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Sample records for dendritic calcium transients

  1. Calmodulin activation by calcium transients in the postsynaptic density of dendritic spines.

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    Daniel X Keller

    Full Text Available The entry of calcium into dendritic spines can trigger a sequence of biochemical reactions that begins with the activation of calmodulin (CaM and ends with long-term changes to synaptic strengths. The degree of activation of CaM can depend on highly local elevations in the concentration of calcium and the duration of transient increases in calcium concentration. Accurate measurement of these local changes in calcium is difficult because the spaces are so small and the numbers of molecules are so low. We have therefore developed a Monte Carlo model of intracellular calcium dynamics within the spine that included calcium binding proteins, calcium transporters and ion channels activated by voltage and glutamate binding. The model reproduced optical recordings using calcium indicator dyes and showed that without the dye the free intracellular calcium concentration transient was much higher than predicted from the fluorescent signal. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials induced large, long-lasting calcium gradients across the postsynaptic density, which activated CaM. When glutamate was released at the synapse 10 ms before an action potential occurred, simulating activity patterns that strengthen hippocampal synapses, the calcium gradient and activation of CaM in the postsynaptic density were much greater than when the order was reversed, a condition that decreases synaptic strengths, suggesting a possible mechanism underlying the induction of long-term changes in synaptic strength. The spatial and temporal mechanisms for selectivity in CaM activation demonstrated here could be used in other signaling pathways.

  2. Spike-triggered dendritic calcium transients depend on synaptic activity in the cricket giant interneurons.

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    Ogawa, Hiroto; Baba, Yoshichika; Oka, Kotaro

    2002-02-15

    The relationship between electrical activity and spike-induced Ca2+ increases in dendrites was investigated in the identified wind-sensitive giant interneurons in the cricket. We applied a high-speed Ca2+ imaging technique to the giant interneurons, and succeeded in recording the transient Ca2+ increases (Ca2+ transients) induced by a single action potential, which was evoked by presynaptic stimulus to the sensory neurons. The dendritic Ca2+ transients evoked by a pair of action potentials accumulated when spike intervals were shorter than 100 ms. The amplitude of the Ca2+ transients induced by a train of spikes depended on the number of action potentials. When stimulation pulses evoking the same numbers of action potentials were separately applied to the ipsi- or contra-lateral cercal sensory nerves, the dendritic Ca2+ transients induced by these presynaptic stimuli were different in their amplitude. Furthermore, the side of presynaptic stimulation that evoked larger Ca2+ transients depended on the location of the recorded dendritic regions. This result means that the spike-triggered Ca2+ transients in dendrites depend on postsynaptic activity. It is proposed that Ca2+ entry through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels activated by the action potentials will be enhanced by excitatory synaptic inputs at the dendrites in the cricket giant interneurons.

  3. Calcium Transients in Dendrites of Neocortical Neurons Evoked by Single Subthreshold Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials via Low-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels

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    Markram, Henry; Sakmann, Bert

    1994-05-01

    Simultaneous recordings of membrane voltage and concentration of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]_i) were made in apical dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal cells of rat neocortex after filling dendrites with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator Calcium Green-1. Subthreshold excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs), mediated by the activation of glutamate receptor channels, caused a brief increase in dendritic [Ca2+]_i. This rise in dendritic [Ca2+]_i was mediated by the opening of low-voltage-activated Ca2+ channels in the dendritic membrane. The results provide direct evidence that dendrites do not function as passive cables even at low-frequency synaptic activity; rather, a single subthreshold EPSP changes the dendritic membrane conductance by opening Ca2+ channels and generating a [Ca2+]_i transient that may propagate towards the soma. The activation of these Ca2+ channels at a low-voltage threshold is likely to influence the way in which dendritic EPSPs contribute to the electrical activity of the neuron.

  4. Dopaminergic regulation of dendritic calcium: fast multisite calcium imaging.

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    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Oikonomou, Katerina D; Short, Shaina M; Antic, Srdjan D

    2013-01-01

    Optimal dopamine tone is required for the normal cortical function; however it is still unclear how cortical-dopamine-release affects information processing in individual cortical neurons. Thousands of glutamatergic inputs impinge onto elaborate dendritic trees of neocortical pyramidal neurons. In the process of ensuing synaptic integration (information processing), a variety of calcium transients are generated in remote dendritic compartments. In order to understand the cellular mechanisms of dopaminergic modulation it is important to know whether and how dopaminergic signals affect dendritic calcium transients. In this chapter, we describe a relatively inexpensive method for monitoring dendritic calcium fluctuations at multiple loci across the pyramidal dendritic tree, at the same moment of time (simultaneously). The experiments have been designed to measure the amplitude, time course and spatial extent of action potential-associated dendritic calcium transients before and after application of dopaminergic drugs. In the examples provided here the dendritic calcium transients were evoked by triggering the somatic action potentials (backpropagation-evoked), and puffs of exogenous dopamine were applied locally onto selected dendritic branches.

  5. Comparison of dendritic calcium transients in juvenile wild type and SOD1G93A mouse lumbar motoneurons

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    Katharina Ann Quinlan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of spinal motoneurons in the SOD1 mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown alterations long before disease onset, including increased dendritic branching, increased persistent Na+ and Ca2+ currents, and impaired axonal transport. In this study dendritic Ca2+ entry was investigated using 2 photon excitation fluorescence microscopy and whole-cell patch-clamp of juvenile (P4-11 motoneurons. Neurons were filled with both Ca2+ Green-1 and Texas Red dextrans, and line scans performed throughout. Steps were taken to account for different sources of variability, including 1 dye filling and laser penetration, 2 dendritic anatomy, and 3 the time elapsed from the start of recording. First, Ca2+ Green-1 fluorescence was normalized by Texas Red; next, neurons were reconstructed so anatomy could be evaluated; finally, time was recorded. Customized software detected the largest Ca2+ transients (area under the curve from each line scan and matched it with parameters above. Overall, larger dendritic diameter and shorter path distance from the soma were significant predictors of larger transients, while time was not significant up to 2 hours (data thereafter was dropped. However, Ca2+ transients showed additional variability. Controlling for previous factors, significant variation was found between Ca2+ signals from different processes of the same neuron in 3/7 neurons. This could reflect differential expression of Ca2+ channels, local neuromodulation or other variations. Finally, Ca2+ transients in SOD1G93A motoneurons were significantly smaller than in non-transgenic motoneurons. In conclusion, motoneuron processes show highly variable Ca2+ transients, but these transients are smaller overall SOD1G93A motoneurons.

  6. Simultaneous patch-clamping and calcium imaging in developing dendrites.

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    Kleindienst, Thomas; Lohmann, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Calcium imaging has been used extensively to explore the role of action potential (AP) firing in the development of neuronal structure and synaptic function because increases in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) reliably and, within a certain range, linearly reflect neuronal spiking activity. Patterns of APs in individual cells can be deduced from calcium recordings, which have typically been performed at the level of cell bodies. However, neurons are particularly susceptible to phototoxicity when they are illuminated at the soma. Furthermore, for some imaging experiments (e.g., those that address the interactions between dendrites and axons during synapse formation), the cell body of a given neuron may simply not be in the field of view. In these situations, it would be helpful to determine the spiking patterns of a neuron from the calcium activity in its subcellular compartments such as stretches of dendrites or axons. Here, we describe an approach for determining the relationship between AP firing and dendritic calcium transients by simultaneously imaging calcium transients in small dendritic stretches of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in slice cultures from neonatal rats and recording spiking activity with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in these neurons. These experiments allow us to correlate the electrophysiological spiking pattern with the accompanying changes in the calcium concentration in individual dendritic segments.

  7. Fast spatiotemporal smoothing of calcium measurements in dendritic trees.

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    Eftychios A Pnevmatikakis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss methods for fast spatiotemporal smoothing of calcium signals in dendritic trees, given single-trial, spatially localized imaging data obtained via multi-photon microscopy. By analyzing the dynamics of calcium binding to probe molecules and the effects of the imaging procedure, we show that calcium concentration can be estimated up to an affine transformation, i.e., an additive and multiplicative constant. To obtain a full spatiotemporal estimate, we model calcium dynamics within the cell using a functional approach. The evolution of calcium concentration is represented through a smaller set of hidden variables that incorporate fast transients due to backpropagating action potentials (bAPs, or other forms of stimulation. Because of the resulting state space structure, inference can be done in linear time using forward-backward maximum-a-posteriori methods. Non-negativity constraints on the calcium concentration can also be incorporated using a log-barrier method that does not affect the computational scaling. Moreover, by exploiting the neuronal tree structure we show that the cost of the algorithm is also linear in the size of the dendritic tree, making the approach applicable to arbitrarily large trees. We apply this algorithm to data obtained from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells with experimentally evoked bAPs, some of which were paired with excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs. The algorithm recovers the timing of the bAPs and provides an estimate of the induced calcium transient throughout the tree. The proposed methods could be used to further understand the interplay between bAPs and EPSPs in synaptic strength modification. More generally, this approach allows us to infer the concentration on intracellular calcium across the dendritic tree from noisy observations at a discrete set of points in space.

  8. Sleeping dendrites: fiber-optic measurements of dendritic calcium activity in freely moving and sleeping animals

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    Julie Seibt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendrites are the post-synaptic sites of most excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the brain, making them the main location of cortical information processing and synaptic plasticity. Although current hypotheses suggest a central role for sleep in proper cognitive function and brain plasticity, virtually nothing is known about changes in dendritic activity across the sleep-wake cycle and how waking experience modifies this activity. To start addressing these questions, we developed a method that allows long-term recordings of EEGs/EMG combined with in vivo cortical calcium (Ca2+ activity in freely moving and sleeping rats. We measured Ca2+ activity from populations of dendrites of layer (L 5 pyramidal neurons (n = 13 rats that we compared with Ca2+ activity from populations of neurons in L2/3 (n = 11 rats. L5 and L2/3 neurons were labelled using bolus injection of OGB1-AM or GCaMP6 (1. Ca2+ signals were detected using a fiber-optic system (cannula diameter = 400µm, transmitting the changes in fluorescence to a photodiode. Ca2+ fluctuations could then be correlated with ongoing changes in brain oscillatory activity during 5 major brain states: active wake [AW], quiet wake [QW], NREM, REM and NREM-REM transition (or intermediate state, [IS]. Our Ca2+ recordings show large transients in L5 dendrites and L2/3 neurons that oscillate predominantly at frequencies In summary, we show that this technique is successful in monitoring fluctuations in ongoing dendritic Ca2+ activity during natural brain states and allows, in principle, to combine behavioral measurement with imaging from various brain regions (e.g. deep structures in freely behaving animals. Using this method, we show that Ca2+ transients from populations of L2/3 neurons and L5 dendrites are deferentially regulated across the sleep/wake cycle, with dendritic activity being the highest during the IS sleep. Our correlation analysis suggests that specific sleep EEG activity during NREM and IS

  9. The remodeling transient and the calcium economy.

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    Aloia, J F; Arunabh-Talwar, S; Pollack, S; Yeh, J K

    2008-07-01

    The remodeling transient describes a change in bone mass that lasts one remodeling cycle following an intervention that disturbs the calcium economy. We demonstrated the transient in a study of the response of bone density to calcium/vitamin D3 supplementation and show the hazards of misinterpretation if the transient is not considered. The remodeling transient describes a change in bone mass that lasts for one remodeling cycle following an intervention that disturbs the calcium economy. We report an intervention with calcium and vitamin D supplementation in 208 postmenopausal African-American women where the remodeling transient was considered a priori in the study design. Both groups (calcium alone vs. calcium + 20 microg (800 IU) vitamin D3) were ensured a calcium intake in excess of 1200 mg/day. There were no differences between the two groups in changes in BMD over time. These BMD changes were therefore interpreted to reflect increased calcium intake in both groups but not any influence of vitamin D. A transient increase in bone mineral density was observed during the first year of study, followed by a decline. The remodeling period was estimated at about 9 months, which is similar to histomorphometric estimates. It is problematic to draw conclusions concerning interventions that influence the calcium economy without considering the remodeling transient in study design. Studies of agents that effect bone remodeling must be carried out for at least two remodeling cycles and appropriate techniques must be used in data analysis.

  10. Probing synaptic function in dendrites with calcium imaging.

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    Siegel, Friederike; Lohmann, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Calcium imaging has become a widely used technique to probe neuronal activity on the cellular and subcellular levels. In contrast to standard electrophysiological methods, calcium imaging resolves sub- and suprathreshold activation patterns in structures as small as fine dendritic branches and spines. This review highlights recent findings gained on the subcellular level using calcium imaging, with special emphasis on synaptic transmission and plasticity in individual spines. Since imaging allows monitoring activity across populations of synapses, it has recently been adopted to investigate how dendrites integrate information from many synapses. Future experiments, ideally carried out in vivo, will reveal how the dendritic tree integrates and computes afferent signals. For example, it is now possible to directly test the concept that dendritic inputs are clustered and that single dendrites or dendritic stretches act as independent computational units.

  11. Differential Dendritic Integration of Synaptic Potentials and Calcium in Cerebellar Interneurons.

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    Tran-Van-Minh, Alexandra; Abrahamsson, Therése; Cathala, Laurence; DiGregorio, David A

    2016-08-17

    Dendritic voltage integration determines the transformation of synaptic inputs into output firing, while synaptic calcium integration drives plasticity mechanisms thought to underlie memory storage. Dendritic calcium integration has been shown to follow the same synaptic input-output relationship as dendritic voltage, but whether similar operations apply to neurons exhibiting sublinear voltage integration is unknown. We examined the properties and cellular mechanisms of these dendritic operations in cerebellar molecular layer interneurons using dendritic voltage and calcium imaging, in combination with synaptic stimulation or glutamate uncaging. We show that, while synaptic potentials summate sublinearly, concomitant dendritic calcium signals summate either linearly or supralinearly depending on the number of synapses activated. The supralinear dendritic calcium triggers a branch-specific, short-term suppression of neurotransmitter release that alters the pattern of synaptic activation. Thus, differential voltage and calcium integration permits dynamic regulation of neuronal input-output transformations without altering intrinsic nonlinear integration mechanisms.

  12. Diffusion and extrusion shape standing calcium gradients during ongoing parallel fiber activity in dendrites of Purkinje neurons.

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    Schmidt, Hartmut; Arendt, Oliver; Eilers, Jens

    2012-09-01

    Synaptically induced calcium transients in dendrites of Purkinje neurons (PNs) play a key role in the induction of plasticity in the cerebellar cortex (Ito, Physiol Rev 81:1143-1195, 2001). Long-term depression at parallel fiber-PN synapses can be induced by stimulation paradigms that are associated with long-lasting (>1 min) calcium signals. These signals remain strictly localized (Eilers et al., Learn Mem 3:159-168, 1997), an observation that was rather unexpected, given the high concentration of the mobile endogenous calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin and calbindin in PNs (Fierro and Llano, J Physiol (Lond) 496:617-625, 1996; Kosaka et al., Exp Brain Res 93:483-491, 1993). By combining two-photon calcium imaging experiments in acute slices with numerical computer simulations, we found that significant calcium diffusion out of active branches indeed takes places. It is outweighed, however, by rapid and powerful calcium extrusion along the dendritic shaft. The close interplay of diffusion and extrusion defines the spread of calcium between active and inactive dendritic branches, forming a steep gradient in calcium with drop ranges of ~13 μm (interquartile range, 10-18 μm).

  13. Drosophila mushroom body Kenyon cells generate spontaneous calcium transients mediated by PLTX-sensitive calcium channels.

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    Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M; Su, Hailing; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2005-07-01

    Spontaneous calcium oscillations in mushroom bodies of late stage pupal and adult Drosophila brains have been implicated in memory consolidation during olfactory associative learning. This study explores the cellular mechanisms regulating calcium dynamics in Kenyon cells, principal neurons in mushroom bodies. Fura-2 imaging shows that Kenyon cells cultured from late stage Drosophila pupae generate spontaneous calcium transients in a cell autonomous fashion, at a frequency similar to calcium oscillations in vivo (10-20/h). The expression of calcium transients is up regulated during pupal development. Although the ability to generate transients is a property intrinsic to Kenyon cells, transients can be modulated by bath application of nicotine and GABA. Calcium transients are blocked, and baseline calcium levels reduced, by removal of external calcium, addition of cobalt, or addition of Plectreurys toxin (PLTX), an insect-specific calcium channel antagonist. Transients do not require calcium release from intracellular stores. Whole cell recordings reveal that the majority of voltage-gated calcium channels in Kenyon cells are PLTX-sensitive. Together these data show that influx of calcium through PLTX-sensitive voltage-gated calcium channels mediates spontaneous calcium transients and regulates basal calcium levels in cultured Kenyon cells. The data also suggest that these calcium transients represent cellular events underlying calcium oscillations in the intact mushroom bodies. However, spontaneous calcium transients are not unique to Kenyon cells as they are present in approximately 60% of all cultured central brain neurons. This suggests the calcium transients play a more general role in maturation or function of adult brain neurons.

  14. Simultaneous Sodium and Calcium Imaging from Dendrites and Axons.

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    Miyazaki, Kenichi; Ross, William N

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic calcium imaging is a major technique of neuroscientists. It can reveal information about the location of various calcium channels and calcium permeable receptors, the time course, magnitude, and location of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) changes, and indirectly, the occurrence of action potentials. Dynamic sodium imaging, a less exploited technique, can reveal analogous information related to sodium signaling. In some cases, like the examination of AMPA and NMDA receptor signaling, measurements of both [Ca(2+)]i and [Na(+)]i changes in the same preparation may provide more information than separate measurements. To this end, we developed a technique to simultaneously measure both signals at high speed and sufficient sensitivity to detect localized physiologic events. This approach has advantages over sequential imaging because the preparation may not respond identically in different trials. We designed custom dichroic and emission filters to allow the separate detection of the fluorescence of sodium and calcium indicators loaded together into a single neuron in a brain slice from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats. We then used high-intensity light emitting diodes (LEDs) to alternately excite the two indicators at the appropriate wavelengths. These pulses were synchronized with the frames of a CCD camera running at 500 Hz. Software then separated the data streams to provide independent sodium and calcium signals. With this system we could detect [Ca(2+)]i and [Na(+)]i changes from single action potentials in axons and synaptically evoked signals in dendrites, both with submicron resolution and a good signal-to-noise ratio (S/N).

  15. Transient modulation of calcium and parathyroid hormone stimulates bone formation.

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    Chen, Andy B; Minami, Kazumasa; Raposo, João F; Matsuura, Nariaki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Yokota, Hiroki; Ferreira, Hugo G

    2016-10-01

    Intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone can stimulate bone formation. Parathyroid hormone is a natural hormone that responds to serum calcium levels. In this study, we examined whether a transient increase and/or decrease in the serum calcium can stimulate bone formation. Using a mathematical model previously developed, we first predicted the effects of administration of parathyroid hormone, neutralizing parathyroid hormone antibody, calcium, and EGTA (calcium chelator) on the serum concentration of parathyroid hormone and calcium. The model predicted that intermittent injection of parathyroid hormone and ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid transiently elevated the serum parathyroid hormone, while that of parathyroid hormone antibody and calcium transiently reduced parathyroid hormone in the serum. In vitro analysis revealed that parathyroid hormone's transient changes (both up and down) elevated activating transcription factor 4-mediated osteocalcin expression. In the mouse model of osteoporosis, both intermittent administration of calcium and ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid showed tendency to increase bone mineral density of the upper limb (ulna and humerus) and spine, but the effects varied in a region-specific manner. Collectively, the study herein supports a common bone response to administration of calcium and its chelator through their effects on parathyroid hormone.

  16. Calcium Dynamics in Basal Dendrites of Layer 5A and 5B Pyramidal Neurons Is Tuned to the Cell-Type Specific Physiological Action Potential Discharge

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    Patrik Krieger

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Layer 5 (L5 is a major neocortical output layer containing L5A slender-tufted (L5A-st and L5B thick-tufted (L5B-tt pyramidal neurons. These neuron types differ in their in vivo firing patterns, connectivity and dendritic morphology amongst other features, reflecting their specific functional role within the neocortical circuits. Here, we asked whether the active properties of the basal dendrites that receive the great majority of synaptic inputs within L5 differ between these two pyramidal neuron classes. To quantify their active properties, we measured the efficacy with which action potential (AP firing patterns backpropagate along the basal dendrites by measuring the accompanying calcium transients using two-photon laser scanning microscopy in rat somatosensory cortex slices. For these measurements we used both “artificial” three-AP patterns and more complex physiological AP patterns that were previously recorded in anesthetized rats in L5A-st and L5B-tt neurons in response to whisker stimulation. We show that AP patterns with relatively few APs (3APs evoke a calcium response in L5B-tt, but not L5A-st, that is dependent on the temporal pattern of the three APs. With more complex in vivo recorded AP patterns, the average calcium response was similar in the proximal dendrites but with a decay along dendrites (measured up to 100 μm of L5B-tt but not L5A-st neurons. Interestingly however, the whisker evoked AP patterns—although very different for the two cell types—evoke similar calcium responses. In conclusion, although the effectiveness with which different AP patterns evoke calcium transients vary between L5A-st and L5B-tt cell, the calcium influx appears to be tuned such that whisker-evoked calcium transients are within the same dynamic range for both cell types.

  17. GABAB receptors modulate NMDA receptor calcium signals in dendritic spines.

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    Chalifoux, Jason R; Carter, Adam G

    2010-04-15

    Metabotropic GABA(B) receptors play a fundamental role in modulating the excitability of neurons and circuits throughout the brain. These receptors influence synaptic transmission by inhibiting presynaptic release or activating postsynaptic potassium channels. However, their ability to directly influence different types of postsynaptic glutamate receptors remains unresolved. Here we examine GABA(B) receptor modulation in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons from the mouse prefrontal cortex. We use two-photon laser-scanning microscopy to study synaptic modulation at individual dendritic spines. Using two-photon optical quantal analysis, we first demonstrate robust presynaptic modulation of multivesicular release at single synapses. Using two-photon glutamate uncaging, we then reveal that GABA(B) receptors strongly inhibit NMDA receptor calcium signals. This postsynaptic modulation occurs via the PKA pathway and does not affect synaptic currents mediated by AMPA or NMDA receptors. This form of GABA(B) receptor modulation has widespread implications for the control of calcium-dependent neuronal function.

  18. Sensory-Driven Enhancement of Calcium Signals in Individual Purkinje Cell Dendrites of Awake Mice

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    Farzaneh Najafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Climbing fibers (CFs are thought to contribute to cerebellar plasticity and learning by triggering a large influx of dendritic calcium in the postsynaptic Purkinje cell (PC to signal the occurrence of an unexpected sensory event. However, CFs fire about once per second whether or not an event occurs, raising the question of how sensory-driven signals might be distinguished from a background of ongoing spontaneous activity. Here, we report that in PC dendrites of awake mice, CF-triggered calcium signals are enhanced when the trigger is a sensory event. In addition, we show that a large fraction of the total enhancement in each PC dendrite can be accounted for by an additional boost of calcium provided by sensory activation of a non-CF input. We suggest that sensory stimulation may modulate dendritic voltage and calcium concentration in PCs to increase the strength of plasticity signals during cerebellar learning.

  19. Calcium spikes and calcium plateaux evoked by differential polarization in dendrites of turtle motoneurones in vitro

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    Hounsgaard, J; Kiehn, O

    1993-01-01

    -evoked regenerative responses was relatively insensitive to somatic bias current. 6. TTX-resistant Ca(2+)-mediated plateau potentials promoted by apamin were evoked by differential polarization in both the soma-depolarizing and soma-hyperpolarizing direction. 7. It is concluded that Ca2+ channels responsible for Ca2......The ability of dendrites in turtle motoneurones to support calcium spikes and calcium plateaux was investigated using differential polarization by applied electric fields. 2. Electric fields were generated by passing current through transverse slices of the turtle spinal cord between two plate......-hyperpolarizing and soma-depolarizing direction of the field. The different components of Ca2+ spikes were discrete and additive. High amplitude components had higher threshold and faster time course and were followed by larger after-hyperpolarizations, than low amplitude components. The frequency of field...

  20. Dendritic calcium activity precedes inspiratory bursts in preBotzinger complex neurons

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    Del Negro, Christopher A; Hayes, John A; Rekling, Jens C

    2011-01-01

    to evoke a Ca(2+)-activated inward current that contributes to inspiratory burst generation. We measured Ca(2+) transients by two-photon imaging dendrites while recording neuronal somata electrophysiologically. Dendritic Ca(2+) accumulation frequently precedes inspiratory bursts, particularly at recording...

  1. P/Q-type and T-type calcium channels, but not type 3 transient receptor potential cation channels, are involved in inhibition of dendritic growth after chronic metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 and protein kinase C activation in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

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    Gugger, Olivia S; Hartmann, Jana; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Kapfhammer, Josef P

    2012-01-01

    The development of a neuronal dendritic tree is modulated both by signals from afferent fibers and by an intrinsic program. We have previously shown that chronic activation of either type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1s) or protein kinase C (PKC) in organotypic cerebellar slice cultures of mice and rats severely inhibits the growth and development of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree. The signaling events linking receptor activation to the regulation of dendritic growth remain largely unknown. We have studied whether channels allowing the entry of Ca(2+) into Purkinje cells, in particular the type 3 transient receptor potential cation channels (TRPC3s), P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, and T-type Ca(2+) channels, might be involved in signaling after mGluR1 or PKC stimulation. We show that the inhibition of dendritic growth seen after mGluR1 or PKC stimulation is partially rescued by pharmacological blockade of P/Q-type and T-type Ca(2+) channels, indicating that activation of these channels mediating Ca(2+) influx contributes to the inhibition of dendritic growth. In contrast, the absence of Ca(2+) -permeable TRPC3s in TRPC3-deficient mice or pharmacological blockade had no effect on mGluR1-mediated and PKC-mediated inhibition of Purkinje cell dendritic growth. Similarly, blockade of Ca(2+) influx through glutamate receptor δ2 or R-type Ca(2+) channels or inhibition of release from intracellular stores did not influence mGluR1-mediated and PKC-mediated inhibition of Purkinje cell dendritic growth. These findings suggest that both T-type and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, but not TRPC3 or other Ca(2+) -permeable channels, are involved in mGluR1 and PKC signaling leading to the inhibition of dendritic growth in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

  2. Activity-dependent accumulation of calcium in Purkinje cell dendritic spines.

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    Andrews, S.B.; Leapman, R D; Landis, D M; Reese, T S

    1988-01-01

    The calcium content of synapses of parallel fibers on Purkinje cell dendritic spines was determined by electron probe x-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections from directly frozen slices of mouse cerebellar cortex. In fresh slices frozen within 20-30 sec of excision, calcium concentrations ranging from 0.8 to 18.6 mmol/kg of dry weight were measured in cisterns of smooth endoplasmic reticulum within Purkinje cell dendritic spines. The average calcium content of spine cisterns in rapid...

  3. Dynamics of intrinsic dendritic calcium signaling during tonic firing of thalamic reticular neurons.

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    Patrick Chausson

    Full Text Available The GABAergic neurons of the nucleus reticularis thalami that control the communication between thalamus and cortex are interconnected not only through axo-dendritic synapses but also through gap junctions and dendro-dendritic synapses. It is still unknown whether these dendritic communication processes may be triggered both by the tonic and the T-type Ca(2+ channel-dependent high frequency burst firing of action potentials displayed by nucleus reticularis neurons during wakefulness and sleep, respectively. Indeed, while it is known that activation of T-type Ca(2+ channels actively propagates throughout the dendritic tree, it is still unclear whether tonic action potential firing can also invade the dendritic arborization. Here, using two-photon microscopy, we demonstrated that dendritic Ca(2+ responses following somatically evoked action potentials that mimic wake-related tonic firing are detected throughout the dendritic arborization. Calcium influx temporally summates to produce dendritic Ca(2+ accumulations that are linearly related to the duration of the action potential trains. Increasing the firing frequency facilitates Ca(2+ influx in the proximal but not in the distal dendritic compartments suggesting that the dendritic arborization acts as a low-pass filter in respect to the back-propagating action potentials. In the more distal compartment of the dendritic tree, T-type Ca(2+ channels play a crucial role in the action potential triggered Ca(2+ influx suggesting that this Ca(2+ influx may be controlled by slight changes in the local dendritic membrane potential that determine the T-type channels' availability. We conclude that by mediating Ca(2+ dynamic in the whole dendritic arborization, both tonic and burst firing of the nucleus reticularis thalami neurons might control their dendro-dendritic and electrical communications.

  4. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

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    Bading Hilmar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events.

  5. Computational reconstitution of spine calcium transients from individual proteins

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    Thomas Matthew Bartol

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We have built a stochastic model in the program MCell that simulates Ca2+ transients in spines from the principal molecular components believed to control Ca2+ entry and exit. Proteins, with their kinetic models, are located within two segments of dendrites containing 88 intact spines, centered in a fully reconstructed 5 x 5 x 6 µm cube of hippocampal neuropil. Protein components include AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors, L- and R-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPases, smooth endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPases, immobile Ca2+ buffers, and calbindin. Kinetic models for each protein were taken from published studies of the isolated proteins in vitro. For simulation of electrical stimuli, the time course of voltage changes in the dendritic spine was generated with the desired stimulus in the program NEURON. Voltage-dependent parameters were then continuously re-adjusted during simulations in MCell to reproduce the effects of the stimulus. Nine parameters of the model were optimized within realistic experimental limits by a process that compared results of simulations to published data. We find that simulations in the optimized model reproduce the timing and amplitude of Ca2+ transients measured experimentally in intact neurons. Thus, we demonstrate that the characteristics of individual isolated proteins determined in vitro can accurately reproduce the dynamics of experimentally measured Ca2+ transients in spines. The model will provide a test bed for exploring the roles of additional proteins that regulate Ca2+ influx into spines and for studying the behavior of protein targets in the spine that are regulated by Ca2+ influx.

  6. Potassium conductances mediate bidirectional state-dependent modulation of action potential evoked dendritic calcium signals in dentate gyrus granule cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Brunner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Backpropagating action potentials (bAPs and local calcium signals that they trigger are fundamental for dendritic functions. Here we addressed the question what extent the changes of local dendritic membrane properties can contribute to the shaping of the coupling between dendritic action potentials and the local calcium responses. Using a combination of in vitro electrophysiological and confocal imaging techniques we found that activation of dendritic GIRK channels via mGlu2 or GABAB receptors enhanced the bAP¬-triggered calcium signals in the dendrites of dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs. The enhancement of calcium signals was significant only in those dendritic regions, where these receptors are predominantly expressed. Similarly to GIRK channel activation, somatic hyperpolarization by DC current injection (from -64 mV to -77 mV, significantly increased bAP-associated calcium signals in the proximal dendrites. The hyperpolarization was associated with a decrease in the input resistance due to the rectification of the membrane potential of GCs. The effect of hyperpolarization on the calcium signals was maintained when T-type calcium currents were blocked but it decreased when GIRK channels were inhibited. Simultaneous dual somato-dendritic recordings from GCs showed that somatic hyperpolarization accelerated the repolarization phase of dendritic bAP in the proximal region whereas the rising phase and peak amplitude was not affected. We hypothesize that the larger driving force for calcium ions during the faster repolarization can contribute to the increasing in calcium signals. Employment of previously recorded dendritic bAP waveforms from hyperpolarized membrane potential as voltage command evoked larger calcium currents in nucleated patches compared to bAP waveform from the same recording at depolarized membrane potential. Furthermore, addition of native, high-voltage activated, inactivating potassium conductance by somatic dynamic clamp

  7. Recording of calcium transient and analysis of calcium removal mechanisms in cardiac myocytes from rats and ground squirrels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王世强; 周曾铨; 钱洪

    2000-01-01

    With confocal microscopy, we recorded calcium transients and analyzed calcium removal rate at different temperatures in cardiac myocytes from the rat, a non-hibernator, and the ground squirrel, a hibernator. The results showed a remarkable increase of the diastolic level of calcium transients in the rat but no detectable change in the ground squirrel. Calcium transient of the ground squirrel, compared with that of the rat at the same temperature, had a shorter duration and showed a faster calcium removal. As indicated by the pharmacological effect of cyclopiazonic acid, calcium uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was the major mechanism of calcium removal, and was faster in the ground squirrel than in the rat. Our results confirmed the essential role of SR in hypothermia-tolerant adaptation, and negated the importance of Na-Ca exchange. We postulated the possibility to improve hypothermia-tolerance of the cardiac tissue of non-hibernating mammals.

  8. Dopamine Induces LTP Differentially in Apical and Basal Dendrites through BDNF and Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Korte, Martin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The dopaminergic modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) has been studied well, but the mechanism by which dopamine induces LTP (DA-LTP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons is unknown. Here, we report that DA-LTP in basal dendrites is dependent while in apical dendrites it is independent of activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VDCC).…

  9. Dopamine Induces LTP Differentially in Apical and Basal Dendrites through BDNF and Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navakkode, Sheeja; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Korte, Martin; Soong, Tuck Wah

    2012-01-01

    The dopaminergic modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) has been studied well, but the mechanism by which dopamine induces LTP (DA-LTP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons is unknown. Here, we report that DA-LTP in basal dendrites is dependent while in apical dendrites it is independent of activation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VDCC).…

  10. Downregulation of transient K+ channels in dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons by activation of PKA and PKC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, D A; Johnston, D

    1998-05-15

    We have reported recently a high density of transient A-type K+ channels located in the distal dendrites of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons and shown that these channels shape EPSPs, limit the back-propagation of action potentials, and prevent dendritic action potential initiation (). Because of the importance of these channels in dendritic signal propagation, their modulation by protein kinases would be of significant interest. We investigated the effects of activators of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and the Ca2+-dependent phospholipid-sensitive protein kinase (PKC) on K+ channels in cell-attached patches from the distal dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Inclusion of the membrane-permeant PKA activators 8-bromo-cAMP (8-br-cAMP) or forskolin in the dendritic patch pipette resulted in a depolarizing shift in the activation curve for the transient channels of approximately 15 mV. Activation of PKC by either of two phorbol esters also resulted in a 15 mV depolarizing shift of the activation curve. Neither PKA nor PKC activation affected the sustained or slowly inactivating component of the total outward current. This downregulation of transient K+ channels in the distal dendrites may be responsible for some of the frequently reported increases in cell excitability found after PKA and PKC activation. In support of this hypothesis, we found that activation of either PKA or PKC significantly increased the amplitude of back-propagating action potentials in distal dendrites.

  11. A cell model study of calcium influx mechanism regulated by calcium-dependent potassium channels in Purkinje cell dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Koji; Takagi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Shozo; Suzuki, Hideo; Ito, Etsuro

    2003-10-30

    The present study was designed to elucidate the roles of dendritic voltage-gated K+ channels in Ca2+ influx mechanism of a rat Purkinje cell using a computer simulation program. First, we improved the channel descriptions and the maximum conductance in the Purkinje cell model to mimic both the kinetics of ion channels and the Ca2+ spikes, which had failed in previous studies. Our cell model is, therefore, much more authentic than those in previous studies. Second, synaptic inputs that mimic stimulation of parallel fibers and induce sub-threshold excitability were simultaneously applied to the spiny dendrites. As a result, transient Ca2+ responses were observed in the stimulation points and they decreased with the faster decay rate in the cell model including high-threshold Ca2+-dependent K+ channels than in those excluding these channels. Third, when a single synaptic input was applied into a spiny dendrite, Ca2+-dependent K+ channels suppressed Ca2+ increases at stimulation and recording points. Finally, Ca2+-dependent K+ channels were also found to suppress the time to peak Ca2+ values in the recording points. These results suggest that the opening of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels by Ca2+ influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels hyperpolarizes the membrane potentials and deactivates these Ca2+ channels in a negative feedback manner, resulting in local, weak Ca2+ responses in spiny dendrites of Purkinje cells.

  12. Formalin evokes calcium transients from the endoplasmatic reticulum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J M Fischer

    Full Text Available The formalin test is the most widely used behavioral screening test for analgesic compounds. The cellular mechanism of action of formaldehyde, inducing a typically biphasic pain-related behavior in rodents is addressed in this study. The chemoreceptor channel TRPA1 was suggested as primary transducer, but the high concentrations used in the formalin test elicit a similar response in TRPA1 wildtype and knockout animals. Here we show that formaldehyde evokes a dose-dependent calcium release from intracellular stores in mouse sensory neurons and primary keratinocytes as well as in non-neuronal cell lines, and independent of TRPA1. The source of calcium is the endoplasmatic reticulum and inhibition of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase has a major contribution. This TRPA1-independent mechanism may underlie formaldehyde-induced pan-neuronal excitation and subsequent inflammation.

  13. Splice variants of the CaV1.3 L-type calcium channel regulate dendritic spine morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanika, Ruslan; Campiglio, Marta; Pinggera, Alexandra; Lee, Amy; Striessnig, Jörg; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Obermair, Gerald J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic compartments of glutamatergic synapses in the brain. Their number and shape are subject to change in synaptic plasticity and neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson’s disease. The L-type calcium channel CaV1.3 constitutes an important calcium entry pathway implicated in the regulation of spine morphology. Here we investigated the importance of full-length CaV1.3L and two C-terminally truncated splice variants (CaV1.342A and CaV1.343S) and their modulation by densin-180 and shank1b for the morphology of dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons. Live-cell immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy of epitope-tagged CaV1.3L revealed its localization at the base-, neck-, and head-region of dendritic spines. Expression of the short splice variants or deletion of the C-terminal PDZ-binding motif in CaV1.3L induced aberrant dendritic spine elongation. Similar morphological alterations were induced by co-expression of densin-180 or shank1b with CaV1.3L and correlated with increased CaV1.3 currents and dendritic calcium signals in transfected neurons. Together, our findings suggest a key role of CaV1.3 in regulating dendritic spine structure. Under physiological conditions it may contribute to the structural plasticity of glutamatergic synapses. Conversely, altered regulation of CaV1.3 channels may provide an important mechanism in the development of postsynaptic aberrations associated with neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27708393

  14. Optimizing conditions for calcium phosphate mediated transient transfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Guo

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Calcium phosphate mediated transfection is the most low-cost approach to introduce recombinant DNA into culture cells. However, the utility of this procedure is limited in highly-differentiated cells. Here we describe the specific HBS-buffered saline, PH, glycerol shock, vortex strength, transfection medium, and particle concentrations conditions necessary to optimize this transfection method in highly differentiated cells.

  15. NMDAR-mediated calcium transients elicited by glutamate co-release at developing inhibitory synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Kalmbach

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Before hearing onset, the topographic organization of the inhibitory sound localization pathway from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB to the lateral superior olive (LSO is refined by means of synaptic silencing and strengthening. During this refinement period MNTB-LSO synapses not only release GABA and glycine but also release glutamate. This co-released glutamate can elicit postsynaptic currents that are predominantly mediated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs. To gain a better understanding of how glutamate contributes to synaptic signaling at developing MNTB-LSO inhibitory synapse, we investigated to what degree and under what conditions NMDARs contribute to postsynaptic calcium responses. Our results demonstrate that MNTB-LSO synapses can elicit compartmentalized calcium responses along aspiny LSO dendrites. These responses are significantly attenuated by the NMDARs antagonist APV. APV, however, has no effect on somatically recorded electrical postsynaptic responses, indicating little, if any, contribution of NMDARs to spike generation. Small NMDAR-mediated calcium responses were also observed under physiological levels of extracellular magnesium concentrations indicating that MNTB-LSO synapses activate magnesium sensitive NMDAR on immature LSO dendrites. In Fura-2 AM loaded neurons, blocking GABAA and glycine receptors decreased NMDAR contribution to somatic calcium responses suggesting that GABA and glycine, perhaps by shunting backpropagating action potentials, decrease the level of NMDAR activation under strong stimulus conditions.

  16. Weak sinusoidal electric fields entrain spontaneous Ca transients in the dendritic tufts of CA1 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slice preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kazuma; Maruyama, Ryuichi; Nagae, Toru; Inoue, Masashi; Aonishi, Toru; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Neurons might interact via electric fields and this notion has been referred to as ephaptic interaction. It has been shown that various types of ion channels are distributed along the dendrites and are capable of supporting generation of dendritic spikes. We hypothesized that generation of dendritic spikes play important roles in the ephaptic interactions either by amplifying the impact of electric fields or by providing current source to generate electric fields. To test if dendritic activities can be modulated by electric fields, we developed a method to monitor local Ca-transients in the dendrites of a neuronal population in acute rat hippocampal slices by applying spinning-disk confocal microscopy and multi-cell dye loading technique. In a condition in which the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons show spontaneous Ca-transients due to added 50 μM 4-aminopyridine to the bathing medium and adjusted extracellular potassium concentration, we examined the impact of sinusoidal electric fields on the Ca-transients. We have found that spontaneously occurring fast-Ca-transients in the tufts of the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons can be blocked by applying 1 μM tetrodotoxin, and that the timing of the transients become entrained to sub-threshold 1-4 Hz electric fields with an intensity as weak as 0.84 mV/mm applied parallel to the somato-dendritic axis of the neurons. The extent of entrainment increases with intensity below 5 mV/mm, but does not increase further over the range of 5-20 mV/mm. These results suggest that population of pyramidal cells might be able to detect electric fields with biologically relevant intensity by modulating the timing of dendritic spikes.

  17. Transmitter modulation of spike-evoked calcium transients in arousal related neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne; Leonard, Christopher S

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-containing cholinergic neurons in the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) influence behavioral and motivational states through their projections to the thalamus, ventral tegmental area and a brainstem 'rapid eye movement (REM)-induction' site. Action potential-evoked intracel......Nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-containing cholinergic neurons in the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) influence behavioral and motivational states through their projections to the thalamus, ventral tegmental area and a brainstem 'rapid eye movement (REM)-induction' site. Action potential......-evoked intracellular calcium transients dampen excitability and stimulate NO production in these neurons. In this study, we investigated the action of several arousal-related neurotransmitters and the role of specific calcium channels in these LDT Ca(2+)-transients by simultaneous whole-cell recording and calcium...... of cholinergic LDT neurons and that inhibition of spike-evoked Ca(2+)-transients is a common action of neurotransmitters that also activate GIRK channels in these neurons. Because spike-evoked calcium influx dampens excitability, our findings suggest that these 'inhibitory' transmitters could boost firing rate...

  18. Impaired mitochondria and intracellular calcium transients in the salivary glands of obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittichaicharoen, Jitjiroj; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Tanajak, Pongpan; Sa-Nguanmoo, Piangkwan; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2017-04-01

    Long-term consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) causes not only obese-insulin resistance, but is also associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in several organs. However, the effect of obese-insulin resistance on salivary glands has not been investigated. We hypothesized that obese-insulin resistance induced by HFD impaired salivary gland function by reducing salivation, increasing inflammation, and fibrosis, as well as impairing mitochondrial function and calcium transient signaling. Male Wistar rats (200-220 g) were fed either a ND or an HFD (n = 8/group) for 16 weeks. At the end of week 16, salivary flow rates, metabolic parameters, and plasma oxidative stress were determined. Rats were then sacrificed and submandibular glands were removed to determine inflammation, fibrosis, apoptosis, mitochondrial function and dynamics, and intracellular calcium transient signaling. Long-term consumption of an HFD caused obese-insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress, fibrosis, inflammation, and apoptosis in the salivary glands. In addition, impaired mitochondrial function, as indicated by increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and mitochondrial swelling in salivary glands and impaired intracellular calcium regulation, as indicated by a reduced intracellular calcium transient rising rate, decay rates, and amplitude of salivary acinar cells, were observed in HFD-fed rats. However, salivary flow rate and level of aquaporin 5 protein were not different between both groups. Although HFD consumption did not affect salivation, it caused obese-insulin resistance, leading to pathophysiological alteration of salivary glands, including impaired intracellular calcium transients, increased oxidative stress and inflammation, and salivary mitochondrial dysfunction.

  19. Calcium transients in skeletal muscle fibres under isometric conditions and during and after a quick stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, P

    1991-12-01

    The transient change in the sarcoplasmic concentration of Ca2+ was measured in intact fibres isolated from the anterior tibial muscle of the frog Litoria moorei. The fibres had been injected with the calcium-sensitive dye arsenazo III and the change of the calcium concentration was calculated from the changes in light absorbance at 570, 600 and 720 nm wavelengths. Absorbance and force were measured under three different conditions: (1) during a normal isometric twitch, (2) when a quick ramp-and-hold stretch had been applied to the fibre during onset of the contraction, and (3) when the fibre was allowed to contract isometrically at a length corresponding to the final length of the stretch. A method was devised to neutralize most of the movement artefacts encountered in such measurements. While the quick stretch caused substantial increase in the level and the duration of the contractile force such as originally described in whole muscle by A. V. Hill, the calcium transients appeared basically unaffected. It thus seems that the mechanism behind the phenomenon of the force enhancement lies at a step in the excitation-contraction coupling subsequent to the calcium release. From the present results, however, it is not clear whether the phenomenon is caused by an increase in the level of activation of the calcium-dependent regulatory system, or whether it is to be found in the acto-myosin interaction itself. The latter alternative would be consistent with the stiffness measurements published earlier.

  20. Spatial distributions of GABA receptors and local inhibition of Ca2+ transients studied with GABA uncaging in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Kanemoto

    Full Text Available GABA (γ-amino-butylic acid-mediated inhibition in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons was characterized by two-photon uncaging of a caged-GABA compound, BCMACM-GABA, and one-photon uncaging of RuBi-GABA in rat hippocampal slice preparations. Although we found that GABA(A-mediated currents were diffusely distributed along the dendrites, currents elicited at the branch points of the apical dendritic trunk were approximately two times larger than those elsewhere in the dendrite. We examined the inhibitory action of the GABA-induced currents on Ca(2+ transients evoked with a single back-propagating action potential (bAP in oblique dendrites. We found that GABA uncaging selectively inhibited the Ca(2+ transients in the region adjacent (20 µm. Our data indicate that GABA inhibition results in spatially confined inhibition of Ca(2+ transients shortly after bAP, and suggest that this effect is particularly potent at the dendritic branch points where GABA receptors cluster.

  1. Label-Free Imaging of Dynamic and Transient Calcium Signaling in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jin; Li, Jinghong

    2015-11-09

    Cell signaling consists of diverse events that occur at various temporal and spatial scales, ranging from milliseconds to hours and from single biomolecules to cell populations. The pathway complexities require the development of new techniques that detect the overall signaling activities and are not limited to quantifying a single event. A plasmonic-based electrochemical impedance microscope (P-EIM) that can provide such data with excellent temporal and spatial resolution and does not require the addition of any labels for detection has now been developed. The highly dynamic and transient calcium signaling activities at the early stage of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation were thus studied. It could be shown that a subpopulation of cells is more responsive towards agonist stimulation, and the heterogeneity of the local distributions and the transient activities of the ion channels during agonist-activated calcium flux in single HeLa cells were investigated.

  2. GABA-A receptor inhibition of local calcium signaling in spines and dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlin, Joseph J; Carter, Adam G

    2014-11-26

    Cortical interneurons activate GABA-A receptors to rapidly control electrical and biochemical signaling at pyramidal neurons. Different populations of interneurons are known to uniquely target the soma and dendrites of pyramidal neurons. However, the ability of these interneurons to inhibit Ca(2+) signaling at spines and dendrites is largely unexplored. Here we use whole-cell recordings, two-photon microscopy, GABA uncaging and optogenetics to study dendritic inhibition at layer 5 (L5) pyramidal neurons in slices of mouse PFC. We first show that GABA-A receptors strongly inhibit action potential (AP)-evoked Ca(2+) signals at both spines and dendrites. We find robust inhibition over tens of milliseconds that spreads along the dendritic branch. However, we observe no difference in the amount of inhibition at neighboring spines and dendrites. We then examine the influence of interneurons expressing parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SOM), or 5HT3a receptors. We determine that these populations of interneurons make unique contacts onto the apical and basal dendrites of L5 pyramidal neurons. We also show that SOM and 5HT3a but not PV interneurons potently inhibit AP Ca(2+) signals via GABA-A receptors at both spines and dendrites. These findings reveal how multiple interneurons regulate local Ca(2+) signaling in pyramidal neurons, with implications for cortical function and disease.

  3. Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Impairs the Dendritic Arborization of Newborn Neurons in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus through the AMPK and Akt Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujing Tian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurite growth is an important process for the adult hippocampal neurogenesis which is regulated by a specific range of the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4 is a calcium-permeable channel and activation of it causes an increase in [Ca2+]i. We recently reported that TRPV4 activation promotes the proliferation of stem cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG. The present study aimed to examine the effect of TRPV4 activation on the dendrite morphology of newborn neurons in the adult hippocampal DG. Here, we report that intracerebroventricular injection of the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A for 5 days (GSK1016790A-injected mice reduced the number of doublecortin immunopositive (DCX+ cells and DCX+ fibers in the hippocampal DG, showing the impaired dendritic arborization of newborn neurons. The phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK protein level increased from 30 min to 2 h, and then decreased from 1 to 5 days after GSK1016790A injection. The phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt protein level decreased from 30 min to 5 days after GSK1016790A injection; this decrease was markedly attenuated by the AMPK antagonist compound C (CC, but not by the AMPK agonist AICAR. Moreover, the phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6k protein levels were decreased by GSK1016790A; these changes were sensitive to 740 Y-P and CC. The phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β at Y216 was increased by GSK1016790A, and this change was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2 and collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP-2. These changes were markedly blocked by 740 Y-P and CC. Finally, GSK1016790A-induced decrease of DCX+ cells and DCX+ fibers was markedly attenuated by 740 Y-P and CC, but was unaffected by AICAR. We conclude that TRPV4 activation impairs the dendritic arborization of newborn

  4. Spine calcium transients induced by synaptically-evoked action potentials can predict synapse location and establish synaptic democracy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Sterratt

    Full Text Available CA1 pyramidal neurons receive hundreds of synaptic inputs at different distances from the soma. Distance-dependent synaptic scaling enables distal and proximal synapses to influence the somatic membrane equally, a phenomenon called "synaptic democracy". How this is established is unclear. The backpropagating action potential (BAP is hypothesised to provide distance-dependent information to synapses, allowing synaptic strengths to scale accordingly. Experimental measurements show that a BAP evoked by current injection at the soma causes calcium currents in the apical shaft whose amplitudes decay with distance from the soma. However, in vivo action potentials are not induced by somatic current injection but by synaptic inputs along the dendrites, which creates a different excitable state of the dendrites. Due to technical limitations, it is not possible to study experimentally whether distance information can also be provided by synaptically-evoked BAPs. Therefore we adapted a realistic morphological and electrophysiological model to measure BAP-induced voltage and calcium signals in spines after Schaffer collateral synapse stimulation. We show that peak calcium concentration is highly correlated with soma-synapse distance under a number of physiologically-realistic suprathreshold stimulation regimes and for a range of dendritic morphologies. Peak calcium levels also predicted the attenuation of the EPSP across the dendritic tree. Furthermore, we show that peak calcium can be used to set up a synaptic democracy in a homeostatic manner, whereby synapses regulate their synaptic strength on the basis of the difference between peak calcium and a uniform target value. We conclude that information derived from synaptically-generated BAPs can indicate synapse location and can subsequently be utilised to implement a synaptic democracy.

  5. Spine Calcium Transients Induced by Synaptically-Evoked Action Potentials Can Predict Synapse Location and Establish Synaptic Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Rhiannon M.; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2012-01-01

    CA1 pyramidal neurons receive hundreds of synaptic inputs at different distances from the soma. Distance-dependent synaptic scaling enables distal and proximal synapses to influence the somatic membrane equally, a phenomenon called “synaptic democracy”. How this is established is unclear. The backpropagating action potential (BAP) is hypothesised to provide distance-dependent information to synapses, allowing synaptic strengths to scale accordingly. Experimental measurements show that a BAP evoked by current injection at the soma causes calcium currents in the apical shaft whose amplitudes decay with distance from the soma. However, in vivo action potentials are not induced by somatic current injection but by synaptic inputs along the dendrites, which creates a different excitable state of the dendrites. Due to technical limitations, it is not possible to study experimentally whether distance information can also be provided by synaptically-evoked BAPs. Therefore we adapted a realistic morphological and electrophysiological model to measure BAP-induced voltage and calcium signals in spines after Schaffer collateral synapse stimulation. We show that peak calcium concentration is highly correlated with soma-synapse distance under a number of physiologically-realistic suprathreshold stimulation regimes and for a range of dendritic morphologies. Peak calcium levels also predicted the attenuation of the EPSP across the dendritic tree. Furthermore, we show that peak calcium can be used to set up a synaptic democracy in a homeostatic manner, whereby synapses regulate their synaptic strength on the basis of the difference between peak calcium and a uniform target value. We conclude that information derived from synaptically-generated BAPs can indicate synapse location and can subsequently be utilised to implement a synaptic democracy. PMID:22719238

  6. Paradoxical signaling regulates structural plasticity in dendritic spines

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3- to 5-min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium influx caused by NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key featur...

  7. Two New Calcium-rich Gap Transients in Group and Cluster Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunnan, R.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cao, Y.; Hangard, L.; Yaron, O.; Parrent, J. T.; McCully, C.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mulchaey, J. S.; Ben-Ami, S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fremling, C.; Fruchter, A. S.; Howell, D. A.; Koda, J.; Kupfer, T.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Laher, R.; Masci, F.; Nugent, P. E.; Ofek, E. O.; Yagi, M.; Yan, Lin

    2017-02-01

    We present the Palomar Transient Factory discoveries and the photometric and spectroscopic observations of PTF11kmb and PTF12bho. We show that both transients have properties consistent with the class of calcium-rich gap transients, specifically lower peak luminosities and rapid evolution compared to ordinary supernovae, and a nebular spectrum dominated by [Ca ii] emission. A striking feature of both transients is their host environments: PTF12bho is an intracluster transient in the Coma Cluster, while PTF11kmb is located in a loose galaxy group, at a physical offset ∼150 kpc from the most likely host galaxy. Deep Subaru imaging of PTF12bho rules out an underlying host system to a limit of {M}R> -8.0 {mag}, while Hubble Space Telescope imaging of PTF11kmb reveals a marginal counterpart that, if real, could be either a background galaxy or a globular cluster. We show that the offset distribution of Ca-rich gap transients is significantly more extreme than that seen for SNe Ia or even short-hard gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). Thus, if the offsets are caused by a kick, they require higher kick velocities and/or longer merger times than sGRBs. We also show that almost all Ca-rich transients found to date are in group and cluster environments with elliptical host galaxies, indicating a very old progenitor population; the remote locations could partially be explained by these environments having the largest fraction of stars in the intragroup/intracluster light following galaxy–galaxy interactions.

  8. IP3-dependent, post-tetanic calcium transients induced by electrostimulation of adult skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Mariana; Figueroa, Reinaldo; Jorquera, Gonzalo; Escobar, Matías; Molgó, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    Tetanic electrical stimulation induces two separate calcium signals in rat skeletal myotubes, a fast one, dependent on Cav 1.1 or dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) and ryanodine receptors and related to contraction, and a slow signal, dependent on DHPR and inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and related to transcriptional events. We searched for slow calcium signals in adult muscle fibers using isolated adult flexor digitorum brevis fibers from 5–7-wk-old mice, loaded with fluo-3. When stimulated with trains of 0.3-ms pulses at various frequencies, cells responded with a fast calcium signal associated with muscle contraction, followed by a slower signal similar to one previously described in cultured myotubes. Nifedipine inhibited the slow signal more effectively than the fast one, suggesting a role for DHPR in its onset. The IP3R inhibitors Xestospongin B or C (5 µM) also inhibited it. The amplitude of post-tetanic calcium transients depends on both tetanus frequency and duration, having a maximum at 10–20 Hz. At this stimulation frequency, an increase of the slow isoform of troponin I mRNA was detected, while the fast isoform of this gene was inhibited. All three IP3R isoforms were present in adult muscle. IP3R-1 was differentially expressed in different types of muscle fibers, being higher in a subset of fast-type fibers. Interestingly, isolated fibers from the slow soleus muscle did not reveal the slow calcium signal induced by electrical stimulus. These results support the idea that IP3R-dependent slow calcium signals may be characteristic of distinct types of muscle fibers and may participate in the activation of specific transcriptional programs of slow and fast phenotype. PMID:20837675

  9. Thermal conductivity measurements on xonotlite-type calcium silicate by the transient hot-strip method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The experimental results of the thermal conductivities of xonotlite-type calcium silicate insulation materials were presented at different temperatures and pressures.Two appropriative surroundings,i.e.an elevated temperature surrounding from ambient temperature to 1450 K and a vacuum surrounding from atmosphere pressure to 10-3 Pa,were designed for the transient hot-strip (THS) method.The thermal conduetivities of xonotlite-type calcium silicate with four densities from ambient temperature to 1000 K and 0.045 Pa to atmospheric pressure were measured.The results show that the thermal conductivity of xunotlite-type calcium silicate decreases apparently with the fall of density,and decreases apparently with the drop of pressure,and reaches the least value at about 100 Pa.The thermal conductivity of xonotlite-type calcium silicate increases almost linearly with T3,and increases more abundantly with low density than with high density.The thermal conductivity measurement uncertainty is estimated to be approximately 3% at ambient temperature,and 6% at 800 K.

  10. Stimulus-evoked calcium transients in somatosensory cortex are temporarily inhibited by a nearby microhemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor A Cianchetti

    Full Text Available Although microhemorrhages are common in the brain of the elderly, the direct impact of these lesions on neural function remains unclear. In this work, we used femtosecond laser irradiation to rupture the wall of single arterioles in the brain of anesthetized rodents, producing a hematoma of ∼100-µm diameter. Our objective was to study the impact of these microhemorrhages on cortical activity using cell-resolved two-photon imaging of bulk-loaded calcium-sensitive dye. We monitored peripheral sensory stimulus-induced calcium transients from individual neuronal cell bodies, regions of neuropil, and astrocytes at different distances from the microhemorrhage before and 0.5, 2, and 4 hours after the creation of the lesion. We found that immediately after the hemorrhage the average amplitude of the stimulus-induced calcium response was reduced to about half within 150 µm from the hematoma. Beyond 300 µm, there was little effect on cell response, with a smooth increase in response amplitude from 150 µm to 300 µm from the lesion. Cortical function gradually improved with time and by four hours after the lesion the response from neurons and astrocytes had recovered to baseline everywhere but within 150 µm from the hematoma. To assess whether the cells closest to the microhemorrhage recovered over a longer timeframe, we developed a re-openable chronic cranial window preparation that allowed reinjection of calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye. We found that the response largely recovered by one day after the microhemorrhage even within 150 µm from the hematoma. This work suggests that neuronal and astrocyte function is transiently lost near a microhemorrhage, but recovers within one day after the lesion.

  11. Exploring the Potential of Transient Receptor Potential: Troubleshooting Troublesome Calcium Thoroughfares in Biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammad Ahmad Farooqi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Transient Receptor Potential-Canonical (TRPC channels are the border guards residing in the supra-molecular assembly of plasma membrane. TRPCs represent a family of channels that have dual functions of store-operated and second messenger-operated channels in a diversity of cell types. Any disruption in the spatio-temporal organization drastically influences the calcium homeostasis. This review summarizes current interpretations on the infrastructure and characteristic divalent ions regulation in molecular anomalies. A specific targeting of these channels will enable us to get a step closer to personalized medicines.

