other ClC family members. ClC-2 has wide organ/tissue distribution and is ubiquitously expressed. Published studies consistently point to a high degree of conservation of ClC-2 function and regulation across various species from nematodes to humans over vast evolutionary time spans. ClC-2 has been intensively and extensively studied over the past two decades, leading to the accumulation of a plethora of information to advance our understanding of its pathophysiological functions; however, many controversies still exist. It is necessary to analyze the research findings, and integrate different views to have a better understanding of ClC-2. This review focuses on ClC-2 only, providing an analytical overview of the available literature. Nearly every aspect of ClC-2 is discussed in the review: molecular features, biophysical characteristics, pharmacological properties, cellular function, regulation of expression and function, and channelopathies.

  19. Gene replacement therapy for retinal CNG channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Christian; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2013-10-01

    Visual phototransduction relies on the function of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in the rod and cone photoreceptor outer segment plasma membranes. The role of these ion channels is to translate light-triggered changes in the second messenger cyclic guanosine 3'-5'-monophosphate levels into an electrical signal that is further processed within the retinal network and then sent to higher visual centers. Rod and cone photoreceptors express distinct CNG channels. The rod photoreceptor CNG channel is composed of one CNGB1 and three CNGA1 subunits, whereas the cone channel is formed by one CNGB3 and three CNGA3 subunits. Mutations in any of these channel subunits result in severe and currently untreatable retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa or achromatopsia. In this review, we provide an overview of the human diseases and relevant animal models of CNG channelopathies. Furthermore, we summarize recent results from preclinical gene therapy studies using adeno-associated viral vectors and discuss the efficacy and translational potential of these gene therapeutic approaches.

  20. Health Code Number (HCN) Development Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrocchi, Rocky; Craig, Douglas K.; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Trott, Donna M.; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2013-09-01

    This report provides the detailed description of health code numbers (HCNs) and the procedure of how each HCN is assigned. It contains many guidelines and rationales of HCNs. HCNs are used in the chemical mixture methodology (CMM), a method recommended by the department of energy (DOE) for assessing health effects as a result of exposures to airborne aerosols in an emergency. The procedure is a useful tool for proficient HCN code developers. Intense training and quality assurance with qualified HCN developers are required before an individual comprehends the procedure to develop HCNs for DOE.

  1. CO and HCN observations of carbon stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, F; deJong, T; Loup, C

    1996-01-01

    We present CO and HCN observations of carbon stars. They consist of partly new detections in the (CO)-C-12 J = (1-0), (2-1) and HCN(1-0) lines obtained with the SEST and the IRAM telescope, and of (CO)-C-12 and (CO)-C-13 J = (1-0), (2-1) and (3-2) observations with IRAM and the JCMT of some of the i

  2. Muscle Channelopathies: the Nondystrophic Myotonias and Periodic Paralyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statland, Jeffrey M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review The muscle channelopathies are a group of rare inherited diseases caused by mutations in muscle ion channels. Mutations cause an increase or decrease in muscle membrane excitability, leading to a spectrum of related clinical disorders: the nondystrophic myotonias are characterized by delayed relaxation after muscle contraction, causing muscle stiffness and pain; the periodic paralyses are characterized by episodes of flaccid muscle paralysis. This review describes the clinical characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, and treatments of the nondystrophic myotonias and periodic paralyses. Recent Findings Advances have been made in both the treatment and our understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of muscle channelopathies: (1) a recent controlled trial showed that mexiletine was effective for reducing symptoms and signs of myotonia in nondystrophic myotonia; (2) the mechanisms by which hypokalemic periodic paralysis leads to a depolarized but unexcitable sarcolemma membrane have been traced to a novel gating pore current; and (3) an association was demonstrated between mutations in a potassium inward rectifier and patients with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. Summary The muscle channelopathies are an expanding group of muscle diseases caused by mutations in sodium, chloride, potassium, and calcium ion channels that result in increased or decreased muscle membrane excitability. Recognizing patients with channelopathies and confirming the diagnosis is important, as treatment and management strategies differ based on mutation and clinical phenotype. PMID:24305449

  3. Myotonic discharges discriminate chloride from sodium muscle channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, G.; Stunnenberg, B.C.; Trip, J.; Borm, G.F.; McGill, K.C.; Ginjaar, I.H.; Kooi, A.W. van der; Zwarts, M.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Faber, C.G.; Stegeman, D.F.; Lateva, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Non-dystrophic myotonic syndromes represent a heterogeneous group of clinically quite similar diseases sharing the feature of myotonia. These syndromes can be separated into chloride and sodium channelopathies, with gene-defects in chloride or sodium channel proteins of the sarcolemmal membrane. Myo

  4. Muscle channelopathies: recent advances in genetics, pathophysiology and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetterlin, Karen; Männikkö, Roope; Hanna, Michael G

    2014-10-01

    This article reviews recent advances in clinical, genetic, diagnostic and pathophysiological aspects of the skeletal muscle channelopathies. Genetic advances include the use of the minigene assay to confirm pathogenicity of splice site mutations of CLC-1 chloride channels and a new gene association for Andersen-Tawil syndrome. Mutations causing a gating pore current have been established as a pathomechanism for hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. Mutations in nonchannel genes, including the mitochondrial mATP6/8 genes, have been linked to channelopathy-like episodic weakness. Advances in diagnostic tools include the use of MRI and muscle velocity recovery cycles to evaluate myotonia congenita patients. Specific neonatal presentations of sodium channel myotonia are now well documented. An international multicentre placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial established that mexiletine is an effective therapy in the nondystrophic myotonias. This is the first evidence-based treatment for a skeletal muscle channelopathy. Recent evidence in mouse models indicated that bumetanide can prevent attacks of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis, but this has not yet been tested in patient trials. Advances in genetic, clinical, diagnostic and pathomechanistic understanding of skeletal muscle channelopathies are being translated into improved therapies. Mexiletine is the first evidence-based treatment for nondystrophic myotonias. Bumetanide is effective in preventing attacks in mouse models of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis and now needs to be tested in patients.

  5. Muscle channelopathies: the nondystrophic myotonias and periodic paralyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statland, Jeffrey M; Barohn, Richard J

    2013-12-01

    The muscle channelopathies are a group of rare inherited diseases caused by mutations in muscle ion channels. Mutations cause an increase or decrease in muscle membrane excitability, leading to a spectrum of related clinical disorders: the nondystrophic myotonias are characterized by delayed relaxation after muscle contraction, causing muscle stiffness and pain; the periodic paralyses are characterized by episodes of flaccid muscle paralysis. This review describes the clinical characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, and treatments of the nondystrophic myotonias and periodic paralyses. Advances have been made in both the treatment and our understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of muscle channelopathies: (1) a recent controlled trial showed that mexiletine was effective for reducing symptoms and signs of myotonia in nondystrophic myotonia; (2) the mechanisms by which hypokalemic periodic paralysis leads to a depolarized but unexcitable sarcolemma membrane have been traced to a novel gating pore current; and (3) an association was demonstrated between mutations in a potassium inward rectifier and patients with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. The muscle channelopathies are an expanding group of muscle diseases caused by mutations in sodium, chloride, potassium, and calcium ion channels that result in increased or decreased muscle membrane excitability. Recognizing patients with channelopathies and confirming the diagnosis is important, as treatment and management strategies differ based on mutation and clinical phenotype.

  6. Pathophysiological role of omega pore current in channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin eJurkat-Rott

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In voltage-gated cation channels, a recurrent pattern for mutations is the neutralization of positively charged residues in the voltage-sensing S4 transmembrane segments. These mutations cause dominant ion channelopathies affecting many tissues such as brain, heart, and skeletal muscle. Recent studies suggest that the pathogenesis of associated phenotypes is not limited to alterations in the gating of the ion-conducting alpha pore. Instead, aberrant so-called omega currents facilitated by the movement of the S4 segments during activation and during recovery are thought to cause symptoms. Surprisingly, these omega currents display uni- or bi-directionality and conduct cations with varying ion selectivity. Additionally, the voltage-sensitivity enables the channels to conduct different omega currents in the various voltage ranges. This review gives an overview of voltage sensor channelopathies in general and focuses on pathogenesis of skeletal muscle S4 disorders for which current knowledge is most advanced.

  7. Ion channelopathy and hyperphosphorylation contributing to cardiac arrhythmias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-zai DAI; Feng YU

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias is related to the abnormality of ion channels not only in sarcolemma but also in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which regulates the process of calcium release and up-take intracellularly. Patterns of ion channelopathy in the sarcolemma can be divided into single channel disorder from gene mutations and multiple channels disorder in a diseased hypertrophied heart. Abnormal RyR2, FKBP12.6, SERCA2a, and PLB are also involved in the initiation of cardiac arrhythmias. Maladjustment by hyperphosphorylation on the ion channels in the sarcolemma and RyR2-FKBP12.6 and SERCA2a-PLB is discussed. Hyperphosphorylation, which is the main abnormality upstream to ion channels, can be targeted for suppressing the deterioration of ion channelopathy in terms of new drug discovery in the treatment and prevention of malignant cardiac arrhythmias.

  8. Ion channelopathies in endocrinology: recent genetic findings and pathophysiological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolim, Ana Luiza R; Lindsey, Susan C; Kunii, Ilda S; Fujikawa, Aline M; Soares, Fernando A; Chiamolera, Maria Izabel; Maciel, Rui M B; Silva, Magnus R Dias da

    2010-11-01

    Ion channels serve diverse cellular functions, mainly in cell signal transduction. In endocrine cells, these channels play a major role in hormonal secretion, Ca(2+)-mediated cell signaling, transepithelial transport, cell motility and growth, volume regulation and cellular ionic content and acidification of lysosomal compartments. Ion channel dysfunction can cause endocrine disorders or endocrine-related manifestations, such as pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1, Liddle syndrome, Bartter syndrome, persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy, neonatal diabetes mellitus, cystic fibrosis, Dent's disease, hypomagnesemia with secondary hypocalcemia, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and, the most recently genetically identified channelopathy, thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis. This review briefly recapitulates the membrane action potential in endocrine cells and offers a short overview of known endocrine channelopathies with focus on recent progress regarding the pathophysiological mechanisms and functional genetic defects.

  9. Determining the pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with cardiac channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Fernandez, Anna; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-22

    Advancements in genetic screening have generated massive amounts of data on genetic variation; however, a lack of clear pathogenic stratification has left most variants classified as being of unknown significance. This is a critical limitation for translating genetic data into clinical practice. Genetic screening is currently recommended in the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of cardiac channelopathies, which are major contributors to sudden cardiac death in young people. We propose to characterize the pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with cardiac channelopathies using a stratified scoring system. The development of this system was considered by using all of the tools currently available to define pathogenicity. The use of this scoring system could help clinicians to understand the limitations of genetic associations with a disease, and help them better define the role that genetics can have in their clinical routine.

  10. State of the art in hereditary muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkat-Rott, K; Lehmann-Horn, F

    2010-10-01

    A combination of electrophysiological and genetic studies has resulted in the identification of several skeletal muscle disorders to be caused by pathologically functioning ion channels and has led to the term channelopathies. Typical hereditary muscle channelopa thies are congenital myasthenic syndromes, non-dystrophic myotonias, periodic paralyses, malignant hyperthermia, and central core disease. Most muscle channelopathies are commonly considered to be benign diseases. However, life-threatening weakness episodes or progressive permanent weakness may make these diseases severe, particularly the periodic paralyses (PP). Even in the typical PP forms characterized by episodic occurrence of weakness, up to 60% of the patients suffer from permanent weakness and myopathy with age. In addition, some PP patients present with a predominant progressive muscle weakness phenotype. The weakness can be explained by strongly depolarized fibers that take up sodium and water and that are electrically inexcitable. Drugs that repolarize the fiber membrane can restore muscle strength and may prevent progression.

  11. Personalized medicine: genetic diagnosis for inherited cardiomyopathies/channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Michael J; Marcou, Cherisse A; Tester, David J

    2013-04-01

    Major advances in the field of molecular genetics have expanded our ability to identify genetic substrates underlying the pathogenesis of various disorders that follow Mendelian inheritance patterns. Included among these disorders are the potentially lethal and heritable channelopathies and cardiomyopathies for which the underlying genetic basis has been identified and is now better understood. Clinical and genetic heterogeneity are hallmark features of these disorders, with thousands of gene mutations being implicated within these divergent cardiovascular diseases. Genetic testing for several of these heritable channelopathies and cardiomyopathies has matured from discovery to research-based genetic testing to clinically/commercially available diagnostic tests. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a basic understanding of human medical genetics and genetic testing in the context of cardiovascular diseases of the heart. We review the state of clinical genetic testing for the more common channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, discuss some of the pertinent issues that arise from genetic testing, and discuss the future of personalized medicine in cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Voltage-gated sodium channels: mutations, channelopathies and targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andavan, G S B; Lemmens-Gruber, R

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels produce fast depolarization, which is responsible for the rising phase of the action potential in neurons, muscles and heart. These channels are very large membrane proteins and are encoded by ten genes in mammals. Sodium channels are a crucial component of excitable tissues; hence, they are a target for various neurotoxins that are produced by plants and animals for defence and protection, such as tetrodotoxin, scorpion toxins and batrachotoxin. Several mutations in various sodium channel subtypes cause multiple inherited diseases known as channelopathies. When these mutated sodium channel subtypes are expressed in various tissues, channelopathies in brain, skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle develop as well as neuropathic pain. In this review, we discuss aspects of voltage-gated sodium channel genes with an emphasis on cardiac muscle sodium channels. In addition, we report novel mutations that underlie a spectrum of diseases, such as Brugada, long QT syndrome and inherited conduction disorders. Furthermore, this review explains commonalities and differences among the channel subtypes, the channelopathies caused by the sodium channel gene mutation and the specificity of toxins and blockers of the channel subtypes.

  13. Homozygosity for dominant mutations increases severity of muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzel-Hézode, Marianne; Sternberg, Damien; Tabti, Nacira; Vicart, Savine; Goizet, Cyril; Eymard, Bruno; Fontaine, Bertrand; Fournier, Emmanuel

    2010-04-01

    Muscle channelopathies caused by mutations in the SCN4A gene that encodes the muscle sodium channel are transmitted by autosomal-dominant inheritance. We report herein the first cases of homozygous patients for sodium channel mutations responsible for paramyotonia congenita (I1393T) or hypokalemic periodic paralysis (R1132Q). A parallel was drawn between this unprecedented situation and that of myotonia congenita by including patients homozygous or heterozygous for the CLCN1 I556N channel mutation, which is known for incomplete dominance and penetrance. Standardized electromyographic (EMG) protocols combining exercise and cold served as provocative tests to compare homozygotes with heterozygotes for each of the three mutations. Surface-recorded compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were used to monitor muscle electrical activity, and myotonic discharges were evaluated by needle EMG. In heterozygous patients, exercise tests disclosed abnormal patterns of CMAP changes, which matched those previously described for similar dominant sodium and chloride channel mutations. Homozygotes showed much more severe clinical features and CMAP changes. We hypothesized that the presence of 100% defective ion channels in the homozygotes could account for the most severe phenotype. This suggests that the severity of muscle channelopathies depends both on the degree of channel impairment caused by the mutation and on the number of mutant channels engaged in the pathophysiological process. Overall, this study has practical consequences for the diagnosis of muscle channelopathies and raises new questions about their pathophysiology.

  14. An N-terminal deletion variant of HCN1 in the epileptic WAG/Rij strain modulates HCN current densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Kanyshkova, Tatyana; Silbernagel, Nicole; Fernandez-Orth, Juncal; Bittner, Stefan; Kiper, Aytug K; Rinné, Susanne; Netter, Michael F; Meuth, Sven G; Budde, Thomas; Decher, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rij (WAG/Rij) strain show symptoms resembling human absence epilepsy. Thalamocortical neurons of WAG/Rij rats are characterized by an increased HCN1 expression, a negative shift in I h activation curve, and an altered responsiveness of I h to cAMP. We cloned HCN1 channels from rat thalamic cDNA libraries of the WAG/Rij strain and found an N-terminal deletion of 37 amino acids. In addition, WAG-HCN1 has a stretch of six amino acids, directly following the deletion, where the wild-type sequence (GNSVCF) is changed to a polyserine motif. These alterations were found solely in thalamus mRNA but not in genomic DNA. The truncated WAG-HCN1 was detected late postnatal in WAG/Rij rats and was not passed on to rats obtained from pairing WAG/Rij and non-epileptic August Copenhagen Irish rats. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed 2.2-fold increased current amplitude of WAG-HCN1 compared to rat HCN1. While WAG-HCN1 channels did not have altered current kinetics or changed regulation by protein kinases, fluorescence imaging revealed a faster and more pronounced surface expression of WAG-HCN1. Using co-expression experiments, we found that WAG-HCN1 channels suppress heteromeric HCN2 and HCN4 currents. Moreover, heteromeric channels of WAG-HCN1 with HCN2 have a reduced cAMP sensitivity. Functional studies revealed that the gain-of-function of WAG-HCN1 is not caused by the N-terminal deletion alone, thus requiring a change of the N-terminal GNSVCF motif. Our findings may help to explain previous observations in neurons of the WAG/Rij strain and indicate that WAG-HCN1 may contribute to the genesis of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats.

  15. An N-terminal deletion variant of HCN1 in the epileptic WAG/Rij strain modulates HCN current densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin eWemhöner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rats of the Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rij (WAG/Rij strain show symptoms resembling human absence epilepsy. Thalamocortical neurons of WAG/Rij rats are characterized by an increased HCN1 expression, a negative shift in Ih activation curve, and an altered responsiveness of Ih to cAMP. We cloned HCN1 channels from rat thalamic cDNA libraries of the WAG/Rij strain and found an N-terminal deletion of 37 amino acids. In addition, WAG-HCN1 has a stretch of six amino acids, directly following the deletion, where the wild-type sequence (GNSVCF is changed to a polyserine motif. These alterations were found solely in thalamus mRNA but not in genomic DNA. The truncated WAG-HCN1 was detected late postnatal in WAG/Rij rats and was not passed on to rats obtained from pairing WAG/Rij and non-epileptic August Copenhagen Irish (ACI rats. Heterologous expression in Xenopus oocytes revealed 2.2-fold increased current amplitude of WAG-HCN1 compared to rat HCN1. While WAG-HCN1 channels did not have altered current kinetics or changed regulation by protein kinases, fluorescence imaging revealed a faster and more pronounced surface expression of WAG-HCN1. Using co-expression experiments, we found that WAG-HCN1 channels suppress heteromeric HCN2 and HCN4 currents. Moreover, heteromeric channels of WAG HCN1 with HCN2 have a reduced cAMP sensitivity. Functional studies revealed that the gain-of-function of WAG-HCN1 is not caused by the N-terminal deletion alone, thus requiring a change of the N-terminal GNSVCF motif. Our findings may help to explain previous observations in neurons of the WAG/Rij strain and indicate that WAG HCN1 may contribute to the genesis of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats.

  16. Dendritic Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Sevda Söker

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells, a member of family of antigen presenting cells, are most effective cells in the primary immune response. Dendritic cells originated from dendron, in mean of tree in the Greek, because of their long and elaborate cytoplasmic branching processes. Dendritic cells constitute approximately 0.1 to 1 percent of the blood’s mononuclear cell. Dendritic cells are widely distributed, and specialized for antigen capture and T cell stimulation. In this article, structures and functions of...

  17. Isotopic effects in the collision of HCN with He: substitution of HCN by DCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis-Alpizar, Otoniel; Stoecklin, Thierry; Halvick, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    The HCN molecule is among the main tracers of the interstellar medium (ISM) and the observation of its isotopologue DCN should help to understand the physical properties and chemical history of the molecular clouds. We analyse the effects of the substitution of H by D in the collision of HCN with He. The bound levels of the DCN-He complex are reported and compared with the HCN-He levels. The close-coupling equations were solved in the space-fixed frame using the potential energy surface recently published for the HCN-He system. These calculations were performed with two different approaches in which the triatomic molecule was modelized as a rigid rotor or as a rigid bender, the latter approach allowing us to investigate rovibrational transitions. Rovibrational rate coefficients of DCN in collision with He were computed and compared with those for HCN-He. The ratio of the rate coefficients between both isotopologues varies from 0.4 to 3.9 for rotational transitions in the ground vibrational level. In the case of the first l-type doubling transition, we found that the rate coefficients have the same order of magnitude than those for pure rotational transitions. Therefore, in regions of ISM where the first vibrationally excited level of DCN can be populated, l-type doubling transitions are expected to be as important as pure rotational transitions.

  18. THE NITROGEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF METEORITIC HCN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzarello, Sandra, E-mail: pizzar@asu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85018-1604 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    HCN is ubiquitous in extraterrestrial environments and is central to current theories on the origin of early solar system organic compounds such as amino acids. These compounds, observed in carbonaceous meteorites, were likely important in the origin and/or evolution of early life. As part of our attempts to understand the origin(s) of meteoritic CN{sup –}, we have analyzed the {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N isotopic composition of HCN gas released from water extracts of the Murchison meteorite and found its value to be near those of the terrestrial atmosphere. The findings, when evaluated viz-a-viz molecular abundances and isotopic data of meteoritic organic compounds, suggest that HCN formation could have occurred during the protracted water alteration processes known to have affected the mineralogy of many asteroidal bodies during their solar residence. This was an active synthetic stage, which likely involved simple gasses, organic molecules, their presolar precursors, as well as mineral catalysts and would have lead to the formation of molecules of differing isotopic composition, including some with solar values.

  19. Prevalence study of genetically defined skeletal muscle channelopathies in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horga, Alejandro; Raja Rayan, Dipa L; Matthews, Emma; Sud, Richa; Fialho, Doreen; Durran, Siobhan C M; Burge, James A; Portaro, Simona; Davis, Mary B; Haworth, Andrea; Hanna, Michael G

    2013-04-16

    To obtain minimum point prevalence rates for the skeletal muscle channelopathies and to evaluate the frequency distribution of mutations associated with these disorders. Analysis of demographic, clinical, electrophysiologic, and genetic data of all patients assessed at our national specialist channelopathy service. Only patients living in the United Kingdom with a genetically defined diagnosis of nondystrophic myotonia or periodic paralysis were eligible for the study. Prevalence rates were estimated for England, December 2011. A total of 665 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria, of which 593 were living in England, giving a minimum point prevalence of 1.12/100,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.21). Disease-specific prevalence figures were as follows: myotonia congenita 0.52/100,000 (95% CI 0.46-0.59), paramyotonia congenita 0.17/100,000 (95% CI 0.13-0.20), sodium channel myotonias 0.06/100,000 (95% CI 0.04-0.08), hyperkalemic periodic paralysis 0.17/100,000 (95% CI 0.13-0.20), hypokalemic periodic paralysis 0.13/100,000 (95% CI 0.10-0.17), and Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS) 0.08/100,000 (95% CI 0.05-0.10). In the whole sample (665 patients), 15 out of 104 different CLCN1 mutations accounted for 60% of all patients with myotonia congenita, 11 out of 22 SCN4A mutations for 86% of paramyotonia congenita/sodium channel myotonia pedigrees, and 3 out of 17 KCNJ2 mutations for 42% of ATS pedigrees. We describe for the first time the overall prevalence of genetically defined skeletal muscle channelopathies in England. Despite the large variety of mutations observed in patients with nondystrophic myotonia and ATS, a limited number accounted for a large proportion of cases.

  20. Canalopatías epilépticas Epileptic channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Carrizosa Moog

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Se hace una revisión actualizada sobre las epilepsias debidas a alteraciones de los diferentes canales iónicos, con énfasis en su presentación clínica y genotipificación. Se plantean someramente las bases del enfoque farmacológico del tratamiento. Thies an up to date review of the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of epileptic channelopathies is presented and the bases for a pharmacologic approach to treatment are briefly described.

  1. Phenotypic variability in childhood of skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Harumi; Sakoda, Shunichi; Shibata, Takashi; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Oka, Makio; Yuan, Jun-Hui; Takashima, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masanori P; Kitamura, Tetsuro; Murakami, Nagako; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro

    2015-05-01

    Mutations of the SCN4A gene cause several skeletal muscle channelopathies and overlapping forms of these disorders. However, the variability of the clinical presentation in childhood is confusing and not fully understood among pediatric neurologists. We found three different mutations (p.V445M, p.I693L, and a novel mutation, p.V1149L) in SCN4A but not in the CLCN1 gene. The patient with p.V445M showed the clinical phenotype of sodium channel myotonia, but her clear symptoms did not appear until 11 years of age. Her younger sister and mother, who have the same mutation, displayed marked intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity from mild to severe painful myotonia with persistent weakness. The patient with p.I693L exhibited various symptoms that evolved with age, including apneic episodes, tonic muscular contractions during sleep, fluctuating severe episodic myotonia, and finally episodic paralyses. The patient with the novel p.V1149L mutation exhibited episodic paralyses starting at 3 years of age, and myotonic discharges were detected at 11 years of age for the first time. The present cohort reveals the complexity, variability, and overlapping nature of the clinical features of skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies. These are basically treatable disorders, so it is essential to consider genetic testing before the full development of a patient's condition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Autoimmune AQP4 channelopathies and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Shannon R; Lennon, Vanda A; Pittock, Sean J

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorders (SD) represent an evolving group of central nervous system (CNS)-inflammatory autoimmune demyelinating diseases unified by a pathogenic autoantibody specific for the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel. It was historically misdiagnosed as multiple sclerosis (MS), which lacks a distinguishing biomarker. The discovery of AQP4-IgG moved the focus of CNS demyelinating disease research from emphasis on the oligodendrocyte and myelin to the astrocyte. NMO is recognized today as a relapsing disease, extending beyond the optic nerves and spinal cord to include brain (especially in children) and skeletal muscle. Brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities, identifiable in 60% of patients at the second attack, are consistent with MS in 10% of cases. NMOSD-typical lesions (another 10%) occur in AQP4-enriched regions: circumventricular organs (causing intractable nausea and vomiting) and the diencephalon (causing sleep disorders, endocrinopathies, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis). Advances in understanding the immunobiology of AQP4 autoimmunity have necessitated continuing revision of NMOSD clinical diagnostic criteria. Assays that selectively detect pathogenic AQP4-IgG targeting extracellular epitopes of AQP4 are promising prognostically. When referring to AQP4 autoimmunity, we suggest substituting the term "autoimmune aquaporin-4 channelopathy" for the term "NMO spectrum disorders." Randomized clinical trials are currently assessing the efficacy and safety of newer immunotherapies. Increasing therapeutic options based on understanding the molecular pathogenesis is anticipated to improve the outcome for patients with AQP4 channelopathy. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of genetics on the clinical management of channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Peter J; Ackerman, Michael J; George, Alfred L; Wilde, Arthur A M

    2013-07-16

    There are few areas in cardiology in which the impact of genetics and genetic testing on clinical management has been as great as in cardiac channelopathies, arrhythmic disorders of genetic origin related to the ionic control of the cardiac action potential. Among the growing number of diseases identified as channelopathies, 3 are sufficiently prevalent to represent significant clinical and societal problems and to warrant adequate understanding by practicing cardiologists: long QT syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and Brugada syndrome. This review will focus selectively on the impact of genetic discoveries on clinical management of these 3 diseases. For each disorder, we will discuss to what extent genetic knowledge and clinical genetic test results modify the way cardiologists should approach and manage affected patients. We will also address the optimal use of genetic testing, including its potential limitations and the potential medico-legal implications when such testing is not performed. We will highlight how important it is to understand the ways that genotype can affect clinical manifestations, risk stratification, and responses to the therapy. We will also illustrate the close bridge between molecular biology and clinical medicine, and will emphasize that consideration of the genetic basis for these heritable arrhythmia syndromes and the proper use and interpretation of clinical genetic testing should remain the standard of care. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Dravet syndrome--from epileptic encephalopathy to channelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunklaus, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the α1 subunit of the voltage gated sodium channel (SCN1A) are associated with several epilepsy syndromes, ranging from relatively mild phenotypes found in families with genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) to the severe infant-onset epilepsy Dravet syndrome. Evidence has emerged of the consequences of SCN1α dysfunction in different neuronal networks across the brain pointing toward a channelopathy model causing the neurologic features of Dravet syndrome that is beyond purely seizure related damage. A genetic change will present according to its severity, the genetic background of the individual, and environmental factors, and will affect a variety of neuronal networks according to channel distribution. This already-vulnerable system may be susceptible to secondary aggravating events such as status epilepticus. The channelopathy model implies that pharmacologic treatment and the restoration of impaired γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurotransmission might not only help prevent seizures but might affect the comorbidities of the syndrome. This critical review explores recent evidence relating to the pathogenicity of SCN1A mutations in Dravet syndrome and the effect these have on the wider disease phenotype and discusses whether knowledge of specific genotypes can influence clinical practice. Genetic technology is currently advancing at unprecedented speed and will increase our knowledge of new genes and interacting genetic networks. Clinicians and geneticists will have to work in close collaboration to guarantee good delivery and counseling of genetic testing results. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Voltage-gated sodium channels: biophysics, pharmacology, and related channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora eSavio Galimberti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (INa and can also function as cell-adhesion molecules (CAMs. In-vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named channel partners or channel interacting proteins (ChiPs like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin, and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics. Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium channelopathies. This review will outline the structure, function and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field

  6. Calcium channelopathies in inherited neurological disorders: relevance to drug screening for acquired channel disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lory, Philippe; Mezghrani, Alexandre

    2010-07-01

    Mutations located in the human genes encoding voltage-gated calcium channels are responsible for a variety of diseases referred to as calcium channelopathies, including familial hemiplegic migraine, episodic ataxia type 2, spinocerebellar ataxia type 6, childhood absence epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder, all of which are rare inherited forms of common neurological disorders. The genetic basis of these calcium channelopathies provides a unique opportunity to investigate their underlying mechanisms from the molecular to whole-organism levels. Studies of channelopathies provide insight on the relationships between channel structure and function, and reveal diverse and unexpected physiological roles for the channels. Importantly, these studies may also lead to the identification of drugs for the treatment of genetically acquired channel disorders, as well as to novel therapeutic practices. In this feature review, recent findings regarding neurological calcium channelopathies are discussed.

  7. Drosophila in the Heart of Understanding Cardiac Diseases: Modeling Channelopathies and Cardiomyopathies in the Fruitfly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouarda Taghli-Lamallem

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases and, among them, channelopathies and cardiomyopathies are a major cause of death worldwide. The molecular and genetic defects underlying these cardiac disorders are complex, leading to a large range of structural and functional heart phenotypes. Identification of molecular and functional mechanisms disrupted by mutations causing channelopathies and cardiomyopathies is essential to understanding the link between an altered gene and clinical phenotype. The development of animal models has been proven to be efficient for functional studies in channelopathies and cardiomyopathies. In particular, the Drosophila model has been largely applied for deciphering the molecular and cellular pathways affected in these inherited cardiac disorders and for identifying their genetic modifiers. Here we review the utility and the main contributions of the fruitfly models for the better understanding of channelopathies and cardiomyopathies. We also discuss the investigated pathological mechanisms and the discoveries of evolutionarily conserved pathways which reinforce the value of Drosophila in modeling human cardiac diseases.

  8. [Sensory and autonomic neuropathies and pain-related channelopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, I

    2015-08-01

    Loss of pain perception can result from neurodevelopmental defects, degeneration of nociceptive fibers, or altered excitability of sensory neurons. Hereditary neurodegeneration leading to pain loss is classified as sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN). Mutations in approximately 15 genes have been identified in the group of HSAN disorders. Hallmark of the disease is a liability to injury because of impaired acute pain as a warning system to prevent harm. The clinically overlapping "congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP)" is caused by mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels, which control the excitability of nociceptors. However, mutations in the latter genes can also result in disorders with increased pain susceptibility. This review summarizes the clinical presentation of HSAN and pain-related channelopathies and discusses the underlying disease mechanisms.

  9. Voltage-sensor mutations in channelopathies of skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Stephen C

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of voltage-gated ion channels cause several channelopathies of skeletal muscle, which present clinically with myotonia, periodic paralysis, or a combination of both. Expression studies have revealed both loss-of-function and gain-of-function defects for the currents passed by mutant channels. In many cases, these functional changes could be mechanistically linked to the defects of fibre excitability underlying myotonia or periodic paralysis. One remaining enigma was the basis for depolarization-induced weakness in hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) arising from mutations in either sodium or calcium channels. Curiously, 14 of 15 HypoPP mutations are at arginines in S4 voltage sensors, and recent observations show that these substitutions support an alternative pathway for ion conduction, the gating pore, that may be the source of the aberrant depolarization during an attack of paralysis. PMID:20156847

  10. Focus on Kir7.1: physiology and channelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mohit; Pattnaik, Bikash R

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies have linked alterations in Kir7.1 channel to diverse pathologies. We summarize functional relevance of Kir7.1 channel in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), regulation of channel function by various cytoplasmic metabolites, and mutations that cause channelopathies. At the apical membrane of RPE, K(+) channels contribute to subretinal K(+) homeostasis and support Na(+)/K(+) pump and Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter function by providing a pathway for K(+) secretion. Electrophysiological studies have established that barium- and cesium-sensitive inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channels make up a major component of the RPE apical membrane K(+) conductance. Native human RPE expresses transcripts for Kir1.1, Kir2.1, Kir2.2, Kir3.1, Kir3.4, Kir4.2, and Kir6.1, albeit at levels at least 50-fold lower than Kir7.1. Kir7.1 is structurally similar to other Kir channels, consisting of 2 trans-membrane domains, a pore-forming loop that contains the selectivity filter, and 2 cytoplasmic polar tails. Within the cytoplasmic structure, clusters of amino acid sequences form regulatory domains that interact with cellular metabolites and control the opening and closing of the channel. Recent evidence indicated that intrinsic sequence motifs present in Kir7.1 control surface expression. Mutant Kir7.1 channels are associated with inherited eye pathologies such as Snowflake Vitreoretinal Degeneration (SVD) and Lebers Congenital Amaurosis (LCA16). Based on the current evidence, mutations implicated in channelopathies have the potential to be used for genetic testing to diagnose blindness due to Kir7.1.

  11. Simple Organics and Biomonomers Identified in HCN Polymers: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Osuna-Esteban

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen cyanide (HCN is a ubiquitous molecule in the Universe. It is a compound that is easily produced in significant yields in prebiotic simulation experiments using a reducing atmosphere. HCN can spontaneously polymerise under a wide set of experimental conditions. It has even been proposed that HCN polymers could be present in objects such as asteroids, moons, planets and, in particular, comets. Moreover, it has been suggested that these polymers could play an important role in the origin of life. In this review, the simple organics and biomonomers that have been detected in HCN polymers, the analytical techniques and procedures that have been used to detect and characterise these molecules and an exhaustive classification of the experimental/environmental conditions that favour the formation of HCN polymers are summarised. Nucleobases, amino acids, carboxylic acids, cofactor derivatives and other compounds have been identified in HCN polymers. The great molecular diversity found in HCN polymers encourages their placement at the central core of a plausible protobiological system.

  12. Vibrationally Excited HCN in the Galactic Center Circumnuclear Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Elisabeth A.; Morris, M. R.; Güsten, R.

    2012-05-01

    Recent GREAT observations of CO in the Galactic center Circumnuclear Disk (CND) indicate that this structure is transitory, having gas densities on the order of 10^4 to 10^5 cm^-3, much less than those previously determined using high-density tracers such as HCN. We investigate this discrepancy with new HCN data from the APEX telescope in which we detect for the first time vibrationally-excited transitions of HCN in the CND. This suggests that the source of the disagreement in densities inferred from CO and HCN is the assumption that collisional excitation dominates the excitation of both molecules. We find that radiative excitation of HCN is an important contributor in the environment of the CND. We model the radiative excitation using observed rotational lines of HCN and H13CN from J=3-2 to J=8-7 in both the vibrational ground state and the v2=1 excited state. Our results suggest that ignoring radiative pumping from a strong infrared radiation field, such as in the Galactic center or actively star forming galaxies, can lead to overestimates of the density when using HCN and similar molecules.

  13. Implantable defibrillators versus medical therapy for cardiac channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, David A; Goldberger, Jeffrey J; Berendsen, Mark A; Huffman, Mark D

    2015-10-07

    Sudden cardiac death is a significant cause of mortality in both the US and globally. However, 5% to 15% of people with sudden cardiac death have no structural abnormalities, and most of these events are attributed to underlying cardiac ion channelopathies. Rates of cardiac ion channelopathy diagnosis are increasing. However, the optimal treatment for such people is poorly understood and current guidelines rely primarily on expert opinion. To compare the effect of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) with antiarrhythmic drugs or usual care in reducing the risk of all-cause mortality, fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events, and adverse events in people with cardiac ion channelopathies. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2015, Issue 6), EMBASE, MEDLINE, Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science (CPCI-S), ClinicalTrials.gov, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) in July 2015. We applied no language restrictions. We included all randomized controlled trials of people aged 18 years and older with ion channelopathies, including congenital long QT syndrome, congenital short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, or catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. Participants must have been randomized to ICD implantation and compared to antiarrhythmic drug therapy or usual care. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion and extracted the data. We included all-cause mortality, fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events, and adverse events for our primary outcome analyses and non-fatal cardiovascular events, rates of inappropriate ICD firing, quality of life, and cost for our secondary outcome analyses. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dichotomous outcomes, both for independent and pooled study analyses. From the 468 references identified after removing duplicates, we found two trials comprising 86

  14. Skeletal muscle channelopathies: new insights into the periodic paralyses and nondystrophic myotonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Daniel; Griggs, Robert

    2009-10-01

    To summarize advances in our understanding of the clinical phenotypes, genetics, and molecular pathophysiology of the periodic paralyses, the nondystrophic myotonias, and other muscle channelopathies. The number of pathogenic mutations causing periodic paralysis, nondystrophic myotonias, and ryanodinopathies continues to grow with the advent of exon hierarchy analysis strategies for genetic screening and better understanding and recognition of disease phenotypes. Recent studies have expanded and clarified the role of gating pore current in channelopathy pathogenesis. It has been shown that the gating pore current can account for the molecular and phenotypic diseases observed in the muscle sodium channelopathies, and, given that homologous residues are affected in mutations of calcium channels, it is possible that pore leak represents a pathomechanism applicable to many channel diseases. Improvements in treatment of the muscle channelopathies are on the horizon. A randomized controlled trial has been initiated for the study of mexiletine in nondystrophic myotonias. The class IC antiarrhythmia drug flecainide has been shown to depress ventricular ectopy and improve exercise capacity in patients with Andersen-Tawil syndrome. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of gating pore current as a disease-causing mechanism in the muscle channelopathies and have allowed new correlations to be drawn between disease genotype and phenotype.

  15. Optical properties of poly-HCN and their astronomical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, B N; Sagan, C; Thompson, W R; Arakawa, E T; Meisse, C; Tuminello, P S

    1994-01-01

    Matthews (1992) has proposed that HCN "polymer" is ubiquitous in the solar system. We apply vacuum deposition and spectroscopic techniques previously used on synthetic organic heteropolymers (tholins), kerogens, and meteoritic organic residues to the measurement of the optical constants of poly-HCN in the wavelength range 0.05-40 micrometers. These measurements allow quantitative comparison with spectrophotometry of organic-rich bodies in the outer solar system. In a specific test of Matthews' hypothesis, poly-HCN fails to match the optical constants of the haze of the Saturnian moon, Titan, in the visible and near-infrared derived from astronomical observations and standard models of the Titan atmosphere. In contrast, a tholin produced from a simulated Titan atmosphere matches within the probable errors. Poly-HCN is much more N-rich than Titan tholin.

  16. Radiative Transfer of HCN: Interpreting observations of hyperfine anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Mullins, A M; Redman, M P; Wiles, B; Guegan, N; Barrett, J; Keto, E R

    2016-01-01

    Molecules with hyperfine splitting of their rotational line spectra are useful probes of optical depth, via the relative line strengths of their hyperfine components.The hyperfine splitting is particularly advantageous in interpreting the physical conditions of the emitting gas because with a second rotational transition, both gas density and temperature can be derived. For HCN however, the relative strengths of the hyperfine lines are anomalous. They appear in ratios which can vary significantly from source to source, and are inconsistent with local thermodynamic equilibrium. This is the HCN hyperfine anomaly, and it prevents the use of simple LTE models of HCN emission to derive reliable optical depths. In this paper we demonstrate how to model HCN hyperfine line emission, and derive accurate line ratios, spectral line shapes and optical depths. We show that by carrying out radiative transfer calculations over each hyperfine level individually, as opposed to summing them over each rotational level, the anom...

  17. [Inflammatory dendritic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Elodie; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a rare and heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells. Several murine dendritic cell subpopulations have been identified that differ in their phenotype and functional properties. In the steady state, committed dendritic cell precursors differentiate into lymphoid organ-resident dendritic cells and migratory tissue dendritic cells. During inflammation appears an additional dendritic cell subpopulation that has been termed « inflammatory dendritic cells ». Inflammatory dendritic cells differentiate in situ from monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation. Here, we discuss how mouse inflammatory dendritic cells differ from macrophages and from other dendritic cell populations. Finally, we review recent work on human inflammatory dendritic cells.

  18. Shock-tube study of relaxation in HCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, N. K.; Gupte, K. S.; Kiefer, J. H.

    2008-08-01

    Thermal vibrational relaxation in HCN mixtures with Kr has been observed with the laser-schlieren technique. The experiments cover the temperatures 750-2900 K and a large pressure range of 13-420 Torr in 5% and 20% HCN/Kr mixtures. Relaxation is extremely fast but appears to occur in two well-separated stages that are assigned to the vibrational transitions (000)-->(010) and (000)-->(100) with perhaps some lesser contribution from (000)-->(001). This interpretation is strongly supported by a comparison of net density changes to thermodynamic calculations. The first and faster process shows near constant relaxation times whereas the latter slower stage has a slight decrease of these with T. Relaxation times in pure HCN obtained by neglecting the small contribution of krypton are as follows: (a) PτHCN-HCN=27 exp(1.473/T1/3) ns atm (000)-->(010) (b) PτHCN-HCN=11 exp(32.6/T1/3) ns atm (000)-->(100). Probabilities suggested by these results are around 0.05 for the fast step and 0.0035 to 0.005 for the slow process. These results are close to those found by laser fluorescence measurements for deactivation of levels involving excitation of the C-H stretch (001) at 3312 cm-1. These results are also consistent with the notion of a dominance of the fast stage by T,R-V transfer (thermal relaxation) occurring in a weakly bound complex. However, the slow step most likely occurs through a V-V process (03 10)-->(100), ΔE=27.7 cm-1, after multiple excitation of the (010) mode. These are the first thermal measurements of relaxation in HCN and the first to see energy transfer involving the low-frequency modes.

  19. Regulation of epileptiform discharges in rat neocortex by HCN channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, Asher J; Williams, Sidney B; Hablitz, John J

    2013-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated, nonspecific cation (HCN) channels have a well-characterized role in regulation of cellular excitability and network activity. The role of these channels in control of epileptiform discharges is less thoroughly understood. This is especially pertinent given the altered HCN channel expression in epilepsy. We hypothesized that inhibition of HCN channels would enhance bicuculline-induced epileptiform discharges. Whole cell recordings were obtained from layer (L)2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons and L1 and L5 GABAergic interneurons. In the presence of bicuculline (10 μM), HCN channel inhibition with ZD 7288 (20 μM) significantly increased the magnitude (defined as area) of evoked epileptiform events in both L2/3 and L5 neurons. We recorded activity associated with epileptiform discharges in L1 and L5 interneurons to test the hypothesis that HCN channels regulate excitatory synaptic inputs differently in interneurons versus pyramidal neurons. HCN channel inhibition increased the magnitude of epileptiform events in both L1 and L5 interneurons. The increased magnitude of epileptiform events in both pyramidal cells and interneurons was due to an increase in network activity, since holding cells at depolarized potentials under voltage-clamp conditions to minimize HCN channel opening did not prevent enhancement in the presence of ZD 7288. In neurons recorded with ZD 7288-containing pipettes, bath application of the noninactivating inward cationic current (Ih) antagonist still produced increases in epileptiform responses. These results show that epileptiform discharges in disinhibited rat neocortex are modulated by HCN channels.

  20. CN and HCN in the infrared spectrum of IRC + 10216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, G. R.; Deming, D.; Jennings, D. E.; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Keady, John J.

    1991-01-01

    The abundance of HCN in the inner circumstellar shell of IRC + 10216 has been remeasured using the 12-micron nu2 band. The 12-micron lines are less saturated than HCN 3-micron lines previously detected in the spectrum of IRC + 10216. The observed 12-micron HCN line is formed in the circumstellar shell from about 4 to 12 R sub * in accord with a photospheric origin for HCN. The derived HCN abundance in the 4 to 12 R sub* region is 4 x 10 exp-5 and the column density is 7 x 10 exp 18/sq cm. The 5-micron CN vibration-rotation fundamental band was detected for the first time in an astronomical source. Using four CN lines, the CN column density was determined to be 2.6 x 10 exp 15/sq cm and the rotational temperature to be 8 +/-2 K. The peal radial abundance is 1 x 10 exp -5. The values for the temperature and abundance are in good agreement with microwave results and with the formation of CN from the photolysis of HCN.

  1. Catalytic and Gas-Solid Reactions Involving HCN over Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker; Johnsson, Jan Erik; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1997-01-01

    In coal-fired combustion systems solid calcium species may be present as ash components or limestone added to the combustion chamber. In this study heterogeneous reactions involving HCN over seven different limestones were investigated in a laboratory fixed-bed quartz reactor at 873-1,173 K....... Calcined limestone is an effective catalyst for oxidation of HCN. Under conditions with complete conversion of HCN at O-2 concentrations above about 5,000 ppmv the selectivity for formation of NO and N2O is 50-70% and below 5%, respectively. Nitric oxide can be reduced by HCN to N-2 in the absence of O-2...... and to N-2 and N2O in the presence of O-2. At low O-2 concentrations or low temperatures. HCN may react with CaO, forming calcium cyanamide, CaCN2. The selectivities for formation of NO and N2O from oxidation of CaCN2 is 20-25% for both species. The catalytic activity of limestone for oxidation of HCN...

  2. Detection of CO and HCN in Pluto's atmosphere with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Lellouch, E; Butler, B; Fouchet, T; Lavvas, P; Strobel, D F; Sicardy, B; Moullet, A; Moreno, R; Bockelée-Morvan, D; Biver, N; Young, L; Lis, D; Stansberry, J; Stern, A; Weaver, H; Young, E; Zhu, X; Boissier, J

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the Pluto-Charon system, acquired with the ALMA interferometer on June 12-13, 2015, have yielded a detection of the CO(3-2) and HCN(4-3) rotational transitions from Pluto, providing a strong confirmation of the presence of CO, and the first observation of HCN, in Pluto's atmosphere. The CO and HCN lines probe Pluto's atmosphere up to ~450 km and ~900 km altitude, respectively. The CO detection yields (i) a much improved determination of the CO mole fraction, as 515+/-40 ppm for a 12 ubar surface pressure (ii) clear evidence for a well-marked temperature decrease (i.e., mesosphere) above the 30-50 km stratopause and a best-determined temperature of 70+/-2 K at 300 km, in agreement with recent inferences from New Horizons / Alice solar occultation data. The HCN line shape implies a high abundance of this species in the upper atmosphere, with a mole fraction >1.5x10-5 above 450 km and a value of 4x10-5 near 800 km. The large HCN abundance and the cold upper atmosphere imply supersaturation of HCN...

  3. Beyond membrane channelopathies: alternative mechanisms underlying complex human disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konstantinos Dean BOUDOULAS; Peter J MOHLER

    2011-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human disease has flourished in large part due to the discovery of gene mutations linked with membrane ion channels and transporters. In fact, ion channel defects ("channelopathies" - the focus of this review series) have been associated with a spectrum of serious human disease phenotypes including cystic fibrosis, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetes, skeletal muscle defects, and neurological disorders. However, we now know that human disease, particularly excitable cell disease, may be caused by defects in non-ion channel polypeptides including in cellular components residing well beneath the plasma membrane. For example, over the past few years, a new class of potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmias has been linked with cytoplasmic proteins that include sub-membrane adapters such as ankyrin-B (ANK2),ankyrin-G (ANK3), and alpha-1 syntrophin, membrane coat proteins including caveolin-3 (CAV3), signaling platforms including yotiao (AKAPg), and cardiac enzymes (GPD1L). The focus of this review is to detail the exciting role of lamins, yet another class of gene products that have provided elegant new insight into human disease.

  4. Low clinical penetrance in causal mutation carriers for cardiac channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Jáimez, Juan; Álvarez, Miguel; Algarra, María; Macías Ruíz, Rosa; Peñas, Rocío; Valverde, Francisca; Tortajada, Gustavo; Lorente, Jose Antonio; Melgares, Rafael; Tercedor, Luis

    2013-04-01

    Cardiac channelopathies are genetic alterations that can cause sudden death. Long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome are 2 such conditions. Both are diagnosed according to previously published criteria. Our objective was to determine the sensitivity of these criteria in a consecutive series of patients carrying the mutations that cause them. We enrolled 15 families and 31 causal mutation carriers with a high pathogenic probability of having long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome. We conducted clinical and electrocardiographic studies to analyze the extent to which these patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria. Statistical analysis was with SPSS 17.0. Some 48.3% of the subjects met the criteria indicating a high probability of long QT syndrome or Brugada syndrome. Among those with the mutation for long QT syndrome, only 10 out of 21 had a Schwartz index score ≥ 4. Both the median Schwartz score and the cQT interval were lower in relatives than in probands. Of those with the mutation for Brugada syndrome, 60% failed to meet current diagnostic criteria, which were more frequently fulfilled in relatives. Pharmacological tests with epinephrine and flecainide helped establish the diagnosis in 2 mutation carriers with negative phenotype. Current diagnostic criteria for long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome had low sensitivity in our sample of genetic carriers. Genetic tests supported by pharmacological tests can increase diagnostic sensitivity, especially in asymptomatic relatives. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Voltage-Gated Sodium Channels: Biophysics, Pharmacology, and Related Channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio-Galimberti, Eleonora; Gollob, Michael H.; Darbar, Dawood

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC) are multi-molecular protein complexes expressed in both excitable and non-excitable cells. They are primarily formed by a pore-forming multi-spanning integral membrane glycoprotein (α-subunit) that can be associated with one or more regulatory β-subunits. The latter are single-span integral membrane proteins that modulate the sodium current (INa) and can also function as cell adhesion molecules. In vitro some of the cell-adhesive functions of the β-subunits may play important physiological roles independently of the α-subunits. Other endogenous regulatory proteins named “channel partners” or “channel interacting proteins” (ChiPs) like caveolin-3 and calmodulin/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) can also interact and modulate the expression and/or function of VGSC. In addition to their physiological roles in cell excitability and cell adhesion, VGSC are the site of action of toxins (like tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin), and pharmacologic agents (like antiarrhythmic drugs, local anesthetics, antiepileptic drugs, and newly developed analgesics). Mutations in genes that encode α- and/or β-subunits as well as the ChiPs can affect the structure and biophysical properties of VGSC, leading to the development of diseases termed sodium “channelopathies”.  This review will outline the structure, function, and biophysical properties of VGSC as well as their pharmacology and associated channelopathies and highlight some of the recent advances in this field. PMID:22798951

  6. Alternative paradigms for ion channelopathies: disorders of ion channel membrane trafficking and posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Jerry; Mohler, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Channelopathies are a diverse set of disorders associated with defects in ion channel (and transporter) function. Although the vast majority of channelopathies are linked with inherited mutations that alter ion channel biophysical properties, another group of similar disorders has emerged that alter ion channel synthesis, membrane trafficking, and/or posttranslational modifications. In fact, some electrical and episodic disorders have now been identified that are not defects in the ion channel but instead reflect dysfunction in an ion channel (or transporter) regulatory protein. This review focuses on alternative paradigms for physiological disorders associated with protein biosynthesis, folding, trafficking, and membrane retention. Furthermore, the review highlights the role of aberrant posttranslational modifications in acquired channelopathies.

  7. Therapeutic approaches to genetic ion channelopathies and perspectives in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eImbrici

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the human genome more than 400 genes encode ion channels, which are transmembrane proteins mediating ion fluxes across membranes. Being expressed in all cell types, they are involved in almost all physiological processes, including sense perception, neurotransmission, muscle contraction, secretion, immune response, cell proliferation and differentiation. Due to the widespread tissue distribution of ion channels and their physiological functions, mutations in genes encoding ion channel subunits, or their interacting proteins, are responsible for inherited ion channelopathies. These diseases can range from common to very rare disorders and their severity can be mild, disabling, or life-threatening. In spite of this, ion channels are the primary target of only about 5% of the marketed drugs suggesting their potential in drug discovery. The current review summarizes the therapeutic management of the principal ion channelopathies of central and peripheral nervous system, heart, kidney, bone, skeletal muscle and pancreas, resulting from mutations in calcium, sodium, potassium and chloride ion channels. For most channelopathies the therapy is mainly empirical and symptomatic, often limited by lack of efficacy and tolerability for a significant number of patients. Other channelopathies can exploit ion channel targeted drugs, such as marketed sodium channel blockers. Developing new and more specific therapeutic approaches is therefore required. To this aim, a major advancement in the pharmacotherapy of channelopathies has been the discovery that ion channel mutations lead to change in biophysics that can in turn specifically modify the sensitivity to drugs: this opens the way to a pharmacogenetics strategy, allowing the development of a personalized therapy with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. In addition, the identification of disease modifiers in ion channelopathies appears an alternative strategy to discover novel druggable targets.

  8. Therapeutic Approaches to Genetic Ion Channelopathies and Perspectives in Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbrici, Paola; Liantonio, Antonella; Camerino, Giulia M.; De Bellis, Michela; Camerino, Claudia; Mele, Antonietta; Giustino, Arcangela; Pierno, Sabata; De Luca, Annamaria; Tricarico, Domenico; Desaphy, Jean-Francois; Conte, Diana

    2016-01-01

    In the human genome more than 400 genes encode ion channels, which are transmembrane proteins mediating ion fluxes across membranes. Being expressed in all cell types, they are involved in almost all physiological processes, including sense perception, neurotransmission, muscle contraction, secretion, immune response, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Due to the widespread tissue distribution of ion channels and their physiological functions, mutations in genes encoding ion channel subunits, or their interacting proteins, are responsible for inherited ion channelopathies. These diseases can range from common to very rare disorders and their severity can be mild, disabling, or life-threatening. In spite of this, ion channels are the primary target of only about 5% of the marketed drugs suggesting their potential in drug discovery. The current review summarizes the therapeutic management of the principal ion channelopathies of central and peripheral nervous system, heart, kidney, bone, skeletal muscle and pancreas, resulting from mutations in calcium, sodium, potassium, and chloride ion channels. For most channelopathies the therapy is mainly empirical and symptomatic, often limited by lack of efficacy and tolerability for a significant number of patients. Other channelopathies can exploit ion channel targeted drugs, such as marketed sodium channel blockers. Developing new and more specific therapeutic approaches is therefore required. To this aim, a major advancement in the pharmacotherapy of channelopathies has been the discovery that ion channel mutations lead to change in biophysics that can in turn specifically modify the sensitivity to drugs: this opens the way to a pharmacogenetics strategy, allowing the development of a personalized therapy with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. In addition, the identification of disease modifiers in ion channelopathies appears an alternative strategy to discover novel druggable targets. PMID:27242528

  9. Detection of CO and HCN in Pluto's atmosphere with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lellouch, E.; Gurwell, M.; Butler, B.; Fouchet, T.; Lavvas, P.; Strobel, D. F.; Sicardy, B.; Moullet, A.; Moreno, R.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Biver, N.; Young, L.; Lis, D.; Stansberry, J.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H.; Young, E.; Zhu, X.; Boissier, J.

    2017-04-01

    Observations of the Pluto-Charon system, acquired with the ALMA interferometer on June 12-13, 2015, have led to the detection of the CO(3-2) and HCN(4-3) rotational transitions from Pluto (including the hyperfine structure of HCN), providing a strong confirmation of the presence of CO, and the first observation of HCN in Pluto's atmosphere. The CO and HCN lines probe Pluto's atmosphere up to ∼450 km and ∼900 km altitude, respectively, with a large contribution due to limb emission. The CO detection yields (i) a much improved determination of the CO mole fraction, as 515 ± 40 ppm for a 12 μbar surface pressure (ii) strong constraints on Pluto's mean atmospheric dayside temperature profile over ∼50-400 km, with clear evidence for a well-marked temperature decrease (i.e., mesosphere) above the 30-50 km stratopause and a best-determined temperature of 70 ± 2 K at 300 km, somewhat lower than previously estimated from stellar occultations (81 ± 6 K), and in agreement with recent inferences from New Horizons / Alice solar occultation data. The HCN line shape implies a high abundance of this species in the upper atmosphere, with a mole fraction >1.5 × 10-5 above 450 km and a value of 4 × 10-5 near 800 km. Assuming HCN at saturation, this would require a warm (>92 K) upper atmosphere layer; while this is not ruled out by the CO emission, it is inconsistent with the Alice-measured CH4 and N2 line-of-sight column densities. Taken together, the large HCN abundance and the cold upper atmosphere imply supersaturation of HCN to a degree (7-8 orders of magnitude) hitherto unseen in planetary atmospheres, probably due to a lack of condensation nuclei above the haze region and the slow kinetics of condensation at the low pressure and temperature conditions of Pluto's upper atmosphere. HCN is also present in the bottom ∼100 km of the atmosphere, with a 10-8-10-7 mole fraction; this implies either HCN saturation or undersaturation there, depending on the precise

  10. HCN1 and HCN2 in Rat DRG neurons: levels in nociceptors and non-nociceptors, NT3-dependence and influence of CFA-induced skin inflammation on HCN2 and NT3 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Cristian; McMullan, Simon; Djouhri, Laiche; Gao, Linlin; Watkins, Roger; Berry, Carol; Dempsey, Katherine; Lawson, Sally N

    2012-01-01

    I(h), which influences neuronal excitability, has recently been measured in vivo in sensory neuron subtypes in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs). However, expression levels of HCN (hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated) channel proteins that underlie I(h) were unknown. We therefore examined immunostaining of the most abundant isoforms in DRGs, HCN1 and HCN2 in these neuron subtypes. This immunostaining was cytoplasmic and membrane-associated (ring). Ring-staining for both isoforms was in neurofilament-rich A-fiber neurons, but not in small neurofilament-poor C-fiber neurons, although some C-neurons showed cytoplasmic HCN2 staining. We recorded intracellularly from DRG neurons in vivo, determined their sensory properties (nociceptive or low-threshold-mechanoreceptive, LTM) and conduction velocities (CVs). We then injected fluorescent dye enabling subsequent immunostaining. For each dye-injected neuron, ring- and cytoplasmic-immunointensities were determined relative to maximum ring-immunointensity. Both HCN1- and HCN2-ring-immunointensities were positively correlated with CV in both nociceptors and LTMs; they were high in Aβ-nociceptors and Aα/β-LTMs. High HCN1 and HCN2 levels in Aα/β-neurons may, via I(h), influence normal non-painful (e.g. touch and proprioceptive) sensations as well as nociception and pain. HCN2-, not HCN1-, ring-intensities were higher in muscle spindle afferents (MSAs) than in all other neurons. The previously reported very high I(h) in MSAs may relate to their very high HCN2. In normal C-nociceptors, low HCN1 and HCN2 were consistent with their low/undetectable I(h.) In some C-LTMs HCN2-intensities were higher than in C-nociceptors. Together, HCN1 and HCN2 expressions reflect previously reported I(h) magnitudes and properties in neuronal subgroups, suggesting these isoforms underlie I(h) in DRG neurons. Expression of both isoforms was NT3-dependent in cultured DRG neurons. HCN2-immunostaining in small neurons increased 1 day after

  11. HCN channels are not required for mechanotransduction in sensory hair cells of the mouse inner ear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C Horwitz

    Full Text Available The molecular composition of the hair cell transduction channel has not been identified. Here we explore the novel hypothesis that hair cell transduction channels include HCN subunits. The HCN family of ion channels includes four members, HCN1-4. They were originally identified as the molecular correlates of the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels that carry currents known as If, IQ or Ih. However, based on recent evidence it has been suggested that HCN subunits may also be components of the elusive hair cell transduction channel. To investigate this hypothesis we examined expression of mRNA that encodes HCN1-4 in sensory epithelia of the mouse inner ear, immunolocalization of HCN subunits 1, 2 and 4, uptake of the transduction channel permeable dye, FM1-43 and electrophysiological measurement of mechanotransduction current. Dye uptake and transduction current were assayed in cochlear and vestibular hair cells of wildtype mice exposed to HCN channel blockers or a dominant-negative form of HCN2 that contained a pore mutation and in mutant mice that lacked HCN1, HCN2 or both. We found robust expression of HCNs 1, 2 and 4 but little evidence that localized HCN subunits in hair bundles, the site of mechanotransduction. Although high concentrations of the HCN antagonist, ZD7288, blocked 50-70% of the transduction current, we found no reduction of transduction current in either cochlear or vestibular hair cells of HCN1- or HCN2- deficient mice relative to wild-type mice. Furthermore, mice that lacked both HCN1 and HCN2 also had normal transduction currents. Lastly, we found that mice exposed to the dominant-negative mutant form of HCN2 had normal transduction currents as well. Taken together, the evidence suggests that HCN subunits are not required for mechanotransduction in hair cells of the mouse inner ear.

  12. Measuring quality of life impairment in skeletal muscle channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, V A; Ricci, C; Montanari, M; Apolone, G; Rose, M; Meola, G

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Fatigue and pain have been previously shown to be important determinants for decreasing quality of life (QoL) in one report in patients with non-dystrophic myotonia. The aims of our study were to assess QoL in skeletal muscle channelopathies (SMC) using INQoL (individualized QoL) and SF-36 questionnaires. Methods We administered INQoL and SF-36 to 66 Italian patients with SMC (26: periodic paralysis, 36: myotonia congenita and 4: Andersen-Tawil) and compared the results in 422 patients with myotonic dystrophies (DM1: 382; and DM2: 40). Results (i) INQoL index in SMC is similar to that in DMs (P = 0.79). (ii) Patients with myotonia congenita have the worst perception of QoL. (iii) Myotonia has the most detrimental effect on patients with myotonia congenita, followed by patients with DM2 and then by patients with DM1 and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. (iv) Pain is a significant complaint in patients with myotonia congenita, hypokalemic periodic paralysis and DM2 but not in DM1. (v) Fatigue has a similar detrimental effect on all patient groups except for patients with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis in whom muscle weakness and myotonia more than fatigue affect QoL perception. (vi) Muscle symptoms considered in INQoL correlate with physical symptoms assessed by SF-36 (R from −0.34 to −0.76). Conclusions QoL perception in patients with SMC is similar to that of patients with DMs, chronic multisystem disabling conditions. Our results provide information to target treatment and health care of these patients. The sensitivity of INQoL to changes in QoL in the SMC needs to be further explored in longitudinal studies. PMID:22607270

  13. Painful neuropathies: the emerging role of sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Brigitte A; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Gerrits, Monique M; Waxman, Stephen G; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G

    2014-06-01

    Pain is a frequent debilitating feature reported in peripheral neuropathies with involvement of small nerve (Aδ and C) fibers. Voltage-gated sodium channels are responsible for the generation and conduction of action potentials in the peripheral nociceptive neuronal pathway where NaV 1.7, NaV 1.8, and NaV 1.9 sodium channels (encoded by SCN9A, SCN10A, and SCN11A) are preferentially expressed. The human genetic pain conditions inherited erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder were the first to be linked to gain-of-function SCN9A mutations. Recent studies have expanded this spectrum with gain-of-function SCN9A mutations in patients with small fiber neuropathy and in a new syndrome of pain, dysautonomia, and small hands and small feet (acromesomelia). In addition, painful neuropathies have been recently linked to SCN10A mutations. Patch-clamp studies have shown that the effect of SCN9A mutations is dependent upon the cell-type background. The functional effects of a mutation in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and sympathetic neuron cells may differ per mutation, reflecting the pattern of expression of autonomic symptoms in patients with painful neuropathies who carry the mutation in question. Peripheral neuropathies may not always be length-dependent, as demonstrated in patients with initial facial and scalp pain symptoms with SCN9A mutations showing hyperexcitability in both trigeminal ganglion and DRG neurons. There is some evidence suggesting that gain-of-function SCN9A mutations can lead to degeneration of peripheral axons. This review will focus on the emerging role of sodium channelopathies in painful peripheral neuropathies, which could serve as a basis for novel therapeutic strategies.

  14. Measuring quality of life impairment in skeletal muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, V A; Ricci, C; Montanari, M; Apolone, G; Rose, M; Meola, G

    2012-11-01

    Fatigue and pain have been previously shown to be important determinants for decreasing quality of life (QoL) in one report in patients with non-dystrophic myotonia. The aims of our study were to assess QoL in skeletal muscle channelopathies (SMC) using INQoL (individualized QoL) and SF-36 questionnaires. We administered INQoL and SF-36 to 66 Italian patients with SMC (26: periodic paralysis, 36: myotonia congenita and 4: Andersen-Tawil) and compared the results in 422 patients with myotonic dystrophies (DM1: 382; and DM2: 40). (i) INQoL index in SMC is similar to that in DMs (P = 0.79). (ii) Patients with myotonia congenita have the worst perception of QoL. (iii) Myotonia has the most detrimental effect on patients with myotonia congenita, followed by patients with DM2 and then by patients with DM1 and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. (iv) Pain is a significant complaint in patients with myotonia congenita, hypokalemic periodic paralysis and DM2 but not in DM1. (v) Fatigue has a similar detrimental effect on all patient groups except for patients with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis in whom muscle weakness and myotonia more than fatigue affect QoL perception. (vi) Muscle symptoms considered in INQoL correlate with physical symptoms assessed by SF-36 (R from -0.34 to -0.76). QoL perception in patients with SMC is similar to that of patients with DMs, chronic multisystem disabling conditions. Our results provide information to target treatment and health care of these patients. The sensitivity of INQoL to changes in QoL in the SMC needs to be further explored in longitudinal studies. © 2012 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2012 EFNS.

  15. Skeletal muscle channelopathies: nondystrophic myotonias and periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja Rayan, Dipa L; Hanna, Michael G

    2010-10-01

    The aim is to review the recent findings in relation to the genetics, pathophysiology, clinical phenotypes, investigation and treatment of the nondystrophic myotonias (NDMs) and periodic paralyses. The number of pathogenic mutations causing NDMs and periodic paralyses in known genes continues to expand. In addition, a mutation has been identified in the ryanodine receptor gene manifesting as an atypical periodic paralysis phenotype. Another recent study indicated that thyrotoxic hypokalaemic periodic paralysis is determined by mutations in a novel gene encoding an inwardly rectifying potassium channel, Kir2.6. Work studying molecular mechanisms indicates that 90% of the known mutations causing hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) result in loss of positively charged arginine residues in the S4 segments of either SCN4A or CACNA1S, possibly creating a gating-pore current that may be important in the pathogenesis of HypoPP. Recent studies evaluating clinical features and health status in NDM patients have provided more detailed insights into the significant morbidity associated with these diseases. Ultrasound has been successfully used to demonstrate muscle abnormalities in NDM patients and magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies applied to HypoPP patients suggest that this technique can demonstrate both disease-related and treatment-related changes. Recent discoveries in the skeletal muscle channelopathies have increased our understanding of the genetics and pathophysiology of these diseases. Studies reporting imaging techniques raise the possibility of improved disease monitoring and better outcome measures for clinical trials. Randomized controlled trials to establish an evidence base upon which to recommend standard treatments are required.

  16. Radiative transfer of HCN: interpreting observations of hyperfine anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, A. M.; Loughnane, R. M.; Redman, M. P.; Wiles, B.; Guegan, N.; Barrett, J.; Keto, E. R.

    2016-07-01

    Molecules with hyperfine splitting of their rotational line spectra are useful probes of optical depth, via the relative line strengths of their hyperfine components. The hyperfine splitting is particularly advantageous in interpreting the physical conditions of the emitting gas because with a second rotational transition, both gas density and temperature can be derived. For HCN however, the relative strengths of the hyperfine lines are anomalous. They appear in ratios which can vary significantly from source to source, and are inconsistent with local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). This is the HCN hyperfine anomaly, and it prevents the use of simple LTE models of HCN emission to derive reliable optical depths. In this paper, we demonstrate how to model HCN hyperfine line emission, and derive accurate line ratios, spectral line shapes and optical depths. We show that by carrying out radiative transfer calculations over each hyperfine level individually, as opposed to summing them over each rotational level, the anomalous hyperfine emission emerges naturally. To do this requires not only accurate radiative rates between hyperfine states, but also accurate collisional rates. We investigate the effects of different sets of hyperfine collisional rates, derived via the proportional method and through direct recoupling calculations. Through an extensive parameter sweep over typical low-mass star-forming conditions, we show the HCN line ratios to be highly variable to optical depth. We also reproduce an observed effect whereby the red-blue asymmetry of the hyperfine lines (an infall signature) switches sense within a single rotational transition.

  17. Heterogeneous radiolysis of HCN adsorbed on a solid surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin-Garcia, M.; Ortega-Gutierrez, F. [Instituto de Geologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ramos-Bernal, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Negron-Mendoza, A., E-mail: negron@nucleares.unam.m [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-21

    Hydrogen cyanide is a key molecule for chemical evolution studies because, when it is exposed to different sources of energy, it forms various compounds of biological importance. To understand the role of minerals in chemical evolution, a series of experiments was performed. First, the adsorption capacity of HCN on different surface minerals was studied; the results show that HCN is readily adsorbed onto the solids proposed (zeolite, serpentine, dolomite, and sodium montmorillonite), in particular zeolite and montmorillonite. Second, the radiolysis of HCN adsorbed on olivine (as an example of a mineral surface) was also followed; it was found that the rate of HCN decomposition by gamma irradiation is enhanced in the presence of the solid. The third series of studies show that organic material was produced in high abundance from HCN at high radiation doses. The radiolytic products included gases (CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 4}, and CO) and oligomeric materials that release carboxylic acids (succinic, malonic, citric, and tricarballylic acids) and amino acids upon acid hydrolysis. These experiments suggest that minerals could have participated actively in chemical evolution processes.

  18. ALMA Observations of HCN and its Isotopologues on Titan

    CERN Document Server

    Molter, Edward M; Cordiner, Martin A; Serigano, Joseph; Irwin, Patrick G J; Teanby, Nicholas A; Charnley, Steven B; Lindberg, Johan E

    2016-01-01

    We present sub-millimeter spectra of HCN isotopologues on Titan, derived from publicly available ALMA flux calibration observations of Titan taken in early 2014. We report the detection of a new HCN isotopologue on Titan, H$^{13}$C$^{15}$, and confirm an earlier report of detection of DCN. We model high signal-to-noise observations of HCN, H$^{13}$CN, HC$^{15}$N, DCN, and H$^{13}$C$^{15}$ to derive abundances and infer the following isotopic ratios: $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C = 89.8 $\\pm$ 2.8, $^{14}$N/$^{15}$N = 72.3 $\\pm$ 2.2, D/H = (2.5 $\\pm$ 0.2)$\\times$10$^{-4}$, and HCN/H$^{13}$C$^{15}$ = 5800 $\\pm$ 270 (1$\\sigma$ errors). The carbon and nitrogen ratios are consistent with and improve on the precision of previous results, confirming a factor of $\\sim$2.3 elevation in $^{14}$N/$^{15}$N in HCN compared to N$_2$ and a lack of fractionation in $^{12}$C/$^{13}$C from the protosolar value. This is the first published measurement of D/H in a nitrile species on Titan, and we find evidence for a factor of $\\sim$2 deuteri...

  19. HCN and HCO+ Observations of the Galactic Circumnuclear Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Christopher, M H; Stolovy, S R; Yun, M S; Yun, Min S.

    2005-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution (5.1" x 2.7") OVRO millimeter array observations of HCN (J=1-0) and HCO+ (J=1-0) emission in the inner 3 pc of the galaxy. The HCN and HCO+ emission of the circumnuclear disk (CND) is distributed in a well-defined ring with a peak at a radius of 1.6pc. The HCO+/HCN emission ratio is typically ~0.4 but with significant variations. The HCN emission is well correlated with the H_2 emission at 2.12 microns both in the main emission lobes of the CND and also in four filaments. Multiple areas of interaction between the ionized gas and the CND are also seen - the western arm of the minispiral is spatially and kinematically consistent with being the ionized inner edge of the CND, and the northern arm may be connected to the CND northeastern extension. With the enhanced spatial resolution of the HCN map, we resolve numerous dense molecular gas cores within the CND with characteristic diameter of 7" (0.25pc). For 26 of the more isolated cores, we measure sizes, velocity widths, and in...

  20. Novel pharmacological activity of loperamide and CP-339,818 on human HCN channels characterized with an automated electrophysiology assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yan T; Vasilyev, Dmitry V; Shan, Qin J; Dunlop, John; Mayer, Scott; Bowlby, Mark R

    2008-02-26

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels underlie the pacemaker currents in neurons (I(h)) and cardiac (I(f)) cells. As such, the identification and characterization of novel blockers of HCN channels is important to enable the dissection of their function in vivo. Using a new IonWorks HT electrophysiology assay with human HCN1 and HCN4 expressed stably in cell lines, four HCN channel blockers are characterized. Two blockers known for their activity at opioid/Ca(2+) channels and K(+) channels, loperamide and CP-339,818 (respectively), are described to block HCN1 more potently than HCN4. The known HCN blocker ZD7288 was also found to be more selective for HCN1 over HCN4, while the HCN blocker DK-AH269 was equipotent on HCN4 and HCN1. Partial replacement of the intracellular Cl(-) with gluconate reduced the potency on both channels, but to varying degrees. For both HCN1 and HCN4, ZD7288 was most sensitive in lower Cl(-) solutions, while the potency of loperamide was not affected by the differing solutions. The block of HCN1 for all compounds was voltage-dependent, being relieved at more negative potentials. The voltage-dependent, Cl(-) dependent, HCN1 preferring compounds described here elaborate on the current known pharmacology of HCN channels and may help provide novel tools and chemical starting points for the investigation of HCN channel function in natively expressing systems.

  1. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of loss-of-function cardiac sodium channelopathies in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chockalingam, Priya; Clur, Sally-Ann B.; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Kriebel, Thomas; Paul, Thomas; Rammeloo, Lukas A.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Blom, Nico A.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Loss-of-function sodium channelopathies manifest as a spectrum of diseases including Brugada syndrome (BrS) and cardiac conduction disease. OBJECTIVE To analyze the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of these disorders in children. METHODS Patients aged 98th percentile for age). RESULTS:

  2. Predissociation of methyl cyanoformate: The HCN and HNC channels

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelm, Michael J; González-Vázquez, Jesús; Vázquez, Saulo A; Smith, Jonathan M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the 193 nm photolysis of the cyano-ester, methyl cyanoformate (MCF). Specifically, nanosecond time-resolved infrared emission spectroscopy was used to monitor the ro-vibrationally excited photoproducts generated in the photolysis reaction. The signal-to-noise of all time-resolved spectra were enhanced using the recently developed algorithm, spectral reconstruction analysis, which allowed observation of previously obscured minor resonances, and revealed new dissociation channels producing HCN and HNC. Spectral fit analysis of the nascent HCN and electronically excited CN($A^2\\Pi_1$) resonances yield a lower bound estimate for the HCN quantum yield of ca. 0.42$\\pm$0.24%. Multi-configuration self-consistent field calculations were used to interrogate the ground and four lowest energy singlet excited states of MCF. At 193 nm, dissociation is predicted to occur predominantly on the repulsive S$_2$ state. Nevertheless, minor pathways leading to the...

  3. CNG and HCN channels: two peas, one pod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Kimberley B; Zagotta, William N

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-activated ion channels play a fundamental role in a variety of physiological processes. By opening in response to intracellular cyclic nucleotides, they translate changes in concentrations of signaling molecules to changes in membrane potential. These channels belong to two families: the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN) channels. The two families exhibit high sequence similarity and belong to the superfamily of voltage-gated potassium channels. Whereas HCN channels are activated by voltage and CNG channels are virtually voltage independent, both channels are activated by cyclic nucleotide binding. Furthermore, the channels are thought to have similar channel structures, leading to similar mechanisms of activation by cyclic nucleotides. However, although these channels are structurally and behaviorally similar, they have evolved to perform distinct physiological functions. This review describes the physiological roles and biophysical behavior of CNG and HCN channels. We focus on how similarities in structure and activation mechanisms result in common biophysical models, allowing CNG and HCN channels to be viewed as a single genre.

  4. From funny current to HCN channels: 20 years of excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accili, E A; Proenza, C; Baruscotti, M; DiFrancesco, D

    2002-02-01

    The "funny" (pacemaker) current has unusual characteristics, including activation on hyperpolarization, permeability to K(+) and Na(+), modulation by internal cAMP, and a tiny, single-channel conductance. In cardiac cells and neurons, pacemaker channels control repetitive activity and excitability. The recent cloning of HCN subunits provides new insight into the molecular basis for the funny channel properties.

  5. HCN Polymers: Toward Structure Comprehension Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Jean-Yves; Thissen, Roland; Frisari, Ma; Vuitton, Veronique; Quirico, Eric; Le Roy, Léna; Fray, Nicolas; Cottin, Hervé; Horst, Sarah; Yelle, Roger

    A lot of solar system materials, including cometary ices and Titan aerosols, contain dark matter that can be interpreted as complex nitrogen bearing organic matter [1]. In laboratory experi-ments, HCN polymers are thus analogs of great interest. In fact they may be present in Titan atmosphere and in comet nuclei and then reprocessed as a CN distributed source [2], when ices began to sublimate and ejects from the nucleus organic matter grains [3]. The presence of HCN polymers is suggested because HCN molecule has been directly observed in 1P/Halley comet [4] and others. HCN polymers are also of prebiotic interest [5] as it can form amino acid under hydrolysis conditions. Even if they have been studied during the last decades, their chemical composition and structure are still poorly understood, and a great analytical effort has to be continued. In this way we present a high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and a high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (MS/HRMS) analysis of HCN polymers. It was shown [6] that this is a suitable technique to elucidate composition and structure of the soluble part of tholins analogs of Titan's atmosphere aerosols. HCN polymers have never been studied by HRMS, thus we used a LTQ-Orbitrap XL high resolution mass spectrometer to analyse the HCN polymers. These are produced at LISA by direct polymerisation of pure liquid HCN, catalyzed by ammonia. HCN polymers have been completely dissolved in methanol and then injected in the mass spectrometer by ElectroSpray Ionization (ESI). This atmospheric pressure ionization process produces protonated or deprotonated ions, but it does not fragment molecules. Thus HRMS, allows a direct access to the stoechiometry of all the ionizable molecules present in the samples. Fragmentation analyses (MS/MS) of selected ions have also been performed. Thess analysis provide information about the different chemical fonctionnalities present in HCN poly-mers and also about their structure. Thus we are able to

  6. High resolution observations of HCN and HCO+ J=3-2 in the disk and outflow of Mrk231 -Detection of vibrationally excited HCN in the warped nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Aalto, S; Muller, S; Winters, J M; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E; van der Werf, P; Henkel, C; Costagliola, F; Neri, R

    2014-01-01

    We obtained high resolution (0."25 to 0."90) observations of HCN and HCO+ J=3-2 of the ultraluminous QSO galaxy Mrk231 with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We find luminous HCN and HCO+ 3-2 emission in the main disk and we detect compact (r350 pc) line wings are found for HCN 3-2 with velocities +-750 km/s. Line ratios indicate that the emission is emerging in dense gas n=1e4 - 5e5 cm-3 of elevated HCN abundance X(HCN)=1e-8 to 1e-6. High X(HCN) also allows for the emission to originate in gas of more moderate density. We tentatively detect nuclear emission from the reactive ion HOC+ with HCO+/HOC+=10-20. The HCN v2=1f line emission is consistent with the notion of a hot, dusty, warped inner disk of Mrk231 where the v2=1f line is excited by bright mid-IR 14 micron continuum. We estimate the vibrational temperature T_vib to 200-400 K. We propose that 50% of the main HCN emission may have its excitation affected by the radiation field through IR pumping of the vibrational ground state. The HCN emission ...

  7. Inward-rectifying potassium channelopathies: new insights into disorders of sodium and potassium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Sung, Chih-Chien; Huang, Chou-Long; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2015-03-01

    Inward-rectifying potassium (Kir) channels allow more inward than outward potassium flux when channels are open in mammalian cells. At physiological resting membrane potentials, however, they predominantly mediate outward potassium flux and play important roles in regulating the resting membrane potential in diverse cell types and potassium secretion in the kidneys. Mutations of Kir channels cause human hereditary diseases collectively called Kir channelopathies, many of which are characterized by disorders of sodium and potassium homeostasis. Studies on these genetic Kir channelopathies have shed light on novel pathophysiological mechanisms, including renal sodium and potassium handling, potassium shifting in skeletal muscles, and aldosterone production in the adrenal glands. Here, we review several recent advances in Kir channels and their clinical implications in sodium and potassium homeostasis.

  8. Studying channelopathies at the functional level using a system identification approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, A. Aldo

    2007-09-01

    The electrical activity of our brain's neurons is controlled by voltage-gated ion channels. Mutations in these ion channels have been recently associated with clinical conditions, so called channelopathies. The involved ion channels have been well characterised at a molecular and biophysical level. However, the impact of these mutations on neuron function have been only rudimentary studied. It remains unclear how operation and performance (in terms of input-output characteristics and reliability) are affected. Here, I show how system identification techniques provide neuronal performance measures which allow to quantitatively asses the impact of channelopathies by comparing whole cell input-output relationships. I illustrate the feasibility of this approach by comparing the effects on neuronal signalling of two human sodium channel mutations (NaV 1.1 W1204R, R1648H), linked to generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures, to the wild-type NaV 1.1 channel.

  9. Refined Exercise testing can aid DNA-based Diagnosis in Muscle Channelopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, S V; Matthews, E.; Barber, M.; Burge, J. A.; Rajakulendran, S; Fialho, D; Sud, R.; Haworth, A; Koltzenburg, M.; Hanna, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To improve the accuracy of genotype prediction and guide genetic testing in patients with muscle channelopathies we applied and refined specialized electrophysiological exercise test parameters.Methods: We studied 56 genetically confirmed patients and 65 controls using needle electromyography, the long exercise test, and short exercise tests at room temperature, after cooling, and rewarming.Results: Concordant amplitude-and-area decrements were more reliable than amplitude-only mea...

  10. Muscle biopsy and cell cultures: potential diagnostic tools in hereditary skeletal muscle channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Meola

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary muscle channelopathies are caused by dominant mutations in the genes encoding for subunits of muscle voltage- gated ion channels. Point mutations on the human skeletal muscle Na+ channel (Nav1.4 give rise to hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, potassium aggravated myotonia, paramyotonia congenita and hypokalemic periodic paralysis type 2. Point mutations on the human skeletal muscle Ca2+ channel give rise to hypokalemic periodic paralysis and malignant hyperthermia. Point mutations in the human skeletal chloride channel ClC-1 give rise to myotonia congenita. Point mutations in the inwardly rectifying K+ channel Kir2.1 give rise to a syndrome characterized by periodic paralysis, severe cardiac arrhythmias and skeletal alterations (Andersen’s syndrome. Involvement of the same ion channel can thus give rise to different phenotypes. In addition, the same mutation can lead to different phenotypes or similar phenotypes can be caused by different mutations on the same or on different channel subtypes. Bearing in mind, the complexity of this field, the growing number of potential channelopathies (such as the myotonic dystrophies, and the time and cost of the genetic procedures, before a biomolecular approach is addressed, it is mandatory to apply strict diagnostic protocols to screen the patients. In this study we propose a protocol to be applied in the diagnosis of the hereditary muscle channelopathies and we demonstrate that muscle biopsy studies and muscle cell cultures may significantly contribute towards the correct diagnosis of the channel involved. DNAbased diagnosis is now a reality for many of the channelopathies. This has obvious genetic counselling, prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  11. Voltage-gated potassium channelopathy: an expanding spectrum of clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shribman, Sam; Patani, Rickie; Deeb, Jacquie; Chaudhuri, Abhijit

    2013-01-10

    Autoimmune voltage-gated potassium channelopathies represent a wide and expanding spectrum of neurological conditions. We present a case demonstrating the phenotypic heterogeneity of antivoltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC)-associated disorders. Such cases may easily be dismissed as functional disorders at first presentation. We propose that there must remain a high index of suspicion for antiVGKC-associated disorders in cases where there are transient neurological disturbances in atypical spatial and temporal distributions.

  12. Rare neurological channelopathies--networks to study patients, pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Joanna C; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Griggs, Robert C; Waters, Michael F

    2016-04-01

    Each of the thousands of rare neurological diseases requires a widely distributed network of centres, investigators and patients, so as to foster multidisciplinary investigations and involve sufficient numbers of patients in the discovery of disease pathogenesis and novel treatment. In this Review, we highlight the value of this collaborative approach in patient-oriented research into rare neurological channelopathies. Two networks, the Consortium for Clinical Investigations of Neurological Channelopathies (CINCH) and the Clinical Research Consortium for Studies of Cerebellar Ataxias (CRC-SCA), provide a link between patients with rare channelopathies and investigators who are studying disease pathogenesis and developing novel treatments. Interactions between patients, researchers and advocacy groups promote shared agendas that benefit patient education and recruitment, research collaboration and funding, and training and mentoring of junior investigators who are attracted to the study of the diseases that provide the focus for the two networks. Here, we discuss how linkage of national and international centres has enabled recruitment of study participants, provided opportunities for novel studies of pathogenesis, and facilitated successful clinical trials.

  13. Absence epilepsy and sinus dysrhythmia in mice lacking the pacemaker channel HCN2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Andreas; Budde, Thomas; Stieber, Juliane; Moosmang, Sven; Wahl, Christian; Holthoff, Knut; Langebartels, Anke; Wotjak, Carsten; Munsch, Thomas; Zong, Xiangang; Feil, Susanne; Feil, Robert; Lancel, Marike; Chien, Kenneth R.; Konnerth, Arthur; Pape, Hans-Christian; Biel, Martin; Hofmann, Franz

    2003-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cation (HCN) channels are believed to be involved in the generation of cardiac pacemaker depolarizations as well as in the control of neuronal excitability and plasticity. The contributions of the four individual HCN channel isoforms (HCN1–4) to these diverse functions are not known. Here we show that HCN2-deficient mice exhibit spontaneous absence seizures. The thalamocortical relay neurons of these mice displayed a near complete loss of the HCN current, resulting in a pronounced hyperpolarizing shift of the resting membrane potential, an altered response to depolarizing inputs and an increased susceptibility for oscillations. HCN2-null mice also displayed cardiac sinus dysrhythmia, a reduction of the sinoatrial HCN current and a shift of the maximum diastolic potential to hyperpolarized values. Mice with cardiomyocyte- specific deletion of HCN2 displayed the same dysrhythmia as mice lacking HCN2 globally, indicating that the dysrhythmia is indeed caused by sinoatrial dysfunction. Our results define the physiological role of the HCN2 subunit as a major determinant of membrane resting potential that is required for regular cardiac and neuronal rhythmicity. PMID:12514127

  14. Spironolactone Regulates HCN Protein Expression Through Micro-RNA-1 in Rats With Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hua-Dong; Xia, Shuang; Zha, Cheng-Qin; Deng, Song-Bai; Du, Jian-Lin; She, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that aldosterone blockers reduced the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). However, the mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which spironolactone, a classic aldosterone blocker, regulates hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (HCN) protein expression in ischemic rat myocardium after MI. Eighteen rats surviving 24 hours after MI were randomly assigned into 3 groups: MI, spironolactone, and spironolactone + antagomir-1. Six sham-operated rats had a suture loosely tied around the left coronary artery, without ligation. The border zone of the myocardial infarct was collected from each rat at 1 week after MI. HCN2 and HCN4 protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) level were measured in addition to miRNA-1 levels. Spironolactone significantly increased miRNA-1 levels and downregulated HCN2 and HCN4 protein and mRNA levels. miRNA-1 suppression with antagomir-1 increased HCN2 and HCN4 protein levels; however, HCN2 and HCN4 mRNA levels were not affected. These results suggested that spironolactone could increase miRNA-1 expression in ischemic rat myocardium after MI and that the upregulation of miRNA-1 expression partially contributed to the posttranscriptional repression of HCN protein expression, which may contribute to the effect of spironolactone to reduce the incidence of MI-associated ventricular arrhythmias.

  15. Response of Si- and Al-doped graphenes toward HCN: A computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastegar, Somayeh F.; Peyghan, Ali Ahmadi [Department of Chemistry, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadipour, Nasser L., E-mail: hadipour_n@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitivity of Si- and Al-doped graphene (SiG and AlG) toward HCN is investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic properties of AlG are significantly changed in the presence of HCN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is established that AlG can be a good sensor for HCN molecule. - Abstract: Sensitivity of Si- and Al-doped graphenes (SiG and AlG) toward toxic HCN has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) in terms of energetic, geometric and electronic properties. Optimized configurations corresponding to physisorption and, subsequently, chemisorption of HCN on each surface have been identified. It is found that HCN molecule can be adsorbed on impurity atoms with adsorption energies about -27.20 and -38.75 kcal/mol on the SiG and the AlG, respectively. By comparing to HCN adsorption on SiG, it can be inferred that molecular HCN adsorbed on AlG can induce significant change in AlG conductivity. On the basis of calculated changes in the HOMO/LUMO energy gap it is found that electronic properties of AlG are sensitive toward adsorption of HCN and the reverse is correct for SiG, suggesting that the AlG may be a promising sensor for HCN.

  16. J=1-0 HCN toward bright far-infrared sources in the outer Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirogov, L.

    1999-08-01

    Results of the J=1-0 HCN observations toward 34 bright far-infrared sources selected from the IRAS Point Source Catalog are reported. Together with 17 sources observed in this line earlier (Pirogov et al., 1996) they form a complete sample of the sources with flux densities S(100 mu m)>500 Jy and delta > 0degr in the outer Galaxy. The HCN data are compared with the HCO(+) , NH_3, CS and CO data taken from literature. Prominent correlations with nearly similar slopes of ~ 1 are revealed between line integrated intensities of the molecules known to be high density tracers (HCN, HCO(+) , NH_3 and CS). The correlations become higher after adding the data for dark clouds, small globules and cirrus cores implying similar excitation and formation mechanisms of the considered molecules. Collisional excitation in regions with different densities as well as different molecular abundances and velocity dispersions in different types of cores seem to be important in producing these correlations. The following relations hold on the average over ~ 3 orders of magnitude of integrated intensities: I(HCN)>~ I(HCO(+) ~ ) I(CS) > I(NH_3) where ammonia integrated intensities are several times lower than HCN ones. Correlations are also found between HCN and CO integrated intensities for the sample sources as well as between HCN line widths and those of other species. The HCN lines have the same widths as the HCO(+) ones and are larger than CS and especially NH_3 line widths. Weak correlations are found between HCN line widths and luminosities of IRAS sources as well as between HCN integrated intensities, IRAS flux densities at 100mu m and luminosities of IRAS sources divided by distance squared. The sources with most intense HCN lines have associated water masers and molecular outflows while the lack of associated maser and outflow implies weak or no HCN emission. In order to reproduce the anomalies of the J=1-0 HCN hyperfine structure (R12 factor.

  17. Hydrocarbon and HCN Condensation in the Atmosphere of Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, S.; Gao, P.; Limpasuvan, D. L.; Willacy, K.; Yung, Y. L.

    2016-12-01

    Observations by the New Horizons spacecraft revealed the presence of haze in the Pluto atmosphere, which have been shown by microphysical models to be likely composed of fractal aggregates originating from CH4 photolysis and subsequent polymerization of higher hydrocarbons. However, temperatures in the Pluto atmosphere are such that higher hydrocarbons, such as C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, as we well as HCN, should condense, possibly onto the fractal aggregate haze particles. This process can change their shape, as well as their optical properties. We use a modified microphysical model to investigate the characteristics of haze particles as C2 hydrocarbons and HCN condense on them during their sedimentation through the atmosphere. The composition of the particles as a function of altitude can in turn inform the interpretation of New Horizons observations. In addition, we use the condensation rates from the microphysics model to augment the photochemical model that calculates the concentrations of C2 hydrocarbons and HCN to ensure self-consistency.

  18. An ab initio HCN/HNC rotational-vibrational line list and opacity function for astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Gregory John

    HCN/HNC is an important molecule which is found throughout the universe. For example HCN/HNC is known to exist in comets, planetary atmospheres and the interstellar medium. HCN is also an important opacity source in carbon rich stars (C-stars). HCN masers have been observed in the circumstellar material around these C-stars and also in galaxies. Jorgensen and co-workers investigated model carbon star atmospheres in which they included HCN as an opacity source. They found that including a HCN opacity function had a remarkable effect: the atmosphere expanded by five times and the pressure of the atmosphere in the surface layers dropped by one or two orders of magnitude. This suggests that a full and detailed treatment of the rotational-vibrational spectrum of HCN/HNC could have a profound effect on the models of carbon stars, this provides the main motivation in this work. The temperatures of the stars in which HCN is an important opacity source Teff = 2000 - 3000 K. If HCN and HNC are in thermodynamic equilibrium it would be expected that HNC as well as HCN are found in significant populations. The transition dipoles of the fundamental bands of HNC are more than twice as strong as their HCN counter parts. These factors mean that both HCN and HNC will be considered, which makes a semiglobal treatment of the [H,C,N] system necessary. In this thesis an ab initio HCN/HNC linelist, from which accurate spectra and opacity functions can be calculated, is computed. Within this thesis I present least squares fits for ab initio semiglobal potential energy, dipole moment, relativistic correction and adiabatic correction surfaces. The potential energy surface (PES) is morphed for HNC geometries of the potential to improve the HNC representation of the surface. The PES and dipole moment surface (DMS) are used to perform quantum mechanical nuclear motion (rotational-vibrational) calculations with the DVR3D suite of codes. Preliminary calculations are made to optimise a ro

  19. Hypoosmotic cell swelling as a novel mechanism for modulation of cloned HCN2 channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calloe, Kirstine; Elmedyb, Pernille; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2005-01-01

    This work demonstrates cell swelling as a new regulatory mechanism for the cloned hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 2 (HCN2). HCN2 channels were coexpressed with aquaporin1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes and currents were monitored using a two-electrode voltage-clamp. HCN2...... channels were activated by hyperpolarization to -100 mV and the currents were measured before and during hypoosmotic cell swelling. Cell swelling increased HCN2 currents by 30% without changing the kinetics of the currents. Injection of 50 nl intracellular solution resulted in a current increase of 20......%, indicating that an increase in cell volume also under isoosmotic conditions may lead to activation of HCN2. In the absence of aquaporin1 only negligible changes in oocyte cell volume occur during exposure to hypoosmotic media and no significant change in HCN2 channel activity was observed during perfusion...

  20. Characterization of solvated electrons in hydrogen cyanide clusters: (HCN)n- (n=3, 4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Li, Ying; Li, Zhuo; Chen, Wei; Li, Zhi-Ru; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2006-02-01

    Theoretical studies of the solvated electrons (HCN)n- (n =3, 4) reveal a variety of electron trapping possibilities in the (HCN)n (n =3, 4) clusters. Two isomers for (HCN)3- and four isomers for (HCN)4- are obtained at the MP2/aug -cc-pVDZ+dBF (diffusive bond functions) level of theory. In view of vertical electron detachment energies (VDEs) at the CCSD(T) level, the excess electron always "prefers" locating in the center of the system, i.e., the isomer with higher coordination number shows larger VDE value. However, the most stable isomers of the solvated electron state (HCN)3- and (HCN)4- are found to be the linear C∞ν and D∞h structures, respectively, but not the fullyl symmetric structures which have the largest VDE values.

  1. HCN Producing Bacteria Enable Sensing Of Non-Bioavailable Hg Species by the Whole Cell Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, M.; Rijavec, T.; Koron, N.; Lapanje, A.

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria play an important role in Hg transformation reactions. The production of cyanide (HCN) and other secondary metabolites seems to be key elements involved in these transformations. Current hypotheses link the role of HCN production to growth inhibition of nonHCN producing competitor organisms (role of an antimicrobial agent). Our past investigations showed that HCN production did not correlate with antimicrobial activity and since pK value of HCN is very high (pK = 9,21), it can be expected that most of the produced HCN is removed from the microenvironment. This way, the expected inhibitory concentrations can hardly be reached. Accordingly, we proposed a new concept, where the ability of complexation of transient metals by HCN served as a regulation process for the accessibility of micro-elements. In our study, we focused on the presence of HCN producing bacteria and carried it out in the Hg contaminated environment connected to the Idrija Mercury Mine, Slovenia. We characterised the isolates according to the presence of Hg resistance (HgR), level of HCN production and genetic similarities. In laboratory setups, using our merR whole cell based biosensor, we determined the transformation of low bioavailable Hg0 and HgS forms into bioavailable Hg by these HCN producing bacteria. We observed that HgR strains producing HCN had the highest impact on increased Hg bioavailability. In the proposed ecological strategy HgR HCN producing bacteria increase their competitive edge over non-HgR competitors through the increase of Hg toxicity. Due to their activity, Hg is made available to other organisms as well and thus enters into the ecosystem. Finally, using some of the characteristics of bacteria (e.g. Hg resistance genetic elements), we developed a fully automated sensing approach, combining biosensorics and mechatronics, to measure the bioavailability of Hg in situ.

  2. HCN Observations of Dense Star-Forming Gas in High Redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Y; Solomon, P M; Bout, P A V; Gao, Yu; Carilli, Chris L.; Solomon, Philip M.; Bout, Paul A. Vanden

    2007-01-01

    We present here the sensitive HCN(1-0) observations made with the VLA of two submillimeter galaxies and two QSOs at high-redshift. HCN emission is the signature of dense molecular gas found in GMC cores, the actual sites of massive star formation. We have made the first detection of HCN in a submillimeter galaxy, SMM J16359+6612. The HCN emission is seen with a signal to noise ratio of 4$\\sigma$ and appears to be resolved as a double-source of $\\approxlt 2''$ separation. Our new HCN observations, combined with previous HCN detections and upper limits, show that the FIR/HCN ratios in these high redshift sources lie systematically above the FIR/HCN correlation established for nearby galaxies by about a factor of 2. Even considering the scatter in the data and the presence of upper limits, this is an indication that the FIR/HCN ratios for the early Universe molecular emission line galaxies (EMGs) deviate from the correlation that fits Galactic giant molecular cloud cores, normal spirals, LIRGs, and ULIRGs. This ...

  3. Formation of HCN and NH{sub 3} during Datong coal pyrolysis in arc plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao Wei-ren; Zhang Jin-cao; Shen Shu-guang; Cao Qing; Lu Yong-kang [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology

    2006-07-01

    The formation of HCN and NH{sub 3} from coal-N was investigated in a plasma coal pyrolysis reactor. Based on Gibbs free energy minimization principle, Thermodynamic equilibrium fraction of C-H-O-N was calculated. The results from experiments and calculation suggest that HCN is the main product of coal-N at high temperature. Only a little coal-N convertedto NH{sub 3}. As the temperature increases, the yields of HCN and NH{sub 3} increases from the experimental results, but the theoretic calculated results show that HCN gradually increases and NH{sub 3} decreases. The possible reason is the influence of practical operating condition. The yield of HCN increases firstly and then decreases with increasing coal feeding rate, but NH{sub 3} is reverse. Enhancement of input power lease to the increase of HCN and NH{sub 3} yields. H{sub 2} acting as the reactive atmosphere benefits to the formation of HCN and NH{sub 3}, and CO{sub 2} may reduce the yields of HCN and NH{sub 3}, O{sub 2} enhance the formation of NH{sub 3}, but promotes the furthermore conversion of HCN. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Current Indications for Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators in Non-Ischemic Cardiomyopathies and Channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Torrecilla, Esteban; Arenal, Angel; Atienza, Felipe; Datino, Tomás; Bravo, Loreto; Ruiz, Pablo; Ávila, Pablo; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Current indications for implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in patients with channelopathies and cardiomyopathies of non-ischemic origin are mainly based on non-randomized evidence. In patients with nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy (NIDCM), there is a tendency towards a beneficial effect on total mortality of ICD therapy in patients with significant left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Although an important reduction in sudden cardiac death (SCD) seems to be clearly demonstrated in these patients, a net beneficial effect on total mortality is unclear mostly in cases with good functional status. Risk stratification has been changing over the last two decades in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Its risk profile has been delineated in parallel with the beneficial effect of ICD in high risk patients. Observational results based on "appropriate" ICD interventions do support its usefulness both in primary and secondary SCD prevention in these patients. Novel risk models quantify the rate of sudden cardiac death in these patients on individual basis. Less clear risk stratification is available for cases of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and in other uncommon familiar cardiomyopathies. Main features of risk stratification vary among the different channelopathies (long QT syndrome -LQTS-, Brugada syndrome, etc) with great debate on the management of asymptomatic patients. For most familiar cardiomyopathies, ICD therapy is the only accepted strategy in the prevention of SCD. So far, genetic testing has a limited role in risk evaluation and management of the individual patient. This review aims to summarize these criticisms and to refine the current indications of ICD implantation in patients with cardiomyopathies and major channelopathies.

  5. The diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of loss-of-function cardiac sodium channelopathies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chockalingam, Priya; Clur, Sally-Ann B; Breur, Johannes M P J; Kriebel, Thomas; Paul, Thomas; Rammeloo, Lukas A; Wilde, Arthur A M; Blom, Nico A

    2012-12-01

    Loss-of-function sodium channelopathies manifest as a spectrum of diseases including Brugada syndrome (BrS) and cardiac conduction disease. To analyze the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of these disorders in children. Patients aged ≤ 16 years with genetically confirmed loss-of-function sodium channelopathies (SCN5A mutation), presenting with cardiac symptoms, positive family history, and/or abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG), were included. Abnormal ECG consisted of type 1 BrS ECG and/or prolonged conduction intervals (PR interval/QRS duration > 98th percentile for age). Among the cohort (n = 33, age 6 ± 5 years, 58% male subjects, 30% probands), 14 (42%) patients were symptomatic, presenting with syncope (n = 5), palpitations (n = 1), supraventricular arrhythmias (n = 3), aborted cardiac arrest (n = 3), and sudden cardiac death (n = 2). Heart rate was 91 ± 26 beats/min, PR interval 168 ± 35 ms, QRS duration 112 ± 20 ms, and heart-rate corrected QT interval 409 ± 26 ms. Conduction intervals were prolonged in 28 (85%) patients; 6 of these patients also had spontaneous type 1 BrS ECG. Eight fever-associated events occurred in 6 patients; 2 of these were vaccination-related fever episodes. Treatment included aggressive antipyretics during fever in all patients; antiarrhythmic treatment included implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (n = 4), pacemaker (n = 2), and beta-blockers, either alone (n = 3) or in combination with device (n = 2). During follow-up (4 ± 4 years), 2 previously symptomatic patients had monomorphic ventricular tachycardia; there were no deaths. Diagnosis of loss-of-function sodium channelopathies in children relies on cardiac symptoms, family history, and ECG. Fever and vaccination are potential arrhythmia triggers; conduction delay is the commonest finding on ECG. Beta-blockers have a role in preventing tachycardia-induced arrhythmias; implantable cardioverter-defibrillator should probably be reserved for severe cases. Copyright © 2012

  6. Follistatin in chondrocytes: the link between TRPV4 channelopathies and skeletal malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Holly A.; McNulty, Amy L.; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E.; Gloss, Bernd; Kirby, Margaret L.; Hutson, Mary R.; Cohn, Daniel H.; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Point mutations in the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel have been identified as the cause of autosomal-dominant human motor neuropathies, arthropathies, and skeletal malformations of varying severity. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism by which TRPV4 channelopathy mutations cause skeletal dysplasia. The human TRPV4V620I channelopathy mutation was transfected into primary porcine chondrocytes and caused significant (2.6-fold) up-regulation of follistatin (FST) expression levels. Pore altering mutations that prevent calcium influx through the channel prevented significant FST up-regulation (1.1-fold). We generated a mouse model of theTRPV4V620I mutation, and found significant skeletal deformities (e.g., shortening of tibiae and digits, similar to the human disease brachyolmia) and increases in Fst/TRPV4 mRNA levels (2.8-fold). FST was significantly up-regulated in primary chondrocytes transfected with 3 different dysplasia-causing TRPV4 mutations (2- to 2.3-fold), but was not affected by an arthropathy mutation (1.1-fold). Furthermore, FST-loaded microbeads decreased bone ossification in developing chick femora (6%) and tibiae (11%). FST gene and protein levels were also increased 4-fold in human chondrocytes from an individual natively expressing the TRPV4T89I mutation. Taken together, these data strongly support that up-regulation of FST in chondrocytes by skeletal dysplasia-inducing TRPV4 mutations contributes to disease pathogenesis.—Leddy, H. A., McNulty, A. L., Lee, S. H., Rothfusz, N. E., Gloss, B., Kirby, M. L., Hutson, M. R., Cohn, D. H., Guilak, F., Liedtke, W. Follistatin in chondrocytes: the link between TRPV4 channelopathies and skeletal malformations. PMID:24577120

  7. Pathophysiology of movement disorders due to gravity transitions: the channelopathy linkage in human balance and locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo-Sierra, Carlos V; Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E

    2011-07-01

    Despite theoretical and experimental efforts to understand the space adaptation syndrome (SAS), which is responsible for spatial disorientation that severely affects physical and cognitive performance in astronauts, most of its pathophysiology is still unknown. As a consequence, countermeasures for SAS are not completely effective. Accordingly, in addition to the sensory-motor conflict theories, we propose that microgravity would affect the potassium channels of inner ear hair cells that would result in a temporal channelopathy as the most likely molecular origin for SAS, as well as being responsible for perpetuating movement disorders in gravity transition environments including those to be experienced by people visiting or living on the earth, moon, mars and beyond.

  8. A Calcium-Dependent Plasticity Rule for HCN Channels Maintains Activity Homeostasis and Stable Synaptic Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnuraiah, Suraj; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical and computational frameworks for synaptic plasticity and learning have a long and cherished history, with few parallels within the well-established literature for plasticity of voltage-gated ion channels. In this study, we derive rules for plasticity in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, and assess the synergy between synaptic and HCN channel plasticity in establishing stability during synaptic learning. To do this, we employ a conductance-based model for the hippocampal pyramidal neuron, and incorporate synaptic plasticity through the well-established Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM)-like rule for synaptic plasticity, wherein the direction and strength of the plasticity is dependent on the concentration of calcium influx. Under this framework, we derive a rule for HCN channel plasticity to establish homeostasis in synaptically-driven firing rate, and incorporate such plasticity into our model. In demonstrating that this rule for HCN channel plasticity helps maintain firing rate homeostasis after bidirectional synaptic plasticity, we observe a linear relationship between synaptic plasticity and HCN channel plasticity for maintaining firing rate homeostasis. Motivated by this linear relationship, we derive a calcium-dependent rule for HCN-channel plasticity, and demonstrate that firing rate homeostasis is maintained in the face of synaptic plasticity when moderate and high levels of cytosolic calcium influx induced depression and potentiation of the HCN-channel conductance, respectively. Additionally, we show that such synergy between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity enhances the stability of synaptic learning through metaplasticity in the BCM-like synaptic plasticity profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the synergistic interaction between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity preserves robustness of information transfer across the neuron under a rate-coding schema. Our results establish specific physiological roles

  9. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - PVA Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to those inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dendrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provides a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. Shalowgraphic images of pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites forming from the melt show the subtle but distinct effects of gravity-driven heat convection on dentritic growth. In orbit, the dendrite grows as its latent heat is liberated by heat conduction. This yields a blunt dendrite tip. On Earth, heat is carried away by both conduction and gravity-driven convection. This yields a sharper dendrite tip. In addition, under terrestrial conditions, the sidebranches growing in the direction of gravity are augmented as gravity helps carry heat out of the way of the growing sidebranches as opposed to microgravity conditions where no augmentation takes place. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and NASA/Glenn Research Center. Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  10. Dysfunction of cortical dendritic integration in neuropathic pain reversed by serotoninergic neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santello, Mirko; Nevian, Thomas

    2015-04-08

    Neuropathic pain is caused by long-term modifications of neuronal function in the peripheral nervous system, the spinal cord, and supraspinal areas. Although functional changes in the forebrain are thought to contribute to the development of persistent pain, their significance and precise subcellular nature remain unexplored. Using somatic and dendritic whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from neurons in the anterior cingulate cortex, we discovered that sciatic nerve injury caused an activity-dependent dysfunction of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated (HCN) channels in the dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons resulting in enhanced integration of excitatory postsynaptic inputs and increased neuronal firing. Specific activation of the serotonin receptor type 7 (5-HT7R) alleviated the lesion-induced pathology by increasing HCN channel function, restoring normal dendritic integration, and reducing mechanical pain hypersensitivity in nerve-injured animals in vivo. Thus, serotoninergic neuromodulation at the forebrain level can reverse the dendritic dysfunction induced by neuropathic pain and may represent a potential therapeutical target.

  11. HCN ice in Titan's high-altitude southern polar cloud

    CERN Document Server

    de Kok, Remco J; Maltagliati, Luca; Irwin, Patrick G J; Vinatier, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Titan's middle atmosphere is currently experiencing a rapid change of season after northern spring arrived in 2009. A large cloud was observed for the first time above Titan's southern pole in May 2012, at an altitude of 300 km. This altitude previously showed a temperature maximum and condensation was not expected for any of Titan's atmospheric gases. Here we show that this cloud is composed of micron-sized hydrogen cyanide (HCN) ice particles. The presence of HCN particles at this altitude, together with new temperature determinations from mid-infrared observations, indicate a very dramatic cooling of Titan's atmosphere inside the winter polar vortex in early 2012. Such a cooling is completely contrary to previously measured high-altitude warming in the polar vortex, and temperatures are a hundred degrees colder than predicted by circulation models. Besides elucidating the nature of Titan's mysterious polar cloud, these results thus show that post-equinox cooling at the winter pole is much more efficient th...

  12. Improvement of the positive bias stability of a-IGZO TFTs by the HCN treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong-Ho; Choi, Myung-Jea; Kimura, Katsuya; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Choi, Duck-Kyun

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, many researchers have attempted to improve the bias stability of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). In this study, the hydrogen cyanide (HCN) treatment was carried out to improve the positive bias stability of bottom-gate a-IGZO TFTs. The HCN treatment was performed using a 0.1 M HCN solution with a pH of 10 at room temperature. Before applying the positive bias stress, there were no differences in the major electrical properties, including the saturation mobility (μsat), threshold voltage (Vth), and subthreshold swing (S/S), between HCN-treated and non-HCN-treated devices. However, after applying the positive bias stress, the HCN-treated device showed superior bias stability compared to the non-HCN-treated device. This difference is associated with the passivation of the defect states and the surface of the back-channel layer of the HCN-treated device by cyanide ions.

  13. First Principles Study of HCN Adsorption on Graphene Doped with 5d Transition Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hai-Kuan; Wang, Yong-Ping; Shi, Li Bin

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) adsorption on graphene doped with 5d transition metal (TM) is investigated by the first principles based on density functional theory. It is observed that Hg atom cannot be doped into graphene due to saturated valence electron configurations of 5d106s2. Three kinds of HCN adsorption configurations are investigated, in which H, C and N in HCN are close to the adsorption site, respectively. The most stable adsorption configuration is obtained by total energy optimization. HCN adsorption can be studied by adsorption energy and electron density difference. HCN can only be physisorbed on Ir, Pt and Au-doped graphenes, while chemisorption is observed for Lu, Hf, Ta, W, Re and Os-doped graphenes. The band structure is calculated by B3LYP and Generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals. It is observed from B3LYP method that the conductivity of Lu, Hf, Re and Os-doped graphenes does not obviously change before and after HCN adsorption. Ta and W-doped graphenes change from semiconductor to metal after adsorption of HCN molecule. The results indicate that Ta and W-doped graphenes may be a promising sensor for detecting HCN. This study provides a useful basis for understanding of a wide variety of physical properties on graphene.

  14. High-resolution infrared spectroscopy of HCN-Agn (n = 1-4) complexes solvated in superfluid helium droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Paul L; Miller, Roger E

    2007-08-01

    High-resolution infrared spectroscopy has been used to determine the structures, C-H stretching frequencies, and dipole moments of the HCN-Agn (n = 1-3) complexes formed in superfluid helium droplets. The HCN-Ag4 cluster was tentatively assigned based upon pick-up cell pressure dependencies and harmonic vibrational shift calculations. Ab initio and density functional theory calculations were used in conjunction with the high-resolution spectra to analyze the bonding nature of each cluster. All monoligated species reported here are bound through the nitrogen end of the HCN molecule. The HCN-Agn complexes are structurally similar to the previously reported HCN-Cun clusters, with the exception of the HCN-Ag binary complex. Although the interaction between the HCN and the Agn clusters follows the same trends as the HCN-Cun clusters, the more diffuse nature of the electrons surrounding the silver atoms results in a much weaker interaction.