  12. Transient systemic inflammation does not alter the induction of tolerance to gastric autoantigens by migratory dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Dorothée; Ross, Ellen M; Allen, Stacey; Read, Simon; Houghton, Fiona J; Bedoui, Sammy; Boon, Louis; Gleeson, Paul A; van Driel, Ian R

    2014-06-01

    It has been proposed that activation of dendritic cells (DCs) presenting self-antigens during inflammation may lead to activation of autoreactive T cells and the development of autoimmunity. To test this hypothesis, we examined the presentation of the autoantigen recognized in autoimmune gastritis, gastric H(+)/K(+) ATPase, which is naturally expressed in the stomach and is constitutively presented in the stomach-draining lymph nodes. Systemic administration to mice of the TLR9 agonist CpG DNA, agonist anti-CD40 Ab, or TLR4 agonist LPS all failed to abrogate the process of peripheral clonal deletion of H(+)/K(+) ATPase-specific CD4 T cells or promote the development of autoimmune gastritis. We demonstrated that migratory DCs from the stomach-draining lymph nodes are the only DC subset capable of constitutively presenting the endogenous gastric H(+)/K(+) ATPase autoantigen in its normal physiological context. Analysis of costimulatory molecules indicated that, relative to resident DCs, migratory DCs displayed a partially activated phenotype in the steady state. Furthermore, migratory DCs were refractory to stimulation by transient exposure to TLR agonists, as they failed to upregulate costimulatory molecules, secrete significant amounts of inflammatory cytokines, or induce differentiation of effector T cells. Together, these data show that transient systemic inflammation failed to break tolerance to the gastric autoantigen, as migratory DCs presenting the gastric autoantigen remain tolerogenic under such conditions, demonstrating the robust nature of peripheral tolerance.

  13. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release in frog skeletal muscle fibres estimated from Arsenazo III calcium transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylor, S M; Chandler, W K; Marshall, M W

    1983-01-01

    Single twitch fibres, dissected from frog muscle, were injected with the metallochromic dye Arsenazo III. Changes in dye-related absorbance measured at 650 or 660 nm were used to estimate the time course of myoplasmic free [Ca2+] following either action potential stimulation or voltage-clamp depolarization (temperature, 15-17 degrees C). The amplitude of the Ca2+ transient decreased when fibres were stretched to sarcomere spacings approaching 4 microns. The effect appeared to be less marked in H2O Ringer than in D2O Ringer, where a reduction of about 40% was observed in going from 3.0 microns to 3.7-3.9 microns. In fibres heavily injected with dye (1.5-2.2 mM-dye) at least 0.1 mM-Ca2+ was complexed with Arsenazo III following a single action potential, implying that at least 0.1 mM-Ca2+ was released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.) into the myoplasm. Computer simulations were carried out to estimate the flux of Ca2+ between the s.r. and myoplasm (in fibres containing no more that 0.8 mM-dye). The amounts and time courses of Ca2+ bound to the Ca2+-regulatory sites on troponin and to the Ca2+, Mg2+ sites on parvalbumin were estimated from the free [Ca2+] wave form and the law of mass action. In the computations the total myoplasmic [Ca2+] was taken as the total amount of Ca2+ existing either as free ion or as ion complexed with dye, troponin or parvalbumin. The time derivative of total myoplasmic [Ca2+] was used as an estimate of net Ca2+ flux (release minus uptake) from the s.r. into myoplasm. Rate constants for formation of cation: receptor complex were taken from published values. For the Ca2+-regulatory sites on troponin, three sets of rate constants, corresponding to two values of dissociation constant (0.2 and 2 microM) were used. Each set of three simulations was carried out both with and without parvalbumin. The simulations show that following action potential stimulation, 0.2-0.3 mM-Ca2+ enters the myoplasm from the s.r. The wave form of s.r. Ca2

  14. Calcium Transients Closely Reflect Prolonged Action Potentials in iPSC Models of Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmia

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    C. Ian Spencer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Long-QT syndrome mutations can cause syncope and sudden death by prolonging the cardiac action potential (AP. Ion channels affected by mutations are various, and the influences of cellular calcium cycling on LQTS cardiac events are unknown. To better understand LQTS arrhythmias, we performed current-clamp and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i measurements on cardiomyocytes differentiated from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS-CM. In myocytes carrying an LQT2 mutation (HERG-A422T, APs and [Ca2+]i transients were prolonged in parallel. APs were abbreviated by nifedipine exposure and further lengthened upon releasing intracellularly stored Ca2+. Validating this model, control iPS-CM treated with HERG-blocking drugs recapitulated the LQT2 phenotype. In LQT3 iPS-CM, expressing NaV1.5-N406K, APs and [Ca2+]i transients were markedly prolonged. AP prolongation was sensitive to tetrodotoxin and to inhibiting Na+-Ca2+ exchange. These results suggest that LQTS mutations act partly on cytosolic Ca2+ cycling, potentially providing a basis for functionally targeted interventions regardless of the specific mutation site.

  15. Estimating background-subtracted fluorescence transients in calcium imaging experiments: a quantitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joucla, Sébastien; Franconville, Romain; Pippow, Andreas; Kloppenburg, Peter; Pouzat, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    Calcium imaging has become a routine technique in neuroscience for subcellular to network level investigations. The fast progresses in the development of new indicators and imaging techniques call for dedicated reliable analysis methods. In particular, efficient and quantitative background fluorescence subtraction routines would be beneficial to most of the calcium imaging research field. A background-subtracted fluorescence transients estimation method that does not require any independent background measurement is therefore developed. This method is based on a fluorescence model fitted to single-trial data using a classical nonlinear regression approach. The model includes an appropriate probabilistic description of the acquisition system's noise leading to accurate confidence intervals on all quantities of interest (background fluorescence, normalized background-subtracted fluorescence time course) when background fluorescence is homogeneous. An automatic procedure detecting background inhomogeneities inside the region of interest is also developed and is shown to be efficient on simulated data. The implementation and performances of the proposed method on experimental recordings from the mouse hypothalamus are presented in details. This method, which applies to both single-cell and bulk-stained tissues recordings, should help improving the statistical comparison of fluorescence calcium signals between experiments and studies.

  16. Stroma cell-derived factor-1α signaling enhances calcium transients and beating frequency in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ielham Hadad

    Full Text Available Stroma cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α is a cardioprotective chemokine, acting through its G-protein coupled receptor CXCR4. In experimental acute myocardial infarction, administration of SDF-1α induces an early improvement of systolic function which is difficult to explain solely by an anti-apoptotic and angiogenic effect. We wondered whether SDF-1α signaling might have direct effects on calcium transients and beating frequency.Primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were culture-expanded and characterized by immunofluorescence staining. Calcium sparks were studied by fluorescence microscopy after calcium loading with the Fluo-4 acetoxymethyl ester sensor. The cardiomyocyte enriched cellular suspension expressed troponin I and CXCR4 but was vimentin negative. Addition of SDF-1α in the medium increased cytoplasmic calcium release. The calcium response was completely abolished by using a neutralizing anti-CXCR4 antibody and partially suppressed and delayed by preincubation with an inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R blocker, but not with a ryanodine receptor (RyR antagonist. Calcium fluxes induced by caffeine, a RyR agonist, were decreased by an IP3R blocker. Treatment with forskolin or SDF-1α increased cardiomyocyte beating frequency and their effects were additive. In vivo, treatment with SDF-1α increased left ventricular dP/dtmax.These results suggest that in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling increases calcium transients in an IP3-gated fashion leading to a positive chronotropic and inotropic effect.

  17. Calcium-rich gap transients in the remote outskirts of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kasliwal, Mansi M; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Nugent, Peter E; Sullivan, Mark; Bildsten, Lars; Yaron, Ofer; Perets, Hagai B; Arcavi, Iair; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Bhalerao, Varun B; Bloom, Joshua S; Cenko, S Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V; Frail, Dale A; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Horesh, Assaf; Howell, D Andrew; Law, Nicholas M; Leonard, Douglas C; Li, Weidong; Ofek, Eran O; Polishook, David; Poznanski, Dovi; Quimby, Robert M; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Sternberg, Assaf; Xu, Dong

    2011-01-01

    From the first two seasons of the Palomar Transient Factory, we identify three peculiar transients (PTF09dav, PTF10iuv, PTF11bij) with five distinguishing characteristics: peak luminosity in the gap between novae and supernovae (M_R = 15.5 to -16.5), rapid photometric evolution (rise-time ~12--15 days), large photospheric velocities (~6000 to 11000 km/s), early spectroscopic evolution into nebular phase (~1 to 3 months) and peculiar nebular spectra dominated by Calcium. We also culled the extensive decade-long Lick Observatory Supernova Search database and identified an additional member of this group, SN 2007ke. Our choice of photometric and spectroscopic properties was motivated by SN 2005E (Perets et al. 2010). To our surprise, as in the case of SN 2005E, all four members of this group are also clearly offset from the bulk of their host galaxy. Given the well-sampled early and late-time light curves, we derive ejecta masses in the range of 0.4--0.7 Msun. Spectroscopically, we find that there may be a diver...

  18. Simultaneous imaging of structural plasticity and calcium dynamics in developing dendrites and axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Friederike; Lohmann, Christian

    2013-11-01

    During nervous system development, the formation of synapses between pre- and postsynaptic neurons is a remarkably specific process. Both structural and functional plasticity are critical for the selection of synaptic partners and for the establishment and maturation of synapses. To unravel the respective contributions of structural and functional mechanisms as well as their interactions during synaptogenesis, it is important to directly observe structural changes and functional signaling simultaneously. Here, we present an imaging approach to simultaneously follow changes in structure and function. Differential labeling of individual cells and the neuronal network with distinct dyes allows the study of structural plasticity and changes in calcium signaling associated with neural activity at the same time and with high resolution. This is achieved by bulk loading of neuronal populations with a calcium-sensitive indicator in combination with electroporation of individual cells with a calcium indicator and an additional noncalcium-sensitive dye with a different excitation spectrum. Recordings of the two differently labeled structures can be acquired simultaneously using confocal microscopy. Thus, structural plasticity and calcium dynamics of the individually labeled neuron and the surrounding network can be related to each other. This combined imaging approach can be applied to virtually all systems of neuronal networks to study structure and function. We provide a comprehensive description of the labeling procedure, the imaging parameters, and the important aspects of analysis for simultaneous recordings of structure and function in individual neurons.

  19. Imaging and analysis of evoked excitatory-postsynaptic-calcium-transients by individual presynaptic-boutons of cultured Aplysia sensorimotor synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkinson, Guy; Spira, Micha E

    2010-04-01

    The use of the sensory-motor (SN-MN) synapse of the Aplysia gill withdrawal reflex has contributed immensely to the understanding of synaptic transmission, learning and memory acquisition processes. Whereas the majority of the studies focused on analysis of the presynaptic mechanisms, recent studies indicated that as in mammalian synapses, long term potentiation (LTP) formed by Aplysia SN-MN synapse depends on elevation of the postsynaptic free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+](i)). Consistently, injection of the fast calcium chelator BAPTA to the MN prevents the formation of serotonin-induced LTP. Nevertheless, currently there are no published reports that directly examine and document whether evoked synaptic transmission is associated with transient increase in the postsynaptic [Ca2+](i). In the present study we imaged, for the first time, alterations in the postsynaptic [Ca2+](i) in response to presynaptic stimulation and analyzed the underlying mechanisms. Using live imaging of the postsynaptic [Ca2+](i) while monitoring the EPSP, we found that evoked transmitter release generates excitatory postsynaptic calcium concentration transients (EPSCaTs) by two mechanisms: (a) activation of DNQX-sensitive postsynaptic receptors-gated calcium influx and (b) calcium influx through nitrendipine-sensitive voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Concomitant confocal imaging of presynaptic boutons and EPSCaTs revealed that approximately 86% of the presynaptic boutons are associated with functional synapses.

  20. Effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor on the calcium transients and calcium handling proteins in ventricular myocytes from rats with heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-chun; ZENG Wu-tao; LIU Jun; DONG Yu-gang; TANG An-li; FENG Chong; MA Hong; HE Jian-gui; LIAO Xin-xue; CHEN Wen-fang; LENG Xiu-yu; MA Li; MAI Wei-yi; TAO Jun

    2005-01-01

    Background Chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with calcium transients and calcium handling proteins. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor has been demonstrated to have beneficial effect on CHF. Yet studies addressed to the relationship between ACE inhibitor and calcium transients in CHF are rare. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ACE inhibitor (perindopril) on the contractility and calcium transients and calcium handling proteins in ventricular myocytes from rats with experimental heart failure.Results The fraction of cell shortening (FS%) and [Ca2+]imax (nmol/L) were significantly reduced in group CHF-C compared with group PS (FS%: 7.51±1.15 vs 13.21±1.49;[Ca2+]imax:330.85±50.05 vs 498.16±14.07; both P<0.01), and restored at least partially in CHF-T group. In CHF-C group, the left ventricular mRNA of NCX1 and PLB were significantly upregulated in comparing with PS group (RNCX1/β-Actin: 0.51±0.12 vs 0.19±0.06, P<0.01; RPLB/β-Actin: 0.26±0.12 vs 0.20±0.08, P<0.05), while SERCA2 mRNA was downregulated (0.48±0.10 vs 0.80±0.11, P<0.01). The mRNA levels of NCX1 and SERCA2 in CHF-T group were between the CHF-C and PS group, and the differences of the latter two groups were significant (all P<0.05). In CHF-C and CHF-T groups, the protein expression of NCX1 were 1.141±0.047 and 1.074±0.081 times of that in PS group respectively (both P<0.05), and SERCA2 protein levels were 0.803±0.100 and 0.893±0.084 times of that in PS group respectively (both P<0.05). The protein expression of NCX1 and SERCA2 in the CHF-C and CHF-T groups is significantly different (both P<0.05).Conclusion ACE inhibitor could improve cardiac function of failing heart through directly enhancing the contractility of single cardiomyocyte, and these effects are probably mediated by its roles in preventing the deleterious changes of calcium transients and calcium handling proteins in CHF.

  1. Dendritic potassium channels in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D; Hoffman, D A; Magee, J C; Poolos, N P; Watanabe, S; Colbert, C M; Migliore, M

    2000-05-15

    Potassium channels located in the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons control the shape and amplitude of back-propagating action potentials, the amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic potentials and dendritic excitability. Non-uniform gradients in the distribution of potassium channels in the dendrites make the dendritic electrical properties markedly different from those found in the soma. For example, the influence of a fast, calcium-dependent potassium current on action potential repolarization is progressively reduced in the first 150 micrometer of the apical dendrites, so that action potentials recorded farther than 200 micrometer from the soma have no fast after-hyperpolarization and are wider than those in the soma. The peak amplitude of back-propagating action potentials is also progressively reduced in the dendrites because of the increasing density of a transient potassium channel with distance from the soma. The activation of this channel can be reduced by the activity of a number of protein kinases as well as by prior depolarization. The depolarization from excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) can inactivate these A-type K+ channels and thus lead to an increase in the amplitude of dendritic action potentials, provided the EPSP and the action potentials occur within the appropriate time window. This time window could be in the order of 15 ms and may play a role in long-term potentiation induced by pairing EPSPs and back-propagating action potentials.

  2. Glibenclamide decreases ATP-induced intracellular calcium transient elevation via inhibiting reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial activity in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo-ling Li

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence has revealed that glibenclamide has a wide range of anti-inflammatory effects. However, it is unclear whether glibenclamide can affect the resting and adenosine triphosphate (ATP-induced intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+]i handling in Raw 264.7 macrophages. In the present study, [Ca(2+]i transient, reactive oxygen species (ROS and mitochondrial activity were measured by the high-speed TILLvisION digital imaging system using the indicators of Fura 2-am, DCFDA and rhodamine-123, respectively. We found that glibenclamide, pinacidil and other unselective K(+ channel blockers had no effect on the resting [Ca(2+]i of Raw 264.7 cells. Extracellular ATP (100 µM induced [Ca(2+]i transient elevation independent of extracellular Ca(2+. The transient elevation was inhibited by an ROS scavenger (tiron and mitochondria inhibitor (rotenone. Glibenclamide and 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD also decreased ATP-induced [Ca(2+]i transient elevation, but pinacidil and other unselective K(+ channel blockers had no effect. Glibenclamide also decreased the peak of [Ca(2+]i transient induced by extracellular thapsigargin (Tg, 1 µM. Furthermore, glibenclamide decreased intracellular ROS and mitochondrial activity. When pretreated with tiron and rotenone, glibenclamide could not decrease ATP, and Tg induced maximal [Ca(2+]i transient further. We conclude that glibenclamide may inhibit ATP-induced [Ca(2+]i transient elevation by blocking mitochondria KATP channels, resulting in decreased ROS generation and mitochondrial activity in Raw 264.7 macrophages.

  3. Type I TARPs promote dendritic growth of early postnatal neocortical pyramidal cells in organotypic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mohammad I K; Jack, Alexander; Klatt, Oliver; Lorkowski, Markus; Strasdeit, Tobias; Kott, Sabine; Sager, Charlotte; Hollmann, Michael; Wahle, Petra

    2014-04-01

    The ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate glutamate receptors (AMPARs) have been implicated in the establishment of dendritic architecture. The transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) regulate AMPAR function and trafficking into synaptic membranes. In the current study, we employ type I and type II TARPs to modulate expression levels and function of endogenous AMPARs and investigate in organotypic cultures (OTCs) of rat occipital cortex whether this influences neuronal differentiation. Our results show that in early development [5-10 days in vitro (DIV)] only the type I TARP γ-8 promotes pyramidal cell dendritic growth by increasing spontaneous calcium amplitude and GluA2/3 expression in soma and dendrites. Later in development (10-15 DIV), the type I TARPs γ-2, γ-3 and γ-8 promote dendritic growth, whereas γ-4 reduced dendritic growth. The type II TARPs failed to alter dendritic morphology. The TARP-induced dendritic growth was restricted to the apical dendrites of pyramidal cells and it did not affect interneurons. Moreover, we studied the effects of short hairpin RNA-induced knockdown of endogenous γ-8 and showed a reduction of dendritic complexity and amplitudes of spontaneous calcium transients. In addition, the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of γ-8 was required for dendritic growth. Single-cell calcium imaging showed that the γ-8 CT domain increases amplitude but not frequency of calcium transients, suggesting a regulatory mechanism involving the γ-8 CT domain in the postsynaptic compartment. Indeed, the effect of γ-8 overexpression was reversed by APV, indicating a contribution of NMDA receptors. Our results suggest that selected type I TARPs influence activity-dependent dendritogenesis of immature pyramidal neurons.

  4. The differentiation inducer, dimethyl sulfoxide, transiently increases the intracellular calcium ion concentration in various cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, P; Whitfield, J F

    1993-08-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) initiates a coordinated differentiation program in various cell types but the mechanism(s) by which DMSO does this is not understood. In this study, the effect of DMSO on intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) was determined in primary cultures of chicken ovarian granulosa cells from the two largest preovulatory follicles of laying hens, and in three cell lines: undifferentiated P19 embryonal carcinoma cells, 3T3-L1 fibroblasts, and Friend murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells. [Ca2+]i was measured in cells loaded with the Ca(2+)-specific fluoroprobe Fura-2. There was an immediate (i.e., within 5 sec), transient, two to sixfold increase in [Ca2+]i after exposing all cell types to 1% DMSO. DMSO was effective between 0.2 and 1%. The prompt DMSO-induced [Ca2+]i spike in all of the cell types was not prevented by incubating the cells in Ca(2+)-free medium containing 2 mM EGTA or by pretreating them with the Ca(2+)-channel blockers methoxyverapamil (D600; 100 microM), nifedipine (20 microM), or cobalt (5 mM). However, when granulosa cells, 3T3-L1 cells, or MEL cells were pretreated with lanthanum (La3+; 1 mM), which blocks both Ca2+ channels and membrane Ca2+ pumps, there was a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i in response to 1% DMSO. By contrast, pretreating P19 cells with La3+ (1 mM) did not prolong the DMSO-triggered [Ca2+]i transient. In all cases, the DMSO-induced [Ca2+]i surge was unaffected by pretreating the cells with the inhibitors of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis, neomycin (1.5 mM) or U-73, 122 (2.5 microM). These results suggest that DMSO almost instantaneously triggers the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores through a common mechanism in cells in primary cultures and in cells of a variety of established lines, but this release is not mediated through phosphoinositide breakdown. This large, DMSO-induced Ca2+ spike may play a role in the induction of cell differentiation by DMSO.

  5. Inherited cortical HCN1 channel loss amplifies dendritic calcium electrogenesis and burst firing in a rat absence epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Maarten H P; Bräuer, Anja U; Stuart, Greg J

    2007-01-15

    While idiopathic generalized epilepsies are thought to evolve from temporal highly synchronized oscillations between thalamic and cortical networks, their cellular basis remains poorly understood. Here we show in a genetic rat model of absence epilepsy (WAG/Rij) that a rapid decline in expression of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide gated (HCN1) channels (I(h)) precedes the onset of seizures, suggesting that the loss of HCN1 channel expression is inherited rather than acquired. Loss of HCN1 occurs primarily in the apical dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the cortex, leading to a spatially uniform 2-fold reduction in dendritic HCN current throughout the entire somato-dendritic axis. Dual whole-cell recordings from the soma and apical dendrites demonstrate that loss of HCN1 increases somato-dendritic coupling and significantly reduces the frequency threshold for generation of dendritic Ca2+ spikes by backpropagating action potentials. As a result of increased dendritic Ca2+ electrogenesis a large population of WAG/Rij layer 5 neurons showed intrinsic high-frequency burst firing. Using morphologically realistic models of layer 5 pyramidal neurons from control Wistar and WAG/Rij animals we show that the experimentally observed loss of dendritic I(h) recruits dendritic Ca2+ channels to amplify action potential-triggered dendritic Ca2+ spikes and increase burst firing. Thus, loss of function of dendritic HCN1 channels in layer 5 pyramidal neurons provides a somato-dendritic mechanism for increasing the synchronization of cortical output, and is therefore likely to play an important role in the generation of absence seizures.

  6. Activity-dependent depression of excitability and calcium transients in the neurohypophysis suggests a model of "stuttering conduction".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschol, Martin; Kosterin, Paul; Ichikawa, Michinori; Salzberg, B M

    2003-12-10

    Using millisecond time-resolved optical recordings of transmembrane voltage and intraterminal calcium, we have determined how activity-dependent changes in the population action potential are related to a concurrent modulation of calcium transients in the neurohypophysis. We find that repetitive stimulation dramatically alters the amplitude of the population action potential and significantly increases its temporal dispersion. The population action potentials and the calcium transients exhibit well correlated frequency-dependent amplitude depression, with broadening of the action potential playing only a limited role. High-speed camera recordings indicate that the magnitude of the spike modulation is uniform throughout the neurohypophysis, thereby excluding propagation failure as the underlying mechanism. In contrast, temporal dispersion and latency of the population spike do increase with distance from the stimulation site. This increase is enhanced during repeated stimulation and by raising the stimulation frequency. Changes in Ca influx directly affect the decline in population spike amplitude, consistent with electrophysiological measurements of the local loss of excitability in nerve terminals and varicosities, mediated by a Ca-activated K conductance. Our observations suggest a model of "stuttering conduction": repeated action potential stimulation causes excitability failures limited to nerve terminals and varicosities, which account for the rapid decline in the population spike amplitude. These failures, however, do not block action potential propagation but generate the cumulative increases in spike latency.

  7. Coaccumulation of calcium and beta-amyloid in the thalamus after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Susanna; van Groen, Thomas; Clarke, Jared; Thornell, Anders; Corbett, Dale; Hiltunen, Mikko; Soininen, Hilkka; Jolkkonen, Jukka

    2008-02-01

    Transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) in rats leads to abnormal accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides in the thalamus. This study investigated the chemical composition of these deposits. Adult male human beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) overexpressing (hAPP695) rats and their wild-type littermates were subjected to transient MCAO for 2 h or sham operation. After 26-week survival time, histological examination revealed an overlapping distribution pattern for rodent and human Abeta in the thalamus of hAPP695 rats subjected to MCAO. X-ray microanalysis showed that the deposits did not contain significant amount of iron, zinc, or copper typical to senile plaques. In contrast, the deposit both in hAPP695 and non-transgenic rats contained calcium and phosphorus in a ratio (1.28+/-0.15) characteristic to hydroxyapatites. Alizarin red staining confirmed that calcium coaccumulated in these Abeta deposits. It is suggested that APP expression is induced by ischemic insult in cortical neurons adjacent to infarct, which in turn is reflected as increased release of Abeta peptides by their corticothalamic axon endings. This together with insufficient clearance or atypical degradation of Abeta peptides lead to dysregulation of calcium homeostatis and coaccumulation in the thalamus.

  8. Mitochondrial calcium uptake regulates rapid calcium transients in skeletal muscle during excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jianxun; Ma, Changling; Li, Yan; Weisleder, Noah; Ríos, Eduardo; Ma, Jianjie; Zhou, Jingsong

    2011-09-16

    Defective coupling between sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria during control of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling has been implicated in the progression of neuromuscular diseases. Our previous study showed that skeletal muscles derived from an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mouse model displayed segmental loss of mitochondrial function that was coupled with elevated and uncontrolled sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release activity. The localized mitochondrial defect in the ALS muscle allows for examination of the mitochondrial contribution to Ca(2+) removal during excitation-contraction coupling by comparing Ca(2+) transients in regions with normal and defective mitochondria in the same muscle fiber. Here we show that Ca(2+) transients elicited by membrane depolarization in fiber segments with defective mitochondria display an ~10% increased amplitude. These regional differences in Ca(2+) transients were abolished by the application of 1,2-bis(O-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, a fast Ca(2+) chelator that reduces mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Using a mitochondria-targeted Ca(2+) biosensor (mt11-YC3.6) expressed in ALS muscle fibers, we monitored the dynamic change of mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels during voltage-induced Ca(2+) release and detected a reduced Ca(2+) uptake by mitochondria in the fiber segment with defective mitochondria, which mirrored the elevated Ca(2+) transients in the cytosol. Our study constitutes a direct demonstration of the importance of mitochondria in shaping the cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling in skeletal muscle during excitation-contraction coupling and establishes that malfunction of this mechanism may contribute to neuromuscular degeneration in ALS.

  9. Developmental regulation of intracellular calcium transients during cardiomyocyte differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-dong FU; Hui-mei YU; Rong WANG; Ji LIANG; Huang-tian YANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the developmental regulation of intracellular Ca2+ transients, an essential event in excitation-contraction coupling, during cardiomyocyte differentiation. Methods: Using the embryonic stem (ES) cell in vitro differentiation system and pharmacological intervention, we investigated the molecular and functional regulation of Ca2+ handling proteins on the Ca2+ transients at early, intermediate and later differentiation stages of ES cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ESCM). Results: Nifedipine, a selective antagonist of L-type Ca2+ channels, totally blocked Ca2+ transients even in the condition of field-electric stimulation in ESCM at three differentiation stages. The Ca2+ transients of ESCM were also inhibited by both ryanodine [an inhibitor of ryanodine receptors (RyRs)] and 2-aminoethoxydipheylborate [2-APB, an inhibitor of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs)]. The inhibitory effect of ryanodine increased with the time of differentiation, while the effect of 2-APB decreased with the differentiation. Thapsigargin, an inhibitor of SR Ca2+-pump ATPase, inhibited Ca2+ transients equally at three differentiation stages that matched the expression profile. Na+ free solution, which inhibits Na+-Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) to extrude Ca2+ from cytosol, did not affect the amplitude of Ca2+ transients of ESCM until the latter differentiation stage, but it significantly enhanced the basal Ca2+concentration. Conclusion: The Ca2+ transients in ESCM depend on both the sarcolemmal Ca2+ entry via L-type Ca2+ channels and the SR Ca2+ release from RyRs and IP3Rs even at the early differentiation stage; but NCX seems not to regulate the peak of Ca2+ transients until the latter differentiation stage.

  10. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in luck if you like sardines and canned salmon with bones. Almond milk. previous continue Working Calcium ... drinks, and cereals. Other Considerations for Building Bones Vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption, so it's ...

  11. Spontaneous calcium transients manifest in the regenerating muscle and are necessary for skeletal muscle replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Michelle Kim; Borodinsky, Laura Noemi

    2014-07-01

    Tissue regeneration entails replenishing of damaged cells, appropriate cell differentiation and inclusion of regenerated cells into functioning tissues. In adult humans, the capacity of the injured spinal cord and muscle to self-repair is limited. In contrast, the amphibian larva can regenerate its tail after amputation with complete recovery of muscle, notochord and spinal cord. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still unclear. Here we show that upon injury muscle cell precursors exhibit Ca(2+) transients that depend on Ca(2+) release from ryanodine receptor-operated stores. Blockade of these transients impairs muscle regeneration. Furthermore, inhibiting Ca(2+) transients in the regenerating tail prevents the activation and proliferation of muscle satellite cells, which results in deficient muscle replenishment. These findings suggest that Ca(2+)-mediated activity is critical for the early stages of muscle regeneration, which may lead to developing effective therapies for tissue repair.

  12. Calcium-dependent expression of transient receptor potential canonical type 3 channels in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina; Hovsepian, Anahit;

    2011-01-01

    It is unknown whether extracellular calcium may regulate the expression of transient receptor potential canonical type 3 (TRPC3) channels in patients with chronic kidney disease. Using quantitative in-cell Western assay we compared the expression of TRPC3 channel protein in monocytes from 20...... patients with chronic kidney disease and 19 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects. TRPC3 channels were identified by immunoblotting using specific antibodies and TRPC3 protein was further confirmed by mass spectrometry. We observed a significant increase of TRPC3 channel protein expression...... in patients with chronic kidney disease compared to healthy control subjects (normalized expression, 0.42±0.06 vs. 0.19±0.03; p...

  13. High glucose enhances transient receptor potential channel canonical type 6-dependent calcium influx in human platelets via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Daoyan; Maier, Alexandra; Scholze, Alexandra;

    2008-01-01

    Transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channels mediating 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG)-induced calcium entry have been identified on human platelets. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that hyperglycemia increases the expression of TRPC6 channels....

  14. Detection of calcium transients in embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jason S; Tullis, Gregory; Pierret, Christopher; Spears, Kathleen M; Morrison, Jason A; Kirk, Mark D

    2009-12-01

    A central issue in stem cell biology is the determination of function and activity of differentiated stem cells, features that define the true phenotype of mature cell types. Commonly, physiological mechanisms are used to determine the functionality of mature cell types, including those of the nervous system. Calcium imaging provides an indirect method of determining the physiological activities of a mature cell. Camgaroos are variants of yellow fluorescent protein that act as intracellular calcium sensors in transfected cells. We expressed one version of the camgaroos, Camgaroo-2, in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells under the control of the CAG promoter system. Under the control of this promoter, Camgaroo-2 fluorescence was ubiquitously expressed in all cell types derived from the ES cells that were tested. In response to pharmacological stimulation, the fluorescence levels in transfected cells correlated with cellular depolarization and hyperpolarization. These changes were observed in both undifferentiated ES cells as well as ES cells that had been neurally induced, including putative neurons that were differentiated from transfected ES cells. The results presented here indicate that Camgaroo-2 may be used like traditional fluorescent proteins to track cells as well as to study the functionality of stem cells and their progeny.

  15. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 4 channel controls calcium signals and dental follicle stem cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Elevations in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration are a phenomena commonly observed during stem cell differentiation but cease after the process is complete. The Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 4 (TRPM4) is an ion channel that controls Ca2+ signals in excitable and non-excitable cells. However, its role in stem cells remains unknown. The aim of this study was to characterize TRPM4 in rat dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) and to determine its impact on Ca2+ signaling and the differen...

  16. Active properties of neuronal dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, D; Magee, J C; Colbert, C M; Cristie, B R

    1996-01-01

    Dendrites of neurons in the central nervous system are the principal sites for excitatory synaptic input. Although little is known about their function, two disparate perspectives have arisen to describe the activity patterns inherent to these diverse tree-like structures. Dendrites are thus considered either passive or active in their role in integrating synaptic inputs. This review follows the history of dendritic research from before the turn of the century to the present, with a primary focus on the hippocampus. A number of recent techniques, including high-speed fluorescence imaging and dendritic patch clamping, have provided new information and perspectives about the active properties of dendrites. The results support previous notions about the dendritic propagation of action potentials and also indicate which types of voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels are expressed and functionally active in dendrites. Possible roles for the active properties of dendrites in synaptic plasticity and integration are also discussed.

  17. A lipochito-oligosaccharide, Nod factor, induces transient calcium influx in soybean suspension-cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, T; Kobayashi, N; Kouchi, H; Minamisawa, K; Kaku, H; Tsuchiya, K

    2000-04-01

    Lipochito-oligosaccharides (Nod factors) produced by Rhizobium or Bradyrhizobium are the key signal molecules for eliciting nodulation in their corresponding host legumes. To elucidate the signal transduction events mediated by Nod factors, we investigated the effects of Nod factors on the cytosolic [Ca2+] of protoplasts prepared from roots and suspension-cultured cells of soybean (Glycine max and G. soja) using a fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, Fura-PE3. NodBj-V (C18:1, MeFuc), which is a major component of Nod factors produced by Bradyrhizobium japonicum, induces transient elevation of cytosolic [Ca2+] in the cells of soybean within a few minutes. This effect is specific to soybean cells and was not observed in the tobacco BY-2 cells. Furthermore, NodBj-V without MeFuc did not induce any cytosolic [Ca2+] elevation in soybean cells. Exclusion of Ca2+ from the medium, as well as pre-treatment of the cells with an external Ca2+ chelator or with a plasma membrane voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel inhibitor, suppressed the Nod factor-dependent cytosolic [Ca2+] elevation. These results indicate that transient Ca2+ influx from extracellular fluid is one of the earliest responses of soybean cells to NodBj-V (C18:1, MeFuc) in a host-specific manner.

  18. A role for sodium and chloride in kainic acid-induced beading of inhibitory interneuron dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Noori, S; Swann, J W

    2000-01-01

    Excitotoxic injury of the dendrites of inhibitory interneurons could lead to decreases in their synaptic activation and explain subsequent local circuit hyperexcitability and epilepsy. A hallmark of dendrotoxicity, at least in principal neurons of the hippocampus and cortex, is focal or varicose swellings of dendritic arbors. In experiments reported here, transient (1h) exposure of hippocampal explant cultures to kainic acid produced marked focal swellings of the dendrites of parvalbumin-immunoreactive pyramidal basket cells in a highly reproducible and dose-dependent manner. At 5mM kainic acid, more than half of the immunopositive apical dendrites in area CA(1) had a beaded appearance. However, the somal volumes of these cells were unaltered by the same treatment. The presence of focal swellings was reversible with kainate washout and was not accompanied by interneuronal cell death. In contrast, exposure to much higher concentrations (300mM) of kainic acid resulted in the total loss of parvalbumin-positive interneurons from explants. Surprisingly, kainic acid-induced dendritic beading does not appear to be mediated by extracellular calcium. Beading was unaltered in the presence of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, the L-type calcium channel antagonist, nimodipine, cadmium, or by removing extracellular calcium. However, blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels by either tetrodotoxin or lidocaine abolished dendritic beading, while the activation of existing voltage-gated sodium channels by veratridine mimicked the kainic acid-induced dendritic beading. Finally, the removal of extracellular chloride prevented the kainic acid-induced dendritic beading.Thus, we suggest that the movement of Na(+) and Cl(-), rather than Ca(2+), into cells underlies the focal swellings of interneuron dendrites in hippocampus.

  19. Direct In Vivo Manipulation and Imaging of Calcium Transients in Neutrophils Identify a Critical Role for Leading-Edge Calcium Flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerman, Rebecca W; Matty, Molly A; Au, Gina G; Looger, Loren L; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Keller, Philipp J; Tobin, David M

    2015-12-15

    Calcium signaling has long been associated with key events of immunity, including chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and activation. However, imaging and manipulation of calcium flux in motile immune cells in live animals remain challenging. Using light-sheet microscopy for in vivo calcium imaging in zebrafish, we observe characteristic patterns of calcium flux triggered by distinct events, including phagocytosis of pathogenic bacteria and migration of neutrophils toward inflammatory stimuli. In contrast to findings from ex vivo studies, we observe enriched calcium influx at the leading edge of migrating neutrophils. To directly manipulate calcium dynamics in vivo, we have developed transgenic lines with cell-specific expression of the mammalian TRPV1 channel, enabling ligand-gated, reversible, and spatiotemporal control of calcium influx. We find that controlled calcium influx can function to help define the neutrophil's leading edge. Cell-specific TRPV1 expression may have broad utility for precise control of calcium dynamics in other immune cell types and organisms.

  20. The mechanism of hetero-synaptic interaction based on spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiki Futagi

    2014-03-01

    calcium concentration in ER. In contrast, a VDCC-mediated calcium influx was rapid and transient so that it contributed to rapid increase in calcium the concentration in cytoplasm. Taken together, it was found that calcium concentration exhibited a supralinear increase when a presynaptic spike preceded a postsynaptic one. The calcium ions released from ER diffused along cytoplasm and then activated RyRs at neighboring sites. Thus cascades of RyR activation along a dendrite contributed to propagation of calcium pulses. The range of calcium propagation was 10-100 micrometers and depended on dendritic locations because the spatial distribution of VDCC expression was not homogeneous along a dendrite. According to the experimental evidences that the outcome of synaptic plasticity depends on postsynaptic calcium concentration, it was suggested that the RyR-regulated calcium propagation could serve as the mechanism of the hetero-synaptic interaction.

  1. Transient calcium-dependent potassium current in magnocellular neurosecretory cells of the rat supraoptic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourque, C W

    1988-03-01

    1. Magnocellular neurosecretory neurones were impaled in the supraoptic nucleus of perfused explants of rat hypothalamus. Membrane currents were studied at 35 degrees C using the single-microelectrode voltage-clamp technique. 2. Depolarizing voltage steps applied from -100 mV evoked a transient outward current (TOC) from a threshold of -75 mV. From this potential, the amplitude of the current increased non-linearly with voltage. 3. Following its activation TOC reached a peak within 7 ms and subsequently decayed monotonically with a time constant of 30 ms. This time constant did not vary significantly with voltage between -75 and -55 mV. 4. The TOC showed complete steady-state inactivation at potentials positive to -55 mV. Inactivation was removed by hyperpolarization, with a mid-point near -80 mV. The removal of inactivation followed a complex time course with distinct fast (tens of milliseconds) and slow (hundreds of milliseconds) components. 5. Tail current measurements revealed that the TOC equilibrium potential (ETOC) lies near -97 mV in the presence of 3 mM [K+]o. Increasing [K+]o caused a decrease of TOC amplitude and a shift in ETOC of 57 mV/log [K+]o. The TOC is therefore predominantly a K+ current. 6. The TOC was unaffected by tetraethylammonium (up to 12 mM) but was reversibly reduced by 4-aminopyridine (ca. 50% block at 1.0 mM) and dendrotoxin (ca. 50% block at 4 nM). 7. The TOC was strongly inhibited (greater than 70%) by adding Co2+ or Mn2+ (1-3 mM) or Cd2+ (50-400 microM) to Ca-containing solutions, or by removal of Ca2+ from the perfusate. These effects were not accompanied by detectable changes in threshold voltage. The amplitude of TOC was also depressed by the organic Ca2+ channel blocker methoxyverapamil (D600). Finally replacement of Ca2+ by Ba2+ in the perfusate completely and reversibly abolished the TOC. 8. These findings suggest that neurosecretory neurones of the rat supraoptic nucleus display a transient K+ current which is strongly

  2. Aberrant calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity is associated with abnormal dendritic spine morphology in the ATRX mutant mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioda, Norifumi; Beppu, Hideyuki; Fukuda, Takaichi; Li, En; Kitajima, Isao; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2011-01-05

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding ATRX, a chromatin remodeling protein of the sucrose-nonfermenting 2 family, cause several mental retardation disorders, including α-thalassemia X-linked mental retardation syndrome. We generated ATRX mutant mice lacking exon 2 (ATRX(ΔE2) mice), a mutation that mimics exon 2 mutations seen in human patients and associated with milder forms of retardation. ATRX(ΔE2) mice exhibited abnormal dendritic spine formation in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Consistent with other mouse models of mental retardation, ATRX(ΔE2) mice exhibited longer and thinner dendritic spines compared with wild-type mice without changes in spine number. Interestingly, aberrant increased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity was observed in the mPFC of ATRX(ΔE2) mice. Increased CaMKII autophosphorylation and activity were associated with increased phosphorylation of the Rac1-guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1) and kalirin-7, known substrates of CaMKII. We confirmed increased phosphorylation of p21-activated kinases (PAKs) in mPFC extracts. Furthermore, reduced protein expression and activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) was evident in the mPFC of ATRX(ΔE2) mice. In cultured cortical neurons, PP1 inhibition by okadaic acid increased CaMKII-dependent Tiam1 and kalirin-7 phosphorylation. Together, our data strongly suggest that aberrant CaMKII activation likely mediates abnormal spine formation in the mPFC. Such morphological changes plus elevated Rac1-GEF/PAK signaling seen in ATRX(ΔE2) mice may contribute to mental retardation syndromes seen in human patients.

  3. Calcium transients in single fibers of low-frequency stimulated fast-twitch muscle of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, S; Nicotera, P; Pette, D

    1999-12-01

    Ca(2+) transients were investigated in single fibers isolated from rat extensor digitorum longus muscles exposed to chronic low-frequency stimulation for different time periods up to 10 days. Approximately 2.5-fold increases in resting Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) were observed 2 h after stimulation onset and persisted throughout the stimulation period. The elevated [Ca(2+)] levels were in the range characteristic of slow-twitch fibers from soleus muscle. In addition, we noticed a transitory elevation of the integral [Ca(2+)] per pulse with a maximum ( approximately 5-fold) after 1 day. Steep decreases in rate constant of [Ca(2+)] decay could be explained by an immediate impairment of Ca(2+) uptake and, with longer stimulation periods, by an additional loss of cytosolic Ca(2+) binding capacity resulting from a decay in parvalbumin content. A partial recovery of the rate constant of [Ca(2+)] decay in 10-day stimulated muscle could be explained by an increasing mitochondrial contribution to Ca(2+) sequestration.

  4. Functional polarity of dendrites and axons of primate A1 amacrine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Christopher M; Detwiler, Peter B; Dacey, Dennis M

    2007-01-01

    The A1 cell is an axon-bearing amacrine cell of the primate retina with a diffusely stratified, moderately branched dendritic tree (approximately 400 microm diameter). Axons arise from proximal dendrites forming a second concentric, larger arborization (>4 mm diameter) of thin processes with bouton-like swellings along their length. A1 cells are ON-OFF transient cells that fire a brief high frequency burst of action potentials in response to light (Stafford & Dacey, 1997). It has been hypothesized that A1 cells receive local input to their dendrites, with action potentials propagating output via the axons across the retina, serving a global inhibitory function. To explore this hypothesis we recorded intracellularly from A1 cells in an in vitro macaque monkey retina preparation. A1 cells have an antagonistic center-surround receptive field structure for the ON and OFF components of the light response. Blocking the ON pathway with L-AP4 eliminated ON center responses but not OFF center responses or ON or OFF surround responses. Blocking GABAergic inhibition with picrotoxin increased response amplitudes without affecting receptive field structure. TTX abolished action potentials, with little effect on the sub-threshold light response or basic receptive field structure. We also used multi-photon laser scanning microscopy to record light-induced calcium transients in morphologically identified dendrites and axons of A1 cells. TTX completely abolished such calcium transients in the axons but not in the dendrites. Together these results support the current model of A1 function, whereby the dendritic tree receives synaptic input that determines the center-surround receptive field; and action potentials arise in the axons, which propagate away from the dendritic field across the retina.

  5. Transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel controls calcium signals and dental follicle stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Piper; Ngoc Tran, Tran Doan; Zhang, Hanjie; Zolochevska, Olga; Figueiredo, Marxa; Feng, Ji-Ming; Gutierrez, Dina L; Xiao, Rui; Yao, Shaomian; Penn, Arthur; Yang, Li-Jun; Cheng, Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Elevations in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration are a phenomena commonly observed during stem cell differentiation but cease after the process is complete. The transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4) is an ion channel that controls Ca(2+) signals in excitable and nonexcitable cells. However, its role in stem cells remains unknown. The aim of this study was to characterize TRPM4 in rat dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) and to determine its impact on Ca(2+) signaling and the differentiation process. We identified TRPM4 gene expression in DFSCs, but not TRPM5, a closely related channel with similar function. Perfusion of cells with increasing buffered Ca(2+) resulted in a concentration-dependent activation of currents typical for TRPM4, which were also voltage-dependent and had Na(+) conductivity. Molecular suppression with shRNA decreased channel activity and cell proliferation during osteogenesis but not adipogenesis. As a result, enhanced mineralization and phosphatase enzyme activity were observed during osteoblast formation, although DFSCs failed to differentiate into adipocytes. Furthermore, the normal agonist-induced first and secondary phases of Ca(2+) signals were transformed into a gradual and sustained increase which confirmed the channels' ability to control Ca(2+) signaling. Using whole genome microarray analysis, we identified several genes impacted by TRPM4 during DFSC differentiation. These findings suggest an inhibitory role for TRPM4 on osteogenesis while it appears to be required for adipogenesis. The data also provide a potential link between the Ca(2+) signaling pattern and gene expression during stem cell differentiation.

  6. Calcium transient evoked by nicotine in isolated rat vagal pulmonary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennings; Yang, Wenbin; Zhang, Guangfan; Gu, Qihai; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that inhaled cigarette smoke activates vagal pulmonary C fibers and rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) in the airways and that nicotine contained in the smoke is primarily responsible. This study was carried out to determine whether nicotine alone can activate pulmonary sensory neurons isolated from rat vagal ganglia; the response of these neurons was determined by fura-2-based ratiometric Ca(2+) imaging. The results showed: 1) Nicotine (10(-4) M, 20 s) evoked a transient increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in 175 of the 522 neurons tested (Delta[Ca(2+)](i) = 142.2 +/- 12.3 nM); the response was reproducible, with a small reduction in peak amplitude in the same neurons when the challenge was repeated 20 min later. 2) A majority (59.7%) of these nicotine-sensitive neurons were also activated by capsaicin (10(-7) M). 3) 1,1-Dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP; 10(-4) M, 20 s), a selective agonist of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (NnAChRs), evoked a pattern of response similar to that of nicotine. 4) The responses to nicotine and DMPP were either totally abrogated or markedly attenuated by hexamethonium (10(-4) M). 5) In anesthetized rats, right atrial bolus injection of nicotine (75-200 mug/kg) evoked an immediate (latency <1-2 s) and intense burst of discharge in 47.8% of the pulmonary C-fiber endings and 28.6% of the RARs tested. In conclusion, nicotine exerts a direct stimulatory effect on vagal pulmonary sensory nerves, and the effect is probably mediated through an activation of the NnAChRs expressed on the membrane of these neurons.

  7. Analysis of Calcium Transients and Uniaxial Contraction Force in Single Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes on Microstructured Elastic Substrate with Spatially Controlled Surface Chemistries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grespan, Eleonora; Martewicz, Sebastian; Serena, Elena; Le Houerou, Vincent; Rühe, Jürgen; Elvassore, Nicola

    2016-11-22

    The mechanical activity of cardiomyocytes is the result of a process called excitation-contraction coupling (ECC). A membrane depolarization wave induces a transient cytosolic calcium concentration increase that triggers activation of calcium-sensitive contractile proteins, leading to cell contraction and force generation. An experimental setup capable of acquiring simultaneously all ECC features would have an enormous impact on cardiac drug development and disease study. In this work, we develop a microengineered elastomeric substrate with tailor-made surface chemistry to measure simultaneously the uniaxial contraction force and the calcium transients generated by single human cardiomyocytes in vitro. Microreplication followed by photocuring is used to generate an array consisting of elastomeric micropillars. A second photochemical process is employed to spatially control the surface chemistry of the elastomeric pillar. As result, human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) can be confined in rectangular cell-adhesive areas, which induce cell elongation and promote suspended cell anchoring between two adjacent micropillars. In this end-to-end conformation, confocal fluorescence microscopy allows simultaneous detection of calcium transients and micropillar deflection induced by a single-cell uniaxial contraction force. Computational finite elements modeling (FEM) and 3D reconstruction of the cell-pillar interface allow force quantification. The platform is used to follow calcium dynamics and contraction force evolution in hESC-CMs cultures over the course of several weeks. Our results show how a biomaterial-based platform can be a versatile tool for in vitro assaying of cardiac functional properties of single-cell human cardiomyocytes, with applications in both in vitro developmental studies and drug screening on cardiac cultures.

  8. Estimating intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and buffering in a dendritic inhibitory hippocampal interneuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C W; Lien, C C

    2009-12-29

    Calcium is known to regulate several phenomena like neuronal excitability and plasticity. Interestingly, the spatiotemporal profile of dendritic calcium depends on several processes, specific to each neuronal type. In this study, we investigated Ca(2+) buffering and action potential (AP)-evoked Ca(2+) signaling in the dendrites of anatomically identified oriens lacunosum-moleculare (O-LM) cells, a major type of dendrite-targeting interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 region, using a combination of whole-cell patch-clamp recording and fast Ca(2+) imaging in acute rat brain slices. Cells were loaded with fluorescent Ca(2+) indicators fura-2 or Oregon Green BAPTA-1 (OGB-1) via patch-clamping electrode, and the effect of fura-2 on AP-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) transients was determined by ratiometric Ca(2+) imaging. To estimate intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) and endogenous Ca(2+)-binding ratio (kappa(s)) in the proximal dendrite, fluorescence signals were converted into [Ca(2+)](i) using the ratioing method and were analyzed on the basis of the "single compartment model." Resting [Ca(2+)](i) was 22+/-5 nM and the build-up of [Ca(2+)](i) during a single AP was up to 656+/-226 nM. Analysis of Ca(2+) transients revealed that O-LM cells have a relatively low endogenous Ca(2+)-binding ratio (kappa(s)): the kappa(s) was 20+/-8 estimated during fura-2 loading and 27 estimated under steady-state fura-2 concentrations, respectively. To further examine the spatial profile of dendritic Ca(2+) transients, we measured somatic AP-evoked Ca(2+) transients beyond proximal dendrites using OGB-1. Dendritic Ca(2+) transients evoked by single APs or AP trains are not limited to regions close to the soma. The amplitude and decay of [Ca(2+)](i) associated with backpropagating APs are relatively independent of the distance from the soma. In sum, O-LM cells exhibit low endogenous Ca(2+)-binding ratios and relatively distance-independent Ca(2+) dynamics in the dendrites. These

  9. Direct In Vivo Manipulation and Imaging of Calcium Transients in Neutrophils Identify a Critical Role for Leading-Edge Calcium Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca W. Beerman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium signaling has long been associated with key events of immunity, including chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and activation. However, imaging and manipulation of calcium flux in motile immune cells in live animals remain challenging. Using light-sheet microscopy for in vivo calcium imaging in zebrafish, we observe characteristic patterns of calcium flux triggered by distinct events, including phagocytosis of pathogenic bacteria and migration of neutrophils toward inflammatory stimuli. In contrast to findings from ex vivo studies, we observe enriched calcium influx at the leading edge of migrating neutrophils. To directly manipulate calcium dynamics in vivo, we have developed transgenic lines with cell-specific expression of the mammalian TRPV1 channel, enabling ligand-gated, reversible, and spatiotemporal control of calcium influx. We find that controlled calcium influx can function to help define the neutrophil’s leading edge. Cell-specific TRPV1 expression may have broad utility for precise control of calcium dynamics in other immune cell types and organisms.

  10. LTP is accompanied by an enhanced local excitability of pyramidal neuron dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Andreas; Magee, Jeffrey; Johnston, Daniel

    2004-02-01

    The propagation and integration of signals in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons is regulated, in part, by the distribution and biophysical properties of voltage-gated ion channels. It is thus possible that any modification of these channels in a specific part of the dendritic tree might locally alter these signaling processes. Using dendritic and somatic whole-cell recordings, combined with calcium imaging in rat hippocampal slices, we found that the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) was accompanied by a local increase in dendritic excitability that was dependent on the activation of NMDA receptors. These changes favored the back-propagation of action potentials into this dendritic region with a subsequent boost in the Ca(2+) influx. Dendritic cell-attached patch recordings revealed a hyperpolarized shift in the inactivation curve of transient, A-type K(+) currents that can account for the enhanced excitability. These results suggest an important mechanism associated with LTP for shaping signal processing and controlling dendritic function.

  11. Calcium-activated potassium conductances contribute to action potential repolarization at the soma but not the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, N P; Johnston, D

    1999-07-01

    Evidence is accumulating that voltage-gated channels are distributed nonuniformly throughout neurons and that this nonuniformity underlies regional differences in excitability within the single neuron. Previous reports have shown that Ca2+, Na+, A-type K+, and hyperpolarization-activated, mixed cation conductances have varying distributions in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, with significantly different densities in the apical dendrites compared with the soma. Another important channel mediates the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ current (IC), which is responsible in part for repolarization of the action potential (AP) and generation of the afterhyperpolarization that follows the AP recorded at the soma. We have investigated whether this current is activated by APs retrogradely propagating in the dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons using whole-cell dendritic patch-clamp recording techniques. We found no IC activation by back-propagating APs in distal dendritic recordings. Dendritic APs activated IC only in the proximal dendrites, and this activation decayed within the first 100-150 micrometer of distance from the soma. The decay of IC in the proximal dendrites occurred despite AP amplitude, plus presumably AP-induced Ca2+ influx, that was comparable with that at the soma. Thus we conclude that IC activation by action potentials is nonuniform in the hippocampal pyramidal neuron, which may represent a further example of regional differences in neuronal excitability that are determined by the nonuniform distribution of voltage-gated channels in dendrites.

  12. Dendritic Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Sevda Söker

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells, a member of family of antigen presenting cells, are most effective cells in the primary immune response. Dendritic cells originated from dendron, in mean of tree in the Greek, because of their long and elaborate cytoplasmic branching processes. Dendritic cells constitute approximately 0.1 to 1 percent of the blood’s mononuclear cell. Dendritic cells are widely distributed, and specialized for antigen capture and T cell stimulation. In this article, structures and functions of...

  13. NS5806 partially restores action potential duration but fails to ameliorate calcium transient dysfunction in a computational model of canine heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maleckar, Mary M; Lines, Glenn T; Koivumäki, Jussi T

    2014-01-01

    ionic processes with a focus on calcium transients (CaT), how these were altered in HF across the ventricular wall, and the subsequent effects of varying compound concentration in HF. Heart failure model variants recapitulated a characteristic increase in AP duration (APD) in the disease...... activation. CONCLUSIONS: Downstream effects of a compound acting exclusively on sarcolemmal ion channels are difficult to predict. Remediation of APD to pre-failing state does not ameliorate dysfunction in CaT; however, restoration of notch depth appears to impart modest benefit and a likelihood...

  14. Understanding spatial and temporal patterning of astrocyte calcium transients via interactions between network transport and extracellular diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtrahman, E.; Maruyama, D.; Olariu, E.; Fink, C. G.; Zochowski, M.

    2017-02-01

    Astrocytes form interconnected networks in the brain and communicate via calcium signaling. We investigate how modes of coupling between astrocytes influence the spatio-temporal patterns of calcium signaling within astrocyte networks and specifically how these network interactions promote coordination within this group of cells. To investigate these complex phenomena, we study reduced cultured networks of astrocytes and neurons. We image the spatial temporal patterns of astrocyte calcium activity and quantify how perturbing the coupling between astrocytes influences astrocyte activity patterns. To gain insight into the pattern formation observed in these cultured networks, we compare the experimentally observed calcium activity patterns to the patterns produced by a reduced computational model, where we represent astrocytes as simple units that integrate input through two mechanisms: gap junction coupling (network transport) and chemical release (extracellular diffusion). We examine the activity patterns in the simulated astrocyte network and their dependence upon these two coupling mechanisms. We find that gap junctions and extracellular chemical release interact in astrocyte networks to modulate the spatiotemporal patterns of their calcium dynamics. We show agreement between the computational and experimental findings, which suggests that the complex global patterns can be understood as a result of simple local coupling mechanisms.

  15. Involvement of transient receptor potential melastatin-8 (TRPM8) in menthol-induced calcium entry, reactive oxygen species production and cell death in rheumatoid arthritis rat synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang; Pan, Leiting; Yang, Shuang; Sun, Yonglin; Wang, Xinyu; Hu, Fen

    2014-02-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis is most prominently characterized by synoviocyte hyperplasia which therefore serves as an important target for clinical therapy. In the present study, it was observed that menthol, the specific agonist of transient receptor potential melastatin subtype 8 (TRPM8), could induce sustained increases of cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in synoviocytes isolated from collagen-induced arthritis rats in dose-dependent manner, which was evidently blocked by applying an extracellular Ca(2+)-free buffer. Menthol-induced [Ca(2+)]c increase was also significantly inhibited by potent TRPM8 antagonist capsazepine (CZP), indicating that this [Ca(2+)]c elevation was mostly attributed to TRPM8-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Besides, RT-PCR indeed demonstrated presence of TRPM8 in the synoviocytes. Meanwhile, it was found that menthol evoked production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, which could be abolished by Ca(2+) free solutions or CZP. Further experiments showed that menthol reduced the cell numbers and survival of synoviocytes. This reduction was associated with apoptosis as suggested by mitochondrial membrane depolarization, nuclear condensation and a caspase 3/7 apoptotic assay. Menthol-induced death and apoptosis of synoviocytes both were obviously inhibited by CZP, intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM, and reactive oxygen species inhibitor diphenylene iodonium, respectively. Taken together, our data indicated that menthol resulted in synoviocyte death associated with apoptosis via calcium entry and reactive oxygen species production depending on TRPM8 activation.