  15. SCN4A variants and Brugada syndrome : phenotypic and genotypic overlap between cardiac and skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bissay, Veronique; Van Malderen, Sophie C. H.; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Lissens, Willy; Peeters, Uschi; Daneels, Dorien; Jansen, Anna C.; Pappaert, Gudrun; Brugada, Pedro; De Keyser, Jacques; Van Dooren, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A mutations involving the alpha-subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated muscle sodium channel (NaV1.5) result in different cardiac channelopathies with an autosomal-dominant inheritance such as Brugada syndrome. On the other hand, mutations in SCN4A encoding the alpha-subunit of the skeletal voltag

  16. SCN4A variants and Brugada syndrome: Phenotypic and genotypic overlap between cardiac and skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Bissay (Véronique); S. van Malderen (Sophie); K. Keymolen (Kathelijn); J. Lissens (Jurgen); U. Peeters (Uschi); D. Daneels (Dorien); A.C. Jansen (Anna C.); G. Pappaert (Gudrun); P. Rugada (Pedro); J. De Keyser (Jacques); S. van Dooren (Sonia)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSCN5A mutations involving the α-subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated muscle sodium channel (NaV1.5) result in different cardiac channelopathies with an autosomal-dominant inheritance such as Brugada syndrome. On the other hand, mutations in SCN4A encoding the α-subunit of the skeletal vo

  17. Follistatin in chondrocytes: the link between TRPV4 channelopathies and skeletal malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Holly A; McNulty, Amy L; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E; Gloss, Bernd; Kirby, Margaret L; Hutson, Mary R; Cohn, Daniel H; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Point mutations in the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel have been identified as the cause of autosomal-dominant human motor neuropathies, arthropathies, and skeletal malformations of varying severity. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism by which TRPV4 channelopathy mutations cause skeletal dysplasia. The human TRPV4(V620I) channelopathy mutation was transfected into primary porcine chondrocytes and caused significant (2.6-fold) up-regulation of follistatin (FST) expression levels. Pore altering mutations that prevent calcium influx through the channel prevented significant FST up-regulation (1.1-fold). We generated a mouse model of the TRPV4(V620I) mutation, and found significant skeletal deformities (e.g., shortening of tibiae and digits, similar to the human disease brachyolmia) and increases in Fst/TRPV4 mRNA levels (2.8-fold). FST was significantly up-regulated in primary chondrocytes transfected with 3 different dysplasia-causing TRPV4 mutations (2- to 2.3-fold), but was not affected by an arthropathy mutation (1.1-fold). Furthermore, FST-loaded microbeads decreased bone ossification in developing chick femora (6%) and tibiae (11%). FST gene and protein levels were also increased 4-fold in human chondrocytes from an individual natively expressing the TRPV4(T89I) mutation. Taken together, these data strongly support that up-regulation of FST in chondrocytes by skeletal dysplasia-inducing TRPV4 mutations contributes to disease pathogenesis. © FASEB.

  18. [Progress in sodium channelopathies and biological functions of voltage-gated sodium channel blockers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Gou, Meng; Xiao, Rong; Li, Qingwei

    2014-06-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), which are widely distributed in the excitable cells, are the primary mediators of electrical signal amplification and propagation. They play important roles in the excitative conduction of the neurons and cardiac muscle cells. The abnormalities of the structures and functions of VGSCs can change the excitability of the cells, resulting in a variety of diseases such as neuropathic pain, epilepsy and arrhythmia. At present, some voltage-gated sodium channel blockers are used for treating those diseases. In the recent years, several neurotoxins have been purified from the venom of the animals, which could inhibit the current of the voltage-gated sodium channels. Usually, these neurotoxins are compounds or small peptides that have been further designed and modified for targeted drugs of sodium channelopathies in the clinical treatment. In addition, a novel cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRBGP) has been isolated and purified from the buccal gland of the lampreys (Lampetra japonica), and it could inhibit the Na+ current of the hippocampus and dorsal root neurons for the first time. In the present study, the progress of the sodium channelopathies and the biological functions of voltage-gated sodium channel blockers are analyzed and summarized.

  19. Molecular basis of inherited calcium Channelopathies: role of mutations in pore-forming subunits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lynn MCKEOWN; Philip ROBINSON; Owen T JONES

    2006-01-01

    The pore-forming alpha subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels contain the essential biophysical machinery that underlies calcium influx in response to cell depolarization.In combination with requisite auxiliary subunits,these pore subunits form calcium channel complexes that are pivotal to the physiology and pharmacology of diverse cells ranging from sperm to neurons.Not surprisingly,mutations in the pore subunits generate diverse pathologies,termed channelopathies,that range from failures in excitation-contraction coupling to night blindness.Over the last decade, major insights into the mechanisms of pathogenesis have been derived from animals showing spontaneous or induced mutations.In parallel,there has been considerable growth in our understanding of the workings of voltage-gated ion channels from a structure-function,regulation and cell biology perspective.Here we document our current understanding of the mutations underlying channelopathies involving the voltage-gated calcium channel alpha subunits in humans and other species.

  20. De novo mutations in HCN1 cause early infantile epileptic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nava, Caroline; Dalle, Carine; Rastetter, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels contribute to cationic Ih current in neurons and regulate the excitability of neuronal networks. Studies in rat models have shown that the Hcn1 gene has a key role in epilepsy, but clinical evidence implicating HCN1 mutations...... in human epilepsy is lacking. We carried out exome sequencing for parent-offspring trios with fever-sensitive, intractable epileptic encephalopathy, leading to the discovery of two de novo missense HCN1 mutations. Screening of follow-up cohorts comprising 157 cases in total identified 4 additional amino...... toward atypical absences, intellectual disability and autistic traits. These findings provide clear evidence that de novo HCN1 point mutations cause a recognizable early-onset epileptic encephalopathy in humans....

  1. HCN1 Channels Enhance Rod System Responsivity in the Retina under Conditions of Light Exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vithiyanjali Sothilingam

    Full Text Available Vision originates in rods and cones at the outer retina. Already at these early stages, diverse processing schemes shape and enhance image information to permit perception over a wide range of lighting conditions. In this work, we address the role of hyperpolarization-activated and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels 1 (HCN1 in rod photoreceptors for the enhancement of rod system responsivity under conditions of light exposure.To isolate HCN1 channel actions in rod system responses, we generated double mutant mice by crossbreeding Hcn1-/- mice with Cnga3-/- mice in which cones are non-functional. Retinal function in the resulting Hcn1-/- Cnga3-/- animals was followed by means of electroretinography (ERG up to the age of four month. Retinal imaging via scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO and optical coherence tomography (OCT was also performed to exclude potential morphological alterations.This study on Hcn1-/- Cnga3-/- mutant mice complements our previous work on HCN1 channel function in the retina. We show here in a functional rod-only setting that rod responses following bright light exposure terminate without the counteraction of HCN channels much later than normal. The resulting sustained signal elevation does saturate the retinal network due to an intensity-dependent reduction in the dynamic range. In addition, the lack of rapid adaptational feedback modulation of rod photoreceptor output via HCN1 in this double mutant limits the ability to follow repetitive (flicker stimuli, particularly under mesopic conditions.This work corroborates the hypothesis that, in the absence of HCN1-mediated feedback, the amplitude of rod signals remains at high levels for a prolonged period of time, leading to saturation of the retinal pathways. Our results demonstrate the importance of HCN1 channels for regular vision.

  2. Free dendritic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dendritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical 'dendrite problem'. Great strides have been taken in recent years in both the theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status. The development of this field will be sketched, showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) were sufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of 'maximum velocity' was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip. The overall development of cast microstructures, such as equiaxed zone formation, rapidly solidified microstructures, etc., also seems to contain additional non-deterministic features which lie outside the current theories discussed here.

  3. Dendritic polyurea polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuerp, David; Bruchmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic polymers, subsuming dendrimers as well as hyperbranched or highly branched polymers are well established in the field of polymer chemistry. This review article focuses on urea based dendritic polymers and summarizes their synthetic routes through both isocyanate and isocyanate-free processes. Furthermore, this article highlights applications where dendritic polyureas show their specific chemical and physical potential. For these purposes scientific publications as well as patent literature are investigated to generate a comprehensive overview on this topic.

  4. Dissociative electron attachment to HCCH, HCN and HCCCN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chourou, S T; Orel, A E, E-mail: stchourou@ucdavis.ed, E-mail: aeorel@ucdavis.ed [Department of Applied Science, University of California, Davis, CA-95616 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Previous work on the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to acetylene, hydrogen cyanide and its isomer and cyano-acetylene shows that the dissociation process for these systems is inherently polyatomic. We present a comparative summary of the study of these species believed to play a role in the chemistry of interstellar media and to present key elements in the prebiotic synthesis in early Earth. Our treatment was carried out in the low energy range (0-6 eV for HCCH and HCN/HNC and 0-12 eV for HCCCN) using a suitable coordinate system that allows taking into account distortions in the symmetry of the polyatomic target molecule. Computations show that these systems exhibit an intrinsic polyatomic behavior as they break apart.

  5. HCN hyperfine ratio analysis of massive molecular clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schap, W. J.; Barnes, P. J.; Ordoñez, A.; Ginsburg, A.; Yonekura, Y.; Fukui, Y.

    2017-03-01

    We report a new analysis protocol for HCN hyperfine data, based on the PYSPECKIT package, and results of using this new protocol to analyse a sample area of seven massive molecular clumps from the Census of High- and Medium-mass Protostars (CHaMP) survey, in order to derive maps of column density for this species. There is a strong correlation between the HCN integrated intensity, IHCN, and previously reported I_HCO+ in the clumps, but I_N_{2H+} is not well correlated with either of these other two 'dense gas tracers'. The four fitted parameters from PYSPECKIT in this region fall in the range of VLSR = 8-10 km s-1, σV = 1.2-2.2 km s-1, Tex = 4-15 K, and τ = 0.2-2.5. These parameters allow us to derive a column density map of these clouds, without limiting assumptions about the excitation or opacity. A more traditional (linear) method of converting IHCN to total mass column gives much lower clump masses than our results based on the hyperfine analysis. This is primarily due to areas in the sample region of low I, low Tex, and high τ. We conclude that there may be more dense gas in these massive clumps not engaged in massive star formation than previously recognized. If this result holds for other clouds in the CHaMP sample, it would have dramatic consequences for the calibration of the Kennicutt-Schmidt star formation laws, including a large increase in the gas depletion time-scale in such regions.

  6. Spatially Resolved HCN Absorption Features in the Circumnuclear Region of NGC 1052

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada-Satoh, Satoko; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Oh, Se-Jin; Lee, Sang-Sung; Byun, Do-Young; Kameno, Seiji; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Jung, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Hyo-Ryoung; Hwang, Ju-Yeon

    2016-10-01

    We present the first VLBI detection of HCN molecular absorption in the nearby active galactic nucleus NGC 1052. Utilizing the 1 mas resolution achieved by the Korean VLBI Network, we have spatially resolved the HCN absorption against a double-sided nuclear jet structure. Two velocity features of HCN absorption are detected significantly at the radial velocity of 1656 and 1719 km s-1, redshifted by 149 and 212 km s-1 with respect to the systemic velocity of the galaxy. The column density of the HCN molecule is estimated to be 1015-1016 cm-2, assuming an excitation temperature of 100-230 K. The absorption features show high optical depth localized on the receding jet side, where the free-free absorption occurred due to the circumnuclear torus. The size of the foreground absorbing molecular gas is estimated to be on approximately one-parsec scales, which agrees well with the approximate size of the circumnuclear torus. HCN absorbing gas is likely to be several clumps smaller than 0.1 pc inside the circumnuclear torus. The redshifted velocities of the HCN absorption features imply that HCN absorbing gas traces ongoing infall motion inside the circumnuclear torus onto the central engine.

  7. Low-conductance HCN1 ion channels augment the frequency response of rod and cone photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Andrew J; Wu, Samuel M

    2009-05-06

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels are expressed in several tissues throughout the body, including the heart, the CNS, and the retina. HCN channels are found in many neurons in the retina, but their most established role is in generating the hyperpolarization-activated current, I(h), in photoreceptors. This current makes the light response of rod and cone photoreceptors more transient, an effect similar to that of a high-pass filter. A unique property of HCN channels is their small single-channel current, which is below the thermal noise threshold of measuring electronics. We use nonstationary fluctuation analysis (NSFA) in the intact retina to estimate the conductance of single HCN channels, revealing a conductance of approximately 650 fS in both rod and cone photoreceptors. We also analyze the properties of HCN channels in salamander rods and cones, from the biophysical to the functional level, showing that HCN1 is the predominant isoform in both cells, and demonstrate how HCN1 channels speed up the light response of both rods and cones under distinct adaptational conditions. We show that in rods and cones, HCN channels increase the natural frequency response of single cells by modifying the photocurrent input, which is limited in its frequency response by the speed of a molecular signaling cascade. In doing so, HCN channels form the first of several systems in the retina that augment the speed of the visual response, allowing an animal to perceive visual stimuli that change more quickly than the underlying photocurrent.

  8. An Ab Initio MP2 Study of HCN-HX Hydrogen Bonded Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araújo Regiane C.M.U.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available An ab initio MP2/6-311++G** study has been performed to obtain geometries, binding energies and vibrational properties of HCN-HX H-bonded complexes with X = F, Cl, NC, CN and CCH. These MP2/6-311++G** results have revealed that: (i the calculated H-bond lengths are in very good agreement with the experimental ones; (ii the H-bond strength is associated with the intermolecular charge transfer and follows the order: HCN-HNC ~ HCN-HF > HCN-HCl ~ HCN-HCN > HCN-HCCH; (iii BSSE correction introduces an average reduction of 2.4 kJ/mol on the MP2/6-311++G** binding energies, i.e. 11% of the uncorrected binding energy; (iv the calculated zero-point energies reduce the stability of these complexes and show a good agreement with the available experimental values; (v the H-X stretching frequency is shifted downward upon H-bond formation. This displacement is associated with the H-bond length; (vi The more pronounced effect on the infrared intensities occurs with the H-X stretching intensity. It is much enhanced after complexation due to the charge-flux term; (vii the calculated intermolecular stretching frequencies are in very good agreement with the experimental ones; and, finally, (viii the results obtained for the HCN-HX complexes follow the same profile as those found for the acetylene-HX series but, in the latter case, the effects on the properties of the free molecules due to complexation are less pronounced than those in HCN-HX.

  9. Targeted deletion of Kcne2 impairs HCN channel function in mouse thalamocortical circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shui-Wang Ying

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels generate the pacemaking current, I(h, which regulates neuronal excitability, burst firing activity, rhythmogenesis, and synaptic integration. The physiological consequence of HCN activation depends on regulation of channel gating by endogenous modulators and stabilization of the channel complex formed by principal and ancillary subunits. KCNE2 is a voltage-gated potassium channel ancillary subunit that also regulates heterologously expressed HCN channels; whether KCNE2 regulates neuronal HCN channel function is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the effects of Kcne2 gene deletion on I(h properties and excitability in ventrobasal (VB and cortical layer 6 pyramidal neurons using brain slices prepared from Kcne2(+/+ and Kcne2(-/- mice. Kcne2 deletion shifted the voltage-dependence of I(h activation to more hyperpolarized potentials, slowed gating kinetics, and decreased I(h density. Kcne2 deletion was associated with a reduction in whole-brain expression of both HCN1 and HCN2 (but not HCN4, although co-immunoprecipitation from whole-brain lysates failed to detect interaction of KCNE2 with HCN1 or 2. Kcne2 deletion also increased input resistance and temporal summation of subthreshold voltage responses; this increased intrinsic excitability enhanced burst firing in response to 4-aminopyridine. Burst duration increased in corticothalamic, but not thalamocortical, neurons, suggesting enhanced cortical excitatory input to the thalamus; such augmented excitability did not result from changes in glutamate release machinery since miniature EPSC frequency was unaltered in Kcne2(-/- neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Loss of KCNE2 leads to downregulation of HCN channel function associated with increased excitability in neurons in the cortico-thalamo-cortical loop. Such findings further our understanding of the normal physiology of brain circuitry critically

  10. Dimerization of HCN in the gas phase: A theoretical mechanistic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Min Kyoung; Choe, Joong Chul

    2012-06-01

    Potential energy surfaces for the formation of covalently bound HCN dimers from two molecules of HCN or HNC were determined from CBS-QB3/APNO calculations. Several novel pathways, with and without the aid of protons, were found for the formation of iminoacetonitrile (HNdbnd CHCN), an intermediate in adenine synthesis from HCN by oligomerization. Covalent C-C or C-N bonds between the two monomers were formed after rearrangement of bimolecular complex intermediates. Energetic and kinetic analyses suggest that the proton-catalyzed dimerizations substantially lower reaction barriers but cannot occur efficiently under interstellar conditions.

  11. Funny current and cardiac rhythm: insights from HCN knockout mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko eBaruscotti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the adult animal the sinoatrial node (SAN rhythmically generates a depolarizing wave that propagates to the rest of the heart. However, the SAN is more than a simple clock; it is a clock that adjusts its pace according to the metabolic requirements of the organism. The Hyperpolarization-activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated channels (HCN1-4 are the structural component of the funny (If channels; in the SAN the If current is the main driving electrical force of the diastolic depolarization and the HCN4 is the most abundant isoform. The generation of HCN KO mouse models has advanced the understanding of the role of these channels in cardiac excitability. The HCN4 KO models that were first developed allowed either global or cardiac-specific constitutive ablation of HCN4 channels, and resulted in embryonic lethality. A further progress was made with the development of three separate inducible HCN4 KO models; in one model KO was induced globally in the entire organism, in a second, ablation occurred only in HCN4-expressing cells, and finally in a third model KO was confined to cardiac cells. Unexpectedly, the three models yielded different results; similarities and differences among these models will be presented and discussed. The functional effects of HCN2 and HCN3 knockout models and transgenic HCN4 mouse models will also be discussed.In conclusion, HCN KO/transgenic models have allowed to evaluate the functional role of the If currents in intact animals as well as in single SAN cells isolated from the same animals. This opportunity is therefore unique since it allows to 1 verify the contribution of specific HCN isoforms to cardiac activity in intact animals, and 2 to compare these results to those obtained in single cell experiments. These combined studies were not possible prior to the development of KO models. Finally, these models represent critical tools to improve our understanding of the molecular basis of some inheritable arrhythmic human

  12. Phenotypic heterogeneity in skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Saleem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies (SMSCs including hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP, paramyotonia congenita (PC, and sodium channel myotonia are caused by sodium channel gene (SCN4A mutations, with altered sarcolemal excitability, and can present as episodes of skeletal muscle weakness, paralysis, and myotonia. We report a teenage boy, who presented with features of HyperPP, PC, myotonia congenita, and sodium channel myotonia. His electromyography (EMG revealed myopathic changes, myotonia, and Fournier EMG pattern I, and posed a diagnostic challenge. Genetic analysis showed Thr704Met mutation in SCN4A gene. While with typical clinical phenotypes, the electromyographic patterns can be used to direct genetic testing, atypical phenotypes may pose diagnostic dilemmas. Clinicians dealing with neuromuscular disorders in children need to be aware of the unusual clinical presentations of SMSC, so that focused genetic testing can be carried out.

  13. Modelling Human Channelopathies Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Müller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells has pioneered the field of regenerative medicine and developmental biology. They can be generated by overexpression of a defined set of transcription factors in somatic cells derived from easily accessible tissues such as skin or plucked hair or even human urine. In case of applying this tool to patients who are classified into a disease group, it enables the generation of a disease- and patient-specific research platform. iPS cells have proven a significant tool to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms in various diseases such as diabetes, blood disorders, defined neurological disorders, and genetic liver disease. One of the first successfully modelled human diseases was long QT syndrome, an inherited cardiac channelopathy which causes potentially fatal cardiac arrhythmia. This review summarizes the efforts of reprogramming various types of long QT syndrome and discusses the potential underlying mechanisms and their application.

  14. Sodium channelopathies of skeletal muscle result from gain or loss of function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Holzherr, Boris; Fauler, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Five hereditary sodium channelopathies of skeletal muscle have been identified. Prominent symptoms are either myotonia or weakness caused by an increase or decrease of muscle fiber excitability. The voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.4, initiator of the muscle action potential, is mutated in all five disorders. Pathogenetically, both loss and gain of function mutations have been described, the latter being the more frequent mechanism and involving not just the ion-conducting pore, but aberrant pores as well. The type of channel malfunction is decisive for therapy which consists either of exerting a direct effect on the sodium channel, i.e., by blocking the pore, or of restoring skeletal muscle membrane potential to reduce the fraction of inactivated channels. PMID:20237798

  15. Refined Exercise testing can aid DNA-based Diagnosis in Muscle Channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S. Veronica; Matthews, Emma; Barber, Melissa; Burge, James A; Rajakulendran, Sanjeev; Fialho, Doreen; Sud, Richa; Haworth, Andrea; Koltzenburg, Martin; Hanna, Michael G

    2010-01-01

    Objective To improve the accuracy of genotype prediction and guide genetic testing in patients with muscle channelopathies we applied and refined specialised electrophysiological exercise test parameters. Methods We studied 56 genetically confirmed patients and 65 controls using needle electromyography, the long exercise test, and short exercise tests at room temperature, after cooling, and rewarming. Results Concordant amplitude-and-area decrements were more reliable than amplitude-only measurements when interpreting patterns of change during the short exercise tests. Concordant amplitude-and-area pattern I and pattern II decrements of >20% were 100% specific for PMC and MC respectively. When decrements at room temperature and after cooling were 20% allow more reliable interpretation of the short exercise tests and aid accurate DNA-based diagnosis. In patients with negative exercise tests, specific clinical features are helpful in differentiating sodium from chloride channel myotonia. A modified algorithm is suggested.. PMID:21387378

  16. Sudden infant death syndrome and cardiac channelopathies: from mechanisms to prevention of avoidable tragedies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Schwartz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS, with the load of mystery surrounding its causes and with the devastating impact on the affected families, remains the greatest contributor to post-neonatal mortality during the first year of life. Following a succinct review of the non-cardiac genetic factors, which have been associated with SIDS, we focus on the cardiac hypothesis for SIDS and specifically on those diseases produced by cardiac ion channel mutations, the so-called channelopathies. Special attention is devoted to the fact that these causes of SIDS, and especially the long QT syndrome, are preventable if diagnosed in time. This highlights the importance of neonatal ECG screening and carries a number of practical implications, including medico-legal considerations.

  17. Cardiac channelopathies associated with infantile fatal ventricular arrhythmias: from the cradle to the bench.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Koichi; Makiyama, Takeru; Wu, Jie; Ding, Wei-Guang; Kimura, Hiromi; Naiki, Nobu; Ohno, Seiko; Itoh, Hideki; Nakanishi, Toshio; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Horie, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Fatal ventricular arrhythmias in the early period of life have been associated with cardiac channelopathies for decades, and postmortem analyses in SIDS victims have provided evidence of this association. However, the prevalence and functional properties of cardiac ion channel mutations in infantile fatal arrhythmia cases are not clear. Seven infants with potentially lethal arrhythmias at age < 1 year (5 males, age of onset 44.1 ± 72.1 days) were genetically analyzed for KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNE1-5, KCNJ2, SCN5A, GJA5, and CALM1 by using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Whole-cell currents of wildtype and mutant channels were recorded and analyzed in Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with SCN5A and KCNH2 cDNA. In 5 of 7 patients, we identified 4 mutations (p.N1774D, p.T290fsX53, p.F1486del and p.N406K) in SCN5A, and 1 mutation (p.G628D) in KCNH2. N1774D, F1486del, and N406K in SCN5A displayed tetrodotoxin-sensitive persistent late Na(+) currents. By contrast, SCN5A-T290fsX53 was nonfunctional. KCNH2-G628D exhibited loss of channel function. Genetic screening of 7 patients was used to demonstrate the high prevalence of cardiac channelopathies. Functional assays revealed both gain and loss of channel function in SCN5A mutations, as well as loss of function associated with the KCNH2 mutation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Secondary neurotransmitter deficiencies in epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channelopathies: A potential treatment target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Gabriella A; Demos, Michelle; Shyr, Casper; Matthews, Allison; Zhang, Linhua; Race, Simone; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; Van Allen, Margot I; Mancarci, Ogan; Toker, Lilah; Pavlidis, Paul; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Trump, Natalie; Heales, Simon; Pope, Simon; Cross, J Helen; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2016-01-01

    We describe neurotransmitter abnormalities in two patients with drug-resistant epilepsy resulting from deleterious de novo mutations in sodium channel genes. Whole exome sequencing identified a de novo SCN2A splice-site mutation (c.2379+1G>A, p.Glu717Gly.fs*30) resulting in deletion of exon 14, in a 10-year old male with early onset global developmental delay, intermittent ataxia, autism, hypotonia, epileptic encephalopathy and cerebral/cerebellar atrophy. In the cerebrospinal fluid both homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were significantly decreased; extensive biochemical and genetic investigations ruled out primary neurotransmitter deficiencies and other known inborn errors of metabolism. In an 8-year old female with an early onset intractable epileptic encephalopathy, developmental regression, and progressive cerebellar atrophy, a previously unreported de novo missense mutation was identified in SCN8A (c.5615G>A; p.Arg1872Gln), affecting a highly conserved residue located in the C-terminal of the Nav1.6 protein. Aside from decreased homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate was also found to be low. We hypothesize that these channelopathies cause abnormal synaptic mono-amine metabolite secretion/uptake via impaired vesicular release and imbalance in electrochemical ion gradients, which in turn aggravate the seizures. Treatment with oral 5-hydroxytryptophan, l-Dopa/Carbidopa, and a dopa agonist resulted in mild improvement of seizure control in the male case, most likely via dopamine and serotonin receptor activated signal transduction and modulation of glutamatergic, GABA-ergic and glycinergic neurotransmission. Neurotransmitter analysis in other sodium channelopathy patients will help validate our findings, potentially yielding novel treatment opportunities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Congenital short QT syndrome: landmarks of the newest arrhythmogenic cardiac channelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Riera, Andrés Ricardo; Paixão-Almeida, Adail; Barbosa-Barros, Raimundo; Yanowitz, Frank G; Baranchuk, Adrian; Dubner, Sergio; Palandri Chagas, Antônio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Congenital or familial short QT syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous cardiac channelopathy without structural heart disease that has a dominant autosomal or sporadic pattern of transmission affecting the electric system of the heart. Patients present clinically with a spectrum of signs and symptoms including irregular palpitations due to episodes of paroxysmal atrialfibrillation, dizziness and fainting (syncope) and/or sudden cardiac death due to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Electrocardiographic (ECG) findings include extremely short QTc intervals (QTc interval ≤330 ms) not significantly modified with heart rate changes and T waves of great voltage witha narrow base. Electrophysiologic studies are characterized by significant shortening of atrial and ventricular refractory periods and arrhythmias induced by programmed stimulation. A few families have been identified with specific genotypes: 3 with mutations in potassium channels called SQT1 (Iks), SQT2 (Ikr) and SQT3 (Ik1). These 3 potassium channel variants are the "genetic mirror image" of long QT syndrome type 2, type 1 and Andersen-Tawil syndrome respectively because they exert opposite gain-of-function effects on the potassium channels in contrast to the loss-of-function of the potassium channels in the long QT syndromes. Three new variants with overlapping phenotypes affecting the slow inward calcium channels havealso been described. Finally, another variant with mixed phenotype affecting the sodium channel was reported. This review focuses the landmarks of this newest arrhythmogenic cardiac channelopathy on the main clinical, genetic, and proposed ECG mechanisms. In addition therapeutic options and the molecular autopsy of this fascinating primary electrical heart disease are discussed.

  20. A 1D coordination polymer of UF{sub 5} with HCN as a ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibe, Benjamin; Rudel, Stefan S.; Buchner, Magnus R.; Kraus, Florian [Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg (Germany); Karttunen, Antti J. [Department of Chemistry, Aalto University (Finland)

    2017-01-05

    β-Uranium(V) fluoride was reacted with liquid anhydrous hydrogen cyanide to obtain a 1D coordination polymer with the composition {sup 1}{sub ∞}[UF{sub 5}(HCN){sub 2}], {sup 1}{sub ∞}[UF{sub 4/1}F{sub 2/2}-(HCN){sub 2/1}], revealed by single-crystal X-ray structure determination. The reaction system was furthermore studied by means of vibrational and NMR spectroscopy, as well as by quantum chemical calculations. The compound presents the first described polymeric HCN Lewis adduct and the first HCN adduct of a uranium fluoride. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. On a hypothetical generational relationship between HCN and constituents of the reductive citric acid cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenmoser, Albert

    2007-04-01

    Encouraged by observations made on the course of reactions the HCN-tetramer can undergo with acetaldehyde, I delineate a constitutional and potentially generational relationship between HCN and those constituents of the reductive citric acid cycle that are direct precursors of amino acids in contemporary metabolism. In this context, the robustness postulate of classical prebiotic chemistry is questioned, and, by an analysis of the (hypothetical) reaction-tree of a stepwise hydrolysis of the HCN-tetramer, it is shown how such a non-robust chemical reaction platform could harbor the potential for the emergence of autocatalytic cycles. It is concluded that the chemistry of HCN should be revisited by focussing on its non-robust parts in order to demonstrate its full potential as one of the possible roots of prebiotic self-organizing chemical processes.

  2. Using TES retrievals of HCN to determine fire influence of Aura-TES footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulawik, S.; Payne, V.; Fischer, E. V.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) has successfully been used as a tracer of biomass burning in the context of aircraft campaigns. We show HCN observations from Aura-TES for a major fire in Indonesia in 2006, and globally over different seasons. We develop a fire-influence flag for TES observations and show how this relates to enhancements of other TES products, such as PAN, carbon monoxide, and ozone.

  3. Chloride channelopathies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Planells-Cases, Rosa; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2009-01-01

    ... diseases that are known as ‘channelopathies’. Ion channels can be studied in great detail by biophysical techniques which include the analysis of single channel molecules by patch-clamping. Electrophysiological analyses of ion channels engineered to carry human disease mutations have yielded important insights into the pathological mechani...

  4. The hyperpolarization-activated channel HCN4 is required for the generation of pacemaker action potentials in the embryonic heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieber, Juliane; Herrmann, Stefan; Feil, Susanne; Löster, Jana; Feil, Robert; Biel, Martin; Hofmann, Franz; Ludwig, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation currents, termed If or Ih, are generated by four members of the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channel family. These currents have been proposed to contribute to several functions including pacemaker activity in heart and brain, control of resting potential, and neuronal plasticity. Transcripts of the HCN4 isoform have been found in cardiomyocytes and neurons, but the physiological role of this channel is unknown. Here we show that HCN4 is essential for the proper function of the developing cardiac conduction system. In wild-type embryos, HCN4 is highly expressed in the cardiac region where the early sinoatrial node develops. Mice lacking HCN4 channels globally, as well as mice with a selective deletion of HCN4 in cardiomyocytes, died between embryonic days 9.5 and 11.5. On average, If in cardiomyocytes from mutant embryos is reduced by 85%. Hearts from HCN4-deficient embryos contracted significantly slower compared with wild type and could not be stimulated by cAMP. In both wild-type and HCN4-/- mice, cardiac cells with “primitive” pacemaker action potentials could be found. However, cardiac cells with “mature” pacemaker potentials, observed in wild-type embryos starting at day 9.0, were not detected in HCN4-deficient embryos. Thus, HCN4 channels are essential for the proper generation of pacemaker potentials in the emerging sinoatrial node. PMID:14657344

  5. Effects of Yiqi Tongyang on HCN4 Protein Phosphorylation in Damaged Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinfeng Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel (If is closely associated with sinoatrial node pacing function. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in pacing function improvements of damaged sinoatrial node cells and the consequent treatment effects on sick sinus syndrome (SSS after the use of Yiqi Tongyang. HCN4 channel protein expression and phosphorylation were measured by immunoblotting and fluorescent quantitation. After ischemia-reperfusion injury (model group, the HCN4 protein and the optical density (OD of the phosphorylated HCN4 protein as well as intracellular PKA activity in the sinoatrial node cells decreased significantly. However, the OD values and PKA activity increased to different degrees after treatment with serum containing different doses of Yiqi Tongyang; in contrast, no significant improvement was seen in the control group compared to the model group. These findings demonstrated that the use of the traditional Chinese medicine Yiqi Tongyang could increase HCN4 protein expression and phosphorylation as well as PKA activity within sinoatrial node cells damaged by ischemia-reperfusion. The HCN4 protein is involved in the If-related ion channel. Here, we speculated that these effects could be associated with upregulation of HCN4 protein phosphorylation, which consequently improved cell automaticity, increased heart rate, and had treatment effects on SSS.

  6. Dense Molecular Gas around AGN: HCN/CO in NGC3227

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, R; Sternberg, A

    2011-01-01

    There is now convincing evidence that the intensity of HCN molecular line emission is enhanced around active galactic nuclei. In this paper we examine the specific case of the Seyfert galaxy NGC3227, for which there are subarcsecond resolution data for the HCN (1-0) 88 GHz and CO (2-1) 230 GHz rotational lines, enabling us to spatially separate a circumnuclear ring at a radius of 140pc and an inner nuclear region within 40pc of the AGN. The HCN(1-0)/CO(2-1) flux ratio differs by more than an order of magnitude between these two regions. We carry out large velocity gradient (LVG) computations to determine the range of parameters (gas temperature and density, HCN/CO abundance ratio, column densities and velocity gradients) that yield physically plausible solutions for the observed flux ratio in the central 100pc. The observed HCN/CO intensity ratio in the nucleus is consistent with very optically thick thermalized emission in very dense (>=10^5cm^{-3}) gas, in which case the HCN/CO abundance ratio there is unco...

  7. Detection of Macromolecular Fractions in HCN Polymers Using Electrophoretic and Ultrafiltration Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Yaseli, Margarita R; Cid, Cristina; Yagüe, Ana I; Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta

    2017-02-01

    Elucidating the origin of life involves synthetic as well as analytical challenges. Herein, for the first time, we describe the use of gel electrophoresis and ultrafiltration to fractionate HCN polymers. Since the first prebiotic synthesis of adenine by Oró, HCN polymers have gained much interest in studies on the origins of life due to the identification of biomonomers and related compounds within them. Here, we demonstrate that macromolecular fractions with electrophoretic mobility can also be detected within HCN polymers. The migration of polymers under the influence of an electric field depends not only on their sizes (one-dimensional electrophoresis) but also their different isoelectric points (two-dimensional electrophoresis, 2-DE). The same behaviour was observed for several macromolecular fractions detected in HCN polymers. Macromolecular fractions with apparent molecular weights as high as 250 kDa were detected by tricine-SDS gel electrophoresis. Cationic macromolecular fractions with apparent molecular weights as high as 140 kDa were also detected by 2-DE. The HCN polymers synthesized were fractionated by ultrafiltration. As a result, the molecular weight distributions of the macromolecular fractions detected in the HCN polymers directly depended on the synthetic conditions used to produce these polymers. The implications of these results for prebiotic chemistry will be discussed.

  8. Effects of Yiqi Tongyang on HCN4 Protein Phosphorylation in Damaged Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Liu, Ruxiu; Peng, Jie; Wang, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel (I f ) is closely associated with sinoatrial node pacing function. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in pacing function improvements of damaged sinoatrial node cells and the consequent treatment effects on sick sinus syndrome (SSS) after the use of Yiqi Tongyang. HCN4 channel protein expression and phosphorylation were measured by immunoblotting and fluorescent quantitation. After ischemia-reperfusion injury (model group), the HCN4 protein and the optical density (OD) of the phosphorylated HCN4 protein as well as intracellular PKA activity in the sinoatrial node cells decreased significantly. However, the OD values and PKA activity increased to different degrees after treatment with serum containing different doses of Yiqi Tongyang; in contrast, no significant improvement was seen in the control group compared to the model group. These findings demonstrated that the use of the traditional Chinese medicine Yiqi Tongyang could increase HCN4 protein expression and phosphorylation as well as PKA activity within sinoatrial node cells damaged by ischemia-reperfusion. The HCN4 protein is involved in the I f -related ion channel. Here, we speculated that these effects could be associated with upregulation of HCN4 protein phosphorylation, which consequently improved cell automaticity, increased heart rate, and had treatment effects on SSS.

  9. HCN observations of comets C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) and C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy)

    CERN Document Server

    Wirström, E S; Källström, P; Levinsson, A; Olivefors, A; Tegehall, E

    2016-01-01

    HCN J=1-0 emission from the long-period comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) was observed from the Onsala Space Observatory on multiple occasions during the month before its perihelion passage on December 22, 2013. We report detections for seven different dates, spanning heliocentric distances (R_h) decreasing from 0.94 to 0.82 au. Estimated HCN production rates are generally higher than previously reported for the same time period, but the implied increase in production rate with heliocentric distance, Q_{HCN} proportionate to R_h^{-3.2}, represent well the overall documented increase since it was first observed at R_h=1.35. The implied mean HCN abundance relative to water in R1 Lovejoy is 0.2%. We also report on a detection of HCN with the new 3 mm receiver system at Onsala Space Observatory in comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) on January 14, 2015, when its heliocentric distance was 1.3 au. Relative to comet C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy), the HCN production rate of C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) was more than 5 times higher at similar heliocentri...

  10. Submillimeter-HCN Diagram for an Energy Diagnostics in the Centers of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Izumi, Takuma; Aalto, Susanne; Espada, Daniel; Fathi, Kambiz; Harada, Nanase; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Krips, Melanie; Martín, Sergio; Matsushita, Satoki; Meier, David S; Nakai, Naomasa; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Schinnerer, Eva; Sheth, Kartik; Terashima, Yuichi; Turner, Jean L

    2015-01-01

    Compiling data from literature and the ALMA archive, we show enhanced HCN(4-3)/HCO$^+$(4-3) and/or HCN(4-3)/CS(7-6) integrated intensity ratios in circumnuclear molecular gas around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) compared to those in starburst (SB) galaxies (submillimeter HCN-enhancement). The number of sample galaxies is significantly increased from our previous work. We expect this feature could potentially be an extinction-free energy diagnostic tool of nuclear regions of galaxies. Non-LTE radiative transfer modelings of the above molecular emission lines involving both collisional and radiative excitation, as well as a photon trapping effect were conducted to investigate the cause of the high line ratios in AGNs. As a result, we found that enhanced abundance ratios of HCN-to-HCO$^+$ and HCN-to-CS in AGNs as compared to SB galaxies by a factor of a few to even $>$ 10 is a plausible explanation for the submillimeter HCN-enhancement. However, a counter argument of a systematically higher gas density in AGNs t...

  11. ALMA HCN and HCO+ J=3-2 observations of optical Seyfert and luminous infrared galaxies -- Confirmation of elevated HCN-to-HCO+ flux ratios in AGNs --

    CERN Document Server

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Izumi, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of our ALMA observations of three AGN-dominated nuclei in optical Seyfert 1 galaxies (NGC 7469, I Zw 1, and IC 4329 A) and eleven luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with various levels of infrared estimated energetic contributions by AGNs at the HCN and HCO+ J=3-2 emission lines. The HCN and HCO+ J=3-2 emission lines are clearly detected at the main nuclei of all sources, except for IC 4329 A. The vibrationally excited (v2=1f) HCN J=3-2 and HCO+ J=3-2 emission lines are simultaneously covered, and HCN v2=1f J=3-2 emission line signatures are seen in the main nuclei of two LIRGs, IRAS 12112+0305 and IRAS 22491-1808, neither of which show clear buried AGN signatures in the infrared. If the vibrational excitation is dominated by infrared radiative pumping, through the absorption of infrared 14 um photons, primarily originating from AGN-heated hot dust emission, then these two LIRGs may contain infrared-elusive, but (sub)millimeter-detectable, extremely deeply buried AGNs. These vibrational...

  12. Optimization principles of dendritic structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borst Alexander

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendrites are the most conspicuous feature of neurons. However, the principles determining their structure are poorly understood. By employing cable theory and, for the first time, graph theory, we describe dendritic anatomy solely on the basis of optimizing synaptic efficacy with minimal resources. Results We show that dendritic branching topology can be well described by minimizing the path length from the neuron's dendritic root to each of its synaptic inputs while constraining the total length of wiring. Tapering of diameter toward the dendrite tip – a feature of many neurons – optimizes charge transfer from all dendritic synapses to the dendritic root while housekeeping the amount of dendrite volume. As an example, we show how dendrites of fly neurons can be closely reconstructed based on these two principles alone.

  13. Genetic variation in Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels and its relationship with neuroticism, cognition and risk of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mark Mcintosh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are encoded by four genes (HCN1-4 and, through activation by cyclic AMP (cAMP, represent a point of convergence for several psychosis risk genes. On the basis of positive preliminary data, we sought to test whether genetic variation in HCN1-4 conferred risk of depression or cognitive impairment in the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study. HCN1, HCN2, HCN3 and HCN4 were genotyped for 43 haplotype-tagging SNPs and tested for association with DSM-IV depression, neuroticism and a battery of cognitive tests assessing cognitive ability, memory, verbal fluency and psychomotor performance. No association was found between any HCN channel gene SNP and risk of depression, neuroticism or on any cognitive measure. The current study does not support a genetic role for HCN channels in conferring risk of depression or cognitive impairment in human subjects within the Scottish population.

  14. Synchronized network activity in developing rat hippocampus involves regional hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel function

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, Roland A.; Galindo, Rafael; Mameli, Manuel; Gonzalez-Vega, Rebeca; Valenzuela, C. Fernando; Tallie Z. Baram

    2005-01-01

    The principal form of synchronized network activity in neonatal hippocampus consists of low frequency ‘giant depolarizing potentials’ (GDPs). Whereas contribution of both GABA and glutamate to their generation has been demonstrated, full understanding of the mechanisms underlying these synchronized activity bursts remains incomplete. A contribution of the h-current, conducted by HCN channels, to GDPs has been a topic of substantial interest. Here we focus on HCN1, the prevalent HCN channel is...

  15. The rotational excitation of the HCN and HNC molecules by H2 revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Vera, M.; Lique, F.; Dumouchel, F.; Hily-Blant, P.; Faure, A.

    2017-06-01

    HCN and HNC are two fundamental molecules in the dense interstellar medium. The HNC/HCN abundance ratio depends on the kinetic temperature and can be used to explore the physical and chemical conditions of star-forming regions. Modelling of HCN and HNC emissions from interstellar clouds requires to model their collisional and radiative excitations. We report the calculation of the HCN and HNC excitation rate coefficients among the first 26 rotational levels due to H2 collisions, for temperatures ranging from 5 to 500 K, using the exact close coupling and the approximate coupled states methods. We found a propensity for even Δj transitions in the case of HCN-para-H2 collisions, whereas a propensity for odd Δj transitions is observed in the case of HNC-para-H2 collisions. For collisions with ortho-H2, both molecules show a propensity rule favouring transitions with odd Δj. The rate coefficients for HCN and HNC differ significantly, showing clearly that the collisional excitation of the two isomers is different, especially for para-H2. We also evaluate the impact of these new data on the astrophysical modelling through radiative transfer calculations. It is shown that specific calculations have to be performed for the two isomers and that the HNC/HCN abundance ratio in cold molecular clouds cannot be estimated from line intensity ratio. Finally, observations of the two isotopologues H13CN and HN13C towards a sample of prestellar cores are presented, and the larger excitation temperature of HN13C is well reproduced by our excitation model.

  16. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy in young patients with cardiomyopathies and channelopathies: a single Italian centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Federico; Silvano, Maria; Zorzi, Alessandro; Bertaglia, Emanuele; Siciliano, Mariachiara; Leoni, Loira; De Franceschi, Pietro; Iliceto, Sabino; Corrado, Domenico

    2016-07-01

    This study was designed to prospectively evaluate the risk-benefit ratio of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy in young patients with cardiomyopathies and channelopathies. The study population included 96 consecutive patients [68 men, median age 27 (22-32) years] with cardiomyopathies, such as arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 35), dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 17), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 15), Brugada syndrome (n = 14), idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (n = 5), left ventricular noncompaction (n = 4), long-QT syndrome (n = 4) and short-QT syndrome (n = 2), who were 18-35 years old at the time of ICD implantation. During a mean follow-up of 72.6 ± 53.3 months, one patient with end-stage hypertrophic cardiomyopathy died because of acute heart failure, and 11 patients underwent orthotopic heart transplantation. Twenty patients (20.8%) had a total of 38 appropriate ICD interventions (4%/year), and 26 patients (27.1%) experienced a total of 49 adverse ICD-related events (5.4%/year), including 23 inappropriate ICD interventions occurring in nine patients (9.4%) and 26 device-related complications requiring surgical revision occurring in 20 patients (20.8%). Lead failure/fracture requiring lead extraction was the most common complication (n = 9). A threshold for ICD therapy less than 300 ms was associated with a borderline significant lower probability of inappropriate ICD interventions (hazard ratio = 0.2; 95% confidence interval 0.02-1.2; P = 0.07), whereas underweight status was an independent predictor of device-related complications (hazard ratio = 5.4; 95% confidence interval 1.5-19.4; P = 0.01). In young patients with cardiomyopathies and channelopathies, ICD therapy provided life-saving protection by effectively terminating life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. However, because ICD-related adverse events are common, the risk/benefit ratio should be

  17. RAB-10 Regulates Dendritic Branching by Balancing Dendritic Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin A Taylor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction of a large dendritic arbor requires robust growth and the precise delivery of membrane and protein cargoes to specific subcellular regions of the developing dendrite. How the microtubule-based vesicular trafficking and sorting systems are regulated to distribute these dendritic development factors throughout the dendrite is not well understood. Here we identify the small GTPase RAB-10 and the exocyst complex as critical regulators of dendrite morphogenesis and patterning in the C. elegans sensory neuron PVD. In rab-10 mutants, PVD dendritic branches are reduced in the posterior region of the cell but are excessive in the distal anterior region of the cell. We also demonstrate that the dendritic branch distribution within PVD depends on the balance between the molecular motors kinesin-1/UNC-116 and dynein, and we propose that RAB-10 regulates dendrite morphology by balancing the activity of these motors to appropriately distribute branching factors, including the transmembrane receptor DMA-1.

  18. Spatially Resolved HCN Absorption Features in the Circumnuclear Region of NGC 1052

    CERN Document Server

    Sawada-Satoh, Satoko; Oh, Se-Jin; Lee, Sang-Sung; Byun, Do-Young; Kameno, Seiji; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Jung, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Hyo-Ryoung; Hwang, Ju-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    We present the first VLBI detection of HCN molecular absorption in the nearby active galactic nucleus NGC 1052. Utilizing the 1 milliarcsecond resolution achieved by the Korean VLBI Network, we have spatially resolved the HCN absorption against a double-sided nuclear jet structure. Two velocity features of HCN absorption are detected significantly at the radial velocity of 1656 and 1719 km/s, redshifted by 149 and 212 km/s with respect to the systemic velocity of the galaxy. The column density of the HCN molecule is estimated to be 10^{15}-10^{16} cm^{-2}, assuming the excitation temperature of 100-230 K. The absorption features show high optical depth localized on the receding jet side, where the free-free absorption occurred due to the circumnuclear torus. The size of the foreground absorbing molecular gas is estimated to be on approximately one-parsec scales, which agrees well with the approximate size of the circumnuclear torus. HCN absorbing gas is likely to be several clumps smaller than 0.1 parsec insi...

  19. Organics produced by irradiation of frozen and liquid HCN solutions: implications for chemical evolution studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colín-García, M; Negrón-Mendoza, A; Ramos-Bernal, S

    2009-04-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN), an important precursor of organic compounds, is widely present in extraterrestrial environments. HCN is also readily synthesized in prebiotic simulation experiments. To gain insight into the radiation chemistry of one of the most important and highly versatile constituents of cometary ices, we examined the behavior of over-irradiated frozen and liquid HCN solutions under ionizing radiation. The samples were exposed to gamma radiation at a dose range from 0 up to 419 kGy. Ultraviolet spectroscopy and gas chromatography were used to follow the process. The analyses confirmed that gamma-ray irradiation of liquid HCN solutions generates several organic products. Many of them are essential to life; we verified the presence of carboxylic acids (some of them members of the Krebs cycle) as well as free amino acids and urea. These are the first studies to reveal the presence of these compounds in experiments performed at low temperatures and bulk irradiation. Organic material was produced even at low temperatures and low radiation doses. This work strongly supports the presumption that, as a parent molecule, HCN played a central essential role in the process of chemical evolution on early Earth, comets, and other extraterrestrial environments.

  20. Organics Produced by Irradiation of Frozen and Liquid HCN Solutions: Implications for Chemical Evolution Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colín-García, M.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN), an important precursor of organic compounds, is widely present in extraterrestrial environments. HCN is also readily synthesized in prebiotic simulation experiments. To gain insight into the radiation chemistry of one of the most important and highly versatile constituents of cometary ices, we examined the behavior of over-irradiated frozen and liquid HCN solutions under ionizing radiation. The samples were exposed to gamma radiation at a dose range from 0 up to 419 kGy. Ultraviolet spectroscopy and gas chromatography were used to follow the process. The analyses confirmed that gamma-ray irradiation of liquid HCN solutions generates several organic products. Many of them are essential to life; we verified the presence of carboxylic acids (some of them members of the Krebs cycle) as well as free amino acids and urea. These are the first studies to reveal the presence of these compounds in experiments performed at low temperatures and bulk irradiation. Organic material was produced even at low temperatures and low radiation doses. This work strongly supports the presumption that, as a parent molecule, HCN played a central essential role in the process of chemical evolution on early Earth, comets, and other extraterrestrial environments.

  1. In Silico Evaluation of the Potential Antiarrhythmic Effect of Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate on Cardiac Channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroua Boukhabza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that allow the passage of ions according to the direction of their electrochemical gradients. Mutations in more than 30 genes encoding ion channels have been associated with an increasingly wide range of inherited cardiac arrhythmias. In this line, ion channels become one of the most important molecular targets for several classes of drugs, including antiarrhythmics. Nevertheless, antiarrhythmic drugs are usually accompanied by some serious side effects. Thus, developing new approaches could offer added values to prevent and treat the episodes of arrhythmia. In this sense, green tea catechins seem to be a promising alternative because of the significant effect of Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (E3G on the electrocardiographic wave forms of guinea pig hearts. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits-risks balance of E3G consumption in the setting of ion channel mutations linked with aberrant cardiac excitability phenotypes. Two gain-of-function mutations, Nav1.5-p.R222Q and Nav1.5-p.I141V, which are linked with cardiac hyperexcitability phenotypes were studied. Computer simulations of action potentials (APs show that 30 μM E3G reduces and suppresses AP abnormalities characteristics of these phenotypes. These results suggest that E3G may have a beneficial effect in the setting of cardiac sodium channelopathies displaying a hyperexcitability phenotype.

  2. In Silico Evaluation of the Potential Antiarrhythmic Effect of Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate on Cardiac Channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhabza, Maroua; El Hilaly, Jaouad; Attiya, Nourdine; El-Haidani, Ahmed; Filali-Zegzouti, Younes; Mazouzi, Driss; Amarouch, Mohamed-Yassine

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels are transmembrane proteins that allow the passage of ions according to the direction of their electrochemical gradients. Mutations in more than 30 genes encoding ion channels have been associated with an increasingly wide range of inherited cardiac arrhythmias. In this line, ion channels become one of the most important molecular targets for several classes of drugs, including antiarrhythmics. Nevertheless, antiarrhythmic drugs are usually accompanied by some serious side effects. Thus, developing new approaches could offer added values to prevent and treat the episodes of arrhythmia. In this sense, green tea catechins seem to be a promising alternative because of the significant effect of Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate (E3G) on the electrocardiographic wave forms of guinea pig hearts. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits-risks balance of E3G consumption in the setting of ion channel mutations linked with aberrant cardiac excitability phenotypes. Two gain-of-function mutations, Nav1.5-p.R222Q and Nav1.5-p.I141V, which are linked with cardiac hyperexcitability phenotypes were studied. Computer simulations of action potentials (APs) show that 30 μM E3G reduces and suppresses AP abnormalities characteristics of these phenotypes. These results suggest that E3G may have a beneficial effect in the setting of cardiac sodium channelopathies displaying a hyperexcitability phenotype.

  3. Divalent cation-responsive myotonia and muscle paralysis in skeletal muscle sodium channelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, Ami; Grunseich, Christopher; Skov, Martin; Cook, Lisa; Aue, Georg; Purev, Enkhtsetseg; Bakar, Dara; Lehky, Tanya; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Pedersen, Thomas H; Childs, Richard W

    2015-11-01

    We report a patient with paramyotonia congenita/hyperkalemic periodic paralysis due to Nav1.4 I693T mutation who had worsening of myotonia and muscle weakness in the setting of hypomagnesemia and hypocalcemia with marked recovery after magnesium administration. Computer simulations of the effects of the I693T mutation were introduced in the muscle fiber model by both hyperpolarizing shifts in the Nav1.4 channel activation and a faster recovery from slow channel inactivation. A further shift in the Nav1.4 channel activation in the hyperpolarizing direction as expected with low divalent cations resulted in myotonia that progressed to membrane inexcitability. Shifting the channel activation in the depolarizing direction as would be anticipated from magnesium supplementation abolished the myotonia. These observations provide clinical and biophysical evidence that the muscle symptoms in sodium channelopathy are sensitive to divalent cations. Exploration of the role of magnesium administration in therapy or prophylaxis is warranted with a randomized clinical trial. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Stochastic spontaneous calcium release events and sodium channelopathies promote ventricular arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Fernando O.; Shiferaw, Yohannes; Vigmond, Edward J.; Plank, Gernot

    2017-09-01

    Premature ventricular complexes (PVCs), the first initiating beats of a variety of cardiac arrhythmias, have been associated with spontaneous calcium release (SCR) events at the cell level. However, the mechanisms underlying the degeneration of such PVCs into arrhythmias are not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the conditions under which SCR-mediated PVCs can lead to ventricular arrhythmias. In particular, we sought to determine whether sodium (Na+) current loss-of-function in the structurally normal ventricles provides a substrate for unidirectional conduction block and reentry initiated by SCR-mediated PVCs. To achieve this goal, a stochastic model of SCR was incorporated into an anatomically accurate compute model of the rabbit ventricles with the His-Purkinje system (HPS). Simulations with reduced Na+ current due to a negative-shift in the steady-state channel inactivation showed that SCR-mediated delayed afterdepolarizations led to PVC formation in the HPS, where the electrotonic load was lower, conduction block, and reentry in the 3D myocardium. Moreover, arrhythmia initiation was only possible when intrinsic electrophysiological heterogeneity in action potential within the ventricles was present. In conclusion, while benign in healthy individuals SCR-mediated PVCs can lead to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias when combined with Na+ channelopathies.

  5. Neuromyelitis optica and the evolving spectrum of autoimmune aquaporin-4 channelopathies: a decade later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittock, Sean J; Lucchinetti, Claudia F

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of AQP4-IgG (a pathogenic antibody that targets the astrocytic water channel aquaporin-4), as the first sensitive and specific biomarker for any inflammatory central nervous system demyelinating disease (IDD), has shifted emphasis from the oligodendrocyte and myelin to the astrocyte as a central immunopathogenic player. Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) spectrum disorders (SDs) represent an evolving spectrum of IDDs extending beyond the optic nerves and spinal cord to include the brain (especially in children) and, rarely, muscle. NMOSD typical brain lesions are located in areas that highly express the target antigen, AQP4, including the circumventricular organs (accounting for intractable nausea and vomiting) and the diencephalon (accounting for sleep disorders, endocrinopathies, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis). Magnetic resonance imaging brain abnormalities fulfill Barkoff criteria for multiple sclerosis in up to 10% of patients. As the spectrum broadens, the importance of highly specific assays that detect pathogenic AQP4-IgG targeting extracellular epitopes of AQP4 cannot be overemphasized. The rapid evolution of our understanding of the immunobiology of AQP4 autoimmunity necessitates continuing revision of NMOSD diagnostic criteria. Here, we describe scientific advances that have occurred since the discovery of NMO-IgG in 2004 and review novel targeted immunotherapies. We also suggest that NMOSDs should now be considered under the umbrella term autoimmune aquaporin-4 channelopathy. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Muscle channelopathies: does the predicted channel gating pore offer new treatment insights for hypokalaemic periodic paralysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, E; Hanna, M G

    2010-01-01

    Hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (hypoPP) is the archetypal skeletal muscle channelopathy caused by dysfunction of one of two sarcolemmal ion channels, either the sodium channel Nav1.4 or the calcium channel Cav1.1. Clinically, hypoPP is characterised by episodes of often severe flaccid muscle paralysis, in which the muscle fibre membrane becomes electrically inexcitable, and which may be precipitated by low serum potassium levels. Initial functional characterisation of hypoPP mutations failed to adequately explain the pathomechanism of the disease. Recently, as more pathogenic mutations involving loss of positive charge have been identified in the S4 segments of either channel, the hypothesis that an abnormal gating pore current may be important has emerged. Such an aberrant gating pore current has been identified in mutant Nav1.4 channels and has prompted potentially significant advances in this area. The carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide has been used as a treatment for hypokalaemic periodic paralysis for over 40 years but its precise therapeutic mechanism of action is unclear. In this review we summarise the recent advances in the understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of hypoPP and consider how these may relate to the reported beneficial effects of acetazolamide. We also consider potential areas for future therapeutic development. PMID:20123788

  7. Cardiac sodium channelopathy associated with SCN5A mutations: electrophysiological, molecular and genetic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remme, Carol Ann

    2013-09-01

    Over the last two decades, an increasing number of SCN5A mutations have been described in patients with long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3), Brugada syndrome, (progressive) conduction disease, sick sinus syndrome, atrial standstill, atrial fibrillation, dilated cardiomyopathy, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Combined genetic, electrophysiological and molecular studies have provided insight into the dysfunction and dysregulation of the cardiac sodium channel in the setting of SCN5A mutations identified in patients with these inherited arrhythmia syndromes. However, risk stratification and patient management is hindered by the reduced penetrance and variable disease expressivity in sodium channelopathies. Furthermore, various SCN5A-related arrhythmia syndromes are known to display mixed phenotypes known as cardiac sodium channel overlap syndromes. Determinants of variable disease expressivity, including genetic background and environmental factors, are suspected but still largely unknown. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that sodium channel function and regulation is more complicated than previously assumed, and the sodium channel may play additional, as of yet unrecognized, roles in cardiac structure and function. Development of cardiac structural abnormalities secondary to SCN5A mutations has been reported, but the clinical relevance and underlying mechanisms are unclear. Increased insight into these issues would enable a major next step in research related to cardiac sodium channel disease, ultimately enabling improved diagnosis, risk stratification and treatment strategies.

  8. Carotid body overactivity induces respiratory neurone channelopathy contributing to neurogenic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-07-15

    Why sympathetic activity rises in neurogenic hypertension remains unknown. It has been postulated that changes in the electrical excitability of medullary pre-sympathetic neurones are the main causal mechanism for the development of sympathetic overactivity in experimental hypertension. Here we review recent data suggesting that enhanced sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension is, at least in part, dependent on alterations in the electrical excitability of medullary respiratory neurones and their central modulation of sympatho-excitatory networks. We also present results showing a critical role for carotid body tonicity in the aetiology of enhanced central respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension. We propose a novel hypothesis of respiratory neurone channelopathy induced by carotid body overactivity in neurogenic hypertension that may contribute to sympathetic excess. Moreover, our data support the notion of targeting the carotid body as a potential novel therapeutic approach for reducing sympathetic vasomotor tone in neurogenic hypertension. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  9. Sodium channelopathy underlying familial sick sinus syndrome with early onset and predominantly male characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Keisuke; Machida, Taku; Sumitomo, Naokata; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Ohkubo, Kimie; Watanabe, Ichiro; Makiyama, Takeru; Fukae, Satoki; Kohno, Masaki; Harrell, Daniel T; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Tsuji, Yukiomi; Nogami, Akihiko; Watabe, Taichi; Oginosawa, Yasushi; Abe, Haruhiko; Maemura, Koji; Motomura, Hideki; Makita, Naomasa

    2014-06-01

    Sick sinus syndrome (SSS) is a common arrhythmia often associated with aging or organic heart diseases but may also occur in a familial form with a variable mode of inheritance. Despite the identification of causative genes, including cardiac Na channel (SCN5A), the pathogenesis and molecular epidemiology of familial SSS remain undetermined primarily because of its rarity. We genetically screened 48 members of 15 SSS families for mutations in several candidate genes and determined the functional properties of mutant Na channels using whole-cell patch clamping. We identified 6 SCN5A mutations including a compound heterozygous mutation. Heterologously expressed mutant Na channels showed loss-of-function properties of reduced or no Na current density in conjunction with gating modulations. Among 19 family members with SCN5A mutations, QT prolongation and Brugada syndrome were associated in 4 and 2 individuals, respectively. Age of onset in probands carrying SCN5A mutations was significantly less (mean±SE, 12.4±4.6 years; n=5) than in SCN5A-negative probands (47.0±4.6 years; n=10; Pchannelopathy indicates that familial SSS with SCN5A mutations may represent a subset of cardiac Na channelopathy with strong male predominance and early clinical manifestations. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. An algorithm for candidate sequencing in non-dystrophic skeletal muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Tai-Seung; Lossin, Christoph; Kim, Dong-Uk; Kim, Myeong-Kyu; Kim, Young-Ok; Choi, Kang-Ho; Choi, Seok-Yong; Park, Sang-Cheol; Na, In-Seop

    2013-07-01

    Human skeletal muscle channelopathies (HSMCs) are a group of heritable conditions with ion channel-related etiology and similar presentation. To create a comprehensive picture of the phenotypic spectrum for each condition and to devise a strategy that facilitates the differential diagnosis, we collected the genotype and phenotype information from more than 500 previously published HSMC studies. Using these records, we were able to identify clear correlations between particular clinical features and the underlying alteration(s) in the genes SCN4A, CACNA1S, KCNJ2, and CLCN1. This allowed us to develop a clinical, symptom-based, binary decision flow algorithm that predicts the proper genetic origin with high accuracy (0.88-0.93). The algorithm was implemented in a stand-alone online tool ("CGPS"- http://cgps.ddd.co.kr ) to assist with HSCM diagnosis in the clinical practice. The CGPS provides simple, symptom-oriented navigation that guides the user to the most likely molecular basis of the presentation, which permits highly targeted genetic screens and, upon confirmation, tailored pharmacotherapy based on the molecular origin.

  11. Calcium channelopathies and Alzheimer's disease: insight into therapeutic success and failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakroborty, Shreaya; Stutzmann, Grace E

    2014-09-15

    Calcium ions are versatile and universal biological signaling factors that regulate numerous cellular processes ranging from cell fertilization, to neuronal plasticity that underlies learning and memory, to cell death. For these functions to be properly executed, calcium signaling requires precise regulation, and failure of this regulation may tip the scales from a signal for life to a signal for death. Disruptions in calcium channel function can generate complex multi-system disorders collectively referred to as "calciumopathies" that can target essentially any cell type or organ. In this review, we focus on the multifaceted involvement of calcium signaling in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and summarize the various therapeutic options currently available to combat this disease. Detailing the series of disappointing AD clinical trial results on cognitive outcomes, we emphasize the urgency to design alternative therapeutic strategies if synaptic and memory functions are to be preserved. One such approach is to target early calcium channelopathies centrally linked to AD pathogenesis. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Active properties of neuronal dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D; Magee, J C; Colbert, C M; Cristie, B R

    1996-01-01

    Dendrites of neurons in the central nervous system are the principal sites for excitatory synaptic input. Although little is known about their function, two disparate perspectives have arisen to describe the activity patterns inherent to these diverse tree-like structures. Dendrites are thus considered either passive or active in their role in integrating synaptic inputs. This review follows the history of dendritic research from before the turn of the century to the present, with a primary focus on the hippocampus. A number of recent techniques, including high-speed fluorescence imaging and dendritic patch clamping, have provided new information and perspectives about the active properties of dendrites. The results support previous notions about the dendritic propagation of action potentials and also indicate which types of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are expressed and functionally active in dendrites. Possible roles for the active properties of dendrites in synaptic plasticity and integration are also discussed.

  13. Origins of Scatter in the Relationship between HCN 1-0 and Dense Gas Mass in the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Battersby, Cara

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the correlation of HCN 1-0 with gas mass in the central 300 pc of the Galaxy. We find that on the ∼10 pc size scale of individual cloud cores, HCN 1-0 is well correlated with dense gas mass when plotted as a log–log relationship. There is ∼0.75 dex of scatter in this relationship from clouds like Sgr B2, which has an integrated HCN 1-0 intensity of a cloud less than half its mass, and others that have HCN 1-0 enhanced by a factor of 2–3 relative to clouds of comparable mass. We identify the two primary sources of scatter to be self-absorption and variations in HCN abundance. We also find that the extended HCN 1-0 emission is more intense per unit mass than in individual cloud cores. In fact the majority (80%) of HCN 1-0 emission comes from extended gas with column densities below 7 × 1022 cm‑2, accounting for 68% of the total mass. We find variations in the brightness of HCN 1-0 would only yield a ∼10% error in the dense gas mass inferred from this line in the Galactic center. However, the observed order of magnitude HCN abundance variations, and the systematic nature of these variations, warn of potential biases in the use of HCN as dense gas mass tracer in more extreme environments such as an active galactic nucleus and shock-dominated regions. We also investigate other 3 mm tracers, finding that HNCO is better correlated with mass than HCN, and might be a better tracer of cloud mass in this environment.

  14. Loss of HCN1 enhances disease progression in mouse models of CNG channel-linked retinitis pigmentosa and achromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Christian; Asteriti, Sabrina; Koch, Susanne; Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Tanimoto, Naoyuki; Herms, Jochen; Seeliger, Mathias W; Cangiano, Lorenzo; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos

    2016-03-15

    Most inherited blinding diseases are characterized by compromised retinal function and progressive degeneration of photoreceptors. However, the factors that affect the life span of photoreceptors in such degenerative retinal diseases are rather poorly understood. Here, we explore the role of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 1 (HCN1) in this context. HCN1 is known to adjust retinal function under mesopic conditions, and although it is expressed at high levels in rod and cone photoreceptor inner segments, no association with any retinal disorder has yet been found. We investigated the effects of an additional genetic deletion of HCN1 on the function and survival of photoreceptors in a mouse model of CNGB1-linked retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We found that the absence of HCN1 in Cngb1 knockout (KO) mice exacerbated photoreceptor degeneration. The deleterious effect was reduced by expression of HCN1 using a viral vector. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of HCN1 also enhanced rod degeneration in Cngb1 KO mice. Patch-clamp recordings revealed that the membrane potentials of Cngb1 KO and Cngb1/Hcn1 double-KO rods were both significantly depolarized. We also found evidence for altered calcium homeostasis and increased activation of the protease calpain in Cngb1/Hcn1 double-KO mice. Finally, the deletion of HCN1 also exacerbated degeneration of cone photoreceptors in a mouse model of CNGA3-linked achromatopsia. Our results identify HCN1 as a major modifier of photoreceptor degeneration and suggest that pharmacological inhibition of HCN channels may enhance disease progression in RP and achromatopsia patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Output power stability of a HCN laser using a stepping motor for the EAST interferometer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. B.; Wei, X. C.; Liu, H. Q.; Shen, J. J.; Zeng, L.; Jie, Y. X.

    2015-11-01

    The HCN laser on EAST is a continuous wave glow discharge laser with 3.4 m cavity length and 120 mW power output at 337 μ m wavelength. Without a temperature-controlled system, the cavity length of the laser is very sensitive to the environmental temperature. An external power feedback control system is applied on the HCN laser to stabilize the laser output power. The feedback system is composed of a stepping motor, a PLC, a supervisory computer, and the corresponding control program. One step distance of the stepping motor is 1 μ m and the time response is 0.5 s. Based on the power feedback control system, a stable discharge for the HCN laser is obtained more than eight hours, which satisfies the EAST experiment.

  16. Simultaneous removal of Hg0 and HCN from the yellow phosphorus tail gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanan; Wang, Xueqian

    2017-08-01

    Transition metal oxides supported on TiO2 were synthesized by a sol-gel method and implied to simultaneous removal of Hg0 and HCN under low temperature and micro-oxygen conditions. The results show that catalysts that modified by manganese oxide have superior catalytic oxidation activity for both the removal of elemental mercury (Hg0) and HCN. Furthermore, the O2 can promote in the removal reaction process. The fresh and used catalysts were characterized by BET and XPS. The catalyst characterization indicated that the catalyst possessed a large specific surface area and the chemisorbed oxygen participated in the catalytic oxidation reaction. The MnOx/TiO2 catalyst was demonstrated to a good catalytic oxidant for simultaneous removal of elemental mercury (Hg0) and HCN under micro-oxygen conditions.

  17. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This video, captured during the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flown on STS-87 as a part of the fourth United States Microgravity payload, shows the growth of a dendrite, and the surface solidification that occurred on the front and back windows of the growth chamber. Dendrites are tiny, tree like structures that form as metals solidify.

  18. Formation of glycine from HCN and H2O: A computational mechanistic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Moo; Choe, Joong Chul

    2017-05-01

    The potential energy surfaces for the formation of glycine from HCN and H2O were determined from CBS-QB3 calculations. After the formation of a HCN trimer, amino malononitrile, amino malononitrile monoamide (3) was formed by a water addition reaction. Two pathways were found for the subsequent reaction, 3 + 2H2O → glycine + HNCO + NH3. One pathway involving an amino ketone was much more favored than the other pathway involving glycinamide. Addition of a water molecule as a catalyst greatly enhanced steps occurring by hydrogen rearrangement.

  19. The Excitation of HCN and HCO+ in the Galactic Center Circumnuclear Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, E. A. C.; Güsten, R.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Morris, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present new observations of HCN and HCO+ in the circumnuclear disk (CND) of the Galaxy, which we obtained with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope. We mapped emission in rotational lines of HCN J = 3-2, 4-3, and 8-7, as well as of HCO+ J = 3-2, 4-3, and 9-8. We also present spectra of H13CN J = 3-2 and 4-3 as well as H13CO+ J = 3-2 and 4-3 toward four positions in the CND. Using the intensities of all of these lines, we present an excitation analysis for each molecule using the non-LTE radiative transfer code RADEX. The HCN line intensities toward the northern emission peak of the CND yield log densities (cm-3) of 5.6^{+0.6}_{-0.6}, consistent with those measured with HCO+ as well as with densities recently reported for this region from an excitation analysis of highly excited lines of CO. These densities are too low for the gas to be tidally stable. The HCN line intensities toward the CND's southern emission peak yield log densities of 6.5^{+0.5}_{-0.7}, higher than densities determined for this part of the CND with CO (although the densities measured with HCO+, log [n] = 5.6^{+0.2}_{-0.2}, are more consistent with the CO-derived densities). We investigate whether the higher densities we infer from HCN are affected by midinfrared radiative excitation of this molecule through its 14 μm rovibrational transitions. We find that radiative excitation is important for at least one clump in the CND, where we additionally detect the J = 4-3, v 2 = 1 vibrationally excited transition of HCN, which is excited by dust temperatures of gsim125-150 K. If this hot dust is present elsewhere in the CND, it could lower our inferred densities, potentially bringing the HCN-derived densities for the southern part of the CND into agreement with those measured using HCO+ and CO. Additional sensitive, high-resolution submillimeter observations, as well as midinfrared observations, would be useful to assess the importance of the radiative excitation of HCN in this environment.

  20. An Analysis of HCN Observations of The Galactic Centre's Circumnuclear Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Ian Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    The Circumnuclear Disk (CND) is a torus of dust and moleular gas rotating about the galactic centre and extends from 1.6 to 7pc from the central massive black hole SgrA*. Large Velocity Gradient modelling of selected transitions of HCN rotational collisions with molecular hydrogen is used to infer Hydrogen density and HCN opacities. The analysis concludes that the predicted hydrogen number density of CND clumps is about 10^6 which is insufficiently dense to withstand the tidal shear forces generated by SgrA* and the stellar group in the cavity between the galactic centre and the CND.

  1. The excitation of HCN and HCO{sup +} in the galactic center circumnuclear disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, E. A. C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O 1009, Lopezville Drive, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Güsten, R.; Requena-Torres, M. A. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf Dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Morris, M. R., E-mail: millsb@astro.ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Physics and Astronomy Building, 430 Portola Plaza, Box 951547 Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    We present new observations of HCN and HCO{sup +} in the circumnuclear disk (CND) of the Galaxy, which we obtained with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope. We mapped emission in rotational lines of HCN J = 3-2, 4-3, and 8-7, as well as of HCO{sup +} J = 3-2, 4-3, and 9-8. We also present spectra of H{sup 13}CN J = 3-2 and 4-3 as well as H{sup 13}CO{sup +} J = 3-2 and 4-3 toward four positions in the CND. Using the intensities of all of these lines, we present an excitation analysis for each molecule using the non-LTE radiative transfer code RADEX. The HCN line intensities toward the northern emission peak of the CND yield log densities (cm{sup –3}) of 5.6{sub −0.6}{sup +0.6}, consistent with those measured with HCO{sup +} as well as with densities recently reported for this region from an excitation analysis of highly excited lines of CO. These densities are too low for the gas to be tidally stable. The HCN line intensities toward the CND's southern emission peak yield log densities of 6.5{sub −0.7}{sup +0.5}, higher than densities determined for this part of the CND with CO (although the densities measured with HCO{sup +}, log [n] = 5.6{sub −0.2}{sup +0.2}, are more consistent with the CO-derived densities). We investigate whether the higher densities we infer from HCN are affected by midinfrared radiative excitation of this molecule through its 14 μm rovibrational transitions. We find that radiative excitation is important for at least one clump in the CND, where we additionally detect the J = 4-3, v {sub 2} = 1 vibrationally excited transition of HCN, which is excited by dust temperatures of ≳125-150 K. If this hot dust is present elsewhere in the CND, it could lower our inferred densities, potentially bringing the HCN-derived densities for the southern part of the CND into agreement with those measured using HCO{sup +} and CO. Additional sensitive, high-resolution submillimeter observations, as well as midinfrared observations, would be

  2. A study of the HCN formation mechanism during the coal char gasification by O{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Orikasa; A. Tomita [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials

    2003-12-01

    The HCN formation mechanism during the O{sub 2} gasification of Blair Athol coal char is examined at 600{degree}C. A nitrogen-free phenol resin char is also used as a reference char sample, to examine HCN formation during the reaction with NO/O{sub 2} mixed gas at the same temperature. It is concluded that, in both systems, the nitrogen-containing surface species (C(N)) has an important role as a reaction intermediate for HCN formation. The HCN formation temperature, 600{degree}C, is much lower than that for the reaction without O{sub 2}. In the temperature-programmed desorption experiment, a high temperature ({gt}900{degree}C) is also necessary for HCN formation. An important role of O{sub 2} in enhancing HCN formation is to activate C(N) via breakdown of the carbon network. In the resin char/NO/O{sub 2} reaction, the evolution of HCN is not influenced by the removal of NO from the feed gas. This result shows the importance of C(N) as an intermediate for the HCN formation. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Long-lasting spatial learning and memory impairments caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion associate with a dynamic change of HCN1/HCN2 expression in hippocampal CA1 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Pan; Lu, Yun; Li, Changjun; Zhou, Mei; Chen, Cheng; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; He, Zhi; Guo, Lianjun

    2015-09-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) causes learning and memory impairments and increases the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) through several biologically plausible pathways, yet the mechanisms underlying the disease process remained unclear particularly in a temporal manner. We performed permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO) to induce CCH. To determine whether hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are altered at different stages of cognitive impairment caused by CCH, adult male SD rats were randomly distributed into sham-operated 4, 8 and 12weeks group, 2VO 4, 8 and 12weeks group. Learning and memory performance were evaluated with Morris water maze (MWM) and long-term potentiation (LTP) was used to address the underlying synaptic mechanisms. Expression of NeuN, HCN1 and HCN2 in hippocampal CA1, DG and CA3 areas was quantified by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Our data showed that CCH induced a remarkable spatial learning and memory deficits in rats of 2VO 4, 8, and 12weeks group although neuronal loss only occurred after 4weeks of 2VO surgery in CA1. In addition, a significant reduction of HCN1 surface expression in CA1 was observed in the group that suffered 4weeks ischemia but neither 8 nor 12weeks. However, HCN2 surface expression in CA1 increased throughout the ischemia time-scales (4, 8 and 12w). Our findings indicate spatial learning and memory deficits in the CCH model are associated with disturbed HCN1 and HCN2 surface expression in hippocampal CA1. The altered patterns of both HCN1 and HCN2 surface expression may be implicated in the early stage (4w) of spatial learning and memory impairments; and the stable and long-lasting impairments of spatial learning and memory may partially attribute to the up-regulated HCN2 surface expression.

  4. Transport Processes in Dendritic Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dentritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical dendrite problem. The development of theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status is sketched showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) are insufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of maximum velocity was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to be able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip.

  5. Probing highly-obscured galaxy nuclei with vibrationally excited HCN - Extreme luminosity densities inside self-absorbed v=0 HCN and HCO+

    CERN Document Server

    Aalto, S; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E; Muller, S; Sakamoto, K; Fuller, G A; Garcia-Burillo, S; van der Werf, P; Neri, R; Spaans, M; Combes, F; Viti, S; Muehle, S; Armus, L; Evans, A; Sturm, E; Cernicharo, J; Henkel, C; Greve, T R

    2015-01-01

    We present high resolution (0."4) IRAM PdBI and ALMA mm and submm observations of the (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies ((U)LIRGs) IRAS17208-0014, Arp220, IC860 and Zw049.057 that reveal intense line emission from vibrationally excited (v2=1) J=3-2 and 4-3 HCN. The emission is emerging from buried, compact (r5e13 Lsun/kpc2. These nuclei are likely powered by accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and/or hot (>200 K) extreme starbursts. Vibrational, v2=1, lines of HCN are excited by intense 14 micron mid-infrared emission and are excellent probes of the dynamics, masses and physical conditions of (U)LIRG nuclei when H2 column densities exceed 1e24 cm-2. It is clear that these lines open up a new interesting avenue to gain access to the most obscured AGNs and starbursts. Vibrationally excited HCN acts as a proxy for the absorbed mid-infrared emission from the embedded nuclei, which allows for reconstruction of the intrinsic, hotter dust SED. In contrast, the ground vibrational state (v=0), J=3-2 and 4-3 ro...

  6. Modification of dendritic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  7. Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy of He-HCN and He-DCN: Energy Levels Near the Dissociation Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Kensuke; Tanaka, Keiichi

    2017-06-01

    The He-HCN complex is a weakly bound complex with binding energy of about 9 cm^{-1}. We have measured the the j=1 ← 0 internal rotation fundamental band of the He-HCN complex by millimeter-wave absorption spectroscopy and reported the potential energy surface (PES) to reproduce the observed transition frequencies. In the present study, we have extended the measurement to the j=2 ← 1 internal rotation hot bands of the He-HCN and He-DCN complexes. In the analysis, the upper state of several observed transitions are found to be located above the "dissociation limit" (D_0). The rovibtrational levels with e label dissociate to the HCN molecule with j=0 and the He atom (D_0), while those with f label, due to the parity conservation, to the HCN molecule with j=1 and the He atom which is higher in energy by about 2.96 cm^{-1} (2B_{HCN}) than D_0. The f levels are bound up to D_0 + 2B_{HCN}. The revised PES of He-HCN has a global minimum in the linear He-HCN configuration with a depth of 29.9 cm^{-1} and has a saddle point at the anti-linear He-NCH configuration with a depth of 20.9 cm^{-1}. The ν_s intermolecular stretching first excited state and the j=2 internal rotation second excited state are determined to be located 9.1405 and 9.0530 cm^{-1} above the ground state and very close to the calculated dissociation limit (D_0) of 9.32 cm^{-1}. Life times of several quasi-bound levels (both of e and f labels) and line widths of the related transitions are predicted for He-HCN and He-DCN from the revised PESs. K. Harada, K. Tanaka, T. Tanaka, S. Nanbu, and M. Aoyagi, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 7041 (2002).

  8. Canine CNGA3 Gene Mutations Provide Novel Insights into Human Achromatopsia-Associated Channelopathies and Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Tanaka

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG ion channels are key mediators underlying signal transduction in retinal and olfactory receptors. Genetic defects in CNGA3 and CNGB3, encoding two structurally related subunits of cone CNG channels, lead to achromatopsia (ACHM. ACHM is a congenital, autosomal recessive retinal disorder that manifests by cone photoreceptor dysfunction, severely reduced visual acuity, impaired or complete color blindness and photophobia. Here, we report the first canine models for CNGA3-associated channelopathy caused by R424W or V644del mutations in the canine CNGA3 ortholog that accurately mimic the clinical and molecular features of human CNGA3-associated ACHM. These two spontaneous mutations exposed CNGA3 residues essential for the preservation of channel function and biogenesis. The CNGA3-R424W results in complete loss of cone function in vivo and channel activity confirmed by in vitro electrophysiology. Structural modeling and molecular dynamics (MD simulations revealed R424-E306 salt bridge formation and its disruption with the R424W mutant. Reversal of charges in a CNGA3-R424E-E306R double mutant channel rescued cGMP-activated currents uncovering new insights into channel gating. The CNGA3-V644del affects the C-terminal leucine zipper (CLZ domain destabilizing intersubunit interactions of the coiled-coil complex in the MD simulations; the in vitro experiments showed incompetent trimeric CNGA3 subunit assembly consistent with abnormal biogenesis of in vivo channels. These newly characterized large animal models not only provide a valuable system for studying cone-specific CNG channel function in health and disease, but also represent prime candidates for proof-of-concept studies of CNGA3 gene replacement therapy for ACHM patients.

  9. Canine CNGA3 Gene Mutations Provide Novel Insights into Human Achromatopsia-Associated Channelopathies and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naoto; Dutrow, Emily V; Miyadera, Keiko; Delemotte, Lucie; MacDermaid, Christopher M; Reinstein, Shelby L; Crumley, William R; Dixon, Christopher J; Casal, Margret L; Klein, Michael L; Aguirre, Gustavo D; Tanaka, Jacqueline C; Guziewicz, Karina E

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels are key mediators underlying signal transduction in retinal and olfactory receptors. Genetic defects in CNGA3 and CNGB3, encoding two structurally related subunits of cone CNG channels, lead to achromatopsia (ACHM). ACHM is a congenital, autosomal recessive retinal disorder that manifests by cone photoreceptor dysfunction, severely reduced visual acuity, impaired or complete color blindness and photophobia. Here, we report the first canine models for CNGA3-associated channelopathy caused by R424W or V644del mutations in the canine CNGA3 ortholog that accurately mimic the clinical and molecular features of human CNGA3-associated ACHM. These two spontaneous mutations exposed CNGA3 residues essential for the preservation of channel function and biogenesis. The CNGA3-R424W results in complete loss of cone function in vivo and channel activity confirmed by in vitro electrophysiology. Structural modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations revealed R424-E306 salt bridge formation and its disruption with the R424W mutant. Reversal of charges in a CNGA3-R424E-E306R double mutant channel rescued cGMP-activated currents uncovering new insights into channel gating. The CNGA3-V644del affects the C-terminal leucine zipper (CLZ) domain destabilizing intersubunit interactions of the coiled-coil complex in the MD simulations; the in vitro experiments showed incompetent trimeric CNGA3 subunit assembly consistent with abnormal biogenesis of in vivo channels. These newly characterized large animal models not only provide a valuable system for studying cone-specific CNG channel function in health and disease, but also represent prime candidates for proof-of-concept studies of CNGA3 gene replacement therapy for ACHM patients.

  10. A channelopathy contributes to cerebellar dysfunction in a model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Shannon D; Cheng, Xiaoyang; Gasser, Andreas; Saab, Carl Y; Tyrrell, Lynda; Eastman, Emmanuella M; Iwata, Masashi; Zwinger, Pamela J; Black, Joel A; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-02-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS) contributes significantly to disability, is relatively refractory to symptomatic therapy, and often progresses despite treatment with disease-modifying agents. We previously observed that sodium channel Nav1.8, whose expression is normally restricted to the peripheral nervous system, is present in cerebellar Purkinje neurons in a mouse model of MS (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis [EAE]) and in humans with MS. Here, we tested the hypothesis that upregulation of Nav1.8 in cerebellum in MS and EAE has functional consequences contributing to symptom burden. Electrophysiology and behavioral assessment were performed in a new transgenic mouse model overexpressing Nav1.8 in Purkinje neurons. We also measured EAE symptom progression in mice lacking Nav1.8 compared to wild-type littermates. Finally, we administered the Nav1.8-selective blocker A803467 in the context of previously established EAE to determine reversibility of MS-like deficits. We report that, in the context of an otherwise healthy nervous system, ectopic expression of Nav1.8 in Purkinje neurons alters their electrophysiological properties, and disrupts coordinated motor behaviors. Additionally, we show that Nav1.8 expression contributes to symptom development in EAE. Finally, we demonstrate that abnormal patterns of Purkinje neuron firing and MS-like deficits in EAE can be partially reversed by pharmacotherapy using a Nav1.8-selective blocker. Our results add to the evidence that a channelopathy contributes to cerebellar dysfunction in MS. Our data suggest that Nav1.8-specific blockers, when available for humans, merit study in MS. Copyright © 2012 American Neurological Association.

  11. Genetic purgatory and the cardiac channelopathies: Exposing the variants of uncertain/unknown significance issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Merriam-Webster's online dictionary defines purgatory as "an intermediate state after death for expiatory purification" or more specifically as "a place or state of punishment wherein according to Roman Catholic doctrine the souls of those who die in God׳s grace may make satisfaction for past sins and so become fit for heaven." Alternatively, it is defined as "a place or state of temporary suffering or misery." Either way, purgatory is a place where you are stuck, and you don't want to be stuck there. It is in this context that the term genetic purgatory is introduced. Genetic purgatory is a place where the genetic test-ordering physician and patients and their families are stuck when a variant of uncertain/unknown significance (VUS) has been elucidated. It is in this dark place where suffering and misery are occurring because of unenlightened handling of a VUS, which includes using the VUS for predictive genetic testing and making radical treatment recommendations based on the presence or absence of a so-called maybe mutation. Before one can escape from this miserable place, one must first recognize that one is stuck there. Hence, the purpose of this review article is to fully expose the VUS issue as it relates to the cardiac channelopathies and make the cardiologists/geneticists/genetic counselors who order such genetic tests believers in genetic purgatory. Only then can one meaningfully attempt to get out of that place and seek to promote a VUS to disease-causative mutation status or demote it to an utterly innocuous and irrelevant variant. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. MLC1 protein: a likely link between leukodystrophies and brain channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stefania eBrignone

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Megalencephalic leukoencephalopathy with subcortical cysts (MLC disease is a rare inherited, autosomal recessive form of childhood-onset spongiform leukodystrophy characterized by macrocephaly, deterioration of motor functions, epileptic seizures and mental decline. Brain edema, subcortical fluid cysts, myelin and astrocyte vacuolation are the histopathological hallmarks of MLC. Mutations in either the MLC1 gene (>75% of patients or the GlialCAM gene (<20% of patients are responsible for the disease. Recently, the GlialCAM adhesion protein was found essential for the membrane expression and function of the chloride channel ClC-2 indicating MLC disease caused by mutation in GlialCAM as the first channelopathy among leukodystrophies.. These results may explain the phenotypic convergence of ClC-2 KO mice showing brain edema and myelin vacuolation and human MLC pathology, despite mutations in the ClC-2 gene were not found in patients affected by this leukodystrophy. On the contrary, the function of MLC1 protein, which binds GlialCAM, its functional relationship with ClC-2 and the molecular mechanisms underlying MLC1 mutation-induced functional defects are not fully understood yet. The human MLC1 gene encodes a 377-amino acid membrane protein with eight predicted transmembrane domains which shows very low homology with voltage-dependent potassium K+ channel subunits. The high expression of MLC1 in brain astrocytes contacting blood vessels and meninges and brain alterations observed in MLC patients have led to hypothesize a role for MLC1 in the regulation of ion and water homeostasis. Recent studies have shown that MLC1 establishes structural and/or functional interactions with several ion/water channels and transporters and ion channel accessory proteins, and that these interactions are affected by MLC1 mutations causing MLC. Here, we review data on MLC1 functional properties obtained in in vitro and in vivo models and discuss evidence linking the

  13. Cancer as a channelopathy: ion channels and pumps in tumor development and progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa eLitan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that ion channels and pumps not only regulate membrane potential, ion homeostasis, and electric signaling in excitable cells but also play important roles in cell proliferation, migration, apoptosis and differentiation. Consistent with a role in cell signaling, channel proteins and ion pumps can form macromolecular complexes with growth factors, and cell adhesion and other signaling molecules. And while cancer is still not being catalogued as a channelopathy, as the non-traditional roles of ion pumps and channels are being recognized, it is increasingly being suggested that ion channels and ion pumps contribute to cancer progression. Cancer cell migration requires the regulation of adhesion complexes between migrating cells and surrounding extracellular matrix proteins. Cell movement along solid surfaces requires a sequence of cell protrusions and retraction that mainly depends on regulation of the actin cytoskeleton along with contribution of microtubules and molecular motor proteins such as mysoin. This process is triggered and modulated by a combination of environmental signals, which are sensed and integrated by membrane receptors, including integrins and cadherins. Membrane receptors transduce these signals into downstream signaling pathways, often involving the Rho GTPase protein family. These pathways regulate the cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for proper timing of adhesion, contraction and detachment of cells in order to find their way through extracellular spaces. Migration and adhesion involve continuous modulation of cell motility, shape and volume, in which ion channels and pumps play major roles. Research on cancer cells suggests that certain ion channels may be involved in aberrant tumor growth and channel inhibitors often lead to growth arrest. This review will describe recent research into the role of ion pumps and ion channels in cell migration and adhesion, and how they may contribute to

  14. Minireview: potassium channels and aldosterone dysregulation: is primary aldosteronism a potassium channelopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Oki, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism is the most common form of secondary hypertension and has significant cardiovascular consequences. Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs) are responsible for half the cases of primary aldosteronism, and about half have mutations of the G protein-activated inward rectifying potassium channel Kir3.4. Under basal conditions, the adrenal zona glomerulosa cells are hyperpolarized with negative resting potentials determined by membrane permeability to K(+) mediated through various K(+) channels, including the leak K(+) channels TASK-1, TASK-3, and Twik-Related Potassium Channel 1, and G protein inward rectifying potassium channel Kir3.4. Angiotensin II decreases the activity of the leak K(+) channels and Kir3.4 channel and decreases the expression of the Kir3.4 channel, resulting in membrane depolarization, increased intracellular calcium, calcium-calmodulin pathway activation, and increased expression of cytochrome P450 aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2), the last enzyme for aldosterone production. Somatic mutations of the selectivity filter of the Kir3.4 channel in APA results in loss of selectivity for K(+) and entry of sodium, resulting in membrane depolarization, calcium mobilization, increased CYP11B2 expression, and hyperaldosteronism. Germ cell mutations cause familial hyperaldosteronism type 3, which is associated with adrenal zona glomerulosa hyperplasia, rather than adenoma. Less commonly, somatic mutations of the sodium-potassium ATPase, calcium ATPase, or the calcium channel calcium channel voltage-dependent L type alpha 1D have been found in some APAs. The regulation of aldosterone secretion is exerted to a significant degree by activation of membrane K(+) and calcium channels or pumps, so it is not surprising that the known causes of disorders of aldosterone secretion in APA have been channelopathies, which activate mechanisms that increase aldosterone synthesis.

  15. Imaging alterations in skeletal muscle channelopathies: a study in 15 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Lorenzo; Brugnoni, Raffaella; Canioni, Eleonora; Maccagnano, Elio; Bernasconi, Pia; Morandi, Lucia

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle channelopathies (SMC), including non dystrophic myotonias (NDM) and periodic paralyses (PP), are characterized by considerable clinical overlap and clinical features not always allow addressing molecular diagnosis. Muscle imaging has been shown to be useful for differential diagnosis in neuromuscular disorders, however it has been relatively poorly investigated in SMC. We studied 15 patients affected by genetically confirmed SMC (NDM = 9, PP = 6) through muscle MRI or CT of thighs and legs, including 11 patients mutated in SCN4A gene, 2 in CACNA1S and 2 in CLCN1. Mean age at muscle imaging was 45.2 ± 18 years (range 22-70). Overall, fatty infiltration was found in thigh muscles in 8 (53%) patients and in leg muscles in 10 (60%). All patients mutated in CLCN1 and CACNA1S had abnormal thigh and/or leg muscle MRI, regardless the disease duration. On the contrary normal thigh and leg muscle MRI or CT scans were observed in 4/15 (27%) patients, all mutated in SCN4A. Variable degrees of fatty changes were found in patients mutated in SCN4A, CACNA1S and CLCN1. No differences on overall score of fatty infiltration were detected between NDM and PP (p-value = 0.953) neither between presence or absence of permanent weakness (p-value = 0.951). Our data confirm the presence of muscle fatty changes in the majority of SMC patients, although without any specific pattern of involvement. However muscle MRI may be a useful tool for longitudinal follow-up of SMC patients, in particular to evaluate the occurrence and the progression of fixed myopathy.

  16. Familial gain-of-function Nav1.9 mutation in a painful channelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chongyang; Yang, Yang; Te Morsche, Rene H; Drenth, Joost P H; Politei, Juan M; Waxman, Stephen G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D

    2017-03-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in Nav1.9 have been identified in three families with rare heritable pain disorders, and in patients with painful small-fibre neuropathy. Identification and functional assessment of new Nav1.9 mutations will help to elucidate the phenotypic spectrum of Nav1.9 channelopathies. Patients from a large family with early-onset pain symptoms were evaluated by clinical examination and genomic screening for mutations in SCN9A and SCN11A. Electrophysiological recordings and multistate modelling analysis were implemented for functional analyses. A novel Nav1.9 mutation, p.Arg222His, was identified in patients with early-onset pain in distal extremities including joints and gastrointestinal disturbances, but was absent from an asymptomatic blood relative. This mutation alters channel structure by substituting the highly conserved first arginine residue in transmembrane segment 4 (domain 1), the voltage sensor, with histidine. Voltage-clamp recordings demonstrate a hyperpolarising shift and acceleration of activation of the p.Arg222His mutant channel, which make it easier to open the channel. When expressed in dorsal root ganglion neurons, mutant p.Arg222His channels increase excitability via a depolarisation of resting potential and increased evoked firing. This study expands the spectrum of heritable pain disorders linked to gain-of-function mutations in Nav1.9, strengthening human validation of this channel as a potential therapeutic target for pain. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Ro-vibrational excitation of an organic molecule (HCN) in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Bruderer, Simon; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) Organic molecules are important constituents of protoplanetary disks. Their ro-vibrational lines observed in the near- and mid-infrared are commonly detected toward T Tauri disks. These lines are the only way to probe the chemistry in the inner few au where terrestrial planets form. To understand this chemistry, accurate molecular abundances have to be determined. This is complicated by excitation effects. Most analyses so far have made the assumption of local thermal equilibrium (LTE). Starting from estimates for the collisional rate coefficients of HCN, non-LTE slab models of the HCN emission were calculated to study the importance of different excitation mechanisms. Using a new radiative transfer model, the HCN emission from a full two-dimensional disk was then modeled to study the effect of the non-LTE excitation, together with the line formation. We ran models tailored to the T Tauri disk AS 205 (N) where HCN lines in both the 3 {\\mu}m and 14 {\\mu}m bands have been observed by VLT-CRIRES and t...

  18. Extended HCN and HCO$^{+}$ emission in the starburst galaxy M82

    CERN Document Server

    Salas, Pedro; Salter, Demerese; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Bolatto, Alberto D; Kepley, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    We mapped 3 mm continuum and line emission from the starburst galaxy M82 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We targeted the HCN, HCO$^{+}$, HNC, CS and HC$_{3}$N lines, but here we focus on the HCN and HCO$^{+}$ emission. The map covers a field of 1.2' with a ~5" resolution. The HCN and HCO$^{+}$ observations are combined with single dish images. The molecular gas in M82 had been previously found to be distributed in a molecular disk, coincident with the central starburst, and a galactic scale outflow which originates in the central starburst. With the new short spacings-corrected maps we derive some of the properties of the dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. From the HCN and HCO$^{+}$ J=(1-0) line emission, and under the assumptions of the gas being optically thin and in local thermodynamic equilibrium, we place lower limits to the amount of dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. The lower limits are $7\\times10^{6}$ $M_{\\odot}$ and $21\\times10^{6}$ $M_{\\...

  19. Descriptor‐Based Analysis Applied to HCN Synthesis from NH3 and CH4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabow, Lars C.; Studt, Felix; Abild‐Pedersen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    A trendy volcano: By the example of HCN synthesis from NH3 and CH4, it is demonstrated how scaling relations for intermediates and transition states provide a basis for the prediction of trends in heterogeneous catalysis (see logarithmic turnover frequency, TOF). These trends include not only the...

  20. Electron-impact rotational and hyperfine excitation of HCN, HNC, DCN and DNC

    CERN Document Server

    Faure, A; Stoecklin, T; Tennyson, J

    2007-01-01

    Rotational excitation of isotopologues of HCN and HNC by thermal electron-impact is studied using the molecular {\\bf R}-matrix method combined with the adiabatic-nuclei-rotation (ANR) approximation. Rate coefficients are obtained for electron temperatures in the range 5$-$6000 K and for transitions among all levels up to J=8. Hyperfine rates are also derived using the infinite-order-sudden (IOS) scaling method. It is shown that the dominant rotational transitions are dipole allowed, that is those for which $\\Delta J=1$. The hyperfine propensity rule $\\Delta J=\\Delta F$ is found to be stronger than in the case of He$-$HCN collisions. For dipole allowed transitions, electron-impact rates are shown to exceed those for excitation of HCN by He atoms by 6 orders of magnitude. As a result, the present rates should be included in any detailed population model of isotopologues of HCN and HNC in sources where the electron fraction is larger than 10$^{-6}$, for example in interstellar shocks and comets.

  1. Electron-impact rotational and hyperfine excitation of HCN, HNC, DCN and DNC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Alexandre; Varambhia, Hemal N.; Stoecklin, Thierry; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2007-12-01

    Rotational excitation of isotopologues of HCN and HNC by thermal electron-impact is studied using the molecular R-matrix method combined with the adiabatic-nuclei-rotation approximation. Rate coefficients are obtained for electron temperatures in the range 5-6000 K and for transitions among all levels up to J = 8. Hyperfine rates are also derived using the infinite-order-sudden scaling method. It is shown that the dominant rotational transitions are dipole-allowed, that is, those for which ΔJ = 1. The hyperfine propensity rule ΔJ = ΔF is found to be stronger than that in the case of He-HCN collisions. For dipole-allowed transitions, electron-impact rates are shown to exceed those for excitation of HCN by He atoms by six orders of magnitude. As a result, the present rates should be included in any detailed population model of isotopologues of HCN and HNC in sources where the electron fraction is larger than 10-6, for example, in interstellar shocks and comets.

  2. HCN(1-0) enhancement in the bar of NGC 2903

    CERN Document Server

    Leon, S; Pérez-Ramírez, D; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Lee, S W; Flaquer, B Ocana

    2008-01-01

    We have mapped the \\hcn emission from two spiral galaxies, NGC2903 and NGC3504 to study the gas properties in the bars. The HCN(1-0) emission is detected in the center and along the bar of NGC2903. The line ratio HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) ranges from 0.07 to 0.12 with the lowest value in the center. The enhancement of HCN(1-0) emission along the bar indicates a higher fraction of dense molecular gas in the bar than at the center. The mass of dense molecular gas in the center (2.2x 10^7 Msun) is about 6 times lower than that in the bar (1.2x 10^8 Msun). The total star formation rate (SFR) is estimated to be 1.4 Msun/yr, where the SFR at the center is 1.9 times higher than that in the bar. The time scale of consumption of the dense molecular gas in the center is about 3x 10^7 yr which is much shorter than that in the bar of about 2 to 10 x 10^8 yr. The dynamical time scale of inflow of the gas from the bar to the center is shorter than the consumption time scale in the bar, which suggests that the star formation (SF) ac...

  3. The Excitation of HCN and HCO+ in the Galactic Center Circumnuclear Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, Elisabeth A C; Torres, Miguel A Requena; Morris, Mark R

    2013-01-01

    We present new observations of HCN and HCO+in the circumnuclear disk (CND) of the Galaxy, obtained with the APEX telescope. We have mapped emission in rotational lines of HCN J = 3-2, 4-3, and 8-7, as well as HCO+ J = 3-2, 4-3, and 9-8. We also present spectra of H13CN and H13CO+ toward four positions in the CND. Using the intensities of all of these lines, we present an excitation analysis for each molecule using the non-LTE radiative transfer code RADEX. The HCN line intensities toward the northern emission peak of the CND yield log densities (cm^-3) of 5.6 +0.6/-0.6, consistent with those measured with HCO+, as well as with densities recently reported for this region from an excitation analysis of highly-excited lines of CO. These densities are too low for the gas to be tidally stable. The HCN line intensities toward the CND's southern emission peak yield log densities of 6.5 +0.5/-0.7, higher than densities determined for this part of the CND with CO (although the densities measured with HCO+, log [n] = 5...

  4. THE HCN/HNC ABUNDANCE RATIO TOWARD DIFFERENT EVOLUTIONARY PHASES OF MASSIVE STAR FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Mihwa; Lee, Jeong-Eun [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kee-Tae, E-mail: mihwajin.sf@gmail.com, E-mail: jeongeun.lee@khu.ac.kr, E-mail: ktkim@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-20

    Using the H{sup 13}CN and HN{sup 13}C J = 1–0 line observations, the abundance ratio of HCN/HNC has been estimated for different evolutionary stages of massive star formation: infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), and ultracompact H ii regions (UCH iis). IRDCs were divided into “quiescent IRDC cores (qIRDCc)” and “active IRDC cores (aIRDCc),” depending on star formation activity. The HCN/HNC ratio is known to be higher at active and high temperature regions related to ongoing star formation, compared to cold and quiescent regions. Our observations toward 8 qIRDCc, 16 aIRDCc, 23 HMPOs, and 31 UCH iis show consistent results; the ratio is 0.97 (±0.10), 2.65 (±0.88), 4.17 (±1.03), and 8.96 (±3.32) in these respective evolutionary stages, increasing from qIRDCc to UCH iis. The change of the HCN/HNC abundance ratio, therefore, seems directly associated with the evolutionary stages of star formation, which have different temperatures. One suggested explanation for this trend is the conversion of HNC to HCN, which occurs effectively at higher temperatures. To test the explanation, we performed a simple chemical model calculation. In order to fit the observed results, the energy barrier of the conversion must be much lower than the value provided by theoretical calculations.

  5. Ab initio potential-energy surface and rovibrational states of the HCN-HCl complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avoird, A. van der; Pedersen, T.B.; Dhont, G.S.F.; Fernandez, B.; Koch, H.

    2006-01-01

    A four-dimensional intermolecular potential-energy surface has been calculated for the HCN-HCl complex, with the use of the coupled cluster method with single and double excitations and noniterative inclusion of triples. Data for more than 13 000 geometries were represented by an angular expansion i

  6. Hallmarks of the channelopathies associated with L-type calcium channels: a focus on the Timothy mutations in Ca(v)1.2 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidaud, Isabelle; Lory, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Within the voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav channels) family, there are four genes coding for the L-type Cav channels (Cav1). The Cav1 channels underly many important physiological functions like excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, neuronal excitability and gene transcription. Mutations found in the genes encoding the Cav channels define a wide variety of diseases called calcium channelopathies and all four genes coding the Cav1 channels are carrying such mutations. L-type calcium channelopathies include muscular, neurological, cardiac and vision syndromes. Among them, the Timothy syndrome (TS) is linked to missense mutations in CACNA1C, the gene that encodes the Ca(v)1.2 subunit. Here we review the important features of the Cav1 channelopathies. We also report on the specific properties of TS-Ca(v)1.2 channels, which display non-inactivating calcium current as well as higher plasma membrane expression. Overall, we conclude that both electrophysiological and surface expression properties must be investigated to better account for the functional consequences of mutations linked to calcium channelopathies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Ataxia and myoclonic epilepsy due to a heterozygous new mutation in KCNA2: proposal for a new channelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, S D J; Coimbra, R L M

    2015-02-01

    We have recently performed exome analysis in a 7 year boy who presented in infancy with an encephalopathy characterized by ataxia and myoclonic epilepsy. Parents were not consanguineous and there was no family history of the disease. Exome analysis did not show any pathogenic variants in genes known to be associated with seizures and/or ataxia in children, including all known human channelopathies. However, we have identified a mutation in KCNA2 that we believe to be responsible for the disease in our patient. This gene, which encodes a member of the potassium channel, voltage-gated, shaker-related subfamily, has not been previously described as a cause of disease in humans, but mutations of the orthologous gene in mice (Kcna2) are known to cause both ataxia and convulsions. The mutation is c.890C>A, leading to the amino acid substitution p.Arg297Gln, which involves the second of the critical arginines in the S4 voltage sensor. This mutation is characterized as pathogenic by five different prediction programs. RFLP analysis and Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of the mutation in the patient, but not in his parents, characterizing it as de novo. We believe that this discovery characterizes a new channelopathy. © 2014 John Wiley | Clinical Exome Genome Reports.

  8. Surgical cardiac denervation therapy for treatment of congenital ion channelopathies in pediatric patients: a contemporary, single institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, John P; Wilson, Jennifer K; Louis, Clauden; Peer, Syed M; Zurakowski, David; Nadler, Evan P; Qureshi, Faisal G; Jonas, Richard A; Greene, E Anne; Berul, Charles I; Moak, Jeffrey P; Nath, Dilip S

    2015-01-01

    Congenital ion channel disorders, including congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS), cause significant morbidity in pediatric patients. When medication therapy does not control symptoms or arrhythmias, more invasive treatment strategies may be necessary. This study examines our institution's clinical experience with surgical cardiac denervation therapy for management of these arrhythmogenic disorders in children. An institutional review board-approved retrospective review identified ten pediatric patients with congenital ion channelopathies who underwent surgical cardiac denervation therapy at a single institution between May 2011 and April 2014. Eight patients had a diagnosis of congenital LQTS, two patients were diagnosed with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). All patients underwent sympathectomy and partial stellate ganglionectomy via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Six of the ten patients had documented ventricular arrhythmias preoperatively, and 70% of the patients had preoperative syncope. The corrected QT interval decreased in 75% of patients with LQTS following sympathectomy. Postoperative arrhythmogenic symptoms were absent in 88% of congenital LQTS patients, but both patients with CPVT continued to have symptoms throughout the duration of follow-up. All patients were alive after a median follow-up period of 10 months. Surgical cardiac denervation therapy via VATS is a useful treatment strategy for congenital LQTS patients who fail medical management, and its potential benefit in the management of CPVT is unclear. A prospective comparison of the efficacy of surgical cardiac denervation therapy and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator use in congenital ion channelopathies is timely and crucial. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Research Progress on Pace-making Gene HCN4 of Sinoatrial Node Cells%窦房结细胞起搏基因HCN4的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王妮娜

    2011-01-01

    HCN即超级化激活的环核苷酸门控阳离子通道,其激活后产生的If/Ih离子流是窦房结起搏细胞动作电位正常形成的分子基础.随着对窦房结细胞起搏机制和HCN基因家族研究的不断深入,人们对HCN亚型HCN4的结构、分布、特性已有了较深入的了解.近年来有较多研究表明,人窦房结起搏基因HCN4突变与病态窦房结综合征密切相关.现就窦房结细胞起搏基因HCN4的特性及其与窦房结功能之间的关系作进一步研究和探讨.%Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, also called HCN , is activated to release If/Ih currents that underlie the molecular mechanisms of action potential in sinoatrial node ( SAN)pace-making cells. The further investigations into the pace-making of SAN and HCN gene family allows the understanding of the structure, distribution, and property of HCN subtype 4 ( HCN4 ). Recent studies show that human SAN pace-making gene HCN4 mutations are closely associated with sick sinus syndrome. This article mainly reviews the features of SAN pace-making gene HCN4 in relation to SAN function.

  10. Calcium regulation of HCN channels supports persistent activity in a multiscale model of neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymotin, S A; McDougal, R A; Bulanova, A S; Zeki, M; Lakatos, P; Terman, D; Hines, M L; Lytton, W W

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal persistent activity has been primarily assessed in terms of electrical mechanisms, without attention to the complex array of molecular events that also control cell excitability. We developed a multiscale neocortical model proceeding from the molecular to the network level to assess the contributions of calcium (Ca(2+)) regulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in providing additional and complementary support of continuing activation in the network. The network contained 776 compartmental neurons arranged in the cortical layers, connected using synapses containing AMPA/NMDA/GABAA/GABAB receptors. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) produced inositol triphosphate (IP3) which caused the release of Ca(2+) from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores, with reuptake by sarco/ER Ca(2+)-ATP-ase pumps (SERCA), and influence on HCN channels. Stimulus-induced depolarization led to Ca(2+) influx via NMDA and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs). After a delay, mGluR activation led to ER Ca(2+) release via IP3 receptors. These factors increased HCN channel conductance and produced firing lasting for ∼1min. The model displayed inter-scale synergies among synaptic weights, excitation/inhibition balance, firing rates, membrane depolarization, Ca(2+) levels, regulation of HCN channels, and induction of persistent activity. The interaction between inhibition and Ca(2+) at the HCN channel nexus determined a limited range of inhibition strengths for which intracellular Ca(2+) could prepare population-specific persistent activity. Interactions between metabotropic and ionotropic inputs to the neuron demonstrated how multiple pathways could contribute in a complementary manner to persistent activity. Such redundancy and complementarity via multiple pathways is a critical feature of biological systems. Mediation of activation at different time scales, and through different pathways, would be expected to protect against disruption, in

  11. Identification of the molecular site of ivabradine binding to HCN4 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Bucchi

    Full Text Available Ivabradine is a specific heart rate-reducing agent approved as a treatment of chronic stable angina. Its mode of action involves a selective and specific block of HCN channels, the molecular components of sinoatrial "funny" (f-channels. Different studies suggest that the binding site of ivabradine is located in the inner vestibule of HCN channels, but the molecular details of ivabradine binding are unknown. We thus sought to investigate by mutagenesis and in silico analysis which residues of the HCN4 channel, the HCN isoform expressed in the sinoatrial node, are involved in the binding of ivabradine. Using homology modeling, we verified the presence of an inner cavity below the channel pore and identified residues lining the cavity; these residues were replaced with alanine (or valine either alone or in combination, and WT and mutant channels were expressed in HEK293 cells. Comparison of the block efficiency of mutant vs WT channels, measured by patch-clamp, revealed that residues Y506, F509 and I510 are involved in ivabradine binding. For each mutant channel, docking simulations correctly explain the reduced block efficiency in terms of proportionally reduced affinity for ivabradine binding. In summary our study shows that ivabradine occupies a cavity below the channel pore, and identifies specific residues facing this cavity that interact and stabilize the ivabradine molecule. This study provides an interpretation of known properties of f/HCN4 channel block by ivabradine such as the "open channel block", the current-dependence of block and the property of "trapping" of drug molecules in the closed configuration.

  12. Detection of HCN, HCO+ and HNC in the Mrk231 molecular outflow - Dense molecular gas in the AGN wind

    CERN Document Server

    Aalto, S; Muller, S; Winters, J M; van der Werf, P; Henkel, C; Costagliola, F; Neri, R

    2011-01-01

    We detect luminous emission from HCN, HCO+ and HNC 1--0 in the QSO ULIRG Mrk~231 with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 1."55 by 1."28 resolution. All three lines show broad line wings - which are particularly prominent for HCN. Velocities are found to be similar (750 km/s) to those found for CO 1-0. This is the first time bright HCN, HCO+ and HNC emission has been detected in a large-scale galactic outflow. We find that both the blue- and red-shifted line wings are spatially extended by at least 0."75 (700 pc) in a north-south direction. The line wings are brighter (relative to the line center intensity) in HCN than in CO 1-0 and line ratios suggest that the molecular outflow consists of dense (n>10E4 cmE-3) and clumpy gas with a high HCN abundance X(HCN)>10E-8. These properties are consistent with the molecular gas being compressed and fragmented by shocks in the outflow. Alternatively, HCN is instead pumped by mid-IR continuum, but we propose that this effect is not strong for the spatially extend...

  13. Use of Rats Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modified with mHCN2 Gene to Create Biologic Pacemakers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马金; 张存泰; 黄深; 王国强; 全小庆

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of rats mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified with murine hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated 2 (mHCN2) gene as biological pacemakers in vitro was studied. The cultured MSCs were transfected with pIRES2-EGFP plasmid carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene and mHCN2 gene. The identification using restriction enzyme and sequencing indicated that the mHCN2 gene was inserted to the pIRES2-EGFP. Green fluorescence could be seen in MSCs after transfection for 24-48...

  14. In situ measurements of HCN and CH3CN over the Pacific Ocean: Sources, sinks, and budgets

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, H. B.; Salas, B.; Herlth, D; Kolyer, R.; Czech, E.; Viezee, W.; Q. Li; Jacob, Daniel James; Blake, D.; Sachse, Glen; Harward, C; H. Fuelberg; Kiley, C; Zhao, Y.; Kondo, Yasuyuki

    2003-01-01

    We report the first in situ measurements of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and methyl cyanide (CH3CN, acetonitrile) from the Pacific troposphere (0–12 km) obtained during the NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) airborne mission (February–April 2001). Mean HCN and CH3CN mixing ratios of 243 ± 118 (median 218) ppt and 149 ± 56 (median 138) ppt, respectively, were measured. These in situ observations correspond to a mean tropospheric HCN column of 4.2 × 1015 molecules cm−2 a...