  16. Mitochondrial calcium ion and membrane potential transients follow the pattern of epileptiform discharges in hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Richard; Kardos, Julianna; Heinemann, Uwe; Kann, Oliver

    2005-04-27

    Emerging evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of epilepsy. Recurrent mitochondrial Ca2+ ion load during seizures might act on mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim) and proton motive force. By using electrophysiology and confocal laser-scanning microscopy, we investigated the effects of epileptiform activity, as induced by low-Mg2+ ion perfusion in hippocampal slice cultures, on changes in DeltaPsim and in mitochondrial Ca2+ ion concentration ([Ca2+]m). The mitochondrial compartment was identified by monitoring DeltaPsim in the soma and dendrites of patched CA3 pyramidal cells using the mitochondria-specific voltage-sensitive dye rhodamine-123 (Rh-123). Interictal activity was accompanied by localized mitochondrial depolarization that was restricted to a few mitochondria in small dendrites. In contrast, robust Rh-123 release into the cytosol was observed during seizure-like events (SLEs), indicating simultaneous depolarization of mitochondria. This was critically dependent on Ca2+ ion uptake and extrusion, because inhibition of the mitochondrial Ca2+ ion uniporter by Ru360 and the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ ion exchanger by 7-chloro-5-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,5-dihydro-4,1-benzothiazepin-2(3H)-one but not the inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition pore, cyclosporin A, decreased the SLE-associated mitochondrial depolarization. The Ca2+ ion dependence of simultaneous mitochondrial depolarization suggested enhanced Ca2+ ion cycling across mitochondrial membranes during epileptiform activity. Indeed, [Ca2+]m fluctuated during interictal activity in single dendrites, and these fluctuations spread over the entire mitochondrial compartment during SLEs, as revealed using mitochondria-specific dyes (rhod-2 and rhod-ff) and spatial frequency-based image analysis. These findings strengthen the hypothesis that epileptic activity results in Ca2+ ion-dependent changes in mitochondrial function that might contribute to the

  17. JTT-305, an orally active calcium-sensing receptor antagonist, stimulates transient parathyroid hormone release and bone formation in ovariectomized rats.

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    Kimura, Shuichi; Nakagawa, Takashi; Matsuo, Yushi; Ishida, Yuji; Okamoto, Yoshihisa; Hayashi, Mikio

    2011-10-01

    Intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) has a potent anabolic effect on bone in humans and animals. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) antagonists stimulate endogenous PTH secretion through CaSR on the surface of parathyroid cells and thereby may be anabolic agents for osteoporosis. JTT-305 is a potent oral short-acting CaSR antagonist and transiently stimulates endogenous PTH secretion. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of JTT-305 on PTH secretion and bone in ovariectomized rats. Female rats, immediately after ovariectomy (OVX), were orally administered vehicle or JTT-305 (0.3, 1, or 3 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. The serum PTH concentrations were transiently elevated with increasing doses of JTT-305. In the proximal tibia, JTT-305 prevented OVX-induced decreases in both the cancellous and total bone mineral density (BMD) except for the 0.3mg/kg dose. At the 3mg/kg dose, JTT-305 increased the mineralizing surface and bone formation rate in histomorphometry. The efficacy of JTT-305 at the 3mg/kg dose on the BMD corresponded to that of exogenous rat PTH1-84 injection at doses between 3 and 10 μg/kg. In conclusion, JTT-305 stimulated endogenous transient PTH secretion and bone formation, and consequently prevented bone loss in OVX rats. These results suggest that JTT-305 is orally active and has the potential to be an anabolic agent for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  18. N- and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels mediate fast calcium transients in axonal shafts of mouse peripheral nerve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra eBarzan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the peripheral nervous system a vast number of axons are accommodated within fiber bundles that constitute peripheral nerves. A major function of peripheral axons is to propagate action potentials along their length, and hence they are equipped with Na+ and K+ channels, which ensure successful generation, conduction and termination of each action potential. However little is known about Ca2+ ion channels expressed along peripheral axons and their possible functional significance. The goal of the present study was to test whether voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs are present along peripheral nerve axons in situ and mediate rapid activity-dependent Ca2+ elevations under physiological circumstances. To address this question we used mouse sciatic nerve slices, Ca2+ indicator Oregon Green BAPTA-1, and 2-photon Ca2+ imaging in fast line scan mode (500 Hz. We report that transient increases in intra-axonal Ca2+ concentration take place along peripheral nerve axons in situ when axons are stimulated electrically with single pulses. Furthermore, we show for the first time that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are fast, i.e. occur in a millisecond time-domain. Combining Ca2+ imaging and pharmacology with specific blockers of different VGCCs subtypes we demonstrate that Ca2+ transients in peripheral nerves are mediated mainly by N-type and L-type VGCCs. Discovery of fast Ca2+ entry into the axonal shafts through VGCCs in peripheral nerves suggests that Ca2+ may be involved in regulation of action potential propagation and/or properties in this system, or mediate neurotransmitter release along peripheral axons as it occurs in the optic nerve and white matter of the central nervous system.

  19. N- and L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels Mediate Fast Calcium Transients in Axonal Shafts of Mouse Peripheral Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzan, Ruxandra; Pfeiffer, Friederike; Kukley, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the peripheral nervous system (PNS) a vast number of axons are accommodated within fiber bundles that constitute peripheral nerves. A major function of peripheral axons is to propagate action potentials along their length, and hence they are equipped with Na(+) and K(+) channels, which ensure successful generation, conduction and termination of each action potential. However little is known about Ca(2+) ion channels expressed along peripheral axons and their possible functional significance. The goal of the present study was to test whether voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) are present along peripheral nerve axons in situ and mediate rapid activity-dependent Ca(2+) elevations under physiological circumstances. To address this question we used mouse sciatic nerve slices, Ca(2+) indicator Oregon Green BAPTA-1, and 2-photon Ca(2+) imaging in fast line scan mode (500 Hz). We report that transient increases in intra-axonal Ca(2+) concentration take place along peripheral nerve axons in situ when axons are stimulated electrically with single pulses. Furthermore, we show for the first time that Ca(2+) transients in peripheral nerves are fast, i.e., occur in a millisecond time-domain. Combining Ca(2+) imaging and pharmacology with specific blockers of different VGCCs subtypes we demonstrate that Ca(2+) transients in peripheral nerves are mediated mainly by N-type and L-type VGCCs. Discovery of fast Ca(2+) entry into the axonal shafts through VGCCs in peripheral nerves suggests that Ca(2+) may be involved in regulation of action potential propagation and/or properties in this system, or mediate neurotransmitter release along peripheral axons as it occurs in the optic nerve and white matter of the central nervous system (CNS).

  20. Calcium Signaling in Mitral Cell Dendrites of Olfactory Bulbs of Neonatal Rats and Mice during Olfactory Nerve Stimulation and Beta-Adrenoceptor Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qi; Mutoh, Hiroki; Debarbieux, Franck; Knopfel, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Synapses formed by the olfactory nerve (ON) provide the source of excitatory synaptic input onto mitral cells (MC) in the olfactory bulb. These synapses, which relay odor-specific inputs, are confined to the distally tufted single primary dendrites of MCs, the first stage of central olfactory processing. Beta-adrenergic modulation of electrical…

  1. Single dendrite-targeting interneurons generate branch-specific inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb eStokes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Microcircuits composed of dendrite-targeting inhibitory interneurons and pyramidal cells are fundamental elements of cortical networks, however, the impact of individual interneurons on pyramidal dendrites is unclear. Here, we combine paired recordings and calcium imaging to determine the spatial domain over which single dendrite-targeting interneurons influence pyramidal cells in olfactory cortex. We show that a major action of individual interneurons is to inhibit dendrites in a branch-specific fashion.

  2. Ca analysis: an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular calcium transients including multiple, simultaneous regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greensmith, David J

    2014-01-01

    Here I present an Excel based program for the analysis of intracellular Ca transients recorded using fluorescent indicators. The program can perform all the necessary steps which convert recorded raw voltage changes into meaningful physiological information. The program performs two fundamental processes. (1) It can prepare the raw signal by several methods. (2) It can then be used to analyze the prepared data to provide information such as absolute intracellular Ca levels. Also, the rates of change of Ca can be measured using multiple, simultaneous regression analysis. I demonstrate that this program performs equally well as commercially available software, but has numerous advantages, namely creating a simplified, self-contained analysis workflow.

  3. Calcium transient evoked by TRPV1 activators is enhanced by tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} in rat pulmonary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Youmin; Gu, Qihai; Lin, Ruei-Lung; Kryscio, Richard; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2010-10-01

    TNFα, a proinflammatory cytokine known to be involved in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma, has been shown to induce hyperalgesia in somatic tissue via a sensitizing effect on dorsal root ganglion neurons expressing transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor (TRPV1). Because TRPV1-expressing pulmonary sensory neurons play an important role in regulating airway function, this study was carried out to determine whether TNFα alters the sensitivity of these neurons to chemical activators. Responses of isolated nodose and jugular ganglion neurons innervating the rat lungs were determined by measuring the transient increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Our results showed the following. 1) A pretreatment with TNFα (50 ng/ml) for ∼24 h increased significantly the peak Δ[Ca(2+)](i) evoked by capsaicin (Cap) in these neurons. A pretreatment with the same concentration of TNFα for a longer duration (∼48 h) did not further increase the response, but pretreatment for a shorter duration (1 h) or with a lower concentration (25 ng/ml, 24 h) failed to enhance the Cap sensitivity. 2) The same TNFα pretreatment also induced similar but less pronounced and less uniform increases in the responses to acid (pH 6.5-5.5), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), a common activator of TRPV1, V2, and V3 channels, and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), a selective activator of TRPA1 channel. 3) In sharp contrast, the responses to ATP, ACh, and KCl were not affected by TNFα. 4) The TNFα-induced hypersensitivity to Cap was not prevented by pretreatment with indomethacin (30 μM). 5) The immunoreactivity to both TNF receptor types 1 and 2 were detected in rat vagal pulmonary sensory neurons. In conclusion, prolonged treatment with TNFα induces a pronounced potentiating effect on the responses of isolated pulmonary sensory neurons to TRPV1 activators. This action of TNFα may contribute in part to the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by this cytokine.

  4. Physiological increases in lactate inhibit intracellular calcium transients, acidify myocytes and decrease force in term pregnant rat myometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Jacqui-Ann; Weeks, Andrew; Wray, Susan

    2015-10-15

    Lactate is increased in myometrial capillary blood from women in slow or non-progressive labour (dystocia), suggesting that it is detrimental to uterine contractions. There are, however, no studies of the effect of lactate on the myometrium. We therefore investigated its effects and mechanism of action on myometrial strips from term pregnant rats. The effects on spontaneous and oxytocin-induced contractility in response to sodium lactate and other weak acids (1-20 mM) were studied. In some experiments, simultaneous force and intracellular Ca(2+) or pH (pH(i)) were measured with Indo-1 or Carboxy-SNARF, respectively. Statistical differences were tested using non-parametric tests. Lactate significantly decreased spontaneous contractility with an EC50 of 3.9 mM. Propionate, butyrate and pyruvate also reduced contractions with similar potency. The effects of lactate were reduced in the presence of oxytocin but remained significant. Lactate decreased pH(i) and nulling the decrease in pH(i) abolished its effects. We also show that lactate inhibited Ca(2+) transients, with these changes mirroring those produced on force. If Ca(2+) entry was enhanced by depolarization (high KCl) or applying the Ca(2+) channel agonist, Bay K 4644, the effects of lactate were abolished. Taken together, these data show that lactate in the physiological range potently decreases myometrial contractility as a result of its inhibition of Ca(2+) transients, which can be attributed to the induced acidification. The present study suggests that the accumulation of extracellular lactate will reduce myometrial contractions and could therefore contribute to labour dystocia.

  5. Actions of a hydrogen sulfide donor (NaHS) on transient sodium, persistent sodium, and voltage-gated calcium currents in neurons of the subfornical organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuksis, Markus; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously found gasotransmitter that has been implicated in a variety of beneficial physiological functions. This study was performed to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying actions of H2S previously observed in subfornical organ (SFO), where H2S acts to regulate blood pressure through a depolarization of the membrane and an overall increase in the excitability of SFO neurons. We used whole cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in the voltage-clamp configuration to analyze the effect of 1 mM NaHS, an H2S donor, on voltage-gated potassium, sodium, and calcium currents. We observed no effect of NaHS on potassium currents; however, both voltage-gated sodium currents (persistent and transient) and the N-type calcium current had a depolarized activation curve and an enhanced peak-induced current in response to a series of voltage-step and ramp protocols run in the control and NaHS conditions. These effects were not responsible for the previously observed depolarization of the membrane potential, as depolarizing effects of H2S were still observed following block of these conductances with tetrodotoxin (5 μM) and ω-conotoxin-GVIA (100 nM). Our studies are the first to investigate the effect of H2S on a variety of voltage-gated conductances in a single brain area, and although they do not explain mechanisms underlying the depolarizing actions of H2S on SFO neurons, they provide evidence of potential mechanisms through which this gasotransmitter influences the excitability of neurons in this important brain area as a consequence of the modulation of multiple ion channels.

  6. [Inflammatory dendritic cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, Elodie; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a rare and heterogeneous population of professional antigen-presenting cells. Several murine dendritic cell subpopulations have been identified that differ in their phenotype and functional properties. In the steady state, committed dendritic cell precursors differentiate into lymphoid organ-resident dendritic cells and migratory tissue dendritic cells. During inflammation appears an additional dendritic cell subpopulation that has been termed « inflammatory dendritic cells ». Inflammatory dendritic cells differentiate in situ from monocytes recruited to the site of inflammation. Here, we discuss how mouse inflammatory dendritic cells differ from macrophages and from other dendritic cell populations. Finally, we review recent work on human inflammatory dendritic cells.

  7. Role of calcium mobilization in the regulation of spontaneous transient outward currents in porcine coronary artery myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to further study the characteristics and regulation of spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) in freshly isolated porcine coronary artery smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). STOCs were recorded using the perforated whole-cell patch-clamp configuration. STOCs were voltage-dependent and superimposed stochastically onto whole-cell Ca2+-activated-K+ (BKCa) currents. Charybdotoxin (ChTX, 200 nmol/L), a selective blocker of BKCa channels, completely inhibited STOCs within 10 min. STOCs activity was greatly suppressed when extracellular Ca2+ concentration decreased from 1.8 mmol/L to 200 nmol/L, further removal of Ca2+ abolished STOCs activity. Ca2+ ionophore A23187 (10 μmol/L) increased STOCs activity significantly. Verapamil (20 μmol/L) and CdCl2 (200 μmol/L), two kinds of organic L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (L-VDCCs) antagonists, had little effect on STOCs. In addition, the ryanodine receptors (RyRs) agonist caffeine (5 mmol/L) significantly activated STOCs. Application of ryanodine (50 μmol/L) to block RyRs abolished STOCs, subsequent washout of ryanodine or application of caffeine failed to reproduce STOCs activity. Inhibition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) by 2APB (40 μmol/L) greatly suppressed the activity of STOCs, application of caffeine (5 mmol/L) in the presence of 2APB caused a burst of outward currents followed by inhibition of STOCs. These results suggest that STOCs in porcine coronary ASMCs are mediated by BKCa channels. Extracellular Ca2+ is essential for STOCs activity, while Ca2+ entry through L-VDCCs has little effect on STOCs. Intracellular Ca2+ release induced by RyRs is responsible for the regulation of STOCs, whereas IP3Rs might also be involved.

  8. Electrical advantages of dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan T Gulledge

    Full Text Available Many neurons receive excitatory glutamatergic input almost exclusively onto dendritic spines. In the absence of spines, the amplitudes and kinetics of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs at the site of synaptic input are highly variable and depend on dendritic location. We hypothesized that dendritic spines standardize the local geometry at the site of synaptic input, thereby reducing location-dependent variability of local EPSP properties. We tested this hypothesis using computational models of simplified and morphologically realistic spiny neurons that allow direct comparison of EPSPs generated on spine heads with EPSPs generated on dendritic shafts at the same dendritic locations. In all morphologies tested, spines greatly reduced location-dependent variability of local EPSP amplitude and kinetics, while having minimal impact on EPSPs measured at the soma. Spine-dependent standardization of local EPSP properties persisted across a range of physiologically relevant spine neck resistances, and in models with variable neck resistances. By reducing the variability of local EPSPs, spines standardized synaptic activation of NMDA receptors and voltage-gated calcium channels. Furthermore, spines enhanced activation of NMDA receptors and facilitated the generation of NMDA spikes and axonal action potentials in response to synaptic input. Finally, we show that dynamic regulation of spine neck geometry can preserve local EPSP properties following plasticity-driven changes in synaptic strength, but is inefficient in modifying the amplitude of EPSPs in other cellular compartments. These observations suggest that one function of dendritic spines is to standardize local EPSP properties throughout the dendritic tree, thereby allowing neurons to use similar voltage-sensitive postsynaptic mechanisms at all dendritic locations.

  9. Potential roles for calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) in murine anorectic response to deoxynivalenol (vomitoxin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenda; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J

    2017-01-01

    Food contamination by the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON, vomitoxin) has the potential to adversely affect animal and human health by suppressing food intake and impairing growth. In mice, the DON-induced anorectic response results from aberrant satiety hormone secretion by enteroendocrine cells (EECs) of the gastrointestinal tract. Recent in vitro studies in the murine STC-1 EEC model have linked DON-induced satiety hormone secretion to activation of calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G-coupled protein receptor, and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), a TRP channel. However, it is unknown whether similar mechanisms mediate DON's anorectic effects in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DON-induced food refusal and satiety hormone release in the mouse are linked to activation of CaSR and TRPA1. Oral treatment with selective agonists for CaSR (R-568) or TRPA1 (allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)) suppressed food intake in mice, and the agonist's effects were suppressed by pretreatment with corresponding antagonists NPS-2143 or ruthenium red (RR), respectively. Importantly, NPS-2143 or RR inhibited both DON-induced food refusal and plasma elevations of the satiety hormones cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36); cotreatment with both antagonists additively suppressed both anorectic and hormone responses to DON. Taken together, these in vivo data along with prior in vitro findings support the contention that activation of CaSR and TRPA1 contributes to DON-induced food refusal by mediating satiety hormone exocytosis from EEC.

  10. Non-linear dendrites can tune neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Daniel Cazé

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A signature of visual, auditory, and motor cortices is the presence of neurons tuned to distinct features of the environment. While neuronal tuning can be observed in most brain areas, its origin remains enigmatic, and new calcium imaging data complicate this problem. Dendritic calcium signals, in a L2/3 neuron from the mouse visual cortex, display a wide range of tunings that could be different from the neuronal tuning (Jia et al 2010. To elucidate this observation we use multi-compartmental models of increasing complexity, from a binary to a realistic biophysical model of L2/3 neuron. These models possess non-linear dendritic subunits inside which the result of multiple excitatory inputs is smaller than their arithmetic sum. While dendritic non-linear subunits are ad-hoc in the binary model, non-linearities in the realistic model come from the passive saturation of synaptic currents. Because of these non-linearities our neuron models are scatter sensitive: the somatic membrane voltage is higher when presynaptic inputs target different dendrites than when they target a single dendrite. This spatial bias in synaptic integration is, in our models, the origin of neuronal tuning. Indeed, assemblies of presynaptic inputs encode the stimulus property through an increase in correlation or activity, and only the assembly that encodes the preferred stimulus targets different dendrites. Assemblies coding for the non-preferred stimuli target single dendrites, explaining the wide range of observed tunings and the possible difference between dendritic and somatic tuning. We thus propose, in accordance with the latest experimental observations, that non-linear integration in dendrites can generate neuronal tuning independently of the coding regime.

  11. Dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during circuit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faits, Michelle C; Zhang, Chunmeng; Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-01-07

    Mitochondria move throughout neuronal dendrites and localize to sites of energy demand. The prevailing view of dendritic mitochondria as highly motile organelles whose distribution is continually adjusted by neuronal activity via Ca(2+)-dependent arrests is based on observations in cultured neurons exposed to artificial stimuli. Here, we analyze the movements of mitochondria in ganglion cell dendrites in the intact retina. We find that whereas during development 30% of mitochondria are motile at any time, as dendrites mature, mitochondria all but stop moving and localize stably to synapses and branch points. Neither spontaneous nor sensory-evoked activity and Ca(2+) transients alter motility of dendritic mitochondria; and pathological hyperactivity in a mouse model of retinal degeneration elevates rather than reduces motility. Thus, our findings indicate that dendritic mitochondria reach stable positions during a critical developmental period of high motility, and challenge current views about the role of activity in regulating mitochondrial transport in dendrites.

  12. Cold-induced exodus of postsynaptic proteins from dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui-Hsuan; Huang, Zu-Han; Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Chow, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Yen-Chung

    2009-02-01

    Dendritic spines are small protrusions on neuronal dendrites and the major target of the excitatory inputs in mammalian brains. Cultured neurons and brain slices are important tools in studying the biochemical and cellular properties of dendritic spines. During the processes of immunocytochemical studies of neurons and the preparation of brain slices, neurons were often kept at temperatures lower than 37 degrees C for varied lengths of time. This study sought to investigate whether and how cold treatment would affect the protein composition of dendritic spines. The results indicated that upon cold treatment four postsynaptic proteins, namely, alpha,beta-tubulins, calcium, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIalpha, and cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain and microtubule-associated protein 2, but not PSD-95 or AMPA receptors, exited from the majority of dendritic spines of cultured rat hippocampal neurons in a Gd(3+)-sensitive manner. The cold-induced exit of tubulins from dendritic spines was further found to be an energy-dependent process involving the activation of Gd(3+)-sensitive calcium channels and ryanodine receptors. The results thus indicate that changes in temperature, calcium concentration, and energy supply of the medium surrounding neurons would affect the protein composition of the dendritic spines and conceivably the protein composition of the subcellular organizations, such as the postsynaptic density, in the cytoplasm of dendritic spines.

  13. Combined system for high-time-resolution dual-excitation fluorescence photometry and fluorescence imaging of calcium transients in single normal and diseased skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttenweiler, Dietmar; Wojciechowski, Reinhold; Makabe, Makoto; Veigel, Claudia; Fink, Rainer H.

    1994-12-01

    Fast photometric measurements and video-imaging of fluorescent indicators both are powerful tools in measuring the intracellular free calcium concentration of muscle and many other cells. as photometric systems yield a high temporal resolution, calcium imaging systems have high spatial but significantly reduced temporal resolution. Therefore we have developed an integrated system combining both methods and based mostly on standard components. As a common, sensitive Ca2+- indicator we used the fluorescent probe Fura-2, which is alternatingly excited for ratio measurements at 340/380 nm. We used a commercially available dual excitation photometric system (OSP-3; Olympus) for attaching a CCD-camera and a frame grabber board. To achieve the synchronization we had to design circuitries for external triggering, synchronization and accurate control of the filter changer, which we added to the system. Additionally, the software for a triggered image acquisition was developed. With this integrated setup one can easily switch between the fast photometric mode (ratio frequency 100 Hz) and the imaging mode (ratio frequency 4.17 Hz). The calcium images are correlated with the 25 times faster spot measurements and are analyzed by means of image processing. With this combined system we study release and uptake of calcium ions of normal and diseased skeletal muscle from mdx mice. Such a system will also be important for other cellular studies in which fluorescence indicators are used to monitor similar time dependent alterations as well as changes in cellular distributions of calcium.

  14. Super-resolution 2-photon microscopy reveals that the morphology of each dendritic spine correlates with diffusive but not synaptic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eTakasaki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure of dendritic spines suggests a specialized function in compartmentalizing synaptic signals near active synapses. Indeed, theoretical and experimental analyses indicate that the diffusive resistance of the spine neck is sufficient to effectively compartmentalize some signaling molecules in a spine for the duration of their activated lifetime. Here we describe the application of 2-photon microscopy combined with stimulated emission depletion (STED-2P to the biophysical study of the relationship between synaptic signals and spine morphology, demonstrating the utility of combining STED-2P with modern optical and electrophysiological techniques. Morphological determinants of fluorescence recovery time were identified and evaluated within the context of a simple compartmental model describing diffusive transfer between spine and dendrite. Correlations between the neck geometry and the amplitude of synapse potentials and calcium transients evoked by 2-photon glutamate uncaging were also investigated.

  15. Accumulation of cytoplasmic calcium, but not apamin-sensitive afterhyperpolarization current, during high frequency firing in rat subthalamic nucleus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teagarden, Mark; Atherton, Jeremy F; Bevan, Mark D; Wilson, Charles J

    2008-02-01

    The autonomous firing pattern of neurons in the rat subthalamic nucleus (STN) is shaped by action potential afterhyperpolarization currents. One of these is an apamin-sensitive calcium-dependent potassium current (SK). The duration of SK current is usually considered to be limited by the clearance of calcium from the vicinity of the channel. When the cell is driven to fire faster, calcium is expected to accumulate, and this is expected to result in accumulation of calcium-dependent AHP current. We measured the time course of calcium transients in the soma and proximal dendrites of STN neurons during spontaneous firing and their accumulation during driven firing. We compared these to the time course and accumulation of AHP currents using whole-cell and perforated patch recordings. During spontaneous firing, a rise in free cytoplasmic calcium was seen after each action potential, and decayed with a time constant of about 200 ms in the soma, and 80 ms in the dendrites. At rates higher than 10 Hz, calcium transients accumulated as predicted. In addition, there was a slow calcium transient not predicted by summation of action potentials that became more pronounced at high firing frequency. Spike AHP currents were measured in voltage clamp as tail currents after 2 ms voltage pulses that triggered action currents. Apamin-sensitive AHP (SK) current was measured by subtraction of tail currents obtained before and after treatment with apamin. SK current peaked between 10 and 15 ms after an action potential, had a decay time constant of about 30 ms, and showed no accumulation. At frequencies between 5 and 200 spikes s(-1), the maximal SK current remained the same as that evoked by a single action potential. AHP current did not have time to decay between action potentials, so at frequencies above 50 spikes s(-1) the apamin-sensitive current was effectively constant. These results are inconsistent with the view that the decay of SK current is governed by calcium dynamics. They

  16. The mutant Moonwalker TRPC3 channel links calcium signaling to lipid metabolism in the developing cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulneva, Anna; Lee, Sheena; Oliver, Peter L; Di Gleria, Katalin; Kessler, Benedikt M; Davies, Kay E; Becker, Esther B E

    2015-07-15

    The Moonwalker (Mwk) mouse is a model of dominantly inherited cerebellar ataxia caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel TRPC3. Here, we report impairments in dendritic growth and synapse formation early on during Purkinje cell development in the Mwk cerebellum that are accompanied by alterations in calcium signaling. To elucidate the molecular effector pathways that regulate Purkinje cell dendritic arborization downstream of mutant TRPC3, we employed transcriptomic analysis of developing Purkinje cells isolated by laser-capture microdissection. We identified significant gene and protein expression changes in molecules involved in lipid metabolism. Consistently, lipid homeostasis in the Mwk cerebellum was found to be disturbed, and treatment of organotypic cerebellar slices with ceramide significantly improved dendritic outgrowth of Mwk Purkinje cells. These findings provide the first mechanistic insights into the TRPC3-dependent mechanisms, by which activated calcium signaling is coupled to lipid metabolism and the regulation of Purkinje cell development in the Mwk cerebellum.

  17. Neuronal processing of noxious thermal stimuli mediated by dendritic Ca(2+) influx in Drosophila somatosensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Shin-Ichiro; Matsubara, Daisuke; Onodera, Koun; Matsuzaki, Masanori; Uemura, Tadashi; Usui, Tadao

    2016-02-15

    Adequate responses to noxious stimuli causing tissue damages are essential for organismal survival. Class IV neurons in Drosophila larvae are polymodal nociceptors responsible for thermal, mechanical, and light sensation. Importantly, activation of Class IV provoked distinct avoidance behaviors, depending on the inputs. We found that noxious thermal stimuli, but not blue light stimulation, caused a unique pattern of Class IV, which were composed of pauses after high-frequency spike trains and a large Ca(2+) rise in the dendrite (the Ca(2+) transient). Both these responses depended on two TRPA channels and the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (L-VGCC), showing that the thermosensation provokes Ca(2+) influx. The precipitous fluctuation of firing rate in Class IV neurons enhanced the robust heat avoidance. We hypothesize that the Ca(2+) influx can be a key signal encoding a specific modality.

  18. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx arising from compartmentalized electrical signals in dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda L Bloodgood

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Excitatory synapses on mammalian principal neurons are typically formed onto dendritic spines, which consist of a bulbous head separated from the parent dendrite by a thin neck. Although activation of voltage-gated channels in the spine and stimulus-evoked constriction of the spine neck can influence synaptic signals, the contribution of electrical filtering by the spine neck to basal synaptic transmission is largely unknown. Here we use spine and dendrite calcium (Ca imaging combined with 2-photon laser photolysis of caged glutamate to assess the impact of electrical filtering imposed by the spine morphology on synaptic Ca transients. We find that in apical spines of CA1 hippocampal neurons, the spine neck creates a barrier to the propagation of current, which causes a voltage drop and results in spatially inhomogeneous activation of voltage-gated Ca channels (VGCCs on a micron length scale. Furthermore, AMPA and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs and NMDARs, respectively that are colocalized on individual spine heads interact to produce two kinetically and mechanistically distinct phases of synaptically evoked Ca influx. Rapid depolarization of the spine triggers a brief and large Ca current whose amplitude is regulated in a graded manner by the number of open AMPARs and whose duration is terminated by the opening of small conductance Ca-activated potassium (SK channels. A slower phase of Ca influx is independent of AMPAR opening and is determined by the number of open NMDARs and the post-stimulus potential in the spine. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx only occurs when AMPARs and NMDARs are coactive within an individual spine. These results demonstrate that the morphology of dendritic spines endows associated synapses with specialized modes of signaling and permits the graded and independent control of multiple phases of synaptic Ca influx.

  19. Differential gating of dendritic spikes by compartmentalized inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Anna Wilmes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Different types of local inhibitory interneurons innervate different dendritic sites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus (Klausberger 2009. What could be the functional role of compartmentalized inhibition? Pyramidal cell dendrites support different forms of active signal propagation, which are important not only for dendritic and neuronal signal processing (Smith et al. 2013, but also for synaptic plasticity. While back-propagating action potentials signal post-synaptic activity to synapses in apical oblique and basal dendrites (Markram et al. 1997, Cho et al. 2006, calcium spikes cause plasticity of distal apical tuft synapses (Golding et al. 2002. Suspiciously, the associated regions of the dendrite are targeted by different interneuron populations. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons typically target the proximal dendritic and somatic parts of the neuron, while somatostatin-positive interneurons target the apical dendrite. The matching compartmentalization in terms of dendritic spikes and inhibitory control suggests that inhibition could differentially regulate different dendritic spikes and thereby introduce a compartment-specific modulation of synaptic plasticity. We evaluate this hypothesis in a biophysical multi-compartment model of a pyramidal neuron, receiving shunting inhibition at different locations on the dendrite. The model shows that, first, inhibition can gate dendritic spikes in an all-or-none manner. Second, spatially selective inhibition can individually suppress back-propagating action potentials and calcium spikes, thereby allowing a compartment-specific switch for synaptic plasticity. In our model, proximal inhibition on the apical dendrite eliminated both the back-propagating action potential and the calcium spike, thus influencing plasticity in the whole apical dendrite. Distal apical inhibition could selectively affect calcium spikes and thus distal plasticity, without suppressing back­propagation of action

  20. Spatiotemporal Progression of Microcalcification in the Hippocampal CA1 Region following Transient Forebrain Ischemia in Rats: An Ultrastructural Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Ryong Riew

    Full Text Available Calcification in areas of neuronal degeneration is a common finding in several neuropathological disorders including ischemic insults. Here, we performed a detailed examination of the onset and spatiotemporal profile of calcification in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, where neuronal death has been observed after transient forebrain ischemia. Histopathological examinations showed very little alizarin red staining in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer until day 28 after reperfusion, while prominent alizarin red staining was detected in CA1 dendritic subfields, particularly in the stratum radiatum, by 14 days after reperfusion. Electron microscopy using the osmium/potassium dichromate method and electron probe microanalysis revealed selective calcium deposits within the mitochondria of degenerating dendrites at as early as 7 days after reperfusion, with subsequent complete mineralization occurring throughout the dendrites, which then coalesced to form larger mineral conglomerates with the adjacent calcifying neurites by 14 days after reperfusion. Large calcifying deposits were frequently observed at 28 days after reperfusion, when they were closely associated with or completely engulfed by astrocytes. In contrast, no prominent calcification was observed in the somata of CA1 pyramidal neurons showing the characteristic features of necrotic cell death after ischemia, although what appeared to be calcified mitochondria were noted in some degenerated neurons that became dark and condensed. Thus, our data indicate that intrahippocampal calcification after ischemic insults initially occurs within the mitochondria of degenerating dendrites, which leads to the extensive calcification that is associated with ischemic injuries. These findings suggest that in degenerating neurons, the calcified mitochondria in the dendrites, rather than in the somata, may serve as the nidus for further calcium precipitation in the ischemic hippocampus.

  1. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment - PVA Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), flown on three Space Shuttle missions, is yielding new insights into virtually all industrially relevant metal and alloy forming operations. IDGE used transparent organic liquids that form dendrites (treelike structures) similar to those inside metal alloys. Comparing Earth-based and space-based dendrite growth velocity, tip size and shape provides a better understanding of the fundamentals of dentritic growth, including gravity's effects. Shalowgraphic images of pivalic acid (PVA) dendrites forming from the melt show the subtle but distinct effects of gravity-driven heat convection on dentritic growth. In orbit, the dendrite grows as its latent heat is liberated by heat conduction. This yields a blunt dendrite tip. On Earth, heat is carried away by both conduction and gravity-driven convection. This yields a sharper dendrite tip. In addition, under terrestrial conditions, the sidebranches growing in the direction of gravity are augmented as gravity helps carry heat out of the way of the growing sidebranches as opposed to microgravity conditions where no augmentation takes place. IDGE was developed by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and NASA/Glenn Research Center. Advanced follow-on experiments are being developed for flight on the International Space Station. Photo Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center

  2. CTAB-Influenced Electrochemical Dissolution of Silver Dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Regan, Colm; Zhu, Xi; Zhong, Jun; Anand, Utkarsh; Lu, Jingyu; Su, Haibin; Mirsaidov, Utkur

    2016-04-19

    Dendrite formation on the electrodes of a rechargeable battery during the charge-discharge cycle limits its capacity and application due to short-circuits and potential ignition. However, understanding of the underlying dendrite growth and dissolution mechanisms is limited. Here, the electrochemical growth and dissolution of silver dendrites on platinum electrodes immersed in an aqueous silver nitrate (AgNO3) electrolyte solution was investigated using in situ liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The dissolution of Ag dendrites in an AgNO3 solution with added cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant was compared to the dissolution of Ag dendrites in a pure aqueous AgNO3 solution. Significantly, when CTAB was added, dendrite dissolution proceeded in a step-by-step manner, resulting in nanoparticle formation and transient microgrowth stages due to Ostwald ripening. This resulted in complete dissolution of dendrites and "cleaning" of the cell of any silver metal. This is critical for practical battery applications because "dead" lithium is known to cause short circuits and high-discharge rates. In contrast to this, in a pure aqueous AgNO3 solution, without surfactant, dendrites dissolved incompletely back into solution, leaving behind minute traces of disconnected silver particles. Finally, a mechanism for the CTAB-influenced dissolution of silver dendrites was proposed based on electrical field dependent binding energy of CTA(+) to silver.

  3. A highly sensitive fluorescent indicator dye for calcium imaging of neural activity in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Mayumi; Takeuchi, Atsuya; Hashizume, Miki; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kano, Masanobu

    2014-06-01

    Calcium imaging of individual neurons is widely used for monitoring their activity in vitro and in vivo. Synthetic fluorescent calcium indicator dyes are commonly used, but the resulting calcium signals sometimes suffer from a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Therefore, it is difficult to detect signals caused by single action potentials (APs) particularly from neurons in vivo. Here we showed that a recently developed calcium indicator dye, Cal-520, is sufficiently sensitive to reliably detect single APs both in vitro and in vivo. In neocortical neurons, calcium signals were linearly correlated with the number of APs, and the SNR was > 6 for in vitro slice preparations and > 1.6 for in vivo anesthetised mice. In cerebellar Purkinje cells, dendritic calcium transients evoked by climbing fiber inputs were clearly observed in anesthetised mice with a high SNR and fast decay time. These characteristics of Cal-520 are a great advantage over those of Oregon Green BAPTA-1, the most commonly used calcium indicator dye, for monitoring the activity of individual neurons both in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Loss of Dendritic Complexity Precedes Neurodegeneration in a Mouse Model with Disrupted Mitochondrial Distribution in Mature Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo López-Doménech

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Correct mitochondrial distribution is critical for satisfying local energy demands and calcium buffering requirements and supporting key cellular processes. The mitochondrially targeted proteins Miro1 and Miro2 are important components of the mitochondrial transport machinery, but their specific roles in neuronal development, maintenance, and survival remain poorly understood. Using mouse knockout strategies, we demonstrate that Miro1, as opposed to Miro2, is the primary regulator of mitochondrial transport in both axons and dendrites. Miro1 deletion leads to depletion of mitochondria from distal dendrites but not axons, accompanied by a marked reduction in dendritic complexity. Disrupting postnatal mitochondrial distribution in vivo by deleting Miro1 in mature neurons causes a progressive loss of distal dendrites and compromises neuronal survival. Thus, the local availability of mitochondrial mass is critical for generating and sustaining dendritic arbors, and disruption of mitochondrial distribution in mature neurons is associated with neurodegeneration.

  5. Cellular and subcellular localization of the neuron-specific plasma membrane calcium ATPase PMCA1a in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Katharine A; Bushong, Eric A; Mauer, Amy S; Strehler, Emanuel E; Weinberg, Richard J; Burette, Alain C

    2010-08-15

    Regulation of intracellular calcium is crucial both for proper neuronal function and survival. By coupling ATP hydrolysis with Ca(2+) extrusion from the cell, the plasma membrane calcium-dependent ATPases (PMCAs) play an essential role in controlling intracellular calcium levels in neurons. In contrast to PMCA2 and PMCA3, which are expressed in significant levels only in the brain and a few other tissues, PMCA1 is ubiquitously distributed, and is thus widely believed to play a "housekeeping" function in mammalian cells. Whereas the PMCA1b splice variant is predominant in most tissues, an alternative variant, PMCA1a, is the major form of PMCA1 in the adult brain. Here, we use immunohistochemistry to analyze the cellular and subcellular distribution of PMCA1a in the brain. We show that PMCA1a is not ubiquitously expressed, but rather is confined to neurons, where it concentrates in the plasma membrane of somata, dendrites, and spines. Thus, rather than serving a general housekeeping function, our data suggest that PMCA1a is a calcium pump specialized for neurons, where it may contribute to the modulation of somatic and dendritic Ca(2+) transients.

  6. Calcium signaling-mediated endogenous protection of cell energetics in the acutely diabetic myocardium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ziegelhoffer, Attila; Waczulikova, Iveta; Ferko, Miroslav; Kincelova, Dana; Ziegelhoffer, Barbara; Ravingerova, Tana; Cagalinec, Michal; Schonburg, Markus; Ziegelhoeffer, Tibor; Sikurova, Libusa; Ulicna, Olga; Mujkosova, Jana

    2009-01-01

    In acute diabetic myocardium, calcium signals propagated by intracellular calcium transients participate in the protection of cell energetics via upregulating the formation of mitochondrial energy transition pores (ETP...

  7. Free dendritic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dendritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical 'dendrite problem'. Great strides have been taken in recent years in both the theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status. The development of this field will be sketched, showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) were sufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of 'maximum velocity' was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip. The overall development of cast microstructures, such as equiaxed zone formation, rapidly solidified microstructures, etc., also seems to contain additional non-deterministic features which lie outside the current theories discussed here.

  8. Dendritic polyurea polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuerp, David; Bruchmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic polymers, subsuming dendrimers as well as hyperbranched or highly branched polymers are well established in the field of polymer chemistry. This review article focuses on urea based dendritic polymers and summarizes their synthetic routes through both isocyanate and isocyanate-free processes. Furthermore, this article highlights applications where dendritic polyureas show their specific chemical and physical potential. For these purposes scientific publications as well as patent literature are investigated to generate a comprehensive overview on this topic.

  9. Channelopathies and dendritic dysfunction in fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brager, Darrin H; Johnston, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Dendritic spine abnormalities and the metabotropic glutamate receptor theory put the focus squarely on synapses and protein synthesis as the cellular locus of fragile X syndrome. Synapses however, are only partly responsible for information processing in neuronal networks. Neurotransmitter triggered excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) are shaped and integrated by dendritic voltage-gated ion channels. These EPSPs, and in some cases the resultant dendritic spikes, are further modified by dendritic voltage-gated ion channels as they propagate to the soma. If the resultant somatic depolarization is large enough, action potential(s) will be triggered and propagate both orthodromically down the axon, where it may trigger neurotransmitter release, and antidromically back into the dendritic tree, where it can activate and modify dendritic voltage-gated and receptor activated ion channels. Several channelopathies, both soma-dendritic (L-type calcium channels, Slack potassium channels, h-channels, A-type potassium channels) and axo-somatic (BK channels and delayed rectifier potassium channels) were identified in the fmr1-/y mouse model of fragile X syndrome. Pathological function of these channels will strongly influence the excitability of individual neurons as well as overall network function. In this chapter we discuss the role of voltage-gated ion channels in neuronal processing and describe how identified channelopathies in models of fragile X syndrome may play a role in dendritic pathophysiology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-09

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  11. The "conscious pilot"-dendritic synchrony moves through the brain to mediate consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameroff, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive brain functions including sensory processing and control of behavior are understood as "neurocomputation" in axonal-dendritic synaptic networks of "integrate-and-fire" neurons. Cognitive neurocomputation with consciousness is accompanied by 30- to 90-Hz gamma synchrony electroencephalography (EEG), and non-conscious neurocomputation is not. Gamma synchrony EEG derives largely from neuronal groups linked by dendritic-dendritic gap junctions, forming transient syncytia ("dendritic webs") in input/integration layers oriented sideways to axonal-dendritic neurocomputational flow. As gap junctions open and close, a gamma-synchronized dendritic web can rapidly change topology and move through the brain as a spatiotemporal envelope performing collective integration and volitional choices correlating with consciousness. The "conscious pilot" is a metaphorical description for a mobile gamma-synchronized dendritic web as vehicle for a conscious agent/pilot which experiences and assumes control of otherwise non-conscious auto-pilot neurocomputation.

  12. Electrophysiological localization of distinct calcium potentials at selective somatodendritic sites in the substantia nigra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, J; Nedergaard, S; Greenfield, S A

    1992-01-01

    in the rostral substantia nigra, the dendrites are shown to be the origin of classic low-threshold and high-threshold type calcium potentials: indeed the high-threshold conductance appears to be exclusively dendritic. By contrast, in a second, more caudally located cell type, which discharges rhythmically......, a high-threshold calcium spike is located principally in the cell body. The differential localization of these calcium conductances in sub-populations of neurons is likely to determine the functions for the calcium responses in each type of neuron, and moreover highlight the dendrites as dynamic...... and selective components in the physiology of the substantia nigra. The presence, for example, of the high-threshold calcium conductance in the dendrites of only one class of neuron suggests that this sub-population plays a prominent role in non-classical phenomena of dendritic release of a variety of chemical...

  13. Ca2+ imaging of mouse neocortical interneurone dendrites: Ia-type K+ channels control action potential backpropagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Jesse H; Tamas, Gabor; Yuste, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    GABAergic interneurones are essential in cortical processing, yet the functional properties of their dendrites are still poorly understood. In this first study, we combined two-photon calcium imaging with whole-cell recording and anatomical reconstructions to examine the calcium dynamics during action potential (AP) backpropagation in three types of V1 supragranular interneurones: parvalbumin-positive fast spikers (FS), calretinin-positive irregular spikers (IS), and adapting cells (AD). Somatically generated APs actively backpropagated into the dendritic tree and evoked instantaneous calcium accumulations. Although voltage-gated calcium channels were expressed throughout the dendritic arbor, calcium signals during backpropagation of both single APs and AP trains were restricted to proximal dendrites. This spatial control of AP backpropagation was mediated by Ia-type potassium currents and could be mitigated by by previous synaptic activity. Further, we observed supralinear summation of calcium signals in synaptically activated dendritic compartments. Together, these findings indicate that in interneurons, dendritic AP propagation is synaptically regulated. We propose that interneurones have a perisomatic and a distal dendritic functional compartment, with different integrative functions. PMID:12844506

  14. Large-Scale mRNA Transfection of Dendritic Cells by Electroporation in Continuous Flow Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmeczi, Dávid; Hansen, Thomas Steen; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is well established for transient mRNA transfection of many mammalian cells, including immune cells such as dendritic cells used in cancer immunotherapy. Therapeutic application requires methods to efficiently electroporate and transfect millions of immune cells in a fast process...... the instrumentation and methods needed for the efficient transfection by electroporation of millions of dendritic cells in one continuous flow process....... with high cell survival. Continuous flow of suspended dendritic cells through a channel incorporating spatially separated microporous meshes with a synchronized electrical pulsing sequence can yield dendritic cell transfection rates of >75 % with survival rates of >90 %. This chapter describes...

  15. 钾通道阻断剂4-氨基吡啶诱导海马CA1锥体神经元钙瞬变%Calcium transient of CA1 pyramidal neurons induced by potassium blocker 4-aminopyridine in acute hippocampal slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏涛; 丛文东; 廖卫平

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the calcium transient of CA1 pyramidal neurons induced by potassium blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) in acute hippocampal slices to explore the relation between potassium channel function and calcium transient, and their mechanism. Methods Fluorescent probe was employed to mark the hippocampai neurons in acute brain slices of rats; confocal microscopy was used to perform calcium imaging to observe the influences of different concentrations of 4-AP and perfusate with/without calcium on calcium transient of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Results The response of [Ca2+]I to lower concentration of 4-AP (<15 mmol/L) was in a dose-dependent manner (r2=0.910, P=0.000); the higher the concentration of 4-AP (20-80 mmol/L), the lower the peak level of calcium transient. The latency and amplitude of calcium transient induced by 4-AP were obviously reduced when the extracellular condition was switched to an absence of calcium, which was significantly different as compared with that with calcium (P<0.05). Conclusion Blockade of potassium channels with 4-AP can increase [Ca2+]I in the hippocampal pyramidal neurons of acute slices. The increase of [Ca2+]1 to 4-AP could be ascribe to calcium release from intracellular stores and calcium influx from extracellular matrix.%目的 研究4-氨基吡啶(4-AP)诱导的急性脑片海马CA1锥体神经元钙瞬变现象,探讨钾通道功能与钙瞬变的关系及可能机制.方法 荧光探针标记正常大鼠急性脑片海马神经元.共聚焦显微镜技术进行钙成像,观察不同浓度4-AP及细胞灌流液条件对神经元钙瞬变的影响.结果 低浓度(<15 mmol/L)4-AP诱导的钙瞬变峰值与剂量呈线性相关(r2=0.910,P=0.000),高浓度(20~80 mmol/L)4-AP诱导的钙瞬变峰值随浓度增高而下降.在无钙灌流液条件下,4-AP诱导的钙瞬变峰值水平下降,达峰时间延长,与含钙灌流液比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 4-AP可诱导急性脑片海马CA1锥体神经

  16. Novel vistas of calcium-mediated signalling in the thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, Hans-Christian; Munsch, Thomas; Budde, Thomas

    2004-05-01

    Traditionally, the role of calcium ions (Ca(2+)) in thalamic neurons has been viewed as that of electrical charge carriers. Recent experimental findings in thalamic cells have only begun to unravel a highly complex Ca(2+) signalling network that exploits extra- and intracellular Ca(2+) sources. In thalamocortical relay neurons, interactions between T-type Ca(2+) channel activation, Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity and the hyperpolarization-activated cation current ( I(h)) regulate oscillatory burst firing during periods of sleep and generalized epilepsy, while a functional triad between Ca(2+) influx through high-voltage-activated (most likely L-type) Ca(2+) channels, Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release via ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and a repolarizing mechanism (possibly via K(+) channels of the BK(Ca) type) supports tonic spike firing as required during wakefulness. The mechanisms seem to be located mostly at dendritic and somatic sites, respectively. One functional compartment involving local GABAergic interneurons in certain thalamic relay nuclei is the glomerulus, in which the dendritic release of GABA is regulated by Ca(2+) influx via canonical transient receptor potential channels (TRPC), thereby presumably enabling transmitters of extrathalamic input systems that are coupled to phospholipase C (PLC)-activating receptors to control feed-forward inhibition in the thalamus. Functional interplay between T-type Ca(2+) channels in dendrites and the A-type K(+) current controls burst firing, contributing to the range of oscillatory activity observed in these interneurons. GABAergic neurons in the reticular thalamic (RT) nucleus recruit a specific set of Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms for the generation of rhythmic burst firing, of which a particular T-type Ca(2+) channel in the dendritic membrane, the Ca(2+)-dependent activation of non-specific cation channels ( I(CAN)) and of K(+) channels (SK(Ca) type) are key players. Glial Ca(2+) signalling in

  17. Optimization principles of dendritic structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borst Alexander

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendrites are the most conspicuous feature of neurons. However, the principles determining their structure are poorly understood. By employing cable theory and, for the first time, graph theory, we describe dendritic anatomy solely on the basis of optimizing synaptic efficacy with minimal resources. Results We show that dendritic branching topology can be well described by minimizing the path length from the neuron's dendritic root to each of its synaptic inputs while constraining the total length of wiring. Tapering of diameter toward the dendrite tip – a feature of many neurons – optimizes charge transfer from all dendritic synapses to the dendritic root while housekeeping the amount of dendrite volume. As an example, we show how dendrites of fly neurons can be closely reconstructed based on these two principles alone.

  18. Villin promoter-mediated transgenic expression of transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6) increases intestinal calcium absorption in wild-type and vitamin D receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Min; Li, Qiang; Johnson, Robert; Fleet, James C

    2012-10-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6) is an apical membrane calcium (Ca) channel in the small intestine proposed to be essential for vitamin D-regulated intestinal Ca absorption. Recent studies have challenged the proposed role for TRPV6 in Ca absorption. We directly tested intestinal TRPV6 function in Ca and bone metabolism in wild-type (WT) and vitamin D receptor knockout (VDRKO) mice. TRPV6 transgenic mice (TG) were made with intestinal epithelium-specific expression of a 3X Flag-tagged human TRPV6 protein. TG and VDRKO mice were crossed to make TG-VDRKO mice. Ca and bone metabolism was examined in WT, TG, VDRKO, and TG-VDRKO mice. TG mice developed hypercalcemia and soft tissue calcification on a chow diet. In TG mice fed a 0.25% Ca diet, Ca absorption was more than three-fold higher and femur bone mineral density (BMD) was 26% higher than WT. Renal 1α hydroxylase (CYP27B1) mRNA and intestinal expression of the natural mouse TRPV6 gene were reduced to intestine calbindin-D(9k) expression was elevated >15 times in TG mice. TG-VDRKO mice had high Ca absorption that prevented the low serum Ca, high renal CYP27B1 mRNA, low BMD, and abnormal bone microarchitecture seen in VDRKO mice. In addition, small intestinal calbindin D(9K) mRNA and protein levels were elevated in TG-VDRKO. Transgenic TRPV6 expression in intestine is sufficient to increase Ca absorption and bone density, even in VDRKO mice. VDR-independent upregulation of intestinal calbindin D(9k) in TG-VDRKO suggests this protein may buffer intracellular Ca during Ca absorption. © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. RAB-10 Regulates Dendritic Branching by Balancing Dendritic Transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin A Taylor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The construction of a large dendritic arbor requires robust growth and the precise delivery of membrane and protein cargoes to specific subcellular regions of the developing dendrite. How the microtubule-based vesicular trafficking and sorting systems are regulated to distribute these dendritic development factors throughout the dendrite is not well understood. Here we identify the small GTPase RAB-10 and the exocyst complex as critical regulators of dendrite morphogenesis and patterning in the C. elegans sensory neuron PVD. In rab-10 mutants, PVD dendritic branches are reduced in the posterior region of the cell but are excessive in the distal anterior region of the cell. We also demonstrate that the dendritic branch distribution within PVD depends on the balance between the molecular motors kinesin-1/UNC-116 and dynein, and we propose that RAB-10 regulates dendrite morphology by balancing the activity of these motors to appropriately distribute branching factors, including the transmembrane receptor DMA-1.

  20. Spatial training preserves associative memory capacity with augmentation of dendrite ramification and spine generation in Tg2576 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xia; Chai, Gao-Shang; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Hu, Yu; Li, Xiao-Guang; Ma, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2015-03-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and there is currently no efficient cure for this devastating disease. Cognitive stimulation can delay memory loss during aging and in patients with mild cognitive impairment. In 3 × Tg-AD mice, training decreased the neuropathologies with transient amelioration of memory decline. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the learning-improved memory capacity are poorly understood. Here, we found in Tg2576 mice spatial training in Morris water maze (MWM) remarkably improved the subsequent associative memory acquisition detected by contextual fear conditioning. We also found that spatial training enhanced long term potentiation, dendrite ramification and spine generation in hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 neurons at 24 h after the training. In the molecular level, the MWM training remarkably activated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) with elevation of glutamate AMPA receptor GluA1 subunit (GluA1), postsynaptic density protein 93 (PSD93) and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) in the hippocampus. Finally, the training also significantly ameliorated AD-like tau and amyloid pathologies. We conclude that spatial training in MWM preserves associative memory capacity in Tg2576 mice, and the mechanisms involve augmentation of dendrite ramification and spine generation in hippocampus.

  1. Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This video, captured during the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) flown on STS-87 as a part of the fourth United States Microgravity payload, shows the growth of a dendrite, and the surface solidification that occurred on the front and back windows of the growth chamber. Dendrites are tiny, tree like structures that form as metals solidify.

  2. Spiny Neurons of Amygdala, Striatum and Cortex Use Dendritic Plateau Potentials to Detect Network UP States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina D Oikonomou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Spiny neurons of amygdala, striatum, and cerebral cortex share four interesting features: [1] they are the most abundant cell type within their respective brain area, [2] covered by thousands of thorny protrusions (dendritic spines, [3] possess high levels of dendritic NMDA conductances, and [4] experience sustained somatic depolarizations in vivo and in vitro (UP states. In all spiny neurons of the forebrain, adequate glutamatergic inputs generate dendritic plateau potentials (dendritic UP states characterized by (i fast rise, (ii plateau phase lasting several hundred milliseconds and (iii abrupt decline at the end of the plateau phase. The dendritic plateau potential propagates towards the cell body decrementally to induce a long-lasting (longer than 100 ms, most often 200 – 800 ms steady depolarization (~20 mV amplitude, which resembles a neuronal UP state. Based on voltage-sensitive dye imaging, the plateau depolarization in the soma is precisely time-locked to the regenerative plateau potential taking place in the dendrite. The somatic plateau rises after the onset of the dendritic voltage transient and collapses with the breakdown of the dendritic plateau depolarization. We hypothesize that neuronal UP states in vivo reflect the occurrence of dendritic plateau potentials (dendritic UP states. We propose that the somatic voltage waveform during a neuronal UP state is determined by dendritic plateau potentials. A mammalian spiny neuron uses dendritic plateau potentials to detect and transform coherent network activity into a ubiquitous neuronal UP state. The biophysical properties of dendritic plateau potentials allow neurons to quickly attune to the ongoing network activity, as well as secure the stable amplitudes of successive UP states.

  3. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry eSamigullin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 рА and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 µM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  4. Transport Processes in Dendritic Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Free dentritic growth refers to the unconstrained development of crystals within a supercooled melt, which is the classical dendrite problem. The development of theoretical understanding of dendritic growth and its experimental status is sketched showing that transport theory and interfacial thermodynamics (capillarity theory) are insufficient ingredients to develop a truly predictive model of dendrite formation. The convenient, but incorrect, notion of maximum velocity was used for many years to estimate the behavior of dendritic transformations until supplanted by modern dynamic stability theory. The proper combinations of transport theory and morphological stability seem to be able to predict the salient aspects of dendritic growth, especially in the neighborhood of the tip.

  5. Transient osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korompilias, Anastasios V; Karantanas, Apostolos H; Lykissas, Marios G; Beris, Alexandros E

    2008-08-01

    Transient osteoporosis is characterized primarily by bone marrow edema. The disease most commonly affects the hip, knee, and ankle in middle-aged men. Its cause remains unknown. The hallmark that separates transient osteoporosis from other conditions presenting with a bone marrow edema pattern is its self-limited nature. Laboratory tests usually do not contribute to the diagnosis. Plain radiographs may reveal regional osseous demineralization. Magnetic resonance imaging is used primarily for early diagnosis and monitoring disease progression. Early differentiation from more aggressive conditions with long-term sequelae is essential to avoid unnecessary treatment. Clinical entities such as transient osteoporosis of the hip and regional migratory osteoporosis are spontaneously resolving conditions. However, early differential diagnosis and surgical treatment are crucial for the patient with osteonecrosis of the hip or knee.

  6. Modification of dendritic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria-Velasco, Alfredo; del Angel, Alma Rosa; Gonzalez-Burgos, Ignacio

    2002-01-01

    Since 1890 Ramón y Cajal strongly defended the theory that dendrites and their processes and spines had a function of not just nutrient transport to the cell body, but they had an important conductive role in neural impulse transmission. He extensively discussed and supported this theory in the Volume 1 of his extraordinary book Textura del Sistema Nervioso del Hombre y de los Vertebrados. Also, Don Santiago significantly contributed to a detailed description of the various neural components of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex during development. Extensive investigation has been done in the last Century related to the functional role of these complex brain regions, and their association with learning, memory and some limbic functions. Likewise, the organization and expression of neuropsychological qualities such as memory, exploratory behavior and spatial orientation, among others, depend on the integrity and adequate functional activity of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. It is known that brain serotonin synthesis and release depend directly and proportionally on the availability of its precursor, tryptophan (TRY). By using a chronic TRY restriction model in rats, we studied their place learning ability in correlation with the dendritic spine density of pyramidal neurons in field CA1 of the hippocampus during postnatal development. We have also reported alterations in the maturation pattern of the ability for spontaneous alternation and task performance evaluating short-term memory, as well as adverse effects on the density of dendritic spines of hippocampal CA1 field pyramidal neurons and on the dendritic arborization and the number of dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons from the third layer of the prefrontal cortex using the same model of TRY restriction. The findings obtained in these studies employing a modified Golgi method, can be interpreted as a trans-synaptic plastic response due to understimulation of serotoninergic receptors located in the

  7. State-dependent firing determines intrinsic dendritic Ca2+ signaling in thalamocortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errington, Adam C; Renger, John J; Uebele, Victor N; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    Activity-dependent dendritic Ca(2+) signals play a critical role in multiple forms of nonlinear cellular output and plasticity. In thalamocortical neurons, despite the well established spatial separation of sensory and cortical inputs onto proximal and distal dendrites, respectively, little is known about the spatiotemporal dynamics of intrinsic dendritic Ca(2+) signaling during the different state-dependent firing patterns that are characteristic of these neurons. Here we demonstrate that T-type Ca(2+) channels are expressed throughout the entire dendritic tree of rat thalamocortical neurons and that they mediate regenerative propagation of low threshold spikes, typical of, but not exclusive to, sleep states, resulting in global dendritic Ca(2+) influx. In contrast, actively backpropagating action potentials, typical of wakefulness, result in smaller Ca(2+) influxes that can temporally summate to produce dendritic Ca(2+) accumulations that are linearly related to firing frequency but spatially confined to proximal dendritic regions. Furthermore, dendritic Ca(2+) transients evoked by both action potentials and low-threshold spikes are shaped by Ca(2+) uptake by sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases but do not rely on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Our data demonstrate that thalamocortical neurons are endowed with intrinsic dendritic Ca(2+) signaling properties that are spatially and temporally modified in a behavioral state-dependent manner and suggest that backpropagating action potentials faithfully inform proximal sensory but not distal corticothalamic synapses of neuronal output, whereas corticothalamic synapses only "detect" Ca(2+) signals associated with low-threshold spikes.