  15. Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy associated with a high voltage gated calcium channelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardson, Simon; Oz, Shimrit; Abulhijaa, Fida Aziz; Taher, Flora Barghouthi; Shaag, Avraham; Zenvirt, Shamir; Dascal, Nathan; Elpeleg, Orly

    2013-02-01

    Early infantile epileptic encephalopathies usually manifest as severely impaired cognitive and motor development and often result in a devastating permanent global developmental delay and intellectual disability. A large set of genes has been implicated in the aetiology of this heterogeneous group of disorders. Among these, the ion channelopathies play a prominent role. In this study, we investigated the genetic cause of infantile epilepsy in three affected siblings. Homozygosity mapping in DNA samples followed by exome analysis in one of the patients resulted in the identification of a homozygous mutation, p.L1040P, in the CACNA2D2 gene. This gene encodes the auxiliary α(2)δ2 subunit of high voltage gated calcium channels. The expression of the α(2)δ2-L1040P mutant instead of α(2)δ2 wild-type (WT) in Xenopus laevis oocytes was associated with a notable reduction of current density of both N (Ca(V)2.2) and L (Ca(V)1.2) type calcium channels. Western blot and confocal imaging analyses showed that the α(2)δ2-L1040P mutant was synthesised normally in oocyte but only the α(2)δ2-WT, and not the α(2)δ2-L1040P mutant, increased the expression of α(1B), the pore forming subunit of Ca(V)2.2, at the plasma membrane. The expression of α(2)δ2-WT with Ca(V)2.2 increased the surface expression of α(1B) 2.5-3 fold and accelerated current inactivation, whereas α(2)δ2-L1040P did not produce any of these effects. L1040P mutation in the CACNA2D2 gene is associated with dysfunction of α(2)δ2, resulting in reduced current density and slow inactivation in neuronal calcium channels. The prolonged calcium entry during depolarisation and changes in surface density of calcium channels caused by deficient α(2)δ2 could underlie the epileptic phenotype. This is the first report of an encephalopathy caused by mutation in the auxiliary α(2)δ subunit of high voltage gated calcium channels in humans, illustrating the importance of this subunit in normal physiology of the

  16. Gene mutations in cardiac arrhythmias: a review of recent evidence in ion channelopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao PY

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pi-Yin Hsiao,1 Hui-Chun Tien,2 Chu-Pin Lo,2 Jyh-Ming Jimmy Juang,3 Yi-Hsin Wang,2 Ruey J Sung41Institute of Life Sciences, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 2Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Taichung, Taiwan; 3Cardiovascular Center and Department of Cardiology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USAAbstract: Over the past 15 years, molecular genetic studies have linked gene mutations to many inherited arrhythmogenic disorders, in particular, "ion channelopathies", in which mutations in genes encode functional units of ion channels and/or their transporter-associated proteins in patients without primary cardiac structural abnormalities. These disorders are exemplified by congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS, short QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome (BrS and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT. Functional and pathophysiological studies have led to better understanding of the clinical spectrum, ion channel structures and cellular electrophysiology involving dynamics of intracellular calcium cycling in many subtypes of these disorders and more importantly, development of potentially more effective pharmacological agents and even curative gene therapy. In this review, we have summarized (1 the significance of unveiling mutations in genes encoding transporter-associated proteins as the cause of congenital LQTS, (2 the technique of catheter ablation applied at the right ventricular outflow tract may be curative for severely symptomatic BrS, (3 mutations with channel function modulated by protein Kinase A-dependent phosphorylation can be the culprit of CPVT mimicry in Andersen-Tawil syndrome (LQT7, (4 ablation of the ion channel anchoring protein may prevent arrhythmogenesis in Timothy syndrome (LQT8, (5 altered intracellular Ca2+ cycling can be the basis of effective targeted

  17. Phase field modeling of dendrite growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutuo ZHANG; Chengzhi WANG; Dianzhong LI; Yiyi LI

    2009-01-01

    Single dendrite and multi-dendrite growth for A1-2 mol pct Si alloy during isothermal solidification are simulated by phase field method. In the case of single equiaxed dendrite growth, the secondary and the necking phenomenon can be observed. For multi-dendrite growth, there exists the competitive growth among the dendrites dur-ing solidification. As solidification proceeds, growing and coarsening of the primary arms occurs, together with the branching and coarsening of the secondary arms.When the diffusion fields of dendrite tips come into contact with those of the branches growing from the neighboring dendrites, the dendrites stop growing and being to ripen and thicken.

  18. Effect of Non-specific HCN1 Blocker CsCl on Spatial Learning and Memory in Mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xin; GUO Lianjun; YIN Guangfu; ZONG Xiangang; AI Yongxun

    2006-01-01

    It has been suggested that HCN1 is primarily expressed in hippocampus, however little is known about its effects on spatial learning and memory. In the present study, we investigated the effects of non-specific HCN1 blocker CsCl on spatial learning and memory by using Morris water maze and in situ hybridization in mice. The results showed CsCl 160 mg/kg ip for 4 days, and the mean escape latency was 34 s longer than that of normal control (P<0.01). In hippocampal tissues, staining for the HCN1 mRNA was stronger in the DG and CA1 region of the hippocampus (P <0.05, P<0.05, when CsCl-administration group was compared with normal group). Our results suggested that CsCl could significantly affect the spatial learning and memory in mice, and HCN channel is involved in the process of learning and memory.

  19. Multiple-quantum HCN-CCH-TOCSY experiment for 13C/15N labeled RNA oligonucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Weidong; Jiang Licong [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (United States)

    1999-12-15

    A multiple-quantum 3D HCN-CCH-TOCSY experiment is presented for the assignment of RNA ribose resonances. The experiment makes use of the chemical shift dispersion of N1 of pyrimidine and N9 of purine to distinguish the ribose spin systems. It provides an alternative approach for the assignment of ribose resonances to the currently used COSY- and TOCSY-type experiments in which either {sup 13}C or {sup 1}H is utilized to distinguish the different spin systems. Compared to the single-quantum version, the sensitivity of the multiple-quantum HCN-CCH-TOCSY experiment is enhanced on average by a factor of 2 for a 23-mer RNA aptamer complexed with neomycin.

  20. Navigating the Chemical Space of HCN Polymerization and Hydrolysis: Guiding Graph Grammars by Mass Spectrometry Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F. Stadler

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Polymers of hydrogen cyanide and their hydrolysis products constitute a plausible, but still poorly understood proposal for early prebiotic chemistry on Earth. HCN polymers are generated by the interplay of more than a dozen distinctive reaction mechanisms and form a highly complex mixture. Here we use a computational model based on graph grammars as a means of exploring the chemical spaces of HCN polymerization and hydrolysis. A fundamental issue is to understand the combinatorial explosion inherent in large, complex chemical systems. We demonstrate that experimental data, here obtained by mass spectrometry, and computationally predicted free energies together can be used to guide the exploration of the chemical space and makes it feasible to investigate likely pathways and chemical motifs even in potentially open-ended chemical systems.

  1. Increased HCN channel driven inward rectification in benign cramp fasciculation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czesnik, Dirk; Howells, James; Negro, Francesco; Wagenknecht, Melanie; Hanner, Susanne; Farina, Dario; Burke, David; Paulus, Walter

    2015-11-01

    Muscle cramps are a common complaint associated with sudden painful involuntary contractions of a muscle. The mechanisms responsible for muscle cramps are still not clear. Axonal excitability and multi-unit electromyography studies were performed in 20 patients suffering from benign cramp fasciculation syndrome, not currently on medication. The measures of axonal excitability suggested greater inward rectification, indicative of an increase in Ih. Mathematical modelling suggested that the data were best explained by depolarization of the voltage dependence of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Parameters associated with polarization of resting membrane potential were not changed. These findings suggest that a role for HCN channels may become apparent during the rhythmic discharge associated with a voluntary contraction. Consistent with this view, patients had higher motor unit discharge rates than healthy controls during maximal voluntary effort.

  2. EXTENDED HCN AND HCO{sup +} EMISSION IN THE STARBURST GALAXY M82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salas, P.; Galaz, G. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicua Mackenna 4860, 782-0436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Salter, D.; Herrera-Camus, R.; Bolatto, A. D. [Department of Astronomy and Laboratory for Millimeter-Wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kepley, A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    We mapped 3 mm continuum and line emission from the starburst galaxy M82 using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. We targeted the HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, CS, and HC{sub 3}N lines, but here we focus on the HCN and HCO{sup +} emission. The map covers a field of 1.'2 with an ≈5'' resolution. The HCN and HCO{sup +} observations are short spacings corrected. The molecular gas in M82 had been previously found to be distributed in a molecular disk, coincident with the central starburst, and a galactic scale outflow which originates in the central starburst. With the new short spacings-corrected maps we derive some of the properties of the dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. From the HCN and HCO{sup +} J = (1-0) line emission, and under the assumptions of the gas being optically thin and in local thermodynamic equilibrium, we place lower limits on the amount of dense molecular gas in the base of the outflow. The lower limits are 7 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉} and 21 × 10{sup 6} M {sub ☉}, or ≳ 2% of the total molecular mass in the outflow. The kinematics and spatial distribution of the dense gas outside the central starburst suggests that it is being expelled through chimneys. Assuming a constant outflow velocity, the derived outflow rate of dense molecular gas is ≥0.3 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, which would lower the starburst lifetime by ≥5%. The energy required to expel this mass of dense gas is (1-10) × 10{sup 52} erg.

  3. Lamellar {gamma}-AlOOH architectures: Synthesis and application for the removal of HCN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou Hongwei, E-mail: houhw@ztri.com.cn [China National Tobacco Quality Supervision and Test Center, No. 2 Fengyang Street, Zhengzhou High and New Technology Industries Development Zone, Zhengzhou, 450001 (China); Zhu You [China National Tobacco Corporation Shandong Branch (China); China National Tobacco Corporation Shandong Corporation (China); Tang Gangling [China National Tobacco Quality Supervision and Test Center, No. 2 Fengyang Street, Zhengzhou High and New Technology Industries Development Zone, Zhengzhou, 450001 (China); Hu Qingyuan, E-mail: huqy@ztri.com.cn [China National Tobacco Quality Supervision and Test Center, No. 2 Fengyang Street, Zhengzhou High and New Technology Industries Development Zone, Zhengzhou, 450001 (China)

    2012-06-15

    Using hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as a structure-directing agent and precipitator, the complete synthesis of lamellar {gamma}-AlOOH architectures was successfully accomplished via a hydrothermal route. Different product structures were obtained by varying the molar ratio of aluminum nitrate and CTAB. Several techniques, including X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry thermal analysis, were used to characterize the products. The effects of CTAB concentration, reaction temperature and time, and the molar ratio of Al{sup 3+}/CTAB on the product morphologies were investigated. The nitrogen adsorption and desorption measurements indicated that the {gamma}-AlOOH architectures possess a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of approximately 75.02 m{sup 2}/g. It was also demonstrated that 10 mg {gamma}-AlOOH architectures can remove 45.3% of the HCN (1.68 {mu}g/mL) from model wastewater. When 0.03 mg/cig {gamma}-AlOOH architectures were combined with cigarette paper, 8.12% of the present HCN was adsorbed. These results indicate that lamellar {gamma}-AlOOH architectures may be a potential adsorbent for removing HCN from highly toxic pollutant solutions and harmful cigarette smoke. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) was used as a structure-directing agent and precipitator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal treatment enables growth of lamellar {gamma}-AlOOH architectures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lamellar {gamma}-AlOOH architectures were demonstrated to exhibit high BET surface area and excellent adsorptive capacity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCN in contaminated water and cigarette smoke can be effectively removed by the prepared lamellar {gamma}-AlOOH superstructures.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CIG 638 CCH, HCN. HOC and HNC spectra (Martin+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Aladro, R.; Espada, D.; Argudo-Ferandez, M.; Kramer, C.; Scott, T. C.

    2014-02-01

    IRAM 30m spectra with the FTS spectrometer towards CIG 638. The four FITS file cover the same 4GHz spectral band, but each is centered at and baselined around each of the individual spectral features at 87.317GHz (CCH 1-0), 88.630GHz (HCN 1-0), 89.188GHz (HCO+ 1-0) and 90.663GHz (HNC). (2 data files).

  5. Ketamine, propofol and the EEG: a neural field analysis of HCN1-mediated interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo eBojak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ketamine and propofol are two well-known, powerful anesthetic agents, yet at first sight this appears to be their only commonality. Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic agent, whose main mechanism of action is considered to be N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA antagonism; whereas propofol is a general anesthetic agent, which is assumed to primarily potentiate currents gated by γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA A receptors. However, several experimental observations suggest a closer relationship. First, the effect of ketamine on the electroencephalogram (EEG is markedly changed in the presence of propofol: on its own ketamine increases theta (4–8 Hz and decreases alpha (8–13 Hz oscillations, whereas ketamine induces a significant shift to beta band frequencies (13–30 Hz in the presence of propofol. Second, both ketamine and propofol cause inhibition of the inward pacemaker current Ih, by binding to the corresponding hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated potassium channel 1 (HCN1 subunit. The resulting effect is a hyperpolarization of the neuron’s resting membrane potential. Third, the ability of both ketamine and propofol to induce hypnosis is reduced in HCN1-knockout mice. Here we show that one can theoretically understand the observed spectral changes of the EEG based on HCN1-mediated hyperpolarizations alone, without involving the supposed main mechanisms of action of these drugs through NMDA and GABA A, respectively. On the basis of our successful EEG model we conclude that ketamine and propofol should be antagonistic to each other in their interaction at HCN1 subunits. Such a prediction is in accord with the results of clinical experiment in which it is found that ketamine and propofol interact in an infra-additive manner with respect to the endpoints of hypnosis and immobility.

  6. Targeted next generation sequencing application in cardiac channelopathies: Analysis of a cohort of autopsy-negative sudden unexplained deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, A; Keyser, C; Hollard, C; Raul, J S; Muller, J; Ludes, B

    2015-09-01

    Genetic testing for cardiac channelopathies in sudden unexplained death (SUD) has developed substantially over the last years. The Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology provides an unprecedented opportunity to screen for genetic variations underlying arrhythmogenic genes in a short period of time at a low cost. The present study aimed to perform genetic testing with NGS technologies on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine™ (Ion PGM™) sequencer, in targeting a total of 23 genes reported to be associated with inherited cardiac channelopathies in order to identify the possible cause of death in a cohort of post-mortem cases. The molecular analyses focused on 16 cases of SUD, aged less than 35 years old. In all cases, the cause of death could not be determined after a rigorous autopsy associated with histopathological and toxicological analyses according to the guidelines of the Association for European Cardiovascular Pathology. DNA was extracted from fresh frozen tissue. An average of 200 variants was identified per case. However, after the prioritization process using a new scoring program (VaRank) and after the conjunction of clinical data and molecular findings, four "likely pathogenic" variants (including two undescribed variants), were identified in three cases (18.75%) of our cohort in the genes KCNH2, ANK2, SCN5A and RYR2. One case, who died during psychiatric hospitalization after administration of a QT prolonging drug, showed a double "likely pathogenic" variant in Long QT genes (ANK2 and SCN5A) which may have predisposed to drug-induced cardiac arrhythmias. Our study illustrates that the NGS approach based on AmpliSeq™ libraries and Ion Torrent PGM™ sequencing may be an efficient approach, integrated to post-mortem examination. Given the massive amount of information generated by NGS, a rigorous filtration strategy of variants coupled with multidisciplinary collaboration is crucial to determine the potential pathogenic role of identified

  7. SCN4A variants and Brugada syndrome: phenotypic and genotypic overlap between cardiac and skeletal muscle sodium channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissay, Véronique; Van Malderen, Sophie C H; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Lissens, Willy; Peeters, Uschi; Daneels, Dorien; Jansen, Anna C; Pappaert, Gudrun; Brugada, Pedro; De Keyser, Jacques; Van Dooren, Sonia

    2016-03-01

    SCN5A mutations involving the α-subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated muscle sodium channel (NaV1.5) result in different cardiac channelopathies with an autosomal-dominant inheritance such as Brugada syndrome. On the other hand, mutations in SCN4A encoding the α-subunit of the skeletal voltage-gated sodium channel (NaV1.4) cause non-dystrophic myotonia and/or periodic paralysis. In this study, we investigated whether cardiac arrhythmias or channelopathies such as Brugada syndrome can be part of the clinical phenotype associated with SCN4A variants and whether patients with Brugada syndrome present with non-dystrophic myotonia or periodic paralysis and related gene mutations. We therefore screened seven families with different SCN4A variants and non-dystrophic myotonia phenotypes for Brugada syndrome and performed a neurological, neurophysiological and genetic work-up in 107 Brugada families. In the families with an SCN4A-associated non-dystrophic myotonia, three patients had a clinical diagnosis of Brugada syndrome, whereas we found a remarkably high prevalence of myotonic features involving different genes in the families with Brugada syndrome. One Brugada family carried an SCN4A variant that is predicted to probably affect function, one family suffered from a not genetically confirmed non-dystrophic myotonia, one family was diagnosed with myotonic dystrophy (DMPK gene) and one family had a Thomsen disease myotonia congenita (CLCN1 variant that affects function). Our findings and data suggest a possible involvement of SCN4A variants in the pathophysiological mechanism underlying the development of a spontaneous or drug-induced type 1 electrocardiographic pattern and the occurrence of malignant arrhythmias in some patients with Brugada syndrome.

  8. The JCMT dense gas survey in dense molecular clouds: an HCO+/HCN comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Smith, Samantha; Richer, John; Buckle, Jane; Salji, Carl; Hatchell, Jennifer; Drabek, Emily

    2013-07-01

    We present the results of a large-scale survey of the very dense molecular gas in Perseus, Orion A and B, Serpens and Ophiuchus using HCO+ and HCN (J = 4 - 3) transitions. We have used this emission to trace the structure and kinematics of gas at the extremely high densities found in pre- and protostellar cores; as well as tracing outflows powered by these early star-forming cores. We present a comparison of the HCO+/HCN data, highlighting regions where there is a marked discrepancy in the spectra of the two emission lines. This is particularly noticeable in some of the more powerful outflows driven by Class 0 sources, where the HCN is greatly enhanced in the linewings in comparison with HCO+. We also use the HCO+ to positively identify protostellar outflows and their driving sources. We present a statistical analysis of the outflow properties that we derive from this tracer. We show that our results are comparable to those obtained from similar outflow analyses using 12CO.

  9. United States Historical Climatology Network (US HCN) monthly temperature and precipitation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Boden, T.A. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Easterling, D.R.; Karl, T.R.; Mason, E.H.; Hughes, P.Y.; Bowman, D.P. [National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, NC (United States)

    1996-01-11

    This document describes a database containing monthly temperature and precipitation data for 1221 stations in the contiguous United States. This network of stations, known as the United States Historical Climatology Network (US HCN), and the resulting database were compiled by the National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina. These data represent the best available data from the United States for analyzing long-term climate trends on a regional scale. The data for most stations extend through December 31, 1994, and a majority of the station records are serially complete for at least 80 years. Unlike many data sets that have been used in past climate studies, these data have been adjusted to remove biases introduced by station moves, instrument changes, time-of-observation differences, and urbanization effects. These monthly data are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. The NDP includes this document and 27 machine-readable data files consisting of supporting data files, a descriptive file, and computer access codes. This document describes how the stations in the US HCN were selected and how the data were processed, defines limitations and restrictions of the data, describes the format and contents of the magnetic media, and provides reprints of literature that discuss the editing and adjustment techniques used in the US HCN.

  10. A novel mutation in the HCN4 gene causes symptomatic sinus bradycardia in Moroccan Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laish-Farkash, Avishag; Glikson, Michael; Brass, Dovrat; Marek-Yagel, Dina; Pras, Elon; Dascal, Nathan; Antzelevitch, Charles; Nof, Eyal; Reznik, Haya; Eldar, Michael; Luria, David

    2010-12-01

    to conduct a clinical, genetic, and functional analysis of 3 unrelated families with familial sinus bradycardia (FSB). mutations in the hyperpolarization-activated nucleotide-gated channel (HCN4) are known to be associated with FSB. three males of Moroccan Jewish descent were hospitalized: 1 survived an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and 2 presented with weakness and presyncopal events. All 3 had significant sinus bradycardia, also found in other first-degree relatives, with a segregation suggesting autosomal-dominant inheritance. All had normal response to exercise and normal heart structure. Sequencing of the HCN4 gene in all patients revealed a C to T transition at nucleotide position 1,454, which resulted in an alanine to valine change (A485V) in the ion channel pore found in most of their bradycardiac relatives, but not in 150 controls. Functional expression of the mutated ion channel in Xenopus oocytes and in human embryonic kidney 293 cells revealed profoundly reduced function and synthesis of the mutant channel compared to wild-type. we describe a new mutation in the HCN4 gene causing symptomatic FSB in 3 unrelated individuals of similar ethnic background that may indicate unexplained FSB in this ethnic group. This profound functional defect is consistent with the symptomatic phenotype.

  11. Infrared and microwave study of angular-radial coupling effects in Ar-HCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, G. T.; Pine, A. S.

    1989-09-01

    Microwave and infrared spectra of Ar-HCN have been obtained using an electric-resonance optothermal spectrometer. The microwave measurements extend to higher J the previous results of Leopold et al. and Klots et al., allowing the determination of higher-order centrifugal distortion constants for this quasilinear, highly nonrigid complex. A Padé approximant fit to the microwave data indicates a significant rotation-induced asymptotic increase in the zero-point center-of-mass separation between the Ar and the HCN, above that expected from pure radial distortion. This results from the large coupling between the angular and radial degrees in the intermolecular potential forcing the centrifugal alignment of the HCN. Infrared spectra are reported for the C-H streching fundamental ν1 and the combination band ν1+ν15, where ν5 is the van der Waals bending vibration. The band-origin difference between these two bands gives ν5=7.8 cm-1, in rough agreement with the 10 cm-1 harmonic value predicted from the microwave-determined nuclear quadrupole coupling constant. The complexation-induced red shift of the C-H stretching vibration is 2.69 cm-1 and the vibrational predissociation linewidths Γ are <10 MHz (FWHM). The vibrationally excited complex predissociates before striking the bolometer detector, implying that the predissociation lifetime τ<1 ms.

  12. An analysis of HCN observations of the Circumnuclear Disk at the galactic centre

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Ian L

    2013-01-01

    The Circumnuclear Disk (CND) is a torus of dust and molecular gas rotating about the galactic centre and extending from approximately 1.6pc to 7pc from the central massive black hole, SgrA*. Large Velocity Gradient modelling of the intensities of the HCN 1-0, 3-2 and 4-3 transitions is used to infer hydrogen density and HCN optical depth. From HCN observations we find the molecular hydrogen density ranges from 0.1 to 2 $\\times$ 10$^{6}$ cm$^{-3}$, about an order of magnitude less than inferred previously. The 1-0 line is weakly inverted with line-centre optical depth approx $-$0.1, in stark contrast to earlier estimates of 4. The estimated mass of the ring is approximately 3 $-$ 4 $\\times$ 10$^{5}$M$_{\\odot}$ consistent with estimates based on thermal dust emission. The tidal shear in the disk implies that star formation is not expected to occur without some significant triggering event.

  13. A large CO and HCN line survey of Luminous Infrared Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulos, P P; Van der Werf, P P; M"uehle, S; Isaak, K; Gao, Y; Papadopoulos, Padelis P.; Greve, Thomas R.; Werf, Paul van der; M\\"uehle, Stefanie; Isaak, Kate; Gao, Yu

    2007-01-01

    A large CO, HCN multi-transition survey of 30 Luminous Infrared Galaxies ($\\rm L_{IR}>10^{11} L_{\\odot}$) is nearing completion with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) on Mauna Kea (Hawaii), and the IRAM 30-meter telescope at Pico Veleta (Spain). The CO J=1--0, 2--1, 3--2, 4--3,6--5, $ ^{13}$CO J=2--1, HCN J=1--0, 3--2, 4--3 observations, resulting from $\\sim 250$ hours of JCMT, $\\sim 100$ hours of 30-m observing time and data from the literature constitute {\\it the largest extragalactic molecular line survey to date}, and can be used to address a wide range of issues and eventually allow the construction of reliable Spectral Line Energy Distributions (SLEDs) for the molecular gas in local starbursts. First results suggest that: a) HCN and HCO$^+$ J=1--0 line luminosities can be poor mass estimators of dense molecular gas ($\\rm n\\geq 10^4 cm^{-3}$) unless their excitation is accounted for, b) CO cooling of such gas in ULIRGs may be comparable to that of the CII line at $\\rm 158 \\mu m$, and c) low excita...

  14. A panel study on patients with dominant cerebellar ataxia highlights the frequency of channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutelier, Marie; Coarelli, Giulia; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Konop, Juliette; Davoine, Claire-Sophie; Tesson, Christelle; Valter, Rémi; Anheim, Mathieu; Behin, Anthony; Castelnovo, Giovanni; Charles, Perrine; David, Albert; Ewenczyk, Claire; Fradin, Mélanie; Goizet, Cyril; Hannequin, Didier; Labauge, Pierre; Riant, Florence; Sarda, Pierre; Sznajer, Yves; Tison, François; Ullmann, Urielle; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Mochel, Fanny; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra

    2017-06-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have a marked heterogeneous genetic background, with mutations in 34 genes identified so far. This large amount of implicated genes accounts for heterogeneous clinical presentations, making genotype-phenotype correlations a major challenge in the field. While polyglutamine ataxias, linked to CAG repeat expansions in genes such as ATXN1, ATXN2, ATXN3, ATXN7, CACNA1A and TBP, have been extensively characterized in large cohorts, there is a need for comprehensive assessment of frequency and phenotype of more 'conventional' ataxias. After exclusion of CAG/polyglutamine expansions in spinocerebellar ataxia genes in 412 index cases with dominantly inherited cerebellar ataxias, we aimed to establish the relative frequencies of mutations in other genes, with an approach combining panel sequencing and TaqMan® polymerase chain reaction assay. We found relevant genetic variants in 59 patients (14.3%). The most frequently mutated were channel genes [CACNA1A (n = 16), KCND3 (n = 4), KCNC3 (n = 2) and KCNA1 (n = 2)]. Deletions in ITPR1 (n = 11) were followed by biallelic variants in SPG7 (n = 9). Variants in AFG3L2 (n = 7) came next in frequency, and variants were rarely found in STBN2 (n = 2), ELOVL5, FGF14, STUB1 and TTBK2 (n = 1 each). Interestingly, possible risk factor variants were detected in SPG7 and POLG. Clinical comparisons showed that ataxias due to channelopathies had a significantly earlier age at onset with an average of 24.6 years, versus 40.9 years for polyglutamine expansion spinocerebellar ataxias and 37.8 years for SPG7-related forms (P = 0.001). In contrast, disease duration was significantly longer in the former (20.5 years versus 9.3 and 13.7, P=0.001), though for similar functional stages, indicating slower progression of the disease. Of interest, intellectual deficiency was more frequent in channel spinocerebellar ataxias, while cognitive impairment in adulthood was similar among the three groups. Similar

  15. Dendrite Injury Triggers DLK-Independent Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Stone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Axon injury triggers regeneration through activation of a conserved kinase cascade, which includes the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK. Although dendrites are damaged during stroke, traumatic brain injury, and seizure, it is not known whether mature neurons monitor dendrite injury and initiate regeneration. We probed the response to dendrite damage using model Drosophila neurons. Two larval neuron types regrew dendrites in distinct ways after all dendrites were removed. Dendrite regeneration was also triggered by injury in adults. Next, we tested whether dendrite injury was initiated with the same machinery as axon injury. Surprisingly, DLK, JNK, and fos were dispensable for dendrite regeneration. Moreover, this MAP kinase pathway was not activated by injury to dendrites. Thus, neurons respond to dendrite damage and initiate regeneration without using the conserved DLK cascade that triggers axon regeneration.

  16. Channelopathies in Cav1.1, Cav1.3, and Cav1.4 voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolz, Hanno Jörn; Koschak, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels couple membrane depolarization to Ca2+-dependent intracellular signaling events. This is achieved by mediating Ca2+ ion influx or by direct conformational coupling to intracellular Ca2+ release channels. The family of Cav1 channels, also termed L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs), is uniquely sensitive to organic Ca2+ channel blockers and expressed in many electrically excitable tissues. In this review, we summarize the role of LTCCs for human diseases caused by genetic Ca2+ channel defects (channelopathies). LTCC dysfunction can result from structural aberrations within their pore-forming α1 subunits causing hypokalemic periodic paralysis and malignant hyperthermia sensitivity (Cav1.1 α1), incomplete congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB2; Cav1.4 α1), and Timothy syndrome (Cav1.2 α1; reviewed separately in this issue). Cav1.3 α1 mutations have not been reported yet in humans, but channel loss of function would likely affect sinoatrial node function and hearing. Studies in mice revealed that LTCCs indirectly also contribute to neurological symptoms in Ca2+ channelopathies affecting non-LTCCs, such as Cav2.1 α1 in tottering mice. Ca2+ channelopathies provide exciting disease-related molecular detail that led to important novel insight not only into disease pathophysiology but also to mechanisms of channel function. PMID:20213496

  17. Channelopathies in Cav1.1, Cav1.3, and Cav1.4 voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striessnig, Jörg; Bolz, Hanno Jörn; Koschak, Alexandra

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels couple membrane depolarization to Ca2+-dependent intracellular signaling events. This is achieved by mediating Ca2+ ion influx or by direct conformational coupling to intracellular Ca2+ release channels. The family of Cav1 channels, also termed L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs), is uniquely sensitive to organic Ca2+ channel blockers and expressed in many electrically excitable tissues. In this review, we summarize the role of LTCCs for human diseases caused by genetic Ca2+ channel defects (channelopathies). LTCC dysfunction can result from structural aberrations within their pore-forming alpha1 subunits causing hypokalemic periodic paralysis and malignant hyperthermia sensitivity (Cav1.1 alpha1), incomplete congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB2; Cav1.4 alpha1), and Timothy syndrome (Cav1.2 alpha1; reviewed separately in this issue). Cav1.3 alpha1 mutations have not been reported yet in humans, but channel loss of function would likely affect sinoatrial node function and hearing. Studies in mice revealed that LTCCs indirectly also contribute to neurological symptoms in Ca2+ channelopathies affecting non-LTCCs, such as Cav2.1 alpha1 in tottering mice. Ca2+ channelopathies provide exciting disease-related molecular detail that led to important novel insight not only into disease pathophysiology but also to mechanisms of channel function.

  18. Optimal Current Transfer in Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Integration of synaptic currents across an extensive dendritic tree is a prerequisite for computation in the brain. Dendritic tapering away from the soma has been suggested to both equalise contributions from synapses at different locations and maximise the current transfer to the soma. To find out how this is achieved precisely, an analytical solution for the current transfer in dendrites with arbitrary taper is required. We derive here an asymptotic approximation that accurately matches results from numerical simulations. From this we then determine the diameter profile that maximises the current transfer to the soma. We find a simple quadratic form that matches diameters obtained experimentally, indicating a fundamental architectural principle of the brain that links dendritic diameters to signal transmission. PMID:27145441

  19. Electrical advantages of dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan T Gulledge

    Full Text Available Many neurons receive excitatory glutamatergic input almost exclusively onto dendritic spines. In the absence of spines, the amplitudes and kinetics of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs at the site of synaptic input are highly variable and depend on dendritic location. We hypothesized that dendritic spines standardize the local geometry at the site of synaptic input, thereby reducing location-dependent variability of local EPSP properties. We tested this hypothesis using computational models of simplified and morphologically realistic spiny neurons that allow direct comparison of EPSPs generated on spine heads with EPSPs generated on dendritic shafts at the same dendritic locations. In all morphologies tested, spines greatly reduced location-dependent variability of local EPSP amplitude and kinetics, while having minimal impact on EPSPs measured at the soma. Spine-dependent standardization of local EPSP properties persisted across a range of physiologically relevant spine neck resistances, and in models with variable neck resistances. By reducing the variability of local EPSPs, spines standardized synaptic activation of NMDA receptors and voltage-gated calcium channels. Furthermore, spines enhanced activation of NMDA receptors and facilitated the generation of NMDA spikes and axonal action potentials in response to synaptic input. Finally, we show that dynamic regulation of spine neck geometry can preserve local EPSP properties following plasticity-driven changes in synaptic strength, but is inefficient in modifying the amplitude of EPSPs in other cellular compartments. These observations suggest that one function of dendritic spines is to standardize local EPSP properties throughout the dendritic tree, thereby allowing neurons to use similar voltage-sensitive postsynaptic mechanisms at all dendritic locations.

  20. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Malarik, D. C.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of dendrites is one of the commonly observed forms of solidification encountered when metals and alloys freeze under low thermal gradients, as occurs in most casting and welding processes. In engineering alloys, the details of the dendritic morphology directly relates to important material responses and properties. Of more generic interest, dendritic growth is also an archetypical problem in morphogenesis, where a complex pattern evolves from simple starting conditions. Thus, the physical understanding and mathematical description of how dendritic patterns emerge during the growth process are of interest to both scientists and engineers. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is a basic science experiment designed to measure, for a fundamental test of theory, the kinetics and morphology of dendritic growth without complications induced by gravity-driven convection. The IDGE, a collaboration between Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in Troy NY, and NASA's Lewis Research Center (LeRC) was developed over a ten year period from a ground-based research program into a space flight experiment. Important to the success of this flight experiment was provision of in situ near-real-time teleoperations during the spaceflight experiment.

  1. Novel HCN2 mutation contributes to febrile seizures by shifting the channel's kinetics in a temperature-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nakamura

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channel-mediated currents, known as I h, are involved in the control of rhythmic activity in neuronal circuits and in determining neuronal properties including the resting membrane potential. Recent studies have shown that HCN channels play a role in seizure susceptibility and in absence and limbic epilepsy including temporal lobe epilepsy following long febrile seizures (FS. This study focused on the potential contributions of abnormalities in the HCN2 isoform and their role in FS. A novel heterozygous missense mutation in HCN2 exon 1 leading to p.S126L was identified in two unrelated patients with FS. The mutation was inherited from the mother who had suffered from FS in a pedigree. To determine the effect of this substitution we conducted whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology. We found that mutant channels had elevated sensitivity to temperature. More specifically, they displayed faster kinetics at higher temperature. Kinetic shift by change of temperature sensitivity rather than the shift of voltage dependence led to increased availability of I h in conditions promoting FS. Responses to cyclic AMP did not differ between wildtype and mutant channels. Thus, mutant HCN2 channels cause significant cAMP-independent enhanced availability of I h during high temperatures, which may contribute to hyperthermia-induced neuronal hyperexcitability in some individuals with FS.

  2. HCN and HNC in comets C/2000 WM1 (Linear) and C/2002 C1 (Ikeya-Zhang).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, William M; Bergman, Per; Lowe, Thomas B; Matthews, Henry; McGonagle, Douglas; Nummelin, Albert; Owen, Toby

    2003-12-01

    Comets have been suggested as a possibly significant source of organic molecules to the early Earth. Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is important in models of prebiotic chemistry, but may be difficult to form in the early terrestrial environment, while hydrogen isocyanide (HNC) is a 'classical' tracer of interstellar ion-molecule chemistry. We have observed both HCN and HNC in 2 recent comets, bringing the number of comets with published measurements of the HNC/HCN abundance ratio to 6. The HNC/HCN ratio in comet Ikeya-Zhang appears to increase with decreasing heliocentric distance, as was previously observed for comet Hale-Bopp, indicating that the HNC is produced at least in part by processes in the cometary coma (atmosphere) and is not simply a constituent of the nuclear ices. Both comets C/2000 WMI (Linear) and C/2002 C1 (Ikeya-Zhang) exhibit values of the HNC/HCN ratio that appear to be too large (approximately 0.09-0.19) to be matched by current models of coma chemistry. Cometary HNC may be a photodissociation product of organic grains or large organic polymers stored in the nucleus. We have also set a limit on the emission from the NO radical in comet WM1.

  3. Allostery between two binding sites in the ion channel subunit TRIP8b confers binding specificity to HCN channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Kyle A; Han, Ye; Heuermann, Robert J; Cheng, Xiangying; Kurz, Jonathan E; Lyman, Reagan E; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Chetkovich, Dane M

    2017-09-08

    Tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains are ubiquitous structural motifs that mediate protein-protein interactions. For example, the TPR domains in the peroxisomal import receptor PEX5 enable binding to a range of type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) motifs. A homolog of PEX5, tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b interacting protein (TRIP8b), binds to and functions as an auxiliary subunit of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. Given the similarity between TRIP8b and PEX5, this difference in function raises the question of what mechanism accounts for their binding specificity. In this report, we found that the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) and the C-terminus of the HCN channel are critical for conferring specificity to TRIP8b binding. We show that TRIP8b binds the HCN CNBD through a 37-residue domain and the HCN C-terminus through the TPR domains. Using a combination of fluorescence polarization and co-immunoprecipitation based assays, we establish that binding at either site increases affinity at the other. Thus, allosteric coupling of the TRIP8b TPR domains both promotes binding to HCN channels and limits binding to PTS1 substrates. These results raise the possibility that other TPR domains may similarly be influenced by allosteric mechanisms as a general feature of protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. Genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker: Stem cells transfected with HCN2 gene and myocytes-A model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanani, S. [Institut Genomique Fonctionelle, 141 Rue de la Cardonille, 34396 Montpellier (France); Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS and Universite de Nice, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France); Pumir, A. [Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS and Universite de Nice, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France); Laboratoire J.A. Dieudonne, CNRS and Universite de Nice, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice (France)], E-mail: alain.pumir@unice.fr; Krinsky, V. [Institut Non Lineaire de Nice, CNRS and Universite de Nice, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France)

    2008-01-07

    One of the successfully tested methods to design genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker cells consists in transfecting a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) with a HCN2 gene and connecting it to a myocyte. We develop and study a mathematical model, describing a myocyte connected to a hMSC transfected with a HCN2 gene. The cardiac action potential is described both with the simple Beeler-Reuter model, as well as with the elaborate dynamic Luo-Rudy model. The HCN2 channel is described by fitting electrophysiological records, in the spirit of Hodgkin-Huxley. The model shows that oscillations can occur in a pair myocyte-stem cell, that was not observed in the experiments yet. The model predicted that: (1) HCN pacemaker channels can induce oscillations only if the number of expressed I{sub K1} channels is low enough. At too high an expression level of I{sub K1} channels, oscillations cannot be induced, no matter how many pacemaker channels are expressed. (2) At low expression levels of I{sub K1} channels, a large domain of values in the parameter space (n, N) exists, where oscillations should be observed. We denote N the number of expressed pacemaker channels in the stem cell, and n the number of gap junction channels coupling the stem cell and the myocyte. (3) The expression levels of I{sub K1} channels observed in ventricular myocytes, both in the Beeler-Reuter and in the dynamic Luo-Rudy models are too high to allow to observe oscillations. With expression levels below {approx}1/4 of the original value, oscillations can be observed. The main consequence of this work is that in order to obtain oscillations in an experiment with a myocyte-stem cell pair, increasing the values of n, N is unlikely to be helpful, unless the expression level of I{sub K1} has been reduced enough. The model also allows us to explore levels of gene expression not yet achieved in experiments, and could be useful to plan new experiments, aimed at improving the robustness of the oscillations.

  5. Genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker: Stem cells transfected with HCN2 gene and myocytes—A model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanani, S.; Pumir, A.; Krinsky, V.

    2008-01-01

    One of the successfully tested methods to design genetically engineered cardiac pacemaker cells consists in transfecting a human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) with a HCN2 gene and connecting it to a myocyte. We develop and study a mathematical model, describing a myocyte connected to a hMSC transfected with a HCN2 gene. The cardiac action potential is described both with the simple Beeler Reuter model, as well as with the elaborate dynamic Luo Rudy model. The HCN2 channel is described by fitting electrophysiological records, in the spirit of Hodgkin Huxley. The model shows that oscillations can occur in a pair myocyte-stem cell, that was not observed in the experiments yet. The model predicted that: (1) HCN pacemaker channels can induce oscillations only if the number of expressed I channels is low enough. At too high an expression level of I channels, oscillations cannot be induced, no matter how many pacemaker channels are expressed. (2) At low expression levels of I channels, a large domain of values in the parameter space (n, N) exists, where oscillations should be observed. We denote N the number of expressed pacemaker channels in the stem cell, and n the number of gap junction channels coupling the stem cell and the myocyte. (3) The expression levels of I channels observed in ventricular myocytes, both in the Beeler Reuter and in the dynamic Luo Rudy models are too high to allow to observe oscillations. With expression levels below ˜1/4 of the original value, oscillations can be observed. The main consequence of this work is that in order to obtain oscillations in an experiment with a myocyte-stem cell pair, increasing the values of n, N is unlikely to be helpful, unless the expression level of I has been reduced enough. The model also allows us to explore levels of gene expression not yet achieved in experiments, and could be useful to plan new experiments, aimed at improving the robustness of the oscillations.

  6. Effects of Shensong Yangxin capsule on pacemaker channels encoded by human HCN4 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-ping; LI Ning; WU Yi-ling; PU Jie-lin

    2010-01-01

    @@ Shensong Yangxin (SSYX) is one of the compound recipes of Chinese materia medica including 12ingredients such as Panax ginseng, dwarf lilyturf tuber,nardostachys root, etc. Small-scale randomized multi-centre clinical trials suggested that SSYX reduced the number of ventricular extrasystoles in patients with or without structural heart disease.1 Besides excellent antiarrhythmic efficacy,2 SSYX also improved bradycardia in some patients, which was evidenced by animal studies3 as well. However, the antiarrhythmic mechanisms of SSYX have not been fully understood.Our previous studies have explored effect of SSYX on many channels except hyperpolarization-activated cation channel encoded by human hHCN4 gene.4

  7. Seasonal and interannual variations in HCN amounts in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere observed by MIPAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatthor, N.; Höpfner, M.; Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.; Funke, B.; Lossow, S.; Eckert, E.; Grabowski, U.; Kellmann, S.; Linden, A.; Walker, K. A.; Wiegele, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a HCN climatology of the years 2002-2012, derived from FTIR limb emission spectra measured with the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on the ENVISAT satellite, with the main focus on biomass burning signatures in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. HCN is an almost unambiguous tracer of biomass burning with a tropospheric lifetime of 5-6 months and a stratospheric lifetime of about 2 years. The MIPAS climatology is in good agreement with the HCN distribution obtained by the spaceborne ACE-FTS experiment and with airborne in situ measurements performed during the INTEX-B campaign. The HCN amounts observed by MIPAS in the southern tropical and subtropical upper troposphere have an annual cycle peaking in October-November, i.e. 1-2 months after the maximum of southern hemispheric fire emissions. The probable reason for the time shift is the delayed onset of deep convection towards austral summer. Because of overlap of varying biomass burning emissions from South America and southern Africa with sporadically strong contributions from Indonesia, the size and strength of the southern hemispheric plume have considerable interannual variations, with monthly mean maxima at, for example, 14 km between 400 and more than 700 pptv. Within 1-2 months after appearance of the plume, a considerable portion of the enhanced HCN is transported southward to as far as Antarctic latitudes. The fundamental period of HCN variability in the northern upper troposphere is also an annual cycle with varying amplitude, which in the tropics peaks in May after and during the biomass burning seasons in northern tropical Africa and southern Asia, and in the subtropics peaks in July due to trapping of pollutants in the Asian monsoon anticyclone (AMA). However, caused by extensive biomass burning in Indonesia and by northward transport of part of the southern hemispheric plume, northern HCN maxima also occur around October/November in several years

  8. In situ measurements of HCN and CH3CN over the Pacific Ocean: Sources, sinks, and budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. B.; Salas, L.; Herlth, D.; Kolyer, R.; Czech, E.; Viezee, W.; Li, Q.; Jacob, D. J.; Blake, D.; Sachse, G.; Harward, C. N.; Fuelberg, H.; Kiley, C. M.; Zhao, Y.; Kondo, Y.

    2003-10-01

    We report the first in situ measurements of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and methyl cyanide (CH3CN, acetonitrile) from the Pacific troposphere (0-12 km) obtained during the NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) airborne mission (February-April 2001). Mean HCN and CH3CN mixing ratios of 243 ± 118 (median 218) ppt and 149 ± 56 (median 138) ppt, respectively, were measured. These in situ observations correspond to a mean tropospheric HCN column of 4.2 × 1015 molecules cm-2 and a CH3CN column of 2.5 × 1015 molecules cm-2. This is in good agreement with the 0-12 km HCN column of 4.4 (±0.6) × 1015 molecules cm-2 derived from infrared solar spectroscopic observations over Japan. Mixing ratios of HCN and CH3CN were greatly enhanced in pollution outflow from Asia and were well correlated with each other as well as with known tracers of biomass combustion (e.g., CH3Cl, CO). Volumetric enhancement (or emission) ratios (ERs) relative to CO in free tropospheric plumes, likely originating from fires, were 0.34% for HCN and 0.17% for CH3CN. ERs with respect to CH3Cl and CO in selected biomass burning (BB) plumes in the free troposphere and in boundary layer pollution episodes are used to estimate a global BB source of 0.8 ± 0.4 Tg (N) yr-1 for HCN and 0.4 ± 0.1 Tg (N) yr-1 for CH3CN. In comparison, emissions from industry and fossil fuel combustion are quite small (CN indicated reduced mixing ratios in the marine boundary layer (MBL). Using a simple box model, the observed gradients across the top of the MBL are used to derive an oceanic loss rate of 8.8 × 10-15 g (N) cm-2 s-1 for HCN and 3.4 × 10-15 g (N) cm-2 s-1 for CH3CN. An air-sea exchange model is used to conclude that this flux can be maintained if the oceans are undersaturated in HCN and CH3CN by 27% and 6%, respectively. These observations also correspond to an open ocean mean deposition velocity (vd) of 0.12 cm s-1 for HCN and 0.06 cm s-1 for CH3CN. It is inferred that oceanic loss is a

  9. A novel high-throughput screening assay for HCN channel blocker using membrane potential-sensitive dye and FLIPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, Dmitry V; Shan, Qin J; Lee, Yan T; Soloveva, Veronica; Nawoschik, Stanley P; Kaftan, Edward J; Dunlop, John; Mayer, Scott C; Bowlby, Mark R

    2009-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cation nonselective (HCN) channels represent an interesting group of targets for drug development. In this study, the authors report the development of a novel membrane potential-sensitive dye (MPSD) assay for HCN channel modulators that has been miniaturized into 384-well fluorescent imaging plate reader (FLIPR) high-throughput screening (HTS) format. When optimized (by cell plating density, plate type, cell recovery from cryopreservation), the well-to-well signal variability was low, with a Z' = 0.73 and coefficient of variation = 6.4%, whereas the MPSD fluorescence signal amplitude was -23,700 +/- 1500 FLIPR(3) relative fluorescence units (a linear relationship was found between HCN1 MPSD fluorescence signal and the cell plating density) and was completely blocked by 30 microM ZD7288. The assay tolerated up to 1% DMSO, inclusion of which did not significantly change the signal kinetics or amplitude. A single-concentration screening of an ion channel-focused library composed of 4855 compounds resulted in 89 HCN1 blocker hits, 51 of which were subsequently analyzed with an 8-point concentration-response analysis on the IonWorks HT electrophysiology platform. The correlation between MPSD and the electrophysiology assay was moderate, as shown by the linear regression analysis (r(2) = 0.56) between the respective IC(50)s obtained using these 2 assays. The reported HTS-compatible HCN channel blocker assay can serve as a tool in drug discovery in the pursuit of HCN channel isoform-selective small molecules that could be used in the development of clinically relevant compounds.

  10. Coding and decoding with dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsi, Athanasia; Kastellakis, George; Psarrou, Maria; Anastasakis, Stelios; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of complex, voltage dependent mechanisms in the dendrites of multiple neuron types, great effort has been devoted in search of a direct link between dendritic properties and specific neuronal functions. Over the last few years, new experimental techniques have allowed the visualization and probing of dendritic anatomy, plasticity and integrative schemes with unprecedented detail. This vast amount of information has caused a paradigm shift in the study of memory, one of the most important pursuits in Neuroscience, and calls for the development of novel theories and models that will unify the available data according to some basic principles. Traditional models of memory considered neural cells as the fundamental processing units in the brain. Recent studies however are proposing new theories in which memory is not only formed by modifying the synaptic connections between neurons, but also by modifications of intrinsic and anatomical dendritic properties as well as fine tuning of the wiring diagram. In this review paper we present previous studies along with recent findings from our group that support a key role of dendrites in information processing, including the encoding and decoding of new memories, both at the single cell and the network level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The 7-channel FIR HCN Interferometer on J-TEXT Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wei; Chen, J; Li, Q; Wang, Z J; Zhuang, G

    2011-01-01

    A seven-channel far-infrared hydrogen cyanide (HCN) laser interferometer has been established aiming to provide the line integrated plasma density for the J-TEXT experimental scenarios. A continuous wave glow discharge HCN laser designed with a cavity length 3.4 m is used as the laser source with a wavelength of 337 {\\mu}m (cutoff density is 9.8*10^21/m^3) and an output power up to 100 mW. The system is configured as a Mach-Zehnder type interferometer. Phase modulation is achieved by a rotating grating, with a modulation frequency of 10 kHz which corresponds to the temporal resolution of 0.1 ms. The optic viewing chords travel through the plasma vertically, their radial positions are r=21cm, 14cm, 7cm, 0cm, -7cm, -14cm, -21cm, respectively. The beat signal is detected by TGS detector. The phase shift induced by the plasma is derived by the comparator with a phase sensitivity of 0.06 fringe. The experimental results measured by the J-TEXT interferometer are presented in details in this meeting. In addition, th...

  12. Signal detection circuit design of HCN measurement system based on TDLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chungui; Zhang, Yujun; Chen, Chen; Lu, Yibing; Liu, Guohua; Gao, Yanwei; You, Kun; He, Ying; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Wenqing

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen cyanide gas leakage may exist in the petrochemical industry, smelting plant, and other industrial processes, causing serious harm to the environment, and even threatening the safety of personnel. So the continuous detection of HCN gas plays an important role in the prevention of risk in production process and storage environment that existing hydrogen cyanide gas. The Tunable Diode Laser Technology (TDLAS) has advantages of non-contact, high sensitivity, high selectivity, and fast response time, etc., which is one of the ideal method of gas detection technologies and can be used to measure the hydrogen cyanide concentration. This paper studies the HCN detection system based on TDLAS technology, selects the absorption lines of hydrogen cyanide in 6539.12cm-1, and utilizes the center wavelength of 1.529μm distributed feedback (DFB) laser as a light source. It is discussed in detail on technical requirements of a high frequency modulated laser signal detection circuit, including noise level, gain, and bandwidth. Based on the above theory, the high frequency modulation preamplifier circuit and main amplifier circuit are designed for InGaAs photoelectric detector. The designed circuits are calculation analyzed with corresponding formula and simulation analyzed based on the Multisim software.

  13. The HCN-Water Ratio in the Planet Formation Region of Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Najita, Joan R; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Salyk, Colette; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2013-01-01

    We find a trend between the mid-infrared HCN/H2O flux ratio and submillimeter disk mass among T Tauri stars in Taurus. While it may seem puzzling that the molecular emission properties of the inner disk (< few AU) are related to the properties of the outer disk (beyond ~20 AU) probed by the submillimeter continuum, an interesting possible interpretation is that the trend is a result of planetesimal and protoplanet formation. Because objects this large are decoupled from the accretion flow, when they form, they can lock up water (and oxygen) beyond the snow line, thereby enhancing the C/O ratio in the inner disk and altering the molecular abundances there. We discuss the assumptions that underlie this interpretation, a possible alternative explanation, and related open questions that motivate future work. Whatever its origin, understanding the meaning of the relation between the HCN/H2O ratio and disk mass is of interest as trends like this among T Tauri disk properties are relatively rare.

  14. Observation of HCN hyperfine line anomalies towards low- and high-mass star-forming cores

    CERN Document Server

    Loughnane, R M; Thompson, M A; Lo, N; O'Dwyer, B; Cunningham, M R; 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2011.20121.x

    2013-01-01

    HCN is becoming a popular choice of molecule for studying star formation in both low- and high-mass regions and for other astrophysical sources from comets to high-redshift galaxies. However, a major and often overlooked difficulty with HCN is that it can exhibit non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) behaviour in its hyperfine line structure. Individual hyperfine lines can be strongly boosted or suppressed. In low-mass star-forming cloud observations, this could possibly lead to large errors in the calculation of opacity and excitation temperature, while in massive star-forming clouds, where the hyperfine lines are blended due to turbulent broadening, errors will arise in infall measurements that are based on the separation of the peaks in a self-absorbed profile. The underlying line shape cannot be known for certain if hyperfine anomalies are present. We present a first observational investigation of these anomalies across a range of conditions and transitions by carrying out a survey of low-mass sta...

  15. ALMA Imaging of HCN, CS and dust in Arp 220 and NGC 6240

    CERN Document Server

    Scoville, Nick; Walter, Fabian; Manohar, Swarnima; Zschaechner, Laura; Yun, Min; Koda, Jin; Sanders, David; Murchikova, Lena; Thompson, Todd; Robertson, Brant; Genzel, Reinhard; Hernquist, Lars; Tacconi, Linda; Brown, Robert; Narayanan, Desika; Hayward, Christopher C; Barnes, Joshua; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Davies, Richard; van der Werf, Paul; Fomalont, Edward

    2014-01-01

    We report ALMA Band 7 (350 GHz) imaging at 0.4 - 0.6arcsec resolution and Band 9 (696 GHz) at ~0.25arcsec resolution of the luminous IR galaxies Arp 220 and NGC 6240. The long wavelength dust continuum is used to estimate ISM masses for Arp 220 East, West and NGC 6240 of 1.9, 4.2 and 1.6x10^9 msun within radii of 69, 65 and 190 pc. The HCN emission was modeled to derive the emissivity distribution as a function of radius and the kinematics of each nuclear disk, yielding dynamical masses consistent with the masses and sizes derived from the dust emission. In Arp 220, the major dust and gas concentrations are at radii less than 50 pc in both counter-rotating nuclear disks. The thickness of the disks in Arp 220estimated from the velocity dispersion and rotation velocities are 10-20 pc and the mean gas densities are n_H2 ~10^5 cm^-3 at R < 50 pc. We develop an analytic treatment for the molecular excitation (including photon trapping), yielding volume densities for both the HCN and CS emission with n_H2 ~2x10^...

  16. Structure and properties of the radiation-induced intermediates produced from HCN in noble gas matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameneva, Svetlana V.; Tyurin, Daniil A.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we report the results of systematic studies on the radiation-induced transformations in HCN/Ng systems (Ng=Ne, Ar, Kr or Xe) at 7 K using a combination of FTIR and EPR spectroscopy. It was shown that HCN underwent efficient decomposition producing H atoms, CN radicals and HNC isomer. The thermally induced reactions of H atoms in different matrices result in the formation of two isomeric radicals, H2CN and trans-HCNH, the former being predominated. The temperature dependent dynamics of CN and H2CN radicals in a krypton matrix was observed by EPR spectroscopy in solid krypton. The vibrational frequencies, IR intensities and magnetic resonance parameters of H2CN and trans-HCNH radicals calculated at the CCSD(T) level are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. It was found that HCNH radical could be effectively bleached with visible light. The comparison of experimental and computational data made it possible to assign a new vibrational band at 918 cm-1 in an Ar matrix (and the corresponding bands in Kr and Xe) to trans-HCNH radical. In addition, HKrCN was found in the case of krypton, whereas HXeCN and HXeNC were produced in solid xenon. The reaction mechanisms and contribution of different channels are discussed.

  17. ASTE Simultaneous HCN(4-3) and HCO+(4-3) Observations of the Two Luminous Infrared Galaxies NGC 4418 and Arp 220

    CERN Document Server

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Yamada, Masako; Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of HCN(J=4-3) and HCO+(J=4-3) observations of two luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), NGC 4418 and Arp 220, made using the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). The ASTE wide-band correlator provided simultaneous observations of HCN(4-3) and HCO+(4-3) lines, and a precise determination of their flux ratios. Both galaxies showed high HCN(4-3) to HCO+(4-3) flux ratios of >2, possibly due to AGN-related phenomena. The J = 4-3 to J = 1-0 transition flux ratios for HCN (HCO+) are similar to those expected for fully thermalized (sub-thermally excited) gas in both sources, in spite of HCN's higher critical density. If we assume collisional excitation and neglect an infrared radiative pumping process, our non-LTE analysis suggests that HCN traces gas with significantly higher density than HCO+. In Arp 220, we separated the double-peaked HCN(4-3) emission into the eastern and western nuclei, based on velocity information. We confirmed that the eastern nucleus showed a higher HCN(4-3)...

  18. Dendritic Cells—Ontogeny—

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Takeuchi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC play key rolls in various aspects of immunity. The functions of DC depend on the subsets as well as their location or activation status. Understanding developmental lineages, precursors and inducing factors for various DC subsets would help their clinical application, but despite extensive efforts, the precise ontogeny of various DC, remain unclear and complex. Because of their many functional similarities to macrophages, DC were originally thought to be of myeloid-lineage, an idea supported by many in vitro studies where monocytes or GM-CSF (a key myeloid growth factor has been extensively used for generating DC. However, there has been considerable evidence which suggests the existence of lymphoid-lineage DC. After the confusion of myeloid-/lymphoid-DC concept regarding DC surface markers, we have now reached a consensus that each DC subset can differentiate through both myeloid- and lymphoid-lineages. The identification of committed populations (such as common myeloid- and lymphoid progenitors as precursors for every DC subsets and findings from various knockout (KO mice that have selected lymphoid- or myeloid-lineage deficiency appear to indicate flexibility of DC development rather than their lineage restriction. Why is DC development so flexible unlike other hematopoitic cells? It might be because there is developmental redundancy to maintain such important populations in any occasions, or such developmental flexibility would be advantageous for DC to be able to differentiate from any “available” precursors in situ irrespective of their lineages. This review will cover ontogeny of conventional (CD8+/- DC DC, plasmacytoid DC and skin Langerhans cells, and recently-identified many Pre-DC (immediate DC precursor populations, in addition to monocytes and plasmacytoid DC, will also be discussed.