  8. Increased rhythmicity in hypertensive arterial smooth muscle is linked to transient receptor potential canonical channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Dachun; Ma, Shuangtao

    2010-01-01

    Vasomotion describes oscillations of arterial vascular tone due to synchronized changes of intracellular calcium concentrations. Since increased calcium influx into vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) has been associated with variances of transient receptor...

  9. Ca2+ imaging of mouse neocortical interneurone dendrites: Contribution of Ca2+-permeable AMPA and NMDA receptors to subthreshold Ca2+dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Jesse H; Yuste, Rafael; Tamas, Gabor

    2003-01-01

    In this second study, we have combined two-photon calcium imaging with whole-cell recording and anatomic reconstructions to directly characterize synaptically evoked calcium signals in three types of mouse V1 supragranular interneurones: parvalbumin-positive fast spikers (FS), calretinin-positive irregular spikers (IS), and adapting cells (AD). We observed that subthreshold synaptic activation evoked calcium signals locally restricted to individual dendritic compartments. These signals were mediated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in AD and IS cells, whereas in FS cells, calcium-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) provided an additional and kinetically distinct influx. Furthermore, even a single, subthreshold synaptic activation evoked a larger dendritic calcium influx than backpropagating action potentials. Our results demonstrate that NMDARs dominate subthreshold calcium dynamics in interneurones and reveal the functional contribution of CP-AMPARs to a specific subclass of cortical interneurone. These data highlight different strategies in dendritic signal processing by distinct classes of interneurones. PMID:12844507

  10. SK2 channel modulation contributes to compartment-specific dendritic plasticity in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Gen; Piochon, Claire; Adelman, John P; Hansel, Christian

    2012-07-12

    Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (SK channels) modulate excitability and curtail excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in neuronal dendrites. Here, we demonstrate long-lasting plasticity of intrinsic excitability (IE) in dendrites that results from changes in the gain of this regulatory mechanism. Using dendritic patch-clamp recordings from rat cerebellar Purkinje cells, we find that somatic depolarization or parallel fiber (PF) burst stimulation induce long-term amplification of synaptic responses to climbing fiber (CF) or PF stimulation and enhance the amplitude of passively propagated sodium spikes. Dendritic plasticity is mimicked and occluded by the SK channel blocker apamin and is absent in Purkinje cells from SK2 null mice. Triple-patch recordings from two dendritic sites and the soma and confocal calcium imaging studies show that local stimulation limits dendritic plasticity to the activated compartment of the dendrite. This plasticity mechanism allows Purkinje cells to adjust the SK2-mediated control of dendritic excitability in an activity-dependent manner.

  11. Astrocyte calcium signaling: the third wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargani, Narges; Attwell, David

    2016-02-01

    The discovery that transient elevations of calcium concentration occur in astrocytes, and release 'gliotransmitters' which act on neurons and vascular smooth muscle, led to the idea that astrocytes are powerful regulators of neuronal spiking, synaptic plasticity and brain blood flow. These findings were challenged by a second wave of reports that astrocyte calcium transients did not mediate functions attributed to gliotransmitters and were too slow to generate blood flow increases. Remarkably, the tide has now turned again: the most important calcium transients occur in fine astrocyte processes not resolved in earlier studies, and new mechanisms have been discovered by which astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i is raised and exerts its effects. Here we review how this third wave of discoveries has changed our understanding of astrocyte calcium signaling and its consequences for neuronal function.

  12. Calcium signaling-mediated endogenous protection of cell energetics in the acutely diabetic myocardiumThis article is one of a selection of papers published in a special issue on Advances in Cardiovascular Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cagalinec, Michal; Ziegelhoeffer, Tibor; Mujkošová, Jana; Ziegelhöffer, Barbara; Waczulíková, Iveta; Ziegelhöffer, Attila; Šikurová, Libuša; Kincelová, Dana; Schönburg, Markus; Uli čná, O ľga; Ravingerová, Tá ňa; Ferko, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    In acute diabetic myocardium, calcium signals propagated by intracellular calcium transients participate in the protection of cell energetics via upregulating the formation of mitochondrial energy transition pores (ETP...

  13. Phase field modeling of dendrite growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutuo ZHANG; Chengzhi WANG; Dianzhong LI; Yiyi LI

    2009-01-01

    Single dendrite and multi-dendrite growth for A1-2 mol pct Si alloy during isothermal solidification are simulated by phase field method. In the case of single equiaxed dendrite growth, the secondary and the necking phenomenon can be observed. For multi-dendrite growth, there exists the competitive growth among the dendrites dur-ing solidification. As solidification proceeds, growing and coarsening of the primary arms occurs, together with the branching and coarsening of the secondary arms.When the diffusion fields of dendrite tips come into contact with those of the branches growing from the neighboring dendrites, the dendrites stop growing and being to ripen and thicken.

  14. Clinical Analysis the Clopidogrel Combination With Atorvastatin Calcium in Treatment the Transient Ischemic Attack%氯吡格雷联合阿托伐他汀钙治疗短暂性脑缺血发作的临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩英姬; 宋东日

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨短暂性脑缺血发作患者采用氯吡格雷与阿托伐他汀钙联合治疗的效果及对其斑块面积的影响。方法选取我院2015年1月~2015年9月收取的短暂性脑缺血发作患者87例进行临床对照性研究。结果研究组治疗总有效率90.9%,高于对照组的76.7%,治疗后斑块面积小于对照组(P<0.05)。结论氯吡格雷与阿托伐他汀钙联合治疗短暂性脑缺血发作,可以提高治疗效果,缩减斑块面积。%Objective To study the patients with transient ischemic attack with clopidogrel and the effect of combination treatment with atorvastatin calcium and the effects on the plaque area.MethodsSelected 87 patients with transient ischemic attack in controlled clinical studies from January 2015 to September 2015 in our hospital. ResultsThe sutdy group therapy effect rate was 90.9%, higher than the control group 76.7%, plaque area was smaller than the control group after treatment (P<0.05). Conclusion Clopidogrel and combination treatment with atorvastatin calcium transient ischemic attack, can improve the treatment effect, reduce plaque area.

  15. Transformation of odor selectivity from projection neurons to single mushroom body neurons mapped with dual-color calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Li, Yiming; Lei, Zhengchang; Wang, Kaiyu; Guo, Aike

    2013-07-16

    Although the response properties of most neurons are, to a large extent, determined by the presynaptic inputs that they receive, comprehensive functional characterization of the presynaptic inputs of a single neuron remains elusive. Toward this goal, we introduce a dual-color calcium imaging approach that simultaneously monitors the responses of a single postsynaptic neuron together with its presynaptic axon terminal inputs in vivo. As a model system, we applied the strategy to the feed-forward connections from the projection neurons (PNs) to the Kenyon cells (KCs) in the mushroom body of Drosophila and functionally mapped essentially all PN inputs for some of the KCs. We found that the output of single KCs could be well predicted by a linear summation of the PN input signals, indicating that excitatory PN inputs play the major role in generating odor-selective responses in KCs. When odors failed to activate KC output, local calcium transients restricted to individual postsynaptic sites could be observed in the KC dendrites. The response amplitudes of the local transients often correlated linearly with the presynaptic response amplitudes, allowing direct assay of the strength of single synaptic sites. Furthermore, we found a scaling relationship between the total number of PN terminals that a single KC received and the average synaptic strength of these PN-KC synapses. Our strategy provides a unique perspective on the process of information transmission and integration in a model neural circuit and may be broadly applicable for the study of the origin of neuronal response properties.

  16. Acute calcium homeostasis in MHS swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, G G; Morrell, D F; Brain, V; Jaros, G G

    1987-07-01

    To elucidate a pathogenesis for the reduction in bone calcium content observed in MHS individuals, we studied the acute calcium homeostasis of MHS swine. This was achieved by the serial measurement, with a calcium selective electrode, of calcium transients in Landrace MHS (five) and control Landrace/large white cross MH negative (five) swine following IV bolus injection of calcium gluconate 0.1 mmol X kg-1--a dose which induced an acute 45 per cent increase in plasma ionised calcium. Experimental animals were anaesthetised with ketamine 10 mg X kg-1 IM, thiopentone (intermittent divided doses) 15-25 mg X kg-1 (total) IV and N2O/O2 (FIO2 0.3) by IPPV to maintain a normal blood gas, acid/base state. The plasma ionised calcium decay curve observed in MHS swine did not differ from that of control normal swine. Further it was noted that the induced acute rise in plasma ionised calcium failed to trigger the MH syndrome in any MHS swine. It is concluded that the mechanisms of acute calcium homeostasis in MHS swine are normal. An explanation for the reduction in bone calcium content observed in MHS individuals must be sought, therefore, through study of the slow long-term component of the calcium regulatory process. In addition, the conventional strictures placed on the use, in MHS patients, of calcium gluconate are called in question.

  17. Myoscape controls cardiac calcium cycling and contractility via regulation of L-type calcium channel surface expression

    OpenAIRE

    Eden, Matthias; Meder, Benjamin; V?lkers, Mirko; Poomvanicha, Montatip; Domes, Katrin; Branchereau, M.; Marck, P.; Will, Rainer; Bernt, Alexander; Rangrez, Ashraf; Busch, Matthias; ,; Adler, Thure; Busch, Dirk H.; Antonio Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Calcium signalling plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Here we describe a cardiac protein named Myoscape/FAM40B/STRIP2, which directly interacts with the L-type calcium channel. Knockdown of Myoscape in cardiomyocytes decreases calcium transients associated with smaller Ca2+ amplitudes and a lower diastolic Ca2+ content. Likewise, L-type calcium channel currents are significantly diminished on Myoscape ablation, and downregulation of Myoscape significantly reduces cont...

  18. Synaptic integration in tuft dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons: a new unifying principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkum, Matthew E; Nevian, Thomas; Sandler, Maya; Polsky, Alon; Schiller, Jackie

    2009-08-07

    Tuft dendrites are the main target for feedback inputs innervating neocortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons, but their properties remain obscure. We report the existence of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) spikes in the fine distal tuft dendrites that otherwise did not support the initiation of calcium spikes. Both direct measurements and computer simulations showed that NMDA spikes are the dominant mechanism by which distal synaptic input leads to firing of the neuron and provide the substrate for complex parallel processing of top-down input arriving at the tuft. These data lead to a new unifying view of integration in pyramidal neurons in which all fine dendrites, basal and tuft, integrate inputs locally through the recruitment of NMDA receptor channels relative to the fixed apical calcium and axosomatic sodium integration points.

  19. Elongation factor-2 phosphorylation in dendrites and the regulation of dendritic mRNA translation in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher eHeise

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity results in long lasting changes in synaptic structure and function by regulating mRNA translation in dendrites. These activity dependent events yield the synthesis of proteins known to be important for synaptic modifications and diverse forms of synaptic plasticity. Worthy of note, there is accumulating evidence that the eukaryotic Elongation Factor 2 Kinase (eEF2K/eukaryotic Elongation Factor 2 (eEF2 pathway may be strongly involved in this process. Upon activation, eEF2K phosphorylates and thereby inhibits eEF2, resulting in a dramatic reduction of mRNA translation. eEF2K is activated by elevated levels of calcium and binding of Calmodulin (CaM, hence its alternative name calcium/CaM-dependent protein kinase III (CaMKIII. In dendrites, this process depends on glutamate signaling and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR activation. Interestingly, it has been shown that eEF2K can be activated in dendrites by the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR 1/5 signaling, as well. Therefore, neuronal activity can induce local proteomic changes at the postsynapse by altering eEF2K activity. Well-established targets of eEF2K in dendrites include Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc, the alpha subunit of calcium/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (αCaMKII, and Microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B, all of which have well-known functions in different forms of synaptic plasticity.In this review we will give an overview of the involvement of the eEF2K/eEF2 pathway at dendrites in regulating the translation of dendritic mRNA in the context of altered NMDAR- and neuronal activity, and diverse forms of synaptic plasticity, such as metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent-long-term depression (mGluR-LTD. For this, we draw on studies carried out both in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Dendritic Arborization Patterns of Small Juxtaglomerular Cell Subtypes within the Rodent Olfactory Bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywalez, Wolfgang G.; Ona-Jodar, Tiffany; Lukas, Michael; Ninkovic, Jovica; Egger, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    Within the glomerular layer of the rodent olfactory bulb, numerous subtypes of local interneurons contribute to early processing of incoming sensory information. Here we have investigated dopaminergic and other small local juxtaglomerular cells in rats and mice and characterized their dendritic arborization pattern with respect to individual glomeruli by fluorescent labeling via patching and reconstruction of dendrites and glomerular contours from two-photon imaging data. Dopaminergic neurons were identified in a transgenic mouse line where the expression of dopamine transporter (DAT) was labeled with GFP. Among the DAT+ cells we found a small short-axon cell (SAC) subtype featuring hitherto undescribed dendritic specializations. These densely ramifying structures clasped mostly around somata of other juxtaglomerular neurons, which were also small, non-dopaminergic and to a large extent non-GABAergic. Clasping SACs were observed also in wild-type mice and juvenile rats. In DAT+ SAC dendrites, single backpropagating action potentials evoked robust calcium entry throughout both clasping and non-clasping compartments. Besides clasping SACs, most other small neurons either corresponded to the classical periglomerular cell type (PGCs), which was never DAT+, or were undersized cells with a small dendritic tree and low excitability. Aside from the presence of clasps in SAC dendrites, many descriptors of dendritic morphology such as the number of dendrites and the extent of branching were not significantly different between clasping SACs and PGCs. However, a detailed morphometric analysis in relation to glomerular contours revealed that the dendrites of clasping SACs arborized mostly in the juxtaglomerular space and never entered more than one glomerulus (if at all), whereas most PGC dendrites were restricted to their parent glomerulus, similar to the apical tufts of mitral cells. These complementary arborization patterns might underlie a highly complementary functional

  1. Dendritic channelopathies contribute to neocortical and sensory hyperexcitability in Fmr1(-/y) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Bonnan, Audrey; Bony, Guillaume; Ferezou, Isabelle; Pietropaolo, Susanna; Ginger, Melanie; Sans, Nathalie; Rossier, Jean; Oostra, Ben; LeMasson, Gwen; Frick, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Hypersensitivity in response to sensory stimuli and neocortical hyperexcitability are prominent features of Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) and autism spectrum disorders, but little is known about the dendritic mechanisms underlying these phenomena. We found that the primary somatosensory neocortex (S1) was hyperexcited in response to tactile sensory stimulation in Fmr1(-/y) mice. This correlated with neuronal and dendritic hyperexcitability of S1 pyramidal neurons, which affect all major aspects of neuronal computation, from the integration of synaptic input to the generation of action potential output. Using dendritic electrophysiological recordings, calcium imaging, pharmacology, biochemistry and a computer model, we found that this defect was, at least in part, attributable to the reduction and dysfunction of dendritic h- and BKCa channels. We pharmacologically rescued several core hyperexcitability phenomena by targeting BKCa channels. Our results provide strong evidence pointing to the utility of BKCa channel openers for the treatment of the sensory hypersensitivity aspects of FXS.

  2. Increased store-operated and 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol-induced calcium influx in monocytes is mediated by transient receptor potential canonical channels in human essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dao Yan; Thilo, Florian; Scholze, Alexandra;

    2007-01-01

    Activation of nonselective cation channels of the transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) family has been associated with hypertension. Whether store-operated channels, which are activated after depletion of intracellular stores, or second-messenger-operated channels, which are activated by 1......-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol, are affected in essential hypertension is presently unknown....

  3. An improved method for culturing cerebellar Purkinje cells with differentiated dendrites under a mixed monolayer setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, S; Makino, A; Hirabayashi, Y

    1998-11-01

    We report here a novel cell culture protocol which facilitates in vitro survival and dendritic differentiation of cerebellar Purkinje cells in a monolayer, mixed culture setting. We found that the type of culture medium is a critical factor for the maintenance of these cells. Purkinje cells present in the single cell suspension of embryonic rat cerebellum were best maintained in a medium based on Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/F-12 without the addition of known neurotrophic factors. These cells maintained in DMEM/F-12-based media displayed an approximately 2.5-3.5-fold increase in survival compared with cells maintained in the widely used Basal Medium Eagle's (BME)-based serum-free culture medium with the same supplements. This novel protocol permits not only enhanced survival but also accelerated, improved dendritic differentiation of these cells. Purkinje cells developed highly branched spiny dendrites by 14-16 days in vitro, which matches the time course of the dendritic growth of these cells in vivo. The Purkinje cells expressed metabotropic glutamate receptor 1alpha in the cell bodies and branched dendrites, and the intradendritic calcium concentration increased when trans-ACPD, a selective agonist of this receptor, was applied. This novel protocol allows the development of functional branched dendrites and therefore is useful for electrophysiological and ion-imaging studies on dendrites of Purkinje cells grown in vitro.

  4. Calcium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... D is needed to help your body use calcium. Milk is fortified with vitamin D for this reason. ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ...

  5. Localized direction selective responses in the dendrites of visual interneurons of the fly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinnefeld Philip

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The various tasks of visual systems, including course control, collision avoidance and the detection of small objects, require at the neuronal level the dendritic integration and subsequent processing of many spatially distributed visual motion inputs. While much is known about the pooled output in these systems, as in the medial superior temporal cortex of monkeys or in the lobula plate of the insect visual system, the motion tuning of the elements that provide the input has yet received little attention. In order to visualize the motion tuning of these inputs we examined the dendritic activation patterns of neurons that are selective for the characteristic patterns of wide-field motion, the lobula-plate tangential cells (LPTCs of the blowfly. These neurons are known to sample direction-selective motion information from large parts of the visual field and combine these signals into axonal and dendro-dendritic outputs. Results Fluorescence imaging of intracellular calcium concentration allowed us to take a direct look at the local dendritic activity and the resulting local preferred directions in LPTC dendrites during activation by wide-field motion in different directions. These 'calcium response fields' resembled a retinotopic dendritic map of local preferred directions in the receptive field, the layout of which is a distinguishing feature of different LPTCs. Conclusions Our study reveals how neurons acquire selectivity for distinct visual motion patterns by dendritic integration of the local inputs with different preferred directions. With their spatial layout of directional responses, the dendrites of the LPTCs we investigated thus served as matched filters for wide-field motion patterns.

  6. Dendrite Injury Triggers DLK-Independent Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Stone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Axon injury triggers regeneration through activation of a conserved kinase cascade, which includes the dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK. Although dendrites are damaged during stroke, traumatic brain injury, and seizure, it is not known whether mature neurons monitor dendrite injury and initiate regeneration. We probed the response to dendrite damage using model Drosophila neurons. Two larval neuron types regrew dendrites in distinct ways after all dendrites were removed. Dendrite regeneration was also triggered by injury in adults. Next, we tested whether dendrite injury was initiated with the same machinery as axon injury. Surprisingly, DLK, JNK, and fos were dispensable for dendrite regeneration. Moreover, this MAP kinase pathway was not activated by injury to dendrites. Thus, neurons respond to dendrite damage and initiate regeneration without using the conserved DLK cascade that triggers axon regeneration.

  7. A Role for Synaptic Input Distribution in a Dendritic Computation of Motion Direction in the Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasits, Anna L; Morrie, Ryan D; Tran-Van-Minh, Alexandra; Bleckert, Adam; Gainer, Christian F; DiGregorio, David A; Feller, Marla B

    2016-03-16

    The starburst amacrine cell in the mouse retina presents an opportunity to examine the precise role of sensory input location on neuronal computations. Using visual receptive field mapping, glutamate uncaging, two-photon Ca(2+) imaging, and genetic labeling of putative synapses, we identify a unique arrangement of excitatory inputs and neurotransmitter release sites on starburst amacrine cell dendrites: the excitatory input distribution is skewed away from the release sites. By comparing computational simulations with Ca(2+) transients recorded near release sites, we show that this anatomical arrangement of inputs and outputs supports a dendritic mechanism for computing motion direction. Direction-selective Ca(2+) transients persist in the presence of a GABA-A receptor antagonist, though the directional tuning is reduced. These results indicate a synergistic interaction between dendritic and circuit mechanisms for generating direction selectivity in the starburst amacrine cell.

  8. Drosophila Hook-Related Protein (Girdin) Is Essential for Sensory Dendrite Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Andrew; Polyanovsky, Andrey; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer

    2015-08-01

    The dendrite of the sensory neuron is surrounded by support cells and is composed of two specialized compartments: the inner segment and the sensory cilium. How the sensory dendrite is formed and maintained is not well understood. Hook-related proteins (HkRP) like Girdin, DAPLE, and Gipie are actin-binding proteins, implicated in actin organization and in cell motility. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster single member of the Hook-related protein family, Girdin, is essential for sensory dendrite formation and function. Mutations in girdin were identified during a screen for fly mutants with no mechanosensory function. Physiological, morphological, and ultrastructural studies of girdin mutant flies indicate that the mechanosensory neurons innervating external sensory organs (bristles) initially form a ciliated dendrite that degenerates shortly after, followed by the clustering of their cell bodies. Importantly, we observed that Girdin is expressed transiently during dendrite morphogenesis in three previously unidentified actin-based structures surrounding the inner segment tip and the sensory cilium. These actin structures are largely missing in girdin mutant. Defects in cilia are observed in other sensory organs such as those mediating olfaction and taste, suggesting that Girdin has a general role in forming sensory dendrites in Drosophila. These suggest that Girdin functions temporarily within the sensory organ and that this function is essential for the formation of the sensory dendrites via actin structures.

  9. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center. Calcium and vitamin D: Important at every age. NIAMS.NIH.gov website. www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bone/Bone_Health/Nutrition . Updated May 2015. Accessed March ...

  10. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  11. Optimal Current Transfer in Dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Integration of synaptic currents across an extensive dendritic tree is a prerequisite for computation in the brain. Dendritic tapering away from the soma has been suggested to both equalise contributions from synapses at different locations and maximise the current transfer to the soma. To find out how this is achieved precisely, an analytical solution for the current transfer in dendrites with arbitrary taper is required. We derive here an asymptotic approximation that accurately matches results from numerical simulations. From this we then determine the diameter profile that maximises the current transfer to the soma. We find a simple quadratic form that matches diameters obtained experimentally, indicating a fundamental architectural principle of the brain that links dendritic diameters to signal transmission. PMID:27145441

  12. The use of size-defined DNA-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles to minimise intracellular calcium disturbance during transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Sebastian; Kovtun, Anna; Dietzel, Irmgard D; Epple, Matthias; Heumann, Rolf

    2009-12-01

    Calcium phosphate-based transfection methods are frequently used to transfer DNA into living cells. However, it has so far not been studied in detail to what extend the different transfection methods lead to a net calcium uptake. Upon subsequent resolution of the calcium phosphate, intracellular free ionic calcium-surges could result, inducing as side effect various physiological responses that may finally result in cell death. Here we investigated the overall calcium uptake by the human bladder carcinoma cell line T24 during the standard calcium phosphate transfection method and also during transfection with custom-made calcium phosphate/DNA nanoparticles by isotope labelling with (45)calcium. (45)Calcium uptake was strongly increased after 7h of standard calcium phosphate transfection but not if the transfection was performed with calcium phosphate nanoparticles. Time lapse imaging microscopy using the calcium-sensitive dye Fura-2 revealed large transient increases of the intracellular free calcium level during the standard calcium phosphate transfection but not if calcium phosphate nanoparticles were used. Consistently, the viability of cells transfected by calcium phosphate/DNA nanoparticles was not changed, in remarkable contrast to the standard method where considerable cell death occurred.

  13. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Transient Ischemic Attack TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood ... The only difference between a stroke and TIA is that with TIA the blockage is transient (temporary). ...

  14. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Koss, M. B.; Malarik, D. C.

    1998-01-01

    The growth of dendrites is one of the commonly observed forms of solidification encountered when metals and alloys freeze under low thermal gradients, as occurs in most casting and welding processes. In engineering alloys, the details of the dendritic morphology directly relates to important material responses and properties. Of more generic interest, dendritic growth is also an archetypical problem in morphogenesis, where a complex pattern evolves from simple starting conditions. Thus, the physical understanding and mathematical description of how dendritic patterns emerge during the growth process are of interest to both scientists and engineers. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE) is a basic science experiment designed to measure, for a fundamental test of theory, the kinetics and morphology of dendritic growth without complications induced by gravity-driven convection. The IDGE, a collaboration between Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, in Troy NY, and NASA's Lewis Research Center (LeRC) was developed over a ten year period from a ground-based research program into a space flight experiment. Important to the success of this flight experiment was provision of in situ near-real-time teleoperations during the spaceflight experiment.

  15. Calcium, synaptic plasticity and intrinsic homeostasis in Purkinje neuron models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Achard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We recently reproduced the complex electrical activity of a Purkinje cell (PC with very different combinations of ionic channel maximum conductances, suggesting that a large parameter space is available to homeostatic mechanisms. It has been hypothesized that cytoplasmic calcium concentrations control the homeostatic activity sensors. This raises many questions for PCs since in these neurons calcium plays an important role in the induction of synaptic plasticity. To address this question, we generated 148 new PC models. In these models the somatic membrane voltages are stable, but the somatic calcium dynamics are very variable, in agreement with experimental results. Conversely, the calcium signal in spiny dendrites shows only small variability. We demonstrate that this localized control of calcium conductances preserves the induction of long-term depression for all models. We conclude that calcium is unlikely to be the sole activity-sensor in this cell but that there is a strong relationship between activity homeostasis and synaptic plasticity.

  16. mGluR1/5 subtype-specific calcium signalling and induction of long-term potentiation in rat hippocampal oriens/alveus interneurones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolnik, Lisa; Azzi, Mounia; Morin, France; Kougioumoutzakis, André; Lacaille, Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01

    Hippocampal inhibitory interneurones demonstrate pathway- and synapse-specific rules of transmission and plasticity, which are key determinants of their role in controlling pyramidal cell excitability. Mechanisms underlying long-term changes at interneurone excitatory synapses, despite their importance, remain largely unknown. We use two-photon calcium imaging and whole-cell recordings to determine the Ca2+ signalling mechanisms linked specifically to group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1α and mGluR5) and their role in hebbian long-term potentiation (LTP) in oriens/alveus (O/A) interneurones. We demonstrate that mGluR1α activation elicits dendritic Ca2+ signals resulting from Ca2+ influx via transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. By contrast, mGluR5 activation produces dendritic Ca2+ transients mediated exclusively by intracellular Ca2+ release. Using Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry, we show mGluR1α-specific extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) activation via Src in CA1 hippocampus and, in particular, in O/A interneurones. Moreover, we find that mGluR1α/TRP Ca2+ signals in interneurone dendrites are dependent on activation of the Src/ERK cascade. Finally, this mGluR1α-specific Ca2+ signalling controls LTP at interneurone synapses since blocking either TRP channels or Src/ERK and intracellular Ca2+ release prevents LTP induction. Thus, our findings uncover a novel molecular mechanism of interneurone-specific Ca2+ signalling, critical in regulating synaptic excitability in hippocampal networks. PMID:16740609

  17. Transient global amnesia mimics: Transient epileptic amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Nicastro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 79-year-old patient referred for suspected transient global amnesia, after an episode of anterograde amnesia which lasted 90 min. An EEG, performed after the episode, showed bilateral temporal electrographic seizures, orienting the diagnosis toward a transient epileptic amnesia. Transient epileptic amnesia is defined by temporal lobe epilepsy characterized by recurrent transient amnestic episodes of 30–90 min in duration, sometimes associated with olfactory hallucinations or oral automatisms. Response to antiepileptic drugs is excellent. We would like to raise awareness toward this epileptic amnesia when facing atypical or recurrent transient amnestic episodes.

  18. Signal transfer in passive dendrites with nonuniform membrane conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, M; Meunier, C; Segev, I

    1999-10-01

    In recent years it became clear that dendrites possess a host of ion channels that may be distributed nonuniformly over their membrane surface. In cortical pyramids, for example, it was demonstrated that the resting membrane conductance G(m)(x) is higher (the membrane is "leakier") at distal dendritic regions than at more proximal sites. How does this spatial nonuniformity in G(m)(x) affect the input-output function of the neuron? The present study aims at providing basic insights into this question. To this end, we have analytically studied the fundamental effects of membrane non-uniformity in passive cable structures. Keeping the total membrane conductance over a given modeled structure fixed (i.e., a constant number of passive ion channels), the classical case of cables with uniform membrane conductance is contrasted with various nonuniform cases with the following general conclusions. (1) For cylindrical cables with "sealed ends," monotonic increase in G(m)(x) improves voltage transfer from the input location to the soma. The steeper the G(m)(x), the larger the improvement. (2) This effect is further enhanced when the stimulation is distal and consists of a synaptic input rather than a current source. (3) Any nonuniformity in G(m)(x) decreases the electrotonic length, L, of the cylinder. (4) The system time constant tau(0) is larger in the nonuniform case than in the corresponding uniform case. (5) When voltage transients relax with tau(0), the dendritic tree is not isopotential in the nonuniform case, at variance with the uniform case. The effect of membrane nonuniformity on signal transfer in reconstructed dendritic trees and on the I/f relation of the neuron is also considered, and experimental methods for assessing membrane nonuniformity in dendrites are discussed.

  19. Calcium sulfate cement augments transient stability of pedicle screw in osteoporotic vertebral body%硫酸钙骨水泥增强椎弓根螺钉置入骨质疏松椎体的瞬时稳定性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱爱国; 张烽; 葛勇; 曹涌; 张弛; 陈云

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Poor implant anchorage in osteoporotic bone impacts its stability and requires the new solutions for the treatment. The augmentation technique with bone cements or bone substitutes is one strategy for the solutions. OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the transient stability of pedicle screw augmented using calcium sulfate cement in osteoporotic vertebral body. METHODS:Fresh calf lumbar vertebrae were selected to measure bone density, and then classified into four groups:the group by pedicle screw in normal vertebral body;the group by pedicle screw augmented using calcium sulfate cement in normal vertebral body;the group by pedicle screw in osteoporotic vertebral body;the group by pedicle screw augmented using calcium sulfate cement in osteoporotic vertebral body. Pedicle screw of equal specification was twisted into the tested pedicle of vertebral arch. The maximum axial screw pul-out strength and the maximum energy required to failure were recorded so as to assess the transient stability of pedicle screw augmented using calcium sulfate cement. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The maximum screw pul-out strength and the maximum energy required to failure were significantly less in osteoporotic vertebral body compared with normal vertebral body (P<0.05). The maximum screw pul-out strength and the maximum energy required to failure after augmentation using calcium sulfate cement were significantly increased (P<0.05). The maximum screw pul-out strength and the maximum energy required to failure after augmentation using calcium sulfate cement were identical between normal group and osteoporosis group. These results suggested that calcium sulfate cement could effectively increase the transient stability of pedicle screw. Calcium sulfate cement is effective in augmenting fixation in osteoporotic bone, and has potential in clinical application.%背景:由于内固定在骨质疏松骨上锚着力较差影响了其稳定性,因此需要新的固定方法,使用骨水泥或骨

  20. Coding and decoding with dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoutsi, Athanasia; Kastellakis, George; Psarrou, Maria; Anastasakis, Stelios; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2014-02-01

    Since the discovery of complex, voltage dependent mechanisms in the dendrites of multiple neuron types, great effort has been devoted in search of a direct link between dendritic properties and specific neuronal functions. Over the last few years, new experimental techniques have allowed the visualization and probing of dendritic anatomy, plasticity and integrative schemes with unprecedented detail. This vast amount of information has caused a paradigm shift in the study of memory, one of the most important pursuits in Neuroscience, and calls for the development of novel theories and models that will unify the available data according to some basic principles. Traditional models of memory considered neural cells as the fundamental processing units in the brain. Recent studies however are proposing new theories in which memory is not only formed by modifying the synaptic connections between neurons, but also by modifications of intrinsic and anatomical dendritic properties as well as fine tuning of the wiring diagram. In this review paper we present previous studies along with recent findings from our group that support a key role of dendrites in information processing, including the encoding and decoding of new memories, both at the single cell and the network level. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dendritic Cells—Ontogeny—

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Takeuchi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC play key rolls in various aspects of immunity. The functions of DC depend on the subsets as well as their location or activation status. Understanding developmental lineages, precursors and inducing factors for various DC subsets would help their clinical application, but despite extensive efforts, the precise ontogeny of various DC, remain unclear and complex. Because of their many functional similarities to macrophages, DC were originally thought to be of myeloid-lineage, an idea supported by many in vitro studies where monocytes or GM-CSF (a key myeloid growth factor has been extensively used for generating DC. However, there has been considerable evidence which suggests the existence of lymphoid-lineage DC. After the confusion of myeloid-/lymphoid-DC concept regarding DC surface markers, we have now reached a consensus that each DC subset can differentiate through both myeloid- and lymphoid-lineages. The identification of committed populations (such as common myeloid- and lymphoid progenitors as precursors for every DC subsets and findings from various knockout (KO mice that have selected lymphoid- or myeloid-lineage deficiency appear to indicate flexibility of DC development rather than their lineage restriction. Why is DC development so flexible unlike other hematopoitic cells? It might be because there is developmental redundancy to maintain such important populations in any occasions, or such developmental flexibility would be advantageous for DC to be able to differentiate from any “available” precursors in situ irrespective of their lineages. This review will cover ontogeny of conventional (CD8+/- DC DC, plasmacytoid DC and skin Langerhans cells, and recently-identified many Pre-DC (immediate DC precursor populations, in addition to monocytes and plasmacytoid DC, will also be discussed.

  2. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  3. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease or stomach conditions.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking calcium carbonate, call your doctor.

  4. Calcium Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if a person has symptoms of a parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , or an overactive thyroid. A total calcium level is often measured as part of a routine health screening. It is included in the comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) and the basic metabolic panel (BMP) , ...

  5. Current interruption transients calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Peelo, David F

    2014-01-01

    Provides an original, detailed and practical description of current interruption transients, origins, and the circuits involved, and how they can be calculated Current Interruption Transients Calculationis a comprehensive resource for the understanding, calculation and analysis of the transient recovery voltages (TRVs) and related re-ignition or re-striking transients associated with fault current interruption and the switching of inductive and capacitive load currents in circuits. This book provides an original, detailed and practical description of current interruption transients, origins,

  6. The Deterministic Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm is an immune-inspired algorithm orig- inally based on the function of natural dendritic cells. The original instantiation of the algorithm is a highly stochastic algorithm. While the performance of the algorithm is good when applied to large real-time datasets, it is difficult to anal- yse due to the number of random-based elements. In this paper a deterministic version of the algorithm is proposed, implemented and tested using a port scan dataset to provide a controllable system. This version consists of a controllable amount of parameters, which are experimented with in this paper. In addition the effects are examined of the use of time windows and variation on the number of cells, both which are shown to influence the algorithm. Finally a novel metric for the assessment of the algorithms output is introduced and proves to be a more sensitive metric than the metric used with the original Dendritic Cell Algorithm.

  7. Dendritic cells star in Vancouver

    OpenAIRE

    Klechevsky, Eynav; Kato, Hiroki; Sponaas, Anne-Marit

    2005-01-01

    The fast-moving field of dendritic cell (DC) biology is hard to keep pace with. Here we report on advances from the recent Keystone Symposium, “Dendritic Cells at the Center of Innate and Adaptive Immunity,” organized in Vancouver, BC on Feb. 1–7, 2005 by Anne O'Garra, Jacques Banchereau, and Alan Sher. New insights into the molecular mechanisms of DC function and their influence on immune regulation, their role in infectious and autoimmune disease, and new clinical applications are highlight...

  8. Optical recording of neuronal activity with a genetically-encoded calcium indicator in anesthetized and freely moving mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Lütcke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent calcium (Ca2+ indicator proteins (FCIPs are promising tools for functional imaging of cellular activity in living animals. However, they have still not reached their full potential for in vivo imaging of neuronal activity due to limitations in expression levels, dynamic range, and sensitivity for reporting action potentials. Here, we report that viral expression of the ratiometric Ca2+ sensor yellow cameleon 3.60 (YC3.60 in pyramidal neurons of mouse barrel cortex enables in vivo measurement of neuronal activity with high dynamic range and sensitivity across multiple spatial scales. By combining juxtacellular recordings and two-photon imaging in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that YC3.60 can resolve single action potential (AP-evoked Ca2+ transients and reliably reports bursts of APs with negligible saturation. Spontaneous and whisker-evoked Ca2+ transients were detected in individual apical dendrites and somata as well as in local neuronal populations. Moreover, bulk measurements using wide-field imaging or fiber-optics revealed sensory-evoked YC3.60 signals in large areas of the barrel field. Fiber-optic recordings in particular enabled measurements in awake, freely moving mice and revealed complex Ca2+ dynamics, possibly reflecting different behavior-related brain states. Viral expression of YC3.60 - in combination with various optical techniques - thus opens a multitude of opportunities for functional studies of the neural basis of animal behavior, from dendrites to the levels of local and large-scale neuronal populations.

  9. Dendrite Suppression by Shock Electrodeposition in Charged Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji-Hyung; Wang, Miao; Bai, Peng; Brushett, Fikile R.; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that surface conduction can stabilize electrodeposition in random, charged porous media at high rates, above the diffusion-limited current. After linear sweep voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy, copper electrodeposits are visualized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy in two different porous separators (cellulose nitrate, polyethylene), whose surfaces are modified by layer-by-layer deposition of positive or negative charged polyelectrolytes. Above the limiting current, surface conduction inhibits growth in the positive separators and produces irregular dendrites, while it enhances growth and suppresses dendrites behind a deionization shock in the negative separators, also leading to improved cycle life. The discovery of stable uniform growth in the random media differs from the non-uniform growth observed in parallel nanopores and cannot be explained by classic quasi-steady “leaky membrane” models, which always predict instability and dendritic growth. Instead, the experimental results suggest that transient electro-diffusion in random porous media imparts the stability of a deionization shock to the growing metal interface behind it. Shock electrodeposition could be exploited to enhance the cycle life and recharging rate of metal batteries or to accelerate the fabrication of metal matrix composite coatings.

  10. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture, exhausti

  11. Homer regulates calcium signalling in growth cone turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Michael JW

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homer proteins are post-synaptic density proteins with known functions in receptor trafficking and calcium homeostasis. While they are key mediators of synaptic plasticity, they are also known to function in axon guidance, albeit by mechanisms that are yet to be elucidated. Homer proteins couple extracellular receptors – such as metabotropic glutamate receptors and the transient receptor potential canonical family of cation channels – to intracellular receptors such as inositol triphosphate and ryanodine receptors on intracellular calcium stores and, therefore, are well placed to regulate calcium dynamics within the neural growth cone. Here we used growth cones from dorsal root ganglia, a well established model in the field of axon guidance, and a growth cone turning assay to examine Homer1 function in axon guidance. Results Homer1 knockdown reversed growth cone turning from attraction to repulsion in response to the calcium-dependent guidance cues brain derived neurotrophic factor and netrin-1. Conversely, Homer1 knockdown had no effect on repulsion to the calcium-independent guidance cue Semaphorin-3A. This reversal of attractive turning suggested a requirement for Homer1 in a molecular switch. Pharmacological experiments confirmed that the operational state of a calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase II/calcineurin phosphatase molecular switch was dependent on Homer1 expression. Calcium imaging of motile growth cones revealed that Homer1 is required for guidance-cue-induced rise of cytosolic calcium and the attenuation of spontaneous cytosolic calcium transients. Homer1 knockdown-induced calcium transients and turning were inhibited by antagonists of store-operated channels. In addition, immunocytochemistry revealed the close association of Homer1 with the store-operated proteins TRPC1 and STIM1 within dorsal root ganglia growth cones. Conclusion These experiments provide evidence that Homer1 is an essential

  12. Calcium channels and migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrobon, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    Missense mutations in CACNA1A, the gene that encodes the pore-forming α1 subunit of human voltage-gated Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels, cause a rare form of migraine with aura (familial hemiplegic migraine type 1: FHM1). Migraine is a common disabling brain disorder whose key manifestations are recurrent attacks of unilateral headache that may be preceded by transient neurological aura symptoms. This review, first, briefly summarizes current understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that are believed to underlie migraine headache, migraine aura and the onset of a migraine attack, and briefly describes the localization and function of neuronal Ca(V)2.1 channels in the brain regions that have been implicated in migraine pathogenesis. Then, the review describes and discusses i) the functional consequences of FHM1 mutations on the biophysical properties of recombinant human Ca(V)2.1 channels and native Ca(V)2.1 channels in neurons of knockin mouse models carrying the mild R192Q or severe S218L mutations in the orthologous gene, and ii) the functional consequences of these mutations on neurophysiological processes in the cerebral cortex and trigeminovascular system thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of migraine, and the insights into migraine mechanisms obtained from the functional analysis of these processes in FHM1 knockin mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roney, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    While much is understood about dendritic cells and their role in the immune system, the study of these cells is critical to gain a more complete understanding of their function. Dendritic cell isolation from mouse body tissues can be difficult and the number of cells isolated small. This protocol describes the growth of large number of dendritic cells from the culture of mouse bone marrow cells. The dendritic cells grown in culture facilitate experiments that may require large number of dendritic cells without great expense or use of large number of mice.

  14. The dendritic location of the L-type current and its deactivation by the somatic AHP current both contribute to firing bistability in motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Marin; Zytnicki, Daniel; Meunier, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Spinal motoneurons may display a variety of firing patterns including bistability between repetitive firing and quiescence and, more rarely, bistability between two firing states of different frequencies. It was suggested in the past that firing bistability required that the persistent L-type calcium current be segregated in distal dendrites, far away from the spike generating currents. However, this is not supported by more recent data. Using a two compartment model of motoneuron, we show that the different firing patterns may also result from the competition between the more proximal dendritic component of the dendritic L-type conductance and the calcium sensitive potassium conductance responsible for afterhypolarization (AHP). Further emphasizing this point, firing bistability may be also achieved when the L-type current is put in the somatic compartment. However, this requires that the calcium-sensitive potassium conductance be triggered solely by the high threshold calcium currents activated during spikes and not by calcium influx through the L-type current. This prediction was validated by dynamic clamp experiments in vivo in lumbar motoneurons of deeply anesthetized cats in which an artificial L-type current was added at the soma. Altogether, our results suggest that the dynamical interaction between the L-type and afterhyperpolarization currents is as fundamental as the segregation of the calcium L-type current in dendrites for controlling the discharge of motoneurons.

  15. Rhythmic dendritic Ca2+ oscillations in thalamocortical neurons during slow non-REM sleep-related activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errington, Adam C; Hughes, Stuart W; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2012-08-15

    The distribution of T-type Ca2+ channels along the entire somatodendritic axis of sensory thalamocortical (TC) neurons permits regenerative propagation of low threshold spikes (LTS) accompanied by global dendritic Ca2+ influx. Furthermore, T-type Ca2+ channels play an integral role in low frequency oscillatory activity (dynamics of T-type Ca2+ channel-dependent dendritic Ca2+ signalling during slow sleep-associated oscillations remains unknown. Here we demonstrate using patch clamp recording and two-photon Ca2+ imaging of dendrites from cat TC neurons undergoing spontaneous slow oscillatory activity that somatically recorded δ (1–4 Hz) and slow (<1 Hz) oscillations are associated with rhythmic and sustained global oscillations in dendritic Ca2+. In addition, our data reveal the presence of LTS-dependent Ca2+ transients (Δ[Ca2+]) in dendritic spine-like structures on proximal TC neuron dendrites during slow (<1 Hz) oscillations whose amplitudes are similar to those observed in the dendritic shaft. We find that the amplitude of oscillation associated Δ[Ca2+] do not vary significantly with distance from the soma whereas the decay time constant (τdecay) of Δ[Ca2+] decreases significantly in more distal dendrites. Furthermore, τdecay of dendritic Δ[Ca2+] increases significantly as oscillation frequency decreases from δ to slow frequencies where pronounced depolarised UP states are observed. Such rhythmic dendritic Ca2+ entry in TC neurons during sleep-related firing patterns could be an important factor in maintaining the oscillatory activity and associated biochemical signalling processes, such as synaptic downscaling, that occur in non-REM sleep.

  16. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 activation enhances hapten sensitization in a T-helper type 2-driven fluorescein isothiocyanate-induced contact hypersensitivity mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, Takahiro; Tamai, Takuma; Sahara, Yurina; Kurohane, Kohta [Laboratory of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52‐1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka 422‐8526 (Japan); Watanabe, Tatsuo [Laboratory of Food Chemistry, School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52‐1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka 422‐8526 (Japan); Imai, Yasuyuki, E-mail: imai@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp [Laboratory of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52‐1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka City, Shizuoka 422‐8526 (Japan)

    2012-11-01

    Some chemicals contribute to the development of allergies by increasing the immunogenicity of other allergens. We have demonstrated that several phthalate esters, including dibutyl phthalate (DBP), enhance skin sensitization to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) in a mouse contact hypersensitivity model, in which the T-helper type 2 (Th2) response is essential. On the other hand, some phthalate esters were found to activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channels on sensory neurons. We then found a positive correlation between the enhancing effects of several types of phthalate esters on skin sensitization to FITC and their ability to activate TRPA1. Here we examined the involvement of TRPA1 in sensitization to FITC by using TRPA1 agonists other than phthalate esters. During skin sensitization to FITC, the TRPA1 agonists (menthol, carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde and DBP) augmented the ear-swelling response as well as trafficking of FITC-presenting dendritic cells to draining lymph nodes. We confirmed that these TRPA1 agonists induced calcium influx into TRPA1-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We also found that TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 inhibited DBP-induced calcium influx into TRPA1-expressing CHO cells. After pretreatment with this antagonist upon skin sensitization to FITC, the enhancing effect of DBP on sensitization was suppressed. These results suggest that TRPA1 activation will become a useful marker to find chemicals that facilitate sensitization in combination with other immunogenic haptens. -- Highlights: ► Role of TRPA1 activation was revealed in a mouse model of skin sensitization to FITC. ► TRPA1 agonists enhanced skin sensitization as well as dendritic cell trafficking. ► Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) has been shown to enhance skin sensitization to FITC. ► TRPA1 activation by DBP was inhibited by a selective antagonist, HC-030031. ► HC-030031 inhibited the enhancing effect of DBP on skin sensitization to FITC.

  17. Evidence that dendritic mitochondria negatively regulate dendritic branching in pyramidal neurons in the neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toshiya; Murakami, Fujio

    2014-05-14

    The precise branching patterns of dendritic arbors have a profound impact on information processing in individual neurons and the brain. These patterns are established by positive and negative regulation of the dendritic branching. Although the mechanisms for positive regulation have been extensively investigated, little is known about those for negative regulation. Here, we present evidence that mitochondria located in developing dendrites are involved in the negative regulation of dendritic branching. We visualized mitochondria in pyramidal neurons of the mouse neocortex during dendritic morphogenesis using in utero electroporation of a mitochondria-targeted fluorescent construct. We altered the mitochondrial distribution in vivo by overexpressing Mfn1, a mitochondrial shaping protein, or the Miro-binding domain of TRAK2 (TRAK2-MBD), a truncated form of a motor-adaptor protein. We found that dendritic mitochondria were preferentially targeted to the proximal portion of dendrites only during dendritic morphogenesis. Overexpression of Mfn1 or TRAK2-MBD depleted mitochondria from the dendrites, an effect that was accompanied by increased branching of the proximal portion of the dendrites. This dendritic abnormality cannot be accounted for by changes in the distribution of membrane trafficking organelles since the overexpression of Mfn1 did not alter the distributions of the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, or endosomes. Additionally, neither did these constructs impair neuronal viability or mitochondrial function. Therefore, our results suggest that dendritic mitochondria play a critical role in the establishment of the precise branching pattern of dendritic arbors by negatively affecting dendritic branching.

  18. The Effect of Dye Density on the Efficiency of Photosensitization of TiO2 Films: Light-Harvesting by Phenothiazine-Labelled Dendritic Ruthenium Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Yong Zhu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A family of dendritic tris-bipyridyl ruthenium coordination complexes incorporating two or four carboxylate groups for binding to a TiO2 surface site and another dendritic linker between the metal complex and highly absorptive dyes were formulated as thin films on TiO2 coated glass. The family included phenothiazine-substituted dendrons of increasing structural complexity and higher optical density. The dye-loaded films were characterized by steady-state emission and absorption measurements and by kinetic studies of luminescence and transient absorption. Upon photoexcitation of the bound dyes, rapid electron injection into the metal oxide film was the dominant observed process, producing oxidized dye that persisted for hundreds of milliseconds. Complex decay profiles for emission, transient absorption, and optical bleaching of the dendritic dyes point to highly heterogeneous behavior for the films, with observed persistence lifetimes related directly to structurally enhance electronic coupling between the metal oxide support and the dendritic dyes.

  19. Transient drainage summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report summarizes the history of transient drainage issues on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. It defines and describes the UMTRA Project disposal cell transient drainage process and chronicles UMTRA Project treatment of the transient drainage phenomenon. Section 4.0 includes a conceptual cross section of each UMTRA Project disposal site and summarizes design and construction information, the ground water protection strategy, and the potential for transient drainage.

  20. Excitability in a stochastic differential equation model for calcium puffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, S

    2014-06-01

    Calcium dynamics are essential to a multitude of cellular processes. For many cell types, localized discharges of calcium through small clusters of intracellular channels are building blocks for all spatially extended calcium signals. Because of the large noise amplitude, the validity of noise-approximating model equations for this system has been questioned. Here we revisit the master equations for local calcium release, examine the multiple scales of calcium concentrations in the cluster domain, and derive adapted stochastic differential equations. We show by comparison of discrete and continuous trajectories that the Langevin equations can be made consistent with the master equations even for very small channel numbers. In its deterministic limit, the model reveals that excitability, a dynamical phenomenon observed in many natural systems, is at the core of calcium puffs. The model also predicts a bifurcation from transient to sustained release which may link local and global calcium signals in cells.

  1. Normal and Malignant Cells Exhibit Differential Responses to Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine K; Krüger, Mie B; Mangalanathan, Uma M

    2017-01-01

    tissue after calcium electroporation but decreased in skin tissue 4 hours after treatment to levels comparable with untreated controls, whereas calcium content endured at high levels in tumor tissue. Mechanistic experiments in vitro indicated that calcium influx was similar in fibroblasts and cancer...... necrosis, with a range of sensitivities observed (36%-88%) 2 days after treatment. Necrosis was induced using calcium concentrations of 100-500 mmol/L and injection volumes 20%-80% of tumor volume. Notably, only limited effects were seen in normal tissue. Calcium content increased >7-fold in tumor and skin......Calcium electroporation may offer a simple general tool for anticancer therapy. Transient permeabilization of cancer cell membranes created by applying short, high-voltage pulses in tumors enables high calcium influxes that trigger cell death. In this study, we compared the relative sensitivity...

  2. Phase field modeling of dendritic coarsening during isothermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yutuo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic coarsening in Al-2mol%Si alloy during isothermal solidification at 880K was investigated by phase field modeling. Three coarsening mechanisms operate in the alloy: (a melting of small dendrite arms; (b coalescence of dendrites near the tips leading to the entrapment of liquid droplets; (c smoothing of dendrites. Dendrite melting is found to be dominant in the stage of dendritic growth, whereas coalescence of dendrites and smoothing of dendrites are dominant during isothermal holding. The simulated results provide a better understanding of dendrite coarsening during isothermal solidification.

  3. Dendritic cells and contact dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yoshinori; Aiba, Setsuya

    2007-10-01

    Contact dermatitis is a biological response to simple chemicals in the skin. Although it is well known that allergic contact dermatitis is mediated by the immune system, it is still uncertain whether it is a kind of protective response or it is simply an unnecessary response. We have demonstrated the following: (1) haptens activate Langerhans cells in the initiation phase of murine allergic contact dermatitis in vivo, (2) haptens activate human monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro, (3) the activation of dendritic cells by haptens is primarily mediated by the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and (4) the activation of p38 MAPK is mediated by stimulation related to an imbalance of intracellular redox. Based on these observations, we will discuss the biological significance of contact dermatitis. In addition, we will review some up-to-date findings on Langerhans cell biology.

  4. Lipid dynamics at dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotti, Carlos Gerardo; Esteban, Jose Antonio; Ledesma, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic changes in the structure and composition of the membrane protrusions forming dendritic spines underlie memory and learning processes. In recent years a great effort has been made to characterize in detail the protein machinery that controls spine plasticity. However, we know much less about the involvement of lipids, despite being major membrane components and structure determinants. Moreover, protein complexes that regulate spine plasticity depend on specific interactions with membrane lipids for proper function and accurate intracellular signaling. In this review we gather information available on the lipid composition at dendritic spine membranes and on its dynamics. We pay particular attention to the influence that spine lipid dynamism has on glutamate receptors, which are key regulators of synaptic plasticity.

  5. Microtubules in Dendritic Spine Development

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    It is generally believed that only the actin cytoskeleton resides in dendritic spines and controls spine morphology and plasticity. Here we report that microtubules (MTs) are present in spines and that shRNA knockdown of the MT-plus end binding protein EB3 significantly reduces spine formation. Furthermore, stabilization and inhibition of MTs by low doses of taxol and nocodazole enhance and impair spine formation elicited by BDNF, respectively. Therefore, MTs play an important role in the con...

  6. Melanoma immunotherapy: dendritic cell vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Lozada-Requena, Ivan; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Núñez, César; Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Aguilar, José Luis; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.

    2015-01-01

    This is a narrative review that shows accessible information to the scientific community about melanoma and immunotherapy.Dendritic cells have the ability to participate in innate and adaptive immunity, but are not unfamiliar to the immune evasion oftumors. Knowing the biology and role has led to generate in vitro several prospects of autologous cell vaccines against diversetypes of cancer in humans and animal models. However, given the low efficiency they have shown, we must implementstrateg...

  7. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWu; AleksandarDakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived calls. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors, some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Fit3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):112-118.

  8. Development of Dendritic Cell System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wu; Aleksandar Dakic

    2004-01-01

    The dendritic cell system contains conventional dendritic cells (DCs) and plasmacytoid pre-dendritic cells (pDCs). Both DCs and pDCs are bone marrow derived cells. Although the common functions of DCs are antigen-processing and T-lymphocyte activation, they differ in surface markers, migratory patterns, and cytokine output. These differences can determine the fate of the T cells they activate. Several subsets of mature DCs have been described in both mouse and human and the developmental processes of these specialized DC subsets have been studied extensively. The original concept that all DCs were of myeloid origin was questioned by several recent studies, which demonstrated that in addition to the DCs derived from myeloid precursors,some DCs could also be efficiently generated from lymphoid-restricted precursors. Moreover, it has been shown recently that both conventional DCs and pDCs can be generated by the Flt3 expressing hemopoietic progenitors regardless of their myeloid- or lymphoid-origin. These findings suggest an early developmental flexibility of precursors for DCs and pDCs. This review summarizes some recent observations on the development of DC system in both human and mouse.

  9. Supralinear dendritic Ca(2+) signalling in young developing CA1 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohle, Jörg; Bischofberger, Josef

    2014-11-15

    Although Ca(2+) is critically important in activity-dependent neuronal development, not much is known about the regulation of dendritic Ca(2+) signals in developing neurons. Here, we used ratiometric Ca(2+) imaging to investigate dendritic Ca(2+) signalling in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells during the first 1-4 weeks of postnatal development. We show that active dendritic backpropagation of Nav channel-dependent action potentials (APs) evoked already large dendritic Ca(2+) transients in animals aged 1 week with amplitudes of ∼150 nm, similar to the amplitudes of ∼160 nM seen in animals aged 4 weeks. Although the AP-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) load increased about four times during the first 4 weeks, the peak amplitude of free Ca(2+) concentration was balanced by a four-fold increase in Ca(2+) buffer capacity κs (∼70 vs. ∼280). Furthermore, Ca(2+) extrusion rates increased with postnatal development, leading to a slower decay time course (∼0.2 s vs. ∼0.1 s) and more effective temporal summation of Ca(2+) signals in young cells. Most importantly, during prolonged theta-burst stimulation dendritic Ca(2+) signals were up to three times larger in cells at 1 week than at 4 weeks of age and much larger than predicted by linear summation, which is attributable to an activity-dependent slow-down of Ca(2+) extrusion. As Ca(2+) influx is four-fold smaller in young cells, the larger Ca(2+) signals are generated using four times less ATP consumption. Taken together, the data suggest that active backpropagations regulate dendritic Ca(2+) signals during early postnatal development. Remarkably, during prolonged AP firing, Ca(2+) signals are several times larger in young than in mature cells as a result of activity-dependent regulation of Ca(2+) extrusion rates.

  10. Dendritic web silicon for solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidensticker, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    The dendritic web process for growing long thin ribbon crystals of silicon and other semiconductors is described. Growth is initiated from a thin wirelike dendrite seed which is brought into contact with the melt surface. Initially, the seed grows laterally to form a button at the melt surface; when the seed is withdrawn, needlelike dendrites propagate from each end of the button into the melt, and the web portion of the crystal is formed by the solidification of the liquid film supported by the button and the bounding dendrites. Apparatus used for dendritic web growth, material characteristics, and the two distinctly different mechanisms involved in the growth of a single crystal are examined. The performance of solar cells fabricated from dendritic web material is indistinguishable from the performance of cells fabricated from Czochralski grown material.

  11. Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo L Gollo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the past decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of an active dendritic tree is a highly non-linear function of its afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB. Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease in dynamic range.

  12. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) inhibits cortical dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean C; Palmer, Lucy M; Nyffeler, Thomas; Müri, René M; Larkum, Matthew E

    2016-03-18

    One of the leading approaches to non-invasively treat a variety of brain disorders is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). However, despite its clinical prevalence, very little is known about the action of TMS at the cellular level let alone what effect it might have at the subcellular level (e.g. dendrites). Here, we examine the effect of single-pulse TMS on dendritic activity in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex using an optical fiber imaging approach. We find that TMS causes GABAB-mediated inhibition of sensory-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) activity. We conclude that TMS directly activates fibers within the upper cortical layers that leads to the activation of dendrite-targeting inhibitory neurons which in turn suppress dendritic Ca(2+) activity. This result implies a specificity of TMS at the dendritic level that could in principle be exploited for investigating these structures non-invasively.

  13. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d......-saccharate becomes spontaneously supersaturated with both d-gluconate and d-saccharate calcium salts, from which only calcium d-saccharate slowly precipitates. Calcium d-saccharate is suggested to act as a stabilizer of supersaturated solutions of other calcium hydroxycarboxylates with endothermic complex formation...