  19. Molecular genetic and genetic correlations in sodium channelopathies: Lack of founder effect and evidence for a second gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Zhou, J.; Feero, W.G.; Conwit, R.; Galloway, G.; Hoffman, E.P. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Wessel, H.B. (Children' s Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (United States) Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Todorovic, S.M. (Univ. of Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Barany, F. (Cornell Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, I.; Fidzianska, A. (Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)); Arahata, K. (National Inst. of Neuroscience, Tokyo (Japan)); Sillen, A. (University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)); Marks, H.G. (A. I. duPont Inst., Wilmington, DE (United States)); Hartlage, P. (Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States)); Ricker, K. (Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany)); Lehmann-Horn, F. (Univ. of Ulm (Germany)); Hayakawa, H. (Hitachi General Hospital (Japan))

    1993-06-01

    The authors present a correlation of molecular genetic data (mutations) and genetic data (dinucleotide-repeat polymorphisms) for a cohort of seven hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP) and two paramyotonia congenita (PC) families from diverse ethnic backgrounds. They found that each of three previously identified point mutations of the adult skeletal muscle sodium-channel gene occurred on two different dinucleotide-repeat haplotypes. These results indicate that dinucleotide-repeat haplotypes are not predictive of allelic heterogeneity in sodium channelopathies, contrary to previous suggestions. In addition, they identified a HyperPP pedigree in which the dominant disorder was not linked to the sodium-channel gene. Thus, a second locus can give rise to a similar clinical phenotype. Some individuals in this pedigree exhibited a base change causing the nonconservative substitution of an evolutionarily conserved amino acid. Because this change was not present in 240 normal chromosomes and was near another HyperPP mutation, it fulfilled the most commonly used criteria for being a mutation rather than a polymorphism. However, linkage studies using single-strand conformation polymorphism-derived and sequence-derived haplotypes excluded this base change as a causative mutation: these data serve as a cautionary example of potential pitfalls in the delineation of change-of-function point mutations. 35 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Profiling neuronal ion channelopathies with non-invasive brain imaging and dynamic causal models: Case studies of single gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jessica R; Symmonds, Mkael; Hanna, Michael G; Dolan, Raymond J; Friston, Karl J; Moran, Rosalyn J

    2016-01-01

    Clinical assessments of brain function rely upon visual inspection of electroencephalographic waveform abnormalities in tandem with functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, no current technology proffers in vivo assessments of activity at synapses, receptors and ion-channels, the basis of neuronal communication. Using dynamic causal modeling we compared electrophysiological responses from two patients with distinct monogenic ion channelopathies and a large cohort of healthy controls to demonstrate the feasibility of assaying synaptic-level channel communication non-invasively. Synaptic channel abnormality was identified in both patients (100% sensitivity) with assay specificity above 89%, furnishing estimates of neurotransmitter and voltage-gated ion throughput of sodium, calcium, chloride and potassium. This performance indicates a potential novel application as an adjunct for clinical assessments in neurological and psychiatric settings. More broadly, these findings indicate that biophysical models of synaptic channels can be estimated non-invasively, having important implications for advancing human neuroimaging to the level of non-invasive ion channel assays. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of the SCN5A-encoded channelopathy in irritable bowel syndrome and other gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraelen, T E; Ter Bekke, R M A; Volders, P G A; Masclee, A A M; Kruimel, J W

    2015-07-01

    Gastrointestinal functional and motility disorders, like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), have a high prevalence in the Western population and cause significant morbidity and loss of quality of life leading to considerable costs for health care. A decade ago, it has been demonstrated that interstitial cells of Cajal and intestinal smooth muscle cells, cells important for gastrointestinal motility, express the sodium channel alpha subunit Nav 1.5. In the heart, aberrant variants in this sodium channel, encoded by SCN5A, are linked to inherited arrhythmia syndromes, like the long-QT syndrome type 3 and Brugada syndrome. Mounting data show a possible contribution of SCN5A mutants to gastrointestinal functional and motility disorders. Two percent of IBS patients harbor SCN5A mutations with electrophysiological evidence of loss- and gain-of-function. In addition, gastrointestinal symptoms are more prevalent in cardiac SCN5A-mutation positive patients. This review firstly describes the Nav 1.5 channel and its physiological role in ventricular cardiomyocytes and gastrointestinal cells, then we focus on the involvement of mutant Nav 1.5 in gastrointestinal functional and motility disorders. Future research might uncover novel mutation-specific treatment strategies for SCN5A-encoded gastrointestinal channelopathies. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Global Atmospheric Budgets of Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) and Methyl Cyanide (CH3CN): Constraints From Aircraft Measurements Over the Western Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Jacob, D.; Yantosca, R.; Singh, H.; Koike, M.

    2002-12-01

    We use a global 3-D model analysis of aircraft observations from the TRACE-P mission over the northwest Pacific in Febuary-April 2001 to improve our understanding of the atmospheric budgets of HCN and CH3CN. TRACE-P focused on characterizing Asian outflow, including a major component from seasonal biomass burning in southeast Asia. Observations in biomass burning plumes indicate molar emission ratios (relative to CO) of 0.08-0.38% for HCN and 0.03-0.21% for CH3CN. Enhancements of both gases observed in Chinese urban plumes are attributed to emissions from residential coal burning with molar emission ratios (relative to CO) of 1.3-4.4% for HCN and 0.2-0.8% for CH3CN. Observed vertical gradients of HCN and CH3CN in unpolluted marine air imply a dominant ocean sink for both gases, with deposition velocities of 0.125 and 0.132 cm s-1, respectively (saturation ratios of 0.79 for HCN and 0.88 for CH3CN). The deposition velocities and saturation ratios imply lifetimes of 3 months for HCN(aq)/CN- and 14 months for CH3CN(aq)/CN- against consumption in oceanic mixed layer. Model simulations indicate that biomass burning emission ratios of 0.26% for HCN and 0.15% for CH3CN and residential coal burning emission ratios of 1.4% for HCN and 0.5% for CH3CN offer the best fit to observed vertical distributions, HCN-CH3CN-CO relationship, and HCN columns in TRACE-P, as well as CH3CN vertical profile over the Indian Ocean and seasonal variations of HCN columns. Biomass burning and residential coal burning contribute 0.64 and 0.21 Tg N yr-1 respectively to global HCN and 0.37 and 0.08 Tg N yr-1 to CH3CN. Ocean uptake is the main sink for HCN (0.68 Tg N yr-1) and CH3CN (0.35 Tg N yr-1), resulting in tropospheric lieftimes of 5.2 and 5.6 months, respectively. Both gases can be used as biomass burning tracers in the free troposphere in TRACE-P where biomass burning emissions account for 75-85% of HCN and 75-90% of CH3CN.

  3. HCN(1-0) Maser Emission by IR Pumping from Unresolved AGN Disk/Torus Toward the Seyfert 2 Nucleus of M51?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, S.; V-Trung, D.; Boone, F.; Krips, M.; Lim, J.; Muller, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present ˜1” (˜34 pc) resolution observations of HCN(1-0) together with CO J=1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 toward the Seyfert 2 nucleus of M51 using IRAM PdBI and SMA. HCN shows a strong emission at the nucleus only at the systemic velocity, where no obvious CO emission. HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) >2 at this region. Based on our radiative transfer calculations, we suggest that this strong HCN emission is affected by the IR pumping and possibly weak HCN masing. This suggests the presence of an edge-on rotating circumnuclear dense molecular gas disk or torus, which remains unresolved at our resolution.

  4. The Deterministic Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm is an immune-inspired algorithm orig- inally based on the function of natural dendritic cells. The original instantiation of the algorithm is a highly stochastic algorithm. While the performance of the algorithm is good when applied to large real-time datasets, it is difficult to anal- yse due to the number of random-based elements. In this paper a deterministic version of the algorithm is proposed, implemented and tested using a port scan dataset to provide a controllable system. This version consists of a controllable amount of parameters, which are experimented with in this paper. In addition the effects are examined of the use of time windows and variation on the number of cells, both which are shown to influence the algorithm. Finally a novel metric for the assessment of the algorithms output is introduced and proves to be a more sensitive metric than the metric used with the original Dendritic Cell Algorithm.

  5. Seasonal and interannual variations of HCN amounts in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere observed by MIPAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatthor, N.; Höpfner, M.; Stiller, G. P.; von Clarmann, T.; Funke, B.; Lossow, S.; Eckert, E.; Grabowski, U.; Kellmann, S.; Linden, A.; Wiegele, A.

    2014-04-01

    A global HCN dataset covering nearly the complete period June 2002 to April 2012 has been derived from FTIR limb emission spectra measured with the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on the ENVISAT satellite. HCN is an almost unambiguous tracer of biomass burning with a tropospheric lifetime of 5-6 months and a stratospheric lifetime of about two years. We present a MIPAS HCN climatology with the main focus on biomass burning signatures in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. HCN observed by MIPAS in the southern tropical and subtropical upper troposphere has an annual cycle peaking in October-November during or shortly after the maximum of the southern hemispheric biomass burning season. Within 1-2 months after the burning season, a considerable portion of the enhanced HCN is transported southward to Antarctic latitudes. The fundamental period in the northern upper troposphere is also an annual cycle, which in the tropics peaks in May after the biomass burning seasons in northern tropical Africa and South Asia, and in the subtropics in July due to trapping of pollutants in the Asian monsoon anticyclone. However, caused by extensive biomass burning in Indonesia and Northern Africa together with northward transport of parts of the southern hemispheric plume, in several years HCN maxima are also found around October/November, which leads to semi-annual cycles in the northern tropics and subtropics. Because of overlap of interannually varying burning activities in different source regions, both southern and northern low-latitude maxima have considerable interannual variations. There is also a temporal shift between enhanced HCN in northern low and mid-to-high latitudes, indicating northward transport of pollutants. Due to additional biomass burning at mid and high latitudes this meridional transport pattern is not as clear as in the Southern Hemisphere. Presumably caused by ocean uptake, upper tropospheric HCN above the tropical

  6. Seasonal and interannual variations of HCN amounts in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere observed by MIPAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Glatthor

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A global HCN dataset covering nearly the complete period June 2002 to April 2012 has been derived from FTIR limb emission spectra measured with the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS on the ENVISAT satellite. HCN is an almost unambiguous tracer of biomass burning with a tropospheric lifetime of 5–6 months and a stratospheric lifetime of about two years. We present a MIPAS HCN climatology with the main focus on biomass burning signatures in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. HCN observed by MIPAS in the southern tropical and subtropical upper troposphere has an annual cycle peaking in October–November during or shortly after the maximum of the southern hemispheric biomass burning season. Within 1–2 months after the burning season, a considerable portion of the enhanced HCN is transported southward to Antarctic latitudes. The fundamental period in the northern upper troposphere is also an annual cycle, which in the tropics peaks in May after the biomass burning seasons in northern tropical Africa and South Asia, and in the subtropics in July due to trapping of pollutants in the Asian monsoon anticyclone. However, caused by extensive biomass burning in Indonesia and Northern Africa together with northward transport of parts of the southern hemispheric plume, in several years HCN maxima are also found around October/November, which leads to semi-annual cycles in the northern tropics and subtropics. Because of overlap of interannually varying burning activities in different source regions, both southern and northern low-latitude maxima have considerable interannual variations. There is also a temporal shift between enhanced HCN in northern low and mid-to-high latitudes, indicating northward transport of pollutants. Due to additional biomass burning at mid and high latitudes this meridional transport pattern is not as clear as in the Southern Hemisphere. Presumably caused by ocean uptake, upper

  7. Dendritic cells star in Vancouver

    OpenAIRE

    Klechevsky, Eynav; Kato, Hiroki; Sponaas, Anne-Marit

    2005-01-01

    The fast-moving field of dendritic cell (DC) biology is hard to keep pace with. Here we report on advances from the recent Keystone Symposium, “Dendritic Cells at the Center of Innate and Adaptive Immunity,” organized in Vancouver, BC on Feb. 1–7, 2005 by Anne O'Garra, Jacques Banchereau, and Alan Sher. New insights into the molecular mechanisms of DC function and their influence on immune regulation, their role in infectious and autoimmune disease, and new clinical applications are highlight...

  8. Regulated expression of HCN channels and cAMP levels shape the properties of the h current in developing rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surges, Rainer; Brewster, Amy L; Bender, Roland A; Beck, Heinz; Feuerstein, Thomas J; Baram, Tallie Z

    2006-07-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)) contributes to intrinsic properties and network responses of neurons. Its biophysical properties depend on the expression profiles of the underlying hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels and the presence of cyclic AMP (cAMP) that potently and differentially modulates I(h) conducted by HCN1, HCN2 and/or HCN4. Here, we studied the properties of I(h) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells, the developmental evolution of the HCN-subunit isoforms that contribute to this current, and their interplay with age-dependent free cAMP concentrations, using electrophysiological, molecular and biochemical methods. I(h) amplitude increased progressively during the first four postnatal weeks, consistent with the observed overall increased expression of HCN channels. Activation kinetics of the current accelerated during this period, consonant with the quantitative reduction of mRNA and protein expression of the slow-kinetics HCN4 isoform and increased levels of HCN1. The sensitivity of I(h) to cAMP, and the contribution of the slow component to the overall I(h), decreased with age. These are likely a result of the developmentally regulated transition of the complement of HCN channel isoforms from cAMP sensitive to relatively cAMP insensitive. Thus, although hippocampal cAMP concentrations increased over twofold during the developmental period studied, the coordinated changes in expression of three HCN channel isoforms resulted in reduced effects of this signalling molecule on neuronal h currents.

  9. Highly abundant HCN in the inner hot envelope of GL 2591 : probing the birth of a hot core?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonman, A. M. S.; Stark, R.; Tak, F. F. S. van der; Dishoeck, E. F.; Schafer, F.; Lange, G de; Laauwen, W. M.; van der Wal, P.B.

    2004-01-01

    Published in: Astrophys. J. 553 (2001) L63-L68 citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: We present observations of the v2=0 and vibrationally excited v2=1 J=9-8 rotational lines of HCN at 797 GHz toward the deeply embedded massive young stellar object GL 2591, which provide the missi

  10. Mutation in S6 domain of HCN4 channel in patient with suspected Brugada syndrome modifies channel function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biel, Stephanie; Aquila, Marco; Hertel, Brigitte; Berthold, Anne; Neumann, Thomas; DiFrancesco, Dario; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Kauferstein, Silke

    2016-10-01

    Diseases such as the sick sinus and the Brugada syndrome are cardiac abnormalities, which can be caused by a number of genetic aberrances. Among them are mutations in HCN4, a gene, which encodes the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel 4; this pacemaker channel is responsible for the spontaneous activity of the sinoatrial node. The present genetic screening of patients with suspected or diagnosed Brugada or sick sinus syndrome identified in 1 out of 62 samples the novel mutation V492F. It is located in a highly conserved site of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN)4 channel downstream of the filter at the start of the last transmembrane domain S6. Functional expression of mutant channels in HEK293 cells uncovered a profoundly reduced channel function but no appreciable impact on channel synthesis and trafficking compared to the wild type. The inward rectifying HCN4 current could be partially rescued by an expression of heteromeric channels comprising wt and mutant monomers. These heteromeric channels were responsive to cAMP but they required a more negative voltage for activation and they exhibited a lower current density than the wt channel. This suggests a dominant negative effect of the mutation in patients, which carry this heterozygous mutation. Such a modulation of HCN4 activity could be the cause of the diagnosed cardiac abnormality.

  11. Diode laser absorption measurement and analysis of HCN in atmospheric-pressure, fuel-rich premixed methane/air flames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gersen, Sander; Mokhov, A. V.; Levinsky, H. B.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of HCN in flat, fuel-rich premixed methane/air flames at atmospheric pressure are reported. Quartz-microprobe sampling followed by wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy with second harmonic detection was used to obtain an overall measurement uncertainty of better than 20% for

  12. Acetylene (C2H2 and hydrogen cyanide (HCN from IASI satellite observations: global distributions, validation, and comparison with model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Duflot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present global distributions of C2H2 and HCN total columns derived from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI. These distributions are obtained with a fast method allowing to retrieve C2H2 abundance globally with a 5% precision and HCN abundance in the tropical (subtropical belt with a 10% (30% precision. IASI data are compared for validation purposes with ground-based Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectrometer measurements at four selected stations. We show that there is an overall agreement between the ground-based and space measurements. Global C2H2 and subtropical HCN abundances retrieved from IASI spectra show the expected seasonality linked to variations in the anthropogenic emissions and seasonal biomass burning activity, as well as exceptional events, and are in good agreement with previous spaceborne studies. IASI measurements are also compared to the distributions from the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4. Seasonal cycles observed from satellite data are reasonably well reproduced by the model. However, the model seems to overestimate (underestimate anthropogenic (biomass burning emissions and a negative global mean bias of 1% (16% of the model relative to the satellite observations was found for C2H2 (HCN.

  13. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roney, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    While much is understood about dendritic cells and their role in the immune system, the study of these cells is critical to gain a more complete understanding of their function. Dendritic cell isolation from mouse body tissues can be difficult and the number of cells isolated small. This protocol describes the growth of large number of dendritic cells from the culture of mouse bone marrow cells. The dendritic cells grown in culture facilitate experiments that may require large number of dendritic cells without great expense or use of large number of mice.

  14. Enhancement of Spontaneous Activity by HCN4 Overexpression in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes - A Possible Biological Pacemaker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Saito

    Full Text Available Establishment of a biological pacemaker is expected to solve the persisting problems of a mechanical pacemaker including the problems of battery life and electromagnetic interference. Enhancement of the funny current (If flowing through hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels and attenuation of the inward rectifier K+ current (IK1 flowing through inward rectifier potassium (Kir channels are essential for generation of a biological pacemaker. Therefore, we generated HCN4-overexpressing mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs and induced cardiomyocytes that originally show poor IK1 currents, and we investigated whether the HCN4-overexpressing mESC-derived cardiomyocytes (mESC-CMs function as a biological pacemaker in vitro.The rabbit Hcn4 gene was transfected into mESCs, and stable clones were selected. mESC-CMs were generated via embryoid bodies and purified under serum/glucose-free and lactate-supplemented conditions. Approximately 90% of the purified cells were troponin I-positive by immunostaining. In mESC-CMs, expression level of the Kcnj2 gene encoding Kir2.1, which is essential for generation of IK1 currents that are responsible for stabilizing the resting membrane potential, was lower than that in an adult mouse ventricle. HCN4-overexpressing mESC-CMs expressed about a 3-times higher level of the Hcn4 gene than did non-overexpressing mESC-CMs. Expression of the Cacna1h gene, which encodes T-type calcium channel and generates diastolic depolarization in the sinoatrial node, was also confirmed. Additionally, genes required for impulse conduction including Connexin40, Connexin43, and Connexin45 genes, which encode connexins forming gap junctions, and the Scn5a gene, which encodes sodium channels, are expressed in the cells. HCN4-overexpressing mESC-CMs showed significantly larger If currents and more rapid spontaneous beating than did non-overexpressing mESC-CMs. The beating rate of HCN4-overexpressing mESC-CMs responded

  15. Mechanisms and Kinetics of Radical Reaction of O(1D,3P) + HCN System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yu-Cheng; DU Jin-Yan; JU Xue-Hai; YE Shi-Yong; ZHOU Tao

    2008-01-01

    The reaction of HCN with O(1D, 3P) radical has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio methods. The stationary points on the reaction paths(reactants, intermediates and products) were optimized at the (U)B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ level.Single-point calculations were performed at the (U)QCISD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level for the optimized structures and all the total energies were corrected by zero-point energy. It is shown that there exist three competing mechanisms of oxygen attacking nitrogen O→N, oxygen attacking carbon O→C and oxygen attacking hydrogen O→H. The rate constants were obtained via Eyring transition-state theory in the temperature range of 600~2000 K. The linear relationship between lnk and 1/T was presented. The results show that path 1 is the main reaction channel and the product of NCO + H is predominant.

  16. VB studies on bonding features of HNC(←→)HCN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖新丽; 吴玮; 莫亦荣; 张乾二

    2003-01-01

    Within the bonded tableau unitary group approach (BTUGA), a scheme, combined with Pauling's resonance theory to select the predominant valence bond structures for VB calculations, is proposed. This scheme ensures a reliable and illustrative bonding picture in the description of chemical reactions, as exemplified by the isomerization reaction HNCHCN. The computation results account for important bonding features about this isomerization at the ab initio level and explore the mechanism of phenomena such as (i) HCN is more stable than HNC; (ii) the C-N bond first lengthens and then shortens in the vicinity of the transition state; (iii) only H-atom migration is observed in the isomerization process, without the breaking of the CN bond. Our results demonstrate that only a few bonded tableau functions are sufficient enough to provide a visual and reliable bonding picture.

  17. Electron-impact excitation of the low-lying electronic states of HCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutjian, A.; Tanaka, H.; Srivastava, S. K.; Wicke, B. G.

    1977-01-01

    The first study of the low-energy electron-impact excitation of low-lying electronic transitions in the HCN molecule is reported. Measurements were made at incident electron energies of 11.6 and 21.6 eV in the energy-loss range of 3-10 eV, and at scattering angles of 20-130 deg. Inelastic scattering spectra were placed on the absolute cross-section scale by determining first the ratio of inelastic-to-elastic scattering cross sections, and then separately measuring the absolute elastic scattering cross section. Several new electronic transitions are observed which are intrinsically overlapped in the molecule itself. Assignments of these electronic transitions are suggested. These assignments are based on present spectroscopic and cross-sections measurements, high-energy electron scattering spectra, optical absorption spectra, and ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

  18. A reduced mechanical model for cAMP-modulated gating in HCN channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weißgraeber, Stephanie; Saponaro, Andrea; Thiel, Gerhard; Hamacher, Kay

    2017-01-01

    We developed an in silico mechanical model to analyze the process of cAMP-induced conformational modulations in hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which conduct cations across the membrane of mammalian heart and brain cells. The structural analysis reveals a quaternary twist in the cytosolic parts of the four subunits in the channel tetramer. This motion augments the intrinsic dynamics of the very same protein structure. The pronounced differences between the cAMP bound and unbound form include a mutual interaction between the C-linker of the cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) and the linker between the S4 and S5 transmembrane domain of the channel. This allows a mechanistic annotation of the twisting motion in relation to the allosteric modulation of voltage-dependent gating of this channel by cAMP. PMID:28074902

  19. A reduced mechanical model for cAMP-modulated gating in HCN channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weißgraeber, Stephanie; Saponaro, Andrea; Thiel, Gerhard; Hamacher, Kay

    2017-01-01

    We developed an in silico mechanical model to analyze the process of cAMP-induced conformational modulations in hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which conduct cations across the membrane of mammalian heart and brain cells. The structural analysis reveals a quaternary twist in the cytosolic parts of the four subunits in the channel tetramer. This motion augments the intrinsic dynamics of the very same protein structure. The pronounced differences between the cAMP bound and unbound form include a mutual interaction between the C-linker of the cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) and the linker between the S4 and S5 transmembrane domain of the channel. This allows a mechanistic annotation of the twisting motion in relation to the allosteric modulation of voltage-dependent gating of this channel by cAMP.

  20. Acetylene (C2H2) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) from IASI satellite observations: global distributions, validation, and comparison with model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duflot, V.; Wespes, C.; Clarisse, L.; Hurtmans, D.; Ngadi, Y.; Jones, N.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Hadji-Lazaro, J.; Vigouroux, C.; De Mazière, M.; Metzger, J.-M.; Mahieu, E.; Servais, C.; Hase, F.; Schneider, M.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P.-F.

    2015-09-01

    We present global distributions of C2H2 and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) total columns derived from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) for the years 2008-2010. These distributions are obtained with a fast method allowing to retrieve C2H2 abundance globally with a 5 % precision and HCN abundance in the tropical (subtropical) belt with a 10 % (25 %) precision. IASI data are compared for validation purposes with ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer measurements at four selected stations. We show that there is an overall agreement between the ground-based and space measurements with correlation coefficients for daily mean measurements ranging from 0.28 to 0.81, depending on the site. Global C2H2 and subtropical HCN abundances retrieved from IASI spectra show the expected seasonality linked to variations in the anthropogenic emissions and seasonal biomass burning activity, as well as exceptional events, and are in good agreement with previous spaceborne studies. Total columns simulated by the Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4 (MOZART-4) are compared to the ground-based FTIR measurements at the four selected stations. The model is able to capture the seasonality in the two species in most of the cases, with correlation coefficients for daily mean measurements ranging from 0.50 to 0.86, depending on the site. IASI measurements are also compared to the distributions from MOZART-4. Seasonal cycles observed from satellite data are reasonably well reproduced by the model with correlation coefficients ranging from -0.31 to 0.93 for C2H2 daily means, and from 0.09 to 0.86 for HCN daily means, depending on the considered region. However, the anthropogenic (biomass burning) emissions used in the model seem to be overestimated (underestimated), and a negative global mean bias of 1 % (16 %) of the model relative to the satellite observations was found for C2H2 (HCN).

  1. Release of HCN, NH{sub 3} and HNCO from the thermal gas-phase cracking of coal pyrolysis tars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledesma, E.B.; Li, C.-Z.; Nelson, P.F.; Mackie, J.C. [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Division of Coal and Energy Technology

    1998-05-01

    The release of HCN, NH{sub 3} and HNCO from the thermal cracking of coal tars produced by rapid pyrolysis has been investigated using a quartz fluidized-bed reactor coupled to a quartz tubular-flow reactor. Primary pyrolysis at 600{degree}C in the fluidized-bed reactor generated the tars which were subsequently thermally decomposed in the tubular reactor in the temperature range of 600-1000{degree}C. HNCO was the initial gaseous N-containing species to be evolved, its formation commencing from 600{degree}C. HNCO was found to be a significant N-containing product of tar cracking and some previous measurements of NH{sub 3} yields during coal pyrolysis are probably the sum of the yields of NH{sub 3} and HNCO. Both HCN and NH{sub 3} start to appear from above 700{degree}C. While NH{sub 3} reaches a maximum at 850{degree}C, HCN continues to increase at higher temperatures. It is suggested that NH{sub 3} may be formed from the interactions of N-containing species with donatable H on the soot surface. FTIR analyses of the tars demonstrate that increases in the temperature of pyrolysis result in a decrease in aromatic substitution. Kinetic parameters for the release of tar-N species as HCN were determined by measurement of HCN yields and by assuming that the reaction was first order in tar-N. An overall global rate expression of 10{sup 6} exp(-140 {+-} 15/RT)s{sup -1} was derived from the data. The rate expression suggests that nitrogen release during tar cracking is a complex process. 31 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Development of an HCN dual laser for the interferometer on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gen; Wei, Xuechao; Liu, Haiqing; Shen, Junjie; Jie, Yinxian; Lian, Hui; Zeng, Long; Zou, Zhiyong; Zhang, Jibo; Wang, Shouxin

    2017-08-01

    A two-color continuous wave (CW) discharge-pumped far-infrared (FIR) hydrogen cyanide (HCN) laser was developed as the source of an interferometer for measuring the line-averaged electron density in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The output power of the dual laser system was about 120 mW from each laser on the 337 μm (0.89 THz) line. The polarization of each output beam was fixed using thin tungsten filaments and oscillated in the EH11 mode. Different megahertz intermediate frequencies (IF) and a slight frequency offset (˜1 MHz) were generated in this system to replace the traditional rotating grating with ˜10 kHz IF, and this can improve the time resolution of the interferometer significantly. The experimental result showed that different IF signals were obtained by successfully adjusting the cavity length. In particular, the beat frequency was captured at ˜1.3 MHz by a Schottky mixer when the length of the resonant cavities was changed by 5 μm by an automatic adjustment system. In order to study the character of IF, a long time record of the IF signal was carried out, and the IF signal could be stabilized for a few minutes in the range of 2 MHz to 3 MHz. A real-time IF stability control system was initially designed for long pulse discharge experiments on the EAST. The ˜MHz frequency response and good phase sensitivity of the dual laser HCN interferometer will allow the system to track fast density profiles and resolve fast MHD events, such as tearing/neoclassical tearing, disruptions, etc. Contributed paper, published as part of the Proceedings of the 3rd Domestic Electromagnetic Plasma Diagnostics Workshop, September 2016, Hefei, China.

  3. SUBMILLIMETER-HCN DIAGRAM FOR ENERGY DIAGNOSTICS IN THE CENTERS OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, Takuma; Kohno, Kotaro [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Aalto, Susanne [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Observatory, SE-439 94 Onsala (Sweden); Espada, Daniel; Martín, Sergio; Nakanishi, Kouichiro [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Córdova, 3107, Vitacura, Santiago 763-0355 (Chile); Fathi, Kambiz [Stockholm Observatory, Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Harada, Nanase; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Matsushita, Satoki [Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Hatsukade, Bunyo; Imanishi, Masatoshi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Krips, Melanie [Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimétrique, 300 rue de la Piscine, Domaine Universitaire, F-38406 St. Martin d’Hères (France); Meier, David S. [Department of Physics, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801 Leroy Place, Soccoro, NM 87801 (United States); Nakai, Naomasa [Department of Physics, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Ten-nodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Schinnerer, Eva [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, Heidelberg D-69117 (Germany); Sheth, Kartik [NASA, 300 E Street SW, Washington, DC 20546 (United States); Terashima, Yuichi [Department of Physics, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8577 (Japan); Turner, Jean L., E-mail: takumaizumi@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Compiling data from literature and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array archive, we show enhanced HCN(4–3)/HCO{sup +}(4–3) and/or HCN(4–3)/CS(7–6) integrated intensity ratios in circumnuclear molecular gas around active galactic nuclei (AGNs) compared to those in starburst (SB) galaxies (submillimeter HCN enhancement). The number of sample galaxies is significantly increased from our previous work. We expect that this feature could potentially be an extinction-free energy diagnostic tool of nuclear regions of galaxies. Non-LTE radiative transfer modelings of the above molecular emission lines involving both collisional and radiative excitation, as well as a photon trapping effect, were conducted to investigate the cause of the high line ratios in AGNs. As a result, we found that enhanced abundance ratios of HCN to HCO{sup +} and HCN to CS in AGNs as compared to SB galaxies by a factor of a few to even ≳10 are a plausible explanation for the submillimeter HCN enhancement. However, a counterargument of a systematically higher gas density in AGNs than in SB galaxies can also be a plausible scenario. Although we cannot fully distinguish these two scenarios at this moment owing to an insufficient amount of multi-transition, multi-species data, the former scenario is indicative of abnormal chemical composition in AGNs. Regarding the actual mechanism to realize the composition, we suggest that it is difficult with conventional gas-phase X-ray-dominated region ionization models to reproduce the observed high line ratios. We might have to take into account other mechanisms such as neutral–neutral reactions that are efficiently activated in high-temperature environments and/or mechanically heated regions to further understand the high line ratios in AGNs.

  4. ALMA IMAGING OF HCN, CS, AND DUST IN ARP 220 AND NGC 6240

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scoville, Nick; Manohar, Swarnima; Murchikova, Lena [California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sheth, Kartik [North American ALMA Science Center, National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Walter, Fabian; Zschaechner, Laura [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Yun, Min [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Koda, Jin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Sanders, David; Barnes, Joshua [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, HI 96822 (United States); Thompson, Todd [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Robertson, Brant; Tacconi, Linda; Narayanan, Desika [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); Genzel, Reinhard; Davies, Richard [Max-Planck-Institut fur extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hernquist, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Brown, Robert [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Hayward, Christopher C. [TAPIR 350-17, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kartaltepe, Jeyhan [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); and others

    2015-02-10

    We report ALMA Band 7 (350 GHz) imaging at 0.''4-0.''6 resolution and Band 9 (696 GHz) at ∼0.''25 resolution of the luminous IR galaxies Arp 220 and NGC 6240. The long wavelength dust continuum is used to estimate interstellar medium masses for Arp 220 east and west and NGC 6240 of 1.9, 4.2, and 1.6 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}within radii of 69, 65, and 190 pc. The HCN emission was modeled to derive the emissivity distribution as a function of radius and the kinematics of each nuclear disk, yielding dynamical masses consistent with the masses and sizes derived from the dust emission. In Arp 220, the major dust and gas concentrations are at radii less than 50 pc in both counter-rotating nuclear disks. The thickness of the disks in Arp 220 estimated from the velocity dispersion and rotation velocities are 10-20 pc and the mean gas densities are n{sub H{sub 2}}∼10{sup 5} cm{sup –3} at R <50 pc. We develop an analytic treatment for the molecular excitation (including photon trapping), yielding volume densities for both the HCN and CS emission with n {sub H2} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}. The agreement of the mean density from the total mass and size with that required for excitation suggests that the volume is essentially filled with dense gas, i.e., it is not cloudy or like swiss cheese.

  5. An X-linked channelopathy with cardiomegaly due to a CLIC2 mutation enhancing ryanodine receptor channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Kyoko; Liu, Dan; Tarpey, Patrick; Gallant, Esther; Lam, Alex; Witham, Shawn; Alexov, Emil; Chaubey, Alka; Stevenson, Roger E; Schwartz, Charles E; Board, Philip G; Dulhunty, Angela F

    2012-10-15

    Chloride intracellular channel 2 (CLIC2) protein is a member of the glutathione transferase class of proteins. Its' only known function is the regulation of ryanodine receptor (RyR) intracellular Ca(2+) release channels. These RyR proteins play a major role in the regulation of Ca(2+) signaling in many cells. Utilizing exome capture and deep sequencing of genes on the X-chromosome, we have identified a mutation in CLIC2 (c.303C>G, p.H101Q) which is associated with X-linked intellectual disability (ID), atrial fibrillation, cardiomegaly, congestive heart failure (CHF), some somatic features and seizures. Functional studies of the H101Q variant indicated that it stimulated rather than inhibited the action of RyR channels, with channels remaining open for longer times and potentially amplifying Ca(2+) signals dependent on RyR channel activity. The overly active RyRs in cardiac and skeletal muscle cells and neuronal cells would result in abnormal cardiac function and trigger post-synaptic pathways and neurotransmitter release. The presence of both cardiomegaly and CHF in the two affected males and atrial fibrillation in one are consistent with abnormal RyR2 channel function. Since the dysfunction of RyR2 channels in the brain via 'leaky mutations' can result in mild developmental delay and seizures, our data also suggest a vital role for the CLIC2 protein in maintaining normal cognitive function via its interaction with RyRs in the brain. Therefore, our patients appear to suffer from a new channelopathy comprised of ID, seizures and cardiac problems because of enhanced Ca(2+) release through RyRs in neuronal cells and cardiac muscle cells.

  6. Evidence that dendritic mitochondria negatively regulate dendritic branching in pyramidal neurons in the neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toshiya; Murakami, Fujio

    2014-05-14

    The precise branching patterns of dendritic arbors have a profound impact on information processing in individual neurons and the brain. These patterns are established by positive and negative regulation of the dendritic branching. Although the mechanisms for positive regulation have been extensively investigated, little is known about those for negative regulation. Here, we present evidence that mitochondria located in developing dendrites are involved in the negative regulation of dendritic branching. We visualized mitochondria in pyramidal neurons of the mouse neocortex during dendritic morphogenesis using in utero electroporation of a mitochondria-targeted fluorescent construct. We altered the mitochondrial distribution in vivo by overexpressing Mfn1, a mitochondrial shaping protein, or the Miro-binding domain of TRAK2 (TRAK2-MBD), a truncated form of a motor-adaptor protein. We found that dendritic mitochondria were preferentially targeted to the proximal portion of dendrites only during dendritic morphogenesis. Overexpression of Mfn1 or TRAK2-MBD depleted mitochondria from the dendrites, an effect that was accompanied by increased branching of the proximal portion of the dendrites. This dendritic abnormality cannot be accounted for by changes in the distribution of membrane trafficking organelles since the overexpression of Mfn1 did not alter the distributions of the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, or endosomes. Additionally, neither did these constructs impair neuronal viability or mitochondrial function. Therefore, our results suggest that dendritic mitochondria play a critical role in the establishment of the precise branching pattern of dendritic arbors by negatively affecting dendritic branching.

  7. Pacemaker Activity of the Human Sinoatrial Node: An Update on the Effects of Mutations in HCN4 on the Hyperpolarization-Activated Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie O. Verkerk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2003, several loss-of-function mutations in the HCN4 gene, which encodes the HCN4 protein, have been associated with sinus node dysfunction. In human sinoatrial node (SAN, HCN4 is the most abundant of the four isoforms of the HCN family. Tetramers of HCN subunits constitute the ion channels that conduct the hyperpolarization-activated “funny” current (If, which plays an important modulating role in SAN pacemaker activity. Voltage-clamp experiments on HCN4 channels expressed in COS-7, CHO and HEK-293 cells, as well as in Xenopus oocytes have revealed changes in the expression and kinetics of mutant channels, but the extent to which especially the kinetic changes would affect If flowing during a human SAN action potential often remains unresolved. In our contribution to the Topical Collection on Human Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Disease Diagnostics, we provide an updated review of the mutation-induced changes in the expression and kinetics of HCN4 channels and provide an overview of their effects on If during the time course of a human SAN action potential, as assessed in simulated action potential clamp experiments. Future research may solve apparent inconsistencies between data from clinical studies and data from in vitro and in silico experiments.

  8. The catalytic chemistry of HCN + NO2 over Na- and Ba-Y,FAU: an in situ FTIR and TPD/TPR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szanyi, János; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles H F

    2005-02-03

    The adsorption of HCN and the reaction of HCN with NO(2) over Na-, and Ba-Y,FAU zeolite catalysts were investigated using in situ FTIR and TPD/TPR spectroscopies. Both catalysts adsorb HCN molecularly at room temperature, and the strength of adsorption is higher over Ba-Y than Na-Y. Over Na-Y, the reaction between HCN and NO(2) is slow at 473 K. On Ba-Y, HCN reacts readily with NO(2) at 473K, forming N(2), CO, CO(2), HNCO, NO, N(2)O, and C(2)N(2). The results of this investigation suggest that initial step in the HCN + NO(2) reaction over these catalysts is the hydrogen abstraction from HCN, and the formation of ionic CN- and NC- species. The formation of N(2) can proceed directly from these ionic species upon their interaction with NO+. Alternatively, these cyanide species can be oxidized to isocyanates which then can be further transformed to N(2), N(2)O and CO(x) in their subsequent reaction with NO(x).

  9. Phase field modeling of dendritic coarsening during isothermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yutuo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic coarsening in Al-2mol%Si alloy during isothermal solidification at 880K was investigated by phase field modeling. Three coarsening mechanisms operate in the alloy: (a melting of small dendrite arms; (b coalescence of dendrites near the tips leading to the entrapment of liquid droplets; (c smoothing of dendrites. Dendrite melting is found to be dominant in the stage of dendritic growth, whereas coalescence of dendrites and smoothing of dendrites are dominant during isothermal holding. The simulated results provide a better understanding of dendrite coarsening during isothermal solidification.

  10. Dendritic cells and contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yoshinori; Aiba, Setsuya

    2007-10-01

    Contact dermatitis is a biological response to simple chemicals in the skin. Although it is well known that allergic contact dermatitis is mediated by the immune system, it is still uncertain whether it is a kind of protective response or it is simply an unnecessary response. We have demonstrated the following: (1) haptens activate Langerhans cells in the initiation phase of murine allergic contact dermatitis in vivo, (2) haptens activate human monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro, (3) the activation of dendritic cells by haptens is primarily mediated by the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and (4) the activation of p38 MAPK is mediated by stimulation related to an imbalance of intracellular redox. Based on these observations, we will discuss the biological significance of contact dermatitis. In addition, we will review some up-to-date findings on Langerhans cell biology.

  11. Lipid dynamics at dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotti, Carlos Gerardo; Esteban, Jose Antonio; Ledesma, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic changes in the structure and composition of the membrane protrusions forming dendritic spines underlie memory and learning processes. In recent years a great effort has been made to characterize in detail the protein machinery that controls spine plasticity. However, we know much less about the involvement of lipids, despite being major membrane components and structure determinants. Moreover, protein complexes that regulate spine plasticity depend on specific interactions with membrane lipids for proper function and accurate intracellular signaling. In this review we gather information available on the lipid composition at dendritic spine membranes and on its dynamics. We pay particular attention to the influence that spine lipid dynamism has on glutamate receptors, which are key regulators of synaptic plasticity.

  12. Microtubules in Dendritic Spine Development

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    It is generally believed that only the actin cytoskeleton resides in dendritic spines and controls spine morphology and plasticity. Here we report that microtubules (MTs) are present in spines and that shRNA knockdown of the MT-plus end binding protein EB3 significantly reduces spine formation. Furthermore, stabilization and inhibition of MTs by low doses of taxol and nocodazole enhance and impair spine formation elicited by BDNF, respectively. Therefore, MTs play an important role in the con...

  13. Melanoma immunotherapy: dendritic cell vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Lozada-Requena, Ivan; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Núñez, César; Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Aguilar, José Luis; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.

    2015-01-01

    This is a narrative review that shows accessible information to the scientific community about melanoma and immunotherapy.Dendritic cells have the ability to participate in innate and adaptive immunity, but are not unfamiliar to the immune evasion oftumors. Knowing the biology and role has led to generate in vitro several prospects of autologous cell vaccines against diversetypes of cancer in humans and animal models. However, given the low efficiency they have shown, we must implementstrateg...

  14. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWu; AleksandarDakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived calls. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors, some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Fit3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):112-118.

  15. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wu; Aleksandar Dakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived cells. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors,some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Flt3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse.

  16. Dendritic web silicon for solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidensticker, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    The dendritic web process for growing long thin ribbon crystals of silicon and other semiconductors is described. Growth is initiated from a thin wirelike dendrite seed which is brought into contact with the melt surface. Initially, the seed grows laterally to form a button at the melt surface; when the seed is withdrawn, needlelike dendrites propagate from each end of the button into the melt, and the web portion of the crystal is formed by the solidification of the liquid film supported by the button and the bounding dendrites. Apparatus used for dendritic web growth, material characteristics, and the two distinctly different mechanisms involved in the growth of a single crystal are examined. The performance of solar cells fabricated from dendritic web material is indistinguishable from the performance of cells fabricated from Czochralski grown material.

  17. Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo L Gollo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the past decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of an active dendritic tree is a highly non-linear function of its afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB. Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease in dynamic range.

  18. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) inhibits cortical dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean C; Palmer, Lucy M; Nyffeler, Thomas; Müri, René M; Larkum, Matthew E

    2016-03-18

    One of the leading approaches to non-invasively treat a variety of brain disorders is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, despite its clinical prevalence, very little is known about the action of TMS at the cellular level let alone what effect it might have at the subcellular level (e.g. dendrites). Here, we examine the effect of single-pulse TMS on dendritic activity in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex using an optical fiber imaging approach. We find that TMS causes GABAB-mediated inhibition of sensory-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) activity. We conclude that TMS directly activates fibers within the upper cortical layers that leads to the activation of dendrite-targeting inhibitory neurons which in turn suppress dendritic Ca(2+) activity. This result implies a specificity of TMS at the dendritic level that could in principle be exploited for investigating these structures non-invasively.

  19. Airborne measurements of CO2, CH4 and HCN in boreal biomass burning plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Sebastian J.; Bauguitte, Stephane; Muller, Jennifer B. A.; Le Breton, Michael; Archibald, Alex; Gallagher, Martin W.; Allen, Grant; Percival, Carl J.

    2013-04-01

    Biomass burning plays an important role in the budgets of a variety of atmospheric trace gases and particles. For example, fires in boreal Russia have been linked with large growths in the global concentrations of trace gases such as CO2, CH4 and CO (Langenfelds et al., 2002; Simpson et al., 2006). High resolution airborne measurements of CO2, CH4 and HCN were made over Eastern Canada onboard the UK Atmospheric Research Aircraft FAAM BAe-146 from 12 July to 4 August 2011. These observations were made as part of the BORTAS project (Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites). Flights were aimed at transecting and sampling the outflow from the commonly occurring North American boreal forest fires during the summer months and to investigate and identify the chemical composition and evolution of these plumes. CO2 and CH4 dry air mole fractions were determined using an adapted system based on a Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (FGGA, Model RMT-200) from Los Gatos Research Inc, which uses the cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy technique. In-flight calibrations revealed a mean accuracy of 0.57 ppmv and 2.31 ppbv for 1 Hz observations of CO2 and CH4, respectively, during the BORTAS project. During these flights a number of fresh and photochemically-aged plumes were identified using simultaneous HCN measurements. HCN is a distinctive and useful marker for forest fire emissions and it was detected using chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS). In the freshest plumes, strong relationships were found between CH4, CO2 and other tracers for biomass burning. From this we were able to estimate that 8.5 ± 0.9 g of CH4 and 1512 ± 185 g of CO2 were released into the atmosphere per kg of dry matter burnt. These emission factors are in good agreement with estimates from previous studies and can be used to calculate budgets for the region. However for aged plumes the correlations between CH4 and other

  20. Dendritic Cells, New Tools for Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Review Dendritic cells , new tools for vaccination Jesus Colino, Clifford M. Snapper * Department of Pathology, Uniformed Services University of the...2003 Éditions scientifiques et médicales Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved. Keywords: Vaccines; Immunotherapy; Dendritic cells 1. Introduction During...DATE 2003 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cells , new tools for vaccination 5a

  1. Low Power Dendritic Computation for Wordspotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Nease

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate how a network of dendrites can be used to build the state decoding block of a wordspotter similar to a Hidden Markov Model (HMM classifier structure. We present simulation and experimental data for a single line dendrite and also experimental results for a dendrite-based classifier structure. This work builds on previously demonstrated building blocks of a neural network: the channel, synapses and dendrites using CMOS circuits. These structures can be used for speech and pattern recognition. The computational efficiency of such a system is >10 MMACs/μW as compared to Digital Systems which perform 10 MMACs/mW.

  2. Neoplasms derived from plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchetti, Fabio; Cigognetti, Marta; Fisogni, Simona; Rossi, Giuseppe; Lonardi, Silvia; Vermi, William

    2016-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms manifest in two clinically and pathologically distinct forms. The first variant is represented by nodular aggregates of clonally expanded plasmacytoid dendritic cells found in lymph nodes, skin, and bone marrow ('Mature plasmacytoid dendritic cells proliferation associated with myeloid neoplasms'). This entity is rare, although likely underestimated in incidence, and affects predominantly males. Almost invariably, it is associated with a myeloid neoplasm such as chronic myelomonocytic leukemia or other myeloid proliferations with monocytic differentiation. The concurrent myeloid neoplasm dominates the clinical pictures and guides treatment. The prognosis is usually dismal, but reflects the evolution of the associated myeloid leukemia rather than progressive expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. A second form of plasmacytoid dendritic cells tumor has been recently reported and described as 'blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm'. In this tumor, which is characterized by a distinctive cutaneous and bone marrow tropism, proliferating cells derive from immediate CD4(+)CD56(+) precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The diagnosis of this form can be easily accomplished by immunohistochemistry, using a panel of plasmacytoid dendritic cells markers. The clinical course of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is characterized by a rapid progression to systemic disease via hematogenous dissemination. The genomic landscape of this entity is currently under intense investigation. Recurrent somatic mutations have been uncovered in different genes, a finding that may open important perspectives for precision medicine also for this rare, but highly aggressive leukemia.

  3. Na(v)1.8 channelopathy in mutant mice deficient for myelin protein zero is detrimental to motor axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Alvarez, Susana; Pinchenko, Volodymyr; Klein, Dennis; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Wood, John N; Martini, Rudolf; Krarup, Christian

    2011-02-01

    Myelin protein zero mutations were found to produce Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease phenotypes with various degrees of myelin impairment and axonal loss, ranging from the mild 'demyelinating' adult form to severe and early onset forms. Protein zero deficient homozygous mice ( ) show a severe and progressive dysmyelinating neuropathy from birth with compromised myelin compaction, hypomyelination and distal axonal degeneration. A previous study using immunofluorescence showed that motor nerves deficient of myelin protein zero upregulate the Na(V)1.8 voltage gated sodium channel isoform, which is normally present only in restricted populations of sensory axons. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of motor axons in protein zero-deficient mice with particular emphasis on ectopic Na(V)1.8 voltage gated sodium channel. We combined 'threshold tracking' excitability studies with conventional nerve conduction studies, behavioural studies using rotor-rod measurements, and histological measures to assess membrane dysfunction and its progression in protein zero deficient homozygous mutants as compared with age-matched wild-type controls. The involvement of Na(V)1.8 was investigated by pharmacologic block using the subtype-selective Na(V)1.8 blocker A-803467 and chronically in Na(V)1.8 knock-outs. We found that in the context of dysmyelination, abnormal potassium ion currents and membrane depolarization, the ectopic Na(V)1.8 channels further impair the motor axon excitability in protein zero deficient homozygous mutants to an extent that precipitates conduction failure in severely affected axons. Our data suggest that a Na(V)1.8 channelopathy contributed to the poor motor function of protein zero deficient homozygous mutants, and that the conduction failure was associated with partially reversible reduction of the electrically evoked muscle response and of the clinical function as indicated by the partial recovery of function at rotor-rod measurements. As a

  4. Ion channelopathies in human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes: a dynamic clamp study with virtual IK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalie M.E. Meijer van Putten

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs are widely used in studying basic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias that are caused by ion channelopathies. Unfortunately, the action potential profile of hiPSC-CMs—and consequently the profile of individual membrane currents active during that action potential—differs substantially from that of native human cardiomyocytes, largely due to almost negligible expression of the inward rectifier potassium current (IK1.In the present study, we attempted to ‘normalize’ the action potential profile of our hiPSC-CMs by inserting a voltage dependent in silico IK1 into our hiPSC-CMs, using the dynamic clamp configuration of the patch clamp technique. Recordings were made from single hiPSC-CMs, using the perforated patch clamp technique at physiological temperature.We assessed three different models of IK1, with different degrees of inward rectification, and systematically varied the magnitude of the inserted IK1. Also, we modified the inserted IK1 in order to assess the effects of loss- and gain-of-function mutations in the KCNJ2 gene, which encodes the Kir2.1 protein that is primarily responsible for the IK1 channel in human ventricle.For our experiments, we selected spontaneously beating hiPSC-CMs, with negligible IK1 as demonstrated in separate voltage clamp experiments, which were paced at 1 Hz. Upon addition of in silico IK1 with a peak outward density of 4–6 pA/pF, these hiPSC-CMs showed a ventricular-like action potential morphology with a stable resting membrane potential near −80 mV and a maximum upstroke velocity >150 V/s (n=9. Proarrhythmic action potential changes were observed upon injection of both loss-of-function and gain-of-function IK1, as associated with Andersen-Tawil syndrome type 1 and short QT syndrome type 3, respectively (n=6.We conclude that injection of in silico IK1 makes the hiPSC-CM a more reliable model for investigating mechanisms underlying

  5. Excitation Mechanisms for HCN (1-0) and HCO+ (1-0) in Galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Privon, G C; Evans, A S; Iwasawa, K; Perez-Torres, M A; Armus, L; Diaz-Santos, T; Murphy, E J; Stierwalt, S; Aalto, S; Mazzarella, J M; Barcos-Munoz, L; Borish, H J; Inami, H; Kim, D -C; Treister, E; Surace, J A; Lord, S; Conway, J; Frayer, D T; Alberdi, A

    2015-01-01

    We present new IRAM 30m spectroscopic observations of the $\\sim88$ GHz band, including emission from the CCH (n=1-0) multiplet, HCN (1-0), HCO+ (1-0), and HNC (1-0), for a sample of 58 local luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies from the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). By combining our new IRAM data with literature data and Spitzer/IRS spectroscopy, we study the correspondence between these putative tracers of dense gas and the relative contribution of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation to the mid-infrared luminosity of each system. We find the HCN (1-0) emission to be enhanced in AGN-dominated systems ($\\langle$L'$_{HCN (1-0)}$/L'$_{HCO^+ (1-0)}\\rangle=1.84$), compared to composite and starburst-dominated systems ($\\langle$L'$_{HCN (1-0)}$/L'$_{HCO^+ (1-0)}\\rangle=1.14$, and 0.88, respectively). However, some composite and starburst systems have L'$_{HCN (1-0)}$/L'$_{HCO^+ (1-0)}$ ratios comparable to those of AGN, indicating that enhanced HCN emission is not uniquely ass...

  6. ALMA Detection of the Vibrationally Excited HCN J=4-3 Emission Line in the AGN-Hosting Luminous Infrared Galaxy IRAS 20551-4250

    CERN Document Server

    Imanishi, Masatoshi

    2013-01-01

    We present results from our ALMA Cycle 0 observations, at the frequencies around the HCN, HCO+, and HNC J=4-3 transition lines, of the luminous infrared galaxy IRAS 20551-4250 at z=0.043, which is known to host an energetically important obscured AGN. In addition to the targeted HCN, HCO+, and HNC J=4-3 emission lines, two additional strong emission lines are seen, which we attribute to H2S and CH3CN(+CCH). The HCN-to-HCO+ J=4-3 flux ratio (~0.7) is higher than in the other starburst-dominated galaxy (~0.2) observed in our ALMA Cycle 0 program. We tentatively (~5 sigma) detected the vibrationally excited (v2=1) HCN J=4-3 (l=1f) emission line, which is important for testing an infrared radiative pumping scenario for HCN. This is the second detection of this molecular transition in external galaxies. The most likely reason for this detection is not only the high flux of this emission line, but also the small molecular line widths observed in this galaxy, suggesting that vibrational excitation of HCN may be rela...

  7. CN radical hydrogenation from solid H2 reactions, an alternative way of HCN formation in the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borget, Fabien; Müller, Sandra; Grote, Dirk; Theulé, Patrice; Vinogradoff, Vassilissa; Chiavassa, Thierry; Sander, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    Context. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is the most abundant molecule of the interstellar medium (ISM) in gas phase and it has been assumed to exist in solid state or as coating on grains. Aims: Our goal is to show that solid H2 can act as a hydrogenation agent, reacting with CN radicals to form HCN. Methods: In a H2 matrix, we studied the hydrogenation of the CN radical generated from the vacuum ultraviolet photolysis (VUV-photolysis) of C2N2 at 3.8 K. We modified the wavelengths and the host gas in order to be sure that CN radicals can abstract H from H2 molecules. Results: HCN monomers, dimers, and oligomers have been characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). H2CN as well as CN radicals have also been clearly observed during the photolysis performed at 3.8 K. Conclusions: H2 is a hydrogenation reagent towards CN radicals producing HCN. This type of reaction should be taken into account for the reactivity at low temperature in contaminated H2 ice macro-particles (CHIMPs), H2 flakes or in the first sublayers of grains where solid H2 has accumulated.

  8. The HCN4 channel mutation D553N associated with bradycardia has a C-linker mediated gating defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Michael F; Zuzarte, Marylou; Schlichthörl, Günter; Klöcker, Nikolaj; Decher, Niels

    2012-01-01

    The D553N mutation located in the C-linker of the cardiac pacemaker channel HCN4 is thought to cause sino-atrial dysfunction via a pronounced dominant-negative trafficking defect. Since HCN4 mutations usually have a minor defect in channel gating, it was our aim to further characterize the disease causing mechanism of D553N. Fluorescence microscopy, FACS, TEVC and patch-clamp recordings were performed to characterize D553N. Surprisingly, we found that D553N channels reach the plasma membrane and have no apparent trafficking defect. Co-expression of D553N with HCN4 also revealed no dominant-negative effect on wild-type channels. Consistent with the normal cell surface expression of D553N, it was possible to extensively characterize D553N mutants in Xenopus oocytes and mammalian cells. D553N channels generate currents with reduced amplitude, while the kinetics of activation and deactivation are not altered. While the regulation of D553N by tyrosine kinases is normal, we observed a change in the cAMP regulation which however cannot account for the strong loss-of-function of the mutant. The pronounced current reduction and the regular surface expression indicate a major gating defect of the C-linker gate. We hypothesize that the D553N mutation stabilizes a previously reported salt bridge important for the gating of the channel. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Uncertainty quantification and robust predictive system analysis for high temperature kinetics of HCN/O2/Ar mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Sai Hung; Miki, Kenji; Prudencio, Ernesto; Simmons, Chris

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a stochastic system based Bayesian approach is applied to quantify the uncertainties involved in the modeling of the HCN/O2/Ar mixture kinetics proposed by Thielen and Roth (1987). This enables more robust predictions of quantities of interest such as rate coefficients of HCN + Ar → H + CN + Ar and O2 + CN → NCO + O by using a stochastic Arrhenius form calibrated against their experimental data. This Bayesian approach requires the evaluation of multidimensional integrals, which cannot be done analytically. Here a recently developed stochastic simulation algorithm, which allows for efficient sampling in the high-dimensional parameter space, is used. We quantify the uncertainties in the modeling of the HCN/O2/Ar mixture kinetics and in turn the two rate coefficients and the other relevant rate coefficients. The uncertainty in the error including both the experimental measurement error and physical modeling error is also quantified. The effect of the number of uncertain parameters on the uncertainties is investigated.

  10. Measurements of hydrogen cyanide (HCN and acetylene (C2H2 from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Clerbaux

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen cyanide (HCN and acetylene (C2H2 are ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases with medium lifetime, which are frequently used as indicators of combustion sources and as tracers for atmospheric transport and chemistry. Because of their weak infrared absorption, overlapped by the CO2 Q-branch near 720 cm−1, nadir sounders have up to now failed to measure these gases routinely. Taking into account CO2 line mixing we provide for the first time extensive measurements of HCN and C2H2 total columns at Reunion Island (21° S; 55° E and Jungfraujoch (46° N; 8° E in 2009–2010 using observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI. These are compared with local ground-based Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR measurements and we demonstrate that the seasonality is well captured, except for HCN at Jungfraujoch. We also examine a nonspecific biomass burning plume over austral Africa and show that the emission ratios with respect to CO agree with previously reported values.

  11. Measurements of hydrogen cyanide (HCN and acetylene (C2H2 from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Duflot

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen cyanide (HCN and acetylene (C2H2 are ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases with medium lifetime, which are frequently used as indicators of combustion sources and as tracers for atmospheric transport and chemistry. Because of their weak infrared absorption, overlapped by the CO2 Q branch near 720 cm−1, nadir sounders have up to now failed to measure these gases routinely. Taking into account CO2 line mixing, we provide for the first time extensive measurements of HCN and C2H2 total columns at Reunion Island (21° S, 55° E and Jungfraujoch (46° N, 8° E in 2009–2010 using observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI. A first order comparison with local ground-based Fourier transform infraRed (FTIR measurements has been carried out allowing tests of seasonal consistency which is reasonably captured, except for HCN at Jungfraujoch. The IASI data shows a greater tendency to high C2H2 values. We also examine a nonspecific biomass burning plume over austral Africa and show that the emission ratios with respect to CO agree with previously reported values.