  14. Dendritic Cells, New Tools for Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Review Dendritic cells , new tools for vaccination Jesus Colino, Clifford M. Snapper * Department of Pathology, Uniformed Services University of the...2003 Éditions scientifiques et médicales Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved. Keywords: Vaccines; Immunotherapy; Dendritic cells 1. Introduction During...DATE 2003 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cells , new tools for vaccination 5a

  15. Low Power Dendritic Computation for Wordspotting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Nease

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate how a network of dendrites can be used to build the state decoding block of a wordspotter similar to a Hidden Markov Model (HMM classifier structure. We present simulation and experimental data for a single line dendrite and also experimental results for a dendrite-based classifier structure. This work builds on previously demonstrated building blocks of a neural network: the channel, synapses and dendrites using CMOS circuits. These structures can be used for speech and pattern recognition. The computational efficiency of such a system is >10 MMACs/μW as compared to Digital Systems which perform 10 MMACs/mW.

  16. Neoplasms derived from plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchetti, Fabio; Cigognetti, Marta; Fisogni, Simona; Rossi, Giuseppe; Lonardi, Silvia; Vermi, William

    2016-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms manifest in two clinically and pathologically distinct forms. The first variant is represented by nodular aggregates of clonally expanded plasmacytoid dendritic cells found in lymph nodes, skin, and bone marrow ('Mature plasmacytoid dendritic cells proliferation associated with myeloid neoplasms'). This entity is rare, although likely underestimated in incidence, and affects predominantly males. Almost invariably, it is associated with a myeloid neoplasm such as chronic myelomonocytic leukemia or other myeloid proliferations with monocytic differentiation. The concurrent myeloid neoplasm dominates the clinical pictures and guides treatment. The prognosis is usually dismal, but reflects the evolution of the associated myeloid leukemia rather than progressive expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. A second form of plasmacytoid dendritic cells tumor has been recently reported and described as 'blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm'. In this tumor, which is characterized by a distinctive cutaneous and bone marrow tropism, proliferating cells derive from immediate CD4(+)CD56(+) precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The diagnosis of this form can be easily accomplished by immunohistochemistry, using a panel of plasmacytoid dendritic cells markers. The clinical course of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is characterized by a rapid progression to systemic disease via hematogenous dissemination. The genomic landscape of this entity is currently under intense investigation. Recurrent somatic mutations have been uncovered in different genes, a finding that may open important perspectives for precision medicine also for this rare, but highly aggressive leukemia.

  17. Transient Voltage Recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medelius, Pedro J. (Inventor); Simpson, Howard J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A voltage transient recorder can detect lightning induced transient voltages. The recorder detects a lightning induced transient voltage and adjusts input amplifiers to accurately record transient voltage magnitudes. The recorder stores voltage data from numerous monitored channels, or devices. The data is time stamped and can be output in real time, or stored for later retrieval. The transient recorder, in one embodiment, includes an analog-to-digital converter and a voltage threshold detector. When an input voltage exceeds a pre-determined voltage threshold, the recorder stores the incoming voltage magnitude and time of arrival. The recorder also determines if its input amplifier circuits clip the incoming signal or if the incoming signal is too low. If the input data is clipped or too low, the recorder adjusts the gain of the amplifier circuits to accurately acquire subsequent components of the lightning induced transients.

  18. TRANSIENT ELECTRONICS CATEGORIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-24

    definitions of what it means to be transient. The purpose of this technical report is to provide a background of the issues related to transient...In this section, we will attempt to identify these parameters and provide preliminary definitions for categories of transience behavior. Transient...programmable lifetimes. Ideally , such materials with expiration dates will deconstruct themselves into harmless and invisible remnants. The technology base

  19. The Zwicky Transient Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bellm, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) is a next-generation optical synoptic survey that builds on the experience and infrastructure of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Using a new 47 deg$^2$ survey camera, ZTF will survey more than an order of magnitude faster than PTF to discover rare transients and variables. I describe the survey and the camera design. Searches for young supernovae, fast transients, counterparts to gravitational-wave detections, and rare variables will benefit from ZTF's high cadence, wide area survey.

  20. Functional properties of granule cells with hilar basal dendrites in the epileptic dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Tony; Beck, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    The maturation of adult-born granule cells and their functional integration into the network is thought to play a key role in the proper functioning of the dentate gyrus. In temporal lobe epilepsy, adult-born granule cells in the dentate gyrus develop abnormally and possess a hilar basal dendrite (HBD). Although morphological studies have shown that these HBDs have synapses, little is known about the functional properties of these HBDs or the intrinsic and network properties of the granule cells that possess these aberrant dendrites. We performed patch-clamp recordings of granule cells within the granule cell layer "normotopic" from sham-control and status epilepticus (SE) animals. Normotopic granule cells from SE animals possessed an HBD (SE(+) HBD(+) cells) or not (SE(+) HBD(-) cells). Apical and basal dendrites were stimulated using multiphoton uncaging of glutamate. Two-photon Ca(2+) imaging was used to measure Ca(2+) transients associated with back-propagating action potentials (bAPs). Near-synchronous synaptic input integrated linearly in apical dendrites from sham-control animals and was not significantly different in apical dendrites of SE(+) HBD(-) cells. The majority of HBDs integrated input linearly, similar to apical dendrites. However, 2 of 11 HBDs were capable of supralinear integration mediated by a dendritic spike. Furthermore, the bAP-evoked Ca(2+) transients were relatively well maintained along HBDs, compared with apical dendrites. This further suggests an enhanced electrogenesis in HBDs. In addition, the output of granule cells from epileptic tissue was enhanced, with both SE(+) HBD(-) and SE(+) HBD(+) cells displaying increased high-frequency (>100 Hz) burst-firing. Finally, both SE(+) HBD(-) and SE(+) HBD(+) cells received recurrent excitatory input that was capable of generating APs, especially in the absence of feedback inhibition. Taken together, these data suggest that the enhanced excitability of HBDs combined with the altered intrinsic

  1. In vitro anti-tumor effect of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activated by antigen-loaded dendritic cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells treated with calcium ionophore A23187 and GM-CSF%抗原致敏树突细胞激活细胞毒性T淋巴细胞的体外抗肿瘤作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭卫斌; 沙卫红; 李瑜元; 聂玉强

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of calcium ionophore (CI) A23187 and human recombinant granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) on the cultivation of dendritic cell (DC) from healthy human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and to evaluate the in vitro effect of DC stimulated by K562 cell lysate on inducing specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte ( CTL) against K562 cell Methods Human PBMCs isolated from healthy subjects were separated into two groups. In Group A,the cells were cultured with additional rhGM-CSF, recombinant human interleukin 4 and recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-a only as control group. In Group B, the cells were cultured in the presence of rhGMCSF and CI A23187. The cells in both groups were pre-incubated with K562 cell lysate at 37℃for 30 min.The cells were harvested after a 4-day cultivation. Morphology of DC was continuously observed under inverted microscope. The surface antigens of induced cells were analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM). Then the proliferation of allogenetic T cell and the specific cytotoxicity of T cell primed with DC were examined by colorimetry. Also, the nonspecific inhibition of DC loaded K562 cell lysate against K562 cell was detected.Results Typical morphological features of DC could be observed in both groups. The expressions of CD83,CD1a, CD86 and CD40 were stronger in Group B than those in control group (45. 2% ±1.8%, 31.5% ± 3.9%,40.1%±7.8%,36.4%±6.3% vs 16.9%±1.3%,20.4%±3.4%,26.5%±2.2%,22.3%±3.0%)(all P<0.05).The expression of CD14 Was weaker in Group B than that in control group (5.7%±0.8% vs 19.0%±1.6%)(P<0.05).As compared with the control group,DC in Group B loaded with K562 lysate could evidently stimulate the Proliferation of allogenetic T cell(P<0.05.exclusion of effector-to-target ratio of 1:40)and inhibit the growth of K562 cell(P<0.05).In addition.both groups of DC-stimulated CTL had specific cytotoxicity against K562 cell.At the effector-to-target ratios of 10:1 and 40

  2. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...... current understanding of calcium sensing in neurotransmitter release and hormone secretion....

  3. In vivo dendrite regeneration after injury is different from dendrite development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tun; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung

    2016-01-01

    Neurons receive information along dendrites and send signals along axons to synaptic contacts. The factors that control axon regeneration have been examined in many systems, but dendrite regeneration has been largely unexplored. Here we report that, in intact Drosophila larvae, a discrete injury that removes all dendrites induces robust dendritic growth that recreates many features of uninjured dendrites, including the number of dendrite branches that regenerate and responsiveness to sensory stimuli. However, the growth and patterning of injury-induced dendrites is significantly different from uninjured dendrites. We found that regenerated arbors cover much less territory than uninjured neurons, fail to avoid crossing over other branches from the same neuron, respond less strongly to mechanical stimuli, and are pruned precociously. Finally, silencing the electrical activity of the neurons specifically blocks injury-induced, but not developmental, dendrite growth. By elucidating the essential features of dendrites grown in response to acute injury, our work builds a framework for exploring dendrite regeneration in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27542831

  4. Imaging calcium in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grienberger, Christine; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-03-08

    Calcium ions generate versatile intracellular signals that control key functions in all types of neurons. Imaging calcium in neurons is particularly important because calcium signals exert their highly specific functions in well-defined cellular subcompartments. In this Primer, we briefly review the general mechanisms of neuronal calcium signaling. We then introduce the calcium imaging devices, including confocal and two-photon microscopy as well as miniaturized devices that are used in freely moving animals. We provide an overview of the classical chemical fluorescent calcium indicators and of the protein-based genetically encoded calcium indicators. Using application examples, we introduce new developments in the field, such as calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals and the use of calcium imaging for mapping single spine sensory inputs in cortical neurons in vivo. We conclude by providing an outlook on the prospects of calcium imaging for the analysis of neuronal signaling and plasticity in various animal models.

  5. Ultra-fast in-situ X-ray studies of evolving columnar dendrites in solidifying steel weld pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirihanage, W. U.; Di Michiel, M.; Mathiesen, R. H.

    2015-06-01

    High-brilliance polychromatic synchrotron radiation has been used to conduct in-situ studies of the solidification microstructure evolution during simulated welding. The welding simulations were realized by rapidly fusing ∼ 5 mm spot in Fe-Cr-Ni steel. During the solid- liquid-solid phase transformations, a section of the weld pool was placed in an incident 50-150 keV polychromatic synchrotron X-ray beam, in a near-horizontal position at a very low inclination angle. Multiple high-resolution 2D detectors with very high frame rates were utilized to capture time resolved X-ray diffraction data from suitably oriented solid dendrites evolving in the weld pool. Comprehensive analysis of the diffraction data revealed individual and overall dendritic growth characteristics and relevant melt and solid flow dynamics during weld pool solidification, which was completed within 1.5 s. Columnar dendrite tip velocities were estimated from the experimental data and during early stages of solidification were exceeded 4 mm/s. The most remarkable observation revealed through the time-resolved reciprocal space observations are correlated to significant tilting of columnar type dendrites at their root during solidification, presumably caused by convective currents in the weld pool. When the columnar dendrite tilting are transformed to respective metric linear tilting velocities at the dendrite tip; tilting velocities are found to be in the same order of magnitude as the columnar tip growth velocities, suggesting a highly transient nature of growth conditions.

  6. Recrystallization phenomena of solution grown paraffin dendrites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, F.F.A.; Stasse, O.; Suchtelen, van J.; Enckevort, van W.J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Paraffin crystals were grown from decane solutions using a micro-Bridgman set up for in-situ observation of the morphology at the growth front. It is shown that for large imposed velocities, dendrites are obtained. After dendritic growth, aging or recrystallization processes set in rather quickly, c

  7. A Case of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köpeczi Judit Beáta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia is a rare subtype of acute leukemia, which has recently been established as a distinct pathologic entity that typically follows a highly aggressive clinical course in adults. The aim of this report is to present a case of plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia due to its rarity and difficulty to recognize and diagnose it.

  8. Early events in axon/dendrite polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pei-lin; Poo, Mu-ming

    2012-01-01

    Differentiation of axons and dendrites is a critical step in neuronal development. Here we review the evidence that axon/dendrite formation during neuronal polarization depends on the intrinsic cytoplasmic asymmetry inherited by the postmitotic neuron, the exposure of the neuron to extracellular chemical factors, and the action of anisotropic mechanical forces imposed by the environment. To better delineate the functions of early signals among a myriad of cellular components that were shown to influence axon/dendrite formation, we discuss their functions by distinguishing their roles as determinants, mediators, or modulators and consider selective degradation of these components as a potential mechanism for axon/dendrite polarization. Finally, we examine whether these early events of axon/dendrite formation involve local autocatalytic activation and long-range inhibition, as postulated by Alan Turing for the morphogenesis of patterned biological structure.

  9. Numerical simulation of facet dendrite growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhi; CHEN Chang-le; HAO Li-mei

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation based on phase field method was performed to describe the solidification of silicon. The effect of anisotropy, undercooling and coupling parameter on dendrite growth shape was investigated. It is indicated that the entire facet dendrite shapes are obtained by using regularized phase field model. Steady state tip velocity of dendrite drives to a fixed value when γ≤0.13. With further increasing the anisotropy value, steady state tip velocity decreases and the size is smaller. With the increase in the undercooling and coupling parameter, crystal grows from facet to facet dendrite. In addition, with increasing coupling parameter, the facet part of facet dendrite decreases gradually, which is in good agreement with Wulff theory.

  10. Radiation tolerance of boron doped dendritic web silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, A.

    1980-01-01

    The potential of dendritic web silicon for giving radiation hard solar cells is compared with the float zone silicon material. Solar cells with n(+)-p-P(+) structure and approximately 15% (AMl) efficiency were subjected to 1 MeV electron irradiation. Radiation tolerance of web cell efficiency was found to be at least as good as that of the float zone silicon cell. A study of the annealing behavior of radiation-induced defects via deep level transient spectroscopy revealed that E sub v + 0.31 eV defect, attributed to boron-oxygen-vacancy complex, is responsible for the reverse annealing of the irradiated cells in the temperature range of 150 to 350 C.

  11. Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Roberto; Vogels, Tim P; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-07-15

    Most excitatory inputs in the mammalian brain are made on dendritic spines, rather than on dendritic shafts. Spines compartmentalize calcium, and this biochemical isolation can underlie input-specific synaptic plasticity, providing a raison d'etre for spines. However, recent results indicate that the spine can experience a membrane potential different from that in the parent dendrite, as though the spine neck electrically isolated the spine. Here we use two-photon calcium imaging of mouse neocortical pyramidal neurons to analyze the correlation between the morphologies of spines activated under minimal synaptic stimulation and the excitatory postsynaptic potentials they generate. We find that excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitudes are inversely correlated with spine neck lengths. Furthermore, a spike timing-dependent plasticity protocol, in which two-photon glutamate uncaging over a spine is paired with postsynaptic spikes, produces rapid shrinkage of the spine neck and concomitant increases in the amplitude of the evoked spine potentials. Using numerical simulations, we explore the parameter regimes for the spine neck resistance and synaptic conductance changes necessary to explain our observations. Our data, directly correlating synaptic and morphological plasticity, imply that long-necked spines have small or negligible somatic voltage contributions, but that, upon synaptic stimulation paired with postsynaptic activity, they can shorten their necks and increase synaptic efficacy, thus changing the input/output gain of pyramidal neurons.

  12. A computational model of dendrite elongation and branching based on MAP2 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hely, T A; Graham, B; Ooyen, A V

    2001-06-07

    We introduce a new computational model of dendritic development in neurons. In contrast to previous models, our model explicitly includes cellular mechanisms involved in dendritic development. It is based on recent experimental data which indicates that the phosphorylation state of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) may play a key role in controlling dendritic elongation and branching (Audesirk et al., 1997). Dephosphorylated MAP2 favours elongation by promoting microtubule polymerization and bundling, whilst branching is more likely to occur when MAP2 is phosphorylated and microtubules are spaced apart. In the model, the rate of elongation and branching is directly determined by the ratio of phosphorylated to dephosphorylated MAP2. This is regulated by calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and calcineurin, which are both dependent on the intracellular calcium concentration. Results from computer simulations of the model suggest that the wide variety of branching patterns observed among different cell types may be generated by the same underlying mechanisms and that elongation and branching are not necessarily independent processes. The model predicts how the branching pattern will change following manipulations with calcium, CaMKII and MAP2 phosphorylation.

  13. Visualization of calcium transients controlling orientation of ciliary beat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, S L; Terasaki, M

    1994-06-01

    To image changes in intraciliary Ca controlling ciliary motility, we microinjected Ca Green dextran, a visible wavelength fluorescent Ca indicator, into eggs or two cell stages of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi. The embryos developed normally into free-swimming, approximately 0.5 mm cydippid larvae with cells and ciliary comb plates (approximately 100 microns long) loaded with the dye. Comb plates of larvae, like those of adult ctenophores, undergo spontaneous or electrically stimulated reversal of beat direction, triggered by Ca influx through voltage-sensitive Ca channels. Comb plates of larvae loaded with Ca Green dextran emit spontaneous or electrically stimulated fluorescent flashes along the entire length of their cilia, correlated with ciliary reversal. Fluorescence intensity peaks rapidly (34-50 ms), then slowly falls to resting level in approximately 1 s. Electrically stimulated Ca Green emissions often increase in steps to a maximum value near the end of the stimulus pulse train, and slowly decline in 1-2 s. In both spontaneous and electrically stimulated flashes, measurements at multiple sites along a single comb plate show that Ca Green fluorescence rises within 17 ms (1 video field) and to a similar relative extent above resting level from base to tip of the cilia. The decline of fluorescence intensity also begins simultaneously and proceeds at similar rates along the ciliary length. Ca-free sea water reversibly abolishes spontaneous and electrically stimulated Ca Green ciliary emissions as well as reversed beating. Calculations of Ca diffusion from the ciliary base show that Ca must enter the comb plate along the entire length of the ciliary membranes. The voltage-dependent Ca channels mediating changes in beat direction are therefore distributed over the length of the comb plate cilia. The observed rapid and virtually instantaneous Ca signal throughout the intraciliary space may be necessary for reprogramming the pattern of dynein activity responsible for reorientation of the ciliary beat cycle.

  14. Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons' Dendritic Remodeling and Increased Microglial Density in Primary Motor Cortex in a Murine Model of Facial Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, Diana; Troncoso, Julieta; Múnera, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This work was aimed at characterizing structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with microglial density induced by facial nerve lesion using a murine facial paralysis model. Adult transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in projecting neurons, were submitted to either unilateral section of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Injured animals were sacrificed either 1 or 3 weeks after surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1). It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in the dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Dendritic arborization of the pyramidal cells underwent overall shrinkage. Apical dendrites suffered transient shortening while basal dendrites displayed sustained shortening. Moreover, dendrites suffered transient spine pruning. Significantly higher microglial cell density was found surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons after facial nerve lesion with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. These results suggest that facial nerve lesions elicit active dendrite remodeling due to pyramidal neuron and microglia interaction, which could be the pathophysiological underpinning of some neuropathic motor sequelae in humans.

  15. Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons’ Dendritic Remodeling and Increased Microglial Density in Primary Motor Cortex in a Murine Model of Facial Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Urrego

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at characterizing structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with microglial density induced by facial nerve lesion using a murine facial paralysis model. Adult transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in projecting neurons, were submitted to either unilateral section of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Injured animals were sacrificed either 1 or 3weeks after surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1. It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in the dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Dendritic arborization of the pyramidal cells underwent overall shrinkage. Apical dendrites suffered transient shortening while basal dendrites displayed sustained shortening. Moreover, dendrites suffered transient spine pruning. Significantly higher microglial cell density was found surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons after facial nerve lesion with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. These results suggest that facial nerve lesions elicit active dendrite remodeling due to pyramidal neuron and microglia interaction, which could be the pathophysiological underpinning of some neuropathic motor sequelae in humans.

  16. Somato-dendritic mechanisms underlying the electrophysiological properties of hypothalamic magnocellular neuroendocrine cells: a multicompartmental model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komendantov, Alexander O; Trayanova, Natalia A; Tasker, Jeffrey G

    2007-10-01

    Magnocellular neuroendocrine cells (MNCs) of the hypothalamus synthesize the neurohormones vasopressin and oxytocin, which are released into the blood and exert a wide spectrum of actions, including the regulation of cardiovascular and reproductive functions. Vasopressin- and oxytocin-secreting neurons have similar morphological structure and electrophysiological characteristics. A realistic multicompartmental model of a MNC with a bipolar branching structure was developed and calibrated based on morphological and in vitro electrophysiological data in order to explore the roles of ion currents and intracellular calcium dynamics in the intrinsic electrical MNC properties. The model was used to determine the likely distributions of ion conductances in morphologically distinct parts of the MNCs: soma, primary dendrites and secondary dendrites. While reproducing the general electrophysiological features of MNCs, the model demonstrates that the differential spatial distributions of ion channels influence the functional expression of MNC properties, and reveals the potential importance of dendritic conductances in these properties.

  17. Space exploration by dendritic cells requires maintenance of myosin II activity by IP3 receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanes, Paola; Heuzé, Mélina L; Maurin, Mathieu; Bretou, Marine; Lautenschlaeger, Franziska; Maiuri, Paolo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Thoulouze, Maria-Isabel; Launay, Pierre; Piel, Matthieu; Vargas, Pablo; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2015-03-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) patrol the interstitial space of peripheral tissues. The mechanisms that regulate their migration in such constrained environment remain unknown. We here investigated the role of calcium in immature DCs migrating in confinement. We found that they displayed calcium oscillations that were independent of extracellular calcium and more frequently observed in DCs undergoing strong speed fluctuations. In these cells, calcium spikes were associated with fast motility phases. IP₃ receptors (IP₃Rs) channels, which allow calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, were identified as required for immature DCs to migrate at fast speed. The IP₃R1 isoform was further shown to specifically regulate the locomotion persistence of immature DCs, that is, their capacity to maintain directional migration. This function of IP₃R1 results from its ability to control the phosphorylation levels of myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC) and the back/front polarization of the motor protein. We propose that by upholding myosin II activity, constitutive calcium release from the ER through IP₃R1 maintains DC polarity during migration in confinement, facilitating the exploration of their environment.

  18. Emerging Roles of Filopodia and Dendritic Spines in Motoneuron Plasticity during Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refik Kanjhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Motoneurons develop extensive dendritic trees for receiving excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to perform a variety of complex motor tasks. At birth, the somatodendritic domains of mouse hypoglossal and lumbar motoneurons have dense filopodia and spines. Consistent with Vaughn’s synaptotropic hypothesis, we propose a developmental unified-hybrid model implicating filopodia in motoneuron spinogenesis/synaptogenesis and dendritic growth and branching critical for circuit formation and synaptic plasticity at embryonic/prenatal/neonatal period. Filopodia density decreases and spine density initially increases until postnatal day 15 (P15 and then decreases by P30. Spine distribution shifts towards the distal dendrites, and spines become shorter (stubby, coinciding with decreases in frequency and increases in amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents with maturation. In transgenic mice, either overexpressing the mutated human Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (hSOD1G93A gene or deficient in GABAergic/glycinergic synaptic transmission (gephyrin, GAD-67, or VGAT gene knockout, hypoglossal motoneurons develop excitatory glutamatergic synaptic hyperactivity. Functional synaptic hyperactivity is associated with increased dendritic growth, branching, and increased spine and filopodia density, involving actin-based cytoskeletal and structural remodelling. Energy-dependent ionic pumps that maintain intracellular sodium/calcium homeostasis are chronically challenged by activity and selectively overwhelmed by hyperactivity which eventually causes sustained membrane depolarization leading to excitotoxicity, activating microglia to phagocytose degenerating neurons under neuropathological conditions.

  19. Calcium and calcium isotope changes during carbon cycle perturbations at the end-Permian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Nemanja; Zeebe, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Negative carbon and calcium isotope excursions, as well as climate shifts, took place during the most severe mass extinction event in Earth's history, the end-Permian (˜252 Ma). Investigating the connection between carbon and calcium cycles during transient carbon cycle perturbation events, such as the end-Permian, may help resolve the intricacies between the coupled calcium-carbon cycles, as well as provide a tool for constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here, we identify the deficiencies of a simplified calcium model employed in several previous studies and we demonstrate the importance of a fully coupled carbon-cycle model when investigating the dynamics of carbon and calcium cycling. Simulations with a modified version of the LOSCAR model, which includes a fully coupled carbon-calcium cycle, indicate that increased weathering rates and ocean acidification (potentially caused by Siberian Trap volcanism) are not capable of producing trends observed in the record, as previously claimed. Our model results suggest that combined effects of carbon input via Siberian Trap volcanism (12,000 Pg C), the cessation of biological carbon export, and variable calcium isotope fractionation (due to a change in the seawater carbonate ion concentration) represents a more plausible scenario. This scenario successfully reconciles δ13C and δ44Ca trends observed in the sediment record, as well as the proposed warming of >6oC.

  20. Dysbalance of astrocyte calcium under hyperammonemic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Haack

    Full Text Available Increased brain ammonium (NH4(+/NH3 plays a central role in the manifestation of hepatic encephalopathy (HE, a complex syndrome associated with neurological and psychiatric alterations, which is primarily a disorder of astrocytes. Here, we analysed the influence of NH4(+/NH3 on the calcium concentration of astrocytes in situ and studied the underlying mechanisms of NH4(+/NH3-evoked calcium changes, employing fluorescence imaging with Fura-2 in acute tissue slices derived from different regions of the mouse brain. In the hippocampal stratum radiatum, perfusion with 5 mM NH4(+/NH3 for 30 minutes caused a transient calcium increase in about 40% of astrocytes lasting about 10 minutes. Furthermore, the vast majority of astrocytes (∼ 90% experienced a persistent calcium increase by ∼ 50 nM. This persistent increase was already evoked at concentrations of 1-2 mM NH4(+/NH3, developed within 10-20 minutes and was maintained as long as the NH4(+/NH3 was present. Qualitatively similar changes were observed in astrocytes of different neocortical regions as well as in cerebellar Bergmann glia. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase resulted in significantly larger calcium increases in response to NH4(+/NH3, indicating that glutamine accumulation was not a primary cause. Calcium increases were not mimicked by changes in intracellular pH. Pharmacological inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels, sodium-potassium-chloride-cotransporters (NKCC, the reverse mode of sodium/calcium exchange (NCX, AMPA- or mGluR5-receptors did not dampen NH4(+/NH3-induced calcium increases. They were, however, significantly reduced by inhibition of NMDA receptors and depletion of intracellular calcium stores. Taken together, our measurements show that sustained exposure to NH4(+/NH3 causes a sustained increase in intracellular calcium in astrocytes in situ, which is partly dependent on NMDA receptor activation and on release of calcium from intracellular stores. Our study

  1. Calcium Imaging of Sonoporation of Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabens, David; Aehle, Matthew; Steyer, Grant; Kourennyi, Dmitri; Deng, Cheri X.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound mediated delivery of compounds is a relatively recent development in drug delivery and gene transfection techniques. Due to the lack of methods for real-time monitoring of sonoporation at the cellular level, the efficiency of drug/gene delivery and sonoporation associated side effects, such as the loss of cell viability and enhanced apoptosis, have been studied only through post US exposure analyses, requiring days for cell incubation. Furthermore, because microporation appears to be transient in nature, it was not possible to correlate transfection with microporation on an individual cellular basis. By studying the role of calcium in the cell and using fluorescent calcium imaging to study sonoporation it is possible to quantify both cell porosity and sonoporation side effects. Since both post sonoporation cell survival and delivery efficiency are related to the dynamic process of the cell membrane poration, calcium imaging of sonoporation will provide important knowledge to obtain improved understanding of sonoporation mechanism. Our experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of calcium imaging of sonoporation in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. We have measured the changes in the intracellular calcium concentration using Fura-2, a fluorescent probe, which indicate influx or flow of Calcium across the cell membrane. Analysis of data identified key aspects in the dynamic sonoporation process including the formation of pores in the cell membrane, and the relative temporal duration of the pores and their resealing. These observations are obtained through the analysis of the rate the calcium concentration changes within the cells, making it possible to visualize membrane opening and repair in real-time through such changes in the intracellular calcium concentration.

  2. Dendritic spikes induce ripples in parvalbumin interneurons during hippocampal sharp waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiovini, Balázs; Turi, Gergely F; Katona, Gergely; Kaszás, Attila; Pálfi, Dénes; Maák, Pál; Szalay, Gergely; Szabó, Mátyás Forián; Szabó, Gábor; Szadai, Zoltán; Káli, Szabolcs; Rózsa, Balázs

    2014-05-21

    Sharp-wave ripples are transient oscillatory events in the hippocampus that are associated with the reactivation of neuronal ensembles within specific circuits during memory formation. Fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (FS-PV INs) are thought to provide fast integration in these oscillatory circuits by suppressing regenerative activity in their dendrites. Here, using fast 3D two-photon imaging and a caged glutamate, we challenge this classical view by demonstrating that FS-PV IN dendrites can generate propagating Ca(2+) spikes during sharp-wave ripples. The spikes originate from dendritic hot spots and are mediated dominantly by L-type Ca(2+) channels. Notably, Ca(2+) spikes were associated with intrinsically generated membrane potential oscillations. These oscillations required the activation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, had the same frequency as the field potential oscillations associated with sharp-wave ripples, and controlled the phase of action potentials. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the smallest functional unit that can generate ripple-frequency oscillations is a segment of a dendrite.

  3. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an ... a short time. The only difference between a stroke and TIA is that with TIA the blockage ...

  4. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an ... a short time. The only difference between a stroke and TIA is that with TIA the blockage ...

  5. Searches for radio transients

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, N D R

    2011-01-01

    Exploration of the transient Universe is an exciting and fast-emerging area within radio astronomy. Known transient phenomena range in time scales from sub-nanoseconds to years or longer, thus spanning a huge range in time domain and hinting a rich diversity in their underlying physical processes. Transient phenomena are likely locations of explosive or dynamic events and they offer tremendous potential to uncover new physics and astrophysics. A number of upcoming next-generation radio facilities and recent advances in computing and instrumentation have provided a much needed impetus for this field which has remained a relatively uncharted territory for the past several decades. In this paper we focus mainly on the class of phenomena that occur on very short time scales (i.e. from $\\sim$ milliseconds to $\\sim$ nanoseconds), known as {\\it fast transients}, the detections of which involve considerable signal processing and data management challenges, given the high time and frequency resolutions required in the...

  6. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ischemic Attack TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery for a short time. The only difference between a stroke ...

  7. Dendritic tellurides acting as antioxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Huaping; WANG Yapei; WANG Zhiqiang; LIU Junqiu; Mario Smet; Wim Dehaen

    2006-01-01

    We have described the synthesis of a series of poly(aryl ether) dendrimers with telluride in the core and oligo(ethylene oxide) chains at the periphery which act as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) mimics. These series of compounds were well characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and ESI-MS. Using different ROOH (H2O2, cumene hydroperoxide) for testing the antioxidizing properties of these compounds, we have found that from generation 0 to 2, the activity of the dendritic GPx mimics first decreased and then increased. This can be explained on the basis of a greater steric hindrance, going from generation 0 to 1, and stronger binding interactions going from generation 1 to 2. In other words, there exists a balance between binding interactions and steric hindrance that may optimize the GPx activity.

  8. Fate mapping of dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ursula Schraml

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are a heterogeneous group of mononuclear phagocytes with versatile roles in immunity. They are classified predominantly based on phenotypic and functional properties, namely their stellate morphology, expression of the integrin CD11c and major histocompatibility class II molecules, as well as their superior capacity to migrate to secondary lymphoid organs and stimulate naïve T cells. However, these attributes are not exclusive to DCs and often change within inflammatory or infectious environments. This led to debates over cell identification and questioned even the mere existence of DCs as distinct leukocyte lineage. Here, we review experimental approaches taken to fate map DCs and discuss how these have shaped our understanding of DC ontogeny and lineage affiliation. Considering the ontogenetic properties of DCs will help to overcome the inherent shortcomings of purely phenotypic- and function-based approaches to cell definition and will yield a more robust way of DC classification.

  9. Dendritic Cells for Anomaly Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Aickelin, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems, more specifically the negative selection algorithm, have previously been applied to intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on a novel concept in immunology, the Danger Theory. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are antigen presenting cells and key to the activation of the human signals from the host tissue and correlate these signals with proteins know as antigens. In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion based on time-windows. The whole population of DCs asynchronously correlates the fused signals with a secondary data stream. The behaviour of human DCs is abstracted to form the DC Algorithm (DCA), which is implemented using an immune inspired framework, libtissue. This system is used to detect context switching for a basic machine learning dataset and to detect outgoing portscans in real-time. Experimental results show a significant difference between an outgoing portscan and normal traffic.

  10. Transient multivariable sensor evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilim, Richard B.; Heifetz, Alexander

    2017-02-21

    A method and system for performing transient multivariable sensor evaluation. The method and system includes a computer system for identifying a model form, providing training measurement data, generating a basis vector, monitoring system data from sensor, loading the system data in a non-transient memory, performing an estimation to provide desired data and comparing the system data to the desired data and outputting an alarm for a defective sensor.

  11. Transient multivariable sensor evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilim, Richard B.; Heifetz, Alexander

    2017-02-21

    A method and system for performing transient multivariable sensor evaluation. The method and system includes a computer system for identifying a model form, providing training measurement data, generating a basis vector, monitoring system data from sensor, loading the system data in a non-transient memory, performing an estimation to provide desired data and comparing the system data to the desired data and outputting an alarm for a defective sensor.

  12. Integumentary loss of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J Y; Margen, S; Calloway, D H; Costa, F M

    1979-08-01

    Integumentary calcium loss was studied in 16 healthy young men. The daily loss by the 16 ambulatory but relatively sedentary young men in 52 determinations of 6-day periods each was 8.7 +/- 1.9 mg/m2 per day (average 15.8 mg/man per day). The amount lost was not influenced by calcium intake (0.1 to 2.3 g/day). In contrast to urinary calcium excretion, which is directly related to protein intake, there was no significant change in integumentary calcium loss with varying protein intakes (1 to 96 g nitrogen per day). No compensatory relationship between urinary and integumentary calcium excretion was noted. During strenuous exercise calcium loss increased to an average of 25 mg in 40 min. There was no compensatory decrease in urinary excretion on the day of strenuous exercise. It was also noted that integumentary calcium loss was not affected by general calcium balance.

  13. Simultaneous Denoising, Deconvolution, and Demixing of Calcium Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A; Soudry, Daniel; Gao, Yuanjun; Machado, Timothy A; Merel, Josh; Pfau, David; Reardon, Thomas; Mu, Yu; Lacefield, Clay; Yang, Weijian; Ahrens, Misha; Bruno, Randy; Jessell, Thomas M; Peterka, Darcy S; Yuste, Rafael; Paninski, Liam

    2016-01-20

    We present a modular approach for analyzing calcium imaging recordings of large neuronal ensembles. Our goal is to simultaneously identify the locations of the neurons, demix spatially overlapping components, and denoise and deconvolve the spiking activity from the slow dynamics of the calcium indicator. Our approach relies on a constrained nonnegative matrix factorization that expresses the spatiotemporal fluorescence activity as the product of a spatial matrix that encodes the spatial footprint of each neuron in the optical field and a temporal matrix that characterizes the calcium concentration of each neuron over time. This framework is combined with a novel constrained deconvolution approach that extracts estimates of neural activity from fluorescence traces, to create a spatiotemporal processing algorithm that requires minimal parameter tuning. We demonstrate the general applicability of our method by applying it to in vitro and in vivo multi-neuronal imaging data, whole-brain light-sheet imaging data, and dendritic imaging data.

  14. On the structure of amorphous calcium carbonate--a detailed study by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Holger; Neumann, Markus; Mayer, Christian; Epple, Matthias

    2008-09-01

    The calcium carbonate phases calcite, aragonite, vaterite, monohydrocalcite (calcium carbonate monohydrate), and ikaite (calcium carbonate hexahydrate) were studied by solid-state NMR spectroscopy ( (1)H and (13)C). Further model compounds were sodium hydrogencarbonate, potassium hydrogencarbonate, and calcium hydroxide. With the help of these data, the structure of synthetically prepared additive-free amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was analyzed. ACC contains molecular water (as H 2O), a small amount of mobile hydroxide, and no hydrogencarbonate. This supports the concept of ACC as a transient precursor in the formation of calcium carbonate biominerals.

  15. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  16. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  17. The role of calcium in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, M L; Heaney, R P; Kalkwarf, H J; Pitkin, R M; Repke, J T; Tsang, R C; Schulkin, J

    1999-12-01

    Skeletal fragility at the end of the life span (osteoporosis) is a major source of morbidity and mortality. Adequate calcium intake from childhood to the end of the life span is critical for the formation and retention of a healthy skeleton. High intakes of calcium and vitamin D potentiate the bone loss prevention effects of hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women. Pregnancy and lactation are not risk factors for skeletal fragility, although lactation is associated with a transient loss of bone that cannot be prevented by calcium supplementation. Low calcium intake has been implicated in the development of hypertension, colon cancer, and premenstrual syndrome, and it is associated with low intakes of many other nutrients. Encouragement of increased consumption of calcium-rich foods has the potential to be a cost-effective strategy for reducing fracture incidence later in life and for increasing patients' dietary quality and overall health.

  18. Calcium - Function and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Jianfen; He, Yifan; Gao, Qian; Wang, Xuan; Nout, M.J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the primary food source for more than half of the world population. Levels of calcium contents and inhibitor - phytic acid are summarized in this chapter. Phytic acid has a very strong chelating ability and it is the main inhibit factor for calcium in rice products. Calcium contents in br

  19. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of cardiop

  20. Dendritic cells are stressed out in tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    A recently paper published in Cell reports that dendritic cells (DCs) are dysfunctional in the tumor environment. Tumor impairs DC function through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress response and subsequent disruption of lipid metabolic homeostasis.

  1. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, Nicholas P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ion channel dysfunction or “channelopathy” is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Here we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. PMID:23216577

  2. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, Nicholas P; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Ion channel dysfunction or "channelopathy" is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Herein we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Artificial Dendritic Cells: Multi-faceted Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the crime scene investigators of the human immune system. Their function is to correlate potentially anomalous invading entities with observed damage to the body. The detection of such invaders by dendritic cells results in the activation of the adaptive immune system, eventually leading to the removal of the invader from the host body. This mechanism has provided inspiration for the development of a novel bio-inspired algorithm, the Dendritic Cell Algorithm. This algorithm processes information at multiple levels of resolution, resulting in the creation of information granules of variable structure. In this chapter we examine the multi-faceted nature of immunology and how research in this field has shaped the function of the resulting Dendritic Cell Algorithm. A brief overview of the algorithm is given in combination with the details of the processes used for its development. The chapter is concluded with a discussion of the parallels between our understanding of the human immune system a...

  4. “Dermal dendritic cells” comprise two distinct populations: CD1+ dendritic cells and CD209+ macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa,Maria Teresa; Loncaric, Anya; Krutzik, Stephan R.; Becker, Todd C.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    A key cell type of the resident skin immune system is the dendritic cell, which in normal skin is located in two distinct microanatomical compartments: Langerhans cells (LC) mainly in the epidermis and dermal dendritic cells (DDC) in the dermis. Here, the lineage of dermal dendritic cells was investigated using monoclonal antibodies and immunohistology. We provide evidence that “dermal dendritic cells” comprise at least two major phenotypic populations of dendritic appearing cells: immature D...

  5. Free energy and dendritic self-organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J Kiebel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we pursue recent observations that, through selective dendritic filtering, single neurons respond to specific sequences of presynaptic inputs. We try to provide a principled and mechanistic account of this selectivity by applying the free energy principle to a dendrite that is immersed in its neuropil or environment. We assume that neurons self-organize to minimise a free energy bound on the self-information or surprise of presynaptic inputs that are sampled. We model this as a selective pruning of dendritic spines that are expressed on a dendritic branch. This pruning occurs when the optimized postsynaptic gain falls below a threshold. Crucially, postsynaptic gain is itself optimized with respect to free energy. Pruning suppresses free energy as the dendrite selects presynaptic signals that conform to its expectations, specified by a generative model implicit in its intracellular kinetics. Not only does this provide a principled account of how neurons organize and selectively sample the myriad of potential presynaptic inputs they are exposed to, but it also connects the optimization of elemental neuronal (dendritic processing to generic (surprise or evidence-based schemes in statistics and machine learning, such as Bayesian model selection and automatic relevance determination.

  6. Synaptic Control of Secretory Trafficking in Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Hanus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Localized signaling in neuronal dendrites requires tight spatial control of membrane composition. Upon initial synthesis, nascent secretory cargo in dendrites exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER from local zones of ER complexity that are spatially coupled to post-ER compartments. Although newly synthesized membrane proteins can be processed locally, the mechanisms that control the spatial range of secretory cargo transport in dendritic segments are unknown. Here, we monitored the dynamics of nascent membrane proteins in dendritic post-ER compartments under regimes of low or increased neuronal activity. In response to activity blockade, post-ER carriers are highly mobile and are transported over long distances. Conversely, increasing synaptic activity dramatically restricts the spatial scale of post-ER trafficking along dendrites. This activity-induced confinement of secretory cargo requires site-specific phosphorylation of the kinesin motor KIF17 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK. Thus, the length scales of early secretory trafficking in dendrites are tuned by activity-dependent regulation of microtubule-dependent transport.

  7. The yin and yang of calcium effects on synaptic vesicle endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin-Sheng; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2014-02-12

    A large number of studies suggest that calcium triggers and accelerates vesicle endocytosis at many synapses and non-neuronal secretory cells. However, many studies show that prolonging the duration of the stimulation train, which induces more calcium influx, slows down endocytosis; and several studies suggest that instead of triggering endocytosis, calcium actually inhibits endocytosis. Here we addressed this apparent conflict at a large nerve terminal, the calyx of Held in rat brainstem, in which recent studies suggest that transient calcium increase up to tens of micromolar concentration at the micro/nano domain triggers endocytosis. By dialyzing 0-1 μM calcium into the calyx via a whole-cell pipette, we found that slow endocytosis was inhibited by calcium dialysis in a concentration-dependent manner. Thus, prolonged, small, and global calcium increase inhibits endocytosis, whereas transient and large calcium increase at the micro/nano domain triggers endocytosis and facilitates endocytosis. This yin and yang effect of calcium may reconcile apparent conflicts regarding whether calcium accelerates or inhibits endocytosis. Whether endocytosis is fast or slow depends on the net outcome between the yin and yang effect of calcium.

  8. Simultaneous electrophysiological recording and calcium imaging of suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Robert P; Allen, Charles N

    2013-12-08

    Simultaneous electrophysiological and fluorescent imaging recording methods were used to study the role of changes of membrane potential or current in regulating the intracellular calcium concentration. Changing environmental conditions, such as the light-dark cycle, can modify neuronal and neural network activity and the expression of a family of circadian clock genes within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the location of the master circadian clock in the mammalian brain. Excitatory synaptic transmission leads to an increase in the postsynaptic Ca(2+) concentration that is believed to activate the signaling pathways that shifts the rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes. Hypothalamic slices containing the SCN were patch clamped using microelectrodes filled with an internal solution containing the calcium indicator bis-fura-2. After a seal was formed between the microelectrode and the SCN neuronal membrane, the membrane was ruptured using gentle suction and the calcium probe diffused into the neuron filling both the soma and dendrites. Quantitative ratiometric measurements of the intracellular calcium concentration were recorded simultaneously with membrane potential or current. Using these methods it is possible to study the role of changes of the intracellular calcium concentration produced by synaptic activity and action potential firing of individual neurons. In this presentation we demonstrate the methods to simultaneously record electrophysiological activity along with intracellular calcium from individual SCN neurons maintained in brain slices.

  9. In Situ Observation of Cell-to-Dendrite Transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xiu-Hong; HONG Yong; JIN Wei-Qing

    2005-01-01

    @@ The cell-to-dendrite transition of succinonitrile melt suspended on a loop-shaped Pt heater is observed in real time by a differential interference microscope coupled with Schlieren technique. The transition is divided into two parts: a dendrite coalition process and a subsequent dendrite elimination process. Firstly the dendrites from the same cell are united into a single dendrite. Secondly the competitive growth of dendrites from different cells leads to the elimination of dendrites. The two processes can be understood when involving crystallographic orientation. In addition, the tip velocity and primary spacing of a cell/dendrite are also measured. It turns out that the primary spacing has a significant jump, whereas the growth velocity has no abrupt change during the cell-to-dendrite transition.

  10. Calcium signaling and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2014-08-01

    Calcium signaling is involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. Over the last decade, it has been increasingly recognized as an important factor in epileptogenesis, and it is becoming obvious that the excess synchronization of neurons that is characteristic for seizures can be linked to various calcium signaling pathways. These include immediate effects on membrane excitability by calcium influx through ion channels as well as delayed mechanisms that act through G-protein coupled pathways. Calcium signaling is able to cause hyperexcitability either by direct modulation of neuronal activity or indirectly through calcium-dependent gliotransmission. Furthermore, feedback mechanisms between mitochondrial calcium signaling and reactive oxygen species are able to cause neuronal cell death and seizures. Unravelling the complexity of calcium signaling in epileptogenesis is a daunting task, but it includes the promise to uncover formerly unknown targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs.

  11. Dendritic cells in melanoma - immunohistochemical study and research trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedelcu, Roxana Ioana; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Holeab, Cosmin Adrian; Cioplea, Mirela Daniela; Brînzea, Alice; Zurac, Sabina Andrada

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous dendritic cells play multiple physiological roles and are involved in various pathophysiological processes. Research studies of dendritic cells abound in the medical literature. Nevertheless, the role of dendritic cells in melanoma regression phenomenon is not completely understood. We conducted a scientometric analysis in order to highlight the current state on research regarding dendritic cells and melanoma. We also performed an immunohistochemical study, using specific markers for dendritic cells (CD1a, langerin). We evaluated the frequency and distribution of dendritic cells in areas of tumor regression compared to the areas of inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma without regression. The immunohistochemical study we performed revealed that dendritic cells are more frequent in the regressed areas, comparing with non-regressed ones. In regressed areas, dendritic cells have a predominant nodular pattern (19 cases), followed by diffuse isolate pattern (eight cases) and mixed pattern (diffuse and nodular) (three cases). In melanoma without regression, most cases presented a diffuse pattern (27 cases) of dendritic cells distribution. In conclusion, our immunohistochemical study stressed differences between frequency and distribution of dendritic cells located in the melanoma with regression and melanoma without regression. These data suggest that dendritic cells are involved in the regression phenomenon. Following the literature analysis we obtained, we observed that dendritic cells profile in melanoma with regression was poorly studied. Insights into antitumor immune response and dendritic cells may be essential for the understanding of the potential prognostic role of dendritic cells in melanoma and for the development of new promising therapeutic strategies for melanoma.

  12. Exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields alters the calcium dynamics of cultured entorhinal cortex neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fen-Lan; Yang, Nian; He, Chao; Li, Hong-Li; Li, Chao; Chen, Fang; Xiong, Jia-Xiang; Hu, Zhi-An; Zhang, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies have revealed that extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) exposure affects neuronal dendritic spine density and NMDAR and AMPAR subunit expressions in the entorhinal cortex (EC). Although calcium signaling has a critical role in control of EC neuronal functions, however, it is still unclear whether the ELF-EMF exposure affects the EC neuronal calcium homeostasis. In the present study, using whole-cell recording and calcium imaging, we record the whole-cell inward currents that contain the voltage-gated calcium currents and show that ELF-EMF (50Hz, 1mT or 3mT, lasting 24h) exposure does not influence these currents. Next, we specifically isolate the high-voltage activated (HVA) and low-voltage activated (LVA) calcium channels-induced currents. Similarly, the activation and inactivation characteristics of these membrane calcium channels are also not influenced by ELF-EMF. Importantly, ELF-EMF exposure reduces the maximum amplitude of the high-K(+)-evoked calcium elevation in EC neurons, which is abolished by thapsigargin, a Ca(2+) ATPase inhibitor, to empty the intracellular calcium stores of EC neurons. Together, these findings indicate that ELF-EMF exposure specifically influences the intracellular calcium dynamics of cultural EC neurons via a calcium channel-independent mechanism.

  13. SURFACE MODIFICATION OF CaCO3 WITH DENDRITIC CARBOXYLIC ACIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-xia Guo; Jian Yu

    2002-01-01

    Nanometer calcium carbonate was modified with Frechet type polyether dendrons bearing a COOH group at the focal point by a wet-coating technique in dichloromethane at room temperature. The interaction between CaCO3 and the dendritic modifier was proven by IR and mass spectroscopy of the modified CaCO3 after thorough extraction with dichloromethane. The amount of tightly bonded organic modifier was estimated by TGA. It was shown that the amount of bonded molecules decreased with increasing generation number due to the larger number of branches. Compared to unmodified CaCO3, the modified CaCO3 possess different dispersibility in water and in organic solvents.

  14. Architecture of apical dendrites in the murine neocortex: dual apical dendritic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, M I; Pimienta, H; Caviness, V S; Jacobson, M; Crandall, J E; Kosik, K S

    1986-04-01

    A monoclonal antibody (5F9) against microtubule-associated protein 2 is a selective and sensitive marker for neocortical dendrites in the mouse. The marker stains all dendrites. It affords a particularly comprehensive picture of the patterns of arrangements of apical dendrites which are most intensely stained with this antibody. Dual systems of apical dendrites arise from the polymorphic neurons of layer VI, on the one hand, and the pyramidal neurons of layers II-V, on the other. Terminal arborization of the former is concentrated principally at the interface of layers V and IV, while that of the latter is in the molecular layer. Apical dendrites of both systems are grouped into fascicles. In supragranular layers and in upper layer VI-lower layer V, where apical dendrites are most abundant, the fascicles coalesce into septa. These generate a honeycomb-like pattern, subdividing these cortical levels into columnar spaces of approximately 20-40 micron diameter. At the level of layer IV, where the number of apical dendrites is greatly reduced, the fascicles are isolated bundles. These bundles have the form of circular, elliptical or rectangular columns in the primary somatosensory, temporal and frontal regions, respectively. Those in the barrel field are preferentially concentrated in the sides of barrels and the interbarrel septa. The configurations of the dendritic fascicles, particularly the midcortical bundles, may conform to the spatial configuration of investing axons of interneurons.

  15. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized antigen presenting cells (APC) with a remarkable ability to take up antigens and stimulate major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted specific immune responses. Recent discoveries have shown that their role in initiating primary immune responses seems to be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC are considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC.

  16. Voltage transients elicited by sudden step-up of auxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, B. G.

    1984-01-01

    It is hypothesized (i) that the molecular mechanism for the reception of friction and flexure and the mechanism by which auxin enhances ethylene production have in common a release of free calcium into the cytosol, (ii) that elevated cytosolic calcium initiates vesicle exocytosis, and (iii) that the vesicles release a factor or set of factors which depolarizes the plasmalemma and promotes ethylene synthesis. One consequence of such exocytosis should be small, extracellularly observable voltage transients. Transients, ranging in size up to 600 microvolts and possessing risetimes (10-90%) of approximately 200 ms, are known to be elicited in etiolated stems of Pisum sativum L. by friction and are here shown to be elicited by sudden increase of auxin concentration and also by a Ca2+ ionophore.

  17. Nonequilibrium calcium dynamics regulate the autonomous firing pattern of rat striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Joshua A; Teagarden, Mark A; Foehring, Robert C; Wilson, Charles J

    2009-07-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons discharge rhythmically in two patterns associated with different afterhyperpolarization timescales, each dictated by a different calcium-dependent potassium current. Single spiking depends on a medium-duration afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) generated by rapid SK currents that are associated with N-type calcium channels. Periodic bursting is driven by a delayed and slowly decaying afterhyperpolarization (sAHP) current associated with L-type channels. Using calcium imaging we show that the calcium transients underlying these currents exhibit two corresponding timescales throughout the somatodendritic tree. This result is not consistent with spatial compartmentalization of calcium entering through the two calcium channels and acting on the two potassium currents, or with differences in channel gating kinetics of the calcium dependent potassium currents. Instead, we show that nonequilibrium dynamics of calcium redistribution among cytoplasmic binding sites with different calcium binding kinetics can give rise to multiple timescales within the same cytoplasmic volume. The resulting independence of mAHP and sAHP currents allows cytoplasmic calcium to control two different and incompatible firing patterns (single spiking or bursting and pausing), depending on whether calcium influx is pulsatile or sustained. During irregular firing, calcium entry at both timescales can be detected, suggesting that an interaction between the medium and slow calcium-dependent afterhyperpolarizations may underlie this firing pattern.

  18. Transient lingual papillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornerup, Ida M; Senye, Mireya; Peters, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    A case of recurrent, clinically innocuous, but painful papules involving the tongue dorsum of a 25-year-old man is presented. The lesions were interpreted to represent a transient lingual papillitis. This a poorly understood, but benign and self-limited condition involving the tongue fungiform papillae, which does not appear to be widely recognized.

  19. Transient Heat Conduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten

    1998-01-01

    Analytical theory of transient heat conduction.Fourier's law. General heat conducation equation. Thermal diffusivity. Biot and Fourier numbers. Lumped analysis and time constant. Semi-infinite body: fixed surface temperature, convective heat transfer at the surface, or constant surface heat flux...

  20. Transient tachypnea - newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or reabsorbing it. The first few breaths a baby takes after delivery fill the lungs with air and help to ... goes away within 24 to 48 hours after delivery. In most cases, babies who have had transient tachypnea have no further ...

  1. On Detecting Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Belanger, G

    2013-01-01

    Transient phenomena are interesting and potentially highly revealing of details about the processes under observation and study that could otherwise go unnoticed. It is therefore important to maximise the sensitivity of the method used to identify such events. In this article we present a general procedure based on the use of the likelihood function for identifying transients that is particularly suited for real-time applications because it requires no grouping or pre-processing of the data. The method is optimal in the sense that all the information that is available in the data is used in the statistical decision making process, and is suitable for a wide range of applications. We here consider those most common in astrophysics which involve searching for transient sources, events or features in images, time series, energy spectra and power spectra, and demonstrate the use of the method in the cases of a transient in a time series or in a power spectrum. We derive a fit statistic that is ideal for fitting a...

  2. The LOFAR Transients Pipeline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinbank, J.; Staley, T.; Molenaar, G.; Rol, E.; Rowlinson, A.; Scheers, L.H.A.; Spreeuw, H.; Bell, M.E.; Broderick, J.; Carbone, D.; Garsden, H.; Horst, A. van der; Law, C.J.; Wise, M.W.; Breton, R.P.; Cendes, Y.; Corbel, S.; Eisloeffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Fender, R.P.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Stappers, B.W.; Stewart, A.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Wijnands, R.; Zarka, P.

    2015-01-01

    Current and future astronomical survey facilities provide a remarkably rich opportunity for transient astronomy, combining unprecedented fields of view with high sensitivity and the ability to access previously unexplored wavelength regimes. This is particularly true of LOFAR, a recently-commissione

  3. Intracellular correlates of acquisition and long-term memory of classical conditioning in Purkinje cell dendrites in slices of rabbit cerebellar lobule HVI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, B G; Gusev, P A; Tomsic, D; Alkon, D L; Shi, T

    1998-07-15

    Intradendritic recordings in Purkinje cells from a defined area in parasaggital slices of cerebellar lobule HVI, obtained after rabbits were given either paired (classical conditioning) or explicitly unpaired (control) presentations of tone and periorbital electrical stimulation, were used to assess the nature and duration of conditioning-specific changes in Purkinje cell dendritic membrane excitability. We found a strong relationship between the level of conditioning and Purkinje cell dendritic membrane excitability after initial acquisition of the conditioned response. Moreover, conditioning-specific increases in Purkinje cell excitability were still present 1 month after classical conditioning. Although dendritically recorded membrane potential, input resistance, and amplitude of somatic and dendritic spikes were not different in cells from paired or control animals, the size of a potassium channel-mediated transient hyperpolarization was significantly smaller in cells from animals that received classical conditioning. In slices of lobule HVI obtained from naive rabbits, the conditioning-related increases in membrane excitability could be mimicked by application of potassium channel antagonist tetraethylammonium chloride, iberiotoxin, or 4-aminopyridine. However, only 4-aminopyridine was able to reduce the transient hyperpolarization. The pharmacological data suggest a role for potassium channels and, possibly, channels mediating an IA-like current, in learning-specific changes in membrane excitability. The conditioning-specific increase in Purkinje cell dendritic excitability produces an afterhyperpolarization, which is hypothesized to release the cerebellar deep nuclei from inhibition, allowing conditioned responses to be elicited via the red nucleus and accessory abducens motorneurons.

  4. Brief RU 38486 Treatment Normalizes the Effects of Chronic Stress on Calcium Currents in Rat Hippocampal CA1 Neurons.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karst, H.; Joëls, M.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic stress alters many properties in rat brain, like serotonin responsiveness and dendritic morphology. In the present study, we examined (i) whether unpredictable stress during 21 days affects calcium (Ca) currents of CA1 pyramidal neurons recorded on day 22; and (ii) if so, whether this change

  5. Compressive Transient Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Qilin

    2017-04-01

    High resolution transient/3D imaging technology is of high interest in both scientific research and commercial application. Nowadays, all of the transient imaging methods suffer from low resolution or time consuming mechanical scanning. We proposed a new method based on TCSPC and Compressive Sensing to achieve a high resolution transient imaging with a several seconds capturing process. Picosecond laser sends a serious of equal interval pulse while synchronized SPAD camera\\'s detecting gate window has a precise phase delay at each cycle. After capturing enough points, we are able to make up a whole signal. By inserting a DMD device into the system, we are able to modulate all the frames of data using binary random patterns to reconstruct a super resolution transient/3D image later. Because the low fill factor of SPAD sensor will make a compressive sensing scenario ill-conditioned, We designed and fabricated a diffractive microlens array. We proposed a new CS reconstruction algorithm which is able to denoise at the same time for the measurements suffering from Poisson noise. Instead of a single SPAD senor, we chose a SPAD array because it can drastically reduce the requirement for the number of measurements and its reconstruction time. Further more, it not easy to reconstruct a high resolution image with only one single sensor while for an array, it just needs to reconstruct small patches and a few measurements. In this thesis, we evaluated the reconstruction methods using both clean measurements and the version corrupted by Poisson noise. The results show how the integration over the layers influence the image quality and our algorithm works well while the measurements suffer from non-trival Poisson noise. It\\'s a breakthrough in the areas of both transient imaging and compressive sensing.

  6. Calcium Transient and Sodium-Calcium Exchange Current in Human versus Rabbit Sinoatrial Node Pacemaker Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Verkerk, Arie O.; Marcel M. G. J. van Borren; Ronald Wilders

    2013-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate on the mechanism underlying the pacemaker activity of sinoatrial node (SAN) cells, focusing on the relative importance of the “membrane clock” and the “Ca2+ clock” in the generation of the small net membrane current that depolarizes the cell towards the action potential threshold. Specifically, the debate centers around the question whether the membrane clock-driven hyperpolarization-activated current, I f , which is also known as the “funny current” or “pacemaker c...