  12. In vivo dendrite regeneration after injury is different from dendrite development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tun; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2016-01-01

    Neurons receive information along dendrites and send signals along axons to synaptic contacts. The factors that control axon regeneration have been examined in many systems, but dendrite regeneration has been largely unexplored. Here we report that, in intact Drosophila larvae, a discrete injury that removes all dendrites induces robust dendritic growth that recreates many features of uninjured dendrites, including the number of dendrite branches that regenerate and responsiveness to sensory stimuli. However, the growth and patterning of injury-induced dendrites is significantly different from uninjured dendrites. We found that regenerated arbors cover much less territory than uninjured neurons, fail to avoid crossing over other branches from the same neuron, respond less strongly to mechanical stimuli, and are pruned precociously. Finally, silencing the electrical activity of the neurons specifically blocks injury-induced, but not developmental, dendrite growth. By elucidating the essential features of dendrites grown in response to acute injury, our work builds a framework for exploring dendrite regeneration in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27542831

  13. Recrystallization phenomena of solution grown paraffin dendrites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, F.F.A.; Stasse, O.; Suchtelen, van J.; Enckevort, van W.J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Paraffin crystals were grown from decane solutions using a micro-Bridgman set up for in-situ observation of the morphology at the growth front. It is shown that for large imposed velocities, dendrites are obtained. After dendritic growth, aging or recrystallization processes set in rather quickly, c

  14. A Case of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köpeczi Judit Beáta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia is a rare subtype of acute leukemia, which has recently been established as a distinct pathologic entity that typically follows a highly aggressive clinical course in adults. The aim of this report is to present a case of plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia due to its rarity and difficulty to recognize and diagnose it.

  15. Electric pulse current stimulation increases electrophysiological properties of If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected canine mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuanyuan; Luo, Shouming; Yang, Pan; Song, Zhiyuan

    2016-04-01

    The 'funny' current, also known as the If current, play a crucial role in the spontaneous diastolic depolarization of sinoatrial node cells. The If current is primarily induced by the protein encoded by the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel 4 (HCN4) gene. The functional If channel can be reconstructed in canine mesenchymal stem cells (cMSCs) transfected with mouse HCN4 (mHCN4). Biomimetic studies have shown that electric pulse current stimulation (EPCS) can promote cardiogenesis in cMSCs. However, whether EPCS is able to influence the properties of the If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected cMSCs remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of EPCS on the If current reconstructed in mHCN4-transfected cMSCs. The cMSCs were transfected with the lentiviral vector pLentis-mHCN4-GFP. Following transfection, these cells were divided into two groups: mHCN4-transfected cMSCs (group A), and mHCN4-transfected cMSCs induced by EPCS (group B). Using a whole cell patch-clamp technique, the If current was recorded, and group A cMSCs showed significant time and voltage dependencies and sensitivity to extracellular Cs+. The half-maximal activation (V1/2) value was -101.2±4.6 mV and the time constant of activation was 324±41 msec under -160 mV. In the group B cells the If current increased obviously and activation curve moved to right. The absolute value of V1/2 increased significantly to -92.4±4.8 mV (P<0.05), and the time constant of activation diminished under the same command voltage (251±44 vs. 324±41, P<0.05). In addition, the mRNA and protein expression levels of HCN4, connexin 43 (Cx43) and Cx45 were upregulated in group B compared with group A, as determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses. Transmission electron micrographs also confirmed the increased gap junctions in group B. Collectively, these results indicated that reconstructed If channels may have a

  16. 骨骼肌离子通道病研究现状和进展%Progress in skeletal muscle channelopathies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯新红; 崔丽英

    2011-01-01

    骨骼肌离子通道病是由于肌膜离子通道功能异常所导致的一组疾病,临床症状波动较大,不同离子通道病表现型有重叠.文章就其基因突变、临床表现、电生理诊断和治疗进行总结.%Skeletal muscle channelopaths refer to the disorders produced by abnormal ion channel function.These diseases are characterized by episodic failure of motor activity due to muscle weakness or stiffness. How ever, in some of these disorders ,the clinical phenotypes overlap. In this article, the clinical features, genic mutation,fuctional electrophysiological aspects and treatment of this expanding group of muscle voltage-gated ionic channelopathies are reviewed.

  17. Early events in axon/dendrite polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pei-lin; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation of axons and dendrites is a critical step in neuronal development. Here we review the evidence that axon/dendrite formation during neuronal polarization depends on the intrinsic cytoplasmic asymmetry inherited by the postmitotic neuron, the exposure of the neuron to extracellular chemical factors, and the action of anisotropic mechanical forces imposed by the environment. To better delineate the functions of early signals among a myriad of cellular components that were shown to influence axon/dendrite formation, we discuss their functions by distinguishing their roles as determinants, mediators, or modulators and consider selective degradation of these components as a potential mechanism for axon/dendrite polarization. Finally, we examine whether these early events of axon/dendrite formation involve local autocatalytic activation and long-range inhibition, as postulated by Alan Turing for the morphogenesis of patterned biological structure.

  18. Numerical simulation of facet dendrite growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi; CHEN Chang-le; HAO Li-mei

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation based on phase field method was performed to describe the solidification of silicon. The effect of anisotropy, undercooling and coupling parameter on dendrite growth shape was investigated. It is indicated that the entire facet dendrite shapes are obtained by using regularized phase field model. Steady state tip velocity of dendrite drives to a fixed value when γ≤0.13. With further increasing the anisotropy value, steady state tip velocity decreases and the size is smaller. With the increase in the undercooling and coupling parameter, crystal grows from facet to facet dendrite. In addition, with increasing coupling parameter, the facet part of facet dendrite decreases gradually, which is in good agreement with Wulff theory.

  19. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D; Hoffman, D A; Magee, J C; Poolos, N P; Watanabe, S; Colbert, C M; Migliore, M

    2000-05-15

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 micrometer of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 micrometer from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials.

  20. Non-linear dendrites can tune neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Daniel Cazé

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A signature of visual, auditory, and motor cortices is the presence of neurons tuned to distinct features of the environment. While neuronal tuning can be observed in most brain areas, its origin remains enigmatic, and new calcium imaging data complicate this problem. Dendritic calcium signals, in a L2/3 neuron from the mouse visual cortex, display a wide range of tunings that could be different from the neuronal tuning (Jia et al 2010. To elucidate this observation we use multi-compartmental models of increasing complexity, from a binary to a realistic biophysical model of L2/3 neuron. These models possess non-linear dendritic subunits inside which the result of multiple excitatory inputs is smaller than their arithmetic sum. While dendritic non-linear subunits are ad-hoc in the binary model, non-linearities in the realistic model come from the passive saturation of synaptic currents. Because of these non-linearities our neuron models are scatter sensitive: the somatic membrane voltage is higher when presynaptic inputs target different dendrites than when they target a single dendrite. This spatial bias in synaptic integration is, in our models, the origin of neuronal tuning. Indeed, assemblies of presynaptic inputs encode the stimulus property through an increase in correlation or activity, and only the assembly that encodes the preferred stimulus targets different dendrites. Assemblies coding for the non-preferred stimuli target single dendrites, explaining the wide range of observed tunings and the possible difference between dendritic and somatic tuning. We thus propose, in accordance with the latest experimental observations, that non-linear integration in dendrites can generate neuronal tuning independently of the coding regime.

  1. Cardiac sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, A.S.; Asghari-Roodsari, A.; Tan, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (I-Na) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of I-Na for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of

  2. Pain as a channelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raouf, Ramin; Quick, Kathryn; Wood, John N.

    2010-01-01

    Mendelian heritable pain disorders have provided insights into human pain mechanisms and suggested new analgesic drug targets. Interestingly, many of the heritable monogenic pain disorders have been mapped to mutations in genes encoding ion channels. Studies in transgenic mice have also implicated many ion channels in damage sensing and pain modulation. It seems likely that aberrant peripheral or central ion channel activity underlies or initiates many pathological pain conditions. Understanding the mechanistic basis of ion channel malfunction in terms of trafficking, localization, biophysics, and consequences for neurotransmission is a potential route to new pain therapies. PMID:21041956

  3. Painful and painless channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, David L H; Woods, C Geoffrey

    2014-06-01

    The discovery of genetic variants that substantially alter an individual's perception of pain has led to a step-change in our understanding of molecular events underlying the detection and transmission of noxious stimuli by the peripheral nervous system. For example, the voltage-gated sodium ion channel Nav1.7 is expressed selectively in sensory and autonomic neurons; inactivating mutations in SCN9A, which encodes Nav1.7, result in congenital insensitivity to pain, whereas gain-of-function mutations in this gene produce distinct pain syndromes such as inherited erythromelalgia, paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, and small-fibre neuropathy. Heterozygous mutations in TRPA1, which encodes the transient receptor potential cation channel, can cause familial episodic pain syndromes, and variants of genes coding for the voltage-gated sodium channels Nav1.8 (SCN10A) and Nav1.9 (SCN11A) lead to small-fibre neuropathy and congenital insensitivity to pain, respectively. Furthermore, other genetic polymorphisms have been identified that contribute to risk or severity of more complex pain phenotypes. Novel models of sensory disorders are in development-eg, using human sensory neurons differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Understanding rare heritable pain disorders not only improves diagnosis and treatment of patients but may also reveal new targets for analgesic drug development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cardiac sodium channelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin, A.S.; Asghari-Roodsari, A.; Tan, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac sodium channel are protein complexes that are expressed in the sarcolemma of cardiomyocytes to carry a large inward depolarizing current (I-Na) during phase 0 of the cardiac action potential. The importance of I-Na for normal cardiac electrical activity is reflected by the high incidence of

  5. Dendritic tellurides acting as antioxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Huaping; WANG Yapei; WANG Zhiqiang; LIU Junqiu; Mario Smet; Wim Dehaen

    2006-01-01

    We have described the synthesis of a series of poly(aryl ether) dendrimers with telluride in the core and oligo(ethylene oxide) chains at the periphery which act as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) mimics. These series of compounds were well characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and ESI-MS. Using different ROOH (H2O2, cumene hydroperoxide) for testing the antioxidizing properties of these compounds, we have found that from generation 0 to 2, the activity of the dendritic GPx mimics first decreased and then increased. This can be explained on the basis of a greater steric hindrance, going from generation 0 to 1, and stronger binding interactions going from generation 1 to 2. In other words, there exists a balance between binding interactions and steric hindrance that may optimize the GPx activity.

  6. Fate mapping of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ursula Schraml

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are a heterogeneous group of mononuclear phagocytes with versatile roles in immunity. They are classified predominantly based on phenotypic and functional properties, namely their stellate morphology, expression of the integrin CD11c and major histocompatibility class II molecules, as well as their superior capacity to migrate to secondary lymphoid organs and stimulate naïve T cells. However, these attributes are not exclusive to DCs and often change within inflammatory or infectious environments. This led to debates over cell identification and questioned even the mere existence of DCs as distinct leukocyte lineage. Here, we review experimental approaches taken to fate map DCs and discuss how these have shaped our understanding of DC ontogeny and lineage affiliation. Considering the ontogenetic properties of DCs will help to overcome the inherent shortcomings of purely phenotypic- and function-based approaches to cell definition and will yield a more robust way of DC classification.

  7. Dendritic Cells for Anomaly Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems, more specifically the negative selection algorithm, have previously been applied to intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on a novel concept in immunology, the Danger Theory. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are antigen presenting cells and key to the activation of the human signals from the host tissue and correlate these signals with proteins know as antigens. In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion based on time-windows. The whole population of DCs asynchronously correlates the fused signals with a secondary data stream. The behaviour of human DCs is abstracted to form the DC Algorithm (DCA), which is implemented using an immune inspired framework, libtissue. This system is used to detect context switching for a basic machine learning dataset and to detect outgoing portscans in real-time. Experimental results show a significant difference between an outgoing portscan and normal traffic.

  8. Molecular Gas in NUclei of GAlaxies (NUGA): VI. Detection of a molecular gas disk/torus via HCN in the Seyfert2 galaxy NGC6951?

    CERN Document Server

    Krips, M; García-Burillo, S; Combes, F; Schinnerer, E; Baker, A J; Eckart, A; Boone, F; Hunt, L; Leon, S; Tacconi, L J

    2007-01-01

    Several studies of nearby active galaxies indicate significantly higher HCN-to-CO intensity ratios in AGN than in starburst (SB) environments. HCN enhancement can be caused by many different effects, such as higher gas densities/temperatures, UV/X-ray radiation, and non-collisional excitation. As active galaxies often exhibit intense circumnuclear SB, high angular resolution/sensitivity observations are of paramount importance to disentangling the influence of SB from that of nuclear activity on the chemistry of the surrounding molecular gas. The tight relation of HCN enhancement and nuclear activity may qualify HCN as an ideal tracer of molecular gas close to the AGN, providing complementary and additional information to that gained via CO. NGC6951 houses nuclear and SB activity, making it an ideal testbed in which to study the effects of different excitation conditions on the molecular gas. We used the new ABCD configurations of the IRAM PdBI to observe HCN(1-0) in NGC6951 at high angular resolution (1''). ...

  9. Resolving the Bright HCN(1-0) Emission toward the Seyfert 2 Nucleus of M51: Shock Enhancement by Radio Jets and Weak Masing by Infrared Pumping?

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Satoki; Boone, Frédéric; Krips, Melanie; Lim, Jeremy; Muller, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    We present high angular resolution observations of the HCN(1-0) emission (at ~1" or ~34 pc), together with CO J = 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 observations, toward the Seyfert 2 nucleus of M51 (NGC 5194). The overall HCN(1-0) distribution and kinematics are very similar to that of the CO lines, which have been indicated as the jet-entrained molecular gas in our past observations. In addition, high HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) brightness temperature ratio of about unity is observed along the jets, similar to that observed at the shocked molecular gas in our Galaxy. These results strongly indicate that both diffuse and dense gases are entrained by the jets and outflowing from the AGN. The channel map of HCN(1-0) at the systemic velocity shows a strong emission right at the nucleus, where no obvious emission has been detected in the CO lines. The HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) brightness temperature ratio at this region reaches >2, a value that cannot be explained considering standard physical/chemical conditions. Based on our calculations, we sugg...

  10. Reversal of infall in SgrB2(M) revealed by Herschel/HIFI observations of HCN lines at THz frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Rolffs, Rainer; Comito, Claudia; Bergin, E A; van der Tak, F F S; Lis, D C; Qin, S -L; Menten, K M; Guesten, R; Bell, T A; Blake, G A; Caux, E; Ceccarelli, C; Cernicharo, J; Crockett, N R; Daniel, F; Dubernet, M -L; Emprechtinger, M; Encrenaz, P; Gerin, M; Giesen, T F; Goicoechea, J R; Goldsmith, P F; Gupta, H; Herbst, E; Joblin, C; Johnstone, D; Langer, W D; Latter, W D; Lord, S D; Maret, S; Martin, P G; Melnick, G J; Morris, P; Mueller, H S P; Murphy, J A; Ossenkopf, V; Pearson, J C; Perault, M; Phillips, T G; Plume, R; Schlemmer, S; Stutzki, J; Trappe, N; Vastel, C; Wang, S; Yorke, H W; Yu, S; Zmuidzinas, J; Diez-Gonzalez, M C; Bachiller, R; Martin-Pintado, J; Baechtold, W; Olberg, M; Nordh, L H; Gill, J J; Chattopadhyay, G

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the accretion and feedback processes in massive star formation, we analyze the shapes of emission lines from hot molecular cores, whose asymmetries trace infall and expansion motions. The high-mass star forming region SgrB2(M) was observed with Herschel/HIFI (HEXOS key project) in various lines of HCN and its isotopologues, complemented by APEX data. The observations are compared to spherically symmetric, centrally heated models with density power-law gradient and different velocity fields (infall or infall+expansion), using the radiative transfer code RATRAN. The HCN line profiles are asymmetric, with the emission peak shifting from blue to red with increasing J and decreasing line opacity (HCN to H$^{13}$CN). This is most evident in the HCN 12--11 line at 1062 GHz. These line shapes are reproduced by a model whose velocity field changes from infall in the outer part to expansion in the inner part. The qualitative reproduction of the HCN lines suggests that infall dominates in the colder, oute...

  11. ALMA Investigation of Vibrationally Excited HCN/HCO+/HNC Emission Lines in the AGN-Hosting Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy IRAS 20551-4250

    CERN Document Server

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Izumi, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of ALMA Cycle 2 observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy, IRAS 20551-4250, at HCN/HCO+/HNC J=3-2 lines at both vibrational-ground (v=0) and vibrationally excited (v2=1) levels. This galaxy contains a luminous buried active galactic nucleus (AGN), in addition to starburst activity, and our ALMA Cycle 0 data revealed a tentatively detected vibrationally excited HCN v2=1f J=4-3 emission line. In our ALMA Cycle 2 data, the HCN/HCO+/HNC J=3-2 emission lines at v=0 are clearly detected. The HCN and HNC v2=1f J=3-2 emission lines are also detected, but the HCO+ v2=1f J=3-2 emission line is not. Given the high-energy level of v2=1 and the resulting difficulty of collisional excitation, we compared these results with those of the calculation of infrared radiative pumping, using the available infrared 5-35 micron spectrum. We found that all of the observational results were reproduced, if the HCN abundance was significantly higher than that of HCO+ and HNC. The flux ratio and excitation ...

  12. Binding of the auxiliary subunit TRIP8b to HCN channels shifts the mode of action of cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Santoro, Bina; Saponaro, Andrea; Liu, Haiying; Moroni, Anna; Siegelbaum, Steven

    2013-12-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated cation (HCN) channels generate the hyperpolarization-activated cation current Ih present in many neurons. These channels are directly regulated by the binding of cAMP, which both shifts the voltage dependence of HCN channel opening to more positive potentials and increases maximal Ih at extreme negative voltages where voltage gating is complete. Here we report that the HCN channel brain-specific auxiliary subunit TRIP8b produces opposing actions on these two effects of cAMP. In the first action, TRIP8b inhibits the effect of cAMP to shift voltage gating, decreasing both the sensitivity of the channel to cAMP (K1/2) and the efficacy of cAMP (maximal voltage shift); conversely, cAMP binding inhibits these actions of TRIP8b. These mutually antagonistic actions are well described by a cyclic allosteric mechanism in which TRIP8b binding reduces the affinity of the channel for cAMP, with the affinity of the open state for cAMP being reduced to a greater extent than the cAMP affinity of the closed state. In a second apparently independent action, TRIP8b enhances the action of cAMP to increase maximal Ih. This latter effect cannot be explained by the cyclic allosteric model but results from a previously uncharacterized action of TRIP8b to reduce maximal current through the channel in the absence of cAMP. Because the binding of cAMP also antagonizes this second effect of TRIP8b, application of cAMP produces a larger increase in maximal Ih in the presence of TRIP8b than in its absence. These findings may provide a mechanistic explanation for the wide variability in the effects of modulatory transmitters on the voltage gating and maximal amplitude of Ih reported for different neurons in the brain.

  13. Intensities of Linear-Molecule Vibration-Rotation Transitions with |Δ k| = 2, with Applications to HCN, DCN, and HCCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, James K. G.

    1998-03-01

    TheQbranch of the 2ν22-00band of the HCN molecule and an intensity asymmetry between thePandRbranches have recently been observed by Maki, Quapp, Klee, Mellau, and Albert (J. Mol. Spectrosc.185,356-369 (1997)). Such intensity effects are associated with a contribution from theM˜22terms of the effective dipole moment operator of Aliev and Watson. The quantum number dependence observed by Makiet al.(cited above) is in agreement with this contribution. A formula is derived for the coefficient of this term, and the value calculated from the anharmonic potential and dipole derivatives is in good agreement with the observed value for a particular choice of signs of the combination-band transition momentsR12andR32. For DCN the second derivatives of the dipole moment are not known, but a comparison with the HCN calculation suggests that the agreement is adequate in view of the relatively large uncertainty of the observed values. Similar intensity effects should occur in the (ν4+ ν5)2-00band of HCCH, for which the coefficient is calculated to be similar in magnitude to that of the 2ν22-00band of HCN. The intensity of the Σ--Σ+component of (ν4+ ν5)-0 of HCCH, which should consist of only aQbranch, is also discussed; from present knowledge of the molecular parameters, it is expected to be much weaker than theQbranch of the Δ-Σ+component.

  14. A New Interpretation of the Bipolar HII Region S106 from HCN J = 3 - 2 Mapping Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sheng-Li Qin; Jun-Jie Wang; Gang Zhao; Martin Miller

    2005-01-01

    The first mapping observations of the bipolar HII region S106 in HCN J = 3-2 line were made by KOSMA submillimeter telescope in April, 2004. The results show that there is a bipolar cloud core is perpendicular to the IRS4 and that the flat structure of molecular cloud core is perpendicular to the axis of the outflow. This image roughly corresponds to the optical image where a dark lane bisects the bipolar HII region. Together with the optical, infrared and radio data, we conclude that the central UC HII region, and that a neutral disk is responsible for the bipolar HII region and the outflow.

  15. Dendritic cells are stressed out in tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    A recently paper published in Cell reports that dendritic cells (DCs) are dysfunctional in the tumor environment. Tumor impairs DC function through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress response and subsequent disruption of lipid metabolic homeostasis.

  16. Artificial Dendritic Cells: Multi-faceted Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the crime scene investigators of the human immune system. Their function is to correlate potentially anomalous invading entities with observed damage to the body. The detection of such invaders by dendritic cells results in the activation of the adaptive immune system, eventually leading to the removal of the invader from the host body. This mechanism has provided inspiration for the development of a novel bio-inspired algorithm, the Dendritic Cell Algorithm. This algorithm processes information at multiple levels of resolution, resulting in the creation of information granules of variable structure. In this chapter we examine the multi-faceted nature of immunology and how research in this field has shaped the function of the resulting Dendritic Cell Algorithm. A brief overview of the algorithm is given in combination with the details of the processes used for its development. The chapter is concluded with a discussion of the parallels between our understanding of the human immune system a...

  17. “Dermal dendritic cells” comprise two distinct populations: CD1+ dendritic cells and CD209+ macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa,Maria Teresa; Loncaric, Anya; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Becker, Todd C.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    A key cell type of the resident skin immune system is the dendritic cell, which in normal skin is located in two distinct microanatomical compartments: Langerhans cells (LC) mainly in the epidermis and dermal dendritic cells (DDC) in the dermis. Here, the lineage of dermal dendritic cells was investigated using monoclonal antibodies and immunohistology. We provide evidence that “dermal dendritic cells” comprise at least two major phenotypic populations of dendritic appearing cells: immature D...

  18. [Attempt to estimate risks of fatal poisoning on the basis of HCN and HbCO concentrations in blood of fire victims].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, Teresa; Sybirska, Halina; Maliński, Marian

    2003-01-01

    Using the results of HCN and HbCO concentrations in the blood of 174 deceased found in different burning spaces and 35 people with symptoms of poisoning evacuated from the scene of a fire and then admitted to hospital. The correlation between blood concentration of both these xenobiotics and death or chance of survival in a fire was estimated by statistical analysis. An attempt was made to define a value of so-called "cut-off" points for HbCO and HCN by independence test chi 2 with Yates's correction. Point and interval estimations (95% Comfield's confidence interval) were used for the odds ratio (OR). The research showed that there was a strict statistical correlation between the chance of survival and death risks dependent on blood concentrations of HCN and HbCO in all the groups examined.

  19. Free energy and dendritic self-organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J Kiebel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we pursue recent observations that, through selective dendritic filtering, single neurons respond to specific sequences of presynaptic inputs. We try to provide a principled and mechanistic account of this selectivity by applying the free energy principle to a dendrite that is immersed in its neuropil or environment. We assume that neurons self-organize to minimise a free energy bound on the self-information or surprise of presynaptic inputs that are sampled. We model this as a selective pruning of dendritic spines that are expressed on a dendritic branch. This pruning occurs when the optimized postsynaptic gain falls below a threshold. Crucially, postsynaptic gain is itself optimized with respect to free energy. Pruning suppresses free energy as the dendrite selects presynaptic signals that conform to its expectations, specified by a generative model implicit in its intracellular kinetics. Not only does this provide a principled account of how neurons organize and selectively sample the myriad of potential presynaptic inputs they are exposed to, but it also connects the optimization of elemental neuronal (dendritic processing to generic (surprise or evidence-based schemes in statistics and machine learning, such as Bayesian model selection and automatic relevance determination.

  20. Synaptic Control of Secretory Trafficking in Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Hanus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Localized signaling in neuronal dendrites requires tight spatial control of membrane composition. Upon initial synthesis, nascent secretory cargo in dendrites exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER from local zones of ER complexity that are spatially coupled to post-ER compartments. Although newly synthesized membrane proteins can be processed locally, the mechanisms that control the spatial range of secretory cargo transport in dendritic segments are unknown. Here, we monitored the dynamics of nascent membrane proteins in dendritic post-ER compartments under regimes of low or increased neuronal activity. In response to activity blockade, post-ER carriers are highly mobile and are transported over long distances. Conversely, increasing synaptic activity dramatically restricts the spatial scale of post-ER trafficking along dendrites. This activity-induced confinement of secretory cargo requires site-specific phosphorylation of the kinesin motor KIF17 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK. Thus, the length scales of early secretory trafficking in dendrites are tuned by activity-dependent regulation of microtubule-dependent transport.

  1. Glass distilling collector applied for HCN recovery from submerged culture broth and fruiting body of Pleurotus eryngii for identification and quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Pei-Yu; Hong, Chian-Huei; Chen, Wenlung; Li, Yu-Jang; Chen, Yen-Shang; Chiou, Robin Y-Y

    2006-03-08

    Detection and surveillance of food commodities containing cyanide is a crucial issue of food safety. In this study, five strains of Pleurotus eryngii (P. eryngii) were grown in submerged culture of yeast malt broth (YMB) with the suspected production of HCN. A safety-warranted U-bent glass distilling collector with three enlarged bulbs on each arm was designed to recover the broth vapor. When AgNO(3) solution was used as an absorbent to interact with the vapor, a white precipitate was formed. The precipitate was isolated and identified as AgCN by FT-Raman spectroscopic analysis. When the absorbent was substituted by KOH, after evaporation to dryness, dissolved in D(2)O, and followed by (13)C-NMR analysis, a KCN spectrum was achieved. Formation of AgCN and KCN confirmed HCN production in the broth by P. eryngii. When a sodium picrate solution (1.4%) was used as an absorbent and various authentic KCN solutions were applied for distillation and followed by absorbance determination at 510 nm, a linear dose-dependent relationship was obtained and the procedure was applied for HCN quantification of the marketed P. eryngii mushrooms (fruiting body). As estimated, 67.3% of the products contained HCN less than 1.0 mg/kg, 17.3% between 1.0 and 2.0 mg/kg, and 15.4% higher than 2.0 mg/kg. When the mushrooms were sliced and cooked in water at 95 degrees C for 6 min, 89.1% of the original HCN was lost. When the P. eryngii strains were respectively grown by submerged cultivation in YMB or YMB supplemented with 2.5% glycine for 16 days, HCN content was slightly higher in the latter than in the former for each strain.

  2. Baclofen ameliorates spatial working memory impairments induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion via up-regulation of HCN2 expression in the PFC in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Pan; Chen, Cheng; Lu, Yun; Fu, TianLi; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; Li, Changjun; He, Zhi; Guo, Lianjun

    2016-07-15

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) causes memory deficits and increases the risk of vascular dementia (VD) through several biologically plausible pathways. However, whether CCH causes prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent spatial working memory impairments and Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, could ameliorate the impairments is still not clear especially the mechanisms underlying the process. In this study, rats were subjected to permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO) to induce CCH. Two weeks later, rats were treated with 25mg/kg Baclofen (intraperitioneal injection, i.p.) for 3 weeks. Spatial working memory was evaluated in a Morris water maze using a modified delayed matching-to-place (DMP) procedure. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to quantify the protein levels and protein localization. Our results showed that 2VO caused striking spatial working memory impairments, accompanied with a decreased HCN2 expression in PFC, but the protein levels of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5, a neuron specific protein), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), synaptophysin (SYP), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), parvalbumin (PV) and HCN1 were not distinguishably changed as compared with sham-operated rats. Baclofen treatment significantly improved the spatial working memory impairments caused by 2VO, accompanied with a reversion of 2VO-induced down-regulation of HCN2. Furthermore, there was a co-localization of HCN2 subunits and parvalbumin-positive neurons in PFC. Therefore, HCN2 may target inhibitory interneurons that is implicated in working memory processes, which may be a possible mechanism of the up-regulation of HCN2 by Baclofen treatment that reliefs spatial working memory deficits in rats with CCH.

  3. A single-dish survey of the HCO+, HCN, and CN emission toward the T Tauri disk population in Taurus

    CERN Document Server

    Salter, D M; van der Burg, R F J; Kristensen, L E; Brinch, C

    2011-01-01

    (Abridged) As the stellar X-ray and UV light penetration of a protoplanetary disk depends sensitively on the dust properties, trace molecular species like HCO+, HCN, and CN are expected to show marked differences from photoprocessing effects as the dust content in the disk evolves. We investigate the evolution of the UV irradiation of the molecular gas in a sample of classical T Tauri stars in Taurus that exhibit a wide range in grain growth and dust settling properties. We obtained HCO+ (J=3-2), HCN (J=3-2), and CN (J=2-1) observations of 13 sources with the JCMT. Our sample has 1.3mm fluxes in excess of 75mJy, indicating the presence of significant dust reservoirs; a range of dust settling as traced through their spectral slopes between 6, 13, and 25 microns; and varying degrees of grain growth as extrapolated from the strength of their 10-micron silicate emission features. We compare the emission line strengths with the sources' continuum flux and infrared features, and use detailed modeling based on two d...

  4. Noise-induced plasticity of KCNQ2/3 and HCN channels underlies vulnerability and resilience to tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Kalappa, Bopanna I; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-08-27

    Vulnerability to noise-induced tinnitus is associated with increased spontaneous firing rate in dorsal cochlear nucleus principal neurons, fusiform cells. This hyperactivity is caused, at least in part, by decreased Kv7.2/3 (KCNQ2/3) potassium currents. However, the biophysical mechanisms underlying resilience to tinnitus, which is observed in noise-exposed mice that do not develop tinnitus (non-tinnitus mice), remain unknown. Our results show that noise exposure induces, on average, a reduction in KCNQ2/3 channel activity in fusiform cells in noise-exposed mice by 4 days after exposure. Tinnitus is developed in mice that do not compensate for this reduction within the next 3 days. Resilience to tinnitus is developed in mice that show a re-emergence of KCNQ2/3 channel activity and a reduction in HCN channel activity. Our results highlight KCNQ2/3 and HCN channels as potential targets for designing novel therapeutics that may promote resilience to tinnitus.

  5. Reduction of nitrogen compounds in oceanic basement and its implications for HCN formation and abiotic organic synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubeck Anna

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hydrogen cyanide is an excellent organic reagent and is central to most of the reaction pathways leading to abiotic formation of simple organic compounds containing nitrogen, such as amino acids, purines and pyrimidines. Reduced carbon and nitrogen precursor compounds for the synthesis of HCN may be formed under off-axis hydrothermal conditions in oceanic lithosphere in the presence of native Fe and Ni and are adsorbed on authigenic layer silicates and zeolites. The native metals as well as the molecular hydrogen reducing CO2 to CO/CH4 and NO3-/NO2- to NH3/NH4+ are a result of serpentinization of mafic rocks. Oceanic plates are conveyor belts of reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds from the off-axis hydrothermal environments to the subduction zones, where compaction, dehydration, desiccation and diagenetic reactions affect the organic precursors. CO/CH4 and NH3/NH4+ in fluids distilled out of layer silicates and zeolites in the subducting plate at an early stage of subduction will react upon heating and form HCN, which is then available for further organic reactions to, for instance, carbohydrates, nucleosides or even nucleotides, under alkaline conditions in hydrated mantle rocks of the overriding plate. Convergent margins in the initial phase of subduction must, therefore, be considered the most potent sites for prebiotic reactions on Earth. This means that origin of life processes are, perhaps, only possible on planets where some kind of plate tectonics occur.

  6. ZD 7288, an HCN channel blocker, attenuates chronic visceral pain in irritable bowel syndrome-like rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Lin, Chun; Tang, Ying; Chen, Ai-Qin; Liu, Cui-Ying; Lu, Da-Li

    2014-02-28

    To investigate the effects of ZD 7288, a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker, on rats with chronic visceral pain. Rats with visceral hypersensitivity were generated using neonatal colon irritation during postnatal days 8-15 as described previously. Visceral hypersensitivity was evaluated using electromyographic (EMG) responses of abdominal external oblique muscles to 20-80 mmHg colorectal distentions (CRD). Abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores and pain thresholds were also detected in adult rats. Different doses of ZD 7288 (25, 50, and 100 nmol/L) were intrathecally administered in rats to study the role of spinal HCN channel in chronic visceral hypersensitivity. EMG responses to 20-80 mmHg CRD and AWR scores under 20-60 mmHg CRD significantly increased in rats with visceral hypersensitivity compared to control rats (P pain threshold in rats with visceral hypersensitivity significantly decreased compared to control rats (P pain thresholds (32%-77%, P visceral hypersensitivity.

  7. In Situ Observation of Cell-to-Dendrite Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xiu-Hong; HONG Yong; JIN Wei-Qing

    2005-01-01

    @@ The cell-to-dendrite transition of succinonitrile melt suspended on a loop-shaped Pt heater is observed in real time by a differential interference microscope coupled with Schlieren technique. The transition is divided into two parts: a dendrite coalition process and a subsequent dendrite elimination process. Firstly the dendrites from the same cell are united into a single dendrite. Secondly the competitive growth of dendrites from different cells leads to the elimination of dendrites. The two processes can be understood when involving crystallographic orientation. In addition, the tip velocity and primary spacing of a cell/dendrite are also measured. It turns out that the primary spacing has a significant jump, whereas the growth velocity has no abrupt change during the cell-to-dendrite transition.

  8. The expression of hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide gated (HCN channels in the rat ovary are dependent on the type of cell and the reproductive age of the animal: a laboratory investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Carly

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that levels of hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels 1 to 4 (HCN1-4 are linked to the reproductive age of the ovary. Methods Young, adult, and reproductively aged ovaries were collected from Sprague-Dawley rats. RT-PCR and western blot analysis of ovaries was performed to investigate the presence of mRNA and total protein for HCN1-4. Immunohistochemistry with semiquantitative H score analysis was performed using whole ovarian histologic sections. Results RT-PCR analysis showed the presence of mRNA for HCN1-4. Western blot analysis revealed HCN1-3 proteins in all ages of ovarian tissues. Immunohistochemistry with H score analysis demonstrated distinct age-related changes in patterns of HCN1-3 in the oocytes, granulosa cells, theca cells, and corpora lutea. HCN4 was present only in the oocytes, with declining levels during the reproduction lifespan. Conclusion The evidence presented here demonstrates cell-type and developmental age patterns of HCN1-4 channel expression in rat ovaries. Based on this, we hypothesize that HCN channels have functional significance in rat ovaries and may have changing roles in reproductive aging.

  9. Dendritic cells in melanoma - immunohistochemical study and research trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelcu, Roxana Ioana; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Holeab, Cosmin Adrian; Cioplea, Mirela Daniela; Brînzea, Alice; Zurac, Sabina Andrada

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous dendritic cells play multiple physiological roles and are involved in various pathophysiological processes. Research studies of dendritic cells abound in the medical literature. Nevertheless, the role of dendritic cells in melanoma regression phenomenon is not completely understood. We conducted a scientometric analysis in order to highlight the current state on research regarding dendritic cells and melanoma. We also performed an immunohistochemical study, using specific markers for dendritic cells (CD1a, langerin). We evaluated the frequency and distribution of dendritic cells in areas of tumor regression compared to the areas of inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma without regression. The immunohistochemical study we performed revealed that dendritic cells are more frequent in the regressed areas, comparing with non-regressed ones. In regressed areas, dendritic cells have a predominant nodular pattern (19 cases), followed by diffuse isolate pattern (eight cases) and mixed pattern (diffuse and nodular) (three cases). In melanoma without regression, most cases presented a diffuse pattern (27 cases) of dendritic cells distribution. In conclusion, our immunohistochemical study stressed differences between frequency and distribution of dendritic cells located in the melanoma with regression and melanoma without regression. These data suggest that dendritic cells are involved in the regression phenomenon. Following the literature analysis we obtained, we observed that dendritic cells profile in melanoma with regression was poorly studied. Insights into antitumor immune response and dendritic cells may be essential for the understanding of the potential prognostic role of dendritic cells in melanoma and for the development of new promising therapeutic strategies for melanoma.

  10. Architecture of apical dendrites in the murine neocortex: dual apical dendritic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, M I; Pimienta, H; Caviness, V S; Jacobson, M; Crandall, J E; Kosik, K S

    1986-04-01

    A monoclonal antibody (5F9) against microtubule-associated protein 2 is a selective and sensitive marker for neocortical dendrites in the mouse. The marker stains all dendrites. It affords a particularly comprehensive picture of the patterns of arrangements of apical dendrites which are most intensely stained with this antibody. Dual systems of apical dendrites arise from the polymorphic neurons of layer VI, on the one hand, and the pyramidal neurons of layers II-V, on the other. Terminal arborization of the former is concentrated principally at the interface of layers V and IV, while that of the latter is in the molecular layer. Apical dendrites of both systems are grouped into fascicles. In supragranular layers and in upper layer VI-lower layer V, where apical dendrites are most abundant, the fascicles coalesce into septa. These generate a honeycomb-like pattern, subdividing these cortical levels into columnar spaces of approximately 20-40 micron diameter. At the level of layer IV, where the number of apical dendrites is greatly reduced, the fascicles are isolated bundles. These bundles have the form of circular, elliptical or rectangular columns in the primary somatosensory, temporal and frontal regions, respectively. Those in the barrel field are preferentially concentrated in the sides of barrels and the interbarrel septa. The configurations of the dendritic fascicles, particularly the midcortical bundles, may conform to the spatial configuration of investing axons of interneurons.

  11. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized antigen presenting cells (APC) with a remarkable ability to take up antigens and stimulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted specific immune responses. Recent discoveries have shown that their role in initiating primary immune responses seems to be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC are considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC.

  12. 均苯三甲酸合铜选择性降低卷烟主流烟气中的HCN%Selectively Reducing HCN in Mainstream Cigarette Smoke with Copper-1, 3, 5-benzenetricarboxylic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    者为; 廖头根; 王明锋; 宫玉鹏; 朱保昆

    2014-01-01

    To selectively reduce the delivery of hydrocyanic acid (HCN) in mainstream cigarette smoke, a porous material with metal-organic framework (MOF), copper-1, 3, 5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (Ⅱ) (Cu-BTC), was prepared by hydrothermal synthesis method. The crystal structure, pore structure and thermal stability of the prepared material were characterized by X-Ray powder diffraction, BET surface area analysis and thermal gravimetric analysis. The material was added into cigarette filter to test its harm reducing effect. The results showed that: 1) Cu-BTC was a typical MOF porous material with excellent thermal stability under 270 ℃. 2) Under the conditions of a simulated device for evaluating the harm reducing effects of cigarette additives, the reduction rate of HCN in mainstream cigarette smoke by Cu-BTC reached 51.9%; in a real cigarette experiment, the selective reduction rate of HCN by Cu-BTC was 21.83%, while the deliveries of routine components in cigarette smoke were basically similar to the control.%为选择性降低卷烟主流烟气中氢氰酸(H C N)的释放量,采用水热合成法制备了金属有机骨架(MOFs)多孔材料均苯三甲酸合铜(Ⅱ)(Cu-BTC),运用X射线粉末衍射(XPRD)、比表面积孔径分析(B E T)、热重分析(T G)等技术对材料的晶体结构、孔结构参数及热稳定性进行了表征,并将材料添加于卷烟滤嘴中进行了烟气减害测试。结果表明:①Cu-BTC是一种典型的MOFs多孔材料,在270℃以下具有良好的热稳定性。②在卷烟添加剂减害性能模拟评价条件下,Cu-BTC对卷烟主流烟气中HCN的降低效果可达51.9%;在卷烟应用试验中,Cu-BTC对卷烟主流烟气中HCN的选择性降低率为21.83%,而常规烟气成分释放量与对照卷烟基本一致。

  13. Nerve Conduction Through Dendrites via Proton Hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kier, Lemont B

    2017-01-01

    In our previous studies of nerve conduction conducted by proton hopping, we have considered the axon, soma, synapse and the nodes of Ranvier. The role of proton hopping described the passage of information through each of these units of a typical nerve system. The synapse projects information from the axon to the dendrite and their associated spines. We have invoked the passage of protons via a hopping mechanism to illustrate the continuum of the impulse through the system, via the soma following the dendrites. This is proposed to be a continuum invoked by the proton hopping method. With the proposal of the activity through the dendrites, via proton hopping, a complete model of the nerve function is invoked. At each step to the way, a water pathway is present and is invoked in the proposed model as the carrier of the message via proton hopping. The importance of the dendrites is evident by the presence of a vast number of spines, each possessing the possibility to carry unique messages through the nervous system. With this model of the role of dendrites, functioning with the presence of proton hopping, a complete model of the nerve system is presented. The validity of this model will be available for further studies and models to assess it's validity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. MEG3, HCN3 and linc01105 influence the proliferation and apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells via the HIF-1α and p53 pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weitao; Dong, Kuiran; Li, Kai; Dong, Rui; Zheng, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the differential expression and functional roles of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in neuroblastoma tissue. LncRNA microarrays were used to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs between tumor and para-tumor tissues. In total, in tumor tissues, 3,098 and 1,704 lncRNAs were upregulated and downregulated, respectively. HCN3 and linc01105 exhibited the higher expression (P Noxa and Bid expression was positively correlated with cell apoptosis. Moreover, linc01105 knockdown promoted cell proliferation, whereas MEG3 overexpression inhibited proliferation. Finally, linc01105 knockdown, MEG3 overexpression and HCN3 knockdown all increased apoptosis. The correlation coefficients between those three lncRNAs and the International Neuroblastoma Staging System (INSS) stage were −0.48, −0.58 and −0.55, respectively. In conclusion, we have identified lncRNAs that are differentially expressed in neuroblastoma tissues. The lncRNAs HCN3, linc01105, and MEG3 may be important in biological behaviors of neuroblastoma through mechanisms involving p53 pathway members such as HIF-1α, Noxa, and Bid. The expressions of MEG3, HCN3 and linc01105 are all negatively correlated with the INSS stage. PMID:27824082

  15. Herschel/PACS spectroscopy of NGC 4418 and Arp 220: H2O, H2^{18}O, OH, ^{18}OH, O^0, HCN and NH3

    CERN Document Server

    González-Alfonso, E; Graciá-Carpio, J; Sturm, E; Hailey-Dunsheath, S; Lutz, D; Poglitsch, A; Contursi, A; Feuchtgruber, H; Veilleux, S; Spoon, H W W; Verma, A; Christopher, N; Davies, R; Sternberg, A; Genzel, R; Tacconi, L

    2011-01-01

    Herschel/PACS spectroscopy of the (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies NGC 4418 and Arp 220 reveals high excitation in H2O, OH, HCN, and NH3. In NGC 4418, absorption lines were detected with E_lower>800 K (H2O), 600 K (OH), 1075 K (HCN), and 600 K (NH3), while in Arp 220 the excitation is somewhat lower. While clear outflow signatures are seen in Arp 220 as has been seen in previous studies, in NGC 4418 the lines tracing its outer regions are redshifted relative to the nucleus, suggesting an inflow with Mdot~100 K) nuclear continuum components, together with a more extended and colder component that is much more prominent and massive in Arp 220. A chemical dichotomy is found in both sources: on the one hand, the nuclear regions have high H2O abundances, ~0.5x10^{-5}, and high HCN/H2O and HCN/NH3 column density ratios of 0.2-0.7 and 6-9, respectively, indicating a chemistry typical of evolved hot cores where grain mantle evaporation has occurred. On the other hand, the high OH abundance, with OH/H2O ratios of ~0....

  16. Filamin A promotes dynamin-dependent internalization of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated type 1 (HCN1) channels and restricts /h in hippocampal neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noam, Y.; Ehrengruber, M.U.; Koh, A.; Feyen, P.; Manders, E.M.M.; Abbott, G.W.; Wadman, W.J.; Baram, T.Z.

    2014-01-01

    The actin-binding protein filamin A (FLNa) regulates neuronal migration during development, yet its roles in the mature brain remain largely obscure. Here, we probed the effects of FLNa on the regulation of ion channels that influence neuronal properties. We focused on the HCN1 channels that conduct

  17. 脂质体介导hHCN2基因转染HEK293细胞的效率研究%Study of transfection efficiency of hHCN2 into HEK293 mediated by LipofectamineTM 2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾建博; 方易冰; 卞铁荣; 陈枫; 于风旭; 廖斌

    2012-01-01

    目的:脂质体介导重组起搏基因pIRES2-EGFP-HCN2转染HEK293细胞,观察转染效率,探讨其构建生物起搏器的可行性.方法:对含hHCN2 cDNA的PTR载体进行转化和扩增,将所得hHCN2基因定向克隆到真核表达载体pIRES2-EGFP中,双酶切来鉴定克隆的正确性.将重组质粒用脂质体转染HEK293,荧光显微镜观察EGFP的表达并计算转染效率.结果:构建了重组质粒pIRES2-EGFP-HCN2.荧光显微镜下可见转染后的HEK293呈绿色荧光,其转染效率可达90%以上.结论:成功构建了重组质粒pIRES2-EGFP-HCN2,并用脂质体转染的方法导人HEK293细胞,为生物起搏的研究奠定实验基础.

  18. Detecting Danger: The Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Cayzer, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA) is inspired by the function of the dendritic cells of the human immune system. In nature, dendritic cells are the intrusion detection agents of the human body, policing the tissue and organs for potential invaders in the form of pathogens. In this research, and abstract model of DC behaviour is developed and subsequently used to form an algorithm, the DCA. The abstraction process was facilitated through close collaboration with laboratory- based immunologists, who performed bespoke experiments, the results of which are used as an integral part of this algorithm. The DCA is a population based algorithm, with each agent in the system represented as an 'artificial DC'. Each DC has the ability to combine multiple data streams and can add context to data suspected as anomalous. In this chapter the abstraction process and details of the resultant algorithm are given. The algorithm is applied to numerous intrusion detection problems in computer security including the detection of p...

  19. Cell-Type Specific Channelopathies in the Prefrontal Cortex of the fmr1-/y Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmbach, Brian E; Johnston, Daniel; Brager, Darrin H

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by transcriptional silencing of the fmr1 gene resulting in the loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) expression. FXS patients display several behavioral phenotypes associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) dysfunction. Voltage-gated ion channels, some of which are regulated by FMRP, heavily influence PFC neuron function. Although there is evidence for brain region-specific alterations to the function a single type of ion channel in FXS, it is unclear whether subtypes of principal neurons within a brain region are affected uniformly. We tested for alterations to ion channels critical in regulating neural excitability in two subtypes of prefrontal L5 pyramidal neurons. Using somatic and dendritic patch-clamp recordings, we provide evidence that the functional expression of h-channels (Ih) is down-regulated, whereas A-type K(+) channel function is up-regulated in pyramidal tract-projecting (PT) neurons in the fmr1-/y mouse PFC. This is the opposite pattern of results from published findings from hippocampus where Ih is up-regulated and A-type K(+) channel function is down-regulated. Additionally, we find that somatic Kv1-mediated current is down-regulated, resulting in increased excitability of fmr1-/y PT neurons. Importantly, these h- and K(+) channel differences do not extend to neighboring intratelencephalic-projecting neurons. Thus, the absence of FMRP has divergent effects on the function of individual types of ion channels not only between brain regions, but also variable effects across cell types within the same brain region. Given the importance of ion channels in regulating neural circuits, these results suggest cell-type-specific phenotypes for the disease.

  20. Single dendrite-targeting interneurons generate branch-specific inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb eStokes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Microcircuits composed of dendrite-targeting inhibitory interneurons and pyramidal cells are fundamental elements of cortical networks, however, the impact of individual interneurons on pyramidal dendrites is unclear. Here, we combine paired recordings and calcium imaging to determine the spatial domain over which single dendrite-targeting interneurons influence pyramidal cells in olfactory cortex. We show that a major action of individual interneurons is to inhibit dendrites in a branch-specific fashion.

  1. Semiautomated analysis of dendrite morphology in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Eric S; Langhammer, Chris L; Kutzing, Melinda K; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying dendrite morphology is a method for determining the effect of biochemical pathways and extracellular agents on neuronal development and differentiation. Quantification can be performed using Sholl analysis, dendrite counting, and length quantification. These procedures can be performed on dendrite-forming cell lines or primary neurons grown in culture. In this protocol, we describe the use of a set of computer programs to assist in quantifying many aspects of dendrite morphology, including changes in total and localized arbor complexity.

  2. Role of active dendritic conductances in subthreshold input integration

    OpenAIRE

    Rinzel John; Remme Michiel

    2010-01-01

    Dendrites of many types of neurons contain voltage-dependent conductances that are active at subthreshold membrane potentials. To understand the computations neurons perform it is key to understand the role of active dendrites in the subthreshold processing of synaptic inputs. We examine systematically how active dendritic conductances affect the time course of postsynaptic potentials propagating along dendrites, and how they affect the interaction between such signals. Voltage-dependent curr...

  3. Infection of Dendritic Cells by the Maedi-Visna Lentivirus

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Susanna; Tiley, Laurence; McConnell, Ian; Blacklaws, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    The early stages of lentivirus infection of dendritic cells have been studied in an in vivo model. Maedi-visna virus (MVV) is a natural pathogen of sheep with a tropism for macrophages, but the infection of dendritic cells has not been proven, largely because of the difficulties of definitively distinguishing the two cell types. Afferent lymphatic dendritic cells from sheep have been phenotypically characterized and separated from macrophages. Dendritic cells purified from experimentally infe...

  4. Actin remodeling and polymerization forces control dendritic spine morphology

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are small membranous structures that protrude from the neuronal dendrite. Each spine contains a synaptic contact site that may connect its parent dendrite to the axons of neighboring neurons. Dendritic spines are markedly distinct in shape and size, and certain types of stimulation prompt spines to evolve, in fairly predictable fashion, from thin nascent morphologies to the mushroom-like shapes associated with mature spines. This striking progression is coincident with the (r...

  5. Ab initio calculation of infrared intensities for the linear isoelectronic series HCN, HNC, CO, HCO/+/, and HOC/+/. [in interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J. D.; Hillman, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ab initio infrared intensities and dipole moment derivatives expressed in atomic polar tensor form are calculated using the 4-31 and 6-31G(double asterisk) basis sets for the isoelectronic HCN, HNC, CO, HCO(+), and HOC(+) series of molecules. The calculated atomic polar tensors are analyzed in terms of the charge-charge flux-overlap model, which is found to be useful in explaining some of the trends observed in the dipole moment derivatives for this series of molecules. A detailed examination of the dipole moment derivatives for the structural isomers indicates some of the ways in which experimental atomic polar tensors for one isomer should be modified to predict infrared intensities for the other isomer. The absolute intensities calculated for the HCO(+) and HOC(+) ions are believed to be accurate to within a factor of 2 and thus should be useful in astrophysical applications.

  6. Dendritic Cells Stimulated by Cationic Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitor, Micaela Tamara; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Cruz, Karen Steponavicius Piedade; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; De La Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer aims to harness the immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. To induce an immune response against cancer, activated dendritic cells (DCs) must present tumor antigens to T lymphocytes of patients. However, cancer patients' DCs are frequently defective, therefore, they are prone to induce rather tolerance than immune responses. In this context, loading tumor antigens into DCs and, at the same time, activating these cells, is a tempting goal within the field. Thus, we investigated the effects of cationic liposomes on the DCs differentiation/maturation, evaluating their surface phenotype and ability to stimulate T lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. The cationic liposomes composed by egg phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane and 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (50/25/25% molar) were prepared by the thin film method followed by extrusion (65 nm, polydispersity of 0.13) and by the dehydration-rehydration method (95% of the population 107 nm, polydispersity of 0.52). The phenotypic analysis of dendritic cells and the analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation were performed by flow cytometry and showed that both cationic liposomes were incorporated and activated dendritic cells. Extruded liposomes were better incorporated and induced higher CD86 expression for dendritic cells than dehydrated-rehydrated vesicles. Furthermore, dendritic cells which internalized extruded liposomes also provided stronger T lymphocyte stimulation. Thus, cationic liposomes with a smaller size and polydispersity seem to be better incorporated by dendritic cells. Hence, these cationic liposomes could be used as a potential tool in further cancer immunotherapy strategies and contribute to new strategies in immunotherapy.

  7. A mechanism for the auto-inhibition of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel opening and its relief by cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Madoka; Zhang, Zaiyong; Boulton, Stephen; Selvaratnam, Rajeevan; VanSchouwen, Bryan; Gloyd, Melanie; Accili, Eric A; Lange, Oliver F; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2014-08-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels control neuronal and cardiac electrical rhythmicity. There are four homologous isoforms (HCN1-4) sharing a common multidomain architecture that includes an N-terminal transmembrane tetrameric ion channel followed by a cytoplasmic "C-linker," which connects a more distal cAMP-binding domain (CBD) to the inner pore. Channel opening is primarily stimulated by transmembrane elements that sense membrane hyperpolarization, although cAMP reduces the voltage required for HCN activation by promoting tetramerization of the intracellular C-linker, which in turn relieves auto-inhibition of the inner pore gate. Although binding of cAMP has been proposed to relieve auto-inhibition by affecting the structure of the C-linker and CBD, the nature and extent of these cAMP-dependent changes remain limitedly explored. Here, we used NMR to probe the changes caused by the binding of cAMP and of cCMP, a partial agonist, to the apo-CBD of HCN4. Our data indicate that the CBD exists in a dynamic two-state equilibrium, whose position as gauged by NMR chemical shifts correlates with the V½ voltage measured through electrophysiology. In the absence of cAMP, the most populated CBD state leads to steric clashes with the activated or "tetrameric" C-linker, which becomes energetically unfavored. The steric clashes of the apo tetramer are eliminated either by cAMP binding, which selects for a CBD state devoid of steric clashes with the tetrameric C-linker and facilitates channel opening, or by a transition of apo-HCN to monomers or dimer of dimers, in which the C-linker becomes less structured, and channel opening is not facilitated.

  8. Niflumic acid alters gating of HCN2 pacemaker channels by interaction with the outer region of S4 voltage sensing domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lan; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2009-05-01

    Niflumic acid, 2-[[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]amino]pyridine-3-carboxylic acid (NFA), is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that also blocks or modifies the gating of many ion channels. Here, we investigated the effects of NFA on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) pacemaker channels expressed in X. laevis oocytes using site-directed mutagenesis and the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. Extracellular NFA acted rapidly and caused a slowing of activation and deactivation and a hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of HCN2 channel activation (-24.5 +/- 1.2 mV at 1 mM). Slowed channel gating and reduction of current magnitude was marked in oocytes treated with NFA, while clamped at 0 mV but minimal in oocytes clamped at -100 mV, indicating the drug preferentially interacts with channels in the closed state. NFA at 0.1 to 3 mM shifted the half-point for channel activation in a concentration-dependent manner, with an EC(50) of 0.54 +/- 0.068 mM and a predicted maximum shift of -38 mV. NFA at 1 mM also reduced maximum HCN2 conductance by approximately 20%, presumably by direct block of the pore. The rapid onset and state-dependence of NFA-induced changes in channel gating suggests an interaction with the extracellular region of the S4 transmembrane helix, the primary voltage-sensing domain of HCN2. Neutralization (by mutation to Gln) of any three of the outer four basic charged residues in S4, but not single mutations, abrogated the NFA-induced shift in channel activation. We conclude that NFA alters HCN2 gating by interacting with the extracellular end of the S4 voltage sensor domains.

  9. Sequence learning in differentially activated dendrites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    . It is proposed that the neural machinery required in such a learning/retrieval mechanism could involve the NMDA receptor, in conjunction with the ability of dendrites to maintain differentially activated regions. In particular, it is suggested that such a parcellation of the dendrite allows the neuron...... to participate in multiple sequences, which can be learned without suffering from the 'wash-out' of synaptic efficacy associated with superimposition of training patterns. This is a biologically plausible solution to the stability-plasticity dilemma of learning in neural networks....

  10. Seaweed to dendrite transition in directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provatas, Nikolas; Wang, Quanyong; Haataja, Mikko; Grant, Martin

    2003-10-10

    We simulate directional solidification using a phase-field model solved with adaptive mesh refinement. For small surface tension anisotropy directed at 45 degrees relative to the pulling direction we observe a crossover from a seaweed to a dendritic morphology as the thermal gradient is lowered, consistent with recent experimental findings. We show that the morphology of crystal structures can be unambiguously characterized through the local interface velocity distribution. We derive semiempirically an estimate for the crossover from seaweed to dendrite as a function of thermal gradient and pulling speed.

  11. Dendritic Cells Endocytose Bacillus Anthracis Spores: Implications for Anthrax Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Dendritic Cells Endocytose Bacillus anthracis Spores: Implications for Anthrax Pathogenesis1 Katherine C. Brittingham,* Gordon Ruthel,* Rekha G...germination and dissemination of spores. Found in high frequency throughout the respiratory track, dendritic cells (DCs) routinely take up foreign...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cells endocytose Bacillus anthracis spores: implications for anthrax pathogenesis, The Journal of

  12. Interactions with Astroglia Influence the Shape of the Developing Dendritic Arbor and Restrict Dendrite Growth Independent of Promoting Synaptic Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Jennifer R.; Sterritt, Jeffrey R.; Crane, Andrés B.; Wallace, Christopher S.