  7. Nerve Conduction Through Dendrites via Proton Hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kier, Lemont B

    2017-01-01

    In our previous studies of nerve conduction conducted by proton hopping, we have considered the axon, soma, synapse and the nodes of Ranvier. The role of proton hopping described the passage of information through each of these units of a typical nerve system. The synapse projects information from the axon to the dendrite and their associated spines. We have invoked the passage of protons via a hopping mechanism to illustrate the continuum of the impulse through the system, via the soma following the dendrites. This is proposed to be a continuum invoked by the proton hopping method. With the proposal of the activity through the dendrites, via proton hopping, a complete model of the nerve function is invoked. At each step to the way, a water pathway is present and is invoked in the proposed model as the carrier of the message via proton hopping. The importance of the dendrites is evident by the presence of a vast number of spines, each possessing the possibility to carry unique messages through the nervous system. With this model of the role of dendrites, functioning with the presence of proton hopping, a complete model of the nerve system is presented. The validity of this model will be available for further studies and models to assess it's validity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Tau causes synapse loss without disrupting calcium homeostasis in the rTg4510 model of tauopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J Kopeikina

    Full Text Available Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs of tau are one of the defining hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD, and are closely associated with neuronal degeneration. Although it has been suggested that calcium dysregulation is important to AD pathogenesis, few studies have probed the link between calcium homeostasis, synapse loss and pathological changes in tau. Here we test the hypothesis that pathological changes in tau are associated with changes in calcium by utilizing in vivo calcium imaging in adult rTg4510 mice that exhibit severe tau pathology due to over-expression of human mutant P301L tau. We observe prominent dendritic spine loss without disruptions in calcium homeostasis, indicating that tangles do not disrupt this fundamental feature of neuronal health, and that tau likely induces spine loss in a calcium-independent manner.

  9. Calcium channel blocker poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers act at L-type calcium channels in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles by preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decrease in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy, chronotropy and dromotropy. Poisoning with calcium channel blockers results in reduced cardiac output, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension and shock. The findings of hypotension and bradycardia should suggest poisoning with calcium channel blockers.Conclusions: Treatment includes immediate gastric lavage and whole-bowel irrigation in case of ingestion of sustainedrelease products. All patients should receive an activated charcoal orally. Specific treatment includes calcium, glucagone and insulin, which proved especially useful in shocked patients. Supportive care including the use of catecholamines is not always effective. In the setting of failure of pharmacological therapy transvenous pacing, balloon pump and cardiopulmonary by-pass may be necessary.

  10. Calcium is important forus.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高利平

    2005-01-01

    Calcium is important for our health.We must have it in our diet to stay well.A good place to get it is from dairy products like milk, cheese and ice cream.One pound of cheese has fifty times the calcium we should have every day.Other foods have less.For example,a pound of beans also has calcium.But it has only three times the amount we ought to have daily.

  11. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), TRPV4, and the kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassmann, M.; Harteneck, C.; Zhu, Z.;

    2013-01-01

    Recent preclinical data indicate that activators of transient receptor potential channels of the vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (TRPV1) may improve the outcome of ischaemic acute kidney injury (AKI). The underlying mechanisms are unclear, but may involve TRPV1 channels in dorsal root ganglion neuro...... pharmacological TRPV modulators may be a successful strategy for better treatment of acute or chronic kidney failure.......Recent preclinical data indicate that activators of transient receptor potential channels of the vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (TRPV1) may improve the outcome of ischaemic acute kidney injury (AKI). The underlying mechanisms are unclear, but may involve TRPV1 channels in dorsal root ganglion...... neurones that innervate the kidney. Recent data identified TRPV4, together with TRPV1, to serve as major calcium influx channels in endothelial cells. In these cells, gating of individual TRPV4 channels within a four-channel cluster provides elementary calcium influx (calcium sparklets) to open calcium...

  12. Detecting Danger: The Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Cayzer, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA) is inspired by the function of the dendritic cells of the human immune system. In nature, dendritic cells are the intrusion detection agents of the human body, policing the tissue and organs for potential invaders in the form of pathogens. In this research, and abstract model of DC behaviour is developed and subsequently used to form an algorithm, the DCA. The abstraction process was facilitated through close collaboration with laboratory- based immunologists, who performed bespoke experiments, the results of which are used as an integral part of this algorithm. The DCA is a population based algorithm, with each agent in the system represented as an 'artificial DC'. Each DC has the ability to combine multiple data streams and can add context to data suspected as anomalous. In this chapter the abstraction process and details of the resultant algorithm are given. The algorithm is applied to numerous intrusion detection problems in computer security including the detection of p...

  13. Semiautomated analysis of dendrite morphology in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Eric S; Langhammer, Chris L; Kutzing, Melinda K; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2013-01-01

    Quantifying dendrite morphology is a method for determining the effect of biochemical pathways and extracellular agents on neuronal development and differentiation. Quantification can be performed using Sholl analysis, dendrite counting, and length quantification. These procedures can be performed on dendrite-forming cell lines or primary neurons grown in culture. In this protocol, we describe the use of a set of computer programs to assist in quantifying many aspects of dendrite morphology, including changes in total and localized arbor complexity.

  14. Role of active dendritic conductances in subthreshold input integration

    OpenAIRE

    Rinzel John; Remme Michiel

    2010-01-01

    Dendrites of many types of neurons contain voltage-dependent conductances that are active at subthreshold membrane potentials. To understand the computations neurons perform it is key to understand the role of active dendrites in the subthreshold processing of synaptic inputs. We examine systematically how active dendritic conductances affect the time course of postsynaptic potentials propagating along dendrites, and how they affect the interaction between such signals. Voltage-dependent curr...

  15. Infection of Dendritic Cells by the Maedi-Visna Lentivirus

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Susanna; Tiley, Laurence; McConnell, Ian; Blacklaws, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    The early stages of lentivirus infection of dendritic cells have been studied in an in vivo model. Maedi-visna virus (MVV) is a natural pathogen of sheep with a tropism for macrophages, but the infection of dendritic cells has not been proven, largely because of the difficulties of definitively distinguishing the two cell types. Afferent lymphatic dendritic cells from sheep have been phenotypically characterized and separated from macrophages. Dendritic cells purified from experimentally infe...

  16. Actin remodeling and polymerization forces control dendritic spine morphology

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are small membranous structures that protrude from the neuronal dendrite. Each spine contains a synaptic contact site that may connect its parent dendrite to the axons of neighboring neurons. Dendritic spines are markedly distinct in shape and size, and certain types of stimulation prompt spines to evolve, in fairly predictable fashion, from thin nascent morphologies to the mushroom-like shapes associated with mature spines. This striking progression is coincident with the (r...

  17. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie T. Ramírez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7, an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX- sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95 clustering in neurites and activates Gαo signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gαo subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation.

  18. The Gαo Activator Mastoparan-7 Promotes Dendritic Spine Formation in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Valerie T.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Mastoparan-7 (Mas-7), an analogue of the peptide mastoparan, which is derived from wasp venom, is a direct activator of Pertussis toxin- (PTX-) sensitive G proteins. Mas-7 produces several biological effects in different cell types; however, little is known about how Mas-7 influences mature hippocampal neurons. We examined the specific role of Mas-7 in the development of dendritic spines, the sites of excitatory synaptic contact that are crucial for synaptic plasticity. We report here that exposure of hippocampal neurons to a low dose of Mas-7 increases dendritic spine density and spine head width in a time-dependent manner. Additionally, Mas-7 enhances postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) clustering in neurites and activates Gαo signaling, increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. To define the role of signaling intermediates, we measured the levels of phosphorylated protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) after Mas-7 treatment and determined that CaMKII activation is necessary for the Mas-7-dependent increase in dendritic spine density. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Gαo subunit signaling in the regulation of synapse formation. PMID:26881110

  19. Dendritic Cells Stimulated by Cationic Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitor, Micaela Tamara; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Cruz, Karen Steponavicius Piedade; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; De La Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer aims to harness the immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. To induce an immune response against cancer, activated dendritic cells (DCs) must present tumor antigens to T lymphocytes of patients. However, cancer patients' DCs are frequently defective, therefore, they are prone to induce rather tolerance than immune responses. In this context, loading tumor antigens into DCs and, at the same time, activating these cells, is a tempting goal within the field. Thus, we investigated the effects of cationic liposomes on the DCs differentiation/maturation, evaluating their surface phenotype and ability to stimulate T lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. The cationic liposomes composed by egg phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane and 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (50/25/25% molar) were prepared by the thin film method followed by extrusion (65 nm, polydispersity of 0.13) and by the dehydration-rehydration method (95% of the population 107 nm, polydispersity of 0.52). The phenotypic analysis of dendritic cells and the analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation were performed by flow cytometry and showed that both cationic liposomes were incorporated and activated dendritic cells. Extruded liposomes were better incorporated and induced higher CD86 expression for dendritic cells than dehydrated-rehydrated vesicles. Furthermore, dendritic cells which internalized extruded liposomes also provided stronger T lymphocyte stimulation. Thus, cationic liposomes with a smaller size and polydispersity seem to be better incorporated by dendritic cells. Hence, these cationic liposomes could be used as a potential tool in further cancer immunotherapy strategies and contribute to new strategies in immunotherapy.

  20. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina;

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... to control conditions. We therefore hypothesize that cysteine residues increase TRPC6 channel protein expression in humans....

  1. Differential mitochondrial calcium responses in different cell types detected with a mitochondrial calcium fluorescent indicator, mito-GCaMP2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Chen; Yanru Wang; Tingting Hou; Huiliang Zhang; Aijuan Qu; Xianhua Wang

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial calcium plays a crucial role in mitochondriai metabolism,cell calcium handling,and cell death.However,some mechanisms concerning mitochondrial calcium regulation are still unknown,especially how mitochondrial calcium couples with cytosolic calcium.In this work,we constructed a novel mitochondrial calcium fluorescent indicator (mito-GCaMP2) by genetic manipulation.Mito-GCaMP2 was imported into mitochondria with high efficiency and the fluorescent signals co-localized with that of tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester,a mitochondrial membrane potential indicator.The mitochondrial inhibitors specifically decreased the signals of mito-GCaMP2.The apparent Kd of mito-GCaMP2 was 195.0 nmol/L at pH 8.0 in adult rat cardiomyocytes.Furthermore,we observed that mito-GCaMP2 preferred the alkaline pH surrounding of mitochondria.In HeLa cells,we found that mitochondrial calcium ([Ca2+]mito)responded to the changes of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyto)induced by histamine or thapasigargin.Moreover,external Ca2+ (100 μmol/L) directly induced an increase of [Ca2+]mito in permeabilized HeLa cells.However,in rat cardiomyocytes [Ca2+]mito did not respond to cytosolic calcium transients stimulated by electric pacing or caffeine.In permeabilized cardiomyocytes,600 nmol/L free Ca2+ repeatedly increased the fluorescent signals of mito-GCaMP2,which excluded the possibility that mito-GCaMP2 lost its function in cardiomyocytes mitochondria.These results showed that the response of mitochondrial calcium is diverse in different cell lineages and suggested that mitochondria in cardiomyocytes may have a special defense mechanism to control calcium flux.

  2. Sequence learning in differentially activated dendrites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    . It is proposed that the neural machinery required in such a learning/retrieval mechanism could involve the NMDA receptor, in conjunction with the ability of dendrites to maintain differentially activated regions. In particular, it is suggested that such a parcellation of the dendrite allows the neuron...... to participate in multiple sequences, which can be learned without suffering from the 'wash-out' of synaptic efficacy associated with superimposition of training patterns. This is a biologically plausible solution to the stability-plasticity dilemma of learning in neural networks....

  3. Seaweed to dendrite transition in directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provatas, Nikolas; Wang, Quanyong; Haataja, Mikko; Grant, Martin

    2003-10-10

    We simulate directional solidification using a phase-field model solved with adaptive mesh refinement. For small surface tension anisotropy directed at 45 degrees relative to the pulling direction we observe a crossover from a seaweed to a dendritic morphology as the thermal gradient is lowered, consistent with recent experimental findings. We show that the morphology of crystal structures can be unambiguously characterized through the local interface velocity distribution. We derive semiempirically an estimate for the crossover from seaweed to dendrite as a function of thermal gradient and pulling speed.

  4. Coherent Transient Systems Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-17

    manuscript is submitted for publication with the understanding that the United States Government is authorized to reproduce and distribute reprints...for governmental purposes. 1.0 Introduction The continuous optical correlator presented here is based on the phenomena of coherent transients, also...Gating the Continuous Processor Programming the continuous processor is accomplished by illuminati , n, the material with ,.’ modulated light pulses: a

  5. The Rapid Transient Surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranec, Christoph; Tonry, John; Wright, Shelley; Tully, R. Brent; Lu, Jessica R.; Takamiya, Marianne Y.; Hunter, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The next decade of astronomy will be dominated by large area surveys (see the detailed discussion in the Astro-2010 Decadal survey and NRC's recent OIR System Report). Ground-based optical transient surveys, e.g., LSST, ZTF and ATLAS and space-based exoplanet, supernova, and lensing surveys such as TESS and WFIRST will join the Gaia all-sky astrometric survey in producing a flood of data that will enable leaps in our understanding of the universe. There is a critical need for further characterization of these discoveries through high angular resolution images, deeper images, spectra, or observations at different cadences or periods than the main surveys. Such follow-up characterization must be well matched to the particular surveys, and requires sufficient additional observing resources and time to cover the extensive number of targets.We describe plans for the Rapid Transient Surveyor (RTS), a permanently mounted, rapid-response, high-cadence facility for follow-up characterization of transient objects on the U. of Hawai'i 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will comprise an improved robotic laser adaptive optics system, based on the prototype Robo-AO system (formerly at the Palomar 1.5-m and now at the Kitt Peak 2.2-m telescope), with simultaneous visible and near-infrared imagers as well as a near-infrared integral field spectrograph (R~100, λ = 850 - 1830 nm, 0.15″ spaxels, 8.7″×6.0″ FoV). RTS will achieve an acuity of ~0.07″ in visible wavelengths and automated detection and characterization of astrophysical transients during a sustained observing campaign will yield the necessary statistics to precisely map dark matter in the local universe.

  6. Dendritic Cells Endocytose Bacillus Anthracis Spores: Implications for Anthrax Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Dendritic Cells Endocytose Bacillus anthracis Spores: Implications for Anthrax Pathogenesis1 Katherine C. Brittingham,* Gordon Ruthel,* Rekha G...germination and dissemination of spores. Found in high frequency throughout the respiratory track, dendritic cells (DCs) routinely take up foreign...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dendritic cells endocytose Bacillus anthracis spores: implications for anthrax pathogenesis, The Journal of

  7. Transient Astrophysics Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan

    2017-08-01

    Transient Astrophysics Probe (TAP), selected by NASA for a funded Concept Study, is a wide-field high-energy transient mission proposed for flight starting in the late 2020s. TAP’s main science goals, called out as Frontier Discovery areas in the 2010 Decadal Survey, are time-domain astrophysics and counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) detections. The mission instruments include unique imaging soft X-ray optics that allow ~500 deg2 FoV in each of four separate modules; a high sensitivity, 1 deg2 FoV soft X-ray telescope based on single crystal silicon optics; a passively cooled, 1 deg2 FoV Infrared telescope with bandpass 0.6-3 micron; and a set of ~8 small NaI gamma-ray detectors. TAP will observe many events per year of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including tidal disruptions of stars, supernova shock breakouts, neutron star bursts and superbursts, and high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts. Perhaps most exciting is TAP’s capability to observe X-ray and IR counterparts of GWs involving stellar mass black holes detected by LIGO/Virgo, and possibly X-ray counterparts of GWs from supermassive black holes, detected by LISA and Pulsar Timing Arrays.

  8. Calcium signaling and endoplasmic reticulum dynamics during fertilization in marine protostome worms belonging to the phylum Nemertea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Stephen A

    2014-08-01

    Metaphase-I-arrested eggs of marine protostome worms in the phylum Nemertea generate a series of point-source calcium waves during fertilization. Such calcium oscillations depend on inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-mediated calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores that undergo structural reorganizations prior to and after fertilization. This article reviews fertilization-induced calcium transients and ER dynamics in nemertean eggs and compares these topics to what has been reported for other animals in order to identify unifying characteristics and distinguishing features of calcium responses during fertilization across the animal kingdom. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Voltage-sensitive dye recording from axons, dendrites and dendritic spines of individual neurons in brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Marko; Gao, Xin; Zecevic, Dejan

    2012-11-29

    phototoxic effects (4, 6, 12, 13). At present, we take advantage of the superb brightness and stability of a laser light source at near-optimal wavelength to maximize the sensitivity of the V(m)-imaging technique. The current sensitivity permits multiple site optical recordings of V(m) transients from all parts of a neuron, including axons and axon collaterals, terminal dendritic branches, and individual dendritic spines. The acquired information on signal interactions can be analyzed quantitatively as well as directly visualized in the form of a movie.

  10. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and inhibi...

  11. Dendritic growth in the presence of convection. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaghton, Pantelis John

    1988-01-01

    The motion of the freezing front between a dendritic crystal and a supercooled liquid is studied using an interface evolution equation derived from a boundary integral transformation of the transient convective-diffusion equation. A new steady-state theory is introduced that incorporates the effects of convection in dendritic growth. It is shown that in the absence of capillary effects the shape of the crystal-melt interface is a paraboloid of revolution, similar to that found in situations where diffusion is the sole heat transfer mechanism. A relation between the supercooling, the product of the tip velocity and tip radius, and the strength of the flow is derived which reduces to the well-known Ivantsov theory in the absence of convection. A non-linear interface-tracking algorithm is developed and used to study the temporal and spatial evolution of the dendritic interface. The important role of capillarity and convection on the interface dynamics is established and the response of the interface to finite amplitude disturbances is examined for the first time. Tip splitting is identified as the dominant destabilization mechanism in the limit of zero surface tension. Finite surface tension leads to interface stabilization, irrespective of the magnitude and structure of the external perturbations. Finally, convection significantly decreases the magnitude of the freezing velocity.

  12. Calcium signaling in neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreses-Werringloer Ute

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is a key signaling ion involved in many different intracellular and extracellular processes ranging from synaptic activity to cell-cell communication and adhesion. The exact definition at the molecular level of the versatility of this ion has made overwhelming progress in the past several years and has been extensively reviewed. In the brain, calcium is fundamental in the control of synaptic activity and memory formation, a process that leads to the activation of specific calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways and implicates key protein effectors, such as CaMKs, MAPK/ERKs, and CREB. Properly controlled homeostasis of calcium signaling not only supports normal brain physiology but also maintains neuronal integrity and long-term cell survival. Emerging knowledge indicates that calcium homeostasis is not only critical for cell physiology and health, but also, when deregulated, can lead to neurodegeneration via complex and diverse mechanisms involved in selective neuronal impairments and death. The identification of several modulators of calcium homeostasis, such as presenilins and CALHM1, as potential factors involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, provides strong support for a role of calcium in neurodegeneration. These observations represent an important step towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of calcium signaling disturbances observed in different brain diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases.

  13. Interactions with Astroglia Influence the Shape of the Developing Dendritic Arbor and Restrict Dendrite Growth Independent of Promoting Synaptic Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Jennifer R.; Sterritt, Jeffrey R.; Crane, Andrés B.; Wallace, Christopher S.

    2017-01-01

    Astroglia play key roles in the development of neurons, ranging from regulating neuron survival to promoting synapse formation, yet basic questions remain about whether astrocytes might be involved in forming the dendritic arbor. Here, we used cultured hippocampal neurons as a simple in vitro model that allowed dendritic growth and geometry to be analyzed quantitatively under conditions where the extent of interactions between neurons and astrocytes varied. When astroglia were proximal to neurons, dendrites and dendritic filopodia oriented toward them, but the general presence of astroglia significantly reduced overall dendrite growth. Further, dendritic arbors in partial physical contact with astroglia developed a pronounced pattern of asymmetrical growth, because the dendrites in direct contact were significantly smaller than the portion of the arbor not in contact. Notably, thrombospondin, the astroglial factor shown previously to promote synapse formation, did not inhibit dendritic growth. Thus, while astroglia promoted the formation of presynaptic contacts onto dendrites, dendritic growth was constrained locally within a developing arbor at sites where dendrites contacted astroglia. Taken together, these observations reveal influences on spatial orientation of growth as well as influences on morphogenesis of the dendritic arbor that have not been previously identified. PMID:28081563

  14. Measuring intracellular calcium dynamics of HeLa cells exposed to nitric oxide by microplate fluorescence reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yimei; Chen, Jiangxu; Yang, Hongqin; Zheng, Liqin; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2012-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been reported to have the ability to promote or inhibit the proliferation and metastasis of cancer cells. It appears to have an effect on inducing calcium transient, which participates in essential cellular signaling in the physiological and pathological processes. Our work was intended to study the effects of exogenous NO on intracellular calcium dynamics of HeLa cells with Fluo-3, a calcium fluorescent indicator by microplate fluorescence reader. The results showed that after NO donor was injected into the wells, intracellular Ca2+ fluorescence intensity increased significantly compared with that of control group. Furthermore, the calcium transient activated by NO was mainly due to the calcium release from intracellular calcium stores. These would be helpful to further recognize the role of NO involved in cancer cell proliferation and metastasis.

  15. Calcineurin inhibition with FK506 ameliorates dendritic spine density deficits in plaque-bearing Alzheimer model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozkalne, Anete; Hyman, Bradley T; Spires-Jones, Tara L

    2011-03-01

    Synapse loss is the strongest correlate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease, and synapses are an attractive therapeutic target due to their plastic nature that allows for potential recovery with intervention. We have previously demonstrated in transgenic mice that form senile plaques that dendrites surrounding plaques become dystrophic and lose postsynaptic dendritic spines. Furthermore, we found strong evidence that plaque-associated dendritic changes are mediated by calcineurin, a calcium-dependent phosphatase involved in cell signaling, using in vitro models and genetically encoded inhibitors in mouse models. In this study, we pharmacologically inhibited calcineurin with FK506 treatment to test the hypothesis that calcineurin inhibition will allow recovery of plaque-associated synapse loss. We found that in plaque bearing transgenic mice, short term (1 week) FK506 treatment results in an amelioration of dendritic spine loss. We also observe an effect on spine morphology in wild-type mice with FK506 treatment. These data show that systemic FK506 administration, and hence calcineurin inhibition, may be neuroprotective for amyloid beta induced synaptic alterations.

  16. Active dendrites support efficient initiation of dendritic spikes in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sooyun; Guzman, Segundo J.; Hu, Hua; Jonas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    CA3 pyramidal neurons are important for memory formation and pattern completion in the hippocampal network. It is generally thought that proximal synapses from the mossy fibers activate these neurons most efficiently, whereas distal inputs from the perforant path have a weaker modulatory influence. We used confocally targeted patch-clamp recording from dendrites and axons to map the activation of rat CA3 pyramidal neurons at the subcellular level. Our results reveal two distinct dendritic dom...

  17. Numerical Simulations of Equiaxed Dendrite Growth Using Phase Field Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Phase field method offers the prospect of being able to perform realistic numerical experiments on dendrite growthin a metallic system. In this paper, the equiaxed dendrite evolution during the solidification of a pure material wasnumerically simulated using the phase field model. The equiaxed dendrite growth in a two-dimensional square domainof undercooled melt (nickel) with four-fold anisotropy was simulated. The phase field model equations was solvedusing the explicit finite difference method on a uniform mesh. The formation of various equiaxed dendrite patternswas shown by a series of simulations, and the effect of anisotropy on equiaxed dendrite morphology was investigated.

  18. Calcium sparks in the intact gerbil spiral modiolar artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berge Samantha

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium sparks are ryanodine receptor mediated transient calcium signals that have been shown to hyperpolarize the membrane potential by activating large conductance calcium activated potassium (BK channels in vascular smooth muscle cells. Along with voltage-dependent calcium channels, they form a signaling unit that has a vasodilatory influence on vascular diameter and regulation of myogenic tone. The existence and role of calcium sparks has hitherto been unexplored in the spiral modiolar artery, the end artery that controls blood flow to the cochlea. The goal of the present study was to determine the presence and properties of calcium sparks in the intact gerbil spiral modiolar artery. Results Calcium sparks were recorded from smooth muscle cells of intact arteries loaded with fluo-4 AM. Calcium sparks occurred with a frequency of 2.6 Hz, a rise time of 17 ms and a time to half-decay of 20 ms. Ryanodine reduced spark frequency within 3 min from 2.6 to 0.6 Hz. Caffeine (1 mM increased spark frequency from 2.3 to 3.3 Hz and prolonged rise and half-decay times from 17 to 19 ms and from 20 to 23 ms, respectively. Elevation of potassium (3.6 to 37.5 mM, presumably via depolarization, increased spark frequency from 2.4 to 3.2 Hz. Neither ryanodine nor depolarization changed rise or decay times. Conclusions This is the first characterization of calcium sparks in smooth muscle cells of the spiral modiolar artery. The results suggest that calcium sparks may regulate the diameter of the spiral modiolar artery and cochlear blood flow.

  19. The role of dendritic cells in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Though present in low numbers, dendritic cells (DCs) are recognized as major players in the control of cancer by adaptive immunity. The roles of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells and Th1 helper CD4+ T-cells are well-documented in murine models of cancer and associated with a profound prognostic impact when...... treatment regimens against cancer....

  20. Characterization of chicken dendritic cell markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal and Natural Resources Institute, ARS-USDA, Beltsville, MD, USA. New mouse monoclonal antibodies which detect CD80 and CD83 were developed to characterize chicken dendritic cells (DCs). The characteristics of these molecules have been studied in human, swine, ovine, feline, and canine but not ...

  1. ISOLATION OF CHICKEN FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of the present study was to isolate chicken follicular dendritic cells (FDC). A combination of methods involving panning, iodixanol density gradient centrifugation, and magnetic cell separation technology made it possible to obtain functional FDC from the cecal tonsils from chickens, which h...

  2. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular...

  3. Reduced levels of intracellular calcium releasing in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Juan F

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthenozoospermia is one of the most common findings present in infertile males characterized by reduced or absent sperm motility, but its aetiology remains unknown in most cases. In addition, calcium is one of the most important ions regulating sperm motility. In this study we have investigated the progesterone-evoked intracellular calcium signal in ejaculated spermatozoa from men with normospermia or asthenozoospermia. Methods Human ejaculates were obtained from healthy volunteers and asthenospermic men by masturbation after 4–5 days of abstinence. For determination of cytosolic free calcium concentration, spermatozoa were loaded with the fluorescent ratiometric calcium indicator Fura-2. Results Treatment of spermatozoa from normospermic men with 20 micromolar progesterone plus 1 micromolar thapsigargin in a calcium free medium induced a typical transient increase in cytosolic free calcium concentration due to calcium release from internal stores. Similar results were obtained when spermatozoa were stimulated with progesterone alone. Subsequent addition of calcium to the external medium evoked a sustained elevation in cytosolic free calcium concentration indicative of capacitative calcium entry. However, when progesterone plus thapsigargin were administered to spermatozoa from patients with asthenozoospermia, calcium signal and subsequent calcium entry was much smaller compared to normospermic patients. As expected, pretreatment of normospermic spermatozoa with both the anti-progesterone receptor c262 antibody and with progesterone receptor antagonist RU-38486 decreased the calcium release induced by progesterone. Treatment of spermatozoa with cytochalasin D or jasplakinolide decreased the calcium entry evoked by depletion of internal calcium stores in normospermic patients, whereas these treatments proved to be ineffective at modifying the calcium entry in patients with asthenozoospermia. Conclusion Our results suggest

  4. Subcellular Imaging of Voltage and Calcium Signals Reveals Neural Processing In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Helen H; St-Pierre, François; Sun, Xulu; Ding, Xiaozhe; Lin, Michael Z; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2016-06-30

    A mechanistic understanding of neural computation requires determining how information is processed as it passes through neurons and across synapses. However, it has been challenging to measure membrane potential changes in axons and dendrites in vivo. We use in vivo, two-photon imaging of novel genetically encoded voltage indicators, as well as calcium imaging, to measure sensory stimulus-evoked signals in the Drosophila visual system with subcellular resolution. Across synapses, we find major transformations in the kinetics, amplitude, and sign of voltage responses to light. We also describe distinct relationships between voltage and calcium signals in different neuronal compartments, a substrate for local computation. Finally, we demonstrate that ON and OFF selectivity, a key feature of visual processing across species, emerges through the transformation of membrane potential into intracellular calcium concentration. By imaging voltage and calcium signals to map information flow with subcellular resolution, we illuminate where and how critical computations arise.

  5. Thermal transient anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, James L.; Vresk, Josip

    1989-01-01

    A thermal transient anemometer having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe.

  6. DSN Transient Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, T. B. H.; Monroe, R. M.; White, L. A.; Garcia Miro, C.; Levin, S. M.; Majid, W. A.; Soriano, M.

    2016-11-01

    The Deep Space Network (DSN) Transient Observatory (DTO) is a signal processing facility that can monitor up to four DSN downlink bands for astronomically interesting signals. The monitoring is done commensally with reception of deep space mission telemetry. The initial signal processing is done with two CASPERa ROACH1 boards, each handling one or two baseband signals. Each ROACH1 has a 10 GBe interface with a GPU-equipped Debian Linux workstation for additional processing. The initial science programs include monitoring Mars for electrostatic discharges, radio spectral lines, searches for fast radio bursts and pulsars and SETI. The facility will be available to the scientific community through a peer review process.

  7. Computational modeling reveals dendritic origins of GABA(A-mediated excitation in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Lewin

    Full Text Available GABA is the key inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult central nervous system, but in some circumstances can lead to a paradoxical excitation that has been causally implicated in diverse pathologies from endocrine stress responses to diseases of excitability including neuropathic pain and temporal lobe epilepsy. We undertook a computational modeling approach to determine plausible ionic mechanisms of GABA(A-dependent excitation in isolated post-synaptic CA1 hippocampal neurons because it may constitute a trigger for pathological synchronous epileptiform discharge. In particular, the interplay intracellular chloride accumulation via the GABA(A receptor and extracellular potassium accumulation via the K/Cl co-transporter KCC2 in promoting GABA(A-mediated excitation is complex. Experimentally it is difficult to determine the ionic mechanisms of depolarizing current since potassium transients are challenging to isolate pharmacologically and much GABA signaling occurs in small, difficult to measure, dendritic compartments. To address this problem and determine plausible ionic mechanisms of GABA(A-mediated excitation, we built a detailed biophysically realistic model of the CA1 pyramidal neuron that includes processes critical for ion homeostasis. Our results suggest that in dendritic compartments, but not in the somatic compartments, chloride buildup is sufficient to cause dramatic depolarization of the GABA(A reversal potential and dominating bicarbonate currents that provide a substantial current source to drive whole-cell depolarization. The model simulations predict that extracellular K(+ transients can augment GABA(A-mediated excitation, but not cause it. Our model also suggests the potential for GABA(A-mediated excitation to promote network synchrony depending on interneuron synapse location - excitatory positive-feedback can occur when interneurons synapse onto distal dendritic compartments, while interneurons projecting to the perisomatic

  8. Calcium Green FlAsH as a genetically targeted small-molecule calcium indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, Oded; Adams, Stephen R; Kerr, Rex A; Meijer, Rene M; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Tsien, Richard W; Tsien, Roger Y

    2007-07-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) regulates numerous proteins and cellular functions and can vary substantially over submicron and submillisecond scales, so precisely localized fast detection is desirable. We have created a approximately 1-kDa biarsenical Ca(2+) indicator, called Calcium Green FlAsH (CaGF, 1), to probe [Ca(2+)] surrounding genetically targeted proteins. CaGF attached to a tetracysteine motif becomes ten-fold more fluorescent upon binding Ca(2+), with a K(d) of approximately 100 microM, <1-ms kinetics and good Mg(2+) rejection. In HeLa cells expressing tetracysteine-tagged connexin 43, CaGF labels gap junctions and reports Ca(2+) waves after injury. Total internal reflection microscopy of tetracysteine-tagged, CaGF-labeled alpha(1C) L-type calcium channels shows fast-rising depolarization-evoked Ca(2+) transients, whose lateral nonuniformity suggests that the probability of channel opening varies greatly over micron dimensions. With moderate Ca(2+) buffering, these transients decay surprisingly slowly, probably because most of the CaGF signal comes from closed channels feeling Ca(2+) from a tiny minority of clustered open channels. With high Ca(2+) buffering, CaGF signals decay as rapidly as the calcium currents, as expected for submicron Ca(2+) domains immediately surrounding active channels. Thus CaGF can report highly localized, rapid [Ca(2+)] dynamics.

  9. Dendritic cells cross-present HIV antigens from live as well as apoptotic infected CD4+ T lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón, Concepción; Desoutter, Jean-François; Hoeffel, Guillaume; Cohen, William; Hanau, Daniel; Hosmalin, Anne

    2004-04-01

    A better understanding of the antigen presentation pathways that lead to CD8+ T cell recognition of HIV epitopes in vivo is needed to achieve better immune control of HIV replication. Here, we show that cross-presentation of very small amounts of HIV proteins from apoptotic infected CD4+ T lymphocytes by dendritic cells to CD8+ T cells is much more efficient than other known HIV presentation pathways, i.e., direct presentation of infectious virus or cross-presentation of defective virus. Unexpectedly, dendritic cells also take up actively antigens into endosomes from live infected CD4+ T lymphocytes and cross-present them as efficiently as antigens derived from apoptotic infected cells. Moreover, live infected CD4+ T cells costimulate cross-presenting dendritic cells in the process. Therefore, dendritic cells can present very small amounts of viral proteins from infected T cells either after apoptosis, which is frequent during HIV infection, or not. Thus, if HIV expression is transiently induced while costimulation is enhanced (for instance after IL-2 and IFN immune therapy), this HIV antigen presentation pathway could be exploited to eradicate latently infected reservoirs, which are poorly recognized by patients' immune systems.

  10. Voltage gated calcium channels negatively regulate protective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Gupta

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulates levels and activity of key intracellular second messengers to evade protective immune responses. Calcium release from voltage gated calcium channels (VGCC regulates immune responses to pathogens. In this study, we investigated the roles of VGCC in regulating protective immunity to mycobacteria in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting L-type or R-type VGCC in dendritic cells (DCs either using antibodies or by siRNA increased calcium influx in an inositol 1,4,5-phosphate and calcium release calcium activated channel dependent mechanism that resulted in increased expression of genes favoring pro-inflammatory responses. Further, VGCC-blocked DCs activated T cells that in turn mediated killing of M. tuberculosis inside macrophages. Likewise, inhibiting VGCC in infected macrophages and PBMCs induced calcium influx, upregulated the expression of pro-inflammatory genes and resulted in enhanced killing of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Importantly, compared to healthy controls, PBMCs of tuberculosis patients expressed higher levels of both VGCC, which were significantly reduced following chemotherapy. Finally, blocking VGCC in vivo in M. tuberculosis infected mice using specific antibodies increased intracellular calcium and significantly reduced bacterial loads. These results indicate that L-type and R-type VGCC play a negative role in M. tuberculosis infection by regulating calcium mobilization in cells that determine protective immunity.

  11. Bulk loading of calcium indicator dyes to study astrocyte physiology: key limitations and improvements using morphological maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Alexander M B; Shigetomi, Eiji; Khakh, Baljit S

    2011-06-22

    Calcium signaling has been studied in astrocyte cell bodies using bulk loading of calcium indicator dyes, and astrocytes are known to display intracellular calcium transients. An assumption in recent data on the neuronal impact of somatic astrocyte calcium transients has been that bulk loading reflects signaling in relevant astrocyte compartments such as processes. We assessed bulk loading using Sholl analysis (Sholl, 1953) of astrocytes loaded with common calcium indicator dyes and compared these data with Sholl analysis of astrocyte morphology. In the CA1 region of the hippocampus from rats, we found that bulk loading of calcium indicator dyes only reports on calcium signals within the soma and in the most proximal processes, leaving ∼90% of the area of an astrocyte and its extensive processes unsampled. By using morphological reconstructions as "maps" after the imaging session, we present simple procedures that remedy these shortfalls and permit reliable detection of calcium transients in distal astrocyte processes. The data thus reveal limitations in the interpretation of astrocyte calcium imaging data gathered with bulk loading and provide refinements to minimize these shortcomings.

  12. Transient regional osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient osteoporosis of the hip and regional migratory osteoporosis are uncommon and probably underdiagnosed bone diseases characterized by pain and functional limitation mainly affecting weight-bearing joints of the lower limbs. These conditions are usually self-limiting and symptoms tend to abate within a few months without sequelae. Routine laboratory investigations are unremarkable. Middle aged men and women during the last months of pregnancy or in the immediate post-partum period are principally affected. Osteopenia with preservation of articular space and transitory edema of the bone marrow provided by magnetic resonance imaging are common to these two conditions, so they are also known by the term regional transitory osteoporosis. The appearance of bone marrow edema is not specific to regional transitory osteoporosis but can be observed in several diseases, i.e. trauma, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, avascular osteonecrosis, infections, tumors from which it must be differentiated. The etiology of this condition is unknown. Pathogenesis is still debated in particular the relationship with reflex sympathetic dystrophy, with which regional transitory osteoporosis is often identified. The purpose of the present review is to remark on the relationship between transient osteoporosis of the hip and regional migratory osteoporosis with particular attention to the bone marrow edema pattern and relative differential diagnosis.

  13. Transient Black Hole Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, T M

    2016-01-01

    The last two decades have seen a great improvement in our understand- ing of the complex phenomenology observed in transient black-hole binary systems, especially thanks to the activity of the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer satellite, com- plemented by observations from many other X-ray observatories and ground-based radio, optical and infrared facilities. Accretion alone cannot describe accurately the intricate behavior associated with black-hole transients and it is now clear that the role played by different kinds of (often massive) outflows seen at different phases of the outburst evolution of these systems is as fundamental as the one played by the accretion process itself. The spectral-timing states originally identified in the X-rays and fundamentally based on the observed effect of accretion, have acquired new importance as they now allow to describe within a coherent picture the phenomenology observed at other wave- length, where the effects of ejection processes are most evident. With a particular focu...

  14. Characterizing Nanoscale Transient Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yifan; Anwar, Putri Santi; Huang, Limin; Asvial, Muhamad

    2016-04-01

    We consider the novel paradigm of nanoscale transient communication (NTC), where certain components of the small-scale communication link are physically transient. As such, the transmitter and the receiver may change their properties over a prescribed lifespan due to their time-varying structures. The NTC systems may find important applications in the biomedical, environmental, and military fields, where system degradability allows for benign integration into life and environment. In this paper, we analyze the NTC systems from the channel-modeling and capacity-analysis perspectives and focus on the stochastically meaningful slow transience scenario, where the coherence time of degeneration Td is much longer than the coding delay Tc. We first develop novel and parsimonious models to characterize the NTC channels, where three types of physical layers are considered: electromagnetism-based terahertz (THz) communication, diffusion-based molecular communication (DMC), and nanobots-assisted touchable communication (TouchCom). We then revisit the classical performance measure of ϵ-outage channel capacity and take a fresh look at its formulations in the NTC context. Next, we present the notion of capacity degeneration profile (CDP), which describes the reduction of channel capacity with respect to the degeneration time. Finally, we provide numerical examples to demonstrate the features of CDP. To the best of our knowledge, the current work represents a first attempt to systematically evaluate the quality of nanoscale communication systems deteriorating with time.

  15. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response.

  16. Transient kinetics of Ca2+ transport of sarcoplasmic reticulum. A comparison of cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, M; Wang, T; Mandel, F; Froehlich, J P; Schwartz, A

    1978-12-25

    Current evidence supports similar functions and mechanisms for cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (CSR) as for skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SSR). It is thought that the slower relaxation rate of cardiac muscle compared to fast skeletal muscle reflects the lower ATPase activity and calcium transport of CSR. Possible quantitative differences is phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, and calcium transport of the isolated preparations are studied using a quench-flow apparatus. The results show that both CSR and SSR bind calcium tightly in the absence of ATP, and coupling of E approximately P formation and calcium transport occurs in the transient phase of ATP hydrolysis. The rate of phosphorylation (t-1/2 - 10 ms) of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) preloaded with calcium is the same for cardiac and skeletal preparations. However, the rates of dissociation of extra vesicular calcium (10 s-1 versus 15 s-1), phosphorylation of calcium-free SR, and dephosphorylation of E approximately P (8 s-1 versus 12 s-1) are lower for CSR than for SSR. By computer simulation, the apparent rate constants associated with the reduced rates of phosphorylation of calcium-free SR were: 12 s-1 for CSR and 63 s-1 for SSR in the presence of high Mg2+. The difference in the rates may be partly responsible for the lower levels of ATPase and calcium transport activity with characterize cardiac muscle preparations.

  17. Differentiation of apical and basal dendrites in pyramidal cells and granule cells in dissociated hippocampal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, You Kure; Fujishima, Kazuto; Kengaku, Mineko

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal cells and dentate granule cells develop morphologically distinct dendritic arbors, yet also share some common features. Both cell types form a long apical dendrite which extends from the apex of the cell soma, while short basal dendrites are developed only in pyramidal cells. Using quantitative morphometric analyses of mouse hippocampal cultures, we evaluated the differences in dendritic arborization patterns between pyramidal and granule cells. Furthermore, we observed and described the final apical dendrite determination during dendritic polarization by time-lapse imaging. Pyramidal and granule cells in culture exhibited similar dendritic patterns with a single principal dendrite and several minor dendrites so that the cell types were not readily distinguished by appearance. While basal dendrites in granule cells are normally degraded by adulthood in vivo, cultured granule cells retained their minor dendrites. Asymmetric growth of a single principal dendrite harboring the Golgi was observed in both cell types soon after the onset of dendritic growth. Time-lapse imaging revealed that up until the second week in culture, final principal dendrite designation was not stabilized, but was frequently replaced by other minor dendrites. Before dendritic polarity was stabilized, the Golgi moved dynamically within the soma and was repeatedly repositioned at newly emerging principal dendrites. Our results suggest that polarized growth of the apical dendrite is regulated by cell intrinsic programs, while regression of basal dendrites requires cue(s) from the extracellular environment in the dentate gyrus. The apical dendrite designation is determined from among multiple growing dendrites of young developing neurons.

  18. Asymmetry in signal propagation between the soma and dendrites plays a key role in determining dendritic excitability in motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojeong; Jones, Kelvin E; Heckman, C J

    2014-01-01

    It is widely recognized that propagation of electrophysiological signals between the soma and dendrites of neurons differs depending on direction, i.e. it is asymmetric. How this asymmetry influences the activation of voltage-gated dendritic channels, and consequent neuronal behavior, remains unclear. Based on the analysis of asymmetry in several types of motoneurons, we extended our previous methodology for reducing a fully reconstructed motoneuron model to a two-compartment representation that preserved asymmetric signal propagation. The reduced models accurately replicated the dendritic excitability and the dynamics of the anatomical model involving a persistent inward current (PIC) dispersed over the dendrites. The relationship between asymmetric signal propagation and dendritic excitability was investigated using the reduced models while varying the asymmetry in signal propagation between the soma and the dendrite with PIC density constant. We found that increases in signal attenuation from soma to dendrites increased the activation threshold of a PIC (hypo-excitability), whereas increases in signal attenuation from dendrites to soma decreased the activation threshold of a PIC (hyper-excitability). These effects were so strong that reversing the asymmetry in the soma-to-dendrite vs. dendrite-to-soma attenuation, reversed the correlation between PIC threshold and distance of this current source from the soma. We propose the tight relation of the asymmetric signal propagation to the input resistance in the dendrites as a mechanism underlying the influence of the asymmetric signal propagation on the dendritic excitability. All these results emphasize the importance of maintaining the physiological asymmetry in dendritic signaling not only for normal function of the cells but also for biophysically realistic simulations of dendritic excitability.

  19. Stochastic ion channel gating in dendritic neurons: morphology dependence and probabilistic synaptic activation of dendritic spikes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Cannon

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity is mediated through changes in the probability of stochastic transitions between open and closed states of ion channels. While differences in morphology define neuronal cell types and may underlie neurological disorders, very little is known about influences of stochastic ion channel gating in neurons with complex morphology. We introduce and validate new computational tools that enable efficient generation and simulation of models containing stochastic ion channels distributed across dendritic and axonal membranes. Comparison of five morphologically distinct neuronal cell types reveals that when all simulated neurons contain identical densities of stochastic ion channels, the amplitude of stochastic membrane potential fluctuations differs between cell types and depends on sub-cellular location. For typical neurons, the amplitude of membrane potential fluctuations depends on channel kinetics as well as open probability. Using a detailed model of a hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron, we show that when intrinsic ion channels gate stochastically, the probability of initiation of dendritic or somatic spikes by dendritic synaptic input varies continuously between zero and one, whereas when ion channels gate deterministically, the probability is either zero or one. At physiological firing rates, stochastic gating of dendritic ion channels almost completely accounts for probabilistic somatic and dendritic spikes generated by the fully stochastic model. These results suggest that the consequences of stochastic ion channel gating differ globally between neuronal cell-types and locally between neuronal compartments. Whereas dendritic neurons are often assumed to behave deterministically, our simulations suggest that a direct consequence of stochastic gating of intrinsic ion channels is that spike output may instead be a probabilistic function of patterns of synaptic input to dendrites.

  20. Calculating transient rates from surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, Dario; Wijers, Ralph A M J; Rowlinson, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a method to determine the transient surface density and transient rate for any given survey, using Monte-Carlo simulations. This method allows us to determine the transient rate as a function of both the flux and the duration of the transients in the whole flux-duration plane rather than one or a few points as currently available methods do. It is applicable to every survey strategy that is monitoring the same part of the sky, regardless the instrument or wavelength of the survey, or the target sources. We have simulated both top-hat and Fast Rise Exponential Decay light curves, highlighting how the shape of the light curve might affect the detectability of transients. Another application for this method is to estimate the number of transients of a given kind that are expected to be detected by a survey, provided that their rate is known.

  1. Calculating transient rates from surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Rowlinson, A.

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a method to determine the transient surface density and transient rate for any given survey, using Monte Carlo simulations. This method allows us to determine the transient rate as a function of both the flux and the duration of the transients in the whole flux-duration plane rather than one or a few points as currently available methods do. It is applicable to every survey strategy that is monitoring the same part of the sky, regardless the instrument or wavelength of the survey, or the target sources. We have simulated both top-hat and Fast Rise Exponential Decay light curves, highlighting how the shape of the light curve might affect the detectability of transients. Another application for this method is to estimate the number of transients of a given kind that are expected to be detected by a survey, provided that their rate is known.

  2. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pizza, cheese, frozen 1 serving 115 mg Pudding, chocolate, prepared with 2% milk 4 oz 160 mg ... Treatment Medication and Treatment Adherence Calcium/Vitamin D Nutrition Overall Health Fractures/Fall Prevention Exercise/Safe Movement ...

  3. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  4. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources You may also be interested in: Calcium: Shopping list Menopause: Questions for ... A Federal Government website managed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services healthfinder.gov is ...

  5. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  6. Calcium and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for dinner. Create mini-pizzas by topping whole-wheat English muffins or bagels with pizza sauce, low- ... Minerals Do I Need to Drink Milk? Lactose Intolerance Becoming a Vegetarian Soy Foods and Health Calcium ...

  7. The Zwicky Transient Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) has been designed with a singular focus: a systematic exploration of the night sky at a magnitude level well suited for spectral classification and follow up with the existing class of 4-m to 10-m class telescopes. ZTF is the successor to the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). The discovery engine for ZTF is a 47 square degree camera (realized through 16 e2V monolithic CCDs) that fills the entire focal plane of the 48-inch Oschin telescope of the Palomar Observatory. Single 30-s epoch sensitivity is about 20.5 in g and R bands. The Infarared Processing & Analysis Center (IPAC) is the data center for ZTF. ZTF is a public-private partnership with equal contributions from a consortium of world-wide partners and an NSF MSIP grant. Forty percent of ZTF time is set aside for two major community surveys: a 3-day cadence survey of high latitudes (to mimic LSST) and a time domain survey of the entire Northern Galactic plane. We expect first light in February 2017 and begin a 3-year survey starting summer of 2017. The first year will be spent on building up deep reference images of the sky (a must for transient surveys). During the second year IPAC will deliver near archival quality photometric products within 12 hours of observations. By comparison to reference images photometric alerts will be sent out. Year 3 will see the near real-time release of image differencing products. A Community Science Advisory Committee (CSAC), chaired by S. Ridgway (NOAO), has been set up to both advise the PI and to ensure that the US community's interests are well served. Astronomers interested in getting a head start on ZTF may wish to peruse the data releases from PTF. Young people (or young at heart) may wish to attend the annual summer school on PTF/ZTF (August, Caltech campus). The Principal Investigator (PI) for the project is S. Kulkarni and the Project Scientist is Eric Bellm.For further details please consult http://www.ptf.caltech.edu/ztf

  8. The joy of transient chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tél, Tamás [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, and MTA-ELTE Theoretical Physics Research Group, Pázmány P. s. 1/A, Budapest H-1117 (Hungary)

    2015-09-15

    We intend to show that transient chaos is a very appealing, but still not widely appreciated, subfield of nonlinear dynamics. Besides flashing its basic properties and giving a brief overview of the many applications, a few recent transient-chaos-related subjects are introduced in some detail. These include the dynamics of decision making, dispersion, and sedimentation of volcanic ash, doubly transient chaos of undriven autonomous mechanical systems, and a dynamical systems approach to energy absorption or explosion.

  9. Calcium and Calcium-Base Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-01-01

    should be satisfactory, because the electrolytic process for •(!>: A. H. Everts and G. D. Baglev’, " Physical «nrt m<„.+„4 i «_ of Calcium«, Electrochem...Rev. Metalurgie , 3j2, (1), 129 (1935). 10 ^sm^mssss^ma^^ extension between two known loads, is preferable to the value of 3,700,000 p.B.i. obtained

  10. Improvement of human dendritic cell culture for immunotoxicological investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymery, N; Sibiril, Y; Parent-Massin, D

    2006-07-01

    A toxic injury such as a decrease in the number of immature dendritic cells caused by a cytotoxic effect or a disturbance in their maturation process can be responsible for immunodepression. There is a need to improve in vitro assays on human dendritic cells used to detect and evaluate adverse effects of xenobiotics. Two aspects were explored in this work: cytotoxic effects of xenobiotics on immature dendritic cells, and the interference of xenobiotics with dendritic cell maturation. Dendritic cells of two different origins were tested. Dendritic cells obtained either from umbilical cord blood CD34(+) cells or, for the first time, from umbilical cord blood monocytes. The cytotoxicity assay on immature dendritic cells has been improved. For the study of the potential adverse effects of xenobiotics on the maturation process of dendritic cells, several parameters were selected such as expression of markers (CD86, CD83, HLA-DR), secretion of interleukins 10 and 12, and proliferation of autologous lymphocytes. The relevance and the efficiency of the protocol applied were tested using two mycotoxins, T-2 toxin and deoxynivalence, DON, which are known to be immunosuppressive, and one phycotoxin, domoic acid, which is known not to have any immunotoxic effect. Assays using umbilical cord monocyte dendritic cell cultures with the protocol defined in this work, which involves a cytotoxicity study followed by evaluation of several markers of adverse effects on the dendritic cell maturation process, revealed their usefulness for investigating xenobiotic immunotoxicity toward immune primary reactions.

  11. Remodeling of monoplanar Purkinje cell dendrites during cerebellar circuit formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megumi Kaneko

    Full Text Available Dendrite arborization patterns are critical determinants of neuronal connectivity and integration. Planar and highly branched dendrites of the cerebellar Purkinje cell receive specific topographical projections from two major afferent pathways; a single climbing fiber axon from the inferior olive that extend along Purkinje dendrites, and parallel fiber axons of granule cells that contact vertically to the plane of dendrites. It has been believed that murine Purkinje cell dendrites extend in a single parasagittal plane in the molecular layer after the cell polarity is determined during the early postnatal development. By three-dimensional confocal analysis of growing Purkinje cells, we observed that mouse Purkinje cells underwent dynamic dendritic remodeling during circuit maturation in the third postnatal week. After dendrites were polarized and flattened in the early second postnatal week, dendritic arbors gradually expanded in multiple sagittal planes in the molecular layer by intensive growth and branching by the third postnatal week. Dendrites then became confined to a single plane in the fourth postnatal week. Multiplanar Purkinje cells in the third week were often associated by ectopic climbing fibers innervating nearby Purkinje cells in distinct sagittal planes. The mature monoplanar arborization was disrupted in mutant mice with abnormal Purkinje cell connectivity and motor discoordination. The dendrite remodeling was also impaired by pharmacological disruption of normal afferent activity during the second or third postnatal week. Our results suggest that the monoplanar arborization of Purkinje cells is coupled with functional development of the cerebellar circuitry.

  12. Dynamic and static calcium gradients inside large snail (Helix aspersa) neurones detected with calcium-sensitive microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roger C; Postma, Marten

    2007-04-01

    We have used quartz Ca2+-sensitive microelectrodes (CASMs) in large voltage-clamped snail neurones to investigate the inward spread of Ca2+ after a brief depolarisation. Both steady state and [Ca2+]i transients changed with depth of penetration. When the CASM tip was within 20 microm of the far side of the cell the [Ca2+]i transient time to peak was 4.4+/-0.5s, rising to 14.7+/-0.7s at a distance of 80 microm. We estimate that the Ca2+ transients travelled centripetally at an average speed of 6 microm2 s(-1) and decreased in size by half over a distance of about 45 microm. Cyclopiazonic acid had little effect on the size and time to peak of Ca2+ transients but slowed their recovery significantly. This suggests that the endoplasmic reticulum curtails rather than reinforces the transients. Injecting the calcium buffer BAPTA made the Ca2+ transients more uniform in size and increased their times to peak and rates of recovery near the membrane. We have developed a computational model for the transients, which includes diffusion, uptake and Ca2+ extrusion. Good fits were obtained with a rather large apparent diffusion coefficient of about 90+/-20 microm2 s(-1). This may assist fast recovery by extrusion.

  13. Transient osteoporosis of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliha, George; Morgan, Jordan; Vrahas, Mark

    2012-08-01

    Transient osteoporosis of pregnancy (TOP) is a rare yet perhaps under-reported condition that has affected otherwise healthy pregnancies throughout the world. The condition presents suddenly in the third trimester of a usually uneventful pregnancy and progressively immobilizes the mother. Radiographic studies detect drastic loss of bone mass, elevated rates of turnover in the bone, and oedema in the affected portion. Weakness of the bone can lead to fractures during delivery and other complications for the mother. Then, within weeks of labour, symptoms and radiological findings resolve. Aetiology is currently unknown, although neural, vascular, haematological, endocrine, nutrient-deficiency, and other etiologies have been proposed. Several treatments have also been explored, including simple bed rest, steroids, bisphosphonates, calcitonin, induced termination of pregnancy, and surgical intervention. The orthopedist plays an essential role in monitoring the condition (and potential complications) as well as ensuring satisfactory outcomes for both the mother and newborn.

  14. Transient Detection and Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, Andrew C

    2008-01-01

    I provide an incomplete inventory of the astronomical variability that will be found by next-generation time-domain astronomical surveys. These phenomena span the distance range from near-Earth satellites to the farthest Gamma Ray Bursts. The surveys that detect these transients will issue alerts to the greater astronomical community; this decision process must be extremely robust to avoid a slew of ``false'' alerts, and to maintain the community's trust in the surveys. I review the functionality required of both the surveys and the telescope networks that will be following them up, and the role of VOEvents in this process. Finally, I offer some ideas about object and event classification, which will be explored more thoroughly by other articles in these proceedings.

  15. Stability of Ignition Transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.E. Zarko

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of ignition stability arises in the case of the action of intense external heat stimuli when, resulting from the cut-off of solid substance heating, momentary ignition is followed by extinction. Physical pattern of solid propellant ignition is considered and ignition criteria available in the literature are discussed. It is shown that the above mentioned problem amounts to transient burning at a given arbitrary temperature distribution in the condensed phase. A brief survey of published data on experimental and theoretical studies on ignition stability is offered. The comparison between theory and experiment is shown to prove qualitatively the efficiency of the phenomenological approach in the theory. However, the methods of mathematical simulation as well as those of experimental studying of ignition phenomenon, especially at high fluxes, need to be improved.

  16. Role of Ryanodine Receptor Subtypes in Initiation and Formation of Calcium Sparks in Arterial Smooth Muscle: Comparison with Striated Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Gollasch

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium sparks represent local, rapid, and transient calcium release events from a cluster of ryanodine receptors (RyRs in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs, calcium sparks activate calcium-dependent potassium channels causing decrease in the global intracellular [Ca2+] and oppose vasoconstriction. This is in contrast to cardiac and skeletal muscle, where spatial and temporal summation of calcium sparks leads to global increases in intracellular [Ca2+] and myocyte contraction. We summarize the present data on local RyR calcium signaling in arterial SMCs in comparison to striated muscle and muscle-specific differences in coupling between L-type calcium channels and RyRs. Accordingly, arterial SMC Cav1.2 L-type channels regulate intracellular calcium stores content, which in turn modulates calcium efflux though RyRs. Downregulation of RyR2 up to a certain degree is compensated by increased SR calcium content to normalize calcium sparks. This indirect coupling between Cav1.2 and RyR in arterial SMCs is opposite to striated muscle, where triggering of calcium sparks is controlled by rapid and direct cross-talk between Cav1.1/Cav1.2 L-type channels and RyRs. We discuss the role of RyR isoforms in initiation and formation of calcium sparks in SMCs and their possible molecular binding partners and regulators, which differ compared to striated muscle.

  17. Transient heliosheath modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenby, J. J.; Webber, W. R.

    2015-10-01

    Voyager 1 has explored the solar wind-interstellar medium interaction region between the terminal shock and heliopause, following the intensity distribution of Galactic cosmic ray protons above 200 MeV energy. Before this component reached the expected galactic flux level at 121.7 au from the Sun, four episodes of rapid intensity change occurred with a behaviour similar to that found in Forbush Decreases in the inner Solar system, rather than that expected from a mechanism related to models for the long-term modulation found closer to the Sun. Because the mean solar wind flow is both expected and observed to be perpendicular to the radial direction close to the heliopause, an explanation is suggested in terms of transient radial flows related to possible heliopause boundary flapping. It is necessary that the radial flows are of the order either of the sound speed found for conditions downstream of the terminal shock or of the fluctuations found near the boundary by the Voyager 1 Low Energy Charged Particle detector and that the relevant cosmic ray diffusion perpendicular to the mean field is controlled by `slab' fluctuations accounting for about 20 per cent of the total power in the field variance. However, additional radial drift motion related to possible north to south gradients in the magnetic field may allow the inclusion of some diffusion according to the predictions of a theory based upon the presence of 2D turbulence. The required field gradients may arise due to field variation in the field carried by solar plasma flow deflected away from the solar equatorial plane. Modulation amounting to a total 30 per cent drop in galactic intensity requires explanation by a combination of transient effects.

  18. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate ab

  19. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate ab

  20. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate

  1. Macrophages, Dendritic Cells, and Regression of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Feig

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and monocyte-derived cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and other cellular elements of the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, in this review, the focus will be primarily on the monocyte derived cells- macrophages and dendritic cells. The roles of these cell types in atherogenesis will be highlighted. Finally, the mechanisms of atherosclerosis regression as it relates to these cells will be discussed.

  2. Dendritic nanocomposite for delivery of antibacterial agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pureti Madhu Kumar; PSrinivasa Babu; Shaik Rasheed; Ramadoss Karthikeyan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To develop and explore the use of PEGylated poly (propylene imine) dendritic architecture for the delivery of an anti bacterial bioactive, Trimethoprim. Methods: For this study, PEGylated poly(propylene imine) dendritic architecture was synthesized and loaded with Trimethoprim and targeted to the resistant producing strains of both gram positive and gram negative. The antibacterial activity was carried out by agar well-diffusion method to compare zone of inhibition with standard drug and plain PPI dendrimer. Results: The study showed that the Trimethoprim loaded dendrimer has significant antibacterial activity than the plain PPI dendrimer, but standard drug was not shown zone of inhibition upon both microorganisms butKlebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) the pure drug showed activity. Conclusions: In this study antibacterial activity of synthesized system is also relatively safer and holds potential to deliver any other antibacterial agent to the resistant producing strains.

  3. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Juliana Maria; Rumjanek, Vivian Mary

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies. PMID:27088097

  4. Sensitivity of Dendritic Cells to Microenvironment Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria Motta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells capable of either activating the immune response or inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. They do this by integrating stimuli from the environment and changing their functional status as a result of plasticity. The modifications suffered by these cells have consequences in the way the organism may respond. In the present work two opposing situations known to affect dendritic cells are analyzed: tumor growth, leading to a microenvironment that favors the induction of a tolerogenic profile, and organ transplantation, which leads to a proinflammatory profile. Lessons learned from these situations may help to understand the mechanisms of modulation resulting not only from the above circumstances, but also from other pathologies.

  5. Dendritic Cells for SYN Scan Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Artificial immune systems have previously been applied to the problem of intrusion detection. The aim of this research is to develop an intrusion detection system based on the function of Dendritic Cells (DCs). DCs are antigen presenting cells and key to activation of the human immune system, behaviour which has been abstracted to form the Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA). In algorithmic terms, individual DCs perform multi-sensor data fusion, asynchronously correlating the the fused data signals with a secondary data stream. Aggregate output of a population of cells, is analysed and forms the basis of an anomaly detection system. In this paper the DCA is applied to the detection of outgoing port scans using TCP SYN packets. Results show that detection can be achieved with the DCA, yet some false positives can be encountered when simultaneously scanning and using other network services. Suggestions are made for using adaptive signals to alleviate this uncovered problem.

  6. Wnt-induced calcium signaling mediates axon growth and guidance in the developing corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, B Ian; Li, Li; Kalil, Katherine

    2012-01-10

    Wnt5a gradients guide callosal axons by repulsion through Ryk receptors in vivo. We recently found that Wnt5a repels cortical axons and promotes axon outgrowth through calcium signaling in vitro. Here, using cortical slices, we show that Wnt5a signals through Ryk to guide and promote outgrowth of callosal axons after they cross the midline. Calcium transient frequencies in callosal growth cones positively correlate with axon outgrowth rates in vitro. In cortical slices, calcium release through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptors and calcium entry through transient receptor potential channels modulate axon growth and guidance. Knocking down Ryk inhibits calcium signaling in cortical axons, reduces rates of axon outgrowth subsequent to midline crossing, and causes axon guidance defects. Calcium- and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is required downstream of Wnt-induced calcium signaling for postcrossing callosal axon growth and guidance. Taken together, these results suggest that growth and guidance of postcrossing callosal axons by Wnt-Ryk-calcium signaling involves axon repulsion through CaMKII.

  7. Arterial Stiffness and Dialysis Calcium Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Mac-Way

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffness is the major determinant of isolated systolic hypertension and increased pulse pressure. Aortic stiffness is also associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease, hypertension, and general population. Hemodynamically, arterial stiffness results in earlier aortic pulse wave reflection leading to increased cardiac workload and decreased myocardial perfusion. Although the clinical consequence of aortic stiffness has been clearly established, its pathophysiology in various clinical conditions still remains poorly understood. The aim of the present paper is to review the studies that have looked at the impact of dialysis calcium concentration on arterial stiffness. Overall, the results of small short-term studies suggest that higher dialysis calcium is associated with a transient but significant increase in arterial stiffness. This calcium dependant increase in arterial stiffness is potentially explained by increased vascular smooth muscle tone of the conduit arteries and is not solely explained by changes in mean blood pressure. However, the optimal DCa remains to be determined, and long term studies are required to evaluate its impact on the progression of arterial stiffness.

  8. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    cells, Gr1+ inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils, or TNF production were induced to develop chronic pancreatitis in the context of DC overexpansion...Z. Yao, W. Cao, and Y.J. Liu. 2005. TSLP-activated dendritic cells induce an inflammatory T helper type 2 cell response through OX40 ligand. J. Exp...Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response , including the time for reviewing instructions

  9. Signaling in dendritic spines and spine microdomains

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The specialized morphology of dendritic spines creates an isolated compartment that allows for localized biochemical signaling. Recent studies have revealed complexity in the function of the spine head as a signaling domain and indicate that (1) the spine is functionally subdivided into multiple independent microdomains and (2) not all biochemical signals are equally compartmentalized within the spine. Here we review these findings as well as the developments in fluorescence microscopy that a...

  10. Dendrite fragmentation by catastrophic elastic remelting

    OpenAIRE

    Ananiev, S.; Nikrityuk, P.; Eckert, K.

    2008-01-01

    The paper proposes a new fragmentation mechanism of dendrite arms. The theoretical basis of this mechanism is a shift in the thermodynamical equilibrium at the solid-liquid interface due to the presence of elastic energy. This effect is modelled by the generalized Gibbs-Thomson condition [1], where each term is calculated analytically using a simple Bernoulli-Euler beam model. The resulting nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations is integrated in time using a fully implicit scheme...

  11. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  12. Transient Go: A Mobile App for Transient Astronomy Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, D.; Mahabal, A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, A.; Early, J.; Ivezic, Z.; Jacoby, S.; Kanbur, S.

    2016-12-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is set to revolutionize human interaction with the real world as demonstrated by the phenomenal success of `Pokemon Go'. That very technology can be used to rekindle the interest in science at the school level. We are in the process of developing a prototype app based on sky maps that will use AR to introduce different classes of astronomical transients to students as they are discovered i.e. in real-time. This will involve transient streams from surveys such as the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) today and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) in the near future. The transient streams will be combined with archival and latest image cut-outs and other auxiliary data as well as historical and statistical perspectives on each of the transient types being served. Such an app could easily be adapted to work with various NASA missions and NSF projects to enrich the student experience.

  13. Degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite transition and their growth dynamics in directional solidification of non-axially oriented crystals: a phase-field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Hui; Dong, Xianglei; Wu, Hongjing; Hao, Guanhua; Wang, Jianyuan; Chen, Changle; Jin, Kexin

    2016-05-01

    We report the results of a phase-field study of degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite transition and their growth dynamics during directional solidification of a binary alloy. Morphological selection maps in the planes of (G, Vp) and (ε4, Vp) show that lower pulling velocity, weaker anisotropic strength and higher thermal gradient can enhance the formation of the degenerate seaweed. The tip undercooling shows oscillations in seaweed growth, but it keeps at a constant value in dendritic growth. The M-S instability on the tips and the surface tension anisotropy of the solid-liquid interface are responsible for the formation of the degenerate seaweed. It is evidenced that the place where the interfacial instability occurs determines the morphological transition. The transient transition from degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite shows that dendrites are dynamically preferred over seaweed. For the tilted dendritic arrays with a large tilted angle, primary spacing is investigated by comparing predicted results with the classical scaling power law, and the growth direction is found to be less sensitive to the pulling velocity and the primary spacing. Furthermore, the effect of the initial interface wavelength on the morphological transition is investigated to perform the history dependence of morphological selection.

  14. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  15. The Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    The growth of dendrites is governed by the interplay between two simple and familiar processes---the irreversible diffusion of energy, and the reversible work done in the formation of new surface area. To advance our understanding of these processes, NASA sponsored a project that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia is 1994, 1996, and 1997 to record and analyze benchmark data in an apparent-microgravity ``laboratory.'' In this laboratory, energy transfer by gravity driven convection was essentially eliminated and one could test independently, for the first time, both components of dendritic growth theory. The analysis of this data shows that although the diffusion of energy can be properly accounted for, the results from interfacial physics appear to be in disagreement and alternate models should receive increased attention. Unfortunately, currently and for the foreseeable future, there is no access or financial support to develop and conduct additional experiments of this type. However, the benchmark data of 35mm photonegatives, video, and all supporting instrument data are now available at the IDGE Archive at the College of the Holy Cross. This data may still have considerable relevance to researchers working specifically with dendritic growth, and more generally those working in the synthesis, growth & processing of materials, multiscale computational modeling, pattern formation, and systems far from equilibrium.

  16. Plasmacytoid dendritic cell role in cutaneous malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadeh, Dana; Kurban, Mazen; Abbas, Ossama

    2016-07-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) correspond to a specialized dendritic cell population that exhibit plasma cell morphology, express CD4, CD123, HLA-DR, blood-derived dendritic cell antigen-2 (BDCA-2), and Toll-like receptor (TLR)7 and TLR9 within endosomal compartments. Through their production of type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines, pDCs provide anti-viral resistance and link the innate and adaptive immunity by controlling the function of myeloid DCs, lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells. While lacking from normal skin, pDCs are usually recruited to the skin in several cutaneous pathologies where they appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of several infectious, inflammatory/autoimmune, and neoplastic entities. Among the latter group, pDCs have the potential to induce anti-tumour immunity; however, the complex interaction of pDCs with tumor cells and their micro-environment appears to contribute to immunologic tolerance. In this review, we aim at highlighting the role played by pDCs in cutaneous malignancies with special emphasis on the underlying mechanisms.

  17. Single-Molecule Imaging of PSD-95 mRNA Translation in Dendrites and Its Dysregulation in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifrim, Marius F; Williams, Kathryn R; Bassell, Gary J

    2015-05-06

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by the loss of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA binding protein that regulates translation of numerous target mRNAs, some of which are dendritically localized. Our previous biochemical studies using synaptoneurosomes demonstrate a role for FMRP and miR-125a in regulating the translation of PSD-95 mRNA. However, the local translation of PSD-95 mRNA within dendrites and spines, as well as the roles of FMRP or miR-125a, have not been directly studied. Herein, local synthesis of a Venus-PSD-95 fusion protein was directly visualized in dendrites and spines using single-molecule imaging of a diffusion-restricted Venus-PSD-95 reporter under control of the PSD-95 3'UTR. The basal translation rates of Venus-PSD-95 mRNA was increased in cultured hippocampal neurons from Fmr1 KO mice compared with WT neurons, which correlated with a transient elevation of endogenous PSD-95 within dendrites. Following mGluR stimulation with (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, the rate of Venus-PSD-95 mRNA translation increased rapidly in dendrites of WT hippocampal neurons, but not in those of Fmr1 KO neurons or when the binding site of miR125a, previously shown to bind PSD-95 3'UTR, was mutated. This study provides direct support for the hypothesis that local translation within dendrites and spines is dysregulated in FXS. Impairments in the regulated local synthesis of PSD-95, a critical regulator of synaptic structure and function, may affect the spatiotemporal control of PSD-95 levels and affect dendritic spine development and synaptic plasticity in FXS. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357116-15$15.00/0.

  18. Elemental calcium intake associated with calcium acetate/calcium carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Rosamund J; Copley, J Brian

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcium-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binders have similar efficacy in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia; however, calcium-based binders may be associated with hypercalcemia, vascular calcification, and adynamic bone disease. Scope A post hoc analysis was carried out of data from a 16-week, Phase IV study of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who switched to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy from baseline calcium acetate/calcium carbonate monotherapy. Of the intent...

  19. Inducible expression of endomorphins in murine dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohuai; Xia, Hui; Chen, Yong; Liu, Xiaofen; Zhou, Cheng; Gao, Qin; Li, Zhenghong

    2012-12-15

    Bone marrow precursor cells were extracted from C57BL/6J mice aged 7-8 weeks, and dendritic cells were purified using anti-CD11c (a specific marker for dendritic cells) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression levels of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were upregulated in dendritic cells activated by lipopolysaccharide. An enzyme immunoassay showed that lipopolysaccharide and other Toll-like receptor ligands promoted the secretion of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 from activated dendritic cells. [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation demonstrated that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 both inhibited the proliferation of T lymphocyte induced by activated dendritic cells. Furthermore, this immunosuppressive effect was blocked by CTOP, a specific antagonist of µ-opioid receptors. Our experimental findings indicate that activated dendritic cells can induce the expression and secretion of endomorphins, and that endomorphins suppress T lymphocyte proliferation through activation of µ-opioid receptors.

  20. Dendritic spine actin dynamics in neuronal maturation and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlushchenko, Iryna; Koskinen, Mikko; Hotulainen, Pirta

    2016-09-01

    The majority of the postsynaptic terminals of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system exist on small bulbous structures on dendrites known as dendritic spines. The actin cytoskeleton is a structural element underlying the proper development and morphology of dendritic spines. Synaptic activity patterns rapidly change actin dynamics, leading to morphological changes in dendritic spines. In this mini-review, we will discuss recent findings on neuronal maturation and synaptic plasticity-induced changes in the dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton. We propose that actin dynamics in dendritic spines decrease through actin filament crosslinking during neuronal maturation. In long-term potentiation, we evaluate the model of fast breakdown of actin filaments through severing and rebuilding through polymerization and later stabilization through crosslinking. We will discuss the role of Ca(2+) in long-term depression, and suggest that actin filaments are dissolved through actin filament severing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Numerical Modeling of Dendrite Growth in Al Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许庆彦; 柳百成

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic grains are the most often observed microstructure in metals and alloys. In the past decade, more and more attention has been paid to the modeling and simulation of dendritic microstructures. This paper describes a modified diffusion-limited aggregation model to simulate the complex shape of the dendrite grains during metal solidification. The fractal model was used to simulate equiaxed dendrite growth. The fractal dimensions of simulated Al alloy structures range from 1.63-1.88 which compares well with the experimentally-measured fractal dimension of 1.85; therefore, the model accurately predicts not only the dendritic structure morphology, but also the fractal dimension of the dendrite structure formed during solidification.

  2. Inducible expression of endomorphins in murine dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohuai Yang; Hui Xia; Yong Chen; Xiaofen Liu; Cheng Zhou; Qin Gao; Zhenghong Li

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow precursor cells were extracted from C57BL/6J mice aged 7–8 weeks, and dendritic cells were purified using anti-CD11c (a specific marker for dendritic cells) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression levels of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were upregulated in dendritic cells activated by lipopolysaccharide. An enzyme immunoassay showed that lipopolysaccharide and other Toll-like receptor ligands promoted the secretion of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 from activated dendritic cells. [3H]-thymidine incorporation demonstrated that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 both inhibited the proliferation of T lymphocyte induced by activated dendritic cells. Furthermore, this immunosuppressive effect was blocked by CTOP, a specific antagonist of μ-opioid receptors. Our experimental findings indicate that activated dendritic cells can induce the expression and secretion of endomorphins, and that endomorphins suppress T lymphocyte proliferation through activation of μ-opioid receptors.

  3. Dendritic spine detection using curvilinear structure detector and LDA classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Xiaobo; Witt, Rochelle M; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Adjeroh, Donald; Wong, Stephen T C

    2007-06-01

    Dendritic spines are small, bulbous cellular compartments that carry synapses. Biologists have been studying the biochemical pathways by examining the morphological and statistical changes of the dendritic spines at the intracellular level. In this paper a novel approach is presented for automated detection of dendritic spines in neuron images. The dendritic spines are recognized as small objects of variable shape attached or detached to multiple dendritic backbones in the 2D projection of the image stack along the optical direction. We extend the curvilinear structure detector to extract the boundaries as well as the centerlines for the dendritic backbones and spines. We further build a classifier using Linear Discriminate Analysis (LDA) to classify the attached spines into valid and invalid types to improve the accuracy of the spine detection. We evaluate the proposed approach by comparing with the manual results in terms of backbone length, spine number, spine length, and spine density.

  4. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  5. Calcium sensing receptors and calcium oscillations: calcium as a first messenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitwieser, Gerda E

    2006-01-01

    Calcium sensing receptors (CaR) are unique among G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) since both the first (extracellular) and second (intracellular) messengers are Ca(2+). CaR serves to translate small fluctuations in extracellular Ca(2+) into intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. In many cells and tissues, CaR also acts as a coincidence detector, sensing both changes in extracellular Ca(2+) plus the presence of various allosteric activators including amino acids, polyamines, and/or peptides. CaR oscillations are uniquely shaped by the activating agonist, that is, Ca(2+) triggers sinusoidal oscillations while Ca(2+) plus phenylalanine trigger transient oscillations of lower frequency. The distinct oscillation patterns generated by Ca(2+)versus Ca(2+) plus phenylalanine are the results of activation of distinct signal transduction pathways. CaR is a member of Family C GPCRs, having a large extracellular agonist binding domain, and functioning as a disulfide-linked dimer. The CaR dimer likely can be driven to distinct active conformations by various Ca(2+) plus modulator combinations, which can drive preferential coupling to divergent signaling pathways. Such plasticity with respect to both agonist and signaling outcomes allows CaR to uniquely contribute to the physiology of organs and tissues where it is expressed. This chapter will examine the structural features of CaR, which contribute to its unique properties, the nature of CaR-induced intracellular Ca(2+) signals and the potential role(s) for CaR in development and differentiation.

  6. The MWA Transients Survey (MWATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M.; Murphy, T.; Kaplan, D. L.; Croft, S. D.; Hancock, P.; Rowlinson, A.; Wayth, R.; Gaensler, B.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Offringa, A.; Loi, C.; Bannister, K.; Trott, C.; Marquart, J.

    2017-01-01

    We propose the continuation of the MWA transients survey to search for and monitor low frequency transient and variable radio sources in the southern sky. This proposal is aimed at commensally utilising data from the GLEAM-X (G0008) project in semester 2017-A. The aim of this commensal data acquisition is to commission long baseline observations for transient science. In particular this will involve studying the impact of the ionosphere on calibration and imaging, and developing the techniques needed to produce science quality data products. The proposed drift scans with LST locking (see G0008 proposal) are particularly exciting as we can test image subtraction for transient and variable identification. This survey is targeted at studying objects such as AGN (intrinsic and extrinsic variability), long duration synchrotron emitters, pulsars and transients of unknown origin. The maps generated from this survey will be analysed with the Variables and Slow Transients (VAST) detection pipeline. The motivation for this survey is as follows: (i) To obtain temporal data on an extremely large and robust sample of low frequency sources to explore and quantify both intrinsic and extrinsic variability; (ii) To search and find new classes of low frequency radio transients that previously remained undetected and obscured from multi-wavelength discovery; (iii) To place rigorous statistics on the occurrence of both transients and variables prior to the Australian SKA era.

  7. Inducible expression of endomorphins in murine dendritic cells★

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaohuai; Xia, Hui; Chen, Yong; Liu, Xiaofen; Zhou, Cheng; Gao, Qin; Li, Zhenghong

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow precursor cells were extracted from C57BL/6J mice aged 7–8 weeks, and dendritic cells were purified using anti-CD11c (a specific marker for dendritic cells) antibody-coated magnetic beads. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the expression levels of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 were upregulated in dendritic cells activated by lipopolysaccharide. An enzyme immunoassay showed that lipopolysaccharide and other Toll-like receptor ligands promoted the secretion of endomorphin-...

  8. Assessment of scaling factor in modified dendrite growth model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑞丰; 沈宁福; 曹文博

    2002-01-01

    A model for dendrite growth during rapid solidification was established on the basis of BCT model and marginal stability criterion through modified Peclet numbers. Taking into account the interaction of diffusion fields, including solute diffusion field and thermal diffusion field around the dendrite tip, the model obtain a satisfactory results to predict the dendrite velocity and the tip radius, which agrees well with the experimental data from references in Cu-Ni alloy.

  9. Imaging of calcium dynamics in pollen tube cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberini, María Laura; Muschietti, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic calcium [(Ca(2+))cyt] is a central component of cellular signal transduction pathways. In plants, many external and internal stimuli transiently elevate (Ca(2+))cyt, initiating downstream responses that control different features of plant development. In pollen tubes the establishment of an oscillatory gradient of calcium at the tip is essential for polarized growth. Disruption of the cytosolic Ca(2+) gradient by chelators or channel blockers inhibits pollen tube growth. To quantify the physiological role of (Ca(2+))cyt in cellular systems, genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators such as Yellow Cameleons (YCs) have been developed. The Cameleons are based on a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Here, we describe a method for imaging cytoplasmic Ca(2+) dynamics in growing pollen tubes that express the fluorescent calcium indicator Yellow Cameleon 3.6 (YC 3.6), using laser-scanning confocal microscopy.

  10. In vitro effects of trichothecenes on human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymery, N; Sibiril, Y; Parent-Massin, D

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to study the in vitro effects of trichothecenes on human dendritic cells. Trichothecenes are mycotoxins produced by fungi such as Fusarium, Myrothecium, and Stachybotrys. Two aspects have been explored in this work: the cytotoxicity of trichothecenes on immature dendritic cells to determine IC 50 (inhibition concentration), and the effects of trichothecenes on dendritic cell maturation process. Two mycotoxins (T-2 and DON) known to be immunotoxic have been tested on a model of monocyte-derived dendritic cells culture. Cytotoxic effects of T-2 toxin and DON on immature dendritic cells showed that DON is less potent than T-2 toxin. The exposure to trichothecenes during dendritic cell maturation upon addition of LPS or TNF-alpha markedly inhibited the up-regulation of maturation markers such as CD-86, HLA-DR and CCR7. Features of LPS or TNF-alpha -mediated maturation of dendritic cells, such as IL-10 and IL-12 secretions and endocytosis, were also impaired in response to trichothecenes treatment. These results suggest trichothecenes have adverse effects on dendritic cells and dendritic cell maturation process.

  11. Mapping homeostatic synaptic plasticity using cable properties of dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queenan, B N; Lee, K J; Tan, H; Huganir, R L; Vicini, S; Pak, D T S

    2016-02-19

    When chronically silenced, cortical and hippocampal neurons homeostatically upregulate excitatory synaptic function. However, the subcellular position of such changes on the dendritic tree is not clear. We exploited the cable-filtering properties of dendrites to derive a parameter, the dendritic filtering index (DFI), to map the spatial distribution of synaptic currents. Our analysis indicates that young rat cortical neurons globally scale AMPA receptor-mediated currents, while mature hippocampal neurons do not, revealing distinct homeostatic strategies between brain regions and developmental stages. The DFI presents a useful tool for mapping the dendritic origin of synaptic currents and the location of synaptic plasticity changes.

  12. Dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is independent of Reelin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinkyung; Park, Tae-Ju; Kwon, Namseop; Lee, Dongmyeong; Kim, Seunghwan; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Curran, Tom; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-07-01

    The dendritic planarity of Purkinje cells is critical for cerebellar circuit formation. In the absence of Crk and CrkL, the Reelin pathway does not function resulting in partial Purkinje cell migration and defective dendritogenesis. However, the relationships among Purkinje cell migration, dendritic development and Reelin signaling have not been clearly delineated. Here, we use synchrotron X-ray microscopy to obtain 3-D images of Golgi-stained Purkinje cell dendrites. Purkinje cells that failed to migrate completely exhibited conical dendrites with abnormal 3-D arborization and reduced dendritic complexity. Furthermore, their spines were fewer in number with a distorted morphology. In contrast, Purkinje cells that migrated successfully displayed planar dendritic and spine morphologies similar to normal cells, despite reduced dendritic complexity. These results indicate that, during cerebellar formation, Purkinje cells migrate into an environment that supports development of dendritic planarity and spine formation. While Reelin signaling is important for the migration process, it does not make a direct major contribution to dendrite formation.

  13. Induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F M; Azimi, I; Faville, R A; Peters, A A; Jalink, K; Putney, J W; Goodhill, G J; Thompson, E W; Roberts-Thomson, S J; Monteith, G R

    2014-05-01

    Signals from the tumor microenvironment trigger cancer cells to adopt an invasive phenotype through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Relatively little is known regarding key signal transduction pathways that serve as cytosolic bridges between cell surface receptors and nuclear transcription factors to induce EMT. A better understanding of these early EMT events may identify potential targets for the control of metastasis. One rapid intracellular signaling pathway that has not yet been explored during EMT induction is calcium. Here we show that stimuli used to induce EMT produce a transient increase in cytosolic calcium levels in human breast cancer cells. Attenuation of the calcium signal by intracellular calcium chelation significantly reduced epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and hypoxia-induced EMT. Intracellular calcium chelation also inhibited EGF-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), while preserving other signal transduction pathways such as Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. To identify calcium-permeable channels that may regulate EMT induction in breast cancer cells, we performed a targeted siRNA-based screen. We found that transient receptor potential-melastatin-like 7 (TRPM7) channel expression regulated EGF-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and expression of the EMT marker vimentin. Although intracellular calcium chelation almost completely blocked the induction of many EMT markers, including vimentin, Twist and N-cadherin, the effect of TRPM7 silencing was specific for vimentin protein expression and STAT3 phosphorylation. These results indicate that TRPM7 is a partial regulator of EMT in breast cancer cells, and that other calcium-permeable ion channels are also involved in calcium-dependent EMT induction. In summary, this work establishes an important role for the intracellular calcium signal in the induction of EMT in human breast cancer cells. Manipulation of

  14. Transient regional osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Marquina, Antonio; Tarín, Juan J; García-Pérez, Miguel-Ángel; Cano, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    Transient regional osteoporosis (TRO) is a disease that predisposes to fragility fracture in weight bearing joints of mid-life women and men. Pregnant women may also suffer the process, usually at the hip. The prevalence of TRO is lower than the systemic form, associated with postmenopause and advanced age, but may be falsely diminished by under-diagnosis. The disease may be uni- or bilateral, and may migrate to distinct joints. One main feature of TRO is spontaneous recovery. Pain and progressive limitation in the functionality of the affected joint(s) are key symptoms. In the case of the form associated with pregnancy, difficulties in diagnosis derive from the relatively young age at presentation and from the clinical overlapping with the frequent aches during gestation. Densitometric osteoporosis in the affected region is not always present, but bone marrow edema, with or without joint effusion, is detected by magnetic resonance. There are not treatment guidelines, but the association of antiresorptives to symptomatic treatment seems to be beneficial. Surgery or other orthopedic interventions can be required for specific indications, like hip fracture, intra-medullary decompression, or other.

  15. Applied hydraulic transients

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhry, M Hanif

    2014-01-01

    This book covers hydraulic transients in a comprehensive and systematic manner from introduction to advanced level and presents various methods of analysis for computer solution. The field of application of the book is very broad and diverse and covers areas such as hydroelectric projects, pumped storage schemes, water-supply systems, cooling-water systems, oil pipelines and industrial piping systems. Strong emphasis is given to practical applications, including several case studies, problems of applied nature, and design criteria. This will help design engineers and introduce students to real-life projects. This book also: ·         Presents modern methods of analysis suitable for computer analysis, such as the method of characteristics, explicit and implicit finite-difference methods and matrix methods ·         Includes case studies of actual projects ·         Provides extensive and complete treatment of governed hydraulic turbines ·         Presents design charts, desi...

  16. The Rapid Transient Surveyor

    CERN Document Server

    Baranec, Christoph; Wright, Shelley A; Tonry, John; Tully, R Brent; Szapudi, István; Takamiya, Marianne; Hunter, Lisa; Riddle, Reed; Chen, Shaojie; Chun, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Rapid Transient Surveyor (RTS) is a proposed rapid-response, high-cadence adaptive optics (AO) facility for the UH 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will uniquely address the need for high-acuity and sensitive near-infrared spectral follow-up observations of tens of thousands of objects in mere months by combining an excellent observing site, unmatched robotic observational efficiency, and an AO system that significantly increases both sensitivity and spatial resolving power. We will initially use RTS to obtain the infrared spectra of ~4,000 Type Ia supernovae identified by the Asteroid Terrestrial-Impact Last Alert System over a two year period that will be crucial to precisely measuring distances and mapping the distribution of dark matter in the z < 0.1 universe. RTS will comprise an upgraded version of the Robo-AO laser AO system and will respond quickly to target-of-opportunity events, minimizing the time between discovery and characterization. RTS will acquire simultaneous-multicolor images with a...

  17. The rapid transient surveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranec, C.; Lu, J. R.; Wright, S. A.; Tonry, J.; Tully, R. B.; Szapudi, I.; Takamiya, M.; Hunter, L.; Riddle, R.; Chen, S.; Chun, M.

    2016-07-01

    The Rapid Transient Surveyor (RTS) is a proposed rapid-response, high-cadence adaptive optics (AO) facility for the UH 2.2-m telescope on Maunakea. RTS will uniquely address the need for high-acuity and sensitive near-infrared spectral follow-up observations of tens of thousands of objects in mere months by combining an excellent observing site, unmatched robotic observational efficiency, and an AO system that significantly increases both sensitivity and spatial resolving power. We will initially use RTS to obtain the infrared spectra of 4,000 Type Ia supernovae identified by the Asteroid Terrestrial-Impact Last Alert System over a two year period that will be crucial to precisely measuring distances and mapping the distribution of dark matter in the z efficiency prism integral field unit spectrograph: R = 70-140 over a total bandpass of 840-1830nm with an 8.7" by 6.0" field of view (0.15" spaxels). The AO correction boosts the infrared point-source sensitivity of the spectrograph against the sky background by a factor of seven for faint targets, giving the UH 2.2-m the H-band sensitivity of a 5.7-m telescope without AO.

  18. Inositol trisphosphate and calcium signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate is a second messenger that controls many cellular processes by generating internal calcium signals. It operates through receptors whose molecular and physiological properties closely resemble the calcium-mobilizing ryanodine receptors of muscle. This family of intracellular calcium channels displays the regenerative process of calcium-induced calcium release responsible for the complex spatiotemporal patterns of calcium waves and oscillations. Such a dynamic signalling pathway controls many cellular processes, including fertilization, cell growth, transformation, secretion, smooth muscle contraction, sensory perception and neuronal signalling.

  19. Semi-solid Forming of a Damper Housing with Dendritic and Non-dendritic Al-Si-Mg Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenCM; YangCC; ChaoCG

    2001-01-01

    A motorcycle component of damper housing was made by semi-solid forming process. This was used to investigate the effect of microstructures of feedstock on the formability of semisolid process. The soundness and microstructures of casting parts made by dendritic and non-dendritic feedstock were investigated. Separating of liquid phase was found in the casting produced by dendritic feedstock, which might result in defects of porosity, while uniform microstructures were found in the casting produced by no...

  20. Transient oxytocin signaling primes the development and function of excitatory hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Silvia; Ambrozkiewicz, Mateusz C; Guzzi, Francesca; Gravati, Marta; Biella, Gerardo; Bormuth, Ingo; Hammer, Matthieu; Tuffy, Liam P; Sigler, Albrecht; Kawabe, Hiroshi; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Toselli, Mauro; Brose, Nils; Parenti, Marco; Rhee, JeongSeop

    2017-02-23

    Beyond its role in parturition and lactation, oxytocin influences higher brain processes that control social behavior of mammals, and perturbed oxytocin signaling has been linked to the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders. However, it is still largely unknown how oxytocin exactly regulates neuronal function. We show that early, transient oxytocin exposure in vitro inhibits the development of hippocampal glutamatergic neurons, leading to reduced dendrite complexity, synapse density, and excitatory transmission, while sparing GABAergic neurons. Conversely, genetic elimination of oxytocin receptors increases the expression of protein components of excitatory synapses and excitatory synaptic transmission in vitro. In vivo, oxytocin-receptor-deficient hippocampal pyramidal neurons develop more complex dendrites, which leads to increased spine number and reduced γ-oscillations. These results indicate that oxytocin controls the development of hippocampal excitatory neurons and contributes to the maintenance of a physiological excitation/inhibition balance, whose disruption can cause neurobehavioral disturbances.

  1. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine stimulates human monocyte-derived dendritic cell chemotaxis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ha-young LEE; Eun-ha SHIN; Yoe-sik BAE

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (DC) chemotaxis. Methods: Human DC were generated from peripheral blood monocytes by culturing them with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4. The effect of SPC on the DC chemotactic migration was measured by chemotaxis assay. Intracellular signaling event involved in the SPC-induced DC chemotaxis was investigated with several inhibitors for specific kinase. The expression of the SPC receptors was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: We found that SPC induced chemotactic migration in immature DC (iDC) and mature DC (mDC). In terms of SPC-induced signaling events, mitogen activated protein kinase activation and Akt activation in iDC and mDC were stimulated. SPC-induced chemotaxis was mediated by extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and phosphoino-sitide-3-kinase, but not by calcium in both iDC and mDC. Although mDC express ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1, but not G protein-coupled receptor 4, iDC do not express any of these receptors. To examine the involvement of sphin-gosine-1-phosphate (SIP) receptors, we checked the effect of an SIP receptor antagonist (VPC23019) on SPC-induced DC chemotaxis. VPC23019 did not affect SPC-induced DC chemotaxis. Conclusion: The results suggest that SPC may play a role in regulating DC trafficking during phagocytosis and the T cell-stimulating phase, and the unique SPC receptor, which is different from SIP receptors, is involved in SPC-induced chemotaxis.

  2. [Post-partum transient osteoporosis of the hip causing pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Annemarie Lyng; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck; Morsel-Carlsen, Lone; Sørensen, Inge Juul

    2014-07-14

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH) affects pregnant women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and shows a pattern of bone marrow oedema. We report a case of TOH post-partum with involvement of both hips in a 34-year-old woman. She was known with undifferentiated spondyloartritis since 2004, which posed a diagnostic challenge. The reported patient was treated conservatively avoiding lactation, weight bearing activities, increased intake of calcium and vitamin D and recovered without further medical treatment.

  3. Calcium and Calcium Supplements: Achieving the Right Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bone mass, which is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Many Americans don't get enough calcium in their diets. Children and adolescent girls are at particular risk, but so are adults age 50 and older. How much calcium you ...

  4. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  5. Excessive signal transduction of gain-of-function variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR are associated with increased ER to cytosol calcium gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Ranieri

    Full Text Available In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA. Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate receptor inputs to cell function.

  6. Excessive signal transduction of gain-of-function variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) are associated with increased ER to cytosol calcium gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Marianna; Tamma, Grazia; Di Mise, Annarita; Vezzoli, Giuseppe; Soldati, Laura; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA) and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA). Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt) and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K) variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate) receptor inputs to cell function.

  7. Ternary eutectic dendrites: Pattern formation and scaling properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rátkai, László; Szállás, Attila; Pusztai, Tamás [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Mohri, Tetsuo [Center for Computational Materials Science, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Gránásy, László, E-mail: granasy.laszlo@wigner.mta.hu [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-21

    Extending previous work [Pusztai et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 032401 (2013)], we have studied the formation of eutectic dendrites in a model ternary system within the framework of the phase-field theory. We have mapped out the domain in which two-phase dendritic structures grow. With increasing pulling velocity, the following sequence of growth morphologies is observed: flat front lamellae → eutectic colonies → eutectic dendritesdendrites with target pattern → partitionless dendrites → partitionless flat front. We confirm that the two-phase and one-phase dendrites have similar forms and display a similar scaling of the dendrite tip radius with the interface free energy. It is also found that the possible eutectic patterns include the target pattern, and single- and multiarm spirals, of which the thermal fluctuations choose. The most probable number of spiral arms increases with increasing tip radius and with decreasing kinetic anisotropy. Our numerical simulations confirm that in agreement with the assumptions of a recent analysis of two-phase dendrites [Akamatsu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 105502 (2014)], the Jackson-Hunt scaling of the eutectic wavelength with pulling velocity is obeyed in the parameter domain explored, and that the natural eutectic wavelength is proportional to the tip radius of the two-phase dendrites. Finally, we find that it is very difficult/virtually impossible to form spiraling two-phase dendrites without anisotropy, an observation that seems to contradict the expectations of Akamatsu et al. Yet, it cannot be excluded that in isotropic systems, two-phase dendrites are rare events difficult to observe in simulations.

  8. Pressure effects on the interactions of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium transport enzyme with calcium and dinitrophenyl phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbach, W

    1988-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of dinitrophenyl phosphate by the sarcoplasmic calcium transport enzyme has been studied. The magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate complex is the true substrate of the enzyme (K = 7000 M-1) by which it is hydrolyzed at 20 degrees C with a turnover rate of 4 s-1. Activation by calcium ions occurs between 0.1 and 1 microM as observed for ATP hydrolysis. The activation volume of the enzyme saturated with both ligands exhibits pronounced pressure-dependence, rising from 25 ml/mol at atmospheric pressure to 80 ml/mol at 100 MPa. The apparent binding volumes for magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate and calcium are likewise pressure-dependent. The volume changes connected with the binding of magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate is quite small approaching zero at 100 MPa. The apparent binding volume for calcium greatly increases with pressure from 35 ml/mol at atmospheric pressure to 150 ml/mol at 70 MPa. A nearly constant binding volume of approximately 40 ml/mol results if the effect of pressure on the respective rate constants that contribute to the apparent binding constant, is taken into account. The pressure-dependence of enzyme activity at subsaturating calcium concentrations yields an activation volume of 250 ml/mol related to the rate of calcium binding indicating the occurrence of a transient large volume expansion of the enzyme complex. The volume changes observed for the calcium-dependent interaction of the enzyme with magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate well agree with that found for magnesium p-nitrophenyl phosphate (W. Hasselbach and L. Stephan,Z. Naturforsch. 42 c, 641-652 (1987)) indicating that the found volume changes are intrinsic properties of the transport enzyme, independent of the respective energy donor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Mature dendritic cells derived from human monocytes within 48 hours: a novel strategy for dendritic cell differentiation from blood precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Marc; Obermaier, Bianca; Herten, Jan; Haerle, Carola; Pohl, Katrin; Rothenfusser, Simon; Schnurr, Max; Endres, Stefan; Eigler, Andreas

    2003-04-15

    It is widely believed that generation of mature dendritic cells (DCs) with full T cell stimulatory capacity from human monocytes in vitro requires 5-7 days of differentiation with GM-CSF and IL-4, followed by 2-3 days of activation. Here, we report a new strategy for differentiation and maturation of monocyte-derived DCs within only 48 h of in vitro culture. Monocytes acquire immature DC characteristics by day 2 of culture with GM-CSF and IL-4; they down-regulate CD14, increase dextran uptake, and respond to the inflammatory chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha. To accelerate DC development and maturation, monocytes were incubated for 24 h with GM-CSF and IL-4, followed by activation with proinflammatory mediators for another 24 h (FastDC). FastDC expressed mature DC surface markers as well as chemokine receptor 7 and secreted IL-12 (p70) upon CD40 ligation in the presence of IFN-gamma. The increase in intracellular calcium in response to 6Ckine showed that chemokine receptor 7 expression was functional. When FastDC were compared with mature monocyte-derived DCs generated by a standard 7-day protocol, they were equally potent in inducing Ag-specific T cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production as well as in priming autologous naive T cells using tetanus toxoid as a model Ag. These findings indicate that FastDC are as effective as monocyte-derived DCs in stimulating primary, Ag-specific, Th 1-type immune responses. Generation of FastDC not only reduces labor, cost, and time required for in vitro DC development, but may also represent a model more closely resembling DC differentiation from monocytes in vivo.

  10. Lung Dendritic Cells Facilitate Extrapulmonary Bacterial Dissemination during Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alva eRosendahl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia worldwide. Given the critical role of dendritic cells (DCs in regulating and modulating the immune response to pathogens, we investigated here the role of DCs in S. pneumoniae lung infections. Using a well-established transgenic mouse line which allows the conditional transient depletion of DCs, we showed that ablation of DCs resulted in enhanced resistance to intranasal challenge with S. pneumoniae. DC-depleted mice exhibited delayed bacterial systemic dissemination, significantly reduced bacterial loads in the infected organs and lower levels of serum inflammatory mediators than non-depleted animals. The increased resistance of DC-depleted mice to S. pneumoniae was associated with a better capacity to restrict pneumococci extrapulmonary dissemination. Furthermore, we demonstrated that S. pneumoniae disseminated from the lungs into the regional lymph nodes in a cell-independent manner and that this direct way of dissemination was much more efficient in the presence of DCs. We also provide evidence that S. pneumoniae induces expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 in cultured bone marrow-derived DCs. MMP-9 is a protease involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix proteins and is critical for DC trafficking across extracellular matrix and basement membranes during the migration from the periphery to the lymph nodes. MMP-9 was also significantly up-regulated in the lungs of mice after intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. Notably, the expression levels of MMP-9 in the infected lungs were significantly decreased after depletion of DCs suggesting the involvement of DCs in MMP-9 production during pneumococcal pneumonia. Thus, we propose that S. pneumoniae can exploit the DC-derived proteolysis to open tissue barriers thereby facilitating its own dissemination from the local site of infection.

  11. Helioseismic Effects of Energetic Transients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Ambastha

    2008-03-01

    Photospheric and chromospheric signatures related to large, energetic transients such as flares and CMEs, have been extensively reported during the last several years. In addition, energetic solar transients are expected to cause helioseismic effects. Some of the recent results are reviewed here; in particular, the helioseismic effects of the powerful flares in superactive region, NOAA 10486, including the 4B/X17 superflare of October 28, 2003. We also examine the temporal variations of power in low- modes during the period May 1995–October 2005, and compare with daily, disk-integrated flare- and CME-indices to infer the effect of transients on the scale of whole solar disk.

  12. Electromagnetic transients in power cables

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Filipe Faria

    2013-01-01

    From the more basic concepts to the most advanced ones where long and laborious simulation models are required, Electromagnetic Transients in Power Cables provides a thorough insight into the study of electromagnetic transients and underground power cables. Explanations and demonstrations of different electromagnetic transient phenomena are provided, from simple lumped-parameter circuits to complex cable-based high voltage networks, as well as instructions on how to model the cables.Supported throughout by illustrations, circuit diagrams and simulation results, each chapter contains exercises,

  13. Crosstalk between dendritic cell subsets and implications for dendritic cell-based anticancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakdash, G.; Schreurs, I.; Schreibelt, G.; Tel, J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a family of professional antigen-presenting cells that have an indispensable role in the initiation of innate and adaptive immune responses against pathogens and tumor cells. The DC family is very heterogeneous. Two main types of naturally occurring DCs circulate in periphe

  14. Impact of Dendritic Size and Dendritic Topology on Burst Firing in Pyramidal Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, Ronald A. J.; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2010-01-01

    Neurons display a wide range of intrinsic firing patterns. A particularly relevant pattern for neuronal signaling and synaptic plasticity is burst firing, the generation of clusters of action potentials with short interspike intervals. Besides ion-channel composition, dendritic morphology appears to

  15. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...

  16. A Postsynaptic Role for Short-Term Neuronal Facilitation in Dendritic Spines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sunggu; Santos, Mariton D.; Tang, Cha-Min; Kim, Jae Geun; Yang, Sungchil

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is a fundamental component of information processing in the brain. Presynaptic facilitation in response to repetitive stimuli, often referred to as paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), is a dominant form of short-term synaptic plasticity. Recently, an additional cellular mechanism for short-term facilitation, short-term postsynaptic plasticity (STPP), has been proposed. While a dendritic mechanism was described in hippocampus, its expression has not yet been demonstrated at the levels of the spine. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the mechanism can be expressed in other brain regions, such as sensory cortex. Here, we demonstrated that a postsynaptic response can be facilitated by prior spine excitation in both hippocampal and cortical neurons, using 3D digital holography and two-photon calcium imaging. The coordinated action of pre- and post-synaptic plasticity may provide a more thorough account of information processing in the brain.

  17. Calcium, vitamin D and bone

    OpenAIRE

    Borg, Andrew A.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium, protein and vitamin D are the main nutrients relevant to bone health. This short article discusses the importance of vitamin D and its relation to calcium homeostasis. The various causes, clinical manifestations and treatment are outlined.

  18. Fine structure of synapses on dendritic spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eFrotscher

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Camillo Golgi’s Reazione Nera led to the discovery of dendritic spines, small appendages originating from dendritic shafts. With the advent of electron microscopy (EM they were identified as sites of synaptic contact. Later it was found that changes in synaptic strength were associated with changes in the shape of dendritic spines. While live-cell imaging was advantageous in monitoring the time course of such changes in spine structure, EM is still the best method for the simultaneous visualization of all cellular components, including actual synaptic contacts, at high resolution. Immunogold labeling for EM reveals the precise localization of molecules in relation to synaptic structures. Previous EM studies of spines and synapses were performed in tissue subjected to aldehyde fixation and dehydration in ethanol, which is associated with protein denaturation and tissue shrinkage. It has remained an issue to what extent fine structural details are preserved when subjecting the tissue to these procedures. In the present review, we report recent studies on the fine structure of spines and synapses using high-pressure freezing (HPF, which avoids protein denaturation by aldehydes and results in an excellent preservation of ultrastructural detail. In these studies, HPF was used to monitor subtle fine-structural changes in spine shape associated with chemically induced long-term potentiation (cLTP at identified hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. Changes in spine shape result from reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. We report that cLTP was associated with decreased immunogold labeling for phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing protein. Phosphorylation of cofilin renders it unable to depolymerize F-actin, which stabilizes the actin cytoskeleton. Decreased levels of p-cofilin, in turn, suggest increased actin turnover, possibly underlying the changes in spine shape associated with cLTP. The findings reviewed here establish HPF as

  19. Calcium ion channel and epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yudan Lü; Weihong Lin; Dihui Ma

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between calcium ion channel and epilepsy for well investigating the pathogenesis of epilepsy and probing into the new therapeutic pathway of epilepsy.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online research Calcium ion channel and epilepsy related articles published between January 1994 and December 2006 in the CKNI and Wanfang database with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy, calcium-channel blocker". The language was limited to Chinese. At the same time,related articles published between January 1993 and December 2006 in Pubmed were searched for on online with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy" in English.STUDY SELECTION: The materials were selected firstly. Inclusive criteria: ① Studies related to calcium ion channel and the pat1hogenesis of epilepsy. ② Studies on the application of calcium ion channel blocker in the treatment of epilepsy. Exclusive criteria: repetitive or irrelated studies.DATA EXTRACTION: According to the criteria, 123 articles were retrieved and 93 were excluded due to repetitive or irrelated studies. Altogether 30 articles met the inclusive criteria, 11 of them were about the structure and characters of calcium ion channel, 10 about calcium ion channel and the pathogenesis of epilepsy and 9 about calcium blocker and the treatment of epilepsy.DATA SYNTHESIS: Calcium ion channels mainly consist of voltage dependent calcium channel and receptor operated calcium channel. Depolarization caused by voltage gating channel-induced influxion is the pathological basis of epileptic attack, and it is found in many studies that many anti-epileptic drugs have potential and direct effect to rivalizing voltage-dependent calcium ion channel.CONCLUSION: Calcium influxion plays an important role in the seizure of epilepsy. Some calcium antagonists seen commonly are being tried in the clinical therapy of epilepsy that is being explored, not applied in clinical practice. If there are enough evidences to

  20. Desalted duck egg white peptides promote calcium uptake by counteracting the adverse effects of phytic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Tao; Liu, Weiwei; Shi, Wen; Ma, Zhili; He, Hui

    2017-03-15

    The structure of the desalted duck egg white peptides-calcium chelate was characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Characterization results showed structural folding and aggregation of amino acids or oligopeptides during the chelation process. Desalted duck egg white peptides enhanced the calcium uptake in the presence of oxalate, phosphate and zinc ions in Caco-2 monolayers. Animal model indicated that desalted duck egg white peptides effectively enhanced the mineral absorption and counteracted the deleterious effects of phytic acid. These findings suggested that desalted duck egg white peptides might promote calcium uptake in three pathways: 1) desalted duck egg white peptides bind with calcium to form soluble chelate and avoid precipitate; 2) the chelate is absorbed as small peptides by enterocyte; and 3) desalted duck egg white peptides regulate the proliferation and differentiation of enterocytes through the interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid 6 calcium channel.

  1. Dendritic Cells as Danger-Recognizing Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokmann Hong

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are antigen presenting cells that are characterized by a potent capacity to initiate immune responses. DCs comprise several subsets with distinct phenotypes. After sensing any danger(s to the host via their innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors, DCs become mature and subsequently present antigens to CD4+ T cells. Since DCs possess the intrinsic capacity to polarize CD4+ helper cells, it is critical to understand the immunological roles of DCs for clinical applications. Here, we review the different DC subsets, their danger-sensing receptors and immunological functions. Furthermore, the cytokine reporter mouse model for studying DC activation is introduced.

  2. Viruses, dendritic cells and the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Barney S

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The interaction between viruses and dendritic cells (DCs is varied and complex. DCs are key elements in the development of a host response to pathogens such as viruses, but viruses have developed survival tactics to either evade or diminish the immune system that functions to kill and eliminate these micro-organisms. In the present review we summarize current concepts regarding the function of DCs in the immune system, our understanding of how viruses alter DC function to attenuate both the virus-specific and global immune response, and how we may be able to exploit DC function to prevent or treat viral infections.

  3. Convective heat transfer during dendritic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    Axial growth rate measurements were carried out at 17 levels of supercooling between 0.043 C and 2 C, a temperature range in which convection, instead of diffusion, becomes the controlling mechanism of heat transfer in the dentritic growth process. The growth velocity, normalized to that expected for pure diffusive heat transfer, displays a dependence on orientation. The ratio of the observed growth velocity to that for convection-free growth and the coefficients of supercooling are formulated. The dependence of normalized growth rate in supercooling is described for downward growing dendrites. These experimental correlations can be justified theoretically only to a limited extent.

  4. Convective heat transfer during dendritic solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments on succinonitrile are described in which the dependence of dendritic growth velocity is studied as a function of orientation with respect to gravity. Growth rate measurements were carried out at a relatively small supercooling, requiring high specimen purity as well as extreme thermal stability and precision temperature measurement. The normalized growth velocity showed a dependence on orientation described by the ratio of observed growth velocity to that expected for convection-free growth being equal to 3.52 times the n-th power of Cos half the orientation angle, where n lies between 0.5 and 0.75.

  5. Metamaterial absorber with random dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiren; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2010-05-01

    The metamaterial absorber composed of random dendritic cells has been investigated at microwave frequencies. It is found that the absorptivities come to be weaker and the resonant frequency get red shift as the disordered states increasing, however, the random metamaterial absorber still presents high absorptivity more than 95%. The disordered structures can help understanding of the metamaterial absorber and may be employed for practical design of infrared metamaterial absorber, which may play important roles in collection of radiative heat energy and directional transfer enhancement.

  6. High Blood Calcium (Hypercalcemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as well as kidney function and levels of calcium in your urine. Your provider may do other tests to further assess your condition, such as checking your blood levels of phosphorus (a mineral). Imaging studies also may be helpful, such as bone ...

  7. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium carbonate is not very poisonous. Recovery is quite likely. But, long-term overuse is more serious than a single overdose, because it can cause kidney damage. Few people die from an antacid overdose. Keep all medicines in child-proof bottles and out ...

  8. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  9. Extracellular Calcium and Magnesium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    i cellular and neuronal metabolism and functions. The objective of ... as having preeclampsia or eclampsia, in the same age range. ... Booking status Number (n) ("/o) Number (n) (%). Booked 7 ... is influx of calcium ions into the cell leacling to.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of teriparatide (rhPTH[1-34]) and calcium pharmacodynamics in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterwhite, Julie; Heathman, Michael; Miller, Paul D; Marín, Fernando; Glass, Emmett V; Dobnig, Harald

    2010-12-01

    Teriparatide (rhPTH[1-34]) affects calcium metabolism in a pattern consistent with the known actions of endogenous parathyroid hormone (PTH). This report describes the pharmacokinetics and resulting serum calcium response to teriparatide in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. Pharmacokinetic samples for this analysis were obtained from 360 women who participated in the Fracture Prevention Trial. Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis received daily subcutaneous injections of either teriparatide 20 μg (4.86 μmol) or placebo, median 21 months' treatment. Serum teriparatide and calcium concentrations were measured throughout the study. An indirect-response model was developed to describe the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship between teriparatide concentrations and serum calcium response. The pharmacokinetics of teriparatide were characterized by rapid absorption (maximum concentration achieved within 30 min) and rapid elimination (half-life of 1 h), resulting in a total duration of exposure to the peptide of approximately 4 h. Teriparatide transiently increased serum calcium, with the maximum effect observed at approximately 4.25 h (median increase 0.4 mg/dl [0.1 mmol/l]). Calcium concentrations returned to predose levels by 16-24 h after each dose. Persistent hypercalcemia was not observed; one teriparatide 20 μg-treated patient had a predose serum calcium value above the normal range but transient increase in serum calcium, consistent with the known effects of endogenous PTH on mineral metabolism. The excursion in serum calcium is brief, due to the short length of time that teriparatide concentrations are elevated.

  11. Calcium aluminate in alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Arzu

    The properties of ceramic materials are determined not only by the composition and structure of the phases present, but also by the distribution of impurities, intergranular films and second phases. The phase distribution and microstructure both depend on the fabrication techniques, the raw materials used, the phase-equilibrium relations, grain growth and sintering processes. In this dissertation research, various approaches have been employed to understand fundamental phenomena such as grain growth, impurity segregation, second-phase formation and crystallization. The materials system chosen was alumina intentionally doped with calcium. Atomic-scale structural analyses of grain boundaries in alumina were carried on the processed samples. It was found that above certain calcium concentrations, CA6 precipitated as a second phase at all sintering temperatures. The results also showed that abnormal grain growth can occur after precipitation and it is not only related to the calcium level, but it is also temperature dependent. In order to understand the formation mechanism of CA6 precipitates in calcium doped alumina samples, several studies have been carried out using either bulk materials or thin films The crystallization of CA2 and CA6 powders has been studied. Chemical processing techniques were used to synthesize the powders. It was observed that CA2 powders crystallized directly, however CA6 powders crystallized through gamma-Al 2O3 solid solution. The results of energy-loss near-edge spectrometry confirmed that gamma-Al2O3 can dissolve calcium. Calcium aluminate/alumina reaction couples have also been investigated. All reaction couples were heat treated following deposition. It was found that gamma-Al2O3 was formed at the interface as a result of the interfacial reaction between the film and the substrate. gamma-Al 2O3 at the interface was stable at much higher temperatures compared to the bulk gamma-Al2O3 formed prior to the CA6 crystallization. In order to

  12. Antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdy, Zaleha Abdullah; Basri, Hashimah; Md Isa, Zaleha; Ahmad, Shuhaila; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Mohd Amin, Rahmah

    2014-04-01

    To determine the adequacy of antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia, and the influencing factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among postnatal women who delivered in two tertiary hospitals. Data were collected from antenatal cards, hospital documents and diet recall on daily milk and calcium intake during pregnancy. SPSS version 19.0 was used for statistical analyses. A total of 150 women were studied. The total daily calcium intake was 834 ± 43 mg (mean ± standard error of the mean), but the calcium intake distribution curve was skewed to the right with a median intake of 725 mg daily. When calcium intake from milk and calcium supplements was excluded, the daily dietary calcium intake was only 478 ± 25 mg. Even with inclusion of milk and calcium supplements, more than a third (n=55 or 36.7%) of the women consumed less than 600 mg calcium in their daily diet. The adequacy of daily calcium intake was not influenced by maternal age, ethnicity, income or maternal job or educational status as well as parity. The daily dietary calcium intake of the Malaysian antenatal population is far from adequate without the addition of calcium supplements and milk. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  13. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...

  14. Contribution of sublinear and supralinear dendritic integration to neuronal computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran-Van-Minh, Alexandra; Cazé, Romain D; Abrahamsson, Therése; Cathala, Laurence; Gutkin, Boris S; DiGregorio, David A

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear dendritic integration is thought to increase the computational ability of neurons. Most studies focus on how supralinear summation of excitatory synaptic responses arising from clustered inputs within single dendrites result in the enhancement of neuronal firing, enabling simple computations such as feature detection. Recent reports have shown that sublinear summation is also a prominent dendritic operation, extending the range of subthreshold input-output (sI/O) transformations conferred by dendrites. Like supralinear operations, sublinear dendritic operations also increase the repertoire of neuronal computations, but feature extraction requires different synaptic connectivity strategies for each of these operations. In this article we will review the experimental and theoretical findings describing the biophysical determinants of the three primary classes of dendritic operations: linear, sublinear, and supralinear. We then review a Boolean algebra-based analysis of simplified neuron models, which provides insight into how dendritic operations influence neuronal computations. We highlight how neuronal computations are critically dependent on the interplay of dendritic properties (morphology and voltage-gated channel expression), spiking threshold and distribution of synaptic inputs carrying particular sensory features. Finally, we describe how global (scattered) and local (clustered) integration strategies permit the implementation of similar classes of computations, one example being the object feature binding problem.

  15. Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells: from molecules to intercellular communication network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathan, T.S.M.; Figdor, C.G.; Buschow, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are a specific subset of naturally occurring dendritic cells, that secrete large amounts of Type I interferon and play an important role in the immune response against viral infection. Several studies have highlighted that they are also effective antigen presentin

  16. Barriers in the brain : resolving dendritic spine morphology and compartmentalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrian, Max; Kusters, Remy; Wierenga, Corette J; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Kapitein, Lukas C

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are micron-sized protrusions that harbor the majority of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. The head of the spine is connected to the dendritic shaft by a 50-400 nm thin membrane tube, called the spine neck, which has been hypothesized to confine biochemical and elec

  17. Contribution of sublinear and supralinear dendritic integration to neuronal computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eTran-Van-Minh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear dendritic integration is thought to increase the computational ability of neurons. Most studies focus on how supralinear summation of excitatory synaptic responses arising from clustered inputs within single dendrites result in the enhancement of neuronal firing, enabling simple computations such as feature detection. Recent reports have shown that sublinear summation is also a prominent dendritic operation, extending the range of subthreshold input-output transformations conferred by dendrites. Like supralinear operations, sublinear dendritic operations also increase the repertoire of neuronal computations, but feature extraction requires different synaptic connectivity strategies for each of these operations. In this article we will review the experimental and theoretical findings describing the biophysical determinants of the three primary classes of dendritic operations: linear, sublinear, and supralinear. We then review a Boolean algebra-based analysis of simplified neuron models, which provides insight into how dendritic operations influence neuronal computations. We highlight how neuronal computations are critically dependent on the interplay of dendritic properties (morphology and voltage-gated channel expression, spiking threshold and distribution of synaptic inputs carrying particular sensory features. Finally, we describe how global (scattered and local (clustered integration strategies permit the implementation of similar classes of computations, one example being the object feature binding problem.