    2017-01-01

    Astroglia play key roles in the development of neurons, ranging from regulating neuron survival to promoting synapse formation, yet basic questions remain about whether astrocytes might be involved in forming the dendritic arbor. Here, we used cultured hippocampal neurons as a simple in vitro model that allowed dendritic growth and geometry to be analyzed quantitatively under conditions where the extent of interactions between neurons and astrocytes varied. When astroglia were proximal to neurons, dendrites and dendritic filopodia oriented toward them, but the general presence of astroglia significantly reduced overall dendrite growth. Further, dendritic arbors in partial physical contact with astroglia developed a pronounced pattern of asymmetrical growth, because the dendrites in direct contact were significantly smaller than the portion of the arbor not in contact. Notably, thrombospondin, the astroglial factor shown previously to promote synapse formation, did not inhibit dendritic growth. Thus, while astroglia promoted the formation of presynaptic contacts onto dendrites, dendritic growth was constrained locally within a developing arbor at sites where dendrites contacted astroglia. Taken together, these observations reveal influences on spatial orientation of growth as well as influences on morphogenesis of the dendritic arbor that have not been previously identified. PMID:28081563

  13. Recent advance in inherited arrhythmogenic disease-associated ion channelopathies%遗传性心律失常疾病相关离子通道病变的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明颢; 胡峻岩

    2013-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death of young people is mainly caused by arrhythmia with genetic defects, which is called inherited arrhythmogenic diseases (IADs). The most common kinds of IADs are long QT syndrome (LQTS), short QT syndrome (SQTS), Brugada syndrome (BrS) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). Abnormal cardiac-electrical activities caused by the mutation of the subunit genes coding the ion channels in myocardial cells are the major cause of IADs. In this review, we focus on the advances in pathophysiological and genetic research of the channelopathies mentioned above.

  14. Active dendrites support efficient initiation of dendritic spikes in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sooyun; Guzman, Segundo J.; Hu, Hua; Jonas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    CA3 pyramidal neurons are important for memory formation and pattern completion in the hippocampal network. It is generally thought that proximal synapses from the mossy fibers activate these neurons most efficiently, whereas distal inputs from the perforant path have a weaker modulatory influence. We used confocally targeted patch-clamp recording from dendrites and axons to map the activation of rat CA3 pyramidal neurons at the subcellular level. Our results reveal two distinct dendritic dom...

  15. Numerical Simulations of Equiaxed Dendrite Growth Using Phase Field Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Phase field method offers the prospect of being able to perform realistic numerical experiments on dendrite growthin a metallic system. In this paper, the equiaxed dendrite evolution during the solidification of a pure material wasnumerically simulated using the phase field model. The equiaxed dendrite growth in a two-dimensional square domainof undercooled melt (nickel) with four-fold anisotropy was simulated. The phase field model equations was solvedusing the explicit finite difference method on a uniform mesh. The formation of various equiaxed dendrite patternswas shown by a series of simulations, and the effect of anisotropy on equiaxed dendrite morphology was investigated.

  16. The role of dendritic cells in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Though present in low numbers, dendritic cells (DCs) are recognized as major players in the control of cancer by adaptive immunity. The roles of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and Th1 helper CD4+ T-cells are well-documented in murine models of cancer and associated with a profound prognostic impact when...... treatment regimens against cancer....

  17. Characterization of chicken dendritic cell markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal and Natural Resources Institute, ARS-USDA, Beltsville, MD, USA. New mouse monoclonal antibodies which detect CD80 and CD83 were developed to characterize chicken dendritic cells (DCs). The characteristics of these molecules have been studied in human, swine, ovine, feline, and canine but not ...

  18. ISOLATION OF CHICKEN FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the present study was to isolate chicken follicular dendritic cells (FDC). A combination of methods involving panning, iodixanol density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic cell separation technology made it possible to obtain functional FDC from the cecal tonsils from chickens, which h...

  19. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular...

  20. Dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during circuit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faits, Michelle C; Zhang, Chunmeng; Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-07

    Mitochondria move throughout neuronal dendrites and localize to sites of energy demand. The prevailing view of dendritic mitochondria as highly motile organelles whose distribution is continually adjusted by neuronal activity via Ca(2+)-dependent arrests is based on observations in cultured neurons exposed to artificial stimuli. Here, we analyze the movements of mitochondria in ganglion cell dendrites in the intact retina. We find that whereas during development 30% of mitochondria are motile at any time, as dendrites mature, mitochondria all but stop moving and localize stably to synapses and branch points. Neither spontaneous nor sensory-evoked activity and Ca(2+) transients alter motility of dendritic mitochondria; and pathological hyperactivity in a mouse model of retinal degeneration elevates rather than reduces motility. Thus, our findings indicate that dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during a critical developmental period of high motility, and challenge current views about the role of activity in regulating mitochondrial transport in dendrites.

  1. Differentiation of apical and basal dendrites in pyramidal cells and granule cells in dissociated hippocampal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You Kure; Fujishima, Kazuto; Kengaku, Mineko

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal cells and dentate granule cells develop morphologically distinct dendritic arbors, yet also share some common features. Both cell types form a long apical dendrite which extends from the apex of the cell soma, while short basal dendrites are developed only in pyramidal cells. Using quantitative morphometric analyses of mouse hippocampal cultures, we evaluated the differences in dendritic arborization patterns between pyramidal and granule cells. Furthermore, we observed and described the final apical dendrite determination during dendritic polarization by time-lapse imaging. Pyramidal and granule cells in culture exhibited similar dendritic patterns with a single principal dendrite and several minor dendrites so that the cell types were not readily distinguished by appearance. While basal dendrites in granule cells are normally degraded by adulthood in vivo, cultured granule cells retained their minor dendrites. Asymmetric growth of a single principal dendrite harboring the Golgi was observed in both cell types soon after the onset of dendritic growth. Time-lapse imaging revealed that up until the second week in culture, final principal dendrite designation was not stabilized, but was frequently replaced by other minor dendrites. Before dendritic polarity was stabilized, the Golgi moved dynamically within the soma and was repeatedly repositioned at newly emerging principal dendrites. Our results suggest that polarized growth of the apical dendrite is regulated by cell intrinsic programs, while regression of basal dendrites requires cue(s) from the extracellular environment in the dentate gyrus. The apical dendrite designation is determined from among multiple growing dendrites of young developing neurons.

  2. Asymmetry in signal propagation between the soma and dendrites plays a key role in determining dendritic excitability in motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojeong; Jones, Kelvin E; Heckman, C J

    2014-01-01

    It is widely recognized that propagation of electrophysiological signals between the soma and dendrites of neurons differs depending on direction, i.e. it is asymmetric. How this asymmetry influences the activation of voltage-gated dendritic channels, and consequent neuronal behavior, remains unclear. Based on the analysis of asymmetry in several types of motoneurons, we extended our previous methodology for reducing a fully reconstructed motoneuron model to a two-compartment representation that preserved asymmetric signal propagation. The reduced models accurately replicated the dendritic excitability and the dynamics of the anatomical model involving a persistent inward current (PIC) dispersed over the dendrites. The relationship between asymmetric signal propagation and dendritic excitability was investigated using the reduced models while varying the asymmetry in signal propagation between the soma and the dendrite with PIC density constant. We found that increases in signal attenuation from soma to dendrites increased the activation threshold of a PIC (hypo-excitability), whereas increases in signal attenuation from dendrites to soma decreased the activation threshold of a PIC (hyper-excitability). These effects were so strong that reversing the asymmetry in the soma-to-dendrite vs. dendrite-to-soma attenuation, reversed the correlation between PIC threshold and distance of this current source from the soma. We propose the tight relation of the asymmetric signal propagation to the input resistance in the dendrites as a mechanism underlying the influence of the asymmetric signal propagation on the dendritic excitability. All these results emphasize the importance of maintaining the physiological asymmetry in dendritic signaling not only for normal function of the cells but also for biophysically realistic simulations of dendritic excitability.

  3. Stochastic ion channel gating in dendritic neurons: morphology dependence and probabilistic synaptic activation of dendritic spikes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Cannon

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity is mediated through changes in the probability of stochastic transitions between open and closed states of ion channels. While differences in morphology define neuronal cell types and may underlie neurological disorders, very little is known about influences of stochastic ion channel gating in neurons with complex morphology. We introduce and validate new computational tools that enable efficient generation and simulation of models containing stochastic ion channels distributed across dendritic and axonal membranes. Comparison of five morphologically distinct neuronal cell types reveals that when all simulated neurons contain identical densities of stochastic ion channels, the amplitude of stochastic membrane potential fluctuations differs between cell types and depends on sub-cellular location. For typical neurons, the amplitude of membrane potential fluctuations depends on channel kinetics as well as open probability. Using a detailed model of a hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron, we show that when intrinsic ion channels gate stochastically, the probability of initiation of dendritic or somatic spikes by dendritic synaptic input varies continuously between zero and one, whereas when ion channels gate deterministically, the probability is either zero or one. At physiological firing rates, stochastic gating of dendritic ion channels almost completely accounts for probabilistic somatic and dendritic spikes generated by the fully stochastic model. These results suggest that the consequences of stochastic ion channel gating differ globally between neuronal cell-types and locally between neuronal compartments. Whereas dendritic neurons are often assumed to behave deterministically, our simulations suggest that a direct consequence of stochastic gating of intrinsic ion channels is that spike output may instead be a probabilistic function of patterns of synaptic input to dendrites.

  4. A theoretical study of hydrogen complexes of the XH-pi type between propyne and HF, HCL or HCN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Alessandra M; da Silva, Washington L V; Lopes, Kelson C; Ventura, Elizete; Araújo, Regiane C M U; do Monte, Silmar A; da Silva, João Bosco P; Ramos, Mozart N

    2006-05-15

    The present manuscript reports a systematic investigation of the basis set dependence of some properties of hydrogen-bonded (pi type) complexes formed by propyne and a HX molecule, where X=F, Cl and CN. The calculations have been performed at Hartree-Fock, MP2 and B3LYP levels. Geometries, H-bond energies and vibrational have been considered. The more pronounced effects on the structural parameters of the isolated molecules, as a result of complexation, are verified on RCtriple bondC and HX bond lengths. As compared to double-zeta (6-31G**), triple-zeta (6-311G**) basis set leads to an increase of RCtriple bondC bond distance, at all three computational levels. In the case where diffuse functions are added to both hydrogen and 'heavy' atoms, the effect is more pronounced. The propyne-HX structural parameters are quite similar to the corresponding parameters of acetylene-HX complexes, at all levels. The largest difference is obtained for hydrogen bond distance, RH, with a smaller value for propyne-HX complex, indicating a stronger bond. Concerning the electronic properties, the results yield the following ordering for H-bond energies, DeltaE: propynecdots, three dots, centeredHF>propynecdots, three dots, centeredHCl>propynecdots, three dots, centeredHCN. It is also important to point out that the inclusion of BSSE and zero-point energies (ZPE) corrections cause significant changes on DeltaE. The smaller effect of ZPE is obtained for propynecdots, three dots, centeredHCN at HF/6-311++G** level, while the greatest difference is obtained at MP2/6-31G** level for propynecdots, three dots, centeredHF system. Concerning the IR vibrational it was obtained that larger shift can be associated with stronger hydrogen bonds. The more pronounced effect on the normal modes of the isolated molecule after the complexation is obtained for HX stretching frequency, which is shifted downward.

  5. Trends and variations in CO, C2H6, and HCN in the Southern Hemisphere point to the declining anthropogenic emissions of CO and C2H6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Jones

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the carbon monoxide (CO, ethane (C2H6 and hydrogen cyanide (HCN partial columns (from the ground to 12 km derived from measurements by ground-based solar Fourier Transform Spectroscopy at Lauder, New Zealand (45° S, 170° E, and at Arrival Heights, Antarctica (78° S, 167° E, from 1997 to 2009. Significant negative trends are calculated for all species at both locations, based on the daily-mean observed time series, namely CO (−0.94 ± 0.47% yr−1, C2H6 (−2.37 ± 1.18% yr−1 and HCN (−0.93 ± 0.47% yr−1 at Lauder and CO (−0.92 ± 0.46% yr−1, C2H6 (−2.82 ± 1.37% yr−1 and HCN (−1.41 ± 0.71% yr−1 at Arrival Heights. The uncertainties reflect the 95% confidence limits. However, the magnitudes of the trends are influenced by the anomaly associated with the 1997–1998 El Niño Southern Oscillation event at the beginning of the time series reported. We calculate trends for each month from 1997 to 2009 and find negative trends for all months. The largest monthly trends of CO and C2H6 at Lauder, and to a lesser degree at Arrival Heights, occur during austral spring during the Southern Hemisphere tropical and subtropical biomass burning period. For HCN, the largest monthly trends occur in July and August at Lauder and around November at Arrival Heights. The correlations between CO and C2H6 and between CO and HCN at Lauder in September to November, when the biomass burning maximizes, are significantly larger that those in other seasons. A tropospheric chemistry-climate model is used to simulate CO, C2H6, and HCN partial columns for the period of 1997–2009, using interannually varying biomass burning emissions from GFED3 and annually periodic but seasonally varying emissions from both biogenic and anthropogenic sources. The model-simulated partial columns of these species compare well with the measured partial columns and the model accurately reproduces seasonal cycles of all three species at both locations. However

  6. Improvement of human dendritic cell culture for immunotoxicological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymery, N; Sibiril, Y; Parent-Massin, D

    2006-07-01

    A toxic injury such as a decrease in the number of immature dendritic cells caused by a cytotoxic effect or a disturbance in their maturation process can be responsible for immunodepression. There is a need to improve in vitro assays on human dendritic cells used to detect and evaluate adverse effects of xenobiotics. Two aspects were explored in this work: cytotoxic effects of xenobiotics on immature dendritic cells, and the interference of xenobiotics with dendritic cell maturation. Dendritic cells of two different origins were tested. Dendritic cells obtained either from umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells or, for the first time, from umbilical cord blood monocytes. The cytotoxicity assay on immature dendritic cells has been improved. For the study of the potential adverse effects of xenobiotics on the maturation process of dendritic cells, several parameters were selected such as expression of markers (CD86, CD83, HLA-DR), secretion of interleukins 10 and 12, and proliferation of autologous lymphocytes. The relevance and the efficiency of the protocol applied were tested using two mycotoxins, T-2 toxin and deoxynivalence, DON, which are known to be immunosuppressive, and one phycotoxin, domoic acid, which is known not to have any immunotoxic effect. Assays using umbilical cord monocyte dendritic cell cultures with the protocol defined in this work, which involves a cytotoxicity study followed by evaluation of several markers of adverse effects on the dendritic cell maturation process, revealed their usefulness for investigating xenobiotic immunotoxicity toward immune primary reactions.

  7. Remodeling of monoplanar Purkinje cell dendrites during cerebellar circuit formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Kaneko

    Full Text Available Dendrite arborization patterns are critical determinants of neuronal connectivity and integration. Planar and highly branched dendrites of the cerebellar Purkinje cell receive specific topographical projections from two major afferent pathways; a single climbing fiber axon from the inferior olive that extend along Purkinje dendrites, and parallel fiber axons of granule cells that contact vertically to the plane of dendrites. It has been believed that murine Purkinje cell dendrites extend in a single parasagittal plane in the molecular layer after the cell polarity is determined during the early postnatal development. By three-dimensional confocal analysis of growing Purkinje cells, we observed that mouse Purkinje cells underwent dynamic dendritic remodeling during circuit maturation in the third postnatal week. After dendrites were polarized and flattened in the early second postnatal week, dendritic arbors gradually expanded in multiple sagittal planes in the molecular layer by intensive growth and branching by the third postnatal week. Dendrites then became confined to a single plane in the fourth postnatal week. Multiplanar Purkinje cells in the third week were often associated by ectopic climbing fibers innervating nearby Purkinje cells in distinct sagittal planes. The mature monoplanar arborization was disrupted in mutant mice with abnormal Purkinje cell connectivity and motor discoordination. The dendrite remodeling was also impaired by pharmacological disruption of normal afferent activity during the second or third postnatal week. Our results suggest that the monoplanar arborization of Purkinje cells is coupled with functional development of the cerebellar circuitry.

  8. cAMP control of HCN2 channel Mg2+ block reveals loose coupling between the cyclic nucleotide-gating ring and the pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex K Lyashchenko

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated HCN channels underlie the Na+-K+ permeable IH pacemaker current. As with other voltage-gated members of the 6-transmembrane KV channel superfamily, opening of HCN channels involves dilation of a helical bundle formed by the intracellular ends of S6 albeit this is promoted by inward, not outward, displacement of S4. Direct agonist binding to a ring of cyclic nucleotide-binding sites, one of which lies immediately distal to each S6 helix, imparts cAMP sensitivity to HCN channel opening. At depolarized potentials, HCN channels are further modulated by intracellular Mg2+ which blocks the open channel pore and blunts the inhibitory effect of outward K+ flux. Here, we show that cAMP binding to the gating ring enhances not only channel opening but also the kinetics of Mg2+ block. A combination of experimental and simulation studies demonstrates that agonist acceleration of block is mediated via acceleration of the blocking reaction itself rather than as a secondary consequence of the cAMP enhancement of channel opening. These results suggest that the activation status of the gating ring and the open state of the pore are not coupled in an obligate manner (as required by the often invoked Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric model but couple more loosely (as envisioned in a modular model of protein activation. Importantly, the emergence of second messenger sensitivity of open channel rectification suggests that loose coupling may have an unexpected consequence: it may endow these erstwhile "slow" channels with an ability to exert voltage and ligand-modulated control over cellular excitability on the fastest of physiologically relevant time scales.

  9. Rate Coefficients for Reactions of Ethynyl Radical (C2H) With HCN and CH3CN: Implications for the Formation of Comples Nitriles on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoobler, Ray J.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1997-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reactions of C2H + HCN yields products and C2H + CH3CN yields products have been measured over the temperature range 262-360 K. These experiments represent an ongoing effort to accurately measure reaction rate coefficients of the ethynyl radical, C2H, relevant to planetary atmospheres such as those of Jupiter and Saturn and its satellite Titan. Laser photolysis of C2H2 is used to produce C2H, and transient infrared laser absorption is employed to measure the decay of C2H to obtain the subsequent reaction rates in a transverse flow cell. Rate constants for the reaction C2H + HCN yields products are found to increase significantly with increasing temperature and are measured to be (3.9-6.2) x 10(exp 13) cm(exp 3) molecules(exp -1) s(exp -1) over the temperature range of 297-360 K. The rate constants for the reaction C2H + CH3CN yields products are also found to increase substantially with increasing temperature and are measured to be (1.0-2.1) x 10(exp -12) cm(exp 3) molecules(exp -1) s(exp -1) over the temperature range of 262-360 K. For the reaction C2H + HCN yields products, ab initio calculations of transition state structures are used to infer that the major products form via an addition/elimination pathway. The measured rate constants for the reaction of C2H + HCN yields products are significantly smaller than values currently employed in photochemical models of Titan, which will affect the HC3N distribution.

  10. Sleeping dendrites: fiber-optic measurements of dendritic calcium activity in freely moving and sleeping animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Seibt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendrites are the post-synaptic sites of most excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the brain, making them the main location of cortical information processing and synaptic plasticity. Although current hypotheses suggest a central role for sleep in proper cognitive function and brain plasticity, virtually nothing is known about changes in dendritic activity across the sleep-wake cycle and how waking experience modifies this activity. To start addressing these questions, we developed a method that allows long-term recordings of EEGs/EMG combined with in vivo cortical calcium (Ca2+ activity in freely moving and sleeping rats. We measured Ca2+ activity from populations of dendrites of layer (L 5 pyramidal neurons (n = 13 rats that we compared with Ca2+ activity from populations of neurons in L2/3 (n = 11 rats. L5 and L2/3 neurons were labelled using bolus injection of OGB1-AM or GCaMP6 (1. Ca2+ signals were detected using a fiber-optic system (cannula diameter = 400µm, transmitting the changes in fluorescence to a photodiode. Ca2+ fluctuations could then be correlated with ongoing changes in brain oscillatory activity during 5 major brain states: active wake [AW], quiet wake [QW], NREM, REM and NREM-REM transition (or intermediate state, [IS]. Our Ca2+ recordings show large transients in L5 dendrites and L2/3 neurons that oscillate predominantly at frequencies In summary, we show that this technique is successful in monitoring fluctuations in ongoing dendritic Ca2+ activity during natural brain states and allows, in principle, to combine behavioral measurement with imaging from various brain regions (e.g. deep structures in freely behaving animals. Using this method, we show that Ca2+ transients from populations of L2/3 neurons and L5 dendrites are deferentially regulated across the sleep/wake cycle, with dendritic activity being the highest during the IS sleep. Our correlation analysis suggests that specific sleep EEG activity during NREM and IS

  11. Molecular observations of comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy): HNC/HCN ratios and upper limits to PH3

    CERN Document Server

    Agundez, M; Santos-Sanz, P; Bockelee-Morvan, D; Moreno, R

    2014-01-01

    We present molecular observations carried out with the IRAM 30m telescope at wavelengths around 1.15 mm towards the Oort cloud comets C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/2013 R1 (Lovejoy) when they were at 0.6 and 1 AU, respectively, from the Sun. We detect HCN, HNC, and CH3OH in both comets, together with the ion HCO+ in comet ISON and a few weak unidentified lines in comet Lovejoy, one of which could be tentatively assigned to methylamine (CH3NH2). The monitoring of the HCN J = 3-2 line showed a tenfold enhancement in comet ISON on November 14.4 UT due to an outburst of activity whose exact origin is unknown, although it could be related to some break up of the nucleus. The set of CH3OH lines observed was used to derive the kinetic temperature in the coma, 90 K in comet ISON and 60 K in comet Lovejoy. The HNC/HCN ratios derived, 0.18 in ISON and 0.05 in Lovejoy, are comparable to those found in most previous comets and are consistent with an enhancement of HNC as the comet approaches the Sun. Phosphine (PH3) was also se...

  12. Macrophages, Dendritic Cells, and Regression of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Feig

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and monocyte-derived cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and other cellular elements of the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, in this review, the focus will be primarily on the monocyte derived cells- macrophages and dendritic cells. The roles of these cell types in atherogenesis will be highlighted. Finally, the mechanisms of atherosclerosis regression as it relates to these cells will be discussed.

  13. Dendritic nanocomposite for delivery of antibacterial agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pureti Madhu Kumar; PSrinivasa Babu; Shaik Rasheed; Ramadoss Karthikeyan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop and explore the use of PEGylated poly (propylene imine) dendritic architecture for the delivery of an anti bacterial bioactive, Trimethoprim. Methods: For this study, PEGylated poly(propylene imine) dendritic architecture was synthesized and loaded with Trimethoprim and targeted to the resistant producing strains of both gram positive and gram negative. The antibacterial activity was carried out by agar well-diffusion method to compare zone of inhibition with standard drug and plain PPI dendrimer. Results: The study showed that the Trimethoprim loaded dendrimer has significant antibacterial activity than the plain PPI dendrimer, but standard drug was not shown zone of inhibition upon both microorganisms butKlebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) the pure drug showed activity. Conclusions: In this study antibacterial activity of synthesized system is also relatively safer and holds potential to deliver any other antibacterial agent to the resistant producing strains.

  14. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Juliana Maria; Rumjanek, Vivian Mary

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies. PMID:27088097

  15. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria Motta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies.

  16. Dendritic Cells for SYN Scan Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems have previously been applied to the problem of intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on the function of Dendritic Cells (DCs). DCs are antigen presenting cells and key to activation of the human immune system, behaviour which has been abstracted to form the Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA). In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion, asynchronously correlating the the fused data signals with a secondary data stream. Aggregate output of a population of cells, is analysed and forms the basis of an anomaly detection system. In this paper the DCA is applied to the detection of outgoing port scans using TCP SYN packets. Results show that detection can be achieved with the DCA, yet some false positives can be encountered when simultaneously scanning and using other network services. Suggestions are made for using adaptive signals to alleviate this uncovered problem.

  17. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    cells, Gr1+ inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils, or TNF production were induced to develop chronic pancreatitis in the context of DC overexpansion...Z. Yao, W. Cao, and Y.J. Liu. 2005. TSLP-activated dendritic cells induce an inflammatory T helper type 2 cell response through OX40 ligand. J. Exp...Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response , including the time for reviewing instructions

  18. Signaling in dendritic spines and spine microdomains

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The specialized morphology of dendritic spines creates an isolated compartment that allows for localized biochemical signaling. Recent studies have revealed complexity in the function of the spine head as a signaling domain and indicate that (1) the spine is functionally subdivided into multiple independent microdomains and (2) not all biochemical signals are equally compartmentalized within the spine. Here we review these findings as well as the developments in fluorescence microscopy that a...

  19. Dendrite fragmentation by catastrophic elastic remelting

    OpenAIRE

    Ananiev, S.; Nikrityuk, P.; Eckert, K.

    2008-01-01

    The paper proposes a new fragmentation mechanism of dendrite arms. The theoretical basis of this mechanism is a shift in the thermodynamical equilibrium at the solid-liquid interface due to the presence of elastic energy. This effect is modelled by the generalized Gibbs-Thomson condition [1], where each term is calculated analytically using a simple Bernoulli-Euler beam model. The resulting nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations is integrated in time using a fully implicit scheme...

  20. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  1. Theoretical study of the interplay between lithium bond and hydrogen bond in complexes involved with HLi and HCN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingzhong; Hu, Ting; An, Xiulin; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo; Gong, Baoan; Sun, Jiazhong

    2009-12-21

    The lithium- and hydrogen-bonded complex of HLi-NCH-NCH is studied with ab initio calculations. The optimized structure, vibrational frequencies, and binding energy are calculated at the MP2 level with 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis set. The interplay between lithium bonding and hydrogen bonding in the complex is investigated with these properties. The effect of lithium bonding on the properties of hydrogen bonding is larger than that of hydrogen bonding on the properties of lithium bonding. In the trimer, the binding energies are increased by about 19% and 61% for the lithium and hydrogen bonds, respectively. A big cooperative energy (-5.50 kcal mol(-1)) is observed in the complex. Both the charge transfer and induction effect due to the electrostatic interaction are responsible for the cooperativity in the trimer. The effect of HCN chain length on the lithium bonding has been considered. The natural bond orbital and atoms in molecules analyses indicate that the electrostatic force plays a main role in the lithium bonding. A many-body interaction analysis has also been performed for HLi-(NCH)(N) (N=2-5) systems.

  2. Spatially resolved HCN J=4--3 and CS J=7--6 emission from the disk around HD 142527

    CERN Document Server

    van der Plas, G; Menard, F; Perez, S; Thi, W F; Pinte, C; Christiaens, V

    2014-01-01

    The disk around HD 142527 attracts a lot of attention, amongst others because of its resolved (sub) mm dust continuum that is concentrated into a horseshoe-shape towards the north of the star. In this manuscript we present spatially resolved ALMA detections of the HCN J=4-3 and CS J=7-6 emission lines. These lines give us a view deeper into the disk compared to the (optically thicker) CO isotopes. This is the first detection of CS J=7-6 coming from a protoplanetary disk. Both emission lines are azimuthally asymmetric and are suppressed under the horseshoe-shaped continuum emission peak. A possible mechanism to explain the decrease under the horseshoe-shaped continuum is the increased opacity coming from the higher dust concentration at the continuum peak. Lower {\\gr dust and/or gas} temperatures and an optically thick radio-continuum reduce line emission by freeze-out and shielding of emission from the far side of the disk.

  3. Spatially Resolved HCN J = 4-3 and CS J = 7-6 Emission from the Disk around HD 142527

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, G.; Casassus, S.; Ménard, F.; Perez, S.; Thi, W. F.; Pinte, C.; Christiaens, V.

    2014-09-01

    The disk around HD 142527 attracts a great amount of attention compared to others because of its resolved (sub-)millimeter dust continuum that is concentrated into the shape of a horseshoe toward the north of the star. In this Letter we present spatially resolved ALMA detections of the HCN J = 4-3 and CS J = 7-6 emission lines. These lines give us a deeper view into the disk compared to the (optically thicker) CO isotopes. This is the first detection of CS J = 7-6 coming from a protoplanetary disk. Both emission lines are azimuthally asymmetric and are suppressed under the horseshoe-shaped continuum emission peak. A possible mechanism for explaining the decrease under the horseshoe-shaped continuum is the increased opacity coming from the higher dust concentration at the continuum peak. Lower dust and/or gas temperatures and an optically thick radio-continuum reduce line emission by freezing out and shielding emission from the far side of the disk.

  4. Reversal of HCN channel voltage dependence via bridging of the S4-S5 linker and Post-S6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prole, David L; Yellen, Gary

    2006-09-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels possess charged domains that move in response to changes in transmembrane voltage. How this movement is transduced into gating of the channel pore is largely unknown. Here we show directly that two functionally important regions of the spHCN1 pacemaker channel, the S4-S5 linker and the C-linker, come into close proximity during gating. Cross-linking these regions with high-affinity metal bridges or disulfide bridges dramatically alters channel gating in the absence of cAMP; after modification the polarity of voltage dependence is reversed. Instead of being closed at positive voltage and activating with hyperpolarization, modified channels are closed at negative voltage and activate with depolarization. Mechanistically, this reversal of voltage dependence occurs as a result of selectively eliminating channel deactivation, while retaining an existing inactivation process. Bridging also alters channel activation by cAMP, showing that interaction of these two regions can also affect the efficacy of physiological ligands.

  5. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    The growth of dendrites is governed by the interplay between two simple and familiar processes---the irreversible diffusion of energy, and the reversible work done in the formation of new surface area. To advance our understanding of these processes, NASA sponsored a project that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia is 1994, 1996, and 1997 to record and analyze benchmark data in an apparent-microgravity ``laboratory.'' In this laboratory, energy transfer by gravity driven convection was essentially eliminated and one could test independently, for the first time, both components of dendritic growth theory. The analysis of this data shows that although the diffusion of energy can be properly accounted for, the results from interfacial physics appear to be in disagreement and alternate models should receive increased attention. Unfortunately, currently and for the foreseeable future, there is no access or financial support to develop and conduct additional experiments of this type. However, the benchmark data of 35mm photonegatives, video, and all supporting instrument data are now available at the IDGE Archive at the College of the Holy Cross. This data may still have considerable relevance to researchers working specifically with dendritic growth, and more generally those working in the synthesis, growth & processing of materials, multiscale computational modeling, pattern formation, and systems far from equilibrium.

  6. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell role in cutaneous malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadeh, Dana; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) correspond to a specialized dendritic cell population that exhibit plasma cell morphology, express CD4, CD123, HLA-DR, blood-derived dendritic cell antigen-2 (BDCA-2), and Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 within endosomal compartments. Through their production of type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines, pDCs provide anti-viral resistance and link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. While lacking from normal skin, pDCs are usually recruited to the skin in several cutaneous pathologies where they appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Among the latter group, pDCs have the potential to induce anti-tumour immunity; however, the complex interaction of pDCs with tumor cells and their micro-environment appears to contribute to immunologic tolerance. In this review, we aim at highlighting the role played by pDCs in cutaneous malignancies with special emphasis on the underlying mechanisms.

  7. Probing synaptic function in dendrites with calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Friederike; Lohmann, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Calcium imaging has become a widely used technique to probe neuronal activity on the cellular and subcellular levels. In contrast to standard electrophysiological methods, calcium imaging resolves sub- and suprathreshold activation patterns in structures as small as fine dendritic branches and spines. This review highlights recent findings gained on the subcellular level using calcium imaging, with special emphasis on synaptic transmission and plasticity in individual spines. Since imaging allows monitoring activity across populations of synapses, it has recently been adopted to investigate how dendrites integrate information from many synapses. Future experiments, ideally carried out in vivo, will reveal how the dendritic tree integrates and computes afferent signals. For example, it is now possible to directly test the concept that dendritic inputs are clustered and that single dendrites or dendritic stretches act as independent computational units.

  8. Inducible expression of endomorphins in murine dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohuai; Xia, Hui; Chen, Yong; Liu, Xiaofen; Zhou, Cheng; Gao, Qin; Li, Zhenghong

    2012-12-15

    Bone marrow precursor cells were extracted from C57BL/6J mice aged 7-8 weeks, and dendritic cells were purified using anti-CD11c (a specific marker for dendritic cells) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression levels of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were upregulated in dendritic cells activated by lipopolysaccharide. An enzyme immunoassay showed that lipopolysaccharide and other Toll-like receptor ligands promoted the secretion of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 from activated dendritic cells. [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation demonstrated that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 both inhibited the proliferation of T lymphocyte induced by activated dendritic cells. Furthermore, this immunosuppressive effect was blocked by CTOP, a specific antagonist of µ-opioid receptors. Our experimental findings indicate that activated dendritic cells can induce the expression and secretion of endomorphins, and that endomorphins suppress T lymphocyte proliferation through activation of µ-opioid receptors.

  9. Dendritic spine actin dynamics in neuronal maturation and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlushchenko, Iryna; Koskinen, Mikko; Hotulainen, Pirta

    2016-09-01

    The majority of the postsynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system exist on small bulbous structures on dendrites known as dendritic spines. The actin cytoskeleton is a structural element underlying the proper development and morphology of dendritic spines. Synaptic activity patterns rapidly change actin dynamics, leading to morphological changes in dendritic spines. In this mini-review, we will discuss recent findings on neuronal maturation and synaptic plasticity-induced changes in the dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton. We propose that actin dynamics in dendritic spines decrease through actin filament crosslinking during neuronal maturation. In long-term potentiation, we evaluate the model of fast breakdown of actin filaments through severing and rebuilding through polymerization and later stabilization through crosslinking. We will discuss the role of Ca(2+) in long-term depression, and suggest that actin filaments are dissolved through actin filament severing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Dendrite Growth in Al Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许庆彦; 柳百成

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic grains are the most often observed microstructure in metals and alloys. In the past decade, more and more attention has been paid to the modeling and simulation of dendritic microstructures. This paper describes a modified diffusion-limited aggregation model to simulate the complex shape of the dendrite grains during metal solidification. The fractal model was used to simulate equiaxed dendrite growth. The fractal dimensions of simulated Al alloy structures range from 1.63-1.88 which compares well with the experimentally-measured fractal dimension of 1.85; therefore, the model accurately predicts not only the dendritic structure morphology, but also the fractal dimension of the dendrite structure formed during solidification.

  11. Inducible expression of endomorphins in murine dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohuai Yang; Hui Xia; Yong Chen; Xiaofen Liu; Cheng Zhou; Qin Gao; Zhenghong Li

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow precursor cells were extracted from C57BL/6J mice aged 7–8 weeks, and dendritic cells were purified using anti-CD11c (a specific marker for dendritic cells) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression levels of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were upregulated in dendritic cells activated by lipopolysaccharide. An enzyme immunoassay showed that lipopolysaccharide and other Toll-like receptor ligands promoted the secretion of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 from activated dendritic cells. [3H]-thymidine incorporation demonstrated that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 both inhibited the proliferation of T lymphocyte induced by activated dendritic cells. Furthermore, this immunosuppressive effect was blocked by CTOP, a specific antagonist of μ-opioid receptors. Our experimental findings indicate that activated dendritic cells can induce the expression and secretion of endomorphins, and that endomorphins suppress T lymphocyte proliferation through activation of μ-opioid receptors.

  12. Dendritic spine detection using curvilinear structure detector and LDA classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Xiaobo; Witt, Rochelle M; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Adjeroh, Donald; Wong, Stephen T C

    2007-06-01

    Dendritic spines are small, bulbous cellular compartments that carry synapses. Biologists have been studying the biochemical pathways by examining the morphological and statistical changes of the dendritic spines at the intracellular level. In this paper a novel approach is presented for automated detection of dendritic spines in neuron images. The dendritic spines are recognized as small objects of variable shape attached or detached to multiple dendritic backbones in the 2D projection of the image stack along the optical direction. We extend the curvilinear structure detector to extract the boundaries as well as the centerlines for the dendritic backbones and spines. We further build a classifier using Linear Discriminate Analysis (LDA) to classify the attached spines into valid and invalid types to improve the accuracy of the spine detection. We evaluate the proposed approach by comparing with the manual results in terms of backbone length, spine number, spine length, and spine density.

  13. Inducible expression of endomorphins in murine dendritic cells★

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaohuai; Xia, Hui; Chen, Yong; Liu, Xiaofen; Zhou, Cheng; Gao, Qin; Li, Zhenghong

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow precursor cells were extracted from C57BL/6J mice aged 7–8 weeks, and dendritic cells were purified using anti-CD11c (a specific marker for dendritic cells) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression levels of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were upregulated in dendritic cells activated by lipopolysaccharide. An enzyme immunoassay showed that lipopolysaccharide and other Toll-like receptor ligands promoted the secretion of endomorphin-...

  14. Assessment of scaling factor in modified dendrite growth model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑞丰; 沈宁福; 曹文博

    2002-01-01

    A model for dendrite growth during rapid solidification was established on the basis of BCT model and marginal stability criterion through modified Peclet numbers. Taking into account the interaction of diffusion fields, including solute diffusion field and thermal diffusion field around the dendrite tip, the model obtain a satisfactory results to predict the dendrite velocity and the tip radius, which agrees well with the experimental data from references in Cu-Ni alloy.

  15. Structural Insights into the Functional Role of the Hcn Sub-domain of the Receptor-Binding Domain of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Mosaic Serotype C/D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gardberg, Anna; Edwards, Tom E.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.; Buchko, Garry W.

    2013-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the causative agent of the deadly neuroparalytic disease botulism, is the most poisonous protein known for humans. Produced by different strains of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum, BoNT effects cellular intoxication via a multistep mechanism executed by the three modules of the activated protein. Endocytosis, the first step of cellular intoxication, is triggered by the ~50 kDa, heavy-chain receptor-binding module (HCR) that is specific for a ganglioside and a protein receptor on neuronal cell surfaces. This dual receptor recognition mechanism between BoNT and the host cell’s membrane is well documented and occurs via specific intermolecular interactions with the C-terminal sub-domain, Hcc, of BoNT-HCR. The N-terminal sub-domain of BoNT-HCR, Hcn, comprises ~50% of BoNT-HCR and adopts a B-sheet jelly roll fold. While suspected in assisting cell surface recognition, no unambiguous function for the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT has been indentified. To obtain insights into the potential function of the Hcn sub-domain in BoNT, the first crystal structure of a BoNT with an organic ligand bound to the Hcn sub-domain has been obtained. Here, we describe the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR determined at 1.70 Å resolution with a tetraethylene glycol (PG4) molecule bound in an hydrophobic cleft between B-strands in the B-sheet jelly fold roll of the Hcn sub-domain. The molecule is completely engulfed in the cleft, making numerous hydrophobic (Y932, S959, W966, and D1042) and hydrophilic (S935, W977, L979, N1013, and I1066) contacts with the protein’s side chain and backbone that may mimic in vivo interactions with the phospholipid membranes on neuronal cell surfaces. A sulfate ion was also observed bound to residues T1176, D1177, K1196, and R1243 in the Hcc sub-domain of BoNT/CD-HCR. In the crystal structure of a similar protein, BoNT/D-HCR, a sialic acid

  16. CTAB-Influenced Electrochemical Dissolution of Silver Dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Regan, Colm; Zhu, Xi; Zhong, Jun; Anand, Utkarsh; Lu, Jingyu; Su, Haibin; Mirsaidov, Utkur

    2016-04-19

    Dendrite formation on the electrodes of a rechargeable battery during the charge-discharge cycle limits its capacity and application due to short-circuits and potential ignition. However, understanding of the underlying dendrite growth and dissolution mechanisms is limited. Here, the electrochemical growth and dissolution of silver dendrites on platinum electrodes immersed in an aqueous silver nitrate (AgNO3) electrolyte solution was investigated using in situ liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The dissolution of Ag dendrites in an AgNO3 solution with added cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant was compared to the dissolution of Ag dendrites in a pure aqueous AgNO3 solution. Significantly, when CTAB was added, dendrite dissolution proceeded in a step-by-step manner, resulting in nanoparticle formation and transient microgrowth stages due to Ostwald ripening. This resulted in complete dissolution of dendrites and "cleaning" of the cell of any silver metal. This is critical for practical battery applications because "dead" lithium is known to cause short circuits and high-discharge rates. In contrast to this, in a pure aqueous AgNO3 solution, without surfactant, dendrites dissolved incompletely back into solution, leaving behind minute traces of disconnected silver particles. Finally, a mechanism for the CTAB-influenced dissolution of silver dendrites was proposed based on electrical field dependent binding energy of CTA(+) to silver.

  17. In vitro effects of trichothecenes on human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymery, N; Sibiril, Y; Parent-Massin, D

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to study the in vitro effects of trichothecenes on human dendritic cells. Trichothecenes are mycotoxins produced by fungi such as Fusarium, Myrothecium, and Stachybotrys. Two aspects have been explored in this work: the cytotoxicity of trichothecenes on immature dendritic cells to determine IC 50 (inhibition concentration), and the effects of trichothecenes on dendritic cell maturation process. Two mycotoxins (T-2 and DON) known to be immunotoxic have been tested on a model of monocyte-derived dendritic cells culture. Cytotoxic effects of T-2 toxin and DON on immature dendritic cells showed that DON is less potent than T-2 toxin. The exposure to trichothecenes during dendritic cell maturation upon addition of LPS or TNF-alpha markedly inhibited the up-regulation of maturation markers such as CD-86, HLA-DR and CCR7. Features of LPS or TNF-alpha -mediated maturation of dendritic cells, such as IL-10 and IL-12 secretions and endocytosis, were also impaired in response to trichothecenes treatment. These results suggest trichothecenes have adverse effects on dendritic cells and dendritic cell maturation process.

  18. Mapping homeostatic synaptic plasticity using cable properties of dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queenan, B N; Lee, K J; Tan, H; Huganir, R L; Vicini, S; Pak, D T S

    2016-02-19

    When chronically silenced, cortical and hippocampal neurons homeostatically upregulate excitatory synaptic function. However, the subcellular position of such changes on the dendritic tree is not clear. We exploited the cable-filtering properties of dendrites to derive a parameter, the dendritic filtering index (DFI), to map the spatial distribution of synaptic currents. Our analysis indicates that young rat cortical neurons globally scale AMPA receptor-mediated currents, while mature hippocampal neurons do not, revealing distinct homeostatic strategies between brain regions and developmental stages. The DFI presents a useful tool for mapping the dendritic origin of synaptic currents and the location of synaptic plasticity changes.

  19. Dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is independent of Reelin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinkyung; Park, Tae-Ju; Kwon, Namseop; Lee, Dongmyeong; Kim, Seunghwan; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Curran, Tom; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-07-01

    The dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is critical for cerebellar circuit formation. In the absence of Crk and CrkL, the Reelin pathway does not function resulting in partial Purkinje cell migration and defective dendritogenesis. However, the relationships among Purkinje cell migration, dendritic development and Reelin signaling have not been clearly delineated. Here, we use synchrotron X-ray microscopy to obtain 3-D images of Golgi-stained Purkinje cell dendrites. Purkinje cells that failed to migrate completely exhibited conical dendrites with abnormal 3-D arborization and reduced dendritic complexity. Furthermore, their spines were fewer in number with a distorted morphology. In contrast, Purkinje cells that migrated successfully displayed planar dendritic and spine morphologies similar to normal cells, despite reduced dendritic complexity. These results indicate that, during cerebellar formation, Purkinje cells migrate into an environment that supports development of dendritic planarity and spine formation. While Reelin signaling is important for the migration process, it does not make a direct major contribution to dendrite formation.

  20. Semi-solid Forming of a Damper Housing with Dendritic and Non-dendritic Al-Si-Mg Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenCM; YangCC; ChaoCG

    2001-01-01

    A motorcycle component of damper housing was made by semi-solid forming process. This was used to investigate the effect of microstructures of feedstock on the formability of semisolid process. The soundness and microstructures of casting parts made by dendritic and non-dendritic feedstock were investigated. Separating of liquid phase was found in the casting produced by dendritic feedstock, which might result in defects of porosity, while uniform microstructures were found in the casting produced by no...

  1. Development of selective catalytic oxidation (SCO) for NH{sub 3} and HCN removal from gasification gas; Selektiivisen katalyyttisen hapetusprosessin (SCO) kehittaeminen kaasutuskaasun NH{sub 3}:n ja HCN:n poistoon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T.; Heiskanen, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    In gasification, reactive nitrogen compounds (mainly NH{sub 3} and HCN) are formed from fuel nitrogen. If the gas containing NH{sub 3} is burned, a high NO{sub x} emission may be formed. The content of nitrogen compounds of the hot gasification gas could be reduced in Selective Catalytic Oxidation (SCO) process. In this process small amounts of reactive oxidisers are injected into the gas in order to convert NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2}. The utilization of SCO process together with low NO{sub x} burners in advanced gasification power stations might offer an alternative for flue gas treatment technologies like SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction). In the earlier research, conditions were found, where oxidizers reacted selectively with ammonia in the gasification gas. Highest ammonia reduction took place in the aluminium oxide bed in the presence of NO and O{sub 2}. The aim of this study is to examine the reaction mechanism in order to be able to further evaluate the development possibilities of this kind process. The effect of composition and the amount of added oxidizer, the content of combustible gas components, space velocity, pressure and temperature will be studied. The experiments are carried out with the laboratory scale high pressure flow reactor of VTT Energy. Kinetic modelling of the experimental results is carried out in co-operation with the combustion chemistry group of Aabo Akademi. The aim of the modelling work is to bring insight to the gas-phase reactions that are important for the SCO-process. (orig.)

  2. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Mohri, Tetsuo [Center for Computational Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Gránásy, László, E-mail: granasy.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendritesdendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  3. Crosstalk between dendritic cell subsets and implications for dendritic cell-based anticancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakdash, G.; Schreurs, I.; Schreibelt, G.; Tel, J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a family of professional antigen-presenting cells that have an indispensable role in the initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses against pathogens and tumor cells. The DC family is very heterogeneous. Two main types of naturally occurring DCs circulate in periphe

  4. Impact of Dendritic Size and Dendritic Topology on Burst Firing in Pyramidal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, Ronald A. J.; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2010-01-01

    Neurons display a wide range of intrinsic firing patterns. A particularly relevant pattern for neuronal signaling and synaptic plasticity is burst firing, the generation of clusters of action potentials with short interspike intervals. Besides ion-channel composition, dendritic morphology appears to

  5. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...

  6. Fine structure of synapses on dendritic spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eFrotscher

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Camillo Golgi’s Reazione Nera led to the discovery of dendritic spines, small appendages originating from dendritic shafts. With the advent of electron microscopy (EM they were identified as sites of synaptic contact. Later it was found that changes in synaptic strength were associated with changes in the shape of dendritic spines. While live-cell imaging was advantageous in monitoring the time course of such changes in spine structure, EM is still the best method for the simultaneous visualization of all cellular components, including actual synaptic contacts, at high resolution. Immunogold labeling for EM reveals the precise localization of molecules in relation to synaptic structures. Previous EM studies of spines and synapses were performed in tissue subjected to aldehyde fixation and dehydration in ethanol, which is associated with protein denaturation and tissue shrinkage. It has remained an issue to what extent fine structural details are preserved when subjecting the tissue to these procedures. In the present review, we report recent studies on the fine structure of spines and synapses using high-pressure freezing (HPF, which avoids protein denaturation by aldehydes and results in an excellent preservation of ultrastructural detail. In these studies, HPF was used to monitor subtle fine-structural changes in spine shape associated with chemically induced long-term potentiation (cLTP at identified hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. Changes in spine shape result from reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. We report that cLTP was associated with decreased immunogold labeling for phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing protein. Phosphorylation of cofilin renders it unable to depolymerize F-actin, which stabilizes the actin cytoskeleton. Decreased levels of p-cofilin, in turn, suggest increased actin turnover, possibly underlying the changes in spine shape associated with cLTP. The findings reviewed here establish HPF as

  7. Dendritic Cells as Danger-Recognizing Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokmann Hong

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are antigen presenting cells that are characterized by a potent capacity to initiate immune responses. DCs comprise several subsets with distinct phenotypes. After sensing any danger(s to the host via their innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors, DCs become mature and subsequently present antigens to CD4+ T cells. Since DCs possess the intrinsic capacity to polarize CD4+ helper cells, it is critical to understand the immunological roles of DCs for clinical applications. Here, we review the different DC subsets, their danger-sensing receptors and immunological functions. Furthermore, the cytokine reporter mouse model for studying DC activation is introduced.

  8. Viruses, dendritic cells and the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Barney S

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The interaction between viruses and dendritic cells (DCs is varied and complex. DCs are key elements in the development of a host response to pathogens such as viruses, but viruses have developed survival tactics to either evade or diminish the immune system that functions to kill and eliminate these micro-organisms. In the present review we summarize current concepts regarding the function of DCs in the immune system, our understanding of how viruses alter DC function to attenuate both the virus-specific and global immune response, and how we may be able to exploit DC function to prevent or treat viral infections.

  9. Convective heat transfer during dendritic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    Axial growth rate measurements were carried out at 17 levels of supercooling between 0.043 C and 2 C, a temperature range in which convection, instead of diffusion, becomes the controlling mechanism of heat transfer in the dentritic growth process. The growth velocity, normalized to that expected for pure diffusive heat transfer, displays a dependence on orientation. The ratio of the observed growth velocity to that for convection-free growth and the coefficients of supercooling are formulated. The dependence of normalized growth rate in supercooling is described for downward growing dendrites. These experimental correlations can be justified theoretically only to a limited extent.

  10. Convective heat transfer during dendritic solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments on succinonitrile are described in which the dependence of dendritic growth velocity is studied as a function of orientation with respect to gravity. Growth rate measurements were carried out at a relatively small supercooling, requiring high specimen purity as well as extreme thermal stability and precision temperature measurement. The normalized growth velocity showed a dependence on orientation described by the ratio of observed growth velocity to that expected for convection-free growth being equal to 3.52 times the n-th power of Cos half the orientation angle, where n lies between 0.5 and 0.75.

  11. Metamaterial absorber with random dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiren; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2010-05-01

    The metamaterial absorber composed of random dendritic cells has been investigated at microwave frequencies. It is found that the absorptivities come to be weaker and the resonant frequency get red shift as the disordered states increasing, however, the random metamaterial absorber still presents high absorptivity more than 95%. The disordered structures can help understanding of the metamaterial absorber and may be employed for practical design of infrared metamaterial absorber, which may play important roles in collection of radiative heat energy and directional transfer enhancement.

  12. Dopaminergic regulation of dendritic calcium: fast multisite calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Oikonomou, Katerina D; Short, Shaina M; Antic, Srdjan D

    2013-01-01

    Optimal dopamine tone is required for the normal cortical function; however it is still unclear how cortical-dopamine-release affects information processing in individual cortical neurons. Thousands of glutamatergic inputs impinge onto elaborate dendritic trees of neocortical pyramidal neurons. In the process of ensuing synaptic integration (information processing), a variety of calcium transients are generated in remote dendritic compartments. In order to understand the cellular mechanisms of dopaminergic modulation it is important to know whether and how dopaminergic signals affect dendritic calcium transients. In this chapter, we describe a relatively inexpensive method for monitoring dendritic calcium fluctuations at multiple loci across the pyramidal dendritic tree, at the same moment of time (simultaneously). The experiments have been designed to measure the amplitude, time course and spatial extent of action potential-associated dendritic calcium transients before and after application of dopaminergic drugs. In the examples provided here the dendritic calcium transients were evoked by triggering the somatic action potentials (backpropagation-evoked), and puffs of exogenous dopamine were applied locally onto selected dendritic branches.

  13. Contribution of sublinear and supralinear dendritic integration to neuronal computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Van-Minh, Alexandra; Cazé, Romain D; Abrahamsson, Therése; Cathala, Laurence; Gutkin, Boris S; DiGregorio, David A

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear dendritic integration is thought to increase the computational ability of neurons. Most studies focus on how supralinear summation of excitatory synaptic responses arising from clustered inputs within single dendrites result in the enhancement of neuronal firing, enabling simple computations such as feature detection. Recent reports have shown that sublinear summation is also a prominent dendritic operation, extending the range of subthreshold input-output (sI/O) transformations conferred by dendrites. Like supralinear operations, sublinear dendritic operations also increase the repertoire of neuronal computations, but feature extraction requires different synaptic connectivity strategies for each of these operations. In this article we will review the experimental and theoretical findings describing the biophysical determinants of the three primary classes of dendritic operations: linear, sublinear, and supralinear. We then review a Boolean algebra-based analysis of simplified neuron models, which provides insight into how dendritic operations influence neuronal computations. We highlight how neuronal computations are critically dependent on the interplay of dendritic properties (morphology and voltage-gated channel expression), spiking threshold and distribution of synaptic inputs carrying particular sensory features. Finally, we describe how global (scattered) and local (clustered) integration strategies permit the implementation of similar classes of computations, one example being the object feature binding problem.

  14. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells: from molecules to intercellular communication network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathan, T.S.M.; Figdor, C.G.; Buschow, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a specific subset of naturally occurring dendritic cells, that secrete large amounts of Type I interferon and play an important role in the immune response against viral infection. Several studies have highlighted that they are also effective antigen presentin

  15. Cold-induced exodus of postsynaptic proteins from dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui-Hsuan; Huang, Zu-Han; Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Chow, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Yen-Chung

    2009-02-01

    Dendritic spines are small protrusions on neuronal dendrites and the major target of the excitatory inputs in mammalian brains. Cultured neurons and brain slices are important tools in studying the biochemical and cellular properties of dendritic spines. During the processes of immunocytochemical studies of neurons and the preparation of brain slices, neurons were often kept at temperatures lower than 37 degrees C for varied lengths of time. This study sought to investigate whether and how cold treatment would affect the protein composition of dendritic spines. The results indicated that upon cold treatment four postsynaptic proteins, namely, alpha,beta-tubulins, calcium, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha, and cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain and microtubule-associated protein 2, but not PSD-95 or AMPA receptors, exited from the majority of dendritic spines of cultured rat hippocampal neurons in a Gd(3+)-sensitive manner. The cold-induced exit of tubulins from dendritic spines was further found to be an energy-dependent process involving the activation of Gd(3+)-sensitive calcium channels and ryanodine receptors. The results thus indicate that changes in temperature, calcium concentration, and energy supply of the medium surrounding neurons would affect the protein composition of the dendritic spines and conceivably the protein composition of the subcellular organizations, such as the postsynaptic density, in the cytoplasm of dendritic spines.

  16. Barriers in the brain : resolving dendritic spine morphology and compartmentalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian, Max; Kusters, Remy; Wierenga, Corette J; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are micron-sized protrusions that harbor the majority of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. The head of the spine is connected to the dendritic shaft by a 50-400 nm thin membrane tube, called the spine neck, which has been hypothesized to confine biochemical and elec

  17. Contribution of sublinear and supralinear dendritic integration to neuronal computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eTran-Van-Minh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear dendritic integration is thought to increase the computational ability of neurons. Most studies focus on how supralinear summation of excitatory synaptic responses arising from clustered inputs within single dendrites result in the enhancement of neuronal firing, enabling simple computations such as feature detection. Recent reports have shown that sublinear summation is also a prominent dendritic operation, extending the range of subthreshold input-output transformations conferred by dendrites. Like supralinear operations, sublinear dendritic operations also increase the repertoire of neuronal computations, but feature extraction requires different synaptic connectivity strategies for each of these operations. In this article we will review the experimental and theoretical findings describing the biophysical determinants of the three primary classes of dendritic operations: linear, sublinear, and supralinear. We then review a Boolean algebra-based analysis of simplified neuron models, which provides insight into how dendritic operations influence neuronal computations. We highlight how neuronal computations are critically dependent on the interplay of dendritic properties (morphology and voltage-gated channel expression, spiking threshold and distribution of synaptic inputs carrying particular sensory features. Finally, we describe how global (scattered and local (clustered integration strategies permit the implementation of similar classes of computations, one example being the object feature binding problem.

  18. Modeling of dendritic growth in the presence of convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Mingfang; DAI; Ting; LEE; Sungyoon; HONG; Chunpyo

    2005-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupling modified cellular automaton (MCA)-transport model has been employed to investigate the asymmetrical dendritic growth behavior in a flowing melt. In the present model, the cellular automaton method for crystal growth is incorporated with a transport model, for numerical calculating of the fluid flow and mass transport by both convection and diffusion. The MCA takes into account the effects of the thermal, the constitutional and the curvature undercoolings on dendritic growth. It also considers the preferred growth orientation of crystal and solute redistribution during solidification. In the transport model, the SIMPLE scheme and a fully implicit finite volume method are employed to solve the governing equations of momentum and species transfers. The present model was applied to simulating the evolution of a single dendrite and multi-dendrites of an Al-3mass%Cu alloy in a forced flow. The simulated results show that dendritic growth morphology is strongly influenced by melt convection.

  19. Immune Monitoring Using mRNA-Transfected Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by m......RNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate...... and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA....

  20. Analyzing dendritic growth in a population of immature neurons in the adult dentate gyrus using laminar quantification of disjointed