  18. Transient or permanent fisheye views

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mikkel Rønne; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    , about the benefits and limitations of transient visualizations. We describe an experiment that compares the usability of a fisheye view that participants could call up temporarily, a permanent fisheye view, and a linear view: all interfaces gave access to source code in the editor of a widespread......Transient use of information visualization may support specific tasks without permanently changing the user interface. Transient visualizations provide immediate and transient use of information visualization close to and in the context of the user’s focus of attention. Little is known, however...... programming environment. Fourteen participants performed varied tasks involving navigation and understanding of source code. Participants used the three interfaces for between four and six hours in all. Time and accuracy measures were inconclusive, but subjective data showed a preference for the permanent...

  19. Transient heating of moving objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Baida

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of transient and quasistatic heating of moving objects by various heat sources is considered. The mathematical formulation of the problem is described, examples of thermal calculation given.

  20. Bioceramics of calcium orthophosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V

    2010-03-01

    A strong interest in use of ceramics for biomedical applications appeared in the late 1960's. Used initially as alternatives to metals in order to increase a biocompatibility of implants, bioceramics have become a diverse class of biomaterials, presently including three basic types: relatively bioinert ceramics, bioactive (or surface reactive) and bioresorbable ones. Furthermore, any type of bioceramics could be porous to provide tissue ingrowth. This review is devoted to bioceramics prepared from calcium orthophosphates, which belong to the categories of bioresorbable and bioactive compounds. During the past 30-40 years, there have been a number of major advances in this field. Namely, after the initial work on development of bioceramics that was tolerated in the physiological environment, emphasis was shifted towards the use of bioceramics that interacted with bones by forming a direct chemical bond. By the structural and compositional control, it became possible to choose whether the bioceramics of calcium orthophosphates was biologically stable once incorporated within the skeletal structure or whether it was resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics, which is able to regenerate bone tissues, has been developed. Current biomedical applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics include replacements for hips, knees, teeth, tendons and ligaments, as well as repair for periodontal disease, maxillofacial reconstruction, augmentation and stabilization of the jawbone, spinal fusion and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Potential future applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics will include drug-delivery systems, as well as they will become effective carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and/or various types of cells for tissue engineering purposes.

  1. Requirement for nuclear calcium signaling in Drosophila long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weislogel, Jan-Marek; Bengtson, C Peter; Müller, Michaela K; Hörtzsch, Jan N; Bujard, Martina; Schuster, Christoph M; Bading, Hilmar

    2013-05-07

    Calcium is used throughout evolution as an intracellular signal transducer. In the mammalian central nervous system, calcium mediates the dialogue between the synapse and the nucleus that is required for transcription-dependent persistent neuronal adaptations. A role for nuclear calcium signaling in similar processes in the invertebrate brain has yet to be investigated. Here, we show by in vivo calcium imaging of adult brain neurons of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, that electrical foot shocks used in olfactory avoidance conditioning evoked transient increases in cytosolic and nuclear calcium concentrations in neurons. These calcium signals were detected in Kenyon cells of the flies' mushroom bodies, which are sites of learning and memory related to smell. Acute blockade of nuclear calcium signaling during conditioning selectively and reversibly abolished the formation of long-term olfactory avoidance memory, whereas short-term, middle-term, or anesthesia-resistant olfactory memory remained unaffected. Thus, nuclear calcium signaling is required in flies for the progression of memories from labile to transcription-dependent long-lasting forms. These results identify nuclear calcium as an evolutionarily conserved signal needed in both invertebrate and vertebrate brains for transcription-dependent memory consolidation.

  2. PSD95 suppresses dendritic arbor development in mature hippocampal neurons by occluding the clustering of NR2B-NMDA receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando J Bustos

    Full Text Available Considerable evidence indicates that the NMDA receptor (NMDAR subunits NR2A and NR2B are critical mediators of synaptic plasticity and dendritogenesis; however, how they differentially regulate these processes is unclear. Here we investigate the roles of the NR2A and NR2B subunits, and of their scaffolding proteins PSD-95 and SAP102, in remodeling the dendritic architecture of developing hippocampal neurons (2-25 DIV. Analysis of the dendritic architecture and the temporal and spatial expression patterns of the NMDARs and anchoring proteins in immature cultures revealed a strong positive correlation between synaptic expression of the NR2B subunit and dendritogenesis. With maturation, the pruning of dendritic branches was paralleled by a strong reduction in overall and synaptic expression of NR2B, and a significant elevation in synaptic expression of NR2A and PSD95. Using constructs that alter the synaptic composition, we found that either over-expression of NR2B or knock-down of PSD95 by shRNA-PSD95 augmented dendritogenesis in immature neurons. Reactivation of dendritogenesis could also be achieved in mature cultured neurons, but required both manipulations simultaneously, and was accompanied by increased dendritic clustering of NR2B. Our results indicate that the developmental increase in synaptic expression of PSD95 obstructs the synaptic clustering of NR2B-NMDARs, and thereby restricts reactivation of dendritic branching. Experiments with shRNA-PSD95 and chimeric NR2A/NR2B constructs further revealed that C-terminus of the NR2B subunit (tail was sufficient to induce robust dendritic branching in mature hippocampal neurons, and suggest that the NR2B tail is important in recruiting calcium-dependent signaling proteins and scaffolding proteins necessary for dendritogenesis.

  3. Effects of calcium spikes in the layer 5 pyramidal neuron on coincidence detection and activity propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yansong Chua

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be stabilized by increasing network inhibition or introducing short term depression in the excitatory synapses, but the signal to noise ration remains low. Our results

  4. Dendritic excitability microzones and occluded long-term depression after classical conditioning of the rabbit's nictitating membrane response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, B G; Tomsic, D; Gusev, P A; Alkon, D L

    1997-01-01

    We made intradendritic recordings in Purkinje cells (n = 164) from parasaggital slices of cerebellar lobule HVI obtained from rabbits given paired presentations of tone and periorbital electrical stimulation (classical conditioning, n = 27) or explicitly unpaired presentations of tone and periorbital stimulation (control, n = 16). Purkinje cell dendritic membrane excitability, assessed by the current required to elicit local dendritic calcium spikes, increased significantly in slices from animals that received classical conditioning. In contrast, membrane potential, input resistance, and amplitude of somatic and dendritic spikes were not different in slices from animals given paired or explicitly unpaired stimulus presentations. The location of cells with low thresholds for local dendritic calcium spikes suggested that there are specific sites for learning-related changes within lobule HVI. These areas may correspond to learning "microzones" and are consistent with locations of learning-related in vivo changes in Purkinje cell activity. Application of 4-aminopyridine, an antagonist of the rapidly inactivating potassium current IA, reduced the threshold for dendritic spikes in slices from naive animals to levels found in slices from trained animals. In cells where thresholds for eliciting parallel fiber-stimulated Purkinje cell excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were measured, levels of parallel fiber stimulation required to elicit a 6-mV EPSP as well as a 4-mV EPSP (n = 30) and a Purkinje cell spike (n = 56) were found to be significantly lower in slices from paired animals than unpaired controls. A classical conditioning procedure was simulated in slices of lobule HVI by pairing a brief, high-frequency train of parallel fiber stimulation (8 pulses, 100 Hz) with a brief, lower frequency train of climbing fiber stimulation (3 pulses, 20 Hz) to the same Purkinje cell. Following paired stimulation of the parallel and climbing fibers, Purkinje cell EPSPs

  5. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqadah, Amel; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Schumacher, Jennifer A; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons.

  6. Modeling of dendritic growth in the presence of convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU; Mingfang; DAI; Ting; LEE; Sungyoon; HONG; Chunpyo

    2005-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupling modified cellular automaton (MCA)-transport model has been employed to investigate the asymmetrical dendritic growth behavior in a flowing melt. In the present model, the cellular automaton method for crystal growth is incorporated with a transport model, for numerical calculating of the fluid flow and mass transport by both convection and diffusion. The MCA takes into account the effects of the thermal, the constitutional and the curvature undercoolings on dendritic growth. It also considers the preferred growth orientation of crystal and solute redistribution during solidification. In the transport model, the SIMPLE scheme and a fully implicit finite volume method are employed to solve the governing equations of momentum and species transfers. The present model was applied to simulating the evolution of a single dendrite and multi-dendrites of an Al-3mass%Cu alloy in a forced flow. The simulated results show that dendritic growth morphology is strongly influenced by melt convection.

  7. Immune Monitoring Using mRNA-Transfected Dendritic Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by m......RNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate...... and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA....

  8. Gene Transfer to Dendritic Cells Induced a Protective Immunity against Melanoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pat Metharom; Kay A.O. Ellem; Ming Q. Wei

    2005-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors have shown promises for efficient gene transfer to dividing as well as nondividing cells. In this study, we explored lentiviral vector-mediated, the entire mTRP-2 gene transfer and expression in dendritic cells (DCs). Adoptive transfer of DCs-expressing mTRP-2 (DC-HR'CmT2) into C57BL/6 mouse was also assessed.Dendritic cells were harvested from bone marrow and functional DCs were proved by allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. Lentiviral vectors were produced by transient transfection of 293T cells. Transduction of DCs was proved by marker gene expression and PCR and RT-PCR amplification. Implantation of the transduced DCs, depletion of immune cells as well as the survival of the mice after tumour challenge were investigated. High efficiency of gene transfer into mature DCs was achieved. The high level expression of the functional antigen (TRP-2) and induction of protective immunity by adoptive transfer of TRP-2 gene modified DCs were demonstrated. In vivo study showed a complete protection of mice from further melanoma cell challenge. In comparison, only 83% of mice survived when mTRP-2 peptide-pulsed DCs were administered, suggesting the generation of specific protection. Together, these results demonstrated the usefulness of this gene transfer to DC approach for immunotherapy of cancer and indicated that using tumour associated antigens (TAAs) for gene transfer may be potentially beneficial for the therapy of melanoma.

  9. Calcium imaging of infrared-stimulated activity in rodent brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayce, Jonathan Matthew; Bouchard, Matthew B; Chernov, Mykyta M; Chen, Brenda R; Grosberg, Lauren E; Jansen, E Duco; Hillman, Elizabeth M C; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a promising neurostimulation technique that can activate neural tissue with high spatial precision and without the need for exogenous agents. However, little is understood about how infrared light interacts with neural tissue on a cellular level, particularly within the living brain. In this study, we use calcium sensitive dye imaging on macroscopic and microscopic scales to explore the spatiotemporal effects of INS on cortical calcium dynamics. The INS-evoked calcium signal that was observed exhibited a fast and slow component suggesting activation of multiple cellular mechanisms. The slow component of the evoked signal exhibited wave-like properties suggesting network activation, and was verified to originate from astrocytes through pharmacology and 2-photon imaging. We also provide evidence that the fast calcium signal may have been evoked through modulation of glutamate transients. This study demonstrates that pulsed infrared light can induce intracellular calcium modulations in both astrocytes and neurons, providing new insights into the mechanisms of action of INS in the brain.

  10. Analyzing dendritic growth in a population of immature neurons in the adult dentate gyrus using laminar quantification of disjointed dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira eRosenzweig

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, new granule neurons are continuously produced throughout adult life. A prerequisite for the successful synaptic integration of these neurons is the sprouting and extension of dendrites into the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. Thus, studies aimed at investigating the developmental stages of adult neurogenesis often use dendritic growth as an important indicator of neuronal health and maturity. Based on the known topography of the dentate gyrus, characterized by distinct laminar arrangement of granule neurons and their extensions, we have developed a new method for analysis of dendritic growth in immature adult-born granule neurons. The method is comprised of laminar quantification of cell bodies, primary, secondary and tertiary dendrites separately and independently from each other. In contrast to most existing methods, laminar quantification of dendrites does not require the use of exogenous markers and does not involve arbitrary selection of individual neurons. The new method relies on immonuhistochemical detection of endogenous markers such as doublecortin to perform a comprehensive analysis of a sub-population of immature neurons. Disjointed, orphan dendrites that often appear in the thin histological sections are taken into account. Using several experimental groups of rats and mice, we demonstrate here the suitable techniques for quantifying neurons and dendrites, and explain how the ratios between the quantified values can be used in a comparative analysis to indicate variations in dendritic growth and complexity.

  11. Dendritic cells modified by vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ayako Wakatsuki; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Zocca, Mai-Britt

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, express nuclear receptors for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (VD3) and they are one of its main targets. In the presence of VD3, DCs differentiate into a phenotype that resembles semimature DCs, with reduced T cell ...... and the optimal frequency, dose, and route of DC administration to achieve therapeutic effects in humans, adoptive VD3-DC transfer represents one of the most promising approaches to future treatment of autoimmune diseases.......Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, express nuclear receptors for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (VD3) and they are one of its main targets. In the presence of VD3, DCs differentiate into a phenotype that resembles semimature DCs, with reduced T cell...... costimulatory molecules and hampered IL-12 production. These VD3-modulated DCs induce T cell tolerance in vitro using multiple mechanisms such as rendering T cells anergic, dampening of Th1 responses, and recruiting and differentiating regulatory T cells. Due to their ability to specifically target pathological...

  12. Dendritic growth model of multilevel marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, James Christopher S.; Monterola, Christopher P.

    2017-02-01

    Biologically inspired dendritic network growth is utilized to model the evolving connections of a multilevel marketing (MLM) enterprise. Starting from agents at random spatial locations, a network is formed by minimizing a distance cost function controlled by a parameter, termed the balancing factor bf, that weighs the wiring and the path length costs of connection. The paradigm is compared to an actual MLM membership data and is shown to be successful in statistically capturing the membership distribution, better than the previously reported agent based preferential attachment or analytic branching process models. Moreover, it recovers the known empirical statistics of previously studied MLM, specifically: (i) a membership distribution characterized by the existence of peak levels indicating limited growth, and (ii) an income distribution obeying the 80 - 20 Pareto principle. Extensive types of income distributions from uniform to Pareto to a "winner-take-all" kind are also modeled by varying bf. Finally, the robustness of our dendritic growth paradigm to random agent removals is explored and its implications to MLM income distributions are discussed.

  13. Dendritic Cells in vivo and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wan; Marcel Dupasquier

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are crucial cells of the immune system, and bridged the essential connection between innate and adaptive immunity. They reside in the periphery as sentinels where they take up antigens. Upon activation,they migrate to lymphoid organs and present there the processed antigens to T cells, thereby activating them and eliciting a potent immune response. Dendritic cells are bone marrow-derived cells, still big controversies exist about their in vivo development. In vitro, DC can be generated from multiple precursor cells, among them lymphoid and myeloid committed progenitors. Although it remains unknown how DC are generated in vivo,studying the functions of in vitro generated DC results in fundamental knowledge of the DC biology with promising applications for future medicine. Therefore, in this review, we present current protocols for the generation of DC from precursors in vitro. We will do this for the mouse system, where most research occurs and for the human system, where research concentrates on implementing DC biology in disease treatments.

  14. Dendritic Cells in vivo and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuiWan; MarcelDupasquier

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are crucial cells of the immune system, and bridged the essential connection between innate and adaptive immunity. They reside in the periphery as sentinels where they take up antigens. Upon activation, they migrate to lymphoid organs and present there the processed antigens to T cells, thereby activating them and eliciting a potent immune response. Dendritic cells are bone marrow-derived cells, still big controversies exist about their in vivo development. In vitro, DC can be generated from multiple precursor cells, among them lymphoid and myeloid committed progenitors. Although it remains unknown how DC are generated in vivo, studying the functions of in vitro generated DC results in fundamental knowledge of the DC biology with promising applications for future medicine. Therefore, in this review, we present current protocols for the generation of DC from precursors in vitro. We will do this for the mouse system, where most research occurs and for the human system, where research concentrates on implementing DC biology in disease treatments. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005;2(1):28-35.

  15. PKA controls calcium influx into motor neurons during a rhythmic behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wang

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP has been implicated in the execution of diverse rhythmic behaviors, but how cAMP functions in neurons to generate behavioral outputs remains unclear. During the defecation motor program in C. elegans, a peptide released from the pacemaker (the intestine rhythmically excites the GABAergic neurons that control enteric muscle contractions by activating a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling pathway that is dependent on cAMP. Here, we show that the C. elegans PKA catalytic subunit, KIN-1, is the sole cAMP target in this pathway and that PKA is essential for enteric muscle contractions. Genetic analysis using cell-specific expression of dominant negative or constitutively active PKA transgenes reveals that knockdown of PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons blocks enteric muscle contractions, whereas constitutive PKA activation restores enteric muscle contractions to mutants defective in the peptidergic signaling pathway. Using real-time, in vivo calcium imaging, we find that PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons is essential for the generation of synaptic calcium transients that drive GABA release. In addition, constitutively active PKA increases the duration of calcium transients and causes ectopic calcium transients that can trigger out-of-phase enteric muscle contractions. Finally, we show that the voltage-gated calcium channels UNC-2 and EGL-19, but not CCA-1 function downstream of PKA to promote enteric muscle contractions and rhythmic calcium influx in the GABAergic neurons. Thus, our results suggest that PKA activates neurons during a rhythmic behavior by promoting presynaptic calcium influx through specific voltage-gated calcium channels.

  16. PKA controls calcium influx into motor neurons during a rhythmic behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wang

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP has been implicated in the execution of diverse rhythmic behaviors, but how cAMP functions in neurons to generate behavioral outputs remains unclear. During the defecation motor program in C. elegans, a peptide released from the pacemaker (the intestine rhythmically excites the GABAergic neurons that control enteric muscle contractions by activating a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling pathway that is dependent on cAMP. Here, we show that the C. elegans PKA catalytic subunit, KIN-1, is the sole cAMP target in this pathway and that PKA is essential for enteric muscle contractions. Genetic analysis using cell-specific expression of dominant negative or constitutively active PKA transgenes reveals that knockdown of PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons blocks enteric muscle contractions, whereas constitutive PKA activation restores enteric muscle contractions to mutants defective in the peptidergic signaling pathway. Using real-time, in vivo calcium imaging, we find that PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons is essential for the generation of synaptic calcium transients that drive GABA release. In addition, constitutively active PKA increases the duration of calcium transients and causes ectopic calcium transients that can trigger out-of-phase enteric muscle contractions. Finally, we show that the voltage-gated calcium channels UNC-2 and EGL-19, but not CCA-1 function downstream of PKA to promote enteric muscle contractions and rhythmic calcium influx in the GABAergic neurons. Thus, our results suggest that PKA activates neurons during a rhythmic behavior by promoting presynaptic calcium influx through specific voltage-gated calcium channels.

  17. Dendritic morphology, synaptic transmission, and activity of mature granule cells born following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei eGao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To understand the potential role of enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE in the development of epilepsy, we quantitatively analyzed the geometry of apical dendrites, synaptic transmission, and activation levels of normotopically distributed mature newborn granule cells in the rat.SE in male Sprague-Dawley rats lasting for more than 2 hours was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine. The complexity, spine density, miniature post-synaptic currents, and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc expression of granule cells born five days after SE were studied at least 10 weeks after CAG-GFP retroviral vector-mediated labeling.Mature granule cells born after SE had dendritic complexity similar to that of granule cells born naturally, but with denser mushroom-like spines in dendritic segments located in the outer molecular layer. Miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSCs were similar between the controls and rats subjected to SE; however, smaller miniature excitatory post-synaptic current (mEPSC amplitude with a trend toward less frequent was found in mature granule cells born after SE. After maturation, granule cells born after SE did not show denser Arc expression in the resting condition or after being activated by transient seizure activity than vicinal GFP-unlabeled granule cells.Thus our results suggest that normotopic granule cells born after pilocarpine-induced SE are no more active when mature than age-matched, naturally born granule cells.

  18. Gaia transient detection efficiency: hunting for nuclear transients

    CERN Document Server

    Blagorodnova, Nadejda; Harrison, Diana L; Koposov, Sergey; Mattila, Seppo; Campbell, Heather; Walton, Nicholas A; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the detectability of transient events associated with galaxies for the Gaia European Space Agency astrometric mission. We simulated the on-board detections, and on-ground processing for a mock galaxy catalogue to establish the properties required for the discovery of transient events by Gaia, specifically tidal disruption events (TDEs) and supernovae (SNe). Transients may either be discovered by the on-board detection of a new source or by the brightening of a previously known source. We show that Gaia transients can be identified as new detections on-board for offsets from the host galaxy nucleus of 0.1--0.5,arcsec, depending on magnitude and scanning angle. The Gaia detection system shows no significant loss of SNe at close radial distances to the nucleus. We used the detection efficiencies to predict the number of transients events discovered by Gaia. For a limiting magnitude of 19, we expect around 1300 SNe per year: 65% SN Ia, 28% SN II and 7% SN Ibc, and ~20 TDEs per year.

  19. The calcium-sensing receptor promotes urinary acidification to prevent nephrolithiasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, K.Y.; Velic, A.; Dijkman, H.B.; Verkaart, S.A.J.; Kemp, J.W.C.M. van der; Nowik, M.; Timmermans, K.; Doucet, A.; Wagner, C.A.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Hypercalciuria increases the risk for urolithiasis, but renal adaptive mechanisms reduce this risk. For example, transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 knockout (TPRV5(-/-)) mice lack kidney stones despite urinary calcium (Ca(2+)) wasting and hyperphosphaturia, perhaps as a result of their signifi

  20. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  1. Transient features in nanosecond pulsed electric fields differentially modulate mitochondria and viability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Beebe

    Full Text Available It is hypothesized that high frequency components of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs, determined by transient pulse features, are important for maximizing electric field interactions with intracellular structures. For monopolar square wave pulses, these transient features are determined by the rapid rise and fall of the pulsed electric fields. To determine effects on mitochondria membranes and plasma membranes, N1-S1 hepatocellular carcinoma cells were exposed to single 600 ns pulses with varying electric fields (0-80 kV/cm and short (15 ns or long (150 ns rise and fall times. Plasma membrane effects were evaluated using Fluo-4 to determine calcium influx, the only measurable source of increases in intracellular calcium. Mitochondria membrane effects were evaluated using tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE to determine mitochondria membrane potentials (ΔΨm. Single pulses with short rise and fall times caused electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death. Pulses with long rise and fall times exhibited electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, but diminished effects on dissipation of ΔΨm and viability. Results indicate that high frequency components have significant differential impact on mitochondria membranes, which determines cell death, but lesser variances on plasma membranes, which allows calcium influxes, a primary determinant for dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death.

  2. Transient features in nanosecond pulsed electric fields differentially modulate mitochondria and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Stephen J; Chen, Yeong-Jer; Sain, Nova M; Schoenbach, Karl H; Xiao, Shu

    2012-01-01

    It is hypothesized that high frequency components of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs), determined by transient pulse features, are important for maximizing electric field interactions with intracellular structures. For monopolar square wave pulses, these transient features are determined by the rapid rise and fall of the pulsed electric fields. To determine effects on mitochondria membranes and plasma membranes, N1-S1 hepatocellular carcinoma cells were exposed to single 600 ns pulses with varying electric fields (0-80 kV/cm) and short (15 ns) or long (150 ns) rise and fall times. Plasma membrane effects were evaluated using Fluo-4 to determine calcium influx, the only measurable source of increases in intracellular calcium. Mitochondria membrane effects were evaluated using tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) to determine mitochondria membrane potentials (ΔΨm). Single pulses with short rise and fall times caused electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death. Pulses with long rise and fall times exhibited electric field-dependent increases in calcium influx, but diminished effects on dissipation of ΔΨm and viability. Results indicate that high frequency components have significant differential impact on mitochondria membranes, which determines cell death, but lesser variances on plasma membranes, which allows calcium influxes, a primary determinant for dissipation of ΔΨm and cell death.

  3. Effects of Calcium Spikes in the Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron on Coincidence Detection and Activity Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Yansong; Morrison, Abigail

    2016-01-01

    The role of dendritic spiking mechanisms in neural processing is so far poorly understood. To investigate the role of calcium spikes in the functional properties of the single neuron and recurrent networks, we investigated a three compartment neuron model of the layer 5 pyramidal neuron with calcium dynamics in the distal compartment. By performing single neuron simulations with noisy synaptic input and occasional large coincident input at either just the distal compartment or at both somatic and distal compartments, we show that the presence of calcium spikes confers a substantial advantage for coincidence detection in the former case and a lesser advantage in the latter. We further show that the experimentally observed critical frequency phenomenon, in which action potentials triggered by stimuli near the soma above a certain frequency trigger a calcium spike at distal dendrites, leading to further somatic depolarization, is not exhibited by a neuron receiving realistically noisy synaptic input, and so is unlikely to be a necessary component of coincidence detection. We next investigate the effect of calcium spikes in propagation of spiking activities in a feed-forward network (FFN) embedded in a balanced recurrent network. The excitatory neurons in the network are again connected to either just the distal, or both somatic and distal compartments. With purely distal connectivity, activity propagation is stable and distinguishable for a large range of recurrent synaptic strengths if the feed-forward connections are sufficiently strong, but propagation does not occur in the absence of calcium spikes. When connections are made to both the somatic and the distal compartments, activity propagation is achieved for neurons with active calcium dynamics at a much smaller number of neurons per pool, compared to a network of passive neurons, but quickly becomes unstable as the strength of recurrent synapses increases. Activity propagation at higher scaling factors can be

  4. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradleigh eHocking

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact fruit development, physical traits and disease susceptibility through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to ripening and the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g. blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples. This review works towards an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved

  5. Strategies for mapping synaptic inputs on dendrites in vivo by combining two-photon microscopy, sharp intracellular recording and pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eLevy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Uncovering the functional properties of individual synaptic inputs on single neurons is critical for understanding the computational role of synapses and dendrites. Previous studies combined whole-cell patch recording to load neurons with a fluorescent calcium indicator and two-photon imaging to map subcellular changes in fluorescence upon sensory stimulation. By hyperpolarizing the neuron below spike threshold, the patch electrode ensured that changes in fluorescence associated with synaptic events were isolated from those caused by back-propagating action potentials. This technique holds promise for determining whether the existence of unique cortical feature maps across different species may be associated with distinct wiring diagrams. However, the use of whole-cell patch for mapping inputs on dendrites is challenging in large mammals, due to brain pulsations and the accumulation of fluorescent dye in the extracellular milieu. Alternatively, sharp intracellular electrodes have been used to label neurons with fluorescent dyes, but the current passing capabilities of these high impedance electrodes may be insufficient to prevent spiking. In this study, we tested whether sharp electrode recording is suitable for mapping functional inputs on dendrites in the cat visual cortex. We compared three different strategies for suppressing visually evoked spikes: (1 hyperpolarization by intracellular current injection, (2 pharmacological blockade of voltage-gated sodium channels by intracellular QX-314, and (3 GABA iontophoresis from a perisomatic electrode glued to the intracellular electrode. We found that functional inputs on dendrites could be successfully imaged using all three strategies. However, the best method for preventing spikes was GABA iontophoresis with low currents (5 to 10 nA, which minimally affected the local circuit. Our methods advance the possibility of determining functional connectivity in preparations where whole-cell patch may be

  6. Loss of functional A-type potassium channels in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons from a mouse model of fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routh, Brandy N; Johnston, Daniel; Brager, Darrin H

    2013-12-11

    Despite the critical importance of voltage-gated ion channels in neurons, very little is known about their functional properties in Fragile X syndrome: the most common form of inherited cognitive impairment. Using three complementary approaches, we investigated the physiological role of A-type K(+) currents (I(KA)) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Direct measurement of I(KA) using cell-attached patch-clamp recordings revealed that there was significantly less I(KA) in the dendrites of CA1 neurons from fmr1-/y mice. Interestingly, the midpoint of activation for A-type K(+) channels was hyperpolarized for fmr1-/y neurons compared with wild-type, which might partially compensate for the lower current density. Because of the rapid time course for recovery from steady-state inactivation, the dendritic A-type K(+) current in CA1 neurons from both wild-type and fmr1-/y mice is likely mediated by K(V)4 containing channels. The net effect of the differences in I(KA) was that back-propagating action potentials had larger amplitudes producing greater calcium influx in the distal dendrites of fmr1-/y neurons. Furthermore, CA1 pyramidal neurons from fmr1-/y mice had a lower threshold for LTP induction. These data suggest that loss of I(KA) in hippocampal neurons may contribute to dendritic pathophysiology in Fragile X syndrome.

  7. Synthesis of calcium superoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rewick, R. T.; Blucher, W. G.; Estacio, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    Efforts to prepare Ca(O2) sub 2 from reactions of calcium compounds with 100% O3 and with O(D-1) atoms generated by photolysis of O3 at 2537 A are described. Samples of Ca(OH) sub 2, CaO, CaO2, Ca metal, and mixtures containing suspected impurities to promote reaction have been treated with excess O3 under static and flow conditions in the presence and absence of UV irradiation. Studies with KO2 suggest that the superoxide anion is stable to radiation at 2537 A but reacts with oxygen atoms generated by the photolysis of O3 to form KO3. Calcium superoxide is expected to behave in an analogous.

  8. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  9. Differentiation of apical and basal dendrites in pyramidal cells and granule cells in dissociated hippocampal cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Kure Wu

    Full Text Available Hippocampal pyramidal cells and dentate granule cells develop morphologically distinct dendritic arbors, yet also share some common features. Both cell types form a long apical dendrite which extends from the apex of the cell soma, while short basal dendrites are developed only in pyramidal cells. Using quantitative morphometric analyses of mouse hippocampal cultures, we evaluated the differences in dendritic arborization patterns between pyramidal and granule cells. Furthermore, we observed and described the final apical dendrite determination during dendritic polarization by time-lapse imaging. Pyramidal and granule cells in culture exhibited similar dendritic patterns with a single principal dendrite and several minor dendrites so that the cell types were not readily distinguished by appearance. While basal dendrites in granule cells are normally degraded by adulthood in vivo, cultured granule cells retained their minor dendrites. Asymmetric growth of a single principal dendrite harboring the Golgi was observed in both cell types soon after the onset of dendritic growth. Time-lapse imaging revealed that up until the second week in culture, final principal dendrite designation was not stabilized, but was frequently replaced by other minor dendrites. Before dendritic polarity was stabilized, the Golgi moved dynamically within the soma and was repeatedly repositioned at newly emerging principal dendrites. Our results suggest that polarized growth of the apical dendrite is regulated by cell intrinsic programs, while regression of basal dendrites requires cue(s from the extracellular environment in the dentate gyrus. The apical dendrite designation is determined from among multiple growing dendrites of young developing neurons.

  10. Calcium, essential for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Victoria, Emilio

    2016-07-12

    Calcium (Ca) is the most abundant mineral element in our body. It accounts for about 2% of body weight. The functions of calcium are: a) functions skeletal and b) regulatory functions. Bone consists of a protein matrix that mineralizes mainly with calcium (the most abundant), phosphate and magnesium, for it is essential an adequate dietary intake of Ca, phosphorus and vitamin D. The ionic Ca (Ca2+) is essential to maintain and / or perform different specialized functions of, virtually, all body cells cellular. Because of its important functions Ca2+ must be closely regulated, keeping plasma concentrations within narrow ranges. For this reason there is an accurate response against hypocalcemia or hypercalcemia in which the parathormone, calcitriol, calcitonin and vitamin K are involved. Ca intakes in the Spanish population are low in a significant percentage of the older adult’s population, especially in women. The main source of Ca in the diet is milk and milk derivatives. Green leafy vegetables, fruits and legumes can be important sources of Ca in a Mediterranean dietary pattern. The bioavailability of dietary Ca depends on physiological and dietary factors. Physiological include age, physiological status (gestation and lactation) Ca and vitamin D status and disease. Several studies relate Ca intake in the diet and various diseases, such as osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity.

  11. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  12. Calcium antagonists and vasospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F B

    1990-04-01

    A critical review of the clinical data supports the conclusion that nimodipine decreases the severity of neurologic deficits and improves outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The mechanisms by which mortality and morbidity are reduced are still controversial. First, the frequency of vasospasm is not altered (Figs. 5 and 6). Second, the consistent reversal of vasospasm once present has not been demonstrated either angiographically or by noninvasive cerebral blood flow studies. These observations suggest that there is either modification of microcirculatory flow (i.e., dilation of pial conducting vessels or decreased platelet aggregation) or a direct neuronal protective effect. As suggested previously, support for either mechanism is not resolute, and further investigation is necessary. Currently, nimodipine has been the most thoroughly investigated calcium antagonist both from an experimental and clinical perspective. Oral administration has had few reported complications. Therefore, the benefit/risk ratio clearly supports the prophylactic use of this calcium antagonist in patients of all clinical grades after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Evidence also indicates that starting nimodipine after the onset of delayed ischemic deficits is of benefit. Finally, it can be predicted that in the future additional calcium antagonists with more selective vascular or neuronal effects will be developed for use in neurologic disorders.

  13. Linking Memories across Time via Neuronal and Dendritic Overlaps in Model Neurons with Active Dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kastellakis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Memories are believed to be stored in distributed neuronal assemblies through activity-induced changes in synaptic and intrinsic properties. However, the specific mechanisms by which different memories become associated or linked remain a mystery. Here, we develop a simplified, biophysically inspired network model that incorporates multiple plasticity processes and explains linking of information at three different levels: (1 learning of a single associative memory, (2 rescuing of a weak memory when paired with a strong one, and (3 linking of multiple memories across time. By dissecting synaptic from intrinsic plasticity and neuron-wide from dendritically restricted protein capture, the model reveals a simple, unifying principle: linked memories share synaptic clusters within the dendrites of overlapping populations of neurons. The model generates numerous experimentally testable predictions regarding the cellular and sub-cellular properties of memory engrams as well as their spatiotemporal interactions.

  14. Recent development of transient electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanyu Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient electronics are an emerging class of electronics with the unique characteristic to completely dissolve within a programmed period of time. Since no harmful byproducts are released, these electronics can be used in the human body as a diagnostic tool, for instance, or they can be used as environmentally friendly alternatives to existing electronics which disintegrate when exposed to water. Thus, the most crucial aspect of transient electronics is their ability to disintegrate in a practical manner and a review of the literature on this topic is essential for understanding the current capabilities of transient electronics and areas of future research. In the past, only partial dissolution of transient electronics was possible, however, total dissolution has been achieved with a recent discovery that silicon nanomembrane undergoes hydrolysis. The use of single- and multi-layered structures has also been explored as a way to extend the lifetime of the electronics. Analytical models have been developed to study the dissolution of various functional materials as well as the devices constructed from this set of functional materials and these models prove to be useful in the design of the transient electronics.

  15. Statistical Physics of Neural Systems with Nonadditive Dendritic Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Breuer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available How neurons process their inputs crucially determines the dynamics of biological and artificial neural networks. In such neural and neural-like systems, synaptic input is typically considered to be merely transmitted linearly or sublinearly by the dendritic compartments. Yet, single-neuron experiments report pronounced supralinear dendritic summation of sufficiently synchronous and spatially close-by inputs. Here, we provide a statistical physics approach to study the impact of such nonadditive dendritic processing on single-neuron responses and the performance of associative-memory tasks in artificial neural networks. First, we compute the effect of random input to a neuron incorporating nonlinear dendrites. This approach is independent of the details of the neuronal dynamics. Second, we use those results to study the impact of dendritic nonlinearities on the network dynamics in a paradigmatic model for associative memory, both numerically and analytically. We find that dendritic nonlinearities maintain network convergence and increase the robustness of memory performance against noise. Interestingly, an intermediate number of dendritic branches is optimal for memory functionality.

  16. Control of dendritic morphogenesis by Trio in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Shivalkar

    Full Text Available Abl tyrosine kinase and its effectors among the Rho family of GTPases each act to control dendritic morphogenesis in Drosophila. It has not been established, however, which of the many GTPase regulators in the cell link these signaling molecules in the dendrite. In axons, the bifunctional guanine exchange factor, Trio, is an essential link between the Abl tyrosine kinase signaling pathway and Rho GTPases, particularly Rac, allowing these systems to act coordinately to control actin organization. In dendritic morphogenesis, however, Abl and Rac have contrary rather than reinforcing effects, raising the question of whether Trio is involved, and if so, whether it acts through Rac, Rho or both. We now find that Trio is expressed in sensory neurons of the Drosophila embryo and regulates their dendritic arborization. trio mutants display a reduction in dendritic branching and increase in average branch length, whereas over-expression of trio has the opposite effect. We further show that it is the Rac GEF domain of Trio, and not its Rho GEF domain that is primarily responsible for the dendritic function of Trio. Thus, Trio shapes the complexity of dendritic arbors and does so in a way that mimics the effects of its target, Rac.

  17. Calcium excitability and oscillations in suprachiasmatic nucleus neurons and glia in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Pol, A N; Finkbeiner, S M; Cornell-Bell, A H

    1992-07-01

    Converging lines of evidence suggest that the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the site of the endogenous biological clock controlling mammalian circadian rhythms. To study the calcium responses of the cellular components that make up the clock, computer-controlled digital video and confocal scanning laser microscopy were used with the Ca2+ indicator dye fluo-3 to examine dispersed SCN cells and SCN explants with repeated sampling over time. Ca2+ plays an important second messenger role in a wide variety of cellular mechanisms from gene regulation to electrical activity and neurotransmitter release, and may play a role in clock function and entrainment. SCN neurons and astrocytes showed an intracellular Ca2+ increase in response to glutamate and 5-HT, two major neurotransmitters in afferents to the SCN. Astrocytes showed a marked heterogeneity in their response to the serial perfusion of different transmitters; some responded to both 5-HT and glutamate, some to neither, and others to only one or the other. Under constant conditions, most neurons showed irregular temporal patterns of Ca2+ transients. Expression of regular neuronal oscillations could be blocked by the inhibitory transmitter GABA. Astrocytes, on the other hand, showed very regular rhythms of cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations with periods ranging from 7 to 20 sec. This periodic oscillation could be initiated by in vitro application of glutamate, the putative neurotransmitter conveying visual input to the SCN critical for clock entrainment. Long-distance communication between glial cells, seen as waves of fluorescence moving from cell to cell, probably through gap junctions, was induced by glutamate, 5-HT, and ATP. These waves increased the period length of cellular Ca2+ rises to 45-70 sec. Spontaneously oscillating cells were common in culture medium, serum, or rat cerebrospinal fluid, but rare in HEPES buffer. One source for cytoplasmic Ca2+ increases was an influx of extracellular Ca2+, as

  18. Voltage behavior along the irregular dendritic structure of morphologically and physiologically characterized vagal motoneurons in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, R; Segev, I; Yarom, Y

    1990-02-01

    1. Intracellular recordings from neurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (vagal motoneurons, VMs) obtained in the guinea pig brain stem slice preparation were used for both horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeling of the neurons and for measurements of their input resistance (RN) and time constant (tau 0). Based on the physiological data and on the morphological reconstruction of the labeled cells, detailed steady-state and compartmental models of VM were built and utilized to estimate the range of membrane resistivity, membrane capacitance, and cytoplasm resistivity values (Rm, Cm, and Ri, respectively) and to explore the integrative properties of these cells. 2. VMs are relatively small cells with a simple dendritic structure. Each cell has an average of 5.3 smooth (nonspiny), short (251 microns) dendrites with a low order (2) of branching. The average soma-dendritic surface area of VMs is 9,876 microns 2. 3. Electrically, VMs show remarkably linear membrane properties in the hyperpolarizing direction; they have an average RN of 67 +/- 23 (SD) M omega and a tau 0 of 9.4 +/- 4.1 ms. Several unfavorable experimental conditions precluded the possibility of faithfully recovering ("peeling") the first equalizing time constant (tau 1) and, thereby, of estimating the electrotonic length (Lpeel) of VMs. 4. Reconciling VM morphology with the measured RN and tau 0 through the models, assuming an Ri of 70 omega.cm and a spatially uniform Rm, yielded an Rm estimate of 5,250 omega.cm2 and a Cm of 1.8 microF/cm2. Peeling theoretical transients produced by these models result in an Lpeel of 1.35. Because of marked differences in the length of dendrites within a single cell, this value is larger than the maximal cable length of the dendrites and is twice as long as their average cable length. 5. The morphological and physiological data could be matched indistinguishably well if a possible soma shunt (i.e., Rm, soma less than Rm, dend) was included in the model. Although

  19. Reelin Regulates the Maturation of Dendritic Spines, Synaptogenesis and Glial Ensheathment of Newborn Granule Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Carles; Masachs, Nuria; Exposito-Alonso, David; Martínez, Albert; Teixeira, Cátia M.; Fernaud, Isabel; Pujadas, Lluís; Ulloa, Fausto; Comella, Joan X.; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The Reelin pathway is essential for both neural migration and for the development and maturation of synaptic connections. However, its role in adult synaptic formation and remodeling is still being investigated. Here, we investigated the impact of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway on the synaptogenesis of newborn granule cells (GCs) in the young-adult mouse hippocampus. We show that neither Reelin overexpression nor the inactivation of its intracellular adapter, Dab1, substantially alters dendritic spine numbers in these neurons. In contrast, 3D-electron microscopy (focused ion beam milling/scanning electron microscope) revealed that dysregulation of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway leads to both transient and permanent changes in the types and morphology of dendritic spines, mainly altering mushroom, filopodial, and branched GC spines. We also found that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls synaptic configuration of presynaptic boutons in the dentate gyrus, with its dysregulation leading to a substantial decrease in multi-synaptic bouton innervation. Lastly, we show that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls astroglial ensheathment of synapses. Thus, the Reelin pathway is a key regulator of adult-generated GC integration, by controlling dendritic spine types and shapes, their synaptic innervation patterns, and glial ensheathment. These findings may help to better understanding of hippocampal circuit alterations in neurological disorders in which the Reelin pathway is implicated. Significance Statement The extracellular protein Reelin has an important role in neurological diseases, including epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and psychiatric diseases, targeting hippocampal circuits. Here we address the role of Reelin in the development of synaptic contacts in adult-generated granule cells (GCs), a neuronal population that is crucial for learning and memory and implicated in neurological and psychiatric diseases. We found that the Reelin pathway controls the shapes, sizes, and types of dendritic

  20. Iron acquisition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis residing within myeloid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakanmi, Oyebode; Kesavalu, Banurekha; Abdalla, Maher Y; Britigan, Bradley E

    2013-12-01

    The pathophysiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) infection is linked to the ability of the organism to grow within macrophages. Lung myeloid dendritic cells are a newly recognized reservoir of M.tb during infection. Iron (Fe) acquisition is critical for M.tb growth. In vivo, extracellular Fe is chelated to transferrin (TF) and lactoferrin (LF). We previously reported that M.tb replicating in human monocyte-dervied macrophages (MDM) can acquire Fe bound to TF, LF, and citrate, as well as from the MDM cytoplasm. Access of M.tb to Fe may influence its growth in macrophages and dendritic cells. In the present work we confirmed the ability of different strains of M.tb to grow in human myeloid dendritic cells in vitro. Fe acquired by M.tb replicating within dendritic cells from externally added Fe chelates varied with the Fe chelate present in the external media: Fe-citrate > Fe-LF > Fe-TF. Fe acquisition rates from each chelate did not vary over 7 days. M.tb within dendritic cells also acquired Fe from the dendritic cell cytoplasm, with the efficiency of Fe acquisition greater from cytoplasmic Fe sources, regardless of the initial Fe chelate from which that cytoplasmic Fe was derived. Growth and Fe acquisition results with human MDM were similar to those with dendritic cells. M.tb grow and replicate within myeloid dendritic cells in vitro. Fe metabolism of M.tb growing in either MDM or dendritic cells in vitro is influenced by the nature of Fe available and the organism appears to preferentially access cytoplasmic rather than extracellular Fe sources. Whether these in vitro data extend to in vivo conditions should be examined in future studies.

  1. Activation of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 by eugenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, G; Im, S T; Kim, Y H; Jung, S J; Rhyu, M-R; Oh, S B

    2014-03-07

    Eugenol is a bioactive plant extract used as an analgesic agent in dentistry. The structural similarity of eugenol to cinnamaldehyde, an active ligand for transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), suggests that eugenol might produce its effect via TRPA1, in addition to TRPV1 as we reported previously. In this study, we investigated the effect of eugenol on TRPA1, by fura-2-based calcium imaging and patch clamp recording in trigeminal ganglion neurons and in a heterologous expression system. As the result, eugenol induced robust calcium responses in rat trigeminal ganglion neurons that responded to a specific TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), and not to capsaicin. Capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist failed to inhibit eugenol-induced calcium responses in AITC-responding neurons. In addition, eugenol response was observed in trigeminal ganglion neurons from TRPV1 knockout mice and human embryonic kidney 293 cell lines that express human TRPA1, which was inhibited by TRPA1-specific antagonist HC-030031. Eugenol-evoked TRPA1 single channel activity and eugenol-induced TRPA1 currents were dose-dependent with EC50 of 261.5μM. In summary, these results demonstrate that the activation of TRPA1 might account for another molecular mechanism underlying the pharmacological action of eugenol.

  2. Calcium signalling and calcium channels: evolution and general principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-09-15

    Calcium as a divalent cation was selected early in evolution as a signaling molecule to be used by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Its low cytosolic concentration likely reflects the initial concentration of this ion in the primordial soup/ocean as unicellular organisms were formed. As the concentration of calcium in the ocean subsequently increased, so did the diversity of homeostatic molecules handling calcium. This includes the plasma membrane channels that allowed the calcium entry, as well as extrusion mechanisms, i.e., exchangers and pumps. Further diversification occurred with the evolution of intracellular organelles, in particular the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which also contain channels, exchanger(s) and pumps to handle the homeostasis of calcium ions. Calcium signalling system, based around coordinated interactions of the above molecular entities, can be activated by the opening of voltage-gated channels, neurotransmitters, second messengers and/or mechanical stimulation, and as such is all-pervading pathway in physiology and pathophysiology of organisms.

  3. Elemental calcium intake associated with calcium acetate/calcium carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rosamund J; Copley, J Brian

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcium-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binders have similar efficacy in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia; however, calcium-based binders may be associated with hypercalcemia, vascular calcification, and adynamic bone disease. Scope A post hoc analysis was carried out of data from a 16-week, Phase IV study of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who switched to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy from baseline calcium acetate/calcium carbonate monotherapy. Of the intent-to-treat population (N=2520), 752 patients with recorded dose data for calcium acetate (n=551)/calcium carbonate (n=201) at baseline and lanthanum carbonate at week 16 were studied. Elemental calcium intake, serum phosphate, corrected serum calcium, and serum intact parathyroid hormone levels were analyzed. Findings Of the 551 patients with calcium acetate dose data, 271 (49.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day at baseline, and 142 (25.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) serum phosphate levels were 6.1 (5.89, 6.21) mg/dL at baseline and 6.2 (6.04, 6.38) mg/dL at 16 weeks; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.3 (9.16, 9.44) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Of the 201 patients with calcium carbonate dose data, 117 (58.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day, and 76 (37.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% CI) serum phosphate levels were 5.8 (5.52, 6.06) mg/dL at baseline and 5.8 (5.53, 6.05) mg/dL at week 16; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.7 (9.15, 10.25) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Conclusion Calcium acetate/calcium carbonate phosphate binders, taken to control serum phosphate levels, may result in high levels of elemental calcium intake. This may lead to complications related to calcium balance. PMID:28182142

  4. A novel role of dendritic gap junction and mechanisms underlying its interaction with thalamocortical conductance in fast spiking inhibitory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Qian-Quan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the roles of dendritic gap junctions (GJs of inhibitory interneurons in modulating temporal properties of sensory induced responses in sensory cortices. Electrophysiological dual patch-clamp recording and computational simulation methods were used in combination to examine a novel role of GJs in sensory mediated feed-forward inhibitory responses in barrel cortex layer IV and its underlying mechanisms. Results Under physiological conditions, excitatory post-junctional potentials (EPJPs interact with thalamocortical (TC inputs within an unprecedented few milliseconds (i.e. over 200 Hz to enhance the firing probability and synchrony of coupled fast-spiking (FS cells. Dendritic GJ coupling allows fourfold increase in synchrony and a significant enhancement in spike transmission efficacy in excitatory spiny stellate cells. The model revealed the following novel mechanisms: 1 rapid capacitive current (Icap underlies the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels; 2 there was less than 2 milliseconds in which the Icap underlying TC input and EPJP was coupled effectively; 3 cells with dendritic GJs had larger input conductance and smaller membrane response to weaker inputs; 4 synchrony in inhibitory networks by GJ coupling leads to reduced sporadic lateral inhibition and increased TC transmission efficacy. Conclusion Dendritic GJs of neocortical inhibitory networks can have very powerful effects in modulating the strength and the temporal properties of sensory induced feed-forward inhibitory and excitatory responses at a very high frequency band (>200 Hz. Rapid capacitive currents are identified as main mechanisms underlying interaction between two transient synaptic conductances.

  5. Electromagnetic Transients in Power Cables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Filipe Faria Da; Bak, Claus Leth

    of electromagnetic phenomena associated to their operation, among them electromagnetic transients, increased as well. Transient phenomena have been studied since the beginning of power systems, at first using only analytical approaches, which limited studies to more basic phenomena; but as computational tools became...... concerning HVAC cables. An important topic that is not covered in this book is measurements protocols/ methods. The protocols used when performing measurements on a cable depend on what is to be measured, the available equipment and accessibility. Readers interested in the topic are referred to search....... The chapter ends by proposing a systematic method that can be used when doing the insulation co-ordination study for a line, as well as the modelling requirements, both modelling depth and modelling detail of the equipment, for the study of the different types of transients followed by a step-by-step generic...

  6. Transient Faults in Computer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A powerful technique particularly appropriate for the detection of errors caused by transient faults in computer systems was developed. The technique can be implemented in either software or hardware; the research conducted thus far primarily considered software implementations. The error detection technique developed has the distinct advantage of having provably complete coverage of all errors caused by transient faults that affect the output produced by the execution of a program. In other words, the technique does not have to be tuned to a particular error model to enhance error coverage. Also, the correctness of the technique can be formally verified. The technique uses time and software redundancy. The foundation for an effective, low-overhead, software-based certification trail approach to real-time error detection resulting from transient fault phenomena was developed.

  7. Cohabitation Duration and Transient Domesticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Andrew; Reid, Megan; Strickler, Jennifer; Dunlap, Eloise

    2013-01-01

    Research finds that many impoverished urban Black adults engage in a pattern of partnering and family formation involving a succession of short cohabitations yielding children, a paradigm referred to as transient domesticity. Researchers have identified socioeconomic status, cultural adaptations, and urbanicity as explanations for aspects of this pattern. We used longitudinal data from the 2001 Survey of Income and Program Participation to analyze variation in cohabitation and marriage duration by race/ethnicity, income, and urban residence. Proportional hazards regression indicated that separation risk is greater among couples that are cohabiting, below 200% of the federal poverty line, and Black but is not greater among urban dwellers. This provides empirical demographic evidence to support the emerging theory of transient domesticity and suggests that both socioeconomic status and race explain this pattern. We discuss the implications of these findings for understanding transient domesticity and make recommendations for using the Survey of Income and Program Participation to further study this family formation paradigm.

  8. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma of the Abdomen: the Imaging Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lee, Soon Jin; Song, Hye Jong [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma is a rare neoplasm that originates from follicular dendritic cells in lymphoid follicles. This disease usually involves the lymph nodes, and especially the head and neck area. Rarely, extranodal sites may be affected, including tonsil, the oral cavity, liver, spleen and the gastrointestinal tract. We report here on the imaging findings of follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the abdomen that involved the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and colon. It shows as a well-defined, enhancing homogenous mass with internal necrosis and regional lymphadenopathy.

  9. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF CELLULAR/DENDRITIC PRIMARY SPACING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.Q.Zhang; L.Xiao

    2004-01-01

    A numerical model has been established to calculate the primary spacing of cellular or dendritic structure with fluid flow considered. The computing results show that the primary spacing depends on the growing velocity, the temperature gradient on the interface and fluid flow. There is a critical growing velocity for the cell-dendrite transition, which has a relationship with the temperature gradient: Rcr=(3-4)×10-9GT. Fluid flow leads to an increase of the primary spacing for dendritic growth but a decrease for cellular growth,resulting in an instability on the interface.

  10. Phase field simulation of dendrite growth under convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The phase-field model coupled with a flow field was used to simulate the solidification of pure materials by the finite difference method.The effects of initial crystal radius,the space step and the interface thickness on the dendrite growth were studied.Results indicate that the grain grows into an equiaxial dendrite during free flow and into a typical branched structure under forced flow.The radius of an initial crystal can affect the growth of side-branches but not the stability of the dendrite s tip whe...

  11. Information Fusion for Anomaly Detection with the Dendritic Cell Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Greensmith, Julie; Tedesco, Gianni

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that provide a vital link between the innate and adaptive immune system, providing the initial detection of pathogenic invaders. Research into this family of cells has revealed that they perform information fusion which directs immune responses. We have derived a Dendritic Cell Algorithm based on the functionality of these cells, by modelling the biological signals and differentiation pathways to build a control mechanism for an artificial immune system. We present algorithmic details in addition to experimental results, when the algorithm was applied to anomaly detection for the detection of port scans. The results show the Dendritic Cell Algorithm is sucessful at detecting port scans.

  12. The role of grain boundaries and transient porosity in rocks as fluid pathways for reaction front propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonas, Laura; John, Timm; King, Helen E.; Geisler, Thorsten; Putnis, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The pseudomorphic replacement of Carrara marble by calcium phosphates was used as a model system in order to study the influence of different fluid pathways for reaction front propagation induced by fluid-rock interaction. In this model, grain boundaries present in the rock as well as the transient

  13. Learning rules and persistence of dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Haruo; Hayama, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Motoko; Watanabe, Satoshi; Yagishita, Sho; Noguchi, Jun

    2010-07-01

    Structural plasticity of dendritic spines underlies learning, memory and cognition in the cerebral cortex. We here summarize fifteen rules of spine structural plasticity, or 'spine learning rules.' Together, they suggest how the spontaneous generation, selection and strengthening (SGSS) of spines represents the physical basis for learning and memory. This SGSS mechanism is consistent with Hebb's learning rule but suggests new relations between synaptic plasticity and memory. We describe the cellular and molecular bases of the spine learning rules, such as the persistence of spine structures and the fundamental role of actin, which polymerizes to form a 'memory gel' required for the selection and strengthening of spine synapses. We also discuss the possible link between transcriptional and translational regulation of structural plasticity. The SGSS mechanism and spine learning rules elucidate the integral nature of synaptic plasticity in neuronal network operations within the actual brain tissue.

  14. Harnessing dendritic cells in inflammatory skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chung-Ching; Di Meglio, Paola; Nestle, Frank O

    2011-02-01

    The skin immune system harbors a complex network of dendritic cells (DCs). Recent studies highlight a diverse functional specialization of skin DC subsets. In addition to generating cellular and humoral immunity against pathogens, skin DCs are involved in tolerogenic mechanisms to ensure the maintenance of immune homeostasis, as well as in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation in the skin when excessive immune responses are initiated and unrestrained. Harnessing DCs by directly targeting DC-derived molecules or selectively modulate DC subsets is a convincing strategy to tackle inflammatory skin diseases. In this review we discuss recent advances underlining the functional specialization of skin DCs and discuss the potential implication for future DC-based therapeutic strategies.

  15. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  16. Modulation of tolerogenic dendritic cells and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Jung; Diamond, Betty

    2015-05-01

    A key function of dendritic cells (DCs) is to induce either immune tolerance or immune activation. Many new DC subsets are being recognized, and it is now clear that each DC subset has a specialized function. For example, different DC subsets may express different cell surface molecules and respond differently to activation by secretion of a unique cytokine profile. Apart from intrinsic differences among DC subsets, various immune modulators in the microenvironment may influence DC function; inappropriate DC function is closely related to the development of immune disorders. The most exciting recent advance in DC biology is appreciation of human DC subsets. In this review, we discuss functionally different mouse and human DC subsets both in lymphoid organs and non-lymphoid organs, the molecules that regulate DC function, and the emerging understanding of the contribution of DCs to autoimmune diseases.

  17. Unsteady growth of ammonium chloride dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyushev, L. M.; Terentiev, P. S.; Soboleva, A. S.

    2016-02-01

    Growth of ammonium chloride dendrites from aqueous solution is experimentally investigated. The growth rate υ and the radius ρ of curvature of branches are measured as a function of the relative supersaturation Δ for steady and unsteady growth conditions. It is shown that the experimental results are quantitatively described by the dependences ρ=a/Δ+b, υ=cΔ2, where the factors for primary branches are a=(1.3±0.2)·10-7 m, b=(2.5±0.4)·10-7 m, and c=(2.2±0.3)·10-4 m/s. The factor c is found to be approximately 7 times smaller for the side branches than that for the primary branches.

  18. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1998-01-01

    The specific aims of the project were: (1) Application of the NASA bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC). (2) Compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients. (3) Analyze the effectiveness of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in a murine model of experimental fungal disease. Our investigations have provided new insight into DC immunobiology and have led to the development of methodology to evaluate DC in blood of normal donors and patients. Information gained from these studies has broadened our understanding of possible mechanisms involved in the immune dysfunction of space travelers and earth-bound cancer patients, and could contribute to the design of novel therapies to restore/preserve immunity in these individuals. Several new avenues of investigation were also revealed. The results of studies completed during Round 2 are summarized.

  19. Dendritic Kv3.3 potassium channels in cerebellar purkinje cells regulate generation and spatial dynamics of dendritic Ca2+ spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagha, Edward; Manita, Satoshi; Ross, William N; Rudy, Bernardo

    2010-06-01

    Purkinje cell dendrites are excitable structures with intrinsic and synaptic conductances contributing to the generation and propagation of electrical activity. Voltage-gated potassium channel subunit Kv3.3 is expressed in the distal dendrites of Purkinje cells. However, the functional relevance of this dendritic distribution is not understood. Moreover, mutations in Kv3.3 cause movement disorders in mice and cerebellar atrophy and ataxia in humans, emphasizing the importance of understanding the role of these channels. In this study, we explore functional implications of this dendritic channel expression and compare Purkinje cell dendritic excitability in wild-type and Kv3.3 knockout mice. We demonstrate enhanced excitability of Purkinje cell dendrites in Kv3.3 knockout mice, despite normal resting membrane properties. Combined data from local application pharmacology, voltage clamp analysis of ionic currents, and assessment of dendritic Ca(2+) spike threshold in Purkinje cells suggest a role for Kv3.3 channels in opposing Ca(2+) spike initiation. To study the physiological relevance of altered dendritic excitability, we measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes throughout the dendritic tree in response to climbing fiber activation. Ca(2+) signals were specifically enhanced in distal dendrites of Kv3.3 knockout Purkinje cells, suggesting a role for dendritic Kv3.3 channels in regulating propagation of electrical activity and Ca(2+) influx in distal dendrites. These findings characterize unique roles of Kv3.3 channels in dendrites, with implications for synaptic integration, plasticity, and human disease.

  20. Transient osteoporosis of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Rabeea; Ishaq, Saliha; Amjad, Hira

    2012-02-01

    Transient Osteoporosis of Hip (TOH) is an uncommon disorder of idiopathic nature, particularly in the Asian population. It has been described to mostly occur in middle aged men and women in their third trimester of pregnancy. A distinctive hallmark of this condition is that it is self limiting and resolves in a few months. The patient presents to the physician with pain on movement and impaired mobility of the affected joint, developing without any history of trauma. MRI is the main diagnostic tool. We report herein a case of a forty five year old male, who developed transient osteoporosis of the hip, and was managed conservatively